The East Carolinian, April 30, 1998






mmmmmm
mm
MNLIBiMI
east&rolinian
�)
DeMarco files complaint with Equal Employment
Oooortunitv Commission, claims mistreatment
Former professor, Sal DeMarco, hat claimed ha was mistreated by university officials.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
Officials say university
to deny charges
Melanie Hackworth
STAFF WRITER
Sal De Marco, a former speech
pathology professor who was dis-
missed earlier this month, has filed
a complaint against ECU with the
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC).
DeMarco, who was released
from university employment due to
charges of inappropriate and violent
behavior, has filed for an investiga-
tion with the EEOC, claiming that
ECU treated him unfairly with
regard to his illness, multiple scle-
rosis.
The EEOC is an
offspring of the
Americans with
Disabilities Act,
passed by the feder-
al government The
EEOC represents
disabled Americans
who feel they have
been unjustly treated
due to their disability.
De Marco claims
that when he was
diagnosed with MS
in 1995, the universi-
ty never reached out
According to De Marco,
ters condemning his actions.
As a professor in the allied sci-
ences department De Marco said
he expected
to him.
i he was
forced to deal with anonymous let-
to be treated
fairly.
"We're
allied sci-
ences dept.)
supposed to
know how to
deal with dis-
abilities De
Marco said.
Another of
De Marco's
claims is that
he was not
given the opportunity to respond to
the accusations.
"I was not able to defend
" was not able to defend
myself. Imagine you're
charged with a crime and
never given a chance to
defend yourself
Sal Demarco
Former speech pathology protestor
myself De Marco said. "Imagine
you're charged with a crime arid
never given a chance to defend
yourself
The EEOC responded to De
Marco's charge in the same way
that any case is handled. First (hey
had to determine if De Marco was
covered by the EEOC.
Not everyone is covered by die
EEOC, so not just anyone can go
through this process. The person
charging must have a physical prob- j
lem that substantially limits a major
life activity, like walking.
If the person does not have such
a disability, either the employer'
must regard them as having one, or
they must have a documented his-
SEE BftMMCO. PAGES
SGA
distributes
bi-annuals
Environmental conservation group sponsors bike rally
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
Proceeds benefit
Greenville Greenway
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
23 organizations
apply, 1 denied funds
William LeLiever
staff writer
The Student Government
Association recently appropriated
bi-annual funding to student orga-
nizations for the summer and fall
semesters. This year's appropria-
tion committee distributed $38,206
to various organizations.
According to Alan Stancill, co-
president of appropriations, in the
current bi-annuals only 23 organi-
zations applied for funding. Out of
the 23 organizations, one, Milan,
was denied funding.
Organizations who applied for
funding this year received more
money than those who applied to
the appropriations committee in
June of 1997.
"The main reason the individ-
ual groups got more money than
they had in the past is that in the
past we would have 47 groups turn
in budget proposals asking for
money and this semester we had
only 23 Stancill said. "We get the
same amount of money to give out
regardless
According to Lisa Smith, SGA
treasurer, organizations are
required to use this money by June
30. Returned money is put in the
general fund balance.
"The total amount of money
reverted back to SGA (this year
was)437,288 Smith said.
According to Laura Sweet pan-
SEE ANNUALS. PAGE 4
William LeLi ever
staff writer
The University Environmental
Conservation Organization (ECO)
sponsored its fourth annual Earth
Day bike rally last Sunday.
The proceeds of this event went
to benefit the Greenville
Greenway Organization. Features
of the celebration included infor-
mation booths, four bands and
guest speaker Rick Dove, the
Neuse River keeper.
The booths represented many
organizations, such as the Tar and
Pamlico River Foundation, groups
concerned with poultry and the
Greenville Parks and Recreation
Department. Bands that performed
included Mean Little Girl,
MORdcCAI, Deep Fuzz and
Whitey.
The rally, whose motto was "the
earth is riding on us tried to stim-
ulate student concerns for the envi-
ronment
"Every year we hope to educate
people about the environment and
most of them
return the
next year to
hear more
said Sarah
McConnell,
president of
ECO.
According
to Lori Loyd,
recycling
chair, the
ECO com-
fiu photo pleted a sur-
vey on April
20 to help change the recycling
processes of the dorms. There were
200 students who participated in
the earth day event in an effort to
get permanent recycling bins near
SEE RAllY PAGE 4
Sarah McConnell
President of ECO
Many bikers participated in the fourth annual Earth Day Bike Rally at the Town Commons in support of the Greenville
FH0T0 BT MARC CRIPPEN
Recreation, Leisure Studies students
volunteer for spinal injury camping trip
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu .ed u
Designed for leisure
time, opportunities
Nina M. Dry
STAFF WRITER
The Recreation and Leisure
Studies Students Society, along
with Adaptive Recreation and
Intramural Sports Enrichment
Program (ARISE) and the Spinal
Cord Injury Association of Eastern
North Carolina, recently participat-
This year's camping trip was the third
COURTESY OF RECREATION AND LEISURE
ed in their third annual camping
trip.
Both university students and
residents of eastern North Carolina
with spinal cord injuries participat-
ed in the trip.
"This trip was designed for peo-
ple with disabilities so that they
can increase their
leisure time and
provide them with
the opportunities
they weren't aware
of said Candace
Gray, volunteer and
secretary of the
Recreation and
Leisure Studies
Student Society.
Gray said that
for the group. although this trip
studies has been designed
for people with
spinal cord injuries, it is not exclu-
sively for them.
"The trips that we sponsor arc
offered to all students as well as the
residents of the of eastern North
Carolina with disabilities Gray
SEE CAMPING. PAGE 4
Pitt County ranks third in
state for AIDS transmission
Mecklenburgfirst,
Wake second
Jason Lee
FOCUS WRITER
Of the sexually transmitted dis-
eases, the most feared � and the
most deadly � is AIDS.
The southeastern part of the
United States, small towns and
rural areas have the highest rate of
HIV transmission. Pitt County
rates third among North Carolina
counties for rate of transmission,
behind Mecklenburg and Wake
Counties.
According to Barry Eimore, out-
reach coordinator for PICASO (Pitt
County AIDS Service
Organization), one reason for this is
the advanced medical establish-
ments in each county.
"People who have been infected
with the virus want to move into
areas where they are close to major
medical centers Eimore sard.
"With the ECU medical school and
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
offering new advanced medicines
here in Greenville, many of those
infected with HIV come here to
receive the treatments
HIV (human immunodeficiency
virus) is the virus that causes AIDS.
Being infected with HIV does not
mean a person has or will develop
AIDS. AIDS (acquired immunode-
ficiency syndrome) is a disease that
breaks down the immune system of
the body so that one will eventual
ly not be able to fight off sickness.
SEE AIDS. PAGE 4
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 75
low 55
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 75
low 63
Opinion
Lifestyle
U Sports
Take care of your
home Earth
Biz Markie and
friends appear at
Barefoot today
EJo
Odom resignation
leaves second
vacancy for Dooley
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Do you agree with Chincellor Eekin's
Decision to fire Sal DeMarco? "
Are you genuinely happy at ECU?
69 Yes 31 No
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu
!
1
I





2 Tlwrrtiy. April 30, 1891
news
Tilt E�t Cimliniin
3 Thursda'
.news
briefs
N.C. State, weather
service research
southern twisters
RALEIGH (AP) � Researchers at
North Carolina State University
and the National Weather Service
are working on methods to identify
characteristics of southern torna-
does to help train forecasters.
Overall crime rate
down, follows
five-year trend
RALEIGH (AP) �The overall
crime rate in North Carolina
declined by 1 percent in 1997 and
the murder rate dropped 5 percent-
age points, continuing a five-year
trend, Attorney General Mike
Easley said Monday.
across
nation
Worker rescued after
trench collapses
WEST SPRINGFIELD, Mass.
CAP) � Federal safety inspectors
said a Connecticut construction
worker is lucky to be alive after
. being buried up to his chin when a
14-foot deep sewer trench col-
lapsed. Police, firefighters and co-
worker Thomas Bonaiuto risked
their own lives in a tense half-hour
scramble Monday to dig out James
Gibbons, 37, of New Britain, Conn.
First Lady Clinton
to speak at University
of Michigan
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) � The
University of Michigan was prepar-
ing today for an appearance by
Hillary Rodham Clinton to help
mark the culmination of the
school's Year of the Humanities and
Arts program.
Marmot stashes in
ball-bearing shipment,
bites hand that
feeds him
CARLSTADT, New Jersey (AP)
� A New Jersey company got
something extra in a shipment of
ball bearings from Japan: a furry lit-
tle marmot.
The creature popped out of a
box to Nachi America Corp. on
Monday, police Sgt. Richard Berta
said. The workers named the crea-
ture Hector after the man who
opened the box. The groundhog-
type animal had been inside the
sealed container since it was
shipped from Osaka three weeks
ago, Berta said. The 15-pound (7-
kilo) marmot ate a carrot and drank
some water at the Bergen County
Animal Shelter, then tried to attack
shelter director Mary Ellen Stout.
"I guess he's feeling better, " Ms.
Stout said.
Hector will be quarantined for
10 to 14 days, then released into
the wild.
U.S. medicine,
nutritional supplies
flown to Iraq
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) � Two
Jordanian aircraft laden with U.S.
humanitarian supplies arrived in
Baghdad today in the first
American airlift to Iraq since the
1990 Persian Gulf crisis over
Kuwait.
The Dash-8 and Boeing 707
planes flew from Amman more
than 28 hours behind schedule.
The delay was caused by last-
minute hitches that required the
American volunteers to change
planes and get Iraq's permission to
fly. Guy Smith, a vice chairman at
AmcriCares, said in the Jordanian
capital that Iraq granted permission
for the flight at midmorning.
Adult Student Association encourages
non-traditional student involvement
Organization provides
guidance, comfort
Carolyn Robbins Hyde
staff writfr
According to members of one orga-
nization on campus, age is no barri-
er to enjoying university life. The
Adult Student Association has
made it its mission to encourage
involvement from non-traditional
students who are balancing job,
work and school.
"The Adult Student Association
was established in the fall of 1993 to
help adult and commuter students
become more involved with univer-
sity life said Deborah J. Battle,
graduate assistant for student
development. "Our overall concern
is that all students feel comfortable
and a part of the university
Mary Embrey, an active member
of the organization, said that most
of the adult students she comes in
contact with have many of the same
concerns and worries.
"The majority of the non-tradi-
tional students are carrying a heavy
burden of balancing family, work
and school Embrey said. "Some
have either quit their jobs in order
to return to school or have to cut
back on the hours worked, lessen-
ing their incomes while putting out
additional necessary funds for their
education. The decision to return
to school was not an easy one to
make, and if the ASA can help
make their transition any less
stressful, then the efforts will be
worth it
Any student age 24 and above is
eligible to become a member.
"We strive to incorporate the
non-traditional student within the
general campus population Battle
said.
According to Batde there is a
great need for an organization such
as this to assist the adult students,
especially those who have been out
of school for a number of years, in
feeling comfortable with their deci-
sion to get back into the main-
stream of school.
Providing guidance in many dif-
ferent areas for the non-traditional
students is among the many ser-
vices offered by the ASA. Students
seeking information about financial
aid, housing (in and around the
Greenville area), the availability of
child care, and other services such
as time management seminars,
locations and advantages of on-
campus dining facilities, transporta-
tion and parking information can
contact the ASA office for further
information. Also offered through
the ASA are study skills advice,
recreational facilities available and
the health services provided on
campus.
"One of the programs that we
are especially proud of is the
Pinnacle Program, which is the
non-traditional honor society
Battle said. "This society was char-
tered here at the university in
October 1997. The first induction
ceremony took place in December
1997. Forty-seven members were
inducted
The next induction will be held
in December 1998.
The ASA has also adopted a
mentor program this semester. This
serves as a resource for students
who have questions and do not
know how to get answers.
DeMarco
continued from page I
tory of such a disability.
In the actual process, De Marco
had to fill out a charge question-
naire and be interviewed by an
investigator. Then the EEOC
made a charge in De Marco's favor
against ECU.
According to regulations, the
EEOC had to make the charge
within 10 days. The people being
charged then have a specified
amount of time to respond.
ECU has received a charge from
the EEOC regarding De Marco's
claim. The university must
respond with a position statement
by May 18. The position statement
will detail the university's claims
and its supporting proof.
"When you write a position
statement, you don't say simply,
Police Department names
Horst employee of the month
Leading investigator of
backpack bandit case
Melanie Hackworth
staff writer
The ECU Police Department
named Sgt. Joseph Horst as its spot-
light employee of the month for
April. Horst is a patrol sergeant for
the B-Squad, a foot patrol officer
end the residence hall liaison officer
for Aycock Hall.
Horst, 26, supervises three to
five men on his patrol shift. As a
patrol officer, Horst travels across
campus keeping the peace on foot
or in a vehicle.
Horst came to ECU from San
Diego, Calif where his father is a
lawyer with the attorney general's
jofficc.
"My whole family has been in
Jaw or law enforcement Horst
said.
Horst attrib-
utes his desire
to be in law
enforcement to
his family's
involvement
and his desire
to help people.
"Officer
Friendly as
the Aycock stu-
dents call him,
graduated from
ECU's crimi-
nal justice
department in
1993. Horst
received an honorary membership
in the Phi Sigma Phi national honor
fraternity while at ECU.
Horst's most recently publicized
case for the police is that of the
"Back-Pack Bandit
Police Captain John Umphlett
said that Horst would even come in
on his davs off to work on this case.
Sgt. Joseph Horst, ECU Police
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU POLICE OEPT.
"His was a tireless
pursuit for the bad
guy Umphlett said.
Horst said investi-
gating is part of what
he loves about the job.
"I love being able to
follow the leads and
dig into the case I'm
working on Horst
said.
Horst has followed
the leads on the "Back-
Pack Bandit" case and
continues to investi-
gate.
Horst was named
the spotlight employee
because of the work he does for the
department.
"He got the award for his hard
work and dedication to the- stu-
dents Umphlett said.
"I feel honored that the depart-
ment would choose to recognize
the efforts I've made Horst said.
'we deny that we discriminated
we explain what did happen and
the job related reasons for what
decisions the university made
said Dr. Mary Ann Rose, assistant
to the chancellor and university
EEOC officer.
Rose said ECU goes along with
all of the laws guarding against dis-
crimination.
"We do comply with laws Rose
said.
Rose says the university will
deny the charges by De Marco.
"We don't discriminate Rose
said.
Chancellor Eakin was unavail-
able for comment due to his attend-
ing the inauguration of UNC-
System President, Molly Broad, at
UNC-Chapel Hill.
TEC SGA
Mon, April 27 Meeting of Legislation Room 221 Mendenhall
-approved the 1998-99 funding packet
-two SGA logos were accepted for organization use
-sponsoring the extended hours of the library during exams
-Mr. Jennings introduced Josh Beardsley as the new attorney
general
-bi-annaul fundings were approved for the summer and spring
-According to the official minutes, Eric Rivenbark announced that
he will be dancing naked at the Banquet on Thursday (Mr. Forbes
will also be joining him)
LEGISLATOR'S SAY
"I am excited about the new attorney general, he was selected from
very qualified pool of applicants. We arc looking forward to meeting
with him next yearsaid Eric Rivenbark, SGA president-elect.
Buffalo Wild Wings & Week
Tues. MAY 5"
The very best
Cinco de Mayo
Party hi town!
Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with the Buffalo
Drink Special & Mex Been Specials
20C Wings All Day
Call 758-9191 for Delivery
Limited Delivery Area
Ca
�9B
For mof
www.
Supp
Globa
T
ST
Ri
Gov. Hunt
child healt
insurance pla
for the worl
ing, lo
income fam
lies. Do yo
think it wi
work?
This could i
looked upon a
preventativ
maintenanc
and good fo
public health �
the more we Ik
closer together
outbreaks of d
Clinton raised
age that we ar
thing I don't si,
plan for healt,
tax credit, hu
Commissioner,
will work fine,
the risk ofbecoi,
What is yi
operations ar
hog waste pol
The city ana
to a comprom
dumping haza
gen. Simple cl.
CHEC
UNIT!
PREC
DOW
MON
(WITH :
COST
(ESTIM
You re closer to home
than you think
i
,2,15
f





3 Thurtday. April 30, 1998
news
Thi Eist Carolinian
Candidates for State House gear up for May primary
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Supports farmer,
Global Transpark
T.K. JONES
STAFF WRITER
Robert Wheeler
Robert Wheeler
House, District 9
Gov. Hunt has proposed a new
child health
insurance plan
for the work-
ing, low
income fami-
lies. Do you
think it will
work?
This could be
looked upon as
preventative
maintenance
and good for file phoio
public health �
the more we Ike
closer together, the more opportunity for
outbreaks of diseases. It's the concerns
Clinton raised in his health rate pack-
age that we are trying to achieve. One
thing I don't support is the Republican
plan for health can; it shouldn't be a
tax credit, but a gift. If Insurance
Commissioner Jim Long is in charge it
will work fine. If not, I think it will run
the risk of becoming another bureaucra-
What is your stance on the hog
operations and your thoughts on
hog waste pollution?
The city and the farmer need to come
to a compromise. It's not like we're
dumping hazardous waste, it's nitro-
gen. Simple chemistry could filter it
from the water. City and industry cause
approximately IS percent of the runoff.
The rest is caused by agriculture. A
sewage system should be built to filter the
runoff, while an emergency resources
fund is set aside and used if a problem
occurs. The money needs to be there and
readily available. Farmers aren't try-
ing to pollute the environment and peo-
ple aren't going to boycott bacon and
pork, but we've got to provide a better
balance between the two.
Do you foresee a working plan
that can adequately protect the
beleaguered tobacco farmer?
We need to make a commitment: art we
going to stand behind the farmer, or
turn with the country? We need to real-
ize that it's not the farmer that's causing
the tobacco problems - they're just the
suppliers of the raw material. ECU
and the hospital were built by tobacco
money. We owe it to him (the tobacco
farmer) to stand behind him. The gov-
ernment makes $22,000 on one acre of
tobacco, while the farmer makes about
$1,800. That's about a 20-1 ratio. The
farmer is at the mercy of the way people
use his resources; it's the additives that
they use to increase nicotine levels and
flavors that are killing people, not
tobacco.
The State Transportation bud-
get projected a $500 million cut for
the Kinston Global Trans Park.
What are your thoughts on this?
We've spent $20 million trying to
develop G TR Now they are trying to cut
us out of the picture by putting Federal
Express in Greensboro. I'd like to see
more research done on GTP's develop-
ment. Highway 264 between Wilson
and Greenville shows a lot of promise
as a botential site to locate an air com-
plex. This would form a quadrangle
with Rocky Mount, Kinston, Greenville
and Wilson, and absorb most of the
growth. Would it benefit those who orig-
inally thought of putting it in Kinston?
No. Rut we are talking about what will
benefit the good of all.
Tobacco, infrastructure
Floyd's top concern
T.K. JONES
STAFF WRITER
Emmett Floyd
Gov. Hunt has proposed a new
child health insurance plan for the
working, low income families. Do
you think it will work?
The premise of the special session
was to adopt a plan that would allow
people who make
more money
than Medicare
recipients to
have their chil-
dren covered,
but not enough to
financially
afford health
insurance. We
have over
70,000 children
who are without file photo
insurance. I'm
disappointed that the session has taken
five weeks and we still don't have a
plan. I think Gov. Hunt has proposed a
very good program and a balanced pro-
gram, and I hope the house and senate
will adopt some variation of it.
What is your stance on the hog
operations and your thoughts on
hog waste pollution?
think we all are offended by the
odor of hog operations as well as the
pollution that's generated by them. We
need to utilize our scientific abilities to
minimize the odor that occurs as well as
find ways to better treat hog waste.
There's an incredible amount of water
wasted - sent to lagoons or sprayed on
fields. I think we have enough expertise
that we can minimize the amount of
waste produced and find new effective
Emmett Floyd
House, District 9
STUDENT HOUSING
GETS NO BETTER!
NEWSTUDEN
CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURES
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
�3 BATHROOMS
�3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
�WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�SELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
�SAVE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
CHECK THESE NUMBERS:
UNITS AVAILABLE 24
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICE(ist 12 units)$91,500
DOWN PAYMENT & CLOSING COSTS: (could be less than)$5,000
MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSE:(could be less than)$100"
(WITH 2 ROOMMATES - EXCLUDING UTILITIES COST)
COST SAVINGS TO PARENTS FOR 4 YEARS:(COULD BE MORE THAN)$21,000
(ESTIMATED 3 ANNUAL APPRECIATED VALUE PLUS RENTAL SAVINGS)
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF NOT
DISCUSSING THIS WITH YOUR PARENTS.
ways of dispersement of that waste.
Do you foresee a working plan
that can adequately protect the
beleaguered tobacco farmer?
Pitt County is the largest flu-cured
tobacco producing county in the largest
flu-cured producing slate in the largest
country that produces flu-cured tobacco
in the world. I think we have to recog-
nize the economic importance of tobacco
and find ways to help farmers offset
their loss. It may mean to provide farm-
ers with opportunities to grow more of
other crops. Tobacco is an important
industry to eastern North Carolina. The
loss of it without some offsetting eco-
nomic development would be cata-
strophic to this area.
The State Transportation bud-
get projected a $500 million cut for
the Kinston Global Trans Park.
What are your thoughts on this?
We have to be willing to invest in the
infrastructure if we are to create GTP
from the vision that it is to the reality
that it might become. I was disappoint-
ed when Federal Express didn't choose
to relocate in GTP. My belief is, had we
of had the infrastructure - the roads
and runway extensions - in place they
would have chosen us. I think a loss of
that particular project, along with these
additional funds, is causing a serious
question of the continued future of GTP.
I don't see how it can continue to sur-
vive without any major tenants or
improvements in access to highways.
In light of several scandals on
the Board of Transportation, such
as members resigning because of
suspected illegal influence, should
a different way of selecting board
members be considered?
The people who are appointed are
appointed from districts. They are
expected historically to look after people
in their district and that's the system we
have today. It makes a lot more sense in
terms of the suggestions that have been
circulated to minimize the size of the
board, as well as have other points of
view and other areas of expertise.
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Republican pfan
creates fairness, credits
Henry Aldridge
House, Oistrict 9
T.K. JONES
STAFF WHITER
Marvin "Henry" Aldridge
Gov. Hunt has
proposed a
new child
health insur-
ance plan for
the working,
low income
families. Do
you think it
will work?
First let me hie photo
say, we all sup-
port providing healthcare for children.
In fact, House Republicans have a bet-
ter plan that reflects fairness, account-
ability and personal responsibility. We
must be fair. The Administration s plan
just creates another group of govern-
ment dependent people. We must lie
careful that we do not substitute person-
al responsibility with new government
programs. Our plan is centered around
fairness. It is fair to the uninsured chil-
dren we are trying to help and it is fair
to hardworking North Carolinians who
are already providing health insurance
for their children. Our plan has tax
credits; the Administration's plan does-
n't.
What is your stance on the hog
operations and your thoughts oh
hog waste pollution?
Hog pollution is a problem. We must
make certain that we distinguish
between farmers that abide by the law
and those that pollute. I always believe
that government should stay out of the
way until there is a problem, and I
believe we have reached that level.
Government should help solve the prob-
lem, not create the problem. We should
limit growth of these hog factories that
produce more waste than can be prop-
erly handled. At the same time, "we
should not burden the small hog opera-
tor who is working hard to raise a fam-
ily and make a Irving.
Do you foresee a working plan
that can adequately protect the
beleaguered tobacco farmer?
Tobacco has helped build eastern
North Carolina. Even though it is a
federal issue, I will do all I can to fight
for the tobacco farmer. We cannot allow
the tobacco farmer to join the extinct
species list.
The State Transportation bud-
get projected a $500 million c.u X.
the Kinston Global Trans Park.
What are your thoughts on thisf�j
That figure seems mighty high. Inm
tinue to support the Global Trans Pdrk
and hope that one day in the iear
future, eastern North Carolina will
begin to reap the benefits.
In light of several scandals on
the Board of Transportation, such
as members resigning because'of
suspected illegal influence, shrmld
a different way of selecting boArd
members be considered?
'There are many proposals being
floated around. I believe we may want
to reduce the board a little - currently
there are 26 members - and have
General Assembly confirmation. 'The
current system worts pretty well. The
bottom line is the governor appointed a
few questionable people and they made
bad derisions. I don't favor disman-
tling the board and turning over all the
power to the bureaucrats. Pitt County
deserves a seat at the table.
The Grandaddy of All Beach Music Festivals
Saturday, May 16th, 1998 � 9:30am - 5:00pm
rr
&�(&.
ucmt
'Tropic
DUNKING WATER
BANDS
Coastline Band � Capt. Cook
Embers � Clarence Carter
Band of Oz
SftQi
$30 Gate
$25 in Advance
EVCBVBODT'3 DOt
For More Information Call (919) 354 2250
NO GLASS, BOTTLES, OR KEGS ALLOWED � NO COOLERS OVER 32 QUARTS � NO PETS
. ft





4 Tawrtay, Aarll 30. 1��8
Annuals
continued from piga t
news
hellenic adviser, organizations
spend their money on the necessi-
ties throughout the year.
Panhellenic is planning to spend
their money on rush, educational
speakers and office supplies.
The Pre-professional Health
Alliance is planning to send repre-
sentatives to national conferences.
"I was really happy with appro-
priations, this is the first semester
in a long time that the Inter-
Fraternity Council (IFC) has asked
for this much money said Micah
ttctzlaff, IFC President. "We arc
going to use it to implement new
programming ideas in the fall, for
not only the Greek system but the
entire student population as a
whole
Camping
continued from page 1
Eighteen volunteers and 12 par-
ticipants went to the Croatan
National Forest to enjoy a weekend
of bird watching, volley-
ball, adaptive kayaking
and adaptive canoeing.
"We used a foam type
of material to adapt the
canoes and kayaks for
"each person's needs
Gray said.
Gray said all of the
activities were open
throughout the entire
weekend; there wasn't a
set itinerary.
"This weekend is for
the participants Gray said. "They
get to decide what they want to do
and when they want to do it
Before the plans took effect, the
Recreation and Leisure Studies
(Student Society held fund raisers
,for the trip.
i,i "We contacted local businesses
asking for monetary donations and
miscellaneous camping material
Gray said.
Many people participated to
make the camping trip happen.
Sunrise Medical, The Upper Crust
Bakery, Andy's Cheese Steaks &
Cheeseburgers and Lowes all
donated supplies or money. The
Adventure Program, which is run
through the Student Recreation
Center, also provided some sup-
plies.
"The Adventure Program
donated several tents,
sleeping bags, two
kayaks, three canoes
and other camping sup-
plies Gray said.
Gray said she found
this opportunity very
beneficial and a great
addition to what she is
learning in her major.
CandaceGray "Having the hands-
mi photo on experience working
with the people com-
plements what we learn
in class Gray said. "It gives me
the chance to demonstrate the
knowledge that I learn in class
"When Candace mentioned it, it
sounded as if it would be fun said
Sheri Smith, a therapeutic recre-
ation major and vice president of
the Recreation and Leisure Studies
Student Society. "I really wanted
to get involved

WE BLOW ON SITE!

(GLASS THAT IS)
tobacco flatter
�F ntrbtl npes
Body
Piercing
SVRMSTBi
(ovu � tiais ixnmtNCt)
CrttorAapoMlMIt 561-7473
ecstacy
a revolutionary alternative
that la taxing the nation by a
-CTin nightly news
ENERGY ALSO HAS:
�WATIRPIPES
�BODY PIERCINC
�CLASS BLOWER
�BLACKLK.HT ROOM
�WHIPPED CREAM
CHARCERS
'(747
11-8 PM
AIDS
continuad from pigt I
While there have been several
breakthroughs in medication for
AIDS, the biggest, area for advance-
ment has been prevention.
"The biggest weapon in preven-
tion has been education Elmore
said.
Elmore also pointed out that
transmission of the virus among the
homosexual population has
declined, while the rate of trans-
mission among heterosexuals has
increased.
"There is a 28 percent increase
among males and a 23 percent
increase among females Elmore
said. "Of the new cases reported, 25
percent have been those 21 and
younger and 50 percent have been
those 25 and younger
AIDS is the leading cause of
death for Americans age 25-44.
Many of the people in this age
group contracted the virus while in
college. It takes the body five to 12
weeks and sometimes longer to
develop HIV antibodies. This
"window" allows for the virus to be
spread without knowledge.
HIV can be spread through
unprotected vaginal, anal and oral
sex, sharing needles and childbirth.
Symptoms of the virus include:
fatigue, excess weight loss, fever
and night sweats, frequent diar-
rhea, white spots in the mouth,
swollen glands, dry cough and skin
blotches. Women may have addi-
tional symptoms of chronic vaginal
yeast infections and persistent PID
(pelvic inflammatory disease).
If a person feels he or she is at
. risk, then he or she needs to get
tested. Early detection allows for
sooner treatment. HIV testing is
available at the Pitt County Health
Department located at 201
Government Circle.
While there is no cure for AIDS,
there are many medicines that slow
the infection process.
"I don't think we'll ever see a
cure Elmore said. "Hopefully
we'll have a vaccine in a few years.
That's the best we can hope for
Rally
continued from page I
The organization is requesting
three bins on college hill, central
campus and west campus.
"I would like to recycle and
keep the environment green, but
since there are no bins or services
available, it seems impossible said
George Becerra, ECU student. "I
think the bike rally is a great place
to learn more about the environ-
ment and how to help it"
According to Dove, one of the
biggest problems with our rivers is
pollution. The pollution is mainly
caused by hog waste and the nitro-
gen it causes. More than 80 percent
of the nitrogen produced by hogs
goes into the environment, which
can upset the natural balance. To
prevent this from happening, the
hog waste can be used as an organ-
ic fertilizer instead of the inorganic
fertilizer that is used today.
"Speak out on behalf of the
environment Dove said. "The
government will only do what the
people make them do
KAPPA SIGMA
Presents the 20th Annual
BAHAMA
MAMA
PARTY
Saturday, May 2,1998
12:00 PM -6:00 PM
700 E. 10th Street
(beside Darryl's restaurant)
Tickets $8.00 on Advance - $10.00 at the Door
trfj
BAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Don't miss thil
Register for su
Contact y
viser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opponunityaBimiative action
univeftity, which accommodates the
needs of individual! with duabilitiet
Tna East Carolinian
the most
adrenaline or Pa9e
pumping,
intense
times of
-t
5
your life! Cal Fon Reservations
10th St. NAILS & TANNING
1318 E. 10th St. Beside Cynthias Flowers
757-0703
NEW BEDS AND BULBS
MONTH UNLIMITED $35
10 SESSIONS $25
1 SESSION 3.50
10
OFF ALL
NAIL
SERVICES
WITH
STUDENT
ID
May's
Concealed Weapons Course
Concealed Weapons & Handgun Training
This course is required by the State of NC prior to
receiving a permit to carry a concealed weapon
� Course takes 12 hours and are offered statewide
� Night courses are available
� Location of classes will be determined and scheduled
for each county
� You must be 21 years of age
� After completion of this course, you may receive
a concealed handgun permit application at your
local Sheriff's office
� Eye and hearing protection, books and
literature provided
� Handgun and 50 rounds of ammunition
needed for course
� Gun and Ammunition can be provided by instructor
at an additional cost
W W per person
524-3307
Handgun training by the hour also available
Leslie May has been instructing in handgun training since 1995 and is
certified with the National Rifle Association of America Instructors
Nwuss
HIBBETT SPORTS
laa M;i
Friday May 1
Monday - Wednesday May 4-6
10am - 4pm
rrt-i "Oficially Licensed Carolina Ring Dealers" m�t ap
I RTQ1RVE�f m ECU Student Stores CT A RTQ1RV E D
ZLSii �� Hfl m SDecial Pavment Plans Available S COLLEGE jCWELRY
ufll Wa Q p Special Payment
5 Thursday, i

1
ft
People ai
forget .ab
has achie
has let th
mental p
efforts of
Earth I
ognizing
time of y
indeed rij
Greem
cured shr
and offer;
balls; you
relaxing a
TheGi
bars. It c:
where wa
an old pic
Espech
downtowi
country sc
the solitui
There i
celebrates
does its p
you to be
LEI
On Thursd
Bergman wro
ing me � Ec
of Greenville
H dling of the t
B my tenure as
personally th
column. Alt
1 many misstat
3 did give me i
; East Carolir
C Greenville of
been a men a
� for many year
� tration.
People froi
j United Stat
; Greenville on
( a few dissider
law enforcer
i innocent citiz
tive mayor
J informed all ti
the first time,
! OPINI
Politics h
Republics
elections, ei
politics c
every j
Politics. This '
! lege students ir
i the tic glare. It r
; general populac
; politics and pc
what is worse -
care. This is a
! may not seem





5 Thiiriday. April 30, 1886
opinio
easti&aroliiiiaii
Amv L.RovsTB�E�Hf
Heathkk Burgess Mm�nE�inr
Amanda Austin Kewifdrra Tracy m. lauiach Spun Mai
Hoc.i.y Harris AmNmEdin Steve Loser Am StoraEtn
Andy Turner hftiM. Ed�� Carole Merle HiribwMiw
John Davis AwiumWntyit Ednv John murphy Salt
Matt Hege Admitting
Bobby Tuggle
m m mm �� n� �� mmmm � � ��. � so �. �h�i.tet�MR.b.
����1� iiinmii r 11 iin Tin mi
CMMk SnAx MMkM M, KU ta BftJi hi MMa.c�IUUai.
Cmtenii
oumsw
People around the world last week held a demonstration to call attention to a place we often
forget about: Earth � you know, your home. Earth Day, began in 1970 by Gaylord Nelson,
has achieved its original intention of raised awareness about environmental concerns, and it
has let the political establishment know that something had to be done to control environ-
mental problems. All the problems, of course, have not been remedied, but the grassroots
efforts of Earth Day organizers have been tremendously beneficial.
Earth Day, however, is not just about pointing out what's wrong with Earth. It's about rec-
ognizing what's right. Greenville, your temporary home on earth, has a lot that's right. This
time of year, particularly, we can soak in the Emerald City's offerings and observe what is
indeed right.
Greenville has more to offer than the well-groomed greens of golf courses or the mani-
cured shrubs of shopping malls. The Town Common off of First Street is close to campus
and offers plenty of room to do whatever you want to do. You can throw Frisbees or foot-
balls; you can walk along the edge and look out the Tar River or you can just lie on the grass,
relaxing and staring up at the sky.
The Greenway is another place to get away for a while from traffic and smoky downtown
bars. It can be accessed from the commuter parking lot off of Tenth Street. It's a place
where walkers and runners can go and observe the beauty of nature, instead of smoke from
an old pickup truck.
Especially after exams, you may want a place where you can relax. Maybe getting tanked
downtown isn't what you had in mind. Hop on your bike or in your car and ride out to the
country sometime. Greenville's got a lot of it. The open country is a perfect place to reclaim
the solitude you often lose on campus.
There are plenty of other places around town where you can be a part of what Earth Day
celebrates. Like any relationship, however, you have to respect and take care of it. Earth
does its part for you. It provides endless opportunities for wonder and pleasure. It's up to
. you to be a good partner - year round.
Should Fifth Street be divided
to honor Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr.?
William
Stacey
Cochran:
YES
LETTER
to the editor
Candidate responds to column
On Thursday, April 10, Jeff
Bergman wrote an editorial criticiz-
ing me � Ed Carter, former mayor
of Greenville � for the city's han-
dling of the Halloween riots during
� my tenure as mayor, I would like to
personally thank Bergman for the
'� column. Although it contained
; � many misstatements of the facts, it
'J did give me due credit for ridding
; East Carolina and the city of
K Greenville of a problem that had
been a menace to the community
I for many years prior to my adminis-
! tration.
People from various parts of the
� United States were coming to
; Greenville on Halloween to enjoin
I a few dissident student in attacking
' law enforcement personnel and
i innocent citizens. Being an effec-
? tive mayor and leader, I duly
informed all troublemakers that, for
J the first time, decisive action would
be taken to deal with this idiotic
behavior. As a result of the action
taken under my leadership in 1988,
a number of persons were arrested
and no such problems have existed
since this incident Civic and stu-
dent leaders are now able to proac-
tively circumvent problems relating
to the Halloween celebration. This
is due solely to the effective and
decisive handling of the 1988 inci-
dent.
I will not dignify Bergman's
many outrageous allegations, but
the allegation that I have a problem
with college students exemplifies
just how far Bergman went in an
attempt to be sensational. I am the
only candidate running for the 6th
District Senate seat who has been a
college student. The incumbent,
Bob Martin, who he supports, has
not attended college, nor does he
possess a college degree; neither
does the Republican opponent,
Henry Williams.
ECU, North-Carolina third
largest university; ranks 13thtnitof
the 16 UNC campuses in terms of
the N.C. General Assembly's
appropriations per student. North
Carolina's teacher pay is at the bot-
tom 10 percent in the nation; thou-
sands of jobs are lost in our district
each year, my opponent has been in
elected office for 46 years; and the
General Assembly has experienced
budget surpluses during the past six
years � none of these problems
were addressed. I contend it is not
only time for a change, but that
Bergman, his colleagues and friends
should start now in supporting my
candidacy so as to ensure that I am
sent to Raleigh.
This is a no-lose situation for a good rhetorician. You
can claim that you're supporting MLK while subtly
slighting this achievement to honor him at the same
time � just say more should be done than changing a
section of Fifth Street. Just discredit this accomplish-
ment by claiming that the naming of a section of Fifth
Street after MLK isolates the black community living
in that area. The problem is that line of argument is
subtly racist (even arguably so).
Racism comes in an infi-
nite number of-shades �
from outright hatred to sub-
tle pickings by newspaper
reporters. This latest issue
has uncovered sentiments
that (to be perfectly honest)
I'm not surprised exist, but
which I can't help frowing
upon. And no matter how I write this,
Racism comes in
an infinite number
of shades
Ed Carter
Candidate, N.C. Senate
OPINION
Marvelie
SULLIVAN
Columnist
Politics touches everyone's life
Politics is not Just about
Republicans, Democrats,
elections, etc. The realm of
politics dictates almost
every facet of life.
Politics. This word, to many col-
! lege students incites a yawn or apa-
� thetic glare. It really seems that the
general populace is very ignorant of
politics and policy issues � and
what is worse � no one seems to
care. This is a definite problem. It
! may not seem like a crisis, but in
fact, an unaware public is one of
the chief ills of our society today.
Politics is not just about
Republicans, Democrats, elections,
etc. The realm of politics dictates
almost every facet of life. People
who feel that politics is beneath
them or that it is not relevant to
their lives are truly disillusioned
souls.
Since everything we do is
touched by politics in some way,
shape, or form, it is the individual's
responsibility as a voter and as a cit-
izen to get to get clued in to what is
going on. That does not mean you
have to read The Wall Street Journal
everyday; it means at least know
the names of our state's two sena-
tors and have some idea of their
political views.
Political Science (POLS 1010)
should be a specific requirement
for the general college curriculum.
I think if the state deems it essen-
tial to uke Math 1065 and a science
lab for graduation, surely passing a
general course in government
should be necessary (and would
not be the unmitigated hell of the
former two classes � no offense to
my lab and math teachers). When
you have your diploma and you hit
the pavement, a basic knowledge
of governmental structure will be
of enormous use. Even if you don't
graduate and end up selling drugs
to the people that did (just kid-
ding), sooner of later politics (and
maybe a comprehensive legal
knowledge) will become a great
asset in your life.
Admittedly, "public apathy"
does lately seem to be the worn out
phrase of the day and its under-
tones are a tad bit preachy, but that
is because it is so important The
benefits of political knowledge (or
the disadvantages in the lack there-
of) cannot be fully and thoroughly
realized until some effort is made
to be in-the-know. Contrary to the
popular belief around here, being a
meat head will not lead to a very
fulfilling life. So make a little
effort�read the paper, watch the
news, take POLS 1010 � any-
thing. Do something.
Write a letter to the Editor!
you will have
the comfort of dismissing what I say as either self-
righteous or scoffing at it indifferently, saying I'm sim-
ply misguided or wrong.
But the fact of the matter is 2,000 Greenville resi-
dents, most of whom were black, signed a petition
which precipitated town council's decision to change
the section of East Fifth Street to Martin Luther King
Jr. Drive.
On January 18 several hundred black residents
gathered in frigid and icy conditions to walk along the
section of Fifth Street that is to be changed. Two
white people were there.
Reporters have slightingly referred to the change as
a "crusade and have said the "white community
stood tall and helped support the issue Yes, two
white people showed up at the original march.
People have said that more should be done, that
just changing one section of a street isn't enough, that
it will further isolate the black community that com-
prises the majority of residents along that section of
Fifth Street. People have said that changing the Town
Common's name would be a more fitting honor for
Martin Luther King Jr. People have given dozens of
legitimate reasons why changing a small section of
East Fifth Street is not appropriate or right.
Unfortunately, most of those people are white, and
they simply don't want to applaud this achievement.
The black community proudly supports the
change, and yes, would certainly like to see more done
to honor the civil rights leader. And hopefully with the
support of the "white community" which "stood tall"
more will be done. This is the first step Greenville has
taken to honor King and hopefully more will follow.
In a city that honors its confederate dead with a
statue that gazes nobly and oh so judiciously down
from our courthouse, I'm surprised even a section of
Fifth Street was changed. Maybe all of us who feel
that changing a section of Fifth Street isn't enough
will support the black community in the next endeav-
or to honor their leaders and remember their heritage.
We're all in this together.
But don't knock this first change with rationalized
legitimacy. Honoring MLK is a good thing. It's good.
Let's quit bickering and finding reasons why it's not
appropriate and applaud this achievement. Let's not
overshadow the accomplishment by finding reasons
why this change is inappropriate, why it will cause has-
sles, why it shouldn't be done because it isn't enough
of a memorial, why there's better places to honor
MLK � let's stop bickering about it and simply say
thank you, MLK, for making our world a better place
to live in today. We're all in this together, so let's show
it
i
Amy L.
Roysten
NO
a
D
��
fa

a
ill
it
It astonishes me that anyone feels it is a fitting tribute
to divide a street in half (a division which happens
fall on racial lines) and give only a portion of it in hon
of a man who gave his life for racial equality and
desegregation. M
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered because
he promoted racial equality through non-violent
means. He was murdered because a non-tolerant I
assassin wanted to quiet his words of peace. I
murdered because he had attracted an inter
following of thousands who took comfort in 1
and turned toward him for leadership. King
black hero. He was a hero for everyone. He was � I
for the black population, who were segregated
given second class rights, as well as a hero fari
who wanted segregation and racism eliminated,
words set a precedence for peaceful yet
change for other groups of people in this a
around the world. Today, in GreenvilIe,Xihgs
a hero for people on both the black end of Fifth!
and the white end.
The fact alone that Fifth Street itself is so
is a testament that the societal issues which
addressed more than 30 years ago still persist,
government may not support segregation any I
but people still make conscious decisions about
to live and who to associate with on the basis of r
went to high school in Greenville and I have a I
affection for the people of this town outside -
campus community. However, I also know first 1
that racism is very much alive. It's amazing what I
people will say when they are in a group of all
all black people. Some people mistakingly assume
that if they are in the company of all whites no one wiB
particularly object if they make racist comments like,
"the bad end of Fifth Street" or "across the rail road
tracks
Fifth Street, like many other streets and residential
areas of cities across the country, is divided. Perhaps,
this is why other cities have named large boulevard
and thouroughfarcs after King. It seems unfitting
somehow to divide a street or to select a portion of a
street which is associated, however unfortunately, with
any specific population.
A mother stood up at the city council meeting and
said she had tried to explain to her young daughter
what King stood for and why he was an important
man, worthy of the honor of having a street named
after him. After the mother explained to her daughter
about King's life and the civil rights movement, the
daughter turned to her mother and asked her why he
only got half a street. As the daughter grows older arid
hears racist remarks about areas like West Fifth Streft
and learns that many people still keep very dose social
circles, she will know why the street was divided;
College aged students don't often think past gradus
tion and career, but the day is coming when we
will have a child bom into this world pure, without a
knowledge of racist attitudes or traditions. Citizens j
Greenville, including ECU'S students, have a I
sibility not to carry forward the racist divisions whh
exist today. We have an obligation to broaden
social circles and object to racist remarks,
when they're made inside the quiet walls oft I
geneous group.
I think King would have wanted a street, any street
named for him which ran past a house filled with
white people, a house filled with black people, a house
filled with both white and black people, government
buildings, a public university, a private Catholk
school, black-owned businesses' and white-owned
businesses. King does not deserve a street named in
his honor simply because every other city already has
one or because it is an easy political decision to make.
Driving down the road and seeing the sign labeled Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Drive will never
remind me of the tremendous contributions of a great
leader or of how the civil rights movement effects me
today. Instead, it will always remind me of how divid-
ed my town is and of how tar we all still have to go.
i





i�l Ttmrtfty. Aril 30, IMS
comics
Tht Etit Carolinian
lite pimle of this couac
QUESTJOA): WH4T THE
N& TAILM�AN?
i ARMOUR .
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Starts Wednesday, April 29th
12
Meat or Beef
Armour Hot Dogs
ARMOUR
VIC
. Thit )�'� �t�;p is �nt;tHe� �.
Learo From Rich"
v;tw. ov vo ��r;fs UFt r wv;
W�i ��� �, obWno ��p�rt
W.H Suk-por uorK.
5 kn.s ECO ShtoWs WST Do:
)fco.t �t Venters �� k� �u o 'l��o
. �"� pUtc heawsetMy Kt�p a Shot jii�
beKind e Covnler.
l)Soye your P�p� John S dojcj �rv) irprcis
ywr Friends Whu� the she reoehes
t� c�;l;nj.
�5 Uhh V.Vn "if the d�r penny- lock:
your Frierrds int. their rooms. iFy,u
, W Kaw tht teehniie jive net c.
�)0�n,t mojlrS �t le�jt Vice and mrf,
BWHl belt 5ort .y�ir4e? your t;Fe.
IWo. v'th People, vino hold powerful
F��4nos v,4K tbe neuKPofer So vox
Snoke your 0�y ,�Mu, �� tll�n
Tfcb Conrfjjcl
i
5 nfj 0 Don ja :
i) Qon't t�ir tt� rt � S hr, �
clones, any �ore then thotuil bejin to
inteWtm Atht you fMly torn ft fto f.r.
ADbnt drirfc So W '8����'�' Bl -Hut you poij
Olt to dorm oer For !ppro),r�Wy 8H0 huj
$uWt Fill up � �rfcJt " w ?"�
duri"� oxi intense derm Floor tOfarrighr4Ms
J�t vtoo rnuch Umn water.
�iiXon't V. tt�t or �M ��� 3� JarWs
Vk�� �J ��? nt to J Wy Style
Viuwill Wasted to move anTs by yeurjelFon-
Onether table
Qft
posit
Cons
H; I'm Kith the CeCre.W an�l artist for
�'�.�!(� W�KS installment " �' ' Ut
No pAotltr hoU �o�l of or. id�� t SourJs
tfl �t tki tim , DQrT J PW-DEF t(�
Rnt MAq o Wef t�V�o�l on yuK-orm.trujJ
�b�rf iV.Th��ts � "Y "r h,i n'1
Kmwio( iiftMlly in W� ttuMiiiM-Ani t��n)(S
h n�7�r vH 1 "��5p�c;�i
?.n to �H � ����"� �ff��a toWJ-
Wtot �lf�tlly vw 1 Wo"J�rtd �r7��'y
�tWlty ft�� tht to�;S rS�-T��l th�S� T
h�v� ;�.W�J or cfh�i Ti MS. &t to
5�y tW.Ki 6��5� vM y� �� fS4
T u� thij is the ti�� vhen I tell yow Wh�t
hoppens � the Future with r-y cho.r�cter; 0ut Sli
I J.n"t ���y h�ve &�y eky.ct�r$ i'ii 4. w� yll
vftio twfpinj to me. r te�m f Wi�h 3 .T tfcc p
PoWtrf.l m�n in all oV the wtrt: O.J. Itmfton,
Uvii ForroH.h ond Bon Klnj. W JO r�uio'
fijM'mj crime �nil JoMnj fnyjteriet XPiajinl O-ls
Shoe wtien he Jijeoverj t�,� re�l nvrjonr Was o.
Heismon Trophy vinner �t Uit u,v� Uter went on
0 V�ve �. 2,000 y�rd Season for the 8uf(�U WMI
L4N
tfrt.JrM?w��yo(ni�wAl
rV"Jua?flM-rmfynWfs�rf
�S3
fwtviry ytRSt'eootDft
�A�:i�,rxyoiW5rtoB�,4
OWIT IfiKi .�� Af55f 0
0�Or So ��CWV A TllUfhtk
I've HlYtR PLfylt, OH A. 7ifcXl
titKH GoMMDIHJHK, HAlf
fntp�cfL�i dtMJxnoWiTH
MlFMG&C WD
I'HSTitlfryil
ToFlNO$UfllHD
mji'MRKht
HuST8tMNcMM?ry'
fyMikU
Sou or Hep.
1 feet, uiee.
mama, ciu)SHou.onTFociri
� �����) Wo" Iftvlf ffif-T
at fut tffHafoo'eecMu
�i am fa teu rat. Mum
oisvrntetefbe.iiui.ir
? untie urt&iTicjA
lorioHuueiTFoi fie, jesus
SoTToH UH� IS, IFJt
MJ,rifi
CoMHM
n S&KSbME .
RETglSUTtofJ (
MiftUf. (SS.
"oLD'vim. fu've
Ht0Tb6cKll&
FniereMiif.
goo Lire Mwtei
ij"srorT6�)
fjes�
ni
inisruiirruKu
! ume petitions M
fttOLPIHf
VB"B"NNV
EPISODE 23
NOW THAT I'M, WE MUST GO STOP THE VILLAINS
(WHO REALLYUNQH KILLED ME
GBBDNERSBNTOS
UppyLadu)
k
"iyx2rTl-ibod
Vl!
tydJ.TpM.(iuMjiJji
Fresh Baked Hamburger or
Hot Dog Buns
KS-lSSoz.
Tostitos
6oz.
Harris Teeter
Potato Chips
With
VIC
Caixi
12 ct In the Bakery
Boxed-Only
Glazed Donuts
Drink Feature
Stock Up & Save!
2 Liter
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola
With
VIC
Cud
IOO Ct
Harris Teeter Cbated
Mom In TWa Ad EMM
Effective Through May 5
Afra29Thnx�5hMay S,B9SlnOur 1
BtomOnfy.
iThaRlbUnOuart�a�NbalbOa�.





th
12 OB.
pgeror
Suns
yated
rUy.
Thundiy. April 30. 1998
lifastvte
3
Tht East Ctrgliabn
CD
M. .Tin. ,H P. .TlfAJf .?IK.
Radiohead
AirbagHow am I
driving?
9 OUT OF 10
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL
AY
� �
Diverse lineup
promises to entertain
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
Radiohead might not be as para-
noid as their music and CD pack-
ages suggest If they aren't, it's all
right; their paranoia seems perfect-
ly genuine and well-placed. Where
Irish preach-rockers U2 have tried
to poke fun at the market and
technology cultures that dominate
the West, Radiohead just come out
and admit they're scared as hell.
This E.R could be yet another
marketing ploy by Capitol
Records, since Radiohead's last
album, O.K. Computer, transformed
the band from a struggling Brit-
rock group into the Pink Floyd and
U2 of the '90s. Radiohead certain-
ly act as if it's a marketing ploy,
since the front cover of the E.R
declares "this mini album is aimed
at the U.S.A Like Capitol
Records has a big, big weapon
aimed at our great nation, and they
hope to subjugate us all.
The CD package comes com-
plete with a faux questionnaire
asking bitterly ironic questions
such as, "And how do you see
yourself in fifty year's time?"
There's a quote from the Noam
Chomsky Reader in the back and
there are random terrifying
accounts of the anomie of modem
technomarketing culture posted
on various pages along with graphs
and charts that seem to have
important information.
The music is as beautifully
cryptic as the packaging. One
might think that b-sides and new
recordings would be sub-par com-
pared with the mystical songs of
O.K Computer, but quite the con-
trary, the stuff is gorgeous. Even
the watery Eno-esque instrumen-
tal "Meeting in the Aisle"
is exceptional. It brings to mind
some of the more striking intru-
mentals on R.E.M. albums, such as
"New Orleans Instrumental 1
"Pearly" is a rip-a-hole in your
brain lo-fi number that captures
the rawest aspects of Radiohead.
Thom Yorkc's growly, whiney
vocals are far from the too-beauti-
; ful-to-be-true fridge-buzz of their
early '90s hit "Creep
"A Reminder" and '
"Polythylenc (Parts 1&2)" both
have stong elements of O.K.
Computer in them. Both have the
power and urgency of the songs on
O.K. Computer. Melatonin and Palo
Alto are strong rockers a la The
Bends, or perhaps O.K.
Computer's "Electioneering
If Radiohead keep making b-
side collections this good, the only
truly frightening thing will be the
grandiosity of their next full-length
record. Let's hope they aim that
one at the U.S.A too. I'll take a
bullet for Thom Yorke any day.
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
Break out the Icy Hot for your ass,
'cause it's liable to be sore before
the sun goes down tonight.
However, the soreness won't be
from sitting on it It'll be from
shakin' it all around at Barefoot on
the Mall as this year's lineup of
bands are
known to
set butts to
wigglin
Winners
of the
Battle of
the Bands,
t h e
Cashmere
Jungle
Lords are a
Richmond-
based band
that spe-
cialize in
what they
call "west-
ern surf
jungle
rock
The
band
released
Southern
Barber
Supply last
year,
bringing
them back
CO the PHOTO COURTESY OF SUB F
Emerald
The "Diabolical" Biz Markie
PHOTO COURTESY OF 112 MARKIE S GOIN OFF
The Blue Rags: (L to R) Aaron Wood, Scott
Sharpa, Jacob Hollifield, Bill Reynolds 6 Mike
Rhodes
City to promote the album. The
Lords had been absent from the A
Greenville "scene" since the days4
of New Deli. They've performed
frequently in town since rj
release of the album, pad
them in down at Peasant's.
While at times the Cashmere
Jungle Lords can seem to be a tad
too tame, they're certainly worthy
openers for Barefoot and will like-
ly put on a pleasing show.
Tame is something the Blue
Rags are not. The Ashevillc rag '
and rollers wildly pay their
respect to the music of the past
with a frantic
approach
r- that seems to
prevent feet
from stand-
ing still.
They're sort
of like
N.R.B.Q.
accept a little
less quirky.
(The leg-
endary Q
once record-
ed a song
with wrasslin'
manager
Captain Lou
Albano.)
The
"Diabolical"
Biz Markie is
perhaps best
known for
the 1989 hit
"Just a
Friend
which fea-
tured Biz
wailing, glori-
ously off-keijfc'f
He's als�
Southern Culture on tht Skids: (L to R) Rick Miller, Mary Huff and Dave Hartman
known for his earlier hits "Nobody
Beats the Biz" and "The Vapors
Biz got in a legal tangle with
singer-songwriter Gilbert Sullivan
over samples used for the song
"Alone Again" off his 1991 album
Need a Haircut. The incident hurt
his career and prevented the
PHOTO COURTESY OF GEFFEN RECORDS
album from being released, until
recently (without "Alone Again").
Mr. Markie, a fan of old lunch-
boxes, old video games and old
television shows, is known for live-
ly shows. What else would you
expect from a man with a song
called "Pickin' BoogenV?
Southern Culture on the Skids
headline Barefoot Hillbillies from
Chapel Hill, S.C.O.T.S. play songs
about Mexican wrestlers, chicken,
led clay biscuits, banana pudding
and dirt track dates.
StE BAREFOOT PAGE I
Blue Rags tear through
music's past
Service sorority aims to
improve community
Asheville natives do it
their way
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
If you've heard Muddy Waters'
frantic, soul-stomping Newport
Folk Festival version of "I've Got
My Mojo Workin' (But It Just
Won't Work On You) then you
may have an idea of what the Blue
Rags sound like. Plug Muddy full
of amphetamines and sit him in a
New Orleans brothel circa the '20s
and the Rags could have durn well
been his backup band.
The Asheville natives, who are
appearing at Barefoot today,
released their debut album, Rag-N-
Roll, last fall to critical acclaim. The
album overflows with high-energy
testaments to the power of music,
all kinds of music: blues, jazz,
gospel, ragtime, country. Name it
the Blue Rags do it. Through 13
songs, the dance-happy drive of the
album never subsides as the band
tears through spirited originals and
properly covers songs from sources
as diverse as Leadbelly and Ira and
George Gershwin.
Gloriously raw as it is, Rag-N-
Roll still doesn't capture the real
thing, the Blue Rags live. A Blue
Rags show is a sweat-stained-arm-
shakinass-moving throw down,
guaranteed to make punks and hip-
pies alike slap their bee-hinds
against one another.
"I think it's the honest approach
to what we do explains guitarist
Scott Sharpe. "That transcends the
differences into raw energy. We
play any kind of music that we feel
like playing. We're not confined to
any style
Perhaps oddly enough to some,
the Blue Rags are on Sub Pop
Records, the maison de grunge of the
early '90s. Greg Dulli, frontman for
the Afghan Whigs (formerly on Sup
Pop), recommended the Blue Rags
to the label. Sharpe says the Rags fit
right in at Sub Pop as their raw,
straight-ahead approach redefines
"what punk really is
While the Blue Rags' sound cer-
tainly has '90s sensibilities, the
music it celebrates is indeed from a
different era. When prodded to cite
any modern influences on the band,
Sharpe asks if that means they still
have to be
living,
before cit-
ing aging
(yet still
(it-kick-
i n g )
Mississippi
bluesman
R . L .
Burnside
and a
British
techno
band that
samples
blues riffs.
The
album title,
Rag-N-Roll,
is itself a bit
of a parody,
Sharpe
claims, cit-
ing many
modern
"rock-n-
. roll" bands
rather limited knowledge of music's
past. "Rag-N-Roll is definitely
about life in the '90s he says. "But
it's rock-n-roll mixed with their
great-grandfather's music
The Blue Rags have taken their
rag-n-roll across the country, playing
everywhere cast of the Mississippi
and making it out west for some
shows, including the recent South
by Southwest Festival in Austin.
The band plans to go into the stu-
dio in June to record a new album in
New York. Then, they will head out
west again for some shows.
But for today, you get to bear
witness to the spirit of the Rags.
You won't be sorry.
Gamma Sigdoes their
part for Greenville
Shannnon Meek
senior writer
Albert Schweitzer once said that
"there is no higher religion than
human service. To work for the
common good is the greatest
creed
Perhaps the motto of the
Gamma Sigma Sigma National
Service Sorority, "Unity In
Service
best epito-
mizes Albert
Schweitzer's
ideals.
The
Gamma
Sigma Sigma
National
Service
Sorority was
formed in
1952 dedi-
cated to this
idealism of
service. It is a non-discriminating,
non-hazing organization. The ECU
Gamma Sigma Sigmas, comprised
of nearly 100 sisters, have commit-
ted their efforts to bring about pos-
itive change to the community.
"It's a good feeling knowing
you're doing good for the commu-
nity. What's rewarding is seeing the
smiles on the people you help
says Tercse Mcssick, Gamma
Sigma Sigma's newly elected mem-
bership vice-president
This past weekend Gamma
Sigma Sigma participated in Relay
Gamma Sig members participate in Relay for Life
PHOTO BY HEATHER BURGESS
forK,ifc, an event benefiting cancer
patients. A total of 69 girls from
their chapter, coupled with 12 sis-
ters from UNCG, camped out and
raised $3,000 over a 24 hour period
of time. A member from each team
has to be on the track at every hour
during the day.
Pledges of Gamma Sigma Sigma
are required to do at least 15 hours
of service coupled with five better-
ment points, which include things
like retreats, dinners, cocktails and
formals. Sisters are required to do
20 service hours and five better-
ment points.
The organizations Gamma
Sigma Sigma have volunteered
their time to in this year alone ant:
Ronald
McDonald
House,
Special
Olympics,
My Sister's
Closet,
Project
Impact,
Oak Haven,
Tar River,
Operation
Sunshine,
TEDI( for
battered
women) and Meals on Wheels.
During the holidays the sisters
pay close attention to helping the
unfortunate. ,
On Halloween they dressed in
outlandish costumes and went trick
or treating at the children's ward alt
PCMH Hospital. During Christmas
they ran a Santa booth through Pitt
Volunteer Action Center. During
Easter they were Bunny Helpers
for the Association of Retarded
Citizens.
SEf SORORITY PAGE 1
I





t Tfcwtfry. April 30.1991
I
I
lifcstylp
Tht Eait Carolinian
Carrboro
Harvey Milk, El Sucio,
My So-Called Band at
Lizard Snake in Chapel
Hill
The Grandsons at
The Cave in Chapel
Hill
5 Tuesday
The Recipie at
Peasant's
1 Friday
April
30 Thursday
Dear Liza at Peasant's
Versus at Cat's Cradle in
Carborro
Grasshopper Highway at
Lizard and Snake in Chapel Hill
Mercury Dime at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
Barefoot on the Mall, featuring
Southern Culture on the Skids, Biz
Markie, The Blue Rags, Cashmere
Jungle Lords, 11 a.m6 p.m.
: Stanhip Troopers at 8
p.m. in Hendrix
Theater (through May
Z)
Jazz night at
Staccato
Drummy Zeb and
Razor Posse at the
Attic
Juice Baby,
Meatbox at Peasant's
S.E.A.C. Benefit at
Cat's Cradle in Chapel
Hill
Gumption, The
Panther Branch Boys at
The Cave in Chapel
Hill
Larry Weaver, RBI
at Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
2 Saturday
The Cypher (open mic poetry)
at The Percolator Coffeehouse
Lake Trout at Peasant's
Bio Ritmo at Cat's Cradle in
Lake Trout plays Saturday at Paasant's.
PHOTO COURTSSY OF LAKE TROUT
Juicebaby performs tonight at Peasant's with Meatbox.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JUICEBABY
Heading Home
for the Summer?
Let Penske Truck Rental Take
You Where You Want To Go.
10 ft. Vans 1-2 Rooms
I
15 ft. Vans 2-3 Rooms
� Low Rates
� Free Unlimited Mileage on
One-Way Rentals
� AC and Automatic
Transmission Available
� New, Clean, Top-
Maintained Models
� 24-Hour Emergency Road
Service, 7 Days a Week
� Full Line of Moving
Accessories Including:
Tow Equipment, Hand
Truck, Pads, Cartons
10 DISCOUNT
with Student I.D.
25 ft. Vans 6-8 Rooms

National Reservations Call
1-800-222-0277
10TH STREET BP
2704 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
Truck Rents (919) 758-6100
r
X
�X
-x

-x
-x
-x
-x
�x
-x
-x
-x
�x
-x
-x
'X
'X
Doors open: 7:30 pm
Stage Time: 9:00 pm
SILVER
BULLET
M
" qbwfi qfcfas"
756-6278
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRE & SAT:
Lingerie-Night
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
"Skylar"
10 OR MORE
GIRL DANCERS
EVERY NIGHT!
X-
X


X
X
X-
X
X-
X'
t
l�
l�
I
x
I'
Located 5 miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt. (Behind Aladdin Services & Limo) j
PUIY IT HGflin JPORTJ
ROLLERBLADE IN-LINE
SKATES STARTING AT
$99 NEW!
HEX DUMBBELLS 55(lb
LARGEST SUPPLY OF DISC
GOLF EQUIPMENT AT THE
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
146 S.W. GREENVILLE BLVD. SUITE 101
IN WAL-MART SHOPPING CENTER
(919)353-4344
FAX (919)353-4307
Attention ALL Students:
Get it?
You should. The ECU One Card, that is.
If you don't already have one, you'll have
to pay10 for it after May 15, 1998.
Get yours while it's still free.
ALL STUDENTS
MUST HAVE
AN ECU 1 CARD.
The ECU One Card is required for
all Campus Libraries, Recreation Cen-
ter access, Campus Dining, Student
Activities, Health Services, Financial
Aid Deferment accounts, and every-
thing you needed an ECU I.D. card
for in the past!
l NiunsriT
jr5
t�&SK
Your first card will be made FREE until
May IS, 1998. After that time, your first
card will cost10. To obtain an ECU One
Card, visit the One Card Office.
Location: One Card Office
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Hours: Monday - Friday,
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
To produce your new identification card you must bring with you:
Current ECU ID card OR Driver's license and social security card
Qin stions should be directed to the ECU One C.ird System Office, 328-201 S,
located inside Dowdy Student Stores,Wright Building.
tgf





t Carolinian
A A A &
278 x
x
1
ght
incers
X"
I-
t
I'
X'
I
I-
is & Limo)
rn
IE
Clb
DISC
THE
rN!
3-4307
�svr
sv
��3�
until
r first
:UOne
Kith you:
ity card
9 Thunday, April 30, 1988
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
ROSEMONT
SELF STORAGE
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
�ECU STUDENT DISCOUNT
$5 OFF PER MONTH
�ALL SIZES AVAILABLE
�LARGE COMMERCIAL 10X30
�SMALL 5X10
�SECURITY LIGHTING AND FENCING
�ELECTRICITY AVAILABLE IN SOME UNITS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED OFF
ARLINGTON BLVD EXTENSION
IN THE BELLS FORK AREA
CALL ANYTIME, DAY OR NIGHT
GET YOUR FRIENDS AND RENT TOGETHER!
24
HOUR
ACCESS
FOR LEASING INFORMATION CALL
1909 ROSEMONT DR.
GREENVILLE, NC
353-1395
NO BASKETBALL COURTS AT
HOUR APARTMENTS?
flayers Club Can Help!
Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
1528 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC �7858
GET READY FOR
CINCO DE MAYO
AT
Mexican Restaurant
u
ALL DAY TUESDAY. MAY 5TH!
C 6 CO RON ITAS $5.95
MEXICAN IMPORTS $1.75
" LIME MARGARITAS $2.50
f POLLO LIMON $6.95
BEEF FAJITAS FOR 1 $6.95'
'BUY ONE APPETIZER CET ONE FREE!
(DINE-IN ONLY AFTER 9PM)
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
757-1666 OLE!
Barefoot
continual! from page 7
Sorority
continued from page 7
The Skids have deservedly hit
the big time, going from playing at
Greenville's much missed hole-in-
the-wall, O'Rocks, to being signed
to Geffen Records.
Prepare yourself for chicken
throwin If you want a piece, you
better stand up close. Also, that
way you'll get the full effect of
songs like "Daddy Was a Preacher,
But Mama Was a Go-Go Girl" and
"My House Has Wheels
Barefoot is boasting one of its
most interesting lineups in years,
so be greatful and get out there and
bump butts with the one you love
(or want to).
Amber James, the sorority's vice
president of service, said their
efforts are appreciated.
"A lot of times you are the only
caring person that some people
come in contact with she said.
"They are always happy to see
you
With this combination of ser-
vice, unity and fun, the sorority
finds not only what they do helps
better the community but also,
that for some sisters, it helps better
themselves.
"It makes you more aware of
the real world and what goes on in
the community You get to expe-
rience what is out there James
summed up.
Is your creative
talent better than
this
Then you could
be a Production
Assistant at
casicarolinian
JZppty Within.
I�
Be On The Lookout
Bookbag and textbook thefts tend to rise during this busy end-of-the-semester
rush. ECU-Dowdy Student Stores reminds students:
Keep a watchful eye on your belonsings
Don't leave your backpack or textbooks
in your vehicle
Avoid leaving valuables unattended
Report all suspicious activity to the ECU Police
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores must continue to ask students to
leave all bookbags at the door. For your protection, security
cameras are in place, and a bookbag check-in service will
be provided May 4 through exams in an effort to prevent
theft. Lockers are located outside of the Store for added
convenience.
Book Buvback Policy; ECU student ID
required with each buyback transaction.
4"L(r ' laiaiai. � ���!�
Student Stores
Wright Building � 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
1

3
I
I
i
llfaAaKjtjalijajkaAajpap�pMpafaM





I
10 Thwrtday. April 30. 1998
sports
The Eait Carolinian
Three coaching vacancies mean changes for basketball
New signeesbring
experience to program
TRACY M. LAL'IACH
stouts EDITOR
Things are a-changin' in the world
of Pirate basketball.
Within the past two weeks,
ECU has lost women's basketball
Head Coach Anne Donovan to
the Philadelphia
Rage, men's
basketball Assistant
Coach Lew Hill to
Texas A&M, and
announced
Tuesday that men's
basketball Assistant
Coach Lane Odom
has accepted a
position with the
coaching staff at
UNC-Charlotte.
According to
men's basketball
Head Coach Joe
Dooley, ECU was
fortunate to have
Hill and Odom for
the time they were
here.
"In this
business, there is
usually a three- or four-year period
that people stay and then the time
comes to move on Dooley said.
"Lew and Lane have both come
across opportunities to be closer to
new challenges
Odom joined the Pirates in
1995 after five years on the
coaching staff at the University of
Alabama. He is a 1989 graduate of
High Point University, where he
played basketball for the
Panthers.
The athletic department is in
the process of hiring new coaches
to fill the positions that are now
vacant, and final decisions are
expected to be made within the
next few weeks.
Dooley said that his athletes
are disappointed
to lose these
coaches but
expects the
necessary
adjustments to
run smoothly.
"The guys
understand that
these kinds of
things happen
everywhere, not
just here
Dooley said. "It
will take some
time to get used
to the changes,
but we will do
that and move
on
Official practices
for the men's
basketball team
will begin in October, but in the
meantime, Dooley has been
training his players on an
individual basis.
"We are allowed to have
individual workouts in groups of
Dooley said. "The guys are lifting
a lot and getting ready for
October
On Tuesday, Evaldas Joeys
became the fourth signee for the
Pirates. Coming from Western
Nebraska Community College in
Scottsbluff,
Neb Joeys is
known as
one of the
top five
junior college
basketball
"In this business, there
is usually a three or
four year period that
people stay and then the
time comes to move on.
Lew and Lane have
both come across
opportunities to be
closer to their families
and also to take on new
challenges
Joe Dooley
Head Basketball Coach
their families and also to take on thfce for wo houR cach weck
prospects in
the country.
Averaging 16
points and
7.3 rebounds
per game, he
Joe Dooley brings a 75
head coach percent free
throw
average along with a 40 percent
average from the three-point line.
Joining Joeys as first-time
Pirates will be Kenyatta Brown of
Brooklyn, N.Y, Brandon Hawkins
of Morganton, N.C. and Tim
Washington of Washington D.C.
Dooley has visited with each of
the signees and is pleased with
the experience they will bring to
his program.
"All of the recruits are
important, but the most important
guys at this point are the ones that
arc already in our program
Dooley said. Among those
returning to lead the Pirates on
the court next season will be
Alico Dunk, Garett Blackwelder,
Alphons van Ierland, Neil Punt
and Stephen Branch.
11 Th
Wvndl
the
Lane Odom, assistant men's basketball coach, announced his decision to resign on Tuesday and has accepted a position with
UNCC. The ECU athletic department is in the process of finding replacements for the three coaching positions that have opened.
FILE PHOTO
jr
Student trainers show commitment to ECU athletics
Tracy Hairr
STAFF WHITER
Behind every talented athlete is an athletic trainer who is as important
to the athlete's performance as the athlete himself or herself. In fact,
much of the athlete's
performance is dependent
upon the athletic trainer
whose skills aid in
preparing successful
athletes for competition.
Josh Herman, an ECU
student athletic trainer,
was recently selected as
the recipient of a
scholarship awarded by
the National Athletic
Trainer's Association
(NATA).
"We have to make a lot of
decisions regarding the
athletes Herman said.
The Sports Medicine facilities are visited on a
dairy oasis by athletes in need of treatment.
nu PHOTO
"Our jobs range from teaching prevention
of injuries and rehabilitation after surgery to
counseling on the proper nutrition needed
before games
To be admitted to the sports medicine
program at ECU, potential trainers must
complete one year of service to the program.
As these students commit themselves to
athletes and their
injuries the
competition is
tough, as only a
limited number of
trainers can be
accepted into the
program.
"I think the
competitiveness is
a good thing
Herman said.
"We're put in an
important position
to help athletes,
so there needs co a
be a way to weed
out those who
don't or can't do all the things that need to be done. An athletic trainer
needs to know how to handle a situation, especially one that's an
emergency
In order to be accepted into the athletic training program at ECU,
which has only 32 slots at any given time, there are rigid standards to
follow. Overali, a strict amount of discipline is mandatory. A student
athletic trainer must juggle time for classes and the clinical aspect of the
curriculum, which includes 800 hours of practical experience under a
certified athletic trainer (ATC). These hours are divided among time
spent with at least four different athletic teams while the student is in
college.
"A lot of these hours are spent in the training room Herman said.
"Our schedule usually includes around 30 hours a week in training, and
Athletes turn to their student trainers for both
treatment to injuries and also therapy.
FILE PHOTO
we have to balance this with
our classes. And while we're
training with athletes, we may
be told to leave practice and
come back in a couple of hours
just like the rest of the team
According to Dr. Katie
Walsh, ATC and director of the
sports medicine and athletic
training program of ECU, time
management is the most
necessary skill for anyone
interested in this field.
"They must absolutely be
self-motivated Walsh said.
"All of our students are very
active and socially involved in
things like fraternities,
sororities and the National
Guard. These activities, plus all
the demands they're forced to
meet in the curriculum, take
exemplary time management
skills
Most of the student athletic
trainers further their education
after graduation by seeking a
masters degree and becoming a
certified athletic trainer after
taking the NATA certification
examination.
Though it's not required for
a high school position, this
degree is necessary for anyone
who wishes to pursue a position
with college, professional or
elite teams.
"Five athletic trainers
SEE TEAMS. PAGE 12
Men's track team continues on
right foot at Penn
Teams prepare for
final meets of season
Relays
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's men's and women's track
teams entered the final stretch of
their respective seasons focusing
on whittling down their times and
qualifying for the championship
meets.
This weekend, the women
rested up after the conference
championship meet while the
men competed in the prestigious
Penn Relays.
The Penn Relays has been
established as one of the world's
largest meets. Over 18,000
competitors from 35 countries
competed at the meet, which was
held in Philadelphia's Franklin
Field.
Overall, the Pirates followed
their stunning CAA
championship performance with a
strong showing at the Penn
Relays. They were not daunted
by the scale of the meet and ran
�� T11 WV J 1AA . I �. . �
well. The Pirate 4x200 relay team
of Titus Haygood, Darrick
Ingram, Tyrone Dozier and
Ramondo North placed fourth
behind LSU, Arkansas and
Florida. The 4x400 relay team of
Ingram, Mike Miller, Von Johnson
and Dozier finished ninth overall
and missed the final on Friday.
"Freshman Von Johnson had a
bad leg and that hurt us said Bill
Carson, head coach of men's track.
We haven't come close, but
we're running well
Bill Carson
Head Track Coach
On Saturday they ran in the
IC4A finals and finished fifth.
The stars of the meet were the
Pirate 4x100 relay team of
Haygood, Marcus Gladden, Chris
Justice and North, who won the
IC4A Championship with a time
of 40.79.
"North is anchoring well and
our 4x1, 4x2 and 4x4 teams arc
running well Carson said.
The Pirates were scheduled to
run in the Jesse Owens Classic
this coming weekend; however,
Carson decided to rest his team
following the CAA meet and the
Penn Relays. Next they will head
to the Life College Invitational
on May 10 and meet in Clemson,
S.C. on May 16 before heading to
the IC4A Championships in late
May.
So far, none of the Pirates has
qualified for the NCAA
championship meet
"we haven't come close, but
we're running well Carson said.
This weekend the ECU
women's track team did not
compete.
"We had some injuries, so we
decided to get healed up and take
the week off said Charles
"Choo" Justice, head coach of
women's track.
The Lady Pirates will head to
George Mason University for a
meet on May 2 and to Atlanta for
the Life College Invitational on
May9.
The women's team has several
athletes who have qualified for
the championship meets at the
end of the season. Missy Johnson
has qualified in the hurdles for the
ECAC Championship on the last
weekend in May. The 4x100 relay
squad has also qualified for the
ECAC meet.
"We're expecting several more
kids to qualify in the coming
weeks Justice said. "We have a
lot that are close but we've had so
much bad weather that the
conditions for qualifying haven't
been there. Also we've run more
relays, so the individual events
haven't gotten much attention,
but we're starting to focus more
on the individual events now
Men's Track
Penn Relays
4x200 meter relay
4th, 1:22.28
4x100 meter relay
1st, 41.21
4x400 meter relay
5th, 3:09.73
Criteria for
acceptance into
ECUs Sports
Medicine program
1. CUMULATIVE GPA OF J.O OR ABOVE
J. COMPLETION OF HLTH 2810
WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER
I. CURRENT CPR CERTIFICATION FROM
AN APPROVED PROVIDER
4. SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THE
CANDIDACY PERIOD WHICH INCLUDES
A. LEVEL 1 COMPETENCIES
B. NO VIOLATIONS OF THE NATA OR
ECU SPORTS MEDICINE DIVISION CODE
OF ETHICS
S.PASS IN HEALTH
SCREENINGPHYSICAL EXAMINATION
6. FORMAL LETTER OF APPLICATION
ON FILE
7. INTERVIEW WITH THE PROGRAM
DIRECTORAND FULL TIME ATHLETIC
TRAINERS
8. EVALUATION OF RATING SHEET
WHICH INCLUDES SCORES FROM
INTERVIEWS. PRACTICAL HOURS
LOGGED IN TRAINING ROOM.
PREVIOUS COURSE WORK, AND GPA
Lady Pirate softball
program looks to secure first-time
TEifimrWD
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
Conference tournament
to begin Friday
Jim Phelps
STAFF WHITER
The ECU softball team is gearing
up to head to Rock Hill, S.C, a
neutral turf, on May 1-3 for the
Big South Conference
tournament.
The Lady Pirates have
finished as the first runner-up in
the conference for two
consecutive years. The team
recently closed their regular
season with a record of 14-2;
however, heading into the
tournament, they don't
underestimate any of their
opponents.
"We took each team as if they
were going to give us a run said
Jami Bendle, senior pitcher.
Of all of the teams that will be
competing for the title, Head
Coach Traccy Kee expects
Auburn to be among the most
challenging to beat.
The team that has been the
most challenging according to
senior right fielder Dawn Conrad,
would be Virginia. Teammate Jen
Halpern believes UMBC will be
among the most challenging of
teams in the tournament.
"Any of the six teams has a
chance at winning the
tournament, the conference is
really equal Conrad said.
One thing that has helped the
Lady Pirates be successful this
season is their ability to work
together as a team.
"Everybody plays an
important role, we feed off each
other and help each other out
Bendle said.
While the team has been lead
throughout the season by the
strength of its pitching staff,
success has come through the
efforts of the team as a whole.
"No one specific person has
been the team leader; each
individual player steps up
Conrad said. "That is what makes
us a good team. We are hoping to
win the Big South and make it to
the NCAA regionals
This being their last year, it is
especially
important to
the seniors to
win the
conference
title and
move on the
NCAA
tournament.
In closing
their athletic
careers with
the Lady
Pirates, each
hopes to be
able to bid
farewell with
a win that will go down in the
books.
This being her first year on the
team, Halpern says that playing
for ECU is much different from
playing in high school.
"There is more desire to win
than there was in high school
Halpern said. "It would be really
exciting to make it to the finals
my first year
If the team wins the
conference championship it will
host the MEAC champion. To
make it to the NCAA regionals,
they will need to win best out of
three against the MEAC
champion.
Qualifying to the NCAA
tournament would be a first for
the Lady Pirates. Perhaps this will
be the season that will go down in
history for the team.
1
Softball Pitchers
SPA YHH R HR
Denise Reagan 1.07 17-5 125 41 3
Lisa Paganini 1.83 8-6 94 50 1
Jami Bendle 1.92 14-6 111 56 2
Christi Valevich 4.67 0-0 12 0
mm�,mmmn I ��� I
r rriiiiit' �
L
ENGL
FINA2
1TEC2
MANF
MATH
NURS.
NURS.
SOCI 2
Summe
student
tact the

THUF
FRIDi
SATU
V Y
(919)3!





11 Thundiy, April 30. 1898
sports
Tbt Eiit Carolinian
Chicago should give Pippen, Jackson more credit
Other Mm members,
players overlooked
Wyndham Court Apartments
"DON'T GO HOWE
WITHOUT OWE
Irs
-UE.
I
I
Ji!
Mow IIisi
loom pl
bus route
I'i-k ok
Steve Losey
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The Chicago Bulls camp has been
buzzing with rumors all season
long. As the NBA playoffs begin,
many expect the Bulls to take
another championship, but what
will happen after that is anybody's
guess. Michael Jordan has once
again threatened to leave
basketball for good after this
season, and this time it's not for
baseball.
Jordan has repeatedly said that
he will not play for anybody
except Chicago Bulls Head Coach
Phil Jackson. The Bulls are not
saying much regarding Jackson's
future in Chicago.
Many forget that people
besides Jordan contributed to all
of their championship victories.
The NBA is filled with talented
players, and if Jordan was the only
Bull who could play, the Bulls
would be run over by the other
teams. A good head coach is
necessary for a good team,
something the Bulls management
seems to have forgotten. Look at
what Larry Bird has been able to
do with the Indiana Pacers his
rookie year.
Jackson has brought discipline
to some of the rowdier Bulls, most
notably Dennis Rodman. When
he first came to the Bulls,
Rodman showed everybody why
he was called "Dennis the
Menace Thanks to Jackson's
efforts to get him (relatively)
under control, which included
bonuses for good behavior,
Rodman is a much more
productive member of the Bulls.
The Bulls are also on the fence
about where Scottie Pippen will
play next year. There are rumors
that he will be traded to another
team or not even signed at all.
For yean, Pippen has been the
unsung hero of Chicago. He has
played solid basketball, providing
well-rounded support for Jordan.
When Jordan left to play baseball,
Pippen stepped into Jordan's
shoes rather well. Under Pippen,
the Bulls went to the playoffs,
though they weren't able to take
the championship. Critics whined
about Jordan's loss and blamed
Pippen for the loss. The fact is,
Pippen was the only person who
kept the Bulls from sliding into
the gutter.
Both Pippen and Jackson
deserve more respect than they
are getting. The two men have
done a lot for the Bulls and should
have a secure future there.
561-RENT
WEEKEND
UNIVERSITY
An experience to last a lifetime.
Summer Session 1998
May 15-August 1
ENGL 1200-005Friday 6:00-10:00 pm
FINA 2244-099Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
ITEC 2090-099Friday 6:00-10:00 pm
MANF 3300-099Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
MATH 2283-003. Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
NURS 4000-001Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
NURS 4001-001002. . Friday 8:00 am-5:00 pm
SOCI 2110-090Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
Summer weekend classes are open to all ECU
students. See your adviser for approval, then con-
tact the Weekend University, 102 Erwin building.
m
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
The Weekend University
Division of Continuing Studies
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858 4353
Telephone: 252 328 4696 or 800 328 6567
Fax: 252 328 6540
E-mail: ceweeknd@mail.ecu.edu
Visit our website at http:www.dcs.ecu.edu
An equal opportunityAffirmative action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabililies.
DrSenv
Buffum leaves Pack for
grad school
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)�North
Carolina State junior reserve
Luke Buffum is leaving the
Wolfpack men's basketball
program so he can pursue a
graduate degree beginning this
fall, the school announced. The 6-
foot-8 forward played in 16 games
this past season after an early foot
injury. Buffum will graduate next
month with a bachelor's degree
and wants to pursue an advanced
degree in physical therapy.
Buffum is a three-time member of
the Atlantic Coast Conference
Honor Roll for athletes with
grade-point averages of 3.0 or
higher.
"Luke has been a model
student-athlete during his career
at N.C. State coach Herb
Sendek said Monday. "His
leadership and intensity will be
sorely missed
Buffum, from Beverly Hills,
Calif began his career as a non-
scholarship athlete.
Bulls take win over
Louisville Redbirds
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) -Greg
Blosser's second home run of the
game lifted the Durham Bulls to a
6-5 victory over the Louisville
Redbirds in 11 innings Monday
night in the International League.
Blosser, who also had a two-run
homer in the Bulls' five-run first
inning, hit the homer to lead off
the 11th against Redbirds right-
hander Frankie Rodriguez (0-1).
John Daniels (1-0) pitched a
perfect 10th inning for the Bulls to
record the win. Mark Eichhorn
got his fourth save.
The Redbirds trailed 5-0 after
the first inning following an RBI
single by Steve Cox, Bubba
Trammell's two-run homer and
Blosser's two-run shot.
Louisville scored single runs in
the first, third, fifth, sixth and
eighth innings to come back and
tie.
LaMarsh takes player-of-
week award
GREENSBORO (AP) � Three
hurlers shared pitcher-of-the-
week honors in the Atlantic Coast
Conference, while North
Carolina's Chris LaMarsh
received the conference player-of-
the-week award. LaMarsh, a
junior designated hitter from
Wilmington, batted .440 with 11
HPmBBiXaEIHMS1
hits � five of them home runs �
and 20 RBIs as the Tar Heels
went 5-1 last week LaMarsh hit
four of the home runs and
generated 13 RBIs in two games
against Campbell. The pitcher
award went Monday to North
Carolina's Kyle Snyder, Clemson's
Ryan Mottl and Nick Stocks of
Florida State.
Snyder, a sophomore from
Sarasota, Fla threw a five-hitter
in a 4-0 complete-game shutout
Friday over rival North Carolina
State. Mottl, a sophomore from
Florissant, Mo gave up only four
hits and pitched 8 13 innings in a
2-1 Tiger victory over Florida
State. The freshman Stocks, from
Tampa, Fla struck out 16 batters
and allowed one earned run in two
victories, including a 7-2 FSU win
over Clemson.
Indy tops Charlotte 4-1
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) �
Roberto Petagine hit a two-run
home run in the sixth inning as
Indianapolis beat Charlotte 4-1 on
Monday in the International
League. Petagine's shot was part
of a three-run inning for the
Indians, including an RBI triple
by Steve Gibralter. Rodney
Bolton (1-3) pitched the win,
giving up one run on five hits over
six innings. He struck out two and
walked four. Chris Hammond (1-
3) took the loss for Charlotte,
giving up all four Indianapolis
runs on eight hits. He struck out
seven and walked three. Todd
Dunwoody drove in Charlotte's
only run with an RBI double in
the third inning.
Stanford tops Baseball
America poll
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) � The
Top 25 college baseball teams as
determined by the staff of
Baseball America magazine with
records through April 26 (tic
games are not included in
records):
�Record Pvs� 1. Stanford �
36- 8 1� 2. Miami � 40- 5 2� 3.
South Carolina � 38-10 6� 4.
Florida � 35-12 7� 5. Louisiana
State � 37-13 3� 6. Southern
California � 35-13 5� 7.
Clemson � 40- 8 8� 8. Wichita
State � 39-4 9�9. Alabama �
35-12 4� 10. Texas A&M � 37-
15 12�11. Rice �39-14 13�12.
Florida State � 40-14 11� 13.
Arizona State � 32-16 10� 14.
Cal Sate Fullerton � 36-12 16�
15. Auburn � 34-11 15�16.
Baylor� 37-14 14� 17.
Oklahoma State �34-13 17� 18.
Tulanc � 35-12 19� 19. Virginia
Commonwealth � 38-8 22� 20.
South Alabama � 34-14 20� 21.
Texas Tech � 35-17 21� 22.
Oklahoma � 32-15 18� 23. Ohio
State � 29-11 25� 24. North
Carolina � 32-17 � 25.
Mississippi State � 31-15 .
THURSDAY, APRIL 30
FRIDAY, MAY 1
SATURDAY, MAY 2
"ONE OP
FICTIOi
BEST SCIENCE
VIES EVER
& CBS n 11 ijiii ias. Morta s.ii.is
htilUE HELL-OF-A-
ROCh-AMD-ROLL
ROCKET RIDE!
�mSMMMM
starlU
n � For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted and
ST1 S"7' are FREE to students, faculty, and staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID. No backpacks allowed in the theatre.
BODY PIERCING
7 Navel - Eyebrow Lip
& Ear Cartilage
$25.00
Tongue - Libret:
$35.00
Exotic Piercings Call
For Price
All Prices Include Autoclavcd Sterilized Jewelry. Autoclaving Jewelry and Utensils is the
Proper Method of Sterilization. Not Soaking in BeUdine Or Alcohol as other Shops are
doing.
Come to the only Health Dcpt. Inspected Studio in the Greenville Area. We Have Been In
Business for over Seven Years. We are here to Serve you Dairy with one stop in our own
Public Facility, without Hidden or Confused Agendas!
We arc without a doubt the safest, cleanest. Most Professional Studio in the Area!
NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTIST
For More Information Call: 756-0600
Located At: 4685 US HWY 13 Greenville
puiy it ncmn SPORTS
ATTENTION
GRADUATES!
VVEli BUY YOUR
USED SPORTS
EQUIPMENT
146 S.W. GREENVILLE BLVD. SUITE 101
IN WAL-MART SHOPPING CENTER
(919)353-4344 FAX (919)353-4307
j
WZMB is accepting
applications for the execu-
tive staff for the first sum-
mer session. The deadline
for applications is Friday
May 1st at 2:00pm. You
must have a 2.0 to
work for the station.
Pick up an application at the station
located in the basement of
Mendenhall, Monday - Friday 9-4
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR:
Program Director
Music Director
Production Manager
Promotions Director
News Director
SportsDirector
Grants manager





12 Thur�d�y. April 30. 1998
The East Carolinian
Baseball seniors close college careers
Teams
continued from page 10
Team prepares to
send off five starters
Paul Kaplan
SENIOR RI EH
With the end of the Pirates
Baseball season quickly
approaching, five senior players
arc getting closer and closer to the
end of their baseball careers here
at ECU.
Of the five seniors leaving
Harrington Field this spring two
have CAA Player of the Week
bids this season. Randy Rigsby
picked one up earlier in the
season on March 16, and Ryan
Massimo grabbed the other on
April 6. Massimo picked up his
Player of the Week award after
going 9-12 with seven RBI's and
three runs scored in an ECU three
game sweep against ODU.
Billy Benson has been on the
team for all four of his years here
at ECU but did not get a shot at
the starting line-up until his
Billy Benson
Benson said. "I
for a couple of
gotten a
chance to
play a lot
these past
two
"All of
them have
grown in
their own
way here at
ECU; Rigsby
has had an
outstanding
career,
Assistant
sophomore
year when he
started in
eight games
as the
designated
hitter. Now
Benson is
starting and
has a season
batting
average of
.304.
"I had to cam
my spot
was a role player
years, but I have
Brian Fields
Ryan Massimo
FILE PHOTO
Coach Randy
Ma?cy said.
"Each one
has gone
above and
beyond what
we have
expected of
them
Of the five
players
graduating
this year
file moto Rigsby has
the best
chance of
going on to playing baseball at the
next level.
"I'm really not sure
what his plans are, but
I'm sure Rigsby
would welcome any
opportunity to get a
chance to play
Mazey said.
Jason Colquitt and
Brian Fields are also
among those
graduating. Colquitt
transferred into ECU
in his sophomore year
after playing ball at
Randy Rigsby
file photo
Jason Colquitt
FILE PHOTO
U N C -
Asheville. He
started 37
games
behind the
plate last year
and is
currently
batting .259.
Fields, who
transferred to
ECU last
year from
N.C. State,
had 14 starts
and four complete games. This
season he is 2-7 with eight starts.
The Pirates currently
hold an overall record of
23-24 with eight wins
and 10 losses in the CAA.
"At times this season we
have underachieved, but
the tournament is
coming around and we
have a good chance of
doing well, and
hopefully getting into
the rcgionals Benson
said.
here at ECU are certified Walsh
said. "There's not one ATCJ in
Pitt County high schools, and
ECU is right here in the area
offering degrees and certification.
I would like to see the public
become more aware of the
importance of certified athletic
trainers
Both certified and student
athletic trainers deserve
recognition for their commitment
to training and the beneficial
services offered to athletes. While
theirs is an extremely disciplined
role to assume, they definitely
reap awards.
"It really helps build
character that stays with you out
in the real world Herman said.
OOPS WE GOOFED
In the Michael Jordan Golf Celebrity
story that appeared in the April 28 issue,
TEC reported that Charles Barkley will be
playing in this year's tournament
Although Barkley has been invited to
play, he has not confirmed that he will
return. We apologize for any
inconvenience caused by this error.
Jamison takes quick leap toward career with pros
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � Antawn
Jamison is convinced he's ready
for pro basketball, and he'll be
heading to the NBA with degree
in hand.
The national player of the year
said Monday he'll forgo his senior
year at North Carolina, passing up
a chance to become the Atlantic
Coast Conference's career scoring
leader to enter the NBA draft on
June 24.
"When it was time to leave it
was difficult to swallow because
these three years have probably
been the best three years of my
life Jamison said.
"It is a lot more difficult than I
thought it would be
The 6-foot-9 forward was
joined at a news conference by
coach Bill Guthridge, former
coach Dean Smith, parents Albert
and Kathy Jamison and several
teammates.
"A big reason you are in
coaching is you want what's best
for your players Guthridge said.
"There aren't many that get this
opportunity. So you are thrilled for
him
Jamison is the 13th player to
declare early for the NBA draft,
joining such players as Mike
Bibby of Arizona, Paul Pierce of
Kansas and Robert Traylor of
Michigan. Among the 13 are two
high school players.
Smith will advise
underclassmen to turn pro if
they're projected in the draft's top
five. The former coach did most
of the legwork for Jamison, calling
at least 16 NBA teams to gauge
interest. He likes what he heard.
Jamison, the school's first
national player of the year since
Michael Jordan in 1984, said he
would get his college degree in
African studies after two sessions
of summer school, meaning he
will graduate two semesters ahead
of his class.
"The most important thing for
me is no matter what happens I
have the opportunity to graduate
this summer he said.
"That was the most important
thing about coming to school, to
get a degree and maybe having a
chance to play in the NBA. I am
so close to getting them both at
the same time it was an
opportunity I couldn't pass up
Jamison, the ACC player of the
year, averaged 22.2 points and
10.5 rebounds this season,
becoming the first North Carolina
player since Billy Cunningham in
1964-65 to average a double-
double.
He finished seventh on North
Carolina's scoring list and fourth in
rebounding. This year he set
season marks for field goals and
rebounds and was second in
points in leading the Tar Heels to
a 34-4 record and their second
straight Final Four. North
Carolina lost to Utah in the
semifinals.
Jamison said there was no
chance he would withdraw his
name before the draft, even if the
NBA owners lock out the players.
"I have made my decision and
there's no turning back now he
said. "I am aware there could be a
negative thing with the lockout
but I'm willing to take that
chance
Guthridge said Vince Carter
will decide within two weeks
whether he'll also turn pro after
his junior season. The last time
North Carolina lost two players
early to the NBA was in 1995,
when Jerry Stackhouse and
Rasheed Wallace left after their
sophomore years.
fwaaAfc Jg an i -
jt1 lull
� 0MY$4ADM.
FOR MEMBERS
TONIGHT, April 30lh
JKA-FESTW ssa
� 1.BO HIOH BALLS a BEE
SKINNERBOX
"QATTA SS
SHA-FU SQUIRRELS
R BOTTLES
Don't Strike Out with other Apartments!
ONLY $l ADM.
BEFORE IIPM
GREASE
PAPTVf
PARTY
$4.00
ADM.
FOR
MEMBERS
��?��
FRIDAY, May 1st
"CREASE THE MOVIE SHOWN
ON THE IS FOOT SCREEN
CASH and PHIZES Including tli to set
Breakfast Club for the best "CREASE" costumes
� )l.75 NIEIHIIEIS Ht 32�. lullluck Lii.it
�mmmwm�
Doors:
9:30
Movie:
9:45
Dance:
11:45
Contest:
ALL
NIGHT
STONE KITCHEN
JUICEBABY
$1.50
32oz
DRAFT
"? ������� i
BluegrassFolk Concert
Robin & Linda Williams
and Their Fine Band
In Concert
Saturday, May 2nd at 8pm
Dunn Center at NC Wesleyan College
Rocky Mount
"The finest act on the country-folk circuit
-The News & Observer
Call (252) 985-5197 for tickets
Tickets: $15. $12 for students
sponsored by the
Rocky Mount Rotary Club
-T�
We charge no application fee
Now Offering $300 Security
Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit
for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom
Townhouses � 1.5
Baths, Water, Sewer,
and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
752-0277
1806 E. lit Street
Greenville, NC 27858-0772
13 Th

(llUWKtb
i MlfcU
upemwq
Ufeuattl
hidtuf, H
11 i tin
HH$dtb d
GREENBACKS f OR BUYBACKS! PRIZES & MORE!
� Wmr.
W. -W
ifi�rV�
Mfi
Locations
UJLE.
M
Location)
i
'Utta





it Carolinian
id student
deserve
mimitment
beneficial
etes. While
disciplined
definitely
elps build
ith you out
man said.
ED
lebrlty
issue,
Aill be
ment
ed to
le will
any
cision and
now he
could be a
if lockout
take that
ce Carter
vo weeks
pro after
last time
'o players
in 1995,
use and
ifter their
nts!
1 3 Thuriday, April 30. 1891
Tin East Caralinian
ECUFamlfy
to m
kies and Ice Cream in
ration of achieving
Doctoral II Status
Friday, May 1, 1998
11:00 am
Student Plaza
Rain Site
i Wright Place
Rugby team defeats University of
Maryland to complete season
STAFF REPORTS
The East Carolina Rugby team
finished off another successful
semester with a convincing defeat
of the University of Maryland
Terrapins 31-0 on Saturday April
25. The game began under sunny
skies and saw a determined
Terrapin team use frequent Pirate
penalties to keep ECU out of
their try zone. ECU would put the
mental mistakes behind them
though and take a 7-0 lead into
half-time after a late score by Matt
Oathout and a conversion by
Brian Best. The second half
would see quite a different Pirate
squad which put the earlier
mental mistakes behind them and
dominate the bigger Maryland
team. Using superior technique to
offset the larger squad of
Maryland, the Pirates ran off 24
second half points to put the
finishing touches on an
impressive victory.
Best led all scorers with two
trys and three conversions while
Kendall Jones and Carl Bricnzi
each added scores. The second
game of the day saw another ECU
victory as the second team of the
Pirates beat the Terrapin second
squad 24-0. The two easy
victories came as a surprise to the
ECU team.
"Yeah, we were surprised
said club president Brad Palmer.
"Maryland is traditionally a very
strong team. Fro the team to
perform the way it did today says
a lot about the program we have
here
The Pirate rugby team was
happy to end with a victory to cap
a nearly flawless season. The
season had such highlights as
winning the twentieth annual St.
Patricks's Day tournament in
Savannah, GA and seeing many
new players step up and fill gaps
for injured players.
"We were all pretty healthy all
year but when we did have
injuries, the young players
performed up to the same level as
many of our veteran players
Palmer said.
The Pirates are looking
forward to the summer off before
a tough fall season, but the team
will be ready, according to team
captain Robert Manning.
"We are anxious for the fall due
'to some unfinished business with
UNC-Chapcl Hill and will be
working hard to make next season
even better than this one said
Manning.
State tops Carolina in 11-inning baseball contest
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �Jake Weber hit
a grand slam in the top of the 11th inning to
propel North Carolina State to a 9-4 win over
North Carolina.
The win Sunday helped the Wolfpack (31-
18, 10-8 Atlantic Coast Conference) avert a
three-game sweep by the Tar Heels (32-17,
12-8) in the weekend series.
North Carolina shortstop Brian Roberts set
a conference record with his 51st stolen base of
the season. Roberts also tied Chad Holbrook
for the school record with 98 career stolen
bases.
The game was tied 3-3 after nine innings
and each team added a run in the 10th to tie it
at 4-4.
In the top of the 11th, Andy Ferguson and
Josh Ballard led off with walks off reliever
Ryan Earey. Michael Homey relieved Earey
but Brian Ward hit a grounder that was
misplayed by Roberts to load the bases before
Weber cracked a home run over the left-field
fence. The Pack added an insurance run later
in the inning for a 9-4 lead.
Bubba Scarce shut out the Tar Heels in the
11th to cam the win. Earey took the loss for
North Carolina.
MODELS WANTED!
NTS
ising
er
itor

(lnumim Stytoeg Optim)
W AeefuKfl rWllUMt C6MACUUM 'rUfMrftlflfti Itt Ml
ir raawa? aaarwajw aaraaaaaaa aaapaavaaaa Bf aaaj�
upemwq Hot Sfcwu wt Hty 3wl mi 4tk
We iM h mshufk m$i& intawimi at 7 p
hidat, May Ul awl 11 a w Saiwday, Hbuj
2f in fjtc hbS�i iuj tkc SkwafaHt Atfwctfe Beadmt
W. FmI Wacwt U.
HUdcfc cJumk witt U paid $50 l Ikt 009
For more informal inn or qup�l iiniH, please i .ill
1 BOO r!4rl 9r?a 1 x -4 156
EASTGATE MINI STORAGE
10 DISCOUNT WITH STUDENT ID
�J
"W
Bojangles
Eastgate Or
EASTGATE
Parkers BBQ
E. Greenville Blvd
� Resident
Managers
� Concrete & Steel
Construction
7 Days A Week
Lighted
Insurance
3201 Moseley Dr. Greenville NC
752-6900
1-800-COLLECT RECREATIONAL SPORTS
Let's Rec in the Summer!
INTRAMURALS
May 26 Softball Registration Meeting 4:00 pm SRC 202
5-0N-5 Basketball
4:30 pm SRC 202
c�re8Ucv.
Tennis Singles Deadline 5:00 pm SRC 128
June 2 4 on 4 Volleyball Registration 4:00 pm SRC 202
June 10 Basketball Shooting Challenge 4:00 pm SRC 202
June 17-18
Frisbee Golf
3-6 pm Frisbee
Golf Course
SIGN UP TODAY!
5
'Ha(
tUCBlff
East Carolina University
Remember, you can receive $9 in collect calls, visit www.1800COLLECT.com





wmm
M
M TharU.y. April 30. 1988
FOR RENT
RINGQOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8t
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 782-2865
ROOM FOR RENT � available for
summer 1998. Unfurnished room in
furnished apartment near downtown
and across from campus. Must be
non-smoker, responsible and able to
pay your bills. Upperclassmen or
graduate preferred. Call 752- 5912.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
needed for summer at Player's Club.
321-6215 for information.
NEED TO SUBLEASE two bedroom
one bath apartment for the summer.
Call 757-3598.
THREE BEDROOM DUPLEX East
3rd Streedt available June 1 to share
with one other person. Call Alice
561-7981.
ONE BEDROOM FOR rent at Tar
River Estates. $350month through
July plus option to stay. Free water
sewer; next to pool. Call Jenny 413-
0864.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
share three bedroom 2 12 bath
townhouse $225. 12 phone and
utilities on ECU bus route. Call 919-
335-4917. Leave message. Needed
July or August 1st.
ROOMMATE NEEDED JUNE 1 to
share 3 bedroom house. $200 a
month plus 13 utilities. Contact
Greg 758-1686.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, CONSID-
ERATE, responsible individual, fe-
malegrad student preferred, duplex,
Wyndham Circle on bus route or
short walk to ECU. No pets, non-
smoker. Call JC, 931-9090.
FREE CABLE, NO DEPOSIT. Room-
mate needed starting Aug. '98. 2
story townhouse, WD. 3 bdrms 2
12 baths. Great location. 13 utili-
ties. $225mo. Call Ashley � 353-
1286.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT. SPA-
CIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms. 3
baths. 3 fenced yards, washer, dryer,
pretty foliage, near ECU & PCMH.
$999.00month. 524-5790.
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH town-
house in quiet neighborhood.
Washer and dryer. Availability is ne-
gotiable. If interested please call 353-
6505.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE for
school or work? Home Relocation
and Referral Service can make that
move easier! Relocation packets with
rental listings, guided tours of
Greenville and area rental properties,
plus much more. Call 919-830- 5559
or visit http:
wwwrelocatetogreenvillenc.com for
more information.
PARK VILLAGE ONE bedroom
apartments $300. With Stove. Re-
frigerator Washer Dryer Connec-
tions. On ECU Bus Route Free Wa-
ter & Sewer. Wainright Property
Management LLC 756- 6209
PEONY GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM 1 12 bath apartments
$375. Stove. Refrigerator. Dish-
washer. Washer & Dryer. Free Cable,
Water Er Sewer, Wainright Property
Management LLC 756- 6209
CANNON COURT & CEDAR
Court, Two bedroom 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove. Refrigerator. Dishwasher.
Washer & Dryer Connections.
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apartment $275.00 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets OK. Call 758-1921 ask for Ken.
FEMALE TO SHARE furnished
Townhouse. April rent free. $225
month plus 12 utilities 353-6806
ask for Brigitte
CHRISTIAN NURSERY
WORKERS NEEDED
SUNDAY MORNINGS
9:15-12:15
Additional hours available.
Jorvis Memorial United Methodist Church.
510 S.Washington St.
Apply at church office.
Office hours - 8am - 12 noon,
and 1:30 - 5:00 pm.
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
high energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
PO. Box 370
Cove City, 28523
Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
Fax: 252 637 2125
(Near Greenville, Kinston,
New Bern)
classifieds
TWIN OAKS 3 bedroom 2 12
baths fireplace, all appliances, very
large quiet pool close to park $595
month 766-3009 after 6:00 pm
WALK TO ECU, 1. 2. 3.4. & 5 bed-
room unitshouses: Available June.
July, or Aug. Call 321-4712.
1 BEDROOM APT. for rent,
Woodcliff Apts. Washer and dryer
hookup, 3 blocks from campus. As-
sume lease. Call Michael, 522-4583.
leave message.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: two bed-
room. 2 bathroom, washer and dryer.
$510, Dogwood Hollow Apts. Call
931-0729.
RENT REDUCED FOR SUMMER!
Sublease two bedroom apartment,
washerdryer available with deposit.
Call 754-1939.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for August to share 2 bedroom apart-
ment, close to campus. No pets and
non-smoker. Please call Ashley at
321-2089.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER school
from June to August, one bedroom
apartment located within walking
distance from ECU campus. If inter-
ested call 752-8240 and leave a
message.
COLLEGE VIEW 2 bedroom apart-
ments. Newly remodeled. Free
cable, stove, refrigerator, washer
dryer hookups, ground floor. ECU
bus line. Affordable. 931-0790.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: NON-
SMOKER. No pets. Student pre-
ferred, to share 3 bedroom, brand
new duplex wwasher and dryer.
$210mo utilities. Available May
14. Mike 551-0557. Nick 328-3180.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
HOUSING FOR FALL SEMESTER!
Three bedroom. 2 12 bath 2- story
townhome, overlooks pool. Twin
Oaks. 1800 square feet. 1.5 miles
from ECU off 14th Street. No pets.
Available August. $595 monthly.
Large kitchen and fenced patio with
storage. Rusty. 355-3620.
SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM apart-
ment available end of May to sub-
lease June, July and August with op-
tion to extend lease. On-site laun-
dry and pool. Near campus. Call Am-
ber 413-0891.
TWO BEDROOM. TWO BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3455.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share townhouse at Kingston Place
for Fall 1998. Cable, water, trash
pick-up included in rent. Upper
classman, non-smoker, sports fan
preferred. If interested call 551-3849.
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS, 2
female roommates needed to sub-
lease 4 bedroom house for summer.
$ 135 rent 14 utilities. W&D. Must
like pets. Call 757-1467.
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE for
rent. 5 blocks from campus, fenced
in backyard, central heat & AC. Avail-
able August. Call 551- 5025.
FORREST ACRES ONe & two bed-
room $300-$345. Stove, refrigera-
tor, free water ft sewer, on ECU bus
route. Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES NEEDED
ASAP. Nice 3 bedroom house on Elm
Street 1 block from campus. Cheap
rent. Call Josh for more details. 752-
2560.
3 BEDROOM HOUSES in Univer-
sity Area beginning May- Septem-
ber. $600-$700. Also one bedroom
apartmentswalking distanceutili-
ties included for $305. 757-9387
ECU AREA 3 BEDROOMS, 1 bath,
central gas heat and window AC
unit. Washer, dryer included, pets
OK. $550.00 month, yard work in-
cluded. Call 830-9502.
ECU AREA 6 BEDROOMS, 2 baths
house. Central heat and air down-
stairs. Huge rooms, pets OK. Avail-
able June 1st for $950.00 a month.
Call 830-9502.
ROOMMATE WANTED, NON-
SMOKING, female, stable room
needed to share apartment Player's
Club starting August. Private vanity
and sink included. Call 328-8013
ASAP for financial information.
ROOMMATE, MALE OR FEMALE
wanted to share a great house 3
blocks from campus. 2 blocks from
downtown. 3 bedrooms. Call us,
561-8178.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER WORK: FULL and part-
time available.11.15 to start. Schol-
arships awarded. Great resume'
experience.Call for info. 353-0025.
SUMMER JOBSI APPLY NOW!
Accepting applications for bartend-
ers 8- waitstaff. Full or part-time, flex-
ible schedules available. Send re-
sume apply in person at The Reef
Restaurant. PO Box 2772. Atlantic
Beach. NC 28512, 919- 726-3500.
SUMMER CHILDCARE NEEDED
for two children (37) Monday
through Thursday, possible some
Fridays 8am until 6pm June 8 to Au-
gust 14. Own transportation and ref-
erences required. Call 758-5806 or
707-2822.
FULLTIME SUMMER employment
availalble. Maintenance person
needed May 1st through August
18th for apartment community. Pre-
fer persons experienced in general
maintenance and plumbing. Apply
in person at 214 Elm St. 5
Greenville, N.C.
WANTED: FULL-TIME CHILD care
provider to care for infant in our resi-
dence 8:00 am to 6:00 pm begin-
ning late July. Requires 10 month
minimum work commitment, safe
driving record, own transportation,
non-smoker, swimming skills. & CPR
certification. Experience necessary.
Salary: $300 weekly, social secu-
rity Er paid vacation. Please send let-
ter specifying qualifications with
phone no. to "Nanny Post Office
Box 8088, Greenville, NC 27835.
SUMMER AT THE BEACH. Wanted
3 or 4 responsible students to help
operate The Maze of Atlantic Beach
and Emerald Isle. Full of part-time
day and night. Call 919-354-3827
Emerald Isle after 7:00 pm.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-12X4
GET ON BOARD NOW. the areas
top adult entertainment is once
again searching for beautiful ladies.
If you have what it takes to be a Play-
mate, call 747-7686. Snow Hill.
WORK OUT WEST. Live like a
gypsy. Work your butt off & get paid
for it. Must havew 2.75 GPA. Call
919-933-7716.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGE-
MENT, Inc. Now hiring for Summer
1998. Pool Managers, Lifeguards.
Swim Instructors. Charlotte; Raleigh:
Greensboro; NC. Greenville; Colum-
bia. SC. For Information (704) 889-
4439
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider
being an Air Force officer. Excelling
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package call 1-800-423-
USAF
SUMMER JOB. COLORWORKS
Commercial Manager seeking paint-
ers, pressure washers, and carpen-
ters to work in Triangle Area. Free
on-site room for Summer. Make
$3500 working 40 hrwks at
$7.00hr. Contact Jason Arthur (919)
353-2381
AIRLINE EMPLOYMENT - Entry
levelskilled. Excellent travel ben-
efits. Ask us howl 517-336-0968 Ext.
L53621
CRUISE SHIP & LAND-TOUR
Jobs- Excellent benefits. World
Travel. Ask us how! 517-324-3090
ext. C53624
DISABLED MAN SEEKS physical
assistance. Flexible hours mornings
afternoonsevening. Lifting, bath-
ing, domestic chores, driving. Excel-
lent opportunity for helping profes-
sional. $6hour. Call 830-6028.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
Parks looking for part-time tennis in-
structors. Experience required. Pay
is $5.15hr. 15-20 hoursweek.
Work hours vary. Needed June thru
early August. Call 830-4559.
SUMMER JOBS IN RALEIGH.
Clothing wholesaler is seeking to fill
full and part-time positions this sum-
mer. We offer flexible schedules and
regular pay raises. Must be able to
lift 70 lbs. and have dependable
transportation. Call 1-800-849-9949
and leave name and number.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for sum-
mer. Monday thru Friday daytime
hours. Must provide own transpor-
tation. No housework or cooking re-
quired. If interested call Cindy at
355-3476 after 5:00.
LOCAL COMPANY EXPANDING
in Greenville area. Sales experience
helpful but not necessay. College
students welcome. For personal in-
terview call 355-7469.
PART-TIME CHILDCARE NEEDED
weekdays in our home for 3 y.o. trip-
lets. Hours flex. References required.
Call 321-8578.
CAMPITOWOOD
for private Co-ed
youth camp located in the beautiful
mountains of Western North Carolina.
Cver 25 activities, including All sports,
water skiing, heated pool, tenre, art,
horseback, GoiOrts.
816 to 817Eam $1300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great fun!
Non-smokers call for
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytimel
BE A CHRISTIAN CAMP
COUNSELOR THIS SUMMER
ALSO NEEDED: Life Guards, Canoe
Instructors, and Craft Directors.
QUALIFICATIONS: Joyful Christian outlookCommitment
to Christian educationWillingness and ability to share
our faithEnjoyment in the living and working in the
out-of-doorsEnjoy working with childrenyouthGood
healthHave completed college freshman year or 19
years old.
For more information and an application,
please contact Dennis Tawney at:
Cwsf Roddbfc. Ht 1, ton 15, Parithm, NC 28371, (910) 425-3529
Till East Carolinian
PAID SUMMER INTERSHIPS
available for students who want to
travel, earn money, and gain valu-
able resume experience. For more
information call 1-800-261-4000
ext. 1676.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER- Pool
managers and lifeguards to work at
prestigious clubs in Cary, Chapel Hill,
Durham. Goldsboro, Holly Springs.
Greenville. Wilson and Rocky Mount.
Call 1-800-929-1214 for more infor-
mation.
WORK ON YOUR TAN and get
paid too. Easy PT work at Greenville
and outer banks area golf courses.
Call Steve at 919859-9233 for de-
tails.
BARTENDERS NEEDED. Must be
21. Apply at Pastime Billiards in
Kinston. 627-7828
SUMMER CHILDCARE NEEDED
beginning Monday. June 1, my
home. 7:30-6:00. Person must be
great with children, energetic, reli-
able. Must have excellent references.
No couch potatoes! Must be flexible
with overtime. $200 per week. Call
353-5623 before 3:00p.m.
WANTED: SUMMER CHILDCARE
for two boys, ages 8 and 10. Need
energetic, nurturing person who
likes to play with children. Duties will
include transporting children to and
from activities, such as the pool.
Hopefully in the Fall will continue as
part-time caregiver as well as office
work. Call 756-8886.
SUMMER JOB7 CARE FOr 2 boys,
breakfastlunch provided. Car
needed, minutes away from pool, 3-
4 dayweek, great neighborhood en-
vironment. 756-5350816-7176 for
details.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF NEEDED
for Girl Scout camps in coastal NC.
Positions include administrative staff,
counselors, nurse, lifeguards, boat-
ing instructors, and kitchen staff. Call
1-800-568-9297 ext. 113 for more
information and application. t
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now recruiting for
summer positions. Employees ere
needed for Saturdays and weekdays
between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on
your schedule and on business
needs. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and 'the
hours are flexible. Pay is commen-
surate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager. Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street,
Greenville (on the Downtown MaM).
FOR SALE
LIKE BRAND NEW. BLACK lac
quer bedroom suite, $400 nego-
tiable. Great price! Must sell! Apply
Style Writer II printer. $100
Asnwering machine, $35. Call 561-
8032.
FOR SALE BLUE COUCH only 2
years old in great condition. Perfect
for first apartment. $150 or best of-
fer. Call John 561-7456.
YARD SALE OF THE YEAR. 1309
East 2nd Street A. Saturday 502.
7:00 am-until. Furniture, clothes,
couches, lamps, weight bench, and
much much more.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETCi
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Bffiken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable !
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00 .
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
Need to sublease
your apartment for
summer?
Need to find a
roommate to share
your apartment?
Need to unload the
manual typewriter
your parents gave
you?
You've come to the right spot. The
East Carolinian classifieds are the
perfect place to sublease your apart-
ment, find a roommate, or sell your
useless stuff.
But hurry. There's only
1 issue left.
I
IS Thursday, Aj
J1PLYMOUT
AT V6 CD-play
.Only 53,000 i
: i�ffer. Call 757
, 12 INCH REC
, Hip-Hop, Regg
for DJs. Call
leave messag
only.
ATTENTION
Phen-Phen usi
i all natural, sal
wihtout the sic
i mended 8- gui
, a size 12 to a s
i now 8- ask rr
5831.
. DESK WITH
case, two dress
: two twin bed r
set or separat
, Must go! Ask f
ATTENTION I
(collection of ot
for sale. Excell
request to Post
FREE CATALO
Sglbutor Direct
rtfore! Nor-Andi
ine-$35. Getbi
WASHBURN
thin body, cut-
beautiful! Must
ea
, QUALITY i
PRICE -
BATTERIES,
KADSAl
3205 E. 10th
'758-5237
Hours: 8 am
�a.m. - 1 p.m.
, THIRD GEI
SUPPORTS
SHARED
ACADEA
BROWN a
PONTIAC
GMCJEE
1 '329 Greenvil!
355-6080
Hours: 8.30 a






� EM Carolinian .
AP STAFF NEEDED
imps in coastal NC.
i administrative staff,
se, lifeguards, bbat-
md kitchen staff. Call
' ext. 113 for more
I application.
B8 AVAILABLE.
), a local Women's
s now recruiting for
ins. Employees are
rdays and weekdays
a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
s for between 7 and
reek, depending on
and on business
; are within walking
university and the
le. Pay is commen-
experience and job
id is supplemented
discount. Apply in
i Manager. Joan's
S. Evans Street.
ib Downtown MaM).
ESALE
�EW, BLACK lac-
suite, $400 negp-
;el Must sell! Apply
II printer. $100
line. $35. Call 561-
IE COUCH only 2
t condition. Perfect
rtt. $150orbest-qf-
61-7456.
F THE YEAR. 1309
t A. Saturday 502.
Furniture, clothes,
, weight bench, arid
ire.
fEY?
A
S, JEANS, ETC i
VI, GAP, ETC.
alien Gold Pieces
s � Home, Portable
EVANS STI
:OM 10:00-1:00
ack door tc ring buzzer. '
for
a
are
t?
the
ter
ive
The
Jthe
ipart-
your
tiy
IS Thursday, April 30. 1988
classifieds
41 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM with AC
AT V6 CD-player. Excellent condition.
i�nly 53.000 miles. $5,200 or best
.offer. Call 757-2268.
12 INCH RECORDS FOR sale. Rap,
.Wip-Hop, Reggae. Booty. Bass. Great
for DJ.s. Call John at 752-4715 and
leave message. Serious inquiries
only.
ATTENTION FORMER REDUX &
Phen-Phen users; we now have an
all natural, safe way tolose weight
win tout the side effects Dr. recom-
mended 8- guaranteed. I went from
a size 12 to a size 6 in 7 weeksl Call
now & ask me how. 1-888-648-
5831.
DESK WITH ATTACHED book-
case, two dressers, pull-out sofa, and
two twin bed mattresses. Sold as a
set or separately. All very cheap.
, IVJust gol Ask for Jen. 830-2661.
r i
ATTENTION MOVIE FANS: Huge
(collection of original movie posters
for sale. Excellent condition. Email
request to Posters2go9aol.com.
j-EREE CATALOG & PRICE list. Dis-
,$butor Direct don't pay retail any-
morel Nor-Androstene - $45 Creat-
ing - $35. Get bigl Call 919-233-1739.
WASHBURN EA40 elecacoust.
thin body, cut-away guitar. Black,
beautiful! Must sell. $500. 551-3837.
2 BEDROOM, 1 12 BATH
townhouse. close to ECU campus
and medical school, $41,000. Please
call 355-4895 after 6:30PM. Moti-
vated seller: planning to buy a larger
home.
1931 MERCURY CAPRI conv. 73K.
PS. CC, AC, PW. Pioneer CD player!
Four Pioneer speakers! New Pirelli
P6000 SportVeloce tires! $3500.
Call Derek at 413-0744.
The East Carolinian
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
invite any girls interested in rush next
year to a lemonade social. For more
information call 754-0955.
AMANDA WILLIAMS � CON-
GRATULATIONS on your gradua-
tion. You've been a great big sis! I'll
miss you! Good luck. Love, Marvelle
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA, we had
a blast last Friday at the social. Next
time, we will leave the dogs in the
yard. Thanks, Alpha Sigma Phi
CHI OMEGA SOFTBALL TEAM -
you girls are awesome. Congrats on
your three wins and good luck in th
etournament. Love, your Chi Omega
sisters
I the I � �
eastcarolinian
S A L E S S E R V
, QUALITY SERVICE AT A FAIR
PRICE - OIL CHANGES,
BATTERIES, NC INSPECTIONS
KADS AUTOMOTIVE
3205 E. 10th Street
758-5237
Hours: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. M-F; 8
o.m. - 1 p.m. Sat.
, THIRD GENERATION PIRATES
SUPPORTING ECU THROUGH
SHARED VISIONS-BOTH
ACADEMIC & ATHLETIC
BROWN & WOOD
PONTIACCADILLAC
GMCJEEP
'329 Greenville Blvd. SW
355-6080
Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
For information about being included in
our Auto Directory call 328-6366.
TOTAL QUALITY SERVICE
STEVE BRILEY'S AUTO-
MOTIVE SERVICE CEN-
TER
3142-A Moseley Drive
752-5043
Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
PI KAPPA ALPHA would like to
congratulate this years winners.
Third: Mary Stallings 2nd: Allison
Greenwood and 1998s Greek God-
dess: Cristina Wichtrich
THANKS TO RICHARD ROGERS
for all of his hard work and dedica-
tion in making this year's Greek God-
dess such a great success. Your
brothers at Pi Kappa Alpha
PI KAPPA ALPHA would like to
thank all the contestants who par-
ticipated in Greek Goddess. The
event was a great success. Thanks
girls, you all did great.
KAPPA ALPHA, DELTA SIGMA,
and Alpha Omicron Pi, thanks for the
fun night last Thursday. We all had
a great time. Love. Alpha Delta Pi
A HUGE THANK YOU goes to the
following fraternities for all their sup-
port with our towel contest: Sigma
Alpha Epsilon. Phi Kappa Psi. Tau
Kappa Epsilon, Phi Beta Sigma, and
Pi Lambda Phi. We love you guys!
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
new sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha! We
love you! Love, your sisters
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate our softball. soccer, and
water-polo tema on their victories
last week. We are proud of you all!
Keep it up!
ORDER OF OMEGA MEETING is
today at 6:00PM in The Under-
ground. All members must attend.
Also. Order of Omega social is to-
night. Details TBA at the meeting
tonight.
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
wish Lori Murphy the best on her
engagement! You are the best and
we love you!
PHI KAPPA TAU, thank you so
much for the predowntown last
"Thursday. We had such a great
time. Love, the sisters and new
members of Sigma Sigma Sigma
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI
would like to thank Aaron Givens for
coaching our softball team this sea-
son. We appreciate all of your help
and support.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA PHI
on your win at softball last week!
Thanks for a great game. Love, the
sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL of
our seniors who are graduating. We
are so proud of you. Love, your sis-
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi
ALPHA OMICRON PI wants to give
a sincere Thanks! to Kappa Alpha.
Delta Sigma, and Alpha Delta Pi for
our social last Thursday. We had a
blast.
DELTA SIGMA PHI, the social last
Friday was a blast. It was great to
see you guys again. Can't wait to do
it again soon. Love the sisters and
new members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
THETA CHI THANK YOU for the
social Thursday night, ft was a blast
as usual! Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi
THANK YOU TO BILL BLECHA.
Kendall Jones, and Antonio Raynor
for representing us in the towel con-
test. You guys did a great jobl Love,
the sisters of Pi Delta
THANKS FOR A GREAT weekend.
Player's Club 6. You are the bomb.
Yours sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi
TO THE NEW MEMBERS of Sigma
Sigma Sigma: you guys are doing a
great job and we love you. Love, the
sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
THE BIG SISTERS IN Alpha Phi
would like to thank our new sisters
for a wonderful time Thursday night.
You guys really showed us a great
time!
PI DELTA WISHES TO extend a
very special thank you to the indi-
viduals who either attended, partici-
pated in. or judged our Wild N Crazy
Towel Contest. We appreciate all
your support! Love, the sisters
ALPHA OMICRON PI is having a
lemonade social tomorrow for any
girls interested in rush for next year.
If you need a ride, call 757-0769.
ALPHA PHI, IT WAS great to spend
time with your guys at the Boy's &
Girl's Club last week. Can't wait to
see you guys again soon.
Love.Sigma Sigma Sigma
bills. Never repay. Toll Free 1-800-
218-9000 ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches. Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs.
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WD's. Your
area. Toll Free 1-800- 218-9000 ext.
A-3726
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800484-8546 (code 2466)
or POB 8663. Greenville. NC 27836.
OVERWEIGHT??? I LOST 16 lbs.
in 3 weeks and I'm still losing! 100
safe and natural Dr. recommended.
Money back guarantee. Call 830-
2447. Free samples
SERVICES
OYSTERS! SHRIMPICRABLEGSI
Clamsl Come out to Tripp's Seafood
and enjoy our freshmarket and res-
taurant. Located 14 mile past Bells
Fork Square. Take-out welcome. 353-
0011.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
OTHER
FREE CASH GRANTSI College.
Scholarships. Business. Medical
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP: Tuesday 3:304:30.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the
following workshop April 28th. If you
are interested in this workshop, call
328-6661.
CHOOSING A MAJOR OR A Ca-
reer Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-6:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop April 28th. If inter-
ested, call the Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Anxiety:
Wednesday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering this workshop
April 29th. If you are interested in
this workshop, call 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Anxiety. Thurs-
day 3:304:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop April 30th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
can the Center at 328- 6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:30-6:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop April 23rd. If you are
interested, call 3284661.
GAMMA BETA PHI will meet Tues-
day. April 28 in Mendenhall Room
244 at 5:30 PM.
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSO-
CIATION will hold Officer Elections
at the general meeting on Wednes-
day. April 29th at 2:00 p.m. in GCB
1024. intersted in running for office?
Be therel All majors welocme
toattend. Free Papa John's Pizza!
Come see what we're doing!
SCHOOL OF MUSK EVENTS
TUE APRIL 28- SENIOR RECITAL-
Patrick Kirby. horn. A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 7:00 P.M.
WED APRIL 29- HORN EN-
SEMBLE. Mary Burroughs, Director,
A J. Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 P.M.
WED, APRIL 29- GRADUATE RE-
CITAL. Manuela Rebeggiani, piano,
A J. Fletcher RecitalHall. 9:00 P.M.
THURS APRIL 30- TROMBONE
ENSEMBLE. George Broussard, Di-
rector. A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
8:00 P.M.
FRI MAY1- SENIOR RECITAL,
Whitney-Cole Kleinschuster. mezzo-
soprano. A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
7:00 P.M.
FRI, MAY 1-GRADUATE RECfTAU
Clarissa Severe DeBorba, percus-
sion. A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall. 9:00
P.M.
SAT. MAY 2- ECU TUBAEUPHO-
NIUM ENSEMBLE. Jeff Jarvis.
Conductor. J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
7:00 P.M.
SUN , MAY 3- GRADUATE RECITAL.
Jacqueline Huguet. piano. A. J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. 4:00 P.M.
SUN MAY 3- JUNIOR RECITAL
Nathan L Smith, guitar. A J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 7:00 P.M.
SUN, MAY 3- JUNIOR RECITAL.
Leslie Higgerson. violin. A J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 9:00 P.M.
MON, MAY 4- FACULTY RECITAL.
Jeffrey Bair. saxophone, A. J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. 8:00 P.M.
MON MAY 4- STUDENT RECITAL.
Carrie Maud Burkert. viola.
Immanuel Baptist Church. Elm
Street. 6:30 P.M.
Should East Carolina University Students
Be Requited To Purchase Computers?
We Need Student Opinions.
A University Committee has been formed to
investigate the concept of requiring
students to own their own computers. We
need student input. If you are a student,
please take a few minutes to answer the
following questions.
A. As of this semester your class standing:
(please circle one)
Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior
Graduate Student
3. Major Field of Study:
C. Poyou currently own a computer?
(please circle your response)
Yes (if yes, please skip questions D and E)
No
D. Are you considering purchasing a
computer within the next academic year?
(please circle your response)
Yes
No
E. Do you have regular access to a computer
other than use in a University computer lab?
(please circle your response)
Yes
No
F. Do you presently use the computer labs on
campus? please circle your response)
Yes
No
G. Do you presently use a computer for your
classworkr please circle your response)
Yes
No
H. How frequently do you use a computer for
your classwork? please circle your response)
Very frequently
Moderately frequent
Slightly frequent
Slightly infrequent
Moderately infrequent
Very Infrequent
I. How frequently are computers used to
deliver instruction In your classes?
please circle your response)
Very frequently
Moderately frequent
Slightly frequent
Slightly infrequent
Moderately infrequent
Very infrequent
J. What type of programs do you use on the
computer? Please check all of the different
software programs you currently use. Then
using a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 representing
infrequent use and 5 representing frequent
use rate each of the software programs you
use. ,
i use ProgramsApplications Rate of use
Word processing
Email
K. As a student please select one of the
following statements that best represents
your opinion on this topic.
(please circle your response)
1. Student should be required to own a
computer when they enter East Carolina
University.
2. Students should not be required to own a
computer.
3. Students should be encouraged rather than
required to purchase a computer.
4. Students should be required to purchase a
computer when they reach Junior year.
5. Students should be required to purchase a
computer when they reach their Junior year,
only if required by their department.
Other comments:
Internet
Spread sheet
Presentation Software
Multimedia software
Graphic arts software
ECU batabase
Others;
Thanks for taking the time with this survey.
The results will be compiled and sent to the
committee. Please return this survey to:
Computing and Information Systems
Austin 124
East Carolina University
CIO Frances Hutchinson





EL TORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Stling Shoppe
Est. 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
Say Pirate &
Get Hair Cut
for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
piATe; gPSCIAlr
3800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Frl. 9-6
Walk-Ins Anytime
752-3318 Full Line Professional Hair Care Products
$7.00
Haircut
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
J&E harley Davidson
t 008 DlCKENSON AVE.
END OF 1 OTH ST.
757-1345 �
1 6 YEARS
in Service
Motorcycle Sales
and Service
Appai
Leather
Collectibles
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
I
757-0003
&
Check
us out
Best Rates
Around
Greenville
Mini Storage
3413 Tupper Drive
Call 758-2190, Ask
for Deborah
A PREFERRED
WOMENS HEALTH
CENTER
Abortions to 20 weeks
Licensed &NAF Certified
Private Doctor's Office
Special Reduced Rate Plans
Anesthesia Available
Nitrous Oxide & Vallum
One visit procedures
Same Day Appointments
All Major Credit cards
Insurance riled
Confidential & Experienced
Caring Professional
Call Toll Free
1-888-562 7415
Mon - Sat 8 am - 8 pm
H HaaataaaaaaaaaB&ELiB
108 River Bluff Rd.
Across pom Trade MartABC
Store on E. 10th ST.
757 - 2471
Discount
Rates
5x10 -$24-M
6x10 - B.00
7x10-$30.M
8x8 -SIS�
10x10 -$32�30
10x12 -$44.00
RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGES
I
CANNABIS
STUPIDA
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina g
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1-888-732-3362
www.drugireeamerica.org





ivwm
y Test
Confidential
inseling
Center
id
d
tieck
i out
ates
md
iriUe
orage
er Drive
90, Ask
orah
RRKD
1EALTH
ER
is to 20 weeks
S.NAF Certified
ctor's Office
luced Rate Plans
a Available
tide & Vallum
irocedures
Appointments
Credit cards
Filed
il & Experienced
ifesslonal
Free
7415
in - 8 pm
kBSbst
UuffRd.
te MartABC
10th ST.
471
unt
24.M
26.M
30-M
$32Bafl
$44.M
) CHANGES
sBIS
DA
Drug-Free
Free America
-3362
irica.org






2 Thursday. April 30. 1998
CUS
Tht East Carolinian
!
Career Services prepares
grads for work world
Counselors help with
workshops, contacts
Scott Smith
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Each year, students graduate and go
searching for jobs. For many, that
search begins right here on campus
at Career Services.
Career Services offer workshops
on such things as preparing for the
job interview, resume writing and
business etiquette. Counselors also
help students who are graduating
make contacts with employers.
"We can help them facilitate
connections with employers said
Margie Swartout, assistant director
of Career Services.
According to Swartout, students
should start looking for a job during
their senior year. "We do encourage
students to start looking and
making contacts with employers
during their last academic year
Swartout said. "They can also
register with us and be enrolled in
our database To register with
Career Services you must attend an
orientation registration meeting at
the Career
Services
building during
your last
academic year.
The Career
Services
database has
information on
jobs and is
constantly
updated with
new openings.
Students who
register will
receive a
newsletter
which has
information
about
workshops and
various
employers. It
also has the
schedule of
career days and
interview
schedules which Career Services
organizes.
"We receive hundreds of jobs
every week
and the
entire list is
posted
within our
building
Swartout
said. Job
listings that
can be
found at
Career
Services
range from
banking to
multimedia
jobs. If you
have a
major,
Career
Services
most likely
has a job
listing in
that field.
At Career
Services
there is a room with all types of job
information from company
"We can help
them facilitate
connections with
employers. We do
encourage students
to start looking and
making contacts
with employers
during their last
academic year
Margie Swartout
assistant director of Career Services
Career Services building
PHOTO BY SABRINA THOMAS
Travel Abroad allows
statistics, job openings, and basic
company information. There is also
information supplied by employers
on what they expect from an
applicant. This information helps
prepare students for an interview.
An interview room is provided
where students can practice taking
an interview. The interview can be
taped upon request so students can
see the way they presented
themselves throughout the
interview.
The Internet is also a good way
to look for a job or to do research on
jobs.
"The Internet is a very important
tool to use Swartout said. "We are
also doing a workshop on Internet
job searching
Many companies post their jobs
openings and the qualifications
needed on their web sites. This is
becoming more common because it
is the cheapest way to advertise job
openings. A database of
information can be found in a
special SIGI computer that is
located at Career Services.
You can visit Career Services for
more'information anytime during
the week.
"We also have career advisement
hieetings by appointment with
students who have questions of any
kind Swartout said.
For an up-to-date schedule of
workshops and things going on at
Career Services, visit them online at
http:wwwl .ecu.edustudhfecaree
rindex.htm.
to
, see
Alternative lets students
choose country, adventure
LAKISHA SOUTHERN
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Jackie Oliver, 22, has an
undergraduate degree from ECU in
communication and a minor in
Spanish. He also has no experience
and no plans for future
employment.
Many ECU students are familiar
with this situation and find
themselves anxious about post-
graduation employment. But the
Travel Abroad program, sponsored
by the International Studies
department, may be an exciting
alternative for jobless graduates,
like Oliver. Oliver has now outlined
Or. Linda McGowan, an ECU sociology professor and international studies adviser talks with
a student.
PHOT BY SABRINA THOMAS
a plan, with the help of
International Studies, to travel to
Costa Rica to work and study.
"I'm really excited about this
opportunity and I realize that many
students are not as fortunate to
travel to a foreign country Oliver
said.
According to advisers in the
international studies office, the
program has been a big help to
students who travel instead of
entering the work force. Dr. Linda
McGowan, an ECU sociology
professor and international studies
adviser, said that opportunities vary
from from one country to another.
"I basically deal with students who
want to travel and work abroad, and
the Travel Abroad Program gives
students legal permission to work in
another country
Not all post-graduation plans
include the inevitable party or
vacation, followed by the endless
search for employment. For many
the Travel Abroad program may be
an exciting alternative to the husde
and bustle of the 9-5 world most
students enter after graduation.
"This program is through
Tm really excited about
this opportunity and I
realize that many
students are not as
fortunate to travel to a
foreign country'
Jackie Oliver
International Studies and it is not a
job placement agency which is
more expensive McGowan said.
International Studies offers
literature, located in their office and
in Joyner Library. The office also
offers a free magazine entitled
Student Travels, available each
semester to help students plan their
overseas adventure. McGowan also
suggests students use the free 1998
Work Abroad application printed
in each issue. Students are asked on
the application to provide an e-mail
address and all information
regarding the flight and country
they have chosen.
Traveling abroad for a semester
costs the same as in-state tuition at
most universities, according to
Student Travels. The Council on
International
Educational
Exchange and
Council
Travel both
offer fares for
students to
choose from
when
scheduling an
overseas
flight. The free magazine also
includes a toll-free number and a
web site address for further
information like student discounts
and tourist attractions for the
various countries.
Also included in Student Travels
magazine are free identification
card applications and rail passes for
European countries. One of the
more popular rail passes, the Eurail
Pass, ranges in cost from $522 for
15 consecutive days to $1,468 for
three months.
"The Travel Abroad Program is
really an excellent opportunity that
is not very popular at ECU right
now, but hopefully in the future, it
will be McGowan said.
Graduate school offers
more eduaction
Over2000prad
students attend ECU
Lucas berrini
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Although graduation signals the
end of classes and exams, for many
students it also signifies the
beginning of the next step on the
academic ladder: graduate school.
For some ECU students, that
means another one or two years in
Greenville. For those of you
thinking of moving to Chapel Hill
or Raleigh to get a graduate degree,
you might want to head over to the
graduate school office located in
131 Ragsdale and see what ECU's
graduate school has to offer.
With an enrollment of 2,815
students including 303 pursuing
Ph.D.s through the School of
Medicine, the graduate school at
Applications can be picked up
from the Graduate School office
in Ragsdale Hall or on the Internet at
www. research, ecu. edugrad.
ECU is currendy ranked third in
the state behind UNC-CH and
N.C. State respectively. The
medical school consistendy places
among the top teaching hospitals
in the country and continues to
increase in both enrollment and
caliber of instruction as more
professors are drawn to Greenville
and ECU from all over the country
and the world.
ECU offers more than 60
degrees at the master's and post-
master's level. Degrees are offered
through 10 professional schools as
SEE SMO. PAGE 4
i





3 Thundiy, April 30, 1898
focuS section
Thi Ent Cirolinian
$, engineering, medical work
manufacturing cooling down
Computer e
salaries
PAT WIXTED
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
For today's college graduate, the path
to a successful career begins with
computers. Most hot
careers involve
computers. While jobs
in other industries
such as manufacturing
are on the decline,
computer jobs are
plentiful.
According to the
Occupational Outlook
Handbook, computer QareeVS Tight HOW.
jobs offer the
possibility of
advancement, high
starting salary, benefits
and personal involves COMpUterS
fulfillment. . 7 . , �
is hot right now.
Judy Davis
"Computer
engineering and
computer
accounting are
two very hot
Basically any
career that
"Computer
engineering and
computer accounting
are two very hot
careers right now
said Judy Davis,
assistant credential
secretary with ECU's Career Services.
"Basically any career that involves
computers is hot right now
The hottest fields for college
graduates include engineering,
accounting, computer science,
education, medicine and health
sciences. At ECU, majors offered that
involve some sort of computer
technology include education,
occupational therapy, industrial
technology and business. According to
ECU's Career Services, these fields
show up in a list of the most popular
majors at ECU.
Even more specifically, there are hot
careers within each field. U.S. News
and World Report reported that in the
field of accounting, a business
evaluator is in great demand and has
the possibility of advancement. In
engineering, a computer engineer has
the highest starting salary out there
right now. In the field of health care, a
physician's assistant is second only to a
computer engineer in starting salary
and is in great demand.
Hot and cold careers can also be
broken down into gender categories as
well. According to the U,S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics, men are rapidly
acquiring jobs in the fields of
engineering and computer science. On
the other hand, women are rapidly
taking jobs in the fields of education
and health science.
According to the Occupational
Outlook Handbook, health care will
account for almost one-fifth of all job
growth until the
year 2005. Another
profession,
personnel supply
services, or
temporary agencies,
will be adding 1.3
million jobs by the
year 2005. In
addition, business
health and
education will
account for 70
percent growth by
the year 2005.
This direcdy relates
to graduates of
ECU, according to
a survey done by
Career Services.
"The top four
careers entered by
graduates were
educationnon-
profit organization,
health care, merchandising services
and government said Lamar Bell,
assistant director of language arts for
Career Services.
Most of the careers that are currently
cold are manufacturing careers such as
factory and assembly line workers.
This is because products are no longer
being manufactured by hand and
machines are taking over. According
to the Occupational Outlook Handbook,
the manufacturing industry will lose
1.3 million jobs by the year 2005.
Other career fields that are cold
right now are the fields that were
highly in demand 10 years ago and are
seriously competitive right now.
Careers such as physical and
occupational therapy, geriatrics and
science.
"One of the most competitive
careers today is occupational therapy
Bell said, "while business careers, on
the other hand, are in great demand
More information can be found at
ECU's Career Services Center on the
corner of Fifth Street and Jarvis Street
just outside of campus.
assistant credential
secretary with
ECU's Career Services
Correction
In the April 23 issue of Focus "Scholarships" the wrong byline ran
with the article "Soccer player says perks come at a price The byline
should have read Andrew Moroney instead of Rebecca Glenn. TEC
regrets any inconvenience.
eastxiarolinian
'OCUS
Amy Royster
Editor-in-Chief
Heather Burgess
Managing Editor
Celeste Wilson
Cover and Layout Design
Focus is a combined effort between no East Carolinian and
Sheariean Duke's Basic Reporting class in the
Department of Communication.
Web address for
Occupational Outlook Handbook
http:stats. bis. govocohome. htm
Fastest provving occupations covered in the
1998-99 Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1996-2002
Occupation
Database
administrators,
computer support
specialists, and all
other computer
scientists
Computer engineers
Systems analysts
Personal and home care
aides
Physical and
corrective therapy
assistants and aides
Home health aides
Medical assistants
(Numbers in thousands of jobs)
Employment
change, 1996-2006
Number
249
235
520
171
66
378
166
Desktop publishing
specialists
Physical therapists
Occupational therapy
assistants and aides
Paralegals
Occupational
therapists
Teachers, special
education
Human services workers
Data processing
equipment repairers
Medical records
technicians
Speech-language
pathologists and
audiologists
22
81
11
76
38
241
98
42
44
44
Dental hygienists
Physician assistants
Respiratory therapists
Adjustment clerks
Engineering, science,
and computer
systems managers
Emergency medical
technicians
Bill and account
collectors
Residential counselors
Instructors and
coaches, sports and
physical training
64
30
37
183
155
67
112
74
123
Securities and
financial services
sales workers
Source: URL: http:stats.bb.govooh.tablel.htm
Percent
118
109
103
85
-w
76
74
74
71
69
68
66
59
55
52
51
51
48
47
46
46
45
45
42
41
41
38
Most significantsource
of training
Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
Short-term
on-the-job
training
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Short-term
on-the-job
training
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Long-term
on-the-job
training
Bachelor's degree
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Associate's degree
Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Postsecondary
vocational
training
Associate's degree
Master's degree
Associate's degree
Bachelor's degree
Associate's degree
Short-term
on-the-job
training
Work experience
plus bachelor's
andor higher
degree
Postsecondary
vocational
training
Short-term
on-the-job
training
Bachelor's degree
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Bachelor's degree





4 Thursday. April 30. 1998
focUS section
Thi Em! Carolinian
Grad
We (ECU) use a self-
managed application for
admission to the
graduate school
Dr. Paul Tschetter
Associate Dean of the Graduate School
continued from pige 2
well as the School of Medicine,
which offers Ph.D.s in eight
disciplines.
According to Dr. Paul Tschetter,
associate dean of the graduate
school, the first step in applying to
the graduate program is to talk to the
chair of the department to which you
want to apply.
"We ECU use a self-managed
application for admission to the
graduate school Tschetter said.
With a self-managed application
process, the student is responsible for
gathering all requirements for
admission, including transcripts and
letters of reference. It is up to the
applicant to make sure all the various
pieces of the application arrive in the
graduate office by the deadline. The
deadline for regular admission is
June 15 for the fall semester and Oct.
15 for the spring semester. Some
schools such as the School of Art
have earlier deadlines.
Applications can be picked up
from the graduate office or
downloaded off the Internet from
(http:www.research.ecu.edugrad).
The graduate office works with
the various academic departments in
choosing qualified applicants. For
each school, the requirements differ,
although all have basic standards for
admission which include a
baccalaureate degree, preferably in
the subject in which the applicant
plans to pursue a degree. Some
schools will make exceptions if the
student agrees to take remedial
classes. A senior year GPA of 3.0 or
an overall GPA of 2.5 and a
satisfactory score on the GRE are
also required.
For most programs, the admission
standard is much more competitive.
Students from universities
worldwide apply to programs at
ECU.
"Business, Physical Therapy and
Occupational Therapy are always
very competitive Tschetter said.
"Psychology and maritime history
are also very popular majors here
There is still time to apply for the
fall semester. Anyone interested in
applying, should come by Ragsdale
131 or contact the chair of the
department for the school to which
you want to apply.
I
Type these
addresses
into your
browser and
visit us on
the web
www.tec.ecu.edu
www.wzmb.ecu.edu
www.rebel.ecu.edu
www.expressions.ecu.edu
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
then bookmark them and come
back frequently. We constantly
improve them to better serve you
TUESDAY
MAY 5.1998

M
Prizes
bron
Caroi.v
Dr. Richard
chemistry a
Medicine, v.
of Governor
in Teaching
Presentir
award was
tem Presidt
Corbctt Bi
Board of (
Chairperson
Clifford Can
One facu
ber from eacl
UNC
received a o
rative bronz
lion and a $
prize. The
cnts, represei
mic discipline
special comn
Sti
voli
with
For more
www.te
9di
receive
Craig
SENI
A campus-wid
brings student
community. T
to bring the tv
er together thr
jects.
The Tiller
Project helps '
rural communii
Mount with a
elderly residen
people from t
disciplines invc
er and work on
ject for Tillery.
"Over 100 E
received hand:
education thn
with the concer
Tillery commu
LaKeshia Ellis,
Eight diffe
including nutrit
exercise and sp
been involved
Learn and Serv
three years.
School has beer
SEE V0LUN


Title
The East Carolinian, April 30, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 30, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1272
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy