The East Carolinian, April 28, 1998






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EN
TUESDAY
APRIL 28.1996
eastcarolinian
EASTCAIOMMIfMRSrrY
GMBMULE, NORTH CAflOLMA
New executive council seeks increase in Resolution
involvement among student organizations introduced
Awareness of funding
nigh on priority list
William LeLiever
staff writer
Recent Student Government
Association (SGA) elections have
ushered in a new group of execu-
tives who say they have an abun-
dance of ideas that could change
the organization.
According to the new officers,
SGA's foremost issue is to increase
student organization's awareness of
the funding process which supports
Leslie Pulley
VICE PRESIDENTELECT
them. This complex process
involves writing the organization's
constitution and applying for
money.
"This past year the SGA has
funded more groups than they had
ever done in the past few years
said Leslie Pulley, vice president-
elect. "We are going to implement a
funding workshop; that is now still
in the beginning stages
Alan Stancill, treasurer-elect,
said he hopes to help students and
organizations understand how the
SEE SGA. PAGE 3
24-hour computer lab (Discussed, not passed.)
24-hour visitation in some residence halls.
tfea.
rik4b
Less hassles while tailgating.
� OKI Eliminate bill calling for payment of SGA tuition by student
lB�y fees (Summer tuition for executive committee still paid.)
Source: Campaign flyer listing 1997-1998 platform issues
Commissioner: Some objected to splitting street, not MLK
West Fifth Street to
change name
Jan. 18,1999
Craio D. Ramf.v
SENIOR WRITER
West Fifth Street will be named
after Dr. Martin Luther King next
year, leaving some Greenville resi-
dents upset.
County Commissioner Jeff
Savage and Bennie Rountree, Pitt
County president of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference
(SCLC) led the crusade to change
Fifth Street in honor of the civil
rights leader. They went head to
head with residents and business
owners located along the strip of
Fifth Street from Evans to
Memorial who opposed the street
renaming.
According to Rountree, many
other locations were given consider-
ation before the final decision was
made to change West Fifth Street.
"In the beginning we had less
complaints about Fifth Street
Rountree said.
Many complaints involved
changing the name of one of
Greenville's oldest and most
famous streets. Others complained
about changing the numeric
sequence of streets and about busi-
nesses that will have to change their
letterhead. Some businesses that
will be affect-
ed include
Globe
Hardware,
NAACP, The
Percolator and
Park Theater.
Some said
the renaming
may cause
problems with
road mainte-
nance, since
the area
between
Albermarle
Road and Memorial Drive is a state-
maintained road. However,
Greenville's city planner disagrees.
"On a minor change like this,
the state probably wouldn't have
" don't think people were
against naming a street after
Martin Luther King They
just didn 't think a section of
a street should be changed
Jeff Savage
County Commissionei
any problem accept-
ing the name
change said Harry
Hamilton,
Greenville city plan-
ner.
Other organiza-
tions recommended
naming an entire
street. The Board of
Justmen wanted
Fifth Street to be
changed all the way
from Tenth down to
Memorial Drive.
"I don't think
people were against naming a street
after Martin Luther King Savage
said. "They just didn't think a sec-
tion of a street should be changed
Savage had no opposition to the
selection of West Fifth Street.
"Rocky Mount, Kinston, Wilson
and New Bern had less controversy
when they changed streets to
MLK Rountree said. 'That was
disappointing. This issue always
gets a lot of feedback
Rountree did say he was pleased
with the city council and much of
the white community because they
stood tall and helped support the
issue.
He also believes that changing
the name of West Fifth Street
might reduce the amount of crime
in the area.
The name will officially change
from Fifth Street to Martin Luther
King Drive on Martin Luther King
Day, Jan. 18 1999.
to move
Barefoot
18y ear tradition
broken as celebration
moves to Mendenhall
William LeLiever
staff writer
The controversy surrounding the
celebration of Barefoot on the Mall
continues as
allegations
emerge that
students were
never given a
choice in the
decision to
relocate the
event. In
answer to the
university's
decision to
move
Barefoot to the lawn of
Mendenhall, SGA has passed a
resolution to put it back on the
mall.
According to Alan Stancill, SGA
treasurer-elect and author of the
resolution, the reason for the pro-
posal was to ensure that the stu-
dents' opinion was heard.
There are five main reasons
cited in the resolution as to why
Barefoot should be moved back to
Ronald Speier
OEM OF STUDENTS
SEE BAREFOOT PAGE 3
Career Services helps 2000 find jobs each year
Successful alumni
praise department
M o h a m e o Hussein
STAFF WRITER
The career services department
has gained praise from two of its
job recipients.
Paul Powers, now a vice presi-
dent of First Citizens Bank, gradu-
ated from ECU with a bachelor's in
business in 1992 and a master's in
business in 1994. "The career ser-
vices department was very good to
me Powers said. "They did
everything possible to help me in
my job hunt. "
Lisa Benton graduated in 1983
with a bachelor's in business
administration and a concentration
in human resources. She now
works for Wachovia Bank in the
department of human resources.
"The career services staff was
very helpful when I went to them
for help Benton said. They made
sure I had interviews but then it
was up to me to go through the door
and go through with my interviews
Career Services exists to facili-
tate career development for stu-
Cyberspace considered
as classroom of future
Industrial Tech offers 3
master's defftes online
Career Services, located on Fifth Street, is available to students and alumni to help with job searches and other services.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
dents and alumni by providing
career-related educational opportu-
nities and services.
"Thousands have gone through
this department over the years
said Margie Swartout, assistant
director of Career Services. In fact,
over 2000 graduates and alumni
are helped each year
The general purpose of the
career services is two-fold: to get
students and alumni jobs and to
provide capable employees for
employers. Assistance is provided
to employers who are seeking qual-
ified university-educated candi-
SEE ALUMNI PAGE 2
La IRA Lee Hines
STAFF WRITER
Some professors are offering access
to rooms that allow students to con-
nect to the world in a matter of sec-
onds�chat rooms, that is.
From the World Wide Web and
e-mail to Internet relay chat and
video conferencing, technology has
made its way into the classroom.
One department on campus, the
department of industrial technolo-
gy, has offered three master's
degree programs over the Internet
since 1994. This department was
the first in the world to offer tech-
nical degree programs on the
Internet. Students enrolled in
these programs never have to leave
their homes to receive a degree.
Dr. J. Barry DuVall, director of
the reinvestment program which
established the first global class-
rooms at ECU, said that some of
the first students enrolled in the
global classroom in 1994 never set
foot on campus until 19 when
they came dressed in their gowns
for graduation.
Classes on the Internet offer
many benefits
for both stu-
dents and fac-
ulty. Both par-
ties can be
anywhere in
the world and
still have class.
The Internet
setting is ideal
for students
and faculty
who travel a
lot-
Classes on the Internet also pro-
vide the only opportunity for some
students, such as those who are
handicapped and unable to move
freely, to receive the education they
want and deserve.
Classes in virtual reality, adult
education, music, educational tech-
nology, industrial technology, digi-
tal communication technology and
SEE EDUCATORS PAGE l
Barry DuVall
DIRECTOR Of
REINVESTMENT FROSRAM
TODAY
Cloudy
high 56
low 45
TOMORROW
Cloudy
high 65
low 45
Opinion
Lifestyle
Sports
Campus essential
part of college
experience
Ex-Ninja Turtle
Evans still
stunt hero
fi.
go
Lew Hill resigns
position as
assistant coach
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
'Do you agree with Chencellor Etkin'i
decision to fire Set OeMirco? "
Are you genuinely happy at ECU?
69 Yes 31 No
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu
i
- I





2 Tmidiy, April 28, 1888
news
3 Tutidiy,
Ths Eait Carolinian
.news
briefs
Fuqua donates $20
million to Duke
Business School
DURHAM (AP) �Decades ago, a
young farm boy asked several
libraries if he could check out
books by mail. Only one librarian,
�at Duke University, extended him
' the courtesy. The boy, John Brooks
' Fuqua, grew up to be a multimil-
lionaire philanthropist who never
'forgot the school's generosity.
House candidates
tackle issues
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Early health care less
costly, miss less school
UNC-CH faculty
is resolutic
ig diversity
approves resolution
tavorim
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � Faculty
"members of the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill have
� approved a resolution supporting
the use of race and gender in hir-
ing and admissions decisions. By a
vote of 27 to 21, the Faculty
Council on Friday adopted a state-
ment in favor of promoting ethnic
diversity on campus.
1across
Lt h e
�"nation
�Judge reprimanded for
:� drunk driving arrest
JTRENTON, NJ. (AP) � The
�tate Supreme Court in a unani-
jnous ruling reprimanded a munic-
ipal court judge who was arrested
Jbr driving while drunk. Friday's
Jruling said Judge James C.
Richardson violated two canons of
he code of judicial conduct as a
result of the May 17 incident.
ossed. drugs hit cop
in head during raid
WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) �
Police Detective Tracy Canale
didn't have any problem collecting
evidence in a recent drug raid. A
bag of crack cocaine tossed out a
second-floor window hit him right
on the head. Moments later, police
arrested Carina Cooper, 21, who
they say jettisoned the drugs when
police knocked on the door
Thursday night.
Germans complain
about too much sex
on afternoon TV
BERLIN (AP) �German officials
are calling for a crackdown on tele-
vision stations that broadcast sexy
afternoon talk shows with themes
like I'm a slave to him and Pierced
from head to foot You're perverse.
Federal Family Minister
Claudia Nolte, writing in Super
Illu magazine Saturday, said the
clamor for profits by private broad-
casters should not come ahead of
the emotional health of children,
who make up a large part of the
afternoon viewing audience.
Leftist rebels free 2
remaining Americans
LOS ALPES, Colombia (AP) �
Leftist rebels on Saturday freed
two remaining members of an
American bird-watching junket
Who were kidnapped a month ago,
handing them over a day after
releasing a third captive. The
Revolutionary Armed Forces of
Colombia handed over Peter Shen
of New York City and Todd Mark
of Houston to journalists about an
hour's walk from Los Alpes, an
Andean mountain town 60 miles
south of the capital, Bogota.

TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
Edith Warren (District 8 candi-
date)
What is your stance on the hog
operations and your thoughts on
hog waste pollution?
The current moratorium was a
good move because it provides time to
develop technologies to look for better
ways to proceed with those operations
and recognize at die same time that they
do bring in a great deal to the commu-
nity. We do need to mate sure the envi-
ronment is protected and that we do
have clean water supplies and that care
is given to waste products. Pork oper-
ations are a part of our economy and
we need to create a balance.
In light of several scandals on
the Board of Transportation such
as members resigning because of
suspected illegal influence, should
a different way of selecting board
members be considered?
Board members should be selected
based on their capability and the
knowledge that they have not only of
transportation needs but of area needs.
Their appointmentship should be based
as a candidacy
and not a sim-
ple political
appointment.
Governor
Hunt has pro-
posed a new
child health
insurance
plan for the
working low-
Edith Warren income fami-
fiie photo lies. Do you
think it will
work?
Yes. We have so many children who
endup in emergency rooms when a visit
to a doctor at an earlier stage would
have been less costly and less of a toll on
the child's life. If an illness can be
brought to the attention of a medical
practitioner at an early stage, this can
cost the parents less rime away from
work and the children fewer days lost
from school.
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Health care, road
improvement concerns
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
Jeff Savage (District 8
candidate)
What is your stance on the hog
operations and your thoughts on
hog waste pollution?
I've yet to meet a large number of
people who dislike pork. There has to
be a happy medium between the hog
industry and the concern of the people,
be it environmental or regulatory. You
don 'tjust toss out such a huge industry
that's the livelihood of so many people,
and you don't regulate it to the point
that the consumer can't afford the
product. Hog waste is a legitimate
concern and needs to be dealt with. The
research for a solution is ongoing. It
Just takes time.
In light of several scandals on
the Board of Transportation such
as members resigning because of
suspected illegal influence, should
a different way of selecting board
members be
considered?
seems to
me there is a lot
of pork barrel-
ing going on.
Eastern North
Carolina has
not gotten its
Jeff Savage fair share of
Fin photo road improve-
m e n t .
Districts,
Council of State, House and Senate;
any of these would be a reliable source
in selecting board members alongside
thegovernor.
Governor Hunt has proposed a
new child health insurance plan
for the working low-income fami-
lies. Do you think it will work?
don't care how many plans we
come up with until we get ahold of the
costs associated with health care and
address the health care needs of North
Carolinians. While the governor's
plan is noble in concept, it is fust one
part of a larger problem. I think we
should most definitely implement it
and at the same time make sure there
aren't children who fall through its
cracks. As it stands now there are chil-
dren who could fall through. They are
the children from families who are not
lower class yet not middle class. They
are from hard working families who
can't yet afford health care. These are
the ones we risk falling through the
cracks.
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Welfare, jobs concerns
forcandidate
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
Rufus Huggins
FILE PHOTO
suspected
illegal influ-
ence, should a
different way
of selecting
board mem-
bers be con-
sidered?
We had a
problem one
time on the city
council concern-
Rufus Huggins (District 8
candidate)
What is your stance on the hog
operations and your thoughts on
hog waste pollution?
If we want to create a safe place for
our children, we've got to enforce the
regulations we already have on the
books and make them stronger. The
private and public sector need to work
together and come to an agreement on
something acceptable for everyone. My
responsibility as a lake official is to
protect our environment and our
water. Serving with the state on the
Solid Waste Management Study
Committee gave me the exposure and
knowledge of what is happening here
and that it needs attention.
In light of several scandals on
the Board of Transportation such
as members designing because of
ing appoint-
ments to Imards. The council recog-
nized it and addressed it. Now we
have guidelines and procedures io
eliminate the problems. Anything that
goes wrong can be corrected; you don't
have to throw away the plan. You can
change it. Don't stop appointing them,
but change the systems that appoints
them and increase the number who
have the power to select them. When
you have more than one person on a
job, you decrease the number of prob-
lems that can go wrong.
Governor Hunt has proposed a
new child health insurance plan
for the working low-income fami-
lies. Do you think it will work?
We've got to do something. By tak-
ing people off welfare and placing them
in minimum wage jobs, a lot of them
lose health care because of this. We have
to put politics aside on this issue. Right
now it's the best plan on the table. No
one has shown me an alternative plan.
The longer we wait, the worse the prob-
lem is going to get.
Educators
continued from page 1
occupational safety are currently
being taught on the Internet. Two
classes in the nursing department
are currently being taught via inter-
active TV, and four classes in edu-
cational leadership are being taught
with a combination of Internet,
interactive TV and traditional class-
room settings.
Educators are faced with new
� challenges as technological
advances are integrated with tradi-
tional learning tools.
"It utilizing new technology
and replacing the classroom
requires, on the part of the faculty,
to always be looking for a better
way and takes a professor that can
admit they they can learn from their
students DuVall said.
Given the role of technology in
the classroom now, what will the
university be like in 2048? Will tra-
ditional classrooms still exist?
Educators say they can only guess.
"The university is still going to
exist said Don Sexauer, art profes-
sor and chair of the Faculty Senate.
"Most courses in the arts and sci-
ences will still be in the classroom
Sexauer bases his predictions on
research reported by EduCom, a
company that researches the inte-
gration of the Internet and electron-
ic communication capabilities in
education. EduCom can be found
on the Internet at
http:www.educom.e.
Alumni
continued from page 1
dates to meet their specific human
resources needs.
"I utilized the department'i
resources so that I could find my
job Powers said. "The staff at
career services helped me get eight
interviews with employers. Of the
eight, six offered me a job
Powers' example is just one of
thousands that went through the
department. And now with it's new
JobTrak Internet service, ECU's
career service department has an
even greater tool to help in their
outstanding quest
10 St.
1318 E. 1C
NEW
MO
10
IS
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PAREFOOT
from 10 a.w. until 6 p.m.
look for os and your chance to win. ����
Wednesdays
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the most
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Attention ALL Students:
I
Get it?
You should. The ECU One Card, that is.
If you don't already have one, you'll have
to pay10 for it after May 15, 1998.
Get yours while it's still free.
ALL STUDENTS
MUST HAVE
AN ECU 1 CARD.
The ECU One Card is required for
all Campus Libraries, Recreation Cen-
ter access, Campus Dining, Student
Activities, Health Services, Financial
Aid Deferment accounts, and every-
thing you needed an ECU I.D card
for in the past!
tV��&
VNIVW
ERSl!V
tsssfZ-
Your first card will be made FREE until
May IS, 1998. After that time, your first
card will cost10. To obtain an ECU One
Card, visit the One Card Office.
Location: One Card Office
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Hours: Monday - Friday,
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
To produce your new identification card you muA bring with you:
Current ECU ID card OR Driver's license and social security card
NO PETS
HENI
THURJ
FRI
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All films star
noted and at
staff (onegi
lire! ted to the ECU One Card System Office, 328-2015,
iide Dowdy Student Stores,Wright Building.






3 Tuuday, April 28, 1998
news
it Carolinian
mm
rom page 1
;ir specific human
fie department's
The Eiat Carolinian
I could find
my
1. "The staff at
Iped me get eight
nployers. Of the
ne a job
le is just one of
ent through the
now with it's new
service, ECU'j
partment has an
to help in their
S.Evans St.
3ittman Building
neai courthouse)
�nville, NC
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Senices and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
SGA
continued from page I
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
10 St. NAILS & TANNING
1318 E. 10th St. Beside Cynthias Flowers
757-0703
NEW BEDS AND BULBS
MONTH UNLIMITED $35
10 SESSIONS $25
1 SESSION 3.50
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process of funding works.
"My goal is to help different
organizations on campus under-
stand the funding process Stancill
said. "I would think the SGA could
start this program in the fall
Making organizations aware of
how to get funding was first
addressed by former vice president
Sean McManus but never actually
took place. The time frame for this
program is still being discussed.
"The executive officers hope to
have funding workshops early next
fall, which is when SGA starts to
fund organizations Pulley said.
"One of the major concerns of the
SGA is the lack of involvement
from the student body as a whole
Eric Rivenbark, president-elect,
said he would like to see an increase
in participation of both the student
body and elected officials within
SGA's legislative branch.
"I would like�to see more
involvement in the SGA, particular-
ly in the legislature Rivenbark
said. "For an organization that does
so much for the students there is
such little enthusiasm. I think it is
important to publicize information
about SGA to let the students know
how to get involved and what to do.
If students know this about SGA,
then they will have a better reason
to get involved
During the past semester the
SGA had many vacancies in their
legislative branch and in informa-
tion groups. The new SGA execu-
tives said they are planning on get-
ting more involvement in the filling
of those positions.
"We arc aiming on filling these
vacancies during the next �4eJtions
in the fall before the legislature
meets next year Rivenbark said.
Another idea that the SGapStry-
ing to implement is a statewide
leadership school.
"The leadership school will train
our student organization leaders
Rivenbark said. "A statewide lead-
ership school, with the resources we
have here at ECU, would be a great
way to showcase our great school
Barefoot
continued Irom page I
Carolina
Paintball
For one of Call
the most ,
adrenaline on Pa9e
pumping,
intense
times of
your life! Ca FQp ResepVat:jnnR
to accommodate events and booths
and the students were not asked
before this major change took place.
"My understanding is that
Barefoot is only supposed to be
moved for this year, but what I am
afraid of is the administration
Stancill said. 'They will move it
this year anyway, and if the students
don't act like they care, then future
administrations will move it when-
ever and wherever they want
According to Vanessa Cullers,
Barefoot chair, the Student Union
was never involved in the decision
to move Barefoot. The administra-
tion told the Barefoot Committee it
would change locations without any
student input. University reasoning
for relocating was the need to install
a sprinkler system and reseed the
grass on the mall. Barefoot will have
the same amount of events as it has
always had, but there will not be as
many student organization booths.
"I believe that Barefoot '98 will
be as successful as it has been in the
past, regardless of its location
Cullers said.
According to Ronald Speier,
dean of students, the Student
Union has already made plans to
have Barefoot on the brickyard at
Mendenhall. Speier said the uni-
versity is trying to keep the campus
beautiful for future years.
"I think this is a student program
and if the Student Union is com-
fortable with having.it on the brick-
yard and moving it back next year, I
support that Speier said.
"I believe that we, the student
leaders, should stand behind the
students, and what we are hearing is
they the students want Barefoot
moved back to the mall said Cliff
Webster, SGA vice president.
The resolution was sent to
Chancellor Richard Eakin, SGA
President Scott Forbes, Student
Union adviser J. Marshall, Student
Union Chair Kristen Alford and
Vice Chancellor of Student Life.Al
Matthews and Cullers.
Check out
our new web address
WWW.TEC.EgU.
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Greenville
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300 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
New Item
757-1716
Courtside Half Pounder
Full 8oz lean hamburger served with mustard,
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limited time only where to find us
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Home Cooked Meal co courts q "loHsLI
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12 noon - 6 p.m.
on the mendenhall
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onthursday,april30th,
the day of barefoot '98,
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wflfbe closed, and re-routed
to the south side of mendenhall.
ElffS MfElrf B SSTESffS Kffcf f B
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ROCK-AND-ROLL
ROCKET RIDE
�wufHMiimiis
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail: uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
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Blow Off Some Steoiyi
Finals are just around the corner. Need a break from the the books?
Then have a blast at the 19th Annual Barefoot on the Mall, an all-day outdoor
festival featuring emerging bands such as Southern Culture on the Skids, Biz
Markie, and The Blue Rags. The winner of the Battle of the Bands, Cashmere
Jungle Lords, will open the festivities.
Be sure to revel in all the food and novelty attractions.
THURSDAY, APRIL 30 AT NOON AT MSC BRICKYARD
(Sntfie Sitvm Sateen
Check out Starship Troopers (R), a science fiction thriller that pits humans in a life-
and-death struggle against deadly bug aliens.
Your ECU One Card gets you and a guest in for free.
APRIL 30-MAY 2 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Wil"l0'iiw
Work doesn't have to bewellwork.
Not when you have a state-of-the-art facility at your fingertips.
Located on the ground floor between the Outer Limitz bowling center and
the billiards center, the computer lab at Mendenhall features Pentium-based
computers, Power Macs, and color and laser printers.
And there's always an assistant ready to help you.
Open Monday-Friday 8 a.m10 p.mSaturdaySunday 1 p.mIO p.m.
Take a Load Off
You're stressed, you're tired, and you just want a break.
Mendenhall Dining Hall serves all-you-want-to-eat meals every day as well as
food-court selections while The Spot specializes in pick-up and carry-out snacks.
Chill out while you eat in the TV lounge � you'll love the plush chairs and big-
screen tube � or on the plaza, the Brickyard, or wherever there's a chair.
ALL-U-cAU GLoW" Bowl
GLOBALL AURA�Come to Outer Limitz bowling center every Friday from 7-11
p.m. for exciting theme nights for just $2 per game. Shoe rental is free. Bring a CD,
or dress the part. This week's theme: Swing Pin.
ALL-U-CAN BOWL�Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday
of each month from 8-11 p.m. at the Outer Limitz bowling center for just five bucks
(includes shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS� Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m.
with 50-cent bowling at Outer Limitz (shoe rental included).
ONE-BUCK BOWLING�Make Wednesday and Friday discount days at Outer
Limitz by rolling 10 frames for just $1 (shoe rental included). $1 games between
1-6 p.m.
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4 TutWty, April 28. 1998
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oumoN
Imagine a world that would allow a college student to attend class in pajamas and fuzzy slip-
pers a world where a student could earn a college degree and never set foot on campus,
mucn less in a classroom.
Imagine a world in which a student and a professor never meet, classmates are blips
across a computer monitor and the classroom is actually a chat room on the Internet.
Sounds pretty nice, right?
Now imagine a world where classwork is done alone � just you and your computer. No
human interaction. No friends to talk to. No new people to meet. Imagine the only time
you see another college student is at your fraternity or sorority meeting.
Though some university departments re making the move to teaching classes over the
Internet, we at TEC hope some never will. Yes, there are advantages to taking classes over
the World Wide Web, but there are disadvantages as well.
We are not saying don't offer the option to us; we simply hope there will always be a cam-
pus � after all, it would make Homecoming a little strange, wouldn't it?
What's good for the goose isn't always godd for the gander. What works for the depart-
ment of industrial technology, which offers three master's degrees online, may not work
well for classes that depend on students helping each other, for classes that require students
to be physically present to carry out requirements. How could a chemistry experiment be
conducted online? How could interpersonal communication be taught in cyberspace?
There are departments that teach courses successfully online, among them music, occu-
pational safety and adult education. This option works well; we hope it continues. There
are students with physical limitations who can avoid the hassle of dealing with a non-hand-
icapped-accessible classroom setting and there are students who can keep their full-time
job and see their families but still earn a college degree.
But imagine missing out on the experiences college offer. Imagine not learning to deal
with others face to face, not having the chance to become responsible, not getting to inter-
act with professors and fellow students. Imagine not getting to meet people from across the
state, nation and world.
Education on the Web is the wave of the present and future, but we at TEC hope some
things never change. We hope our campus will be fnrire than web sites and chat rooms. We
hope there will always be buildings and people. We're not saying don't take classes on the
Internet either; it's a wonderful option. We're saying that college is a wonderful experience
� and some of those life lessons just can't be transmitted over the World Wide Web.
OPINION
Columnist
opinioi
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Springer's trash, but trash is hot
The show Springer is trash
and that is why I like the
show: because it is crap,
I look at those people and
realize my life is not as screwy
as I think it is.
Trash television is hot. Jerry
Springer recently beat Oprah
'Whine'frey in the gab show ratings
game. Nobody really paid much
attention to Jerry's show until he
beat the queen (no, not RuPaul).
Since, Springer has scored such
high ratings a few news and radio
talk shows � along with everyone
with an opinion � has been ques-
tioning his show.
Extra, the news magazine,
recently had a few of Springer's for-
mer guests make some claims
about the show. According to the
former guests his show is a sham.
Supposedly the producers of the
guests. These producers told the
guests what to say and who to hit.
The news magazine feels that
Jerry's show crosses the line. Talk
about the dumpster calling the
garbage heap trash.
A few people lied on the
Springer show. You expect more
from a program that showcases her-
maphrodite midgets who happen to
be sleeping with cross dressing
nuns from "Beirut? Even Morton
Downey, the original trash TV, had
guests who lie. Others who fall into
this category are Geraldo, Sally
Jessy Raphael and Ricki Lake.
Jerry Springer's circus is on tele-
vision and we all know how realistic
everything is on the boob tube.
The syndicated talk show might
represent itself as the truth, but so
does wrastlin For those of you
that still think 'pro' wrestling is real,
call me; I have a top of the line
Commodore 64 for sale.
In an effort to research this illus-
trious column, I watched a few
hours of Jerry's programming. The
show is trailer trash and anybody
who watches this show needs to
have their head examined. That
said, the show is great. The show is
trash and that is why I like the
show: because it is crap. I look at
those people and realize my life is
not as screwy as I think it is.
While watching a sister, who has
slept with both of her step-brothers,
I came to a conclusion: the show is
programs fill their time with worth-
less crap. In the past I heard of
Hillary's hair, what school Chelsea
is going to attend, and now the sex
life of the President.
The show predominately focus-
es on sex. The producers of the
show realize that the more sex the
better. Which is an opinion I think
everyone should share. The news
media certainly shares this opinion.
Why else would we have hours
devoted to Marv Albert, Frank
Gifford and Clarence 'Long Dong
Silver' Thomas?
Jerry is also in trouble because
he crosses the line. What line?
Jerry's show is a reflection of our
civil society. Not everybody may
act like Springer's guests but con-
sider the current condition of this
country: a few school massacres, a
four-year-old recently murdered a
six-year-old, some teachers sleep
with their students and Kenneth
Starr is fascinated with Bill
Clinton's sex life.
The show epitomizes trailer
trash. I am pretty sure that when
the guests go home they sit on their
front porch next to their refrigera-
tors and drink a Budweiser tall boy.
In closing, if you want to appear
on Jerry's show go right ahead.
Although if you do happen to be a
guest on Springer's show remember
to strike first and strike hard. If you
want to watch the show, feel no
shame � I don't.
:R
to the editor
Phone registration a success
I would like to respond to your
views on telephone registration
found on the opinion page of TEC.
The reason for the 10:00 opening of
the telephone registration system
was the concern that it would bring
down the telephone lines for the
university � if the system worked
improperly, which has happened at
other universities. Our objective
was to limit the use of the system
the first time it was open to all stu-
dents and we did that by starting at
lOtfO.
Telephone registration is an
option for students to use, not a
replacement for terminal registra-
tion. It is convenient for students
who live out of town and cannot be
on campus during the registration
period.
Your article states the registra-
tion system hangs up on students if
a section is closed. After extensive
testing, I have not been able to
duplicate the problem. High usage
on the phone registration system
may cause longer pauses between
voice messages, which may explain
what these students experienced.
Students choosing to register by
phone can get their registration
code from their adviser the week
before registration begins. I can
assure you there was plenty of plan-
ning and testing that went into the
phone registration system. Of the
1768 calls made to the voice
response system in the first week of
registration, I only received one
problem report, which turned out to
be student error. I fail to see where
the voice response system is as
problematic as you claim. In my
opinion, telephone registration was
a success.
Cheryl Purser, Applications
Analyst Programmer, CIS

Britt
HONEYCUTT
Apathetic students don't vote
Where are the candidates
who are not your average col-
lege student? If I wanted
someone just like me in office,
heck, I'd run for it.
I still haven't heard who won the
SGA election. And I don't care.
You know why? Because noth-
ing will change. I voted for the tick-
et that smooth-talking Rivenbark
ran on last year, him included. I
haven't seen one campaign issue
touched with a ten-foot pole since.
"What were those issues?" you
may ask. They included parking.
"What was that again?" you may
ask. PARKING. The same issue
that was campaigned this year �
but wait, this time they know how
to fix it!
Since most of that militia ran
unopposed, a couple of escaped
experiments from the biology lab
decided that this was their big
chance to get their names in the
paper without having to get arrest-
ed first. The choices that the stu-
dent body were given boiled down
to three basic stereotypes: The
used car salesman, the redneck,
and the pot head. I'll let you match
'em up, boys and girls.
Do I sound a little bitter about
the SGA system as a whole? How
perceptive of you! This bunch of
wannabe PTO chairmen sit around
twiddling their thumbs and steal-
ing $400 a month of my money. I
could use that money to purchase
countless Tickle-Me -Elmos or
Princess Diana Beanie Babies to
preserve for posterity. Or build a
pedestrian bridge over 10th
streetnaw, that would be too use-
ful. I don't like the SGA because
the SGA apparently doesn't like
me.
Why on earth would I vote for a
guy who is so uninterested in the
position that his only comment on
anything is "That, uh, sucks" or
one who thinks that everything on
this campus is perfect or one who,
despite all his flyers and T-shirts,
didn't do anything for me the last
time I tried him?
Where are the candidates who
are not your average college stu-
dent? If I wanted someone just like
me in office, heck, I'd run for it and
get to go to summer school for free.
But I don't want the same person
sitting next to me downtown buy-
ing alcohol in a test tube from a
woman in very tight pants to be
making important decisions.
Because the average college stu-
dent doesn't care. Joe College
doesn't know who the president is
any more than I do. He sure as hell
didn't vote.
So these are our choices. It's like;
dinner at the dining hall � another I
issue this year's candidates couldn't
care less about. You can either have
crap,orcrap.
And this is what we get. Elected
officials reflect the mentalities of
those who elected them, and we
are an apathetic bunch (hey, I'm
not excluding myself here.) I guess
we can either turn off the TV and
start giving a damn, or pray for
someone who really can make a dif-
ference to find it in their heart to
rise up from the murky depths and
lead us like lost sheep- Yeah, that
sounds like a plan! Oh, and if you
do run, whoever you are, give out
candy. It's the only way to get us to
the polls.
OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
KENNEMUR
Columnist attacks unimportant issues
As long as you have
opinions, your heartbeat, you
will truly live. The moment
you start to compromise those
opinions and start going by
someone else's, you go into
cardiac arrest, in a sense.
Today's opinion column is pretty
much going to be just me rambling,
so you don't have to read it if you
don't want to. Just don't complain
when all your friends are talking
about it tomorrow, while you feel
the tears well up in your eyes
because you are no longer cool.
How about we talk about opin-
ions in general? Yeah, that should
take up some inches. My stand-
point on opinions is that they are
like a certain body part. No, not
that one. They are like the human
heart. As long as you have opin-
ions, your heartbeat, you will truly
live. The moment you start to
compromise those opinions and
start going by someone else's, you
go into cardiac arrest, in a sense.
This will render you a worthless
part of our society, not unlike Jim
Carrey.
Recently I wrote a column
about America Online. I got quite
a bit of feedback from people, most
of whom said one of three things
1. Ryan, you're right! I will go
climb a tree!
2. Ryan, I am not addicted and
you are paranoid for saying that.
(Coincidentally, these people
walked away avoiding eye contact
with other students and walking in
a zig-zag fashion.)
3. Ryan, (dirty word) you!
Granted, some of this feedback
was negative, but at least it was
people expressing their opinions. I
know a lot of people who would lis-
ten to someone that is offending
them and just stand there and not
put in their thoughts. I've never
understood that, really. Hmmthis
topic is getting boring, isn't it?
And those friggin' wrong num-
ber dialers! I'm trying to get some
sleep after a long night of not
drinking and being completely
law-abiding (my mother does read
this), and this one guy likes to call
me on a weekly basis. He's always
calling around 4:30 and he just can't
understand "Susan doesn't live
here" and "I'm not going to tell
you what I'm wearing
Sometimes I just want to get one of
those Caller ID things and see who
it is. I'd like to go to his house and
just crack him over the head with a
beer bottle, just to make him sleep
through 4:30 for once. (A beer bot-
tle that I found on the ground,
Mom.)
And what about those people
outside the dorms who cut the
grass and start banging on random
things the second the first rooster
crows? Seriously, have you ever
noticed that they pick the strangest
times to beautify the campus? For
instance, I bet you the next time
we have a hailstorm with hail the
size of basketballs, the kind that
knocks down power lines and
makes permanent sun roofs in
everyone's cars, at least one of the
worker guys will be looking out at
all the destruction and say
"Man, it's really coming down
out there. Hey everybody, check
out what the hail's doing to Belk!
Look at that asbestos fly! Oh man,
look at all those coughing students
running into the hail storm just to
avoid getting it in their lungs!
That's gotta hurt when the hail
knocks you down and pelts you
even after you're unconscious. I
sure am glad we're in here out of
the storm. OH MY GOD! Johnny,
look at those shrubs! I told you to
take care of them last week! Get
out there, now! While you're out
there, those walls need banging,
too
Well, maybe not. Sorry about
the unevenness of the column this
week. I'll do better next time.
Look at it this way: at least you're
still cool.
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lift
Doors open: 7:30 pm
Stage Time: 9:00 pm
SILVER
BULLET
comics
Thi Eiit Carolinian
'X
�X
'X
�x
'X
?A Vouch OfCtass"
756-6278
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
"Skylar"
10 OR MORE
GIRL DANCERS
EVERY NIGHT!
X"
Located 5 miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt. (Behind Aladdin Services & Limo) x �
vote
andidates who
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school for free,
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ky depths and
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Dh, and if you
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ray to get us to
MODELS WANTED!
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1998 Vendor Fair
sponsored by COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS
LARGE SELECTION OF NEW AND
INNOVATIVE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS.
many of the industry's leaders
will be attending.
some of these include:
apple, dell, microsoft,
sun microsystems, compucom,
krueger International, and many
MORE.
where: Mendenhall Student Center
when: Tuesday, April 28, 9am-4pm
vendors: Dell Computers, COECO, CompuCom,
; Whitlock Group, Taff Office Equipment,
CHSC, Krueger International, SAS, Ziff
Davis, Student Stores, Sun Microsystems,
and Assistive Technology.
Special Presentations in Hendrix Theatre:
9:30 to 10:30 - Microsoft Corporation
11:00 to 12:00 - Netwave Technologies
1:30 to 2:30 - Apple Computers
3:00 to 4:00 - Compaq and Microage
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11 Ret's relative
14 Streamlet
15 Tiemey film
16 Negative
conjunction
17 Universal
opener
19 Brouhaha
20 Harold of
�Safety Last"
21 Beer picks
22 Produced like an
orchard
25 Stream of light
28 Musical pieces
29 Rattling sounds
32 Nile dam
33 Fry lightly
34 JudgeBean
35 Stick around
36 Small roads
37 Discomfort
38 Miscue
39 Fathers
40 Painter Picasso
41 Unique person
43 Twisted into
ringlets
44 City on the
Rhone
45 Intense
animosities
46 Breathe heavily
48 Bulk of the body
49 Fate
50 Ocarina
56 Individual
57 First ship on the
moon
58 Wild
59 Knight or
Kennedy
60 Fairy-tale villain
61 Austrian
psychiatrist
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4 Doc of
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5 The Red
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6 Pretty Boy
7 Find a perch
8 Guillemot's
cousin
9 Dander
10 Set down
11 Carved In stone
12 Ala
13 Paid players
18 Tootsies
21 End of a ship
22 River of B.C
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23 Daises
24 Not called for
25 Turns on a pivot
26 Headgear
27 Lunched
29 Stems of
bamboo
30 Vexed
31 Church
gatherings
33 Indira's
wardrobe
36 Exist
37 Echoer
39 Mule of song
40 Delays
42 Impressive
43 Beef and moan
45 Monopoly piece
46 Story line
47 Top-drawer
48 Legendary
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51 Open hosWfee
52 Self image
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I





i Tmtiiy, April 28, 1998
lifestyle
4
The Ent Carolinian
reviews
Da Cocoa Brovaz
The Rude
Awakening
10 OUT OF 10
M a r r i (: k Blue
STAFF WRITER
If the sun is shining through but it
don't wake you up at first, then the
noise on the street will; that's The
Rude Awakening.
The group collectively known
as Da Cocoa Brovaz, Tek and
Steele, first burst on the scene in
1995 with their debut album, Da
Shinin. The group was a little dif-
ferent back then, as they were
known as Smif-N-Wessun. The
album was a smash hit for the
Brooklyn duo, as the album
debuted at number five on
Billboard's R&B chart and number
one Rap album. Da Shinin eventu-
ally scored a Source Magazine nom-
ination for Best New Group of the
Year.
But the group didn't get a
chance to enjoy their success.
Rather than basking in the success
of the album, the group got tied up
in court or in meetings. First,
Smith & Wesson firearms threat-
ened to sue the group, but Tek and
Steele obliged and became Da
Cocoa Brovaz. From there, they
got tied up in entanglements with
their record label. Explains Steele,
"We had to sit back and look at
everything that was going on and
realize, this is a business. We was-
n't thinking about business. We
learned that along with fame
comes responsibility
But the group learned from
their mistakes. Armed with the
knowledge of what had happened
to them and a yearning to return to
the studio, and after drifting
around doing various underground
and independent projects, Da
Shinin part two was finally
released, though it has been three
years since the first album.
Now signed with Duck
DownPriority Records, The Rude
Awakening is now available to satis-
fy the hunger of all those who
didnt get full from Da Shinin. Due
to the album's production team,
amongst whom are Mr. Walt, Sean
J. Period, Baby Paul and 2ND II
Nun; Da Brovas provide hardcore,
muscular tracks that mainly
depend on beats and bass lines
typical of their Boot Camp Clik
brethren.
After just listening to the lead
cut, "Off The Wall you can find
out why Da Brovas were held in
such high regard in 1995. Tek and
Steele have a smooth flow that
seems to match perfectly with the
instrumental. As the album pro-
gresses, the duo plays off each
SEE BROVAZ PAGE 7
Honors director says goodbye
Sanders headed
program since 18
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
This semester, Dr. David Sanders
will see honors students graduate
one last time before he retires.
Sanders, who has directed the hon-
ors program since 1978, retired his
professorship last semester. Up to
that time, he had also been an
English professor, teaching primar-
ily Shakespeare courses. He has
spent this past semester working
half time as director of the honors
program. Until now, Sanders has
been the first and only director of
the program.
"It's my baby Sanders said. "I
feel really close to it. I've been the
director for the past twenty years
Now that Sanders is retiring, a new
Or. David Sanders
PHOTO BY JOHN DAVIS
director will be selected from three
candidates, each of whom made
presentations before the honors stu-
dents last week. The search com-
mittee has already made a recom-
mendation to the Chancellor; it will
only be a matter of time before a
new director is appointed.
"The program began the way
these things should Sanders said.
"It started with a group of students
asking a philosophy professor to
meet with them and discuss great
books. The next year it was decid-
ed that the students should get
course credit for this
In 1978, after about 10 years of
this informal organization, the pre-
sent program was organized and
Sanders was appointed director. At
the time, it was a two-year program,
and under 100 students participat-
ed. By 1994, the program had been
extended to cover all four years and
student enrollment had increased
to about 700.
The Honors program is geared
toward students who score a 1300
on their SAT andor have above a
3.5 GPA in high school. "It's not set
in stone though Sanders said. "It's
a graduating scale, so that if a stu-
dent has a higher GPA and a lower
SAT score, they are still eligible
Honors students are required to
take special sections of General
College courses, as well as special
seminars offered specifically for
them. By their senior year, they
usually complete a senior project in
"It's my baby. I feel really close
to it. I've been the director for
20 years
Dr. David Sanders
Director of the honors program
their major. This can be a thesis or,
as in the case of Art majors, a port-
folio.
The hon-
ors program
has pro-
duced some
exceptional
students.
Some of the
more well-
known
Honors pro-
gram alum-
ni include
Rick
Atkinson,
who won a Pulitzer Prize for
Journalism, and Edward Prados,
who was awarded a Fulbright
Scholarship.
Even most of the not-so-famous
alumni regard the program as
important in their education.
Chandra Speight, a recent alumnus,
is currently at Penn State, pursuing
a Master's Degree. She found the
program stimulating and challeng-
ing.
"I was surrounded by interest-
ing professors and interested stu-
dents she said. "My classes were
small and I thus had a forum for an
intimate exchange
with my professors
and fellow stu
dents. The forum
allowed me tc
experience first
hand the 'high' of
learning from and
with others. This
has driven me to
pursue a career in
academics. I try to
maintain this spirit
as a graduate stu
dent and create this spirit with my
own students as a teaching assis-
tant
David Lemon, now an an
teacher in Southport, benefited
from this spirit as well. "I liked the
opportunity to go 'in depth to
interact more with other students
and professors. It's almost like
being at an all-star game � you're
SEE DIRECTOR. PAGE 7
Spring social held at old amphitheatre
Students bemoan loss
oflandmark
Mice AH SMITH
M'MI'H l R I I K R
The barbecue sizzled, the iced tea
flowed and mirth was in the air on
Friday afternoon, when the old
amphitheater behind Fletcher Hall
was put to official use for the first
time in most students' memories.
Live music was provided by
Deep Fuzz, Xavier and the Cabana
Boys, and SunnyWheat. Students
feasted on free barbecue provided
by the Student Union and many
brought their dogs outside to play
while listening to the bands.
Construction plans for a new
dining hall on west campus call for
the old landmark to be razed, and
now that most students have
become aware of this fact they are
questioning the judgment behind
this decision.
"I know we need more room to
eat, but it seems like we keep
building stuff said Jason, a fresh-
man. "I don't know if it's neces-
sary
Necessity would more than like-
ly demand that almost the entire
grassy area which extends from the
back of Fletcher to Cotanche and
Fifth Streets be used for the cafete-
ria, which would require more
space than most buildings to facili-
tate delivery trucks and garbage
disposal.
When asked their opinions
about what should be done with
school funds, students showed
more approval for increasing the
number of campus parking spaces.
Few students could stomach the
idea of a potentially unsanitary din-
ing facility. Mendenhall has already
warranted more than its share of
student complaints.
According to one Campus
Catering Services employee who
asked not to be named, "They
need to clean up Mendenhall
before they build a new facility
A lot of students were surprised
and bewildered to learn that anoth-
er cafeteria was in the works, since
problems like overcrowding do not
personally affect them. Leah, a
freshman, summed up the thoughts
of many when she said, "They
should have asked the students
first. We never knew that there was
a need for a new cafeteria
Not many students look forward
to the destruction of a part of cam-
pus they consider to be peaceful
Ex-Ninja Turtle still a hero
and aesthetically pleasing, not. to
mention useful. They don't think
that money should be spent on
another dining facility, and that six
should be sufficient.
"They could build onto
Mendenhall if they wanted to do
anything else said sophomore
Blue.
Rebecca, another sophomore,
concurred: "It's a horrible idea to
tear down an open theater like this,
where students can congregate and
have a good time. We need more
open spaces like this on campus.
We don't need another dining hall
SEE AMPHITHEATRE. PAGE 7
THEATRE
"You could only pick
yourlegupsohigfi"
Miccah Smith
senior writer
Several weeks ago, Greenville resi-
dent Curtis Evans walked into a
small convenience store on Hooker
Road and noticed several video-
tapes for sale behind the counter.
Upon closer inspection, he discov-
ered them
to be
bootlegs of
movies with
titles like
Dark City
that had just
been
released in
theaters,
boxed and
ready for
sale.
To the
store's pro-
prietors,
Evans
looked like
just another
Joe paying
for gas or
picking up a A turtle unmasked
soda, but photo courtesy of
the wheels
inside his head had started turning
the moment he spotted the illegal
tapes.
Evans knows all about the
movie business. He knows that
actors are cheated out of royalties
when bootlegged copies of their
movies are sold illegally at flea mar-
kets and corner stores, and he was-
n't about to pretend that he didn't
just see an illegal operation.
Evans played the stunt parts of
Michaelangelo and other Turtles
in the second Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles movie, called The Secret of
the Ooze. He called Crimestoppers
to report the store and to give
himself peace of mind with the
knowledge that he may have been
helping fellow actors keep the
royalties they deserve from the
movies they make. "I got residu-
als off the sale of the Turtles If
video he explained.
Filmed in 1991,Turtles II was a
popular sequel to the first Turtles
movie, spiced up with a guest
appearance
by former
teen heart-
throb
Vanilla Ice.
Evans, who
had retired
as the
North
American
kickboxing
champion,
found him-
self in the
movie as a
replace-
ment for
one of the
stunt
Tu r 11 e s
who had
been
injured dur-
ing the mak-
ing of the first movie.
Evans's 5'5" frame and slender
athletic build enabled him to don
the body-tight rubber suit,
designed by Jim Henson for the
other actor.
He recalled that wearing the tur-
tle suit caused him to shed several
pounds.
"The head pan of the turtle is
kind of like a helmet he said of
the constricting but easily remov-
review
Play
chock full
of action
Last show tonight
atMcGinnis
Curtis Evans.
CURTIS EVANS
PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW LINE CINEMA
able animatronic headgear. "You
couldn't see out of the suit
Evans soon learned that being a
Turtle wasn't all about Cowabunga-
ing down the street in search of
criminals and weird pizza; it was
actually a lot of hard, sweaty work
and precisely timed martial arts
moves done in a suit which often
hampered his mobility.
"You could only pick your leg up
so high he remembered. "The
suit was like a big rubber band
Evans has not done any more
acting, although, "I had some good
times during that film he said.
Evans had studied kickboxing
under Bill McDonald in North
Carolina and enjoyed a career as a
fighter, defending his tide on an
international level.
He now enjoys cooking and
working in his garden.
Stephanie Russell
theatre reviewer
Whether you're into Jerry Springer
or 60 Minutes, you have been
exposed to the situations in .1 View
From the Bridge. The Arthur Miller
play is the story of Eddie, a man
who has fallen in love with his
niece despite all his efforts not to
do so. He is unable to deal with his
emotions when she falls in love
with a romco cousin from Italy.
Love, lust, incest, brawling,
stealing and revenge�what more
could be packed into a play? It's
Jerry action with a 60 Minutes mes-
sage. This play will speak to every-
one who sees it. All those involved
did a sensational job.
John Darrow delivers a fabulous
performance as Eddie Carbone, a
hard working Italian American
who struggles with his growing
love for Catherine, his niece.
Darrow has captured the essence
of the working class, not to men-
tion the complex emotions of a
man trapped by incestuous fcel-
SEE THEATRE. PAGE!
7 Tutiday, Aprl
mm E �
The O
� � � i 1 ! j
�AVA A SM : FOR AD i CALL TC i ONVt
i
iU-4'urn. KM







i Eilt Carolinian
id interested stu
"My classes were
lad a forum for an
itimate exchange
ith my professors
id fellow stu
:nts. The forum
lowed me tc
cperience first
ind the 'high' ol
arning from and
ith others. This
is driven me to
irsue a career in
ademics. I try to
aintain this spirit
a graduate stu
his spirit with my
a teaching assis
n, now an art
hport, benefited
well. "I liked the
;o 'in depth to
th other students
It's almost like
ir game � you're
rOH, PACE 7
re
pleasing, not to
rhey don't think
ild be spent on
:ility, and that six
nt.
J build onto
hey wanted to do
said sophomore
:her sophomore,
horrible idea to
i theater like this,
n congregate and
We need more
this on campus,
ither dining hall
IATHE PAGE 7
TRE
JW
ay
bfuli
tion
�0 tonigjit
linnis
Rl'SSELL
I E VI e W E R
ito Jerry Springer
you have been
uations in A View
he Arthur Miller
f Eddie, a man
n love with his
his efforts not to
e to deal with his
he falls in love
in from Italy,
icest, brawling,
lge�what more
into a play? It's
60 Minutes mes-
I speak to every-
II those involved
b.
ilivers a fabulous
ddie Carbone, a
alian American
th his growing
ne, his niece,
red the essence
iss, not to men-
emotions of a
incestuous feel-
E. PAGE I
,
7 Tuudiy. April 28, 1888
lifestyle
Tht East Carolinian
our new web at
WWW.TEC.ECU.EDU
Amphitheatre
continued from page 6
But even while defending this
peaceful little spot, students are
painfully aware that the old
amphitheater is rarely used, even
informally, except as a place to hang
out.
Shawna, a sophomore, had
never noticed the understated and
somewhat secluded spot. "I never
knew it was here until they said
they were knocking it down she
said.
"They should have plays here,
stuff like that said senior student
Xavier.
The amphitheater has at least a
year left before the start of con-
struction, which should give stu-
dents plenty of time to voice their
opinions to the powers" that be if
they feel that this old landmark,
along with a large chunk of western
campus, should be left in peace. As
for the money that will be spent on
this endeavor, KreJ�marCj�anna
summed up popular opintM by
saying, "There's so manyether
things we need
Director
continued from page 6
with all the heavy hitters. Nobody's
going to look at you funny when
you ask questions in class
Sanders loves the spirit of the
program as well. "I've got the best
job on campus he said. "I get to
work with the best students Still,
he's looking forward to retiring. "I
can't wait to do lots of reading,
writing, traveling. I'll be able to
watch TV when I want, do cross-
words when I want, I'll miss teach-
ing though, because I'll miss con-
tact with the students, miss teach-
ing Shakespeare, and miss my hon-
ors students
As he prepares to leave the aca-
demic life and enjoy hi� retirement,
Dr. Sanders can rest assttred that
the honors program w�lfjftntinue.
He may not be here it EC�F,in per-
son, but so much of his heart and
soul will still be here, in the form of
the program into which he has
poured 20 years of his life. And
that's not a bad way to be remem-
bered at all.
Brovaz
continued from page 6
other very well with a continuous
flow that can tell the story behind
each song nicely.
The group has plenty of stories
to tell. "Off The Wall" tells of the
problems that the group had with
Smith & Wesson firearms. "Back 2
Life" tells of celebrating the con-
victed felon's second chance upon
release. "Black Trump featuring
Chef Raekwon of the Wu-Tang
Clan, is a take-no-prisoners tale
that's a classic hardcore jam heavily
influenced by the Wu-Tang style of
flow. Not one bad track can be
found on this album.
From top to bottom, this 17-
track album is one of the best rap
albums heard in quite a while. In an
era, where so many rap stars can
cash in without paying their dues,
it's refreshing to see an album
based off true experiences rather
than the typical back in the day pat-
tern. Da Brovaz have truly paid
their dues and now that they are
older and wiser, they arc bound to
be a dominating force in the rap
world.
Go to the record store. Buy the
CD. Pop it into the CD player.
Listen. Learn.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
ffl s
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8 Tuudiy. April 28. 1898
lifestyle
The Eitt Carolinian
Theatre
continued train page 6
I
ings. Eddie comes to life on the
stage.
Drama professor Patch Clark is
outstanding in her role as Beatrice,
Eddie's downtrodden, but devoted,
wife. Her .acting is truly breathtak-
ing. Clark's performance is the
finest of the production. Catherine
is played by Jamie Bullock, who
does a fine job with her role. She is
the epitome of confused innocence.
Bullock's transformation from
devoted child to independent
woman is made believable through
her noteworthy performance.
Travp Taylor Parker and John W.
Lawson play the charming Italian
cousins fresh off the boat in search
of their; hopes and dreams. Both
men deliver remarkable perfor-
mances, Parker is the carefree
Rudolpho, a role he seems born to
play. Lawson skillfully develops
Marco from a peaceable family man
to an intimidating force who seeks
to regain family honor at all costs.
Chad Parker adeptly portrays a
lawyer (and the narrator of the play)
who, though from the neighbor-
hood, has risen above it. The
ensemble does a great job. The
casting for this show seems right on.
Everyone's accent is perfect! Great
attention is paid to mannerisms and
facial expression.
A Vtew From the Bridge is directed
by Cedric Winchell. He does an
expert job of bringing cast and crew
together. Under his direction, the
actors portray disturbing issues
with understanding and care.
Robert Alpers' set design is
inspired. Make sure you notice the
ever-changing bridge looming in
the distance. As Eddie gets more
and more involved in a situation
where there is no return, the bridge
develops more and more cables. It
becomes a net � like the nets used
down on the docks where Eddie
works � that no one can escape.
Costumes by Jeffery Phipps
were straight out of the '50s. With
his talent for decking out the cast
and Ken White's talent to light
them, the play is as in character as
the leads. From dimly lit streets to
frantic inner emotions, White can
light them all.
The entire cast and crew have
created a powerful production that
cannot fail. It is the best play of the
season, and everyone will enjoy it.
No matter who you arc or where
you come from, these characters
will tug on your heart strings. It is a
play that refuses to be forgotten.
Do not miss A View From die
Bridge. The last performance is
tonight at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre. Individual tickets are $8-
$9 for the general public, $7-$8 for
ECU facultystaff and $5-$6 for
ECU students and children 12 and
under. Tickets may be purchased
in person or by phone by calling
328-1729. The Theatre box office
is open from 10 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.
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If It rains, sale will be held In store. Socks shown may
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Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
�� OrKtyw'Kdx studying, d(xV forget book buybscknms 5th throi&
-�





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9 Tuesday. April 28, 1998
sports
Tht Eitt Caratiaiai
Baseball team brings new records home
from weekend at College of Charleston
Pirates win two, drop
one over weekend
Jason Thuringer
SENIOR WHITER
The past weekend was a record
setter for Pirate baseball �
specifically for senior shortstop
Ryan Massimo.
Massimo went 6-6 with 6 RBI's
and 5 runs scored in Sunday's 21-
7 pounding of the College of
Charleston.
Massimo's six hits in one game
set a single game record. Three of
those hits were doubles which
tied the school record and the five
runs scored also ties a school
record. Massimo had lots of help
from the plate. John Williamson,
Steve Salargo,
Billy Benson and
Jason Howard all
had multiple
hits. They went
2-6, 3-6, 2-5 and
5-6 respectively.
"They all
made great
adjustments at
the plate
Assistant Coach
Tommy Eason
said. "It was a
total team effort.
In - the nine
innings we swung the bats as well
as we had all year
Freshman John Williamson,
who missed nine games with a
hamstring injury, set the freshman
record for runs scored with 43.
That also loads the team.
Brooks
Jernigan was
the recipient
of the hit
barrage.
Jernigan
pitched seven
innings and
stuck the 11
in picking up
the win. He is
now 7-2 for
the season.
"The
pitching was
good Eason
said. "Brooks did a good job
Saturday's games were not
quite as gracious to ECU. The
Pirates won the series opener 10-8
and lost the nightcap 8-2.
"They all made great
adjustments at the plate. It
was a total team effort. In
the nine innings we swung the
hats as well as we had all
year
Tommy Eason
Assistant Coach. ECU Baseball
"Winning the series was the
most important thing Eason
said.
The Pirates were down by one
run heading into the final inning
and rallied to score three runs.
Brian Fields pitched the bottom
of that inning and struck out two
of the three batters he faced.
Kevyn Fulcher picked up the
win.
Saturday's last game, a seven
inning contest, saw ECU heading
to 2-0 going into the bottom up
the sixth. The College of
Charleston batters came alive and
scored eight runs to secure the
victory.
ECU will be making a Triangle
area road trip this week. Tuesday
they travel to Greensboro to play
UNCG and Wednesday they take
on UNC in Chapel Hill.
Lew Hill hired to Texas A&M
coaching staff as assistant coach
TifinfWTi
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
Hill four year veteran
of men's basketball
Lew Hill
Men's Basketball
FILE PHOTO
TRACY M. LAUBACH
SPORTS EDITOR
Lew Hill, assistant coach for the
ECU men's basketball team for
the past four seasons, has
announced he has accepted a
position as
assistant
basketball
coach with
Texas A&M
University.
"I am'
extremely
confident in
Lew said
M e I v i n
Wat ki ns,
head
basketball
coach at
T e x a s
A&M.
"Also, he played for San Jacinto
Junior College in Texas, so he has
ties within this area. That played
a big part in our decision to hire
him
Hill will not replace anyone on
the Texas A&M coaching staff.
He has been added by Watkins to
assist with recruiting and is a
possible candidate to move into
the position of head coach when
Watkins retires.
"Recruiting is an area where
we will use Lew a lot Watkins
said. "But he has the energy and
the talent to be a head coach
someday, and I fully intend to
include him in everything I do so
that he will be prepared when an
opportunity comes up for him
As for his own days on the
court, Hill was the starting point
guard for San Jacinto Junior
College who helped his team to
the junior college national
championship in 1984. He then
went on to earn All-Missouri
Valley Conference honors as a
senior at Wichita State.
Hill's coaching career goes
back to 1988, when he began at
Wichita East High School. Eager
Hill, who was an assistant men's basketball coach at ECU, has some experience on the floor himself as a starting point guard at
San Jacinto. His move to Texas A&M possibly positions him for the head coaching job in the future.
Flit PHOTO
to move into the collegiate ranks,
he accepted a job in 1990 with
South Alabama, then moved on to
Southeast Missouri State before
coming to ECU.
Celebrity Golf Classic returns to Greenville for 14th year
Brook Valley Country
Club to host tourney
Ian Robson
SENIOR WRITER
This summer, while most ECU
students arc home enjoying their
breaks and Greenville lies
dormant, an annual tradition will
once again take place. This will
mark the 14th year the Michael
Jordan Celebrity Golf Classic will
be held in Greenville.
The tournament was originally
started in 1984 under the name of
the Eastern Carolina Celebrity
Golf Classic in order to raise
money for an upcoming Ronald
McDonald House.
Jordan was a senior in college
at UNC when he was first invited
to play in 1985. In 1988, he
donated
$20,000 to
help
furnish the
Ronald
McDonald
House, and
in 1989,
Jordan was
asked
permission
to have the
tournament
renamed in
his honor. He agreed,
acknowledging that it would help
raise more money for a good
cause.
This year, Jordan will return for
his 10th year of the tournament.
Over the years, the event has
gathered many famous people.
Fast Facts
Michael Jordan Celebrity Golf Classic
Held at: Brook Valley Country Club
Where: Here in Greenville
When: June 26-28
Celebrities scheduled to play: Charles Berkley,
Steven Baldwin. Jason Kidd, and Tim Meadows, to
name a few.
"We have about 850 celebrities
in our database, which are divided
into an 'A' list and a 'B' list and so
on Tournament Director Pam
Crocker said. "We always have a
pretty good list. There are usually
about 50 big names that come
out
Although the tournament is
not televised, many still come out
to the Brook Valley Country Club
to cheer on their favorite stars.
"There are usually about
15,000 spectators, and about 2,500
of them follow Michael Crocker
said.
Of the celebrities who will be
returning or coming to Greenville
for the first time in 1998 are Jim
Palmer, Joe Morgan, Charles
Barkley, Evandcr Holyfield,
Emmit Smith, David Robinson
and Lou Holtz, just to name a few.
ECU's Jeff Blake will also be
returning for another year at the
tournament.
Lady Pirates finish
second at Hokie
Conference tourney
ahead for sluggers
Travis Barkley
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU softball team
concluded its regular season over
the weekend, finishing second at
the Hokie Invitational in
Blacksburg, Va.
The Pirates went 3-2 and
finished with a 42-19 regular
season record.
ECU opened the tournament
on Friday by pounding North
Carolina A&T 23-1. The 23 runs
came on 24 hits and make for a
new ECU fast pitch record. ECU
scored in every inning and limited
the Aggies to just one hit.
Junior slugger Isonette
Polonius went 4-4 at the plate,
including two home runs and five
RBIs. Freshman second baseman
Keisha Sheppperson and
shortstop Marnie Oursler also
homered for the Pirates.
Shepperson went 3-3, scored five
and drove in five runs, while
Oursler finished 2-3.
Freshman starting pitcher Lisa
Paganini got the win for the
Pirates. It was her 13th complete
game of the season.
Pirate Head Coach Tracy Kee
said she was happy to see the
offensive explosion.
"Our hitters really showcased
themselves today Kee said.
"Overall I was pleased
with the way we hit the ball.
Obviously finishing second
- we're disappointed
Tracy Kee
Head Coach. ECU softball
The Pirates split two games on
Saturday, falling to Virginia Tech
in the first game before shutting
out Rutgers University in the
second game.
Virginia Tech scored three runs
in the fifth to take a one-run lead.
ECU tied the game in the top of
the seventh. Shepperson tripled
and scored on Oursler's sacrifice
fly. The Hokies scored a run in
the bottom of the inning to win 4-
3.
The Pirates bounced back in
the second game against Rutgers,
winning 9-0.
ECU scored four runs in the
third and five in the fourth. Senior
pitcher Jami Bendle limited
Rutgers to just two hits and
improved to 15-6 on the season.
The game was called after five
innings due to the eight run
mercy rule. The win against
Rutgers gave the Pirates the top
seed heading into Sunday's final.
In Sunday's first game, ECU
faced North Carolina A&T for the
"We're hitting the ball
really well, and besides the
games we lost, we're scoring
a lot of runs
Tracy Kee
Head Coach. ECU softball
second time. The Pirates scored
six runs in the bottom of the first
and cruised to an 8-0 victory.
Paganini allowed only two hits
and struck out seven. The win
lifted her record to 10-6.
The championship game
featured the Pirates in a rematch
with Virginia Tech. ECU scored
single runs in the first, fourth and
fifth innings to take a 3-0 lead.
Tech rallied in the top of the
sixth, getting all five of their hits
and scoring four runs. Neither
team could score the rest of the
way as Tech held on for the 4-3
final.
"We just made a few hanging
pitches and Tech took
advantage Kee said.
Denise Reagan took the loss in
both games against Tech to fall to
17-7 on the season. Reagan had a
no-hitter going into the fifth, but
gave up four runs on four hits in
the inning.
"Overall I was pleased with
the way we hit the ball Kee said.
"Obviously finishing second
we're disappointed
Polonius collected 12 hits over
the weekend to extend her
hitting streak to 22 games. She
finished the regular season hitting
at a remarkable .500 clip.
"We're hitting the ball really
well, and besides the games we
lost, we're scoring a lot of runs
Kee said. "Hopefully we will
have three good days of practice
Up next for the Pirates is the
Big South Conference
Tournament May 1-3 in Rock
Hill, S.C.
SOFTBALLyiyw�
Pirate LeadenThrough56 Games�kV
Batting LetcHtf
Isonette P17
Keisha SB
Amy HootIk
Jennifer 1-ft
PitchinelSO BB
Denise Re1.0?I "O PO . Mr
Lisa Paganini1.838-6 103.1�'W 61
Jami Bendle1.9214-6 109.144 20
'I
i
i
i





10 Tuttdiy. April 28. 1998
The East Carolinian
11
I
I
Pirate golf team finishes
11th at Cobra Collegiate
for more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Men tie for third in
CAA championship
' Makio Scherhaufer
SEN'tOR WRITER
j The Pirate Golf team ended up
on the 11th spot after their third
and final round on Sunday at the
annual Cobra Collegiate Golf
Tournament, held at Firestone
Country Club at Akron, Ohio.
While Greenville had a lot of
sun and temperatures in the 70s
over the weekend, the ECU golf
j team not only had to fight 18 golf
teams from all over the country
but also bad weather.
"It was cold, wet and felt like
30 degrees even though it was
actually about SO degrees said
Head Coach Kevin Williams.
"That's why the scores were
really high today
The Pirates finished their third
round of 18 with a score of 309
after posting scores of 295 and 303
in the first 36 holes played
Saturday, for a tournament total of
907.
Kent State won both the team
title and the individual title,
finishing with a total score of 861.
Individually, Jon Mills of Kent
State handled the weather
conditions most successfully, with
a finishing score of 205.
ECU senior Kevin Miller,
playing his final collegiate
tournament, finished tied for 28th
and led the team in his final
outing as a Pirate.
K. Miller fired a onc-under in
the first round and followed it up
with two rounds of 77 which give
him a total of 225 strokes.
Sophomore Marc Miller finished
one stroke behind his teammate,
with a par on the first 18 holes to
finish tied for 31st. Daniel Griffis'
73 posted a 232 for the Pirates,
which tied for 66th with his
teammate Scott Campbell.
Stephen Satterly rounded out the
ECU contingent, finishing tied
for 78th with a 235 total.
"Daniel GrifisJ played a great
round today Sunday Williams
said. "His 73 would be like a 67 or
68 under ideal conditions. Kevin
Miller also had a solid round. I
hate to see him go
The Pirates, who finished tied
for third in the CAA
Championship, have now
concluded their 1997-98 season.
af:
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us out
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Greenville
Mini Storage
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GOLF
ECU Scores
28(t) Kevin Miller
31 (t) Marc Miller
66(t) Scott Campbell
66(t) Daniel Griffis
78(t) Stephen Satterly
Totals
71-77-77
72-77-77
78-72-82
82-78-73
74-77-84
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Duke has chance to
sweep ACC tennis titles
ATLANTA (AP) � Duke will
attempt to sweep the Atlantic
Coast Conference tennis
championships for men and
women for the sixth time in seven
years Sunday after the Blue
Devils captured semifinal
victories on Saturday.
The Duke men blanked fifth-
seeded Florida State 5-0,
advancing to the title match
against No. 3 Virginia, which
J upset second-seeded North
j Carolina 4-2.
The Blue Devil women
� extended their winning streak
"against ACC competition to 101
jjriatches with a 5-0 triumph over
i�, (fourth-seeded Maryland and will
Cjgo for their 12th consecutive
j conference title against second-
Speeded Wake Forest, a 5-0 winner
Shyer No. 3 North Carolina State,
puke's women own a 38-1
h advantage over Wake in series
S history, including an 8-0 mark in
vjhe league tournament.
Cj In men's action, Duke
jjwrapped up its match against
jjFSl! when Doug Root beat Alex
f�(olub 6-4, 6-4 in No. 1 singles.
Virginia's victory over Carolina
Jwas clinched in No. 6 singles
Jwhen Tommy Croker beat David
Cheatwood 6-3,6-4.
J; Kathy Sell's 6-3, 6-2 victory
over Chrissie Terrill in No. 5
singles wn ped up Duke's match
with Maryland and Lule Aydin's
7-6 (5), 7-6 (5) victory over Nena
Bonacic in No. 2 singles gave
Wake Forest its victory over State.
and seven earned runs over four
innings in a losing effort for N.C.
State.
GHKNVlUt, NcJL 752-7303
"� nis�nwy m K
i�m���i
Carolina wallops N.C.
State at the plate
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
Brian Roberts hit home runs from
both sides of the plate and Mike
Bynum gave up only two hit over
eight innings as North Carolina
defeated North Carolina State 17-
5 on Saturday. Roberts went 4-for-
5, with three RBI and four runs
scored. He hit a two-run home run
batting Icfthandcd in the fourth
inning and added a solo blast from
the right side of the plate in the
sixth inning.
Jarrett Shearin also homered
for the Tar Heels (32-16, 12-7
Atlantic Coast Conference),
finishing 4-for-6 with four RBI.
Dan Moylan contributed another
home run and three RBI for
North Carolina, which pounded
out a season-high 22 hits. Bynum
(6-3) held the Wolfpack (30-18, 9-
8) scoreless over eight innings
before tiring in the ninth and
giving up all five N.C. State runs,
three of them coming on a home
run by Todd Demakes. Kurt
Blackmon (8-5) allowed 11 hits
Four fans injured at
Talladega race
TALLADEGA, Ala. (AP) � At
least four fans were injured
Saturday at Talladega
Superspeedway when a
windshield popped out of a car
and into the stands.
The incident happened near
the fourth-turn grandstand in the
early part of the Touchstone
Energy 300 NASCAR Busch
Grand National stock car race.
During a nine-car crash, a
windshield sailed over the fence
and into the crowd of 80,000
people. Track officials said three
spectators were treated at the
track for cuts, abrasions and
bruises. A fourth person was
transported to a hospital and was
scheduled to undergo surgery for
a deep cut on the hand. None of
the injured spectators were
identified. Brad Loney, a driver
involved in the crash, was taken to
a nearby hospital for
precautionary X-rays after
complaining about pain in his
abdomen and neck. Otherwise,
the drivers came away without
injury.
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East Carolina Playhouse
Its A View That Will Fill Vou With Compassion find Pity!
Arthur Millers
A VIEW
rccM THE
CRIDGE
Rated PG contains mature themes.
General Public: $8.009.00
eCU StaffFaculty: $7.008.00
eCU Students: $5.006.00
Children: $5.006.00
April 23. 24. 25. 27 and 29.1998 at 8:00 p.m.
April 26.1998 at 2:00 p.m.
Call-328-6829
McGlnnls Theatre-ECtl Main Campus-Corner of Fifth and Eastern Streets
The ECU Library is every students access for information &
knowledge, and like all resources it must be conserved. So
every student must help protect the Library.
4





inillt
E?
11 Tuttdiy, April 28, 1998
The Eilt Carolinian
use
find Pity!
BluegrassFolk Concert
Robin & Linda Williams
and Their Fine Band
In Concert
Saturday, May 2nd at 8pm
Dunn Center at NC Wesleyan College
Rocky Mount
'The finest act on the country-folk circuit"
-The News & Observer
Call (252) 985-5197 for tickets
Tickets: $15. $12 for students
sponsored by the
Rocky Mount Rotary Club
Accelerate
toward gradual
Skate through a
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opportunilyalTirmalive action
university, which accommodates the
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You've hit the books. Now it's time to hit the road. Ford can help. College seniors
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To be eligible you must graduate with an associates or bachelors degree between 10196 and t599 or be currently enrolled in graduate school.
You must purchase or lease your new vehicle between 1M9B and 16799. Some customer and vehicle eligibility restrictions apply. See your dealer tor details
Compton ends NASCAR
short-track drought for Ford
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) � Stacy
Compton broke Ford's year and a
half short-track drought Saturday,
leading almost the entire race in
winning the NASCAR Craftsman
Truck Series Craftsman 200 at
Portland Speedway.
Compton, who started on the
outside of the front row, took the
lead on the third lap of the 100-
mile race when pole starter Greg
Biffle was penalized for jumping
the start. Compton led the next
197 laps and was ahead of Randy
Tolsma's Chevrolet by 1.063
seconds at the end.
The victory, worth $41,600,
was the first on the tour by
Compton, who was starting his
30th race in the series. His best
previous Finish was second,
behind Tolsma, at Bakersfield,
Calif last October.
Compton averaged 62.101
mph in a race slowed eight times
for 48 laps by caution. A six-truck
accident on the 28th lap blocked
the track in Turn 4 but all of the
drivers were able to restart and
finish the $304,000 race.
Rick Carelli, who started 13th,
drove his Chevrolet around Jack
Sprague on the 197th lap to claim
third. Sprague, also in a Chevy,
took fourth, followed by Tony
Raines in a Ford. Ron Homaday,
Bryan Reffncr, Jay Sauter, Joe
Ruttman and Tony Roper
completed the top 10. Butch
Miller in 11th was the only other
driver to complete 200 laps.
The series point lead changed
for the third time in 1998, with
defending champion Sprague
taking a 660-652 edge over
Hornaday. The latter driver
entered the race with a two-point
edge.
Cornpton's victory was the first
for Ford on a track of less than a
mile in length since Mark
Martin's win at North Wilkesboro,
N.C on Sept. 28, 19.
"We sat back and rode the fine
half. Randy made a couple of
good runs on us and we were able
to get away from him said the
30-year-old winner, a veteran
mid-Atlantic area NASCAR
short-track driver. "We were a
little bit tight after the (last)
caution and we had to get to the
bottom of the track to keep
Randy at bay
Biffle lost his chance at victory
before the green flag flew.
NASCAR officials ruled he
accelerated away from the field
before the race officially started.
Biffle's Ford went to pit road for a
stop-and-go penalty, which
dropped him to 32nd in the field
upon his return. Later he was
involved in a spin and an accident
on lap 28, which cost him 29 laps
in the pits for repairs. He finished
26th.
Copy Editor &
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Positions
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WEEKEND
UNIVERSITY
An experience to last a lifetime.
Summer Session 1998
May 15-August 1
ENGL 1200-005Friday 6:00-10:00 pm
FINA 2244-099Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
ITEC 2090-099Friday 6:00-10:00 pm
MANF 3300-099Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
MATH 2283-003Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
NURS 4000-001Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
NURS 4001-001002. . Friday 8:00 am-5:00 pm
SOC1 2110-090Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
Summer weekend classes are open to all ECU
students. See your adviser for approval, then con-
tact the Weekend University, 102 Erwin building.
pmfMj The Weekend University
l Division of Continuing Studies
East Carolina University
J Greenville, NC 27858 4353
AST Telephone: 252 328 4696 or 800 328 6567
Carolina Fax. 252 328 6540
UMVB�srnr . . .
Smmmm E-mail: ceweeknd@mail.ecu.edu
Visit our website at http:www.dcs.ecu.edu
An equal opportunityAffirmative action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.
I
N






12 Tutitfiy. April 28. 1998
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
i!
iff
!i
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"�I
Ei
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I?
ROOM FOR RENT - available for
summer 1998. Unfurnished room in
furnished apartment near downtown
and across from campus. Must be
non-smoker, responsible and able to
pay your bills. Upperclassmen or
graduate preferred. Call 752- 5912.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED for summer at Player's
Club. 321-6215 for information.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, CONSID-
ERATE, responsible individual, fe-
malegrad student preferred, duplex,
Wyndham Circle on bus route or
. short walk to ECU. No pets, non-
, smoker. Call JC, 931-9090.
I FREE CABLE, NO DEPOSIT. Room-
; mate needed starting Aug. '98. 2
story townhouse, WD, 3 bdrms 2
; 12 baths. Great location. 13 utili-
ties. $225mo. Call Ashley 9 353-
1286.
"EL ROLANDO- ELEGANT, spa-
j "cious example of Frank Lloyd Wright
; architecture. 4 bedrooms. 3 baths,
' 3 fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty
foliage, near ECU & PCMH.
$999.00month. 524-5790.
: 3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH town-
i house in quiet neighborhood.
Washer and dryer. Availability is ne-
gotiable. If interested please call 353-
j 6505.
I
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school or work? Home Relocation
and Referral Service can make that
I move easier! Relocation packets with
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; Greenville and area rental properties,
j plus much more. Call 919-830-5559
; or visit http:
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� PARK VILLAGE ONE bedroom
apartments $300. With Stove. Re-
frigerator Washer Dryer Connec-
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PEONY GARDENS TWO bedroom
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:�HC 756- 6209
CANNON COURT & CEDAR
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Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
;Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
;Washer & Dryer Connections.
'�Wainright Property Management
SlC 756-6209
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
department $275.00 per month. Free
.watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets OK. Call 758-1921 ask for Ken.
FEMALE TO SHARE furnished
!Townhouse. April rent free. $225
: month plus 12 utilities 353-6806
!sk for Brigitte
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM 2 12
'oaths fireplace, all appliances, very
: large quiet pool close to park $595
: month 756-3009 after 6:00 pm
-Walk to ecu, 1,2,3.4. & 5 bed-
; room unitshouses: Available June,
July, or Aug. Call 321-4712.
1 BEDROOM APT. for rent.
Woodcliff Apts. Washer and dryer
hookup, 3 blocks from campus. As-
; sume lease. Call Michael, 522-4583.
leave message.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: two bed-
room. 2 bathroom, washer and dryer,
$510, Dogwood Hollow Apts. Call
; 931-0729.
RENT REDUCED FOR SUMMER!
1 Sublease two bedroom apartment,
� washerdryer available with deposit.
-Call 754-1939.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for August to share 2 bedroom apart-
ment, close to campus. No pets and
non-smoker. Please call Ashley at
321-2089.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER school
from June to August, one bedroom
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message.
COLLEGE VIEW 2 BEDROOM
apartments. Newly remodeled. Free
cable, stove, refrigerator, washer
dryer hookups, ground floor, ECU
bus line. Affordable. 931-0790.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: NON-
SMOKER. No pets. Student pre-
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new duplex wwasher and dryer.
$210mo utilities. Available May
14. Mike 551-0557, Nick 328-3180.
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apartment, very close to campus.
Call Kathleen 752-2705.
HOUSING FOR FALL SEMESTER!
Three bedroom, 2 12 bath 2- story
townhome, overlooks pool. Twin
Oaks, 1800 square feet. 1.5 miles
from ECU off 14th Street. No pets.
Available August. $595 monthly.
Large kitchen and fenced patio with
storage. Rusty, 355-3620.
SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM apart-
ment available end of May to sub-
lease June, July and August with
option to extend lease. On-site laun-
dry and pool. Near campus. Call
Amber 413-0891.
TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3455.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share townhouse at Kingston Place
for Fall 1998. Cable, water, trash
pick-up included in rent. Upper
classman, non-smoker, sports fan
preferred. If interested call 551-3849.
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS, 2
female roommates needed to sub-
lease 4 bedroom house for summer.
$135 rent 14 utilities. W&D. Must
like pets. Call 757-1467.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES NEEDED
ASAP. Nice 3 bedroom house on Elm
Street 1 block from campus. Cheap
rent. Call Josh for more details, 752-
2560.
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE for
rent. 5 blocks from campus, fenced
in backyard, central heat & AC. Avail-
able August. Call 551- 5025.
FORREST ACRES ONE ft two bed
room $300-$345. Stove, refrigera-
tor, free water 8- sewer, on ECU bus
route. Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
3 BEDROOM HOUSES IN Univer-
sity Area beginning May- Septem-
ber. $600-$700. Also one bedroom
apartmentswalking distanceutili-
ties included for $305. 757-9387
ECU AREA 3 BEDROOMS, 1 bath,
central gas heat and window AC
unit. Washer, dryer included, pets
OK. $550.00 month, yard work in-
cluded. Call 830-9502.
ECU AREA 6 BEDROOMS, 2 baths
house. Central heat and air down-
stairs. Huge rooms, pets OK. Avail-
able June 1st for $950.00 a month.
Call 830-9502.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY
WORKERS NEIDED
SUNDAY MORNINGS
9:15-12:15
Additional hours available.
Jorvis Memorial United Methodist Church.
510 S.Washington St.
Apply at church office.
Office hours - Bam - 12 noon,
and 1:30 - 5:00 pm.
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
high energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
PO. Box 370
Cove City, 28523
Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
Fax: 252 637 2125
(Near Greenville, Kinston,
New Bern)
.
ROOMMATE WANTED. NON-
SMOKING, female, stable room
needed to share apartment Player's
Club starting August. Private vanity
and sink included. Call 328-8013
ASAP for financial information.
ROOMMATE, MALE OR FEMALE
wanted to share a great house 3
blocks from campus. 2 blocks from
downtown, 3 bedrooms. Call us,
561-8178.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER WORK: full and part-
time available. $11.15 to start. Schol-
arships awarded. Great resume'
experience.Call for info. 353-0025.
SUMMER JOBS! APPLY Now! Ac-
cepting applications for bartenders
& waitstaff. Full or part-time, flexible
schedules available. Send resume
apply in person at The Reef Restau-
rant. PO Box 2772, Atlantic Beach,
NC 28512, 919- 726-3500.
GET ON BOARD now, the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
WORK OUT WEST. Live like a
gypsy. Work your butt off & get paid
for it. Must havew 2.75 GPA. Call
919-933-7716.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGE-
MENT, Inc. Now hiring for Summer
1998. Pool Managers, Lifeguards,
Swim Instructors. Charlotte; Raleigh;
Greensboro; NC. Greenville; Colum-
bia. SC. For Information (704) 889-
4439
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your
science of engineering degree to
work for an aerospace leader. Con-
sider being an Air Force officer. Ex-
celling training and benefits. For a
free information package call 1-800-
423-USAF
SUMMER JOB. COLORWORKS
Commercial Manager seeking paint-
ers, pressure washers, and carpen-
ters to work in Triangle Area. Free
on-site room for Summer. Make
$3500 working 40 hrwks at
$7.00hr. Contact Jason Arthur (919)
353-2381
AIRLINE EMPLOYMENT - ENTRY
levelskilled. Excellent travel ben-
efits. Ask us how! 517-336-0968 Ext.
L53621
CRUISE SHIP Cr LAND-TOUR
Jobs- Excellent benefits. World
Travel. Ask us how! 517-324-3090
ext. C53624
DISABLED MAN SEEKS physical
assistance. Flexible hours mornings
afternoonsevening. Lifting, bath-
ing, domestic chores, driving. Excel-
lent opportunity for helping profes-
sional. $6hour. Call 830-6028.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
Parks looking for part-time tennis in-
structors. Experience required. Pay
is $5.15hr. 15-20 hoursweek.
Work hours vary. Needed June thru
early August. Call 830-4559.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(9X9) 496-2224
SUMMER JOBS IN Raleigh. Cloth-
ing wholesaler is seeking to fill full
and part-time positions this summer.
We offer flexible schedules and regu-
lar pay raises. Must be able to lift
70 lbs. and have dependable trans-
portation. Call 1- 800-849-9949 and
leave name and number.
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR sum-
mer. Monday thru Friday daytime
hours. Must provide own transpor-
tation. No housework or cooking
required. If interested call Cindy at
355-3476 after 5:00.
LOCAL COMPANY EXPANDING
in Greenville area. Sales experience
helpful but not necessary. College
students welcome. For personal in-
terview call 355-7469.
PART-TIME CHILDCARE NEEDED
weekdays in our home for 3 y.o. trip-
lets. Hours flex. References required.
Call 321-8578.
PAID SUMMER INTERSHIPS
available for students who want to
travel, earn money, and gain valu-
able resume experience. For more
information call 1-800-251-4000
ext. 1576.
NOW HIRING FOR Summer- Pool
managers and lifeguards to work at
prestigious clubs in Cary, Chapel Hill.
Durham, Goldsboro, Holly Springs,
Greenville, Wilson and Rocky Mount.
Call 1-800-929-1214 for more infor-
mation.
WORK ON YOUR TAN and get
paid too. Easy PA work at Greenville
and outer banks area golf courses.
Call Steve at 919859-9233 for de-
tails.
BARTENDERS NEEDED. Must be
21. Apply at Pastime Billiards in
Kinston. 527-7828
SUMMER CHILDCARE NEEDED
beginning Monday, June 1. my
home. 7:30-6:00. Person must be
great with children, energetic, reli-
able. Must have excellent references.
No couch potatoes! Must be flexible
with overtime. $200 per week. Call
353-5623 before 3:00p.m.
WANTED: SUMMER CHILDCARE
for two boys, ages 8 and 10. Need
energetic, nurturing person who
likes to play with children. Duties will
include transporting children to and
from activities, such as the pool.
Hopefully in the Fall will continue as
part-time caregiver as well as office
work. Call 756-8886.
SUMMER JOB7 CARE FOR 2
boys, breakfastlunch provided. Car
needed, minutes away from pool, 3-
4 dayweek, great neighborhood
environment. 756-5350816-7176 for
details.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF NEEDED
for Girl Scout camps in coastal NC.
Positions include administrative staff,
counselors, nurse, lifeguards, boat-
ing instructors, and kitchen staff. Call
1-800-558-9297 ext. 113 for more
information and application.
A
CAMP PIXEWOOD
lor private Co-ed
youth camp located in the beautiful
rrounteraoTWestern North Caroina.
Over 25 activtes, including All sports,
water skjjHJit��ipool �6nres, art,
616 to 817Earn $1300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great tunl
Non-smokers call Tor
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
BE A CHRISTIAN CAMP
COUNSELOR THIS SUMMER
ALSO NEEDED: Life Guards, Canoe
Instructors, and Craft Directors.
QUALIFICATIONS: Joyful Christian outlookCommitment
to Christian educationWillingness and ability to share
our faithEnjoyment in the living and working in the
out-of-doorsEnjoy working with childrenyouthGood
healthHave completed college freshman year or 19
years old.
For more information and an application,
please contact Dennis Tawney at:
Camp Rockflsh, Rt 1, Box 15, Parkton, NC 28371, (910) 425-3529
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now recruiting for
summer positions. Employees are
needed for Saturdays and weekdays
between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on
your schedule and on business
needs. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commen-
surate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street.
Greenville (on the Downtown Mall).
FOR SALE
LIKE BRAND NEW. black lacquer
bedroom suite, $400 negotiable.
Great price! Must sell! Apply Style
Writer II printer. $100. Answering
machine. $35. Call 561-8032.
ATTENTION FORMER REDUX &
Phen-Phen users: we now have an
all natural, safe way tolose weight
win tout the side effects Dr. recom-
mended & guaranteed. I went from
a size 12 to a size 6 in 7 weeks! Call
now & ask me how. 1-888-648-
5831
DESK WITH ATTACHED book-
case, two dressers, pull-out sofa, and
two twin bed mattresses. Sold as a
set or separately. All very cheap.
Must go! Ask for Jen, 830-2661.
ATTENTION MOVIE FANS: Huge
collection of original movie posters
for sale. Excellent condition. Email
request to Posters2go@aol.com.
FREE CATALOG & PRICE list. Dis-
tributor Direct don't pay retail any-
more! Nor-Androstene - $45 Creat-
ine-$35. Get big! Call 919-233-1739.
2 BEDROOM. 1 12 BATH
townhouse, close to ECU campus
and medical school. $41,000. Please
call 355-4895 after 5:30PM. Moti-
vated seller: planning to buy a larger
home.
1991 MERCURY CAPRI CONV.
73K. PS. CC. AC, PW. Pioneer CD
player! Four Pioneer speakers! New
Pirelli P6000 SportVeloce tires!
$3500. Call Derek at 413-0744.
WASHBURN EA40 ELEC
ACOUST. thin body, cut-away gui-
tar. Black, beautiful! Must sell. $500.
651-3837.
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
invite any girls interested in rush next
year to a lemonade social. For more
information call 754-0955.
AMANDA WILLIAMS - Congratu-
lations on your graduation. You've
been a great big sis! I'll miss you!
Good luck. Love, Marvelle
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA, we had
a blast last Friday at the social. Next
time, we will leave the dogs in the
yard. Thanks, Alpha Sigma Phi
CHI OMEGA SOFTBALL TEAM -
you girls are awesome. Congrats on
your three wins and good luck in th
etournament. Love, your Chi Omega
sisters
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to
congratulate this years winners.
Third: Mary Stallings 2nd: Allison
Greenwood and 1998s Greek God-
dess: Cristina Wichtrich
THANKS TO RICHARD ROGERS
for all of his hard work and dedica-
tion in making this year's Greek God-
dess such a great success. Your
brothers at Pi Kappa Alpha
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to
thank all the contestants who par-
ticipated in Greek Goddess. The
event was a great success. Thanks
girls, you all did great.
KAPPA ALPHA, DELTA SIGMA,
and Alpha Omicron Pi, thanks for the
fun night last Thursday. We all had
a great time. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
A HUGE THANK YOU GOES to the
following fraternities for all their sup-
port with our towel contest: Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kappa Psi, Tau
Kappa Epsilon, Phi Beta Sigma, and
Pi Lambda Phi. Wfllove you guys!
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha! We
love you! Love, your sisters
Need to sublease
your apartment for
summer?
Need to find a
roommate to share
your apartment?
Need to unload the
manual typewriter
your parents gave
you?
You've come to the right spot. The
East Carolinian classifieds are the
perfect place to sublease your apart-
ment, find a roommate, or sell your
useless stuff.
But hurry. There's only 2
issues left.
i
M
hi
A
m
m
31
IB
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The East Carolinian
EA40 ELEC
body, cut-away gui-
ifull Must sell. $500.
ERSONALS
ION PI would like to
terested in rush next
ide social. For more
754-0955.
LIAMS - Congratu-
graduation. You've
g sis! I'll miss you!
, Marvelle
IA SIGMA, we had
y at the social. Next
sve the dogs in the
pha Sigma Phi
OFTBALL TEAM
isome. Congrats on
and good luck in th
ve, your Chi Omega
�IA WOULD like to
is years winners.
Ilings 2nd: Allison
1998s Greek God-
ichtrich
CHARD ROGERS
i work and dedica-
is year's Greek God-
eat success. Your
ppa Alpha
HA WOULD like to
ntestants who par-
sek Goddess. The
at success. Thanks
great.
L DELTA SIGMA,
on Pi. thanks for the
lursday. We all had
e. Alpha Delta Pi
(YOU GOES to the
ties for all their sup-
rfvel contest: Sigma
'hi Kappa Psi, Tau
hi Beta Sigma, and
Wflove you guys!
of Pi Delta
ITIONS TO THE
exa Tau Alpha! We
our sisters
ise
for
a
are
it?
the
.ter
ave
l The
re the
apart-
lyour
ly 2
13 Tuaidiy, April 28, 1888 '

clagiieds
Tin Em Ciroliniin
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate our Softball, soccer, and
water-polo terns on their victories
last week. We are proud of you all!
Keep it upl
ORDER OF OMEGA MEETING is
today at 6:00PM in The Under-
ground. All members must attend.
Also, Order of Omega social is to-
night. Details TBA at the meeting
tonight.
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
wish Lori Murphy the best on her
engagement! You are the best and
we love you!
PHI KAPPA TAU, thank you so
much for the predowntown last
'Thursday. We had such a great
time. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Sigma Sigma Sigma
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI
would like to thank Aaron Givens for
coaching our softball team this sea-
son. We appreciate all of your help
and support.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA PHI
on your win at Softball last week!
Thanks for a great game. Love, the
sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF
our seniors who are graduating. We
are so proud of you. Love, your sis-
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi
ALPHA OMICRON PI wants to give
a sincere Thanks! to Kappa Alpha,
Delta Sigma, and Alpha Delta Pi for
our social last Thursday. We had a
blast.
THANKS FOR A GREAT WEEK-
END. Player's Club 6. You are the
bomb. Your sisters of Alpha Omicron
Pi
TO THE NEW MEMBERS OF
Sigma Sigma Sigma: you guys are
doing a great job and we love you.
Love, the sisters of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
THE BIG SISTERS IN ALPHA Phi
would like to thank our new sisters
for a wonderful time Thursday night.
You guys really showed us a great
time!
PI DELTA WISHES TO extend a
very special thank you to the indi-
viduals who either attended, partici-
pated in, or judged our Wild 'N Crazy
Towel Contest. We appreciate all
your support! Love, the sisters
ALPHA OMICRON PI IS having a
lemonade social tomorrow for any
girls interested in rush for next year.
If you need a ride, call 757-0769.
ALPHA PHI, IT WAS great to spend
time with your guys at the Boy's &
Girl's Club last week. Can't wait to
see you guys again soon.
Love.Sigma Sigma Sigma
SERVICES
OYSTERS! SHRIMPICRABLEGSI
CLAMSI Come out to Tripp's Sea-
food and enjoy our freshmarket and
restaurant. Located 14 mile past
Bells Fork Square. Take-out wel-
come. 353- 0011.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
OTHER
DELTA SIGMA PHI, THE social last
Friday was a blast. It was great to
see you guys again. C At wait to do
it again soon. Love trWsisters and
new members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
THETA CHITHANK YOU for the
social Thursday night. It was a blast
as usual! Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi
THANK YOU TO BILL BLECHA
Kendall Jones, and Antonio Raynor
for representing us in the towel con-
test. You guys did a great job! Love,
the sisters of Pi Delta
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
Scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll Free 1-800-
218-9000 ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches. Cadillacs, Chevys. BMW's.
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WD's. Your
area. Toll Free 1-800- 218-9000 ext.
A-3726
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME YOUR sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800484-8546 (code 2465)
or POB 8663. Greenville. NC 27835.
OVERWEIGHT??? I LOST 15 lbs.
in 3 weeks and I'm still losing! 100
safe and natural Dr. recommended.
Money back guarantee. Call 830-
2447. Free samples
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP: Tuesday 3:304:30.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the
following workshop April 28th. If you
are interested in this workshop, call
328-6661.
CHOOSING A MAJOR or a Ca-
reer Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-5:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop April 28th. If inter-
ested, call the Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Anxiety:
Wednesday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering this workshop
April 29th. If you are interested in
this workshop, call 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Anxiety: Thurs-
day 3:304:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop April 30th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
call the Center at 328- 6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP; Thursday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop April 23rd. If you are
interested, call 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA PHI will meet Tues-
day, April 28 in Mendenhall Room
244 at 5:30 PM.
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSO-
CIATION will hold Officer Elections
at the general meeting on Wednes-
day, April 29th at 2.00 p.m. in GCB
1024. Intersted in running for office?
Be there! All majors welocme
toattend. Free Papa John's Pizza!
Come see what we're doing!
EASTGATE MINI STORAGE
10 DISCOUNT WITH STUDENT ID
' Bojangles
Parkers BBO
E. Greenville Blvd
Resident
Managers
Concrete & Steel
Construction
7 Days A Week
Lighted
Insurance
3201 Moseley Dr. Greenville NC
752-6900
tilt! 1 � �
eastcarolinian
Advertising Department
Looking
for a fast
paced job
that can help you
prepare for your
career goals?
You Will Gain Experience in:
� Calling on local advertising Clients
� Helping to develop creative advertising
� Develop and coordinate advertising campaigns
� Local advertising account servicing
Applications are available at The East
Carolinian, second floor of the Student
Publications Building or call 328-2000
for more. info.
The East
Carolinian
Advertising
Department
Can Help
You Get The
Needed
Experience
Before you
Graduate.
the l � �
eastcarolinian

THANK YOU TO THE dedicated
volunteers at the REAL Crisis Cen-
ter: Sara Aderhold, Stacy Allen,
Paulette Benz. Mary Boccaccio,
Suzanne Brown. Amanda Canady,
Tara Chadwick. Nicole Cox. Melissa
Falco. Katina Faulkner, Greta Graves,
Steve Green, Brandy Harper, Chris-
tine Harrington, Bobby Heath. Randy
Hoggard, Brandie Hopper, Russell
Horning, Karen Jessick, Carmen
Land. Amanda McCreary. Teresa
Mudra. Rupa Patel. Lori Rath. Janice
Reaves. Adeea Rogers. Christy
Rothenberger, Jennie Santana. Jen-
nifer Shields. Nancy Thurning.
Sandy Traynor, Jonni Wainwright,
Sally Welker. Amy Whitley. Ellen
Wrisley, Michael Walsh, Thank You!
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TUE APRIL 28- SENIOR RECITAL-
Patrick Kirby, horn, A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00 P.M.
WED APRIL 29- HORN EN-
SEMBLE, Mary Burroughs. Director,
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 P.M.
WED APRIL 29- GRADUATE RE-
CITAL Manuela Rebeggiani, piano.
A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 9:00 P.M.
THURS APRIL 30- TROMBONE
ENSEMBLE, George Broussard. Di-
rector. A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 P.M.
FRI MAY1- SENIOR RECITAL,
Whitney-Cole Kleinschuster, mezzo-
soprano, A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00 P.M.
FRI MAY 1- GRADUATE RECITAL.
Clarissa Severo DeBorba, percus-
sion, A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00
P.M.
SAT, MAY 2- ECU TUBAEUPHO-
NIUM ENSEMBLE, Jeff Jarvis.
Conductor.A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
7:00 P.M.
SUN MAY 3- GRADUATE RECITAL
Jacqueline Huguet, piano, A. J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4:00 P.M.
SUN
MAY 3- JUNIOR RECITAL. Nathan
L. Smith, guitar, A. J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7:00 P.M.
SUN MAY 3- JUNIOR RECITAL.
Leslie Higgerson, violin, A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 9:00 P.M.
MON MAY 4- FACULTY RECITAL
Jeffrey Bair. saxophone, A. J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 P.M.
MON MAY 4- STUDENT RECITAL
Carrie Maud Burkert, viola,
Immanuel Baptist Church. Elm
Street. 5:30 P.M.
ie�e D e s
�10lours per week
�CAjnajor preferred
�MirWumGPA2.l1
�Must be able to meet
weekly deadlines
�Experienced in Photoshop,
Ilhistrator, Quark XPress
Summer
Sports Writers!
Needed
�no experience necessary
�interest in all sports
�good organizationtime
management skills
�all majors apply
�minimum GPA of 2.0
�gain experience & extra cash
�apply at 2nd floor
student publications
building or call 328-6366
WZMB is accepting
applications for the execu-
tive staff for the first sum-
mer session. The deadline
for applications is Friday
May 1 st at 2:00pm. You
must have a 2.0 to
work for the station.
Pick up an application at the station
located in the basement of
Mendenhall, Monday - Friday 9-4
ACCEPTINC APPLICATIONS FOR:
Program Director
Music Director
Production Manager
Promotions Director
News Director
SportsDirector
Grants manager
ROSEMONT
SELF STORAGE
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
�ECU STUDENT DISCOUNT
$5 OFF PER MONTH
�ALL SIZES AVAILABLE
�LARGE COMMERCIAL 10X30
�SMALL 5X10
�SECURITY LIGHTING AND FENCING
�ELECTRICITY AVAILABLE IN SOME UNITS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED OFF
ARLINGTON BLVD EXTENSION
IN THE BELLS FORK AREA
CALL ANYTIME, DAY OR NIGHT
GET YOUR FRIENDS AND RENT TOGETHER!
FOR LEASING INFORMATION CALI
1909 ROSEMONT DR.
GREENVILLE, NC
k
353-1395





SSiniiiHiiM
I
i campus life runs along each day, photographers
11 be out and about to capture us, the students, at
: best. If you can identify yourself in any of our
es, present yourself to MSC 109 (Student
dership) and point "you" out to the staff there,
dsjyill be on hand for your efforts, so keep a
seye on those pictures!
There's just a few short weeks left in the semester.
, Since I am going to summer school, this will be my
first summer in living the "Great Metropolis a.k.a.
Greenville. Unfortunately most of my friends, along
with about 23 of the campus will be leaving town
until August. This means no more football games,
tailgating, or huge parties followed by late-nights.
So what the heck am I going to do to entertain
myself in this college town all summer? (All right,
get your mind out of the gutter). One of my buddies
has spent the last couple of summers here in G-town.
He gave me some suggestions of legal and
productive (yes, it is possible in this town) things to
do this summer. Here are ten of my favorites:
10. Borrow a canoe from the Rec. Center and paddle
the Tar River.
9. Go rollerblading.
8. Go horseback riding at a local stable.
7. Volunteer to work at a community organization.
6. Practice your golf swing.
5. Go swimming at the Rec. Center's outdoor pool.
4. Catch a "Sunday in the Park" concert at the Town
Commons.
3. Cook out at the park with some friends.
2. Watch a Wednesday night "Fresh Air Flick
1. Play Frisbee Golf.
AT LAST! With my community service debt paid and the semester drawing to a
close, it's FINALLY time to enjoy one of ECU's best-loved traditionsthe 19th
Annual BAREFOOT ON THE MALL. This year's event has a new twist, as the ffil
Mall and surrounding areas of campus undergo renovations. But who says you frS V
can't teach an old dog new tricks? This is one party that refuses to be y
canceled, as "Barefoot" is migrating down towards Mendenhall and the M�)
Student Rec. Center.
Kicking off at 12 noon on April 30th, the Battle of the Bands champs,
"Cashmere Jungle Lords will get things rolling as the first of four groups to
perform LIVE. Others include "Blue Rags "Biz Markie and "Southern
Culture on the Skids My sister Jane isn't so much into the music as in the five
outrageous "novelty" gags they've got planned for this one, and since she's
graduating in May, this is her last chance to beat me in the VELCRO
OLYMPICS. As for the rest of the party, booths and displays,
including some with concessions, will be out and about to
show off some of our on-campus organizations.
"Barefoot" is FREE for all of us students and to all ECU
faculty and staff. Except for the occasional lost tourist, it should
be one great PIRATE PARTY! Get your lawn chair out, and get
ready to rock. But remember, as with any on-campus function,
there is a NO PETNO ALCOHOL rule, so I had to tell my sister
she couldn't bring her boyfriend this time
TkAVBSI
Have a
Great
Simmieir!
AGH! It's a conspiracy -1 know it! College professors invented stress just to get even with us for making
fun of their wardrobe all semester. And they pay us back with final exams! But I'm going to beat them at their
own game. You see, I made a cheat sheet. Not with the
answers for the test, but with some great tips for
managing test anxiety that I picked up at the Center for
Counseling and Student Development. It goes
something like this:
Like a well-oiled machine, the Division of Student Life
relies heavily on very special individual comyonenfli In our case,
that often is the very people we were designed to serve�the
students! Without the contributing efforts of our student staff and
student leaders, the Division of Student Life would have never
achieved the level of excellence we've worked so hard to obtain.
In May, several of these valuable employees and leaders
become graduates of East Carolina University. As we say
farewell to these outstanding seniors, we wish them and all the
other graduates continued success.
Thank You and Good Luck!
� Try to get an adequate amount of sleep the night
before the exam.
� Eat a good breakfast and plan a strategy for studying
and dealing with tension for the day
� Be prepared. Have the right books, sharpened pencils
pens, paper, etc. And wear a watch to keep
track of time.
� Avoid caffeine and anxious or negative students
before the exam.
� Sit in a seat in which you will not be easily distracted.
� Look over the test as soon as you receive it so that
you know how to budget your time.
� Read each test question slowly. Underline key
words and phrases before you
begin.
� Take a 30-second break to breathe
comfortably and relax your
muscles when needed.
� Give yourself positive statements (I can do it, etc.)
throughout the exam.
With this list and some studying, I know I will
be prepared to do well on finals. And then I can tell my
professor what I think about that tie
Scott Forbes
Chicora Martin
Lisa Smith
Randy Gilland
Haden Jennings
Nicole Gray
Mary Paige Early
KelliKnox
Shannon Hullender
Tiyi Moori
KarraHall
Neteti Moori
KristenWall
Rebecca King
KarlLanford
John Batchelor
Shane Barham
Amie Briley
Reagan Craddock
Bobby Cutright
EUyn Felts
Tylon Guine
Ty Howard
Tracy Mason
Ashley Poplin
Amber Roberson
James Sturdivant
DelvinVrck
Dwayne Wright
Belinda Baxley
Barry Ferrell
Wayne Jacobson
Michelle Williams
Kim Chin
Melanie McStine
Barbara Wood
Shannon Hooks
Felix Daniels
John Hardy
Jennifer Hathaway
Maree Berkheiser
Melissa Miles
Amanda Brockman
Deborah Spruill
Jenny Leonard
Gregory Cox
LatashaWooten
Virginia Anderson
Jason Morton
Rochelle Owsley
Jen Leppien
Kristen Alford
Bianka Baty
Ami Brassure
Carla Cole
Vanessa Cullers
Kevin Earl
Amy Fitzgerald
Craig Hassel
Meredith Manoly
Jeffrey Mobley
Victor Putze
Vernon Shoaf
Alicia Talmadge
Crystal Wade
Sherita Young
Melanie Blanton
Maurice Harris
Karen Page
Kanesha Caldwell
Melissa Hajimihalis
Lucas VanEyk
Chad Parker
Kerri Sperring


Title
The East Carolinian, April 28, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 28, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1271
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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