The East Carolinian, April 23, 1998






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Chancellor overrules committee's
decision, dismisses DeMarco
Written explanation
expresses fear
Holly Harris
assistant news editor
The Faculty Hearing made their
decision and now Eakin has made
his. The Chancellor dismissed
tenured Speech Pathology profes-
sor Sal DeMarco last Thursday for
displaying inappropriate behavior
despite a recommendation by a fac-
ulty due process committee to the
contrary.
DeMarco was suspended with
pay in April of 1997 amid allega-
tions that he had demonstrated vio-
lent behavior towards colleagues,
and shouted
obscenities
during faculty
meetings A
panel of six
faculty mem-
bers was
assembled to
hear the case
and make rec-
ommendations
to Eakin
regarding the
termination of
DeMarco's position.
Chancellor Eakin said he
believes he has made the decision
that is most appropriate.
"I have reviewed the facts of the
case and the transcripts, and have
Chancellor Richard Eakin ruled to dismiss
Oe Marco, overruling the faculty hearing.
made the judgment that is in the
best interests of
the university
Eakin said.
According to
DeMarco,
Eakin's decision
was unfair
because it was
Eakin who first
brought charges
against him, and
Eakin who
made the final
decision. In
a written explanation to DeMarco
of his dismissal, Eakin stated he
believed faculty members were
afraid of DeMarco, and that
DeMarco had not complied with
requests to modify his behavior.
"The right way to have done it
would have been for him Eakin to
have someone else bring the
charges it's part of due process
DeMarco said.
The committee ruled in favor of
DeMarco on all the specifications
brought before them, citing
instances of inappropriate materials
placed in DeMarco's file (including
anonymous letters placed there
without his knowledge), ineffective
departmental leadership and ques-
tionable university policy towards
mediation of disputes. Despite the
fact that his yearly performance
evaluations indicated above satis-
SEE DEMARCO. PAGE I
ECU ranks 25th
"Most Wired"
Only public university
inN.C.torunk
City Council rules downtown bars
excluded from new zoning ordinance
Owners can run bars
without fear of being
moved
Craig D. Ramev
SENIOR WRITER
Four area bar owners can breathe a
little easier after Monday night's
ruling by Greenville's City Council.
The clubs were excluded from a
new zoning ordinance that will
keep private clubs out of the Evans
Street mall area.
Owners of Peasant's Cafe,
Wrong Way Corrigans, Cheap Shot
O'Malley's and Sports Pad, banded
together with the Downtown
Association of Restaurants and
Taverns (DART) to keep them-
selves out of the one block bound-
ary of Cotanche, Dickinson,
Washington and Reade.
This boundary was intro-
duced in February by uptown
Greenville and the City Council in
a plan aimed at bringing daytime
shops, restaurants and residents to
the Evans Street mall. They were
concerned that their plan might
Downtown ban now safe from zoning.
PHOTO Bt SAtRINA THOMAS
conflict with area club owners.
"Uptown Greenville was
concerned with the incompatibili-
ty with restaurants and bars that
might open in the mall said Harry
Hamilton, Greenville's chief of
planning. "In the last 10 years, the
city has encouraged residents to
move to the area. Nighttime activi-
ty could create potential conflict.
There may also be some retail busi-
nesses that wouldn't want to be
near a club
When DART heard about
the proposal, it was just days before
Greenville would vote on the pro-
posal. They quickly hired attorney
Fred Martox to help delay the rul-
SEE D0WMT0WII. PAGE 1
Laura Lee Hines
STAFF WRITER
ECU ranks 25th in the nation as
one of America's "most wired" col-
leges. The university is the only
public university in North Carolina
included in Yahoo! Internet Life
magazine's listings.
Rankings are based on 22 fac-
tors in four categories � general
services, academics, social life and
computer statistics. ECU moved
from 93rd last year to 25th this year,
outranking Duke and Wake Forest
� the only other N.C. universities
included in the list.
"ECU continues to make great
strides in. raising the information
technology (IT) bar in education
said Ernest Marshbum, director of
academic computing. "Beginning
with a commitment to upgrade the
campus networking system with
fiber optics and just this year
becoming the 'first' university in
the nation to implement Microsoft
Exchange 5.0, ECU continues to
make steady progress in education-
al IT
Chancellor Richard Eakin attrib-
utes ECU's technological achieve-
ments to three main factors: the
installation of a $14 million asyn-
chronous transfer mode (ATM)
fiber optic network, the informa-
tion-technology fee included in
student tuition and ECU's commit-
ment to equip faculty with up-to-
date technologies including new
computers for faculty every three
years.
The ATM fiber optic network
enabled ECU to be the first univer-
sity to implement Microsoft
Exchange 5.0 as its campus-wide
messaging system This systems
was chosen after an 18 month eval-
uation period of five messaging sys-
tems. It proved to be the most
effective means for "nomadic user"
access, providing world-wide e-mail
accessibility, attachments capabili-
ties and other assets. Exchange
was also the most cost-effective
SEE WIRED. PAGE 2
Vnivmilia iutiiss thr nation
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Mttgninrhftsrtl'on ��fm1on in 4
mugarirs. Soar art listrdMoa.
i'r
WtyttfteigS, But Not 1
Sonic Plaza nearing
completion
Carolyn Rob bins Hyde
staff writer
A new work of public an is nearing comple-
tion at ECU. The one of a kind "Sonic
Plaza" is targeted to be completed by the
end of May 1998.
"The $31 million price tag is funded
through a State Bond Referendum. The
North Carolina Arts Council commissioned
this project under the Artworks for State
Buildings Program said Bruce Flye, direc-
tor of facilities services.
It is through this program that artworks are com-
missioned for new public buildings using .05 percent
of a building's construction budget. An example of
Technology fee used for
students only, officials say
$40 for hands-on
equipment, $10for
upgrading
The Sonic Plaza, designed by well-known architect,Christopher Janney.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
such artwork can be seen at the Educational Building
in Raleigh where they have a mural on the mall.
SEE SONIC. PAGE 3
Craig D. Ramey
SENIOR WRITER
ECU has one of the lowest student
computing and technology fees in
the state, but manages to keep one
of the most technologically con-
nected campuses in the nation by
spending its money on what offi-
cials call student oriented comput-
ing.
"Of the $50 students pay, $40
goes to hands-on, discipline specif-
ic, student- oriented computing
said Ernie Marshbum, director of
computer information systems
(CIS). 'The other $10 goes to a $13
million bond for upgrading
Marshbum has a strict policy
against spending student technolo-
gy fees on anything but students.
"We won't spend that money on
a lab instructor's station, tables,
desks, chairs or an overhead com-
puter screen Marshbum said.
"That is specifically for student
needs. We will not buy a computer
for a faculty member with that fee
When deciding on how to spend
the money, all departments that
want computer technology for their
students must submit a request to
CIS. This request must ask for what
they want specifi-
cally. "We evaluate
the benefit to the
student and com-
plement it with
money we receive
from state fund-
ing Marshbum
said. "If we order
the technology and
it is less than the
money a specific
department was
granted, we keep
the money and spend it on another
department that might need it
more ECU spends over
$600,000 a year on computer labs.
Each year different departments
receive different amounts, depend-
ing on how much they have
received in the past.
"We try to look at the total time
frame Marshbum said. A com-
"Wewillnotbuy a
computer for a faculty
member with that fee
Emie Marshbum
Director ol computer
information systems
mittee made up of faculty, staff,
graduate students and undergradu-
ate students decides on where the
money goes. Determining factors
may include the total number of
student hours a department has
been enrolled for the upcoming
year, the age of their lab and how
important the lab is to ECU's pub-
licity and reputation
as a prestigious uni-
versity.
"If the lab is a
showcase that might
bring us a lot of atten-
tion, we would proba-
bly help fund it
Marshbum said.
Wake Forest and
Duke are the only
other schools from
North Carolina on the
Use ECU was also the
first to install an enterprise-wide
"pillow port" system.
"With the pillow port system, for
every pillow or head on campus,
there should be an e-mail account
and a place to use it Marshbum
said. "We made the commitment to
the pillow network four years ago.
I'm very proud of what we've
accomplished
TODAY
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TOMORROW
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Opinion
Lifestyle
Sports
New bar law
might not be such
a bad thing.
Bootlegs may
be the way
B(g
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
'An you genuinely happy at ECU?"
Football's great-
est move on to
the NFL
re you
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I T i i f





3 Thunday
I
2 ThurtiiY, April 23. 1898
news
f
Tha East Carolinian
Med School opens clinic
Downtown
continued from page I
Office located in
EJizakrtCity
Mohamed Hussein
staff write!
The ECU psychiatric clinic has
opened and is ready to embark on
its mission to provide psychiatric
services to adults. The new office
opened in February and is located
in Elizabeth City.
"The clinic provides outpatient
services and hospital nursing to our
patients said Shari Thompson,
office manager of the clinic.
The clinic also serves as a rural
residency training site for physi-
cians who have completed medical
school and are in a specialized pro-
gram.
The clinic also provides services
for children and adolescents on a
monthly basis by board-certified
child psychiatrists from the ECU
School of Medicine.
Dr. Marilyn Hammond directs
the clinic Hammond, an associate
professor of psychiatric services at
ECU, has a long-term goal of
increasing the number of psychia-
trists who choose to settle and work
in rural areas. According to
Hammond, most psychiatrists
establish their practices in the type
of community in which they did
their residency training.
"The program is designed to
help these new physicians see the
advantages of life in a small com-
munity Hammond said.
Wired
continued from page I
plan available.
The information-technology fee
allows funds exceeding $700,000 a
year to be spent on technological
equipment to benefit students.
"We want our students to gradu-
ate with more than just 'computer
literacy,m said Richard Brown, vice
chancellor for administration and
finance. "Employers look for peo-
ple who know how to function in
the 'information age' and our grad-
uates are becoming more and more
attractive because of the hands-on
experience they have gained at
ECU
Marshburn said ECU is not rest-
ing with this achievement, but will
continue to maintain the advances
and recognition earned.
Demarco
continued from page 1
factory performance, DeMarco said
' he was targeted for "character
assassination because he did not
agree with several decisions the of
"die administration.
"There is absolutely no docu-
mentation that supports Eakin's
tlaim DeMarco said. "If I acted
this way than my performance eval-
uation should have noted that.
Nowhere did those evaluations
indicate that I was hostile
Despite the Chancellor's ruling
and contrary to the committee's
decision, committee member Dr.
Margie Gallagher said that the
Chancellor is adhering to university
policy.
"It has been my personal expe-
rience that the chancellor does not
discredit input from the faculty
Gallagher said. "The committee
provided the chancellor with a
report I personally think our
report reflected how the committee
felt about the case, but the chancel-
lor has to rule and he has to live ,
with that decision
DeMarco said he will appeal the
ruling to the university board of
trustees and then further to the
UNC- system board of governors if
the trustee's decision is not favor-
able. DeMarco, who surfers from
multiple sclerosis, has also filed for
an investigation by the Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission alleging that the uni-
versity discriminated against him '
by intimidating and harassing him.
as well as refusing to reasonably
accommodate disabilities that his
illness has caused him including
spasticity and depression.
DeMarco put in his request to
be heard by the board of trustees
the day that his dismissal was
announced. The board has 45 days
to decide if they will hear
DeMarco's case. DeMarco said he
would consider employment with
the university if the board of
Trustees rules in his favor.
Until the board notifies
DeMarco on his case status the
matter will remain unresolved.
Eakin said that he is unsure how
the board will rule.
"I could not possibly give an
opinion Eakin said. "Now, for the
process to continue and for me to
make a prediction would be inap-
propriate
it
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ing and keep them outside the
boundary.
"I feel very good about
the result Mattox said.
"Everyone who had an existing
club in the boundary was exclud-
ed. I have no complaints
By excluding the four
clubs in the proposed ordinance,
the owners will be able to continue
operating their businesses without
fear of having to move or change
their image. This ordinance has
been designed to not bother pre-
existing businesses, but to keep
new clubs out of the mall.
"We are happy to be on
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bars downtown said Paul
Edwards, owner of Peasant's Cafe.
City Council and uptown
Greenville have agreed to spend
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Once the mall is complet-
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if their primary income is from
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by day and alcohol by night; over
half of their earnings must come
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Sonic
continued from page I
There is another such work, a
sound sculpture, at the Revenue
Building.
The project artist for the Sonic
Plaza, Christopher Janney, is an
internationally known sound artist
who has created interactive
soundarchitecture installations in
Rome, Paris, Boston and New York.
Upon completion, the "Sonic
Plaza" will consist of four elements:
the ground cloud, a media glock-
enspiel, a percussive water wall and
sonic gates. The ground cloud is a
12-foot circle of water mist over a
gate designed to "dance according
to the whim of the wind, at times
static, at times furious Janney
said.
The media glockenspiel is the
clock tower. Inside the face of this
clock tower is an circular ring of a
dozen, 20-inch video monitors cen-
tered around a set of three front
doors from which various icons will
emerge four times a day. At dawn, a
rooster will appear, crowing. At
noon, a steam whistle with smoke
.and at the end of the day the sound
of cannon fire, as if from a pirate
ship.
Each night at midnight, a sur-
prise object and sound will be seen
and heard. ECU music and art stu-
dents, along with faculty supervi-
sion, will determine the sight and
sound. As you near the new
entrance into Joyner Library, there
will be a 15-foot by 40-foot percus-
sion water wall. Within this wall
will be 64 water jets arranged to
play a series of constant changing
patterns of water mist. Janney
designed the fountain to respond to
activity, using proximity sensors.
"When no one is there, the foun-
tain will be quiet, asleep Janney
said. "As people pass by, it will
wake up and start to dance
The sonic gates are the classical
a NOTCH jml
, V �!�: M y
Name
Don
Joyner
Department
Undergraduate
Studies
Nina M. Dry
STAFF WMTIH
Don Joyner, assistant dean of
undergraduate studies, has been
named TECs faculty member of
the week.
Joyner graduated from ECU
in 1974 with a bachelor of science
in business administration.
Upon returning to the univer-
sity in 1978, Joyner received his
masters degree in counselor edu-
cation. He then went on to
become a university residence
counselor from 1979-1988.
I was kind of the guidance
counselor in the residence halls
Joyner said. "We (the university
residence counselors) would
come in Monday through Friday
from 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. and did
career exploration, provided aca-
demic information to the stu-
dents and helped students with
personal and social difficulties
Joyner advanced to become
the coordinator of the freshmen
experience seminar and the assis-
tant director of orientation.
"This is when I started
putting together this class and
designing the syllabus Joyner
said. "My primary job was the
development and teaching of the
freshmen seminar
After a time as the direc-
tor of orientation, Joyner accept-
ed his current position as the
assistant dean of undergraduate
studies. He also teaches COAD
(the department of counselor and
adult education) courses.
"COAD helps students on
three different levels Joyner,
said. "The first level is the,
adjustment and understanding of
the university environment; (he
second is the understanding of
academic requirements, specifi-
cally academic advising, under-
standing the catalog, roles and
regulations, and awareness of,
various study skills that will
enhance their performance; and
the third is career exploration
Joyner teaches four to five-
sectioas of the COAD courses
each semester, and said he also
tries to get volunteers to teach
the class.
"I want to develop a special
mentoring relationship between
the faculty members and a group
of students Joyner said.
Joyner said that he enjoys his
present job because besides,
teaching, he also supervises at'
the academic support center.
"Every student who is in acade-
mic difficulty is required to be
involved in an intervention pro-
gram Joyner said. "Academic
difficulty is anybody who either
falls under academic probation or -
academic warning
According to Joyner, between
1000-1400 students attend his
workshops each semester.
columns from the original Joyner
Library structure. The difference
is, they will be equipped with
photo-electric cells to emit a tone
from a speaker overhead whenever
movement is sensed.
"The great thing is all this
equipment is programmable Flyc
said. "The idea of interactive art is
almost a reality for ECU
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aak





4-Tlwtfav. April 23. 1898
opinion
Tin Em Carolinian
eastiSarolinian
Amy L Roysteh Mat
Heatheh Blkcess ManagingEdtmt
Amanda Austin Haw Editor Tracy m. lauiach SporaEdira
Hoi.lt Harris Am. Km Urn Steve Losev aw. SporaEdiiw
ANDY Turner LittSTM Editor Carole Mehle Hud Copy Mm
John Davis At�mm Uteiyia E� John murphy SiaHiknrnm
Matt Hece MvanuingManaga
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Caaoan. Sudan Mdioaaa Suaing. ECU. GnamM HBSM3S3 for ntaimwn.cil 919 3� 6366
oumcw
Can you believe the nerve of that City Council? Passing a law restricting the growth of bars
downtown. Don't they know it's our God-given right as college students to spend our week-
ends in an alcoholic haze? All those old fogeys want to do is spoil our fun, right?
Not really.
The new law might not be as bad as ECU students think it is. The law that was passed
by the City Council only applies to the Evans Street Mall area, better known as the brick
walkway where Energy is. New bars will only be prohibited from being opened in the area
bordered by Cotanche, Dickinson, Washington and Reade.
That's really not a whole lot.
It's more like a one-block area. New bars and dance clubs could still open up, so long as
they are outside of the designated area. That leaves 99 percent of Greenville available for
bumpin grindin' and boozin
As popular as places like the Cellar and the Sports Pad are with some students, there
are some who would like to see a greater variety downtown than dance club after dance
club. Downtown Greenville could see a growth of restaurants and shops of all kinds on
Evans Street.
A crop of new restaurants is something downtown sorely needs. Most downtown areas
in major college towns have a wide range of food available to students. With a few excep-
tions, the biggest decision students can make now is what kind of pizza or subs to have.
Under the new law, restaurants can be allowed to have alcohol and entertainment, so long
as more than half of their money comes from food sales.
More places to shop will be a welcome addition to the cigar stores and head shops we
already have. It would be great to have places right downtown to buy clothes, rent movies,
and so on.
Residential areas are in the plan. Hopefully, they will be affordable enough for students
to live in. They could provide another spot for off-campus housing within walking distance
of campus.
At the first glance, the new law looks like an effort to stifle what goes on downtown.
Actually, it is a move to create a more diverse environment and revive an area in a slump.
If we wait, soon there will be a better downtown that has something for everybody. A lit-
tle variety is never a bad thing.
OPINIOI
(Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
We're not as civilized as we think
we are not that
civilized. Maybe, we will
never be the civil society we
like to think we are.
Civilization: making or becom-
ing civilized. Civilize(d): to cause
to improve from a savage or primi-
tive stage of human society to a
more developed one.
The social psychologists, news
media, religious leaders and the
anti-gun lobby will all try to explain
what happened in Arkansas. Some
blame society as a whole; our fasci-
nation with violence and guns are
the cause of the shooting. Others
might blame the parents, the kids
or even Satan as the cause of the
children's trouble. I believe I have
happened upon the answer. The
human race is not civilized.
As a species we have either com-
mitted or allowed genocide to hap-
pen all to often. Hider tried to
eradicate, homosexuals, followers of
the Jewish faith, the handicapped
and whoever the hell he felt was
not "perfect Our own govern-
ment has killed or attempted to kill
leaders of foreign nations. Ethnic
cleansing has recently happened in
Bosnia and Somalia to name two.
We, as United States citizens, flinch
when the President orders troops to
stabilize one of these regions.
Civilized?
Traffic accidents happen all the
time. Slowing down to see what
happened satisfies our morbid
curiosity. The flashing lights of the
ambulance draw our eyes to the
gruesome seen like a vulture to a
carcass. Human generosity takes a
back seat to animal instincts.
As a society, many of us have
evolved the ability to go deaf on
demand. "Spare a quarter, mister
said he. Said I, nothing, my eyes
averted from this man. My eyes,
your eyes they too have turned
away from another human being.
We justify our silence by saying
these people are alcoholics, on
crack, or whatever we feel is neces-
sary to alleviate our conscience. I
have seen animals with more com-
passion than you or me.
We laugh and joke at other peo-
ple's misfortune. What is the dif-
ference between Christopher
Reeve and O.J. Simpson? O.J.
walked. I laughed, as did everyone
else I knew who heard the joke.
Cops is still being broadcast.
The Ultimate Fighting
Championships draw huge crowds,
both in the arenas and on televi-
sion. Watch the highlights from a
NASCAR race; two things are usu-
ally shown: the winner getting the
checkered flag and wrecks. Listen
to the crowd at a boxing match,
hit'em, pulverize the kid or even
kill him.
What happened in Arkansas was
a tragedy. I am not saying I am any
better than everyone else. All I am
trying to say is that we are not that
civilized. Maybe, we will never be
the civil society we like to think we
are. Remember, the Roman
Empire thought they were civi-
lized. What does history tell us
about them?
I am not advocating a
Neanderthal type of life-style. All I
am saying is that we should not pre-
tend to be something we are not.
LETTEI
jto the editot
State's impeding colleges
This letter is being written in
response to the article "University
no longer accepting out-of-state
applications appearing in The East
Carolinian on April 21.
The true reason for the restrict-
ed university admission policy for
the University of North Carolina
system is not really financially
based, as the article explains. The
state of North Carolina would love
to reduce the amount of money it is
required to give the constituent
schools of the system and place
that financial burden on out-of
state students. There is a larger
problem, however, that restricts the
ability of North Carolina to do this.
Who is to blame? The North
Carolina public school system,
which ranks a whopping 48th in
the country in terms of SAT scores.
What this means is that many thou-
sands of North Carolina high school
graduates are literally unable to
attend college outside of North
Carolina.
What all this means is that the
North Carolina public school sys-
tem is hurting the UNC system by
not allowing the constituent uni-
versities to accept the best students
who apply, thereby improving the
universities. Iastead, they are
required to accept students "educt-
ed" in North Carolina � students
who are literally unable to read and
write a simple paragraph (I have
graded junior-level papers here and
was appalled).
Unfortunately, North Carolina
would rather penalize universities
for trying to admit better students
than address a real problem, that of
the totally inadequate education it
is providing for its children.
Robert H. Kelley
Graduate Student
Maritime History
umnists
Marvelle
Sullivan:
NO
Does ECU really need
a new dining nail?
William Stacey
Cochran:
YES
a new cafeteria
will only benefit a
small portion of the
student body
East Carolina University has decided to build a new
cafeteria for the West campus. Honesdy, building this
new cafeteria is a good thought but definitely not the
brightest idea that has ever hit the university adminis-
tration. Of course it would be nice to have a new eating
facility, but there are just too many others things of
which we are in dire need.
Students, faculty and
everyone and their brothers
have been practically beg-
ging for a parking deck. A
parking deck is what we
need if there is money to
bum.
The lack of money may
be a factor stifling the con-
struction of the parking
deck, so now that money is present, let's just utilize it for
something we do not necessarily need, right?
There are numerous reasons that the funding should
be allotted to a different project. First, a new cafeteria
will only benefit a small portion of the student body.
ECU, relative to other state and private universities, has
a very low percentage of students who reside on cam-
pus. Out of those on campus students, many do not
even regularly dine at the dining hall due to lack of time,
quality of food, etc
So why can the money not be used for a project that
profits a greater portion of the student body (like a park-
ing deck)? The situation would be entirely different if
there were only one cafeteria to facilitate the entire
ECU campus, but we are spending money to replace
something we already have. It is ludicrous!
The issue would not be so frustrating if there seemed
to be some logical and coher-
ent motivation for this con-
struction. I am sorry, but the
need for more student ser-
vices does not justify the cafe-
teria project. The whole
thing is just frivolous. I have
lived on West campus, eaten
in Mendenhall, the whole
nine yards, and it really was
not that traumatic (except for
maybe the salad bar around
closing time).
At a rime when the university is making great strides
in such a variety of areas, it would be very appropriate to
give this campus something that would benefit most all
of the students and the
faculty�whether it be a
new parking deck, a
bridge over Tenth Street,
a raise in professor's
salaries � anything
besides a dining hall!
Again it is not as if a new
hall wouldn't be nice, it
is just not necessary. And
when it comes to money,
especially around here,
necessity should rule.
.the need for
more student ser-
vices does not
justify the cafeteria
project
give this
campus something that
would benefit most all �
of the students and the
faculty
Mendenhall Dining Facility was built in 1974, nearly
a quarter century ago. For the past 24 years, it has
stood as a place for thousands upon thousands of stu-j
dents to eat together as a united student body. It has
been a place to socialize, to study, to relax � in short, '
it has been a place to be an East Carolina University j
student. It is where we go when we need nourish- j
ment.
But buildings change. I remember eating at Jones J
Hall Cafeteria long before ground was broken on '
East Campus's commodious Todd Dining Hall �
Students stood in lines that literally streamed out of .
the bowels of Jones Hall (pun painfully intended).
But alas, times changed. Mendenhall could not11
efficiently serve the influx of students making the
trek from College Hill to avoid Jones Hall's roach-
infested, 200-seater, "cafeteria" (I use this term
loosely. My father and mother used to cat in Jones
back in the eariy '60s, so by 1992 it was truly crum-
bling and squalid).
Students flooded Mendenhall between 5:45 and j
6:45 PM, and it was not uncommon for lines to reacrT
out to the central courtyard outside of Mendenhall.
There was no question about the need for Todd. And
Todd Dining Hall has certainly helped attenuate the
mass of students herded into Mendenhall every
evening.
Still though, there are ten dorms on central and
west campus (four of which are high rises) and only
five in close proximity to Todd (with Tyler being the
only high rise on the Hill). Central and west campus
students have become the ones who make the trek in
order to avoid the overcrowding and less refined con
ditions of Mendenhall. But the student body has
grown.
There are times when it is simply impossible toj;
find a table in Mendenhall due to overcrowding (ancC
don't you hate that feeling of helplessness when-
you're standing there with a tray of food in your-
hands but there's no place to sit and it feels like half,
the dining hall is watching to see how you handle
your precariously held tray, while all-t he- while you're
trying to look cool and find a place to sit and winking
at one or two of the opposite sex and managing some-
how not spilling that grilled cheese and tater tots
which any gourmand can appreciate). And even
Todd becomes overcrowded during its peak hours.
Fact is, we simply need a larger and more efficient
diruri�facility.
One can complain about the lack of parking and
the need for a parking deck, but it is this nickle-and-
dime columnist's belief that students need efficient-
ly served food more so than a place to park their
Hyundai. I mean, you gotta eat (although Hyundais
certainly have their place too).
The new 600-seat dining hall will be a welcome
addition to west campus. And let's face it; ECU's din-
ing services make an exorbitant amount of money
from monopolizing our dining choices. A new dining
hall will attract more students and make even more
money for good ole ECU. It will assure continued
growth and diversification to ECU, the pride of
Eastern North Carolina.
?�
Write a letter to the editor!
5 Thursday Apr
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A new dining
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the pride of
:or!
8 Thurtdiy April 23, 1998
Harris Teeter M
comics
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an additional 110 purchase
Otlei good April 22 through
April 28. 1996
COUPON
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With This Coupon lib. bag
Fresh Express Garden Salad
COUPON
VALUE
Limit one coupon per visit and
an additional $10 purchase.
Oder good April 22 Ih
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Harris Teeter
Drink Feature
Stock Up 8c Save
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1 Ballplayer
Yastrzemskl
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9 Proverb
14 Woodwind
instrument
15 Beatles'
metermaid
16 Harvest worker
17 Groeningof
The Simpsons-
IS King of comedy
19 Sports venue
20 Nuclear
22 Some stung
players
24 Tranqullity
26 Ages and ages
27 Blemish
28 Hybrid fruit
32 Quaker pronoun
35 Actress Skjnoret
37 Pedal pumper
38 Parts
40 Serving of corn
41 Sedate
43 Macaw
44 "Company"
47 Michigan or
Ontario
48 Bronx nine
50 Make like a
bookworm
52 Pension acct.
53 Motorist guides
57 Again
61 Weighted down
62 Commonplace
writing
63 Inactive
85 Small amount
66 Barry and
Nelson
67 Approach
68 Faucet problem
69 Beer stimulant
70 Units of work
71 Theater
backdrops
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Answers from Tuesday
DOWN
1 Deep sleep
states
2 Let up
3 Dynamo part
4 Ponderer's
phrase
5 Thanks, to
Pedro
6 Feel III
7 Actor Keach
8 Window element
9 Ear shells of the
sea
10 Brave
11 Pub choices
12 Lady's man
13 Memorable
periods
21 Business abbr.
23 Low tat
25 Attempters
28 Matador
29 Isle of exile
30 Onion's kin
31 Fairy-tale
monster
32 Ice-cube
container
33 Israeli dance
34 Spirited vigor
36 Actress West
39 Superlatively
strict
42 Spinsters
45 Leader
46 Tape, glue, etc.
49 Small gazebos
51 Fruit drink
53 Wmona of "Little
Women"
54 Dig deeply?
55 Little In Lille
56 Ginger cookies
57 Chipper
58 New York c
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jr�
59 Zany Imooene
60 Merchandse
category
54 Fall behind





I
I
6 Thurtdty, April 23. 1991
reviews
lifestyle
Tht Etit Carolinian
Van Halen
Van Halen III
2 OUT OF 10
Pat Reid
senior write!
For the millions of Van Halen fans
everywhere, the wait is finally over
as Van Halen III is in stores and
available for mass consumption.
Unfortunately, it lacks the spark
and energy that fans have come to
expect from the band and could
easily leave buyers regretting
spending the money.
Last summer, the band domi-
nated headlines as they shuffled
between three singers. First, there
was the surprise firing of front man
Sammy Hagar, who had been in
the band for over ten years. Next,
the band reunited with their origi-
nal lead singer David Lee Roth for
two songs for their greatest hits
package. Fans waited with baited
breath to see if the once tumul-
tuous relationship between Roth
and guitarist Eddie Van Halen had
settled down. Their fears were
realized when, in September, Roth
was given the boot a second time
and former Extreme singer Gary
Cherone was hired.
The band was silent thereafter
until work on the new album was
completed. Only then "did they
emerge from the confines of Van
Halen's studio to talk to the press.
Their message was clear This is
our best album ever and Cherone is
the best singer this band has ever
had. Based on this message, it
would appear that the band has not
yet listened to their own album.
Van Halen III has received
mixed reactions from fans, and
pales have been disappointing. In
fact, is the first Van Halen
album not to go to 1 on Billboard's
charts since 1983's 1984. One listen
explains why the album has failed
fo impress the record buying pub-
I The album starts off wonderful-
ly with a short instrumental called
fNeworld Featuring piano and
acoustic guitar, it relaxes listeners
just before the second track,
Without You" smacks them in the
i
face. "Without You" takes a little
getting used to for a number of rea-
sons.
i First, there is the adjustment to
the new voice. Second, the version
on the record is the original demo,
so there are some rough spots and a
few odd notes. However, after a
couple of listens, "Without You"
easily becomes the best song on
the CD.
The biggest problem with the
record is the songwriting. In inter-
views, Eddie talked at great length
about how proud he is of the words
on this album. He says, "For the
first time ever, the words inspired
Hie music That explains why the
longs lack the charisma of typical
Van Halen songs.
Lyrically, the songs try to say too
SEt VAN HALEN. PAGE 7 -
Sum films never mate il n lie Emerald City.
Some an to controversial. Seme art too small. Whatever tit maim, me fits
never gtt to see some mindly good
movies on tie bit sent. Win liey Ml video,
however, tiey'rt ears for lit ratine. This series miI loot at some of lie films
rial didn't matt lit Grttnvillt ml,
nit ones rialgolaway
.t7
3
Bootlegs, baby, may be the way
Just$20'&abrush
with thefeds away
Mark Brett
senior writer
Ah, the wonders of bootleg video.
Through means both legal and oth-
erwise (mostly otherwise), bootleg
entrepreneurs deal their wares to
eager customers worldwide who
crave rare entertainment nuggets.
Want to see the new Godzilla
movies being
made in
Japan? Go to a
video bootleg-
ger. Weird
Mexican
wrestling
movies? Ditto.
Pornographic
Swedish game
shows? You
guessed it.
Bootleg
video is the
only way to go.
How do these tapes get made?
Connections, baby, connections.
The good video bootlegger has con-
nections around the world who sup-
ply him with the strange, the off-
beat, the stuff that no legit video
company would touch with a ten-
foot pole. He makes copies of the
tapes, xeroxes some kind of box art
and puts the whole package on sale
via sci-fi and movie conventions,
through the internet, in his parents'
garage wherever he can.
If this sounds like a specialty
market, it is. But there's still a
dizzying array of material only avail-
Marry Christinas from the Star Wars gang
PHOTO COURTESY OF BORA FETT
able through bootleggers, some of
it surprising. Until recendy, pubes-
cent staple Heavy Metal was only
available through bootleggers, as
was Ralph Bakshi's animated clas-
sic American Pop. And The
Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai, one
of the biggest cult movies this side
of Rocky Horror, has gone out of
print Legally, anyway. �'
I've been introduced to whole
new worlds of cinema through
boots. Sure, in the wake of the suc-
cess of films like Broken Arrow and
Face-Off, Hong Kong action direc-
tor John Woo is enjoying immense
popularity. But where did he gar-
ner his American
following?
Through the
legion of fans
introduced to his
work by bootleg-
gers. Though you
can now get Woo
classics Hard
Boiled and The
Killer on legal
video, his really
hard-hitting
films, such as
Heroes Shed No Tears or Bullet in the
Head, are available only through
bootlegs.
And Woo's fellow Hong Kong
native Jackie Chan? Though the
market is flooded with his crappy
early films, his best are still
unavailable. Chan classic Project A,
which features his best prop fight,
the infamous bicycle chase attack,
can only be seen through bootlegs.
Likewise, Chan's best film ever,
the glorious Drunken Master II, has
never been released in America.
If you're a fan of anime (or
Japanimation, if you must), the best
stuff is only available through shady
Jackie Chan in Drunken Master II is worth life in prison.
PHOTO COURTESY OF FBI
means. The hugely popular series
Macross (partially adapted in
America as '80s cartoon series
Robotech) remains unavailable in its
original form. And more recent
releases, such as the fantasy anime
Vision of Escofoteme or the critically-
acclaimed Memories (from Akira cre-
ator. Katsuhiro Otomo), are avail-
able only in pricey, untranslated
Japanese imports.
But it's not only products of Asia
that can be found through your
friendly neighborhood bootlegger.
American television classics can
also be sought out if you know the
right people. Bootlegs can be
thanked for the continuing popu-
larity of Ralph Bakshi's infamous
Mighty Mouse cartoon show (the
one that supposedly showed
Mighty snorting cocaine � a false
allegation, but provocative
nonetheless).
Then there's the jewel in the
bootleg video crown, the long-lost
Star Wars Holiday Special. Who
knew they celebrated Christmas in
that galaxy far, far away? The mi
lions of American children who
tuned in for this dog back in 1979,
that's who! Meet Chewbacca's fam-
ily! See bad Imperial television fea-
turing Harvey Korman! Heir
Princess Leia sing "The Life Dajt
Song" to the tune of the Star War
theme! See the first appearance of
Boba Fett in a special cartoon fea-
ture!
The Star Wars people deny that
this "special" exists. Carrie Fisher
even says she never filmed it. Of
course, considering how stoned she
looks on the tape, I don't doubt thai
she forgot all about it But those of
us with bootleg video connectionji
know the truth!
And where else can hard-con�
David Lynch fans get their hands
on the full second season of Turin
Peaks, or, even more obscure, his
barely-aired sitcom On theAiri
Okay, I think you get my pot
The underbelly of world cinema
out there waiting for you, just
bucks and a brush with fedei
copyright law away.
Oh yes, the legal issue. Yes, alt
the videos listed here are, techni-
SEE BOOTLEG. PAGE 7
CQ JQCertrevii e w
Nashville Pussy burn live
Brewery crowd
feels thefire
Andy Turner
LIFESfYLE EDITOR
Breasts and fire and smoke and spit
and tattoos and sweat and stink
were all a part of it The Motown
music they piped in before it began
couldn't have prepared you. But
when it hit you, it hit hard.
Hard is the only way
Nashville Pussy knows. They
proved that Sunday night at
the Brewery in Raleigh.
Subtlety isn't Nashville
Pussy's strong point This is a
band who took their name
from a Ted Nugent song
called "Wang Dang, Sweet
Poontang Their new album
on Amphetamine Reptile
records is Let Them Eat Pussy.
Athens, Georgia is home to
the band's headquarters.
Pussy Manor.
Frontman Blaine Cartwright and
lead guitarist Ruytcr prowled
through the crowd before the show
began. The husband and wife duo
look like they'd beat the crap out of
Mickey and Mallory or any other
natural bom killers. They're natural
bom rock-n-rollers. A tidy girl wear-
ing one of those teeny-weenie faux-
leather backpacks looked around
nervous, lost
Cartwight and Ruyter made it to
the stage, where they were joined
by bassist Corey Parks, 6'3" and tat-
tooed everywhere; the Harley
Davidson tattoo on her midsection
proclaims, "EAT ME She's a
supermodel for Satan.
Ruyter and Parks are as likely to
smooch you as boot you. A brave
young man tried to climb on stage
before the show even started;
Ruyter's foot met him square in the
chest Another male offered Ruyter
a drink from their beer; she took the
bottle, drank and spit the beer on
Such nice boys and girls
PHOTO COURTESY OF AMPHETAMINE REPTILE RECOROS
him. He couldn't have been happi-
er
Nashville Pussy actually does
show inspiration from the Motown
music played earlier in the night;
the band blends '50s and '60s dirty
R & B with 70s-era KISS and
ACDC, all with punk attitude.
They're half Supersuckers and half
Lloyd Price. They even covered
the Smokey Robinson-penned,
"First I Look at the Purse
Cartwright late of cow-punkers
Nine Pound Hammer, growls more
than sings, which is appropriate
when you're singing songs with
names like "Go Motherfucker Go
"I'm the Man "Somebody Shoot
Me" and "Eat My Dust"
They know how to put on a
show: Ruyter blazes away on guitar
while going down on a guy's middle
finger; Parks just blazes, breathing
fire in the middle of the Brewery
crowd or pulling down her leopard-
print bra to reveal a breast;
drummer Jeremy
Thompson beats up his
drums, stone-eyed.
But the music is good
too. Somewhere, buried
deep down in the noise and
grudge is rhythm, a rhythm
that you can feel and you
know Nashville Pussy
feels. It's in their sweat.
You feel that too, because
they sling it at you.
Their act or music isn't
new. Nothing's new. But
Nashville Pussy makes you
worry. They scare you some. The
way rock-n-roll should.
They ended it with "Fried
Chicken and Coffee The music
was at its most deafening, Ruyter
and Parks swapped girl spit and
Cartwright screamed over and over
and over, "Nashville Pussy
Like there was a chance you
could forget Nashville Pussy.
tube
BOOB
You witch TVT Of course you do � you're an
American. You watch TV. sprakTY. live TV,
become TV Everyone knows that. What you
don't know is that TV is watching you
Rancid MTV plus new
VJs equals nausea
More videos,
lesspinheads
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
MTV got a little peeved at The
Simpsons recendy when Bart wrote
on the chalkboard at the beginning
of the show "I no longer want my
MTV The cable network took the
message as a sign from the buying
public that it was time for a change.
And they were right It was time for
a change.
Unfortunately, the changes they
made were superficial and pointless
at best They fired all the VJs, for
instance. Oh sure, they kept Matt
Pinhead, I mean Penfield, who was
possibly the most annoying VJ
except for Pauly. Who the heck
needs a know-it-all bigmouth
wannabe rock star as a VJ?
The replacement VJs were even
more annoying than Pinhead. I
haven't seen such a boring, pre-
look at ma, I'm hip.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MTV
dictable cast of
characters
since the case
of Full House;
and at least the
Olsen twin
surprised me
sometimes.
My least
favorite i
Ananda, the
simpering ditz
who VJs th�J
Poetry Slam rip-off show 12 Angrf,
Viewers.
This show is based on the idea
that the MTV viewers know more
about good videos than marketers
and MTV programming staffs
which is probably true, but morel
often than not, MTV manages td
pick viewers that will agree wittf
their programmers and marketers
anyway They then supply the)
show with videos that no one would
watch if they were given the choice
in the first place. So the show
under the pretense of putting diet
common viewer in charge, is really
nothing more than a clever marketl
ingscam.
SEE MTV. PAGE I
24 Friday
en
m





7 Thursday. April 23, 1898
lifestyle
Tat Eitt Carsllnlw
�st Carolinian
;i
d through your
tood bootlegger,
on classics can
if you know the
lotlegs can be
ontinuing popu-
ikshi's infamous
rtoon show (the
sedly showed
mine � a false
provocative
lie jewel in the;
m, the long-lost
y Special. Who
ted Christmas in
away? The mil;
l children who
og back in 1979,
he wbacca's fam-
lal television fea-
Korman! Hear
"The Life Day
of the Star War
st appearance of
cial cartoon fea-
I
eople deny that
cs. Carrie Fisher
er filmed it. Of
; how stoned she
don't doubt thai
I it. But those of
deo connections
,
; can hard-coat
get their hands
season of Twin
ire obscure, his
On the Air.
u get my point j
world cinema 1
for you, just 29
ih with federa
al issue. Yes, alt
icrc are, techni-
0. PAGE 7
new
ea
dictable cast of
characters
since the cast
of Full House'r
and at least the
Olsen twin
surprised me
sometimes.
My leasC
favorite is
Ananda, the
simpering die?
who VJs thej
show 12 Angrf,
ted on the idea
rers know monr
than marketers
amming stafff
true, but more
rv manages to
will agree with
and marketers
:n supply the
at no one would
jven the choidd
So the show
of putting the
charge, is realty
i clever market
�GEI
April
23 Thursday
Boogie Nights at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater (through April 25.)
Jazz night at Staccato
Wake at Peasant's
Anna to th& Infinite Power,
Grasshopper Highway, Yeti at Cat's
Cradle in Chapel Hill
Transportation at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
Cole, Analogue at Lizard and
"Snake in Chapel Hill
24 Friday
TBA at the Attic
Hipbone at the Brewery in
Raleigh
Mondo Topless, Los
Perdidos, Crash Cadillac at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Indycent Exposure,
Superchunk, Hellbender, Evil
Wiener, Glory Fountain, Shark
Quest, Friend Side Monkey at
Cat's Cradle in Carborro
Immigrant Sons, Troubadors of
Divine Bliss at Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
Lou Ford at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
25 Saturday
Capt. Cook at the Attic ,
The Cypher (open mic poetry)
at The Percolator Coffeehouse
Dayroom at Peasant's
Nikki Sudden, Clarissa at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
Trailer Bride, The Billy Goats at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Stanford Prison Experiment,
Shift, Man Will Surrender at Lizard
Snake in Chapel Hill
New Vintage at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
26 Sunday
Jennyanykind at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
27 Monday
George Breakfast, Tim
Stambaugh at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Steve Estes & Jon Wallace at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
Gilian Welch and David
Rawlings at Cat's Cradle'In Chapel
Hill
28 Tuesday
The Revelers at Peasant's
The Troubadors of Desire at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
16 Deluxe, Spoon at Local 506
in Chapel Hill
r. � f
LegaP Professional.
1 f Paralegal.
Van Halen
continued from page 6
much and become burdened by the
message. Still, Cherone could prob-
ably pull it off on songs like "Dirty
Water Dog" and "Ballot or the
Bullet" if there were better chorus-
es. With lines like, "I'm a peek-a-
boy, looking at girlsand I think I
like, I think I like what I see"
"Dirty Water Dog" does not stand a
chance.
Musically, the album sounds like
a band trying to rip off Van Halen.
Eddie, long acknowledged as a gui-
tar virtuoso, falls short of his poten-
tial as some songs contain stale,
rehashed riffs and leads, and others
merely lack any real substance at
all.
Still, they all pale in comparison
to the last, and arguably the worst.
song on the CD, "How Many Say
I This six-minute opus features
Eddie singing lead vocals for the
first time. With a voice comparable
to Pink Floyd's Roger Waters,
Eddie ventures down a road better
left unexplored. None of the lyrics
to this song are very strong; but the '
chorus is the worst part as "How
many, how many say I?" is repeated
endlessly with Cherone singing har-
mony. The second chorus repeats
that single line 11 times. Anyone
ever heard of overkill?
In all, this album has few high-
lights. "Neworld" and "Without
You" are both excellent, but they
are basically different forms of the
same song. After that, "Dirty Water
Dog "Fire in the Hole" and "One
I Want" are listenable, but not plea-
surable. Hopefully, the band will
come to their senses soon and make
the album that fans know they are
capable of making and Van Halen III
can be left for bargain bins every-
where.
continued from oege 8
cally, illegal id sell or own. There
are legal loopholes, of course, but
only if money doesn't change,
hands. The thing is, most of the!
available material is so obscure that
nobody seems to care. I doubt very;
seriously, for instance, that Hanna,
Barbera is sweating over lost rev
enues on bootlegs of Wheelie and the
Chopper Bunch. And what do the!
nice people at Toho International j
care if I've got a copy of the origi-j
nal Japanese edit of Goaxilla vs
King Kong sitting on my shelf? It's;
not hurting anybody.
And, hey, if you happen to,
know anybody who can get me the
pilot episode of Man From Atlantis,
let me know. Just don't tell the;
feds
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Saturday April 2
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Tickets are available at the ECU Central Ticket Office
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Student Prices
$15 Single
$25 Couple
General Public
$20 per person
for further ticket information call 328-4788 or 328-1680
Tuxedo discounts are available at Sharpe's Tuxedo across from Wal-Mart on Greenvilk Blvd. A Semi-formal affair.
'Also available are ads for businesses and individuals. For prices and availability, please contact a member of one of
the respective organizations or call 328-1680 for further information.
The SSa�( St-tt- JkdimtQ ti� is an umbrella organization comprised of Allied Blacks for Leadership and
Equality, and the ECU chapters of the National Fan-Hellenic Council and the National Association for the
i Advancement of Colored People





8 Tinrrity, April 23, 1998
lifestyle
Thi Eitt Carolinian
9 Til!
MTV
coniingtd from page 6
Add in the commercials and the
chatter about why the video for
Hooties "Hold My Hand"
deserves a "5" and you get exactly
three videos per half-hour. This
isn't much of an improvement over
the two videos per half-hour the
network used to show, if they
showed videos at all.
This, of course, is the problem
with MTV. The characteristic
about MTV that bugs Bart
Simpson (and the rest of us too) is
not the VJs. I could put up with
Pinhead if I knew the following
videos were worth watching. The
problem with MTV is not that the
game shows suck (though they do)
or that the VJs are boring and banal
(though they are.) No, the problem
with MTV is that they need to show
morevideos.
I'm not sure who runs MTV, but
they still haven't gotten the point
This past week, in yet another
effort to draw viewers back to the
fold, the network brought back all
the clasic VJs and had them play 12
Angry Viewers, with Kennedy host-
ing the show. Bleah.
At the same time, MTV decided
to give its faithful viewers the
chance to vote on who the newest
VJ would be. There were no limits
to how many times one could vote,
and since voting was done chiefly
online, all those wackos who used
to mail in stupid commentary to
MTV Yack got to vote as many
times as they wanted to.
They picked (from an otherwise
pleasant group of people) the most
annoying, predictable character, a
fellow named Jesse. Jesse looks
like Perry Farrell. Dresses like him
too. Come to think of it Jesse sang
a little ditty (rather than show a
video) and golly, he sounded just
like Perry Farrell. He so resembles
Perry Farrell in every way that I
was genuinely frightened, more
frightened than I would have been
if I'd seen the real Perry Farrell. He
was thinner than the Jane's
Addiction frontman, but I'd be
willing to bet that he shoots more
heroin than Perry. He was, after all,
weirder than Perry.
There are still' not any more
videos per hour than there were last
week The 10 Spot keeps happen-
ing. The endless reruns of what
seems like the fifth Madonna spe-
cial in the past 4 years keep going
on. I think the only reason we're
not still seeing reruns of the Video
Music Awards is because the tape
must have broken from overuse.
In other words, MTV sucks just
as bad as it did when Bart wrote "I
no longer want my MTV The
whole thing reminds me of the
Food Lion bleached meat scandal a
few years back. If you bleach rancid
meat, the bleach won't kill all the
germs, it'll just fill the meat full of
chlorine. Then you have rancid
meat that tastes like bleach.
Yummy.
The same holds true for MTV. If
you fill a rancid network with new
VJs, they won't change the fact that
the network is rancid. You'll just
have a rancid network with bad VJs
to boot Ohhh- I think I lost my
appetite. Keep your VJs � I no
longer want my MTV.
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April 23. 24. 25. 27 and 29.1998 at 8:00 p.m.
April 26.1998 at 2:00 p.m.
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FOR MORE INFO CALL 328-471S
for mc
www
Gonzai
Shan
profes.
ST
ASSISTA
Three of
players will
year. Split ei
- drafted in tl
i- Miami Do
; Dan Gonzi
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and Henry
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drafted by tl
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The ECl
continued tl
over the wee
out of four
the Big Sout
season chamj
have securec
Big South
second year i
On Saturc
double-head
University
Baltimore
snapped EC
streak in the
Paganini all
but took the
single runs i
and fifth inni
The seco
get back on c
their own.
Pirate
Oursler doul
Char
Alhtudp
stafflnvk
I.Af
SEN
On April 15,
for all indiv
starting a ell
ECU.
Although i
much of its so
this will mart
three years a
made at resui
Many forg
of the origina
in North Cai
such as UN
ECU posted
in those yi
championshi
university, all
program dii
reluctant to s
to increasing
If ECU si
staff can sho
developing a
has been giv
the team will





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9 Thursday, April 23. 1998
sports
Th Eut CaroHnian
ITE! 1 Football's finest move on to playing in the NFL
for more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Gonzakz, Henry and
Shannon to enter
professional careers
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STEVE LOSEV
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOI
Three of ECU's best football
players will play in the NFL next
year. Split end Larry Shannon was
drafted in the third round by the
Miami Dolphins. Quarterback
Dan Gonzalez and comerback
Dwight Henry both went free
agent. Gonzalez signed with the
Dallas
Cowboys
and Henry
signed with
the San
Francisco
49ers.
Running
back Scott
H a r 1 e y
signed with
an agent
but was not
drafted.
Shannon,
Gonzalez
and Henry are all seniors, but
Harley is a junior who had one
year of eligibility left.
Shannon, who is a native of
Starke, Fla is excited to be
drafted by the Dolphins.
"I didn't know they were going
to draft me Shannon said.
"Being drafted by the Dolphins in
my home state is extra special
Representatives of the
Dolphins had been looking at
Shannon for a while. Scouts
visited ECU to test Shannon's
skills and see how well he played.
"The Dolphins came here to
Greenville
and worked
me out, and
they were
impressed by
what they
saw.
Shannon
said.
In a
statement
released by
the Dolphins
following
round three
of the NFL
draft, Head
Johnson called
of the higher
Larry Shannon
Runwra
Dwight Henry
FILE PHOTO
Coach Jimmy
Shannon "one
receivers in the draft.
"Here this last week . . . (we
started evaluating the receivers
and Shannon just skyrocketed to
the top Johnson said. "He has a
40-inch vertical jump, he is
extremely
tough and
physical and
ran a 4.45.
He's a big,
tough, fast
receiver and
can make
plays. He
also can help
us on special
teams as
well. Once
we lost
Newberry,
Dan Gonzalez
SEE FOOTBAU PAGE II
Larry Shannon will head to Miami, Florida to play for the Dolphins.
Flit PHOTO
Lady Pirate softball secures top seed
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
Regilar season closed with
14-2 conference record
Travis Bark lev
SEMOR WRITER
The ECU softball team
continued their outstanding play
over the weekend, winning three
out of four games and capturing
the Big South Conference regular
season championship. The Pirates
have secured the top seed in the
Big South Tournament for the
second year in a row.
On Saturday, the Pirates split a
double-header against the
University of Maryland at
Baltimore County. UMBC
snapped ECU's 13-game winning
streak in the first game 3-0. Lisa
Paganini allowed only five hits
but took the loss as UMBC scored
single runs in the second, fourth
and fifth innings.
The second game saw ECU
get back on track with a shutout of
their own.
Pirate shortstop Marnie
Oursler doubled with one out in
the top of the first. Oursler came
home on Isonette Polonius'
single, scoring the only run of the
game.
One run was all Pirate starter
Denise Reagan would need as she
cruised to her seventh shutout of
the season. The win raised
Reagan's record to 17-5, 7-0 in the
Big South. Reagan lowered her
ERA to 1.07 and extended her
streak of consecutive innings
without an earned run to 36.1.
The win against UMBC meant
that the Pirates needed one win
against George Mason to wrap up
the conference title.
ECU would get that win in the
first game on Sunday. The Pirates
trailed 1-0 in the top of the fifth
but rallied, scoring four runs in the
inning. ECU added three in the
sixth for a 7-1 final.
Senior starter Jami Bendle got
her biggest win of the season,
improving to 14-6 on the year.
Even though the conference tide
was on the line, Bendle said she
wasn't nervous.
"I didn't feel any extra
pressure because I didn't know it
was the clincher Bendle said.
At the plate the Pirates banged
out 11 hits. Polonius went 2-2
with two RBIs and senior Christi
Valcvich was 3-3 with two RBIs as
well.
The second game on Sunday
was rained out and moved to
Monday afternoon. On Monday
ECU continued their dominant
play, winning 4-0 behind the
strong pitching performance of
Paganini. The shutout was
Paganini's seventh of the year.
She scattered seven hits and
struck out four to improve to 8-6.
There was no letdown, even
though the Pirates had already
clinched the number one seed the
day before.
"We wanted to go out and have
fun Bendle said. "We didn't
want to drop another game
Head Coach Tracey Kee said
that the Pirates will continue to
play hard the rest of the season.
"The girls realize that just
because we have the number one
seed, we aren't going to lay down
for two weeks Kee said.
The Pirates will begin
preparing for the Big South
Tournament by playing in the
Hokie Invitational this weekend
in Blacksburg, Va.
"Hopefully we will go there
and get in five games Kee said.
"That way I can throw all of my
pitchers out there and see a lot of
at-bats
"It'll be nice to play some
different teams Bendle said. "It
will help us get used to
tournament play
ECU's record now stands at 39-
17. Their 14-2 conference mark is
the team's best ever. While the
Pirates are playing extremely
well, Kee says there is always
room for improvement
"I think our pitchers need to
maintain what they're doing
Kee said. "Offensively we need to
continue driving the ball hard
ECU faces North Carolina
A&T in the first round of the
Hokie Invitational on Friday at 3
p.m.
Big South Player of the Week
Isonette Polonius
.714 Avg. (15-21), 1 HR, 5 2B, 1 3B, 4-4 stolen bases,
1.191 slugging percentage, 16 game hitting streak
Championship Club football program brought back to ECU
All students, faculty and
staff invited to participate
Ian robson
SENIOR WRITF�
On April 15, a meeting was held
for all individuals interested in
starting a club football team at
ECU.
Although club football has lost
much of its support over the years,
this will mark the second time in
three years an attempt has been
made at resurrecting the sport.
Many forget that ECU was one
of the original club football teams
in North Carolina among others
such as UNC and N.C. State.
ECU posted an impressive record
in those years, winning the
championship five times. The
university, along with club sports
program directors, has been
reluctant to start a new team due
to increasing liability costs.
If ECU students, faculty and
staff can show enough interest in
developing a team, a green light
has been given to start. Starting
the team will require at least 30
individuals wanting to have fun
and play against surrounding
schools.
Tommy Dorsey and Lynn
Featherstone spoke at the
meeting on behalf of returning a
team to ECU. Dorsey is an ECU
alumni who is now a graduate
student at Duke University and
an offensive lineman on Duke's
club football team. Featherstone
is a faculty adviser and coach of
UNC's championship team.
"The team gives the young
guys another chance to play ball if
they didn't get a scholarship and
gives us old guys a chance to butt
heads with 40-year-old men
Dorsey said.
Featherstone compares the
club football talent level with that
of a low-level division three team.
The program is open to everyone
interested and no experience is
necessary. The only cost is that of
the entry fee, which has been
tentatively set at $150 per player,
not including equipment costs.
The total cost of starting the
team will tentatively be about
$4800 which will go toward league
entrance fees, referees, fields and
miscellaneous costs. The team
would need to raise about $2500.
"The prices have to be high
enough so we can get a team
started but low enough to attract
people Dorsey said. "There are
also many ways that the money
can be raised: we've done raffles,
car washes; you'd be surprised
how much money we raised for
our squad
The team would practice three
times a week and play games on
Sundays. Traveling could either
be by van or driving your own car
to the games.
"It's really a good time; it's fun
to travel to different schools and
play on their fields Featherstone
said. "Plus you get to hit guys
from Duke and Carolina every
week. What could be better?"
Not much, unless N.C. State
was still in the league.
Another meeting is scheduled
for Wednesday, April 19 in room
142 at Minges Coliseum at 7 p.m.
Support and participation is much
needed so if you are interested,
come out and see what the
program is all about. For more
information, contact Tommy
Dorsey at 758-9151.
FAST FACTS
ECU Club Football
-ECU had a team in the past and won the championship five times
-Other teams in the league include; UNC, UNCW. Appalachian St
Duke, and Western Carolina
-Season is eight games long, and teams play on Sunday afternoon
-Practice will be three times a week
-Team needs about 30 people to field a team but everyone on the
team gets to play
-Season starts on October 10
Team needs to raise about $2600
-Individual costs will be around $150 per player
-Meeting for interested individuals is on Wednesday. April 29. 7p.m
room 142. Minges Coliseum
Dan Gonzalez signed with the Dallas Cowboys on Monday.
Ml MM
Dwight Henry will be moving clear across the country to play
with the San Fransisco 49ers.
Superstitious beliefs
ease athletes' minds
Pirates share their
superstitions with TEC
Paul Kaplan
SE1IOI WHITER
In every sport, all over America
and all over the world there is one
thing that mostly all athletes do
regardless of their sport . No
matter where you go or what team
you are watching, you can always
find those individual athletes who
have their interesting
superstitions and quirks that are
inherent to them.
For all those of you who have
seen the movie Major League,
you should remember a character
by the name of Pedro Cerrano.
Cerrano is the epitome of an
athlete caught up in superstition.
For those of you who never saw
Major League, Cerrano has a
problem hitting curve balls. In his
words, "I hit straight ball very far,
curve ball I no hit at all So for
the majority of the movie Cerrano
prays to Jobu and even makes
offerings to him.
In a more realistic situation
looking at the NBA's Michael
Jordan, whose name often comes
to mind first because of his history
throughout his professional career
of wearing his old Carolina Blue
Tar Heel shorts under his
uniform.
More locally and closer to
home you can find many athletes,
maybe not with the fame and
fortune of Michael Jordan, or the
devout religious practices of
Cerrano, but they do have who
have their own individual
superstitions.
"One superstition that I have
is that I wear the same shorts
every game. I have been doing it
since last year. Last year I had a
pretty good season and I just kept
wearing those shorts and this year,
so far f have been playing pretty
well baseball team captain
Randy Rigsby said. "Also if I get
in a pretty good groove, I'll keep
doing the same things before each
game to get into a routine. I try to
get the same routine, maybe it is
helping, maybe it's not, but it
helps me mentally
This actually turns out to be
the way that most coaches and
athletes at the college level look
at their preparation for games and
practices.
"I'm possibly the most
unsuperstitious guy there is, I
played baseball and football in
college and I just never got into
that. I just don't have any of the
those kind of hang tips head
football coach Steve Logan said.
"I just get so consumed with the
teaching aspects, like have we
taught it correctly, more than
which which shoe I tied first, or if
I tied it correctly
It turns out that of the many
coaches and players spoken to,
the majority of them do not
believe that superstitions make
you the player, and that it is the
hard work that does.
"A lot of the guys on the team
have superstitions, but mostly it's
your basic work hard and get stuff
done attitude baseball player
Ryan Massimo said. "You get on a
hot streak and you try to stay with
the same things. I don't really
believe in it, I just try to work
hard and things work out
Although superstitions work
for some, for most they are more
trivial then helpful, and we all
must remember that even Pedro
Cerrano left Jobu and his
superstitions behind in the end of
the movie.
The Pirate baseball team-suffered a
disappointing loss to Winthrop on Tuesday night,
12-10. The next home game for the team will
be on Friday, May 1 against James Madison.
Game time is set for 4 p.m.
-� �
� Sir!
C r , tft t f 'I
Taammates watched from the dugout as an ECU batter tikes a swing.
Ml Melt





10 Thursday. April 23. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
I;
I
Intramural programs offer variety for all
Softball remains most
popukrsport
scott Rose
SENIOR WHITER
It has come down to the final
stretch at the end of the semester,
and the intramural program is sail
going strong with many sports
open for student involvement.
Some of the sports currently in
action include Softball, indoor
soccer, tennis doubles, water polo,
four-on-four flag football, golf and
frisbee golf doubles.
Softball has the most
participation of all the sports.
Levels of competition range from
men's gold and purple, women's
gold and purple, co-ed gold and
purple and Greek gold and
purple. Softball allows 10 people
on the field and a maximum of 12
can bat at certain levels. There
are four fields, two behind and
two in front of the stadium.
Indoor soccer is played at
Christcnbury Gym and is played
with seven to a team.
Tennis doubles are being
played at the tennis courts by
Minges and a maximum of two to
a team can participate.
Water polo, which is being
played at the SRC pool, allows
five to a team. This sport is
different than the water polo
many people think of. It is played
in inner tubes which the person
must be sitting on top of while
trying to throw the ball into the
goal.
Four-on-four flag football is a
new addition to the intramural
program. It will consist of four
players to a team and has only 32
minutes of playing time with no
halftime. The games will be held
at the bottom of College Hill
before the sun goes down.
"We are going to try it out and
see how it goes and hopefully it
will be a success said David
Gaskins, director of intramurals.
Golf singles is also in action
and there are two divisions: gold
and purple for both men and
women golfers.
Frisbee golf doubles is also a
new addition to the intramural
program this season. All games
will be played at the frisbee golf
course by the track and baseball
field.
Some of the summer sports
that will be available to the
students in May include softball,
five-on-five basketball and tennis
singles. In June there will be
volleyball, racquetball, frisbee
golf singles and a basketball
Intramural S
updateaCa 1 aV
4B
Summer Programs
May
27 Softball Mtg.4:00 SRC Class
27 5-on-5 Basketball Mtg.4:30 SRC Class
28 Tennis Singles Deadline5:00 SRC Office
Juna
3 Volleyball Mtg.4:00 SRC Class
5 Racquetball Deadline5:00 SRC Office
10-11 Frisbee Golf Singles3-6 Frisbee Golf
17 Basketball Shooting4:00 SRC Forum
July
1 Softball Mtg.4:00 SRC Class
1 3-on-3 Basketball Mtg.4:30 SRC Class
2 Racquetball Deadline5:00 SRC Office
8 Sand Volleyball Mtg.4:00 SRC Class
9 1-on-1 Basketball5:00 SRC Office
15 Golf Deadline5:00 SRC Office
16-17 Frisbee Golf Singles3-6 Frisbee Golf
shooting
contest. In
July there
will be
softball,
three-on-
three
basketball,
racquetball,
sand
volleyball,
one-on-one
basketball,
golf singles
and frisbee
golf singles.
T o d d
King,
director of
marketing for
Recreational
Services, said
that summer
programs are
good because
they give
everyone a
chance to be
involved.
"The
summer
program
should be a
lot of fun and
should allow
the students
that stay during the summer to
have an opportunity to
Wyndham Court Apartments
"DOW'T GO HOWE
WITHOUT OWE
I w o bt'di
On I Cl
IVts OK '
tor Summer ,
n Apis, conve
561-RENT
participate King said.
1998 RECGAE JAM
FRIDAY APRIl 24th
JIT THE UNDERWATER JAMAICAN CD WE
511COTANCHE ST.
ROLLY GRAY and SUMFIRE
DONOVAN and THE
AFRICAN CHILDREN
$�PCUUSHI8T:
DJ SPECIAL K T1CK1TS:
� $6 ADVANCE
PHIL MED ft AT THE
CARIBBEAN
POOD
ON SALE
8PM UNTIL
DOOR
TICKETS JIT CD ALLEY GREENVILLE, NC MORE INf 0:919 754 22
MONDAY
U PR4FT! NO COVER
TUESDAY
SI.OO NEWCASTLE GUINESS. PISS.
RED STRIP! HONEY BROWN
WEDNESDAY
SI.OO NIGHT! SI.OO COVER FOR Ml VIPERS
$2.00 FOR NON-MEMBERS
LADIES IOIir I IDIES IN FREE
THURSDAY
THIRSTY THURSDAY
SI 75 IMPORTS SI 25 DOMESTICS
$1.50 WELL HIGH BALLS
$2.00 PREMIUM SHOTS
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
BARTENDERS CHOICE
COMING SOON : BANDS
CALL FOR BOOKING
752-0022
A Place for
Elegance & Fine
Chinese Cuisine
China io
CHINESE QE&TAUQANT
"Make Your Reservations
For Graduation And
Mothers Day Now"
2516 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
830-2238 Fax 830-1735
Today's Specials
SOUPS
SMACH MUSHROOM
SOUPFORTWO
Puree of shitacki mush-
room cooked in creamy
broth with baby
shrimp$4.75
MAIN COURSE
ROASTED GARLIC EGGPLANT
Special Oriental eggplant, chicken
and shrimp cooked with oven
roasted garlic$9.50
CHINA 10 DUCK
half duckling marinated in
fine ChineseTierbs, cooked
rotisserie style, served over a
bed of vegetables$10.95
MODELS WANTED!
ito-
wmwtiw StyCiim Opium)
id aeefeuuj iookiwt cwwciow iudiwduah Jo an
upmmq Habi Skew ok Wwj 2nd and 4tk
lUe iui�� h amduciwq nudd wlwwut al 7 p.w.
Friday, Wwj lot and II a.m. bk Salundai), iHay
2nd in. Ik lobby ej fee Skciatat Mlatdk Bank �t
W. Fail Mamt U.
HfaUfs cJuwe uM h paid $50 irt ike, day
Far more information or questions, please call
1 � BOO 242 � 92B3 v 4356
ST
Need a
Summer
If you will be a returning stddent in the fall and are looking
for a summer job, UHS will be hiring students to assist with
our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to paint, inspect, repair, and renovate residence
hall rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance and UHS Facilities
Management will provide training and supervision. General
knowledge of basic carpentry skills, painting, installation of
hardware, measuring and fitting components is required.The
program will be approximately 10 weeks.This is an
opportunity to have personal training and learn successful
skills in a hands-on experience. Full-time, 40 hour positions
at $5.95 per hour will be offered.To pick up or submit a
completed application, please come by University Housing
Services, Office Suite 100, Jones Hall between 8-5pm M-F.
Selection will begin on April 24, 1998. Notification of
successful! applicants will occur prior to April 30.
CHEERLEfl
PRACTICE:
TRYOUTS
PLACE
TRYOIITS: S
Min
FOR MORE INFORMATION CO
Dowdy Ficklen
Field House
2 Noon
CORBETT AT 328-4510
THE PLACE
FOR ALL YOUR
PET'S NEEDS
3140A Moseley Dr.
(Behind Parker's BBQ on
Greenville BfvdJ 0
758-6603
Won -Sat:
Sunday:
Aquariums & Supplies
Saltwater and Freshwater fish
Reptiles. Small Animals, and Supplies
Live and Frozen Food
Tank Maintenance and Leasing Available
FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF






ps?� 'wgS4'�aKB-n�vsJT
Tat Em Carolinian
Football
coniinu�d from pigi I
we said the two guys we wanted
were Brad Jackson and Larry
Shannon
Shannon will begin preparing
for the Dolphins immediately. He
will visit Miami this weekend for
a mini-camp and is preparing to
move permanently to Florida this
June.
"I'm going to miss all the
friends I made and playing in the
stadium in front of all the fans
Shannon said. "I think I'll be real
nervous in the beginning, but
when I get down there I'll be real
excited
The NFL draft didn't quite go
the .way Gonzalez had wanted it
to.
"Originally I was hoping the
draft would work out Gonzalez
said. "The situation with free
agency came around, and I took
what I could get"
After the draft ended on
Sunday, Gonzalez and the
Cowboys agreed to the term of
his contract. Gonzalez officially
signed with the Cowboys on
Monday.
Gonzalez had many scouts
from the NFL watching him play.
Seven teams were interested in
adding Gonzalez including the
New England Patriot, Seattle
Scahawks, Atlanta Falcons,
Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore
Ravens. Gonzalez decided to sign
with the Cowboy because he had
the best chance at making the
team in Dallas.
"They have two players
returning to the team at
auarterback and they needed a
lird said Gonzalez. "They
called me and let me know I had
a good chance at getting on their
team
Gonzalez leaves Thursday for
Cowboys mini-camp, which lasts
until Sunday.
"It's a step Gonzalez said.
"It's a time in my life when I have
to move on
KJFUUK
Oregon State's John-Blair
Bickerstaff to transfer to
Minnesota
MINNEAPOLIS (AP)�Oregon
State's John-Blair Bickerstaff will
transfer to University of
Minnesota, the university
announced Monday.
Bickerstaff, a 6-foot-6
swingrnan from Denver, averaged
8.6 points per game and shot 54
percent from the field last season.
He is the son of Washington
Wizards coach Bernie Bickerstaff.
He is an excellent athlete, who
as a coach's son, really knows the
game, said Minnesota coach Clem
Raskins.
As required by the NCAA,
Bickerstaff will sit out next
season. He will have two years of
eligibility remaining.
Bickerstaff announced last
week that he was leaving Oregon
State for personal reasons.
MSU defensive end signs
contract with Redskins
BOZEMAN (AP)�Former
Montana State defensive end
Neal Smith has signed a free
agent contract with the
Washington Redskins of the
NFL, MSU announced Monday.
Smith earned all-America honors
for the Bobcats last season after
leading the Big Sky Conference
with 19 12 sacks � the best of
the season among defensive
linemen in NCAA Division I-AA
Smith reports Thursday to
training camp in Washington,
where he will work out with
rookies and free agents over the
weekend.
are looking
3 assist with
Hall
2 residence
S Facilities
n. General
filiation of
�equired.The
an
successful
ir positions
submit a
:y Housing
�5pm M-F.
sn of
).
7& i$Uc6 Student Aeadendifi, gMective
at &Mt @cmliM&14tuxMttu
condCatlcf, Cwtfeb you fo t&e
Second rfmud
7:00 ft m.
'RatHoda, Oh Pta? otel
Tickets are available at the ECU Central Ticket Office
Mendcnhall Student Center
Student Prices
$15 Single
$25 Couple
General Public
$20 per person
for further ticket information call 328-4788 or 328-1680
Tuxedo discounts arc available al Sharpe'j Tuxedo across from Wal-Mart on Greenville Blvd. A Semi-formal affair.
'Also available are ads for businesses and individuals. For prices and availability, please contact a member of one of
the respective organizations or call 328-1680 for further information.
Tlic Zua st-Umt Jauanit &ttecu is an umbrella organization comprised of Allied Blacks for Leadership and
Equality, and the ECU chapters of the National Pan-Hellenic Council and the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
OUR
EDS
)n
FF

The Ledonia Wright
African American Cultural Center
Presents
Heritage Fest '98
FEATURING
FREE FOOD, FUN, AND ENTERTAINMENT
WITH A CULTURAL FLAIR
THURSDAY, APRIL 23,1998 58 PM
ON THE LAWN BESIDE THE CULTURAL CENTER
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE TODAY!
PICK UP YOUR OFFICIAL TICKET FROM THE
CULTURAL CENTER BETWEEN
'8AM-5PM WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15 - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22
Be a Part of a
Center That's
on the Move!





12 Thursday, April 23. 1998
Tha East Carolinian
I
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 BR. 1 12 bath townhouse.
$225, 12 phoneutilities, on ECU
bus route. Call Laura, 756-7128.
Need for May 1st!
ROOM FOR RENT - available for
summer 1998. Unfurnished room in
furnished apartment near downtown
and across from campus. Must be
non-smoker, responsible and able to
pay your bills. Upperclassmen or
graduate preferred. Call 752-5912.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, CONSID-
ERATE, responsible individual, fe-
malegrad student preferred, duplex.
Wyndham Circle on bus route or
short walk to ECU. No pets, non-
smoker. Call JC. 931-9090.
ROOMMATE WANTED, SUM-
MER or full year, two bedroom, one
bath at Rosemont Apartments.185
a month plus utilities. Call 353-7908.
2 BEDROOM, 6-MONTH sublease,
monthly thereafter, no pets, walk to
campus, ac. central heat, free
cable, dishwasher, free water, patio,
lots of light. The first 12 month is
free. 561-7646.
FREE CABLE, NO DEPOSIT. Room-
mate needed starting Aug. '98. 2
story townhouse, WD. 3 bdrms , 2
12 baths. Great location. 13 utili-
ties, $225mo. Call Ashley O 353-
1286.
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE for
rent. 5 blocks from campus, fenced
in backyard, central heat & AC. Avail-
able August. Call 551-5025.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, spa-
cious example of Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths,
3 fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty
foliage, near ECU & PCMH.
$999.00month. 524-5790.
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH town-
house in quiet neighborhood.
Washer and dryer. Availability is ne-
gotiable. If interested please call 353-
6505.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY. Nice 2 bedroom apartment
located on ECU bus route. Asking
12 rent and utility. Water and
sewer, basic cable provided. All you
need is bed. Non-smoker preferred.
Call Jeff at 919-496-2447.
FEMALE TO SHARE furnished
Townhouse. April rent free. $225
month plus 12 utilities 363-6806
ask for Brigitte
SUBLEASE 4 BEDROOM flat in
Flayer's Club Apartments. Available
May 15 with pool, exercise room and
more. Informantion 363-2723
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM 2 12
baths fireplace, all appliances, very
large quiet pool close to park $595
month 756-3009 after 6:00 pm
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM
apartment. Wesley Commons off
First Street. Available May first. Rent
$425.00. Pets allowed. Free cable.
Washerdryer hookup. Central air
conditioning. Call Chris 758-3838
WALK TO ECU. 1.2.3.4. & 5 bed-
room unitshouses; Available June,
July or Aug. Call 3214712.
1 BEDROOM APT. for rent.
Woodclfff Apts. Washer and dryer
hookup, 3 blocks from campus. As-
sume lease. Call Michael. 522-4583,
leave message.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: two bed-
room, 2 bathroom, washer and
dryer. $510, Dogwood Hollow Apts.
Call 931-0729.
RENT REDUCED FOR SUMMER!
Sublease two bedroom apartment,
washerdryer available with deposit.
Call 754-1939.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for August to share 2 bedroom apart-
ment, close to campus. No pets and
non-smoker. Please call Ashley at
321-2089.
ROOMMATE WANTED, NON-
SMOKING, female, stable room
needed to share apartment Player's
Club starting August. Private vanity
and sink included. Call 328-8013
ASAP for financial information.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER school
from June to August, one bedroom
apartment located within walking
distance from ECU campus. If inter-
ested call 752-8240 and leave a
message.
SUMMER JOB. COLOR WORKS
Commercial Manager seeking paint-
ers, pressure washers, and carpen-
ters to work in Triangle Area. Free
on-site room for Summer. Make
$3600-1- working 40 hrwks at
$7.00hr. Contact Jason Arthur
(919) 353-2381
AIRLINE EMPLOYMENT � ENTRY
levelskilled. Excellent travel ben-
efits. Ask us how! 517-336-0968 Ext.
L53621
CRUISE SHIP ft LAND-TOUR
Jobs- Excellent benefits. World
Travel. Ask us how! 517-324-3090
ext. C63624
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
and Parks Department is recruiting
individuals with some background
for overseeing both the skateboard
park and with in-line hockey rink at
the Jaycee Park. Salary rates range
from $6.15 to $6.50 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 8304550
after 2 pm.
DISABLED MAN SEEKS physical
assistance. Flexible hours mornings
afternoonsevening. Lifting, bath-
ing, domestic chores, driving. Excel-
lent opportunity for helping profes-
sional. $6hour. Call 830-6028.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
Parks looking for part-time tennis in-
structors. Experience required. Pay
is $5.15hr. 15-20 hoursweek.
Work hours vary. Needed June thru
early August. Call 8304559.
SUMMER CHILD CARE needed
beginning Monday, June 1, my
home. 7.30AM-6PM. Person must
be great with children, energetic,
reliable. Must have excellent refer-
ences. No couch potatoes! Must be
flexible with overtime. $200 per
week. Call 353-5623 before 3.00PM.
PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR needed
in Kinston to provide individualized
instruction in a positive learning en-
vironment. Afternoon hours: Mon
Thurs. Individual must be competent
in the areas of basic math, algebra,
and chemistry. Pick up application
at Sylvan Learning Center. 2428 S.
Charles Blvd Greenville.
TRAVEL EUROPE � WORK- Teach
basic conversational English in
Prague. Budapest & Krakow. Com-
petitive wages benefits. Ask us
how) (617) 336-0629 ext. K53621
PART-TIME CHHLDCARE NEEDED
weekdays in our home for 3 y.o. trip-
lets. Hours flex References required.
Call 321-8578.
PAID SUMMER INTERSHIPS
available for students who want to
travel, earn money, and gain valu-
able resume experience. For more
information call 1-800-261-4000
ext. 1576.
NOW HIRING FOR Summer- Pool
managers and lifeguards to work at
prestigious clubs in Cary, Chapel Hill.
Durham, Goldsboro, Holly Springs,
Greenville. Wilson and Rocky Mount.
Call 1-800-929-1214 for more infor-
mation.
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
SUMMER JOBSI APPLY Now! Ac-
cepting applications for bartenders
& waitstaff. Full or part-time, flexible
schedules available. Send resume
apply in person at The Reef Restau-
rant. PO Box 2772, Atlantic Beach,
NC 28512. 919-726-3500.
PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR needed
in Greenville to provide individualized
instruction in a positive learning en-
vironment. Possible hours: Mon
Thurs. 30O-83OPM. Individual must
be competent in the areas of basic
math, algebra, geometry, biology,
and chemistry. Pick up application
at Sylvan Learning Center, 2428 S.
Charles Blvd Greenville.
TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX for rent
with shady fenced backyard. Pleas-
ant neighborhood, one mile from
campus. Two blocks from the Purple
Line. $400 monthly. Pets welcome.
931-9014.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE for
school or work? Home Relocation
and Referral Service can make that
move easier! Relocation packets with
rental listings, guided tours of
Greenville and area rental properties,
plus much more. Call 919-830-5559
or visit http:
wwwrelocatetogreenvillenc.com for
more information.
PARK VILLAGE ONE bedroom
apartments $300. With Stove, Re-
frigerator Washer Dryer Connec-
tions, On ECU Bus Route Free Wa-
ter & Sewer, Wainright Property
Management LLC 756-6209
PEONY GARDENS TWO bedroom
112 bath apartments $375. Stove.
Refrigerator. Dishwasher, Washer &
Dryer. Free Cable. Water & Sewer,
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209
CANNON COURT ft CEDAR
Court. Two bedroom 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Washer 6- Dryer Connections.
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209

FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apartment $275.00 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets OK. Call 758-1921 ask for Ken.
GET ON BOARD now. the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
MAKE S2125M0 Looking for 3
ECU students to work with UNC stu-
dents. Must be willing to travel and
work overtime. Call 919-933-7716.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGE-
MENT, Inc. Now hiring for Summer
1998. Pool Managers. Lifeguards.
Swim Instructors. Charlotte; Raleigh;
Greensboro; NC. Greenville; Colum-
bia. SC. For Information (704) 889-
4439
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider
being an Air Force officer. Excelling
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package call 1-800-423-
USAF
SUMMER WAIT STAFF and Ban-
quet Staff day and evenings. No
phone calls. Reply at the Ramada
Plaza Hotel.
PART-TIME FRONT DESK Position
available- nights and weekends. No
phone calls. Reply at the Ramada
Plaza Hotel.
SUMMER JOBS IN Raleigh. Cloth-
ing wholesaler is seeking to fill full
and part-time positions this summer.
We offer flexible schedules and regu-
lar pay raises. Must be able to lift
70 lbs. and have dependable trans-
portation. Call 1-800-849-9949 and
leave name and number.
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR sum-
mer. Monday thru Friday daytime
hours. Must provide own transpor-
tation. No housework or cooking
required. If interested call Cindy at
355-3476 after 5:00.
LOCAL COMPANY EXPANDING
in Greenville area. Sales experience
helpful but not necessay. College
students welcome. For personal in-
terview call 355-7469.
FERGUSON ENTERPRISES, THE
nation's largest supplier of Pipe
Valves and Fittings has an opening
in Greenville, NC for a part-time ware-
house worker. Summers would be
full time with flexible hours to fit
around your school schedule. Career
potential and advancement oppor-
tunities. Mail resume to Personnel,
Ferguson Enterprises, Inc P.O. Box
8207. Greenville. NC 27836.
LIKE BRAND NEW, black lacquer
bedroom suite, $400 negotiable.
Great price! Must sell! Apply Style
Writer II printer. $100. Asnwering
machine. $35. Call 561-8032.
ATTENTION FORMER REDUX &
Phen-Phen users; we now have an
all natural, safe way tolose weight
win tout the side effects Dr. recom-
mended & guaranteed. I went from
a size 12 to a size 6 in 7 weeks! Call
now & ask me how. 1-888-648-5831.
CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR sale,
good condition, asking $95 or best
offer. If interested, call Paul at 353-
2885.
FULL PHOTOSHOP CD 4.01 New
Academic License unregistered plus
Classroom in a CD -I- 2 free Adobe
fonts. $240. 754-8167, leave mes-
sage.
POOL TABLE 4 FT. by 8 ft. $600
neg weight bench with 260 pounds
of weight $225 neg five drawer
dresser $35. Ask for Matt, 764-
2829.
DESK WITH ATTACHED book-
case, two dressers, pull-out sofa, and
two twin bed mattresses. Sold as a
set or separately. All very cheap.
Must go! Ask for Jen, 830-2661
ATTENTION MOVIE FANS: Huge
collection of original movie posters
for sale. Excellent condition. Email
request to Posters2goOaol.com.
FREE CATALOG ft PRICE list. Dis-
tributor Direct don't pay retail any-
more! Nor-Androstene - $45 Creat-
ine - $35. Get big! Call 919-233-1739.
2 BEDROOM, 1 12 BATH
townhouse, close to ECU campus
and medical school. $41,000. Please
call 355-4895 after 5:30PM. Moti-
vated seller; planning to buy a larger
home.
GREEK PERSONALS
ing All-Sing and Founder's Day! We
love you - Your sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha Xi Delta.
JULIE SMITH, KATHRINE Dangler,
and Julie Loweyou all did a won-
derful job representing Alpha Phi in
Greek Goddess. We love you all!
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA PHI
indoor soccer team on your victory
last week, keep up the good work
and sportsmanship.
ALPHA PHI WOULD like to thank
Delta Sigma Phi for a wonderful time
on Friday night. You all provided a
memorable celebration for our new
sisters, and we greatly appreciate it.
ALPHA PHI WOULD like to con-
gratulate and welocme our newest
sisters: Laurin, Taylor. Emily. Ashley,
and Arlington, we are proud of you.
We know you will be a wonderful
addition to our sisterhood.
TO THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi. we
hope you had a great time Friday
night at the social and congratula-
tions to your five new sisters. The
brothers of Delta Sigma
CONGRATULATION TO ALL
who participated in Alpha Xi Delta's
All-Sing! Everyone did an awesome
job. Way to go Chi Omega on win-
ning 2nd place. Love, Chi Omega
CHI OMEGA HOPES that all girls
and their awesome dates had fun
at cocktail) Once again we had a
blast! Love. Chi Omega
CHI OMEGA WOULD like to thank
Andrea and Lisa for representing us
in Greek Goddess. You girls had so
much class. We are all so proud. Chi
Omega
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA would
like to thank Alpha Sigma Phi fo rthe
social Friday night. We had a won-
derful time with you guys! Love, the
sisters of Gamma Sigma Sigma.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA
FOR winning 1st place at the All-
Sing last Tuesday. We are so proud
of you. Love, yoru Sigma sisters and
new members.
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
hii energy, people to
scout cotton.
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Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
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GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA would
like to say "Happy Anniversary' to
the Lambda Pledge Class! We love
you guys!
CONGRATULATIONS TO LAYNE
Summerfield for being accepted into
the Phi ETA Sigma and the Gamma
Beta Phi Honor Society. We also
would like to thank you for doing
such a great job with your office.
Love, your alpha Delta Pi sisters.
ALPHA XI DELTA wants everyone
to get pumped for our annual "Greek
God Contest" on April 30th at Kappa
Sigma! For tickets or more info call
754-2892.
STEPHANIE HERNDON AND Sa-
rah Evans-A special thanks to you
both for all) your hard work prepar-
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 4964X24
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
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TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LBVI, GAP, ETC.
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AUDRA KENNEDY, SHANNON
Dean, and Usa Warfle. you guys did
a great job in All-Sing. Love, your
Delta Zeta sisters 1
ALPHA ONHCRON PI would like to
invite any girls interested in rush next
year to a lemonade social. For more
information call 764-0966.
to
THANKS SIGMA PI for the social
last Wednesday. Let's do it again
soon. Love, the sisters and new
members of Delta Zeta
THANK YOU TO the brothers of
Lambda Chi Alpha for sharing our
Big Sis Party with us. We had a great"
time. Love, the sisters and new mem1
bers of Delta Zeta.
HEATHER CLINE, SUMMER
Huggard, and Audra Kennedy, you'
guys did a great job in Greek God-
dess. Love, your Delta Zeta sisters.
THANK YOU TO our sister Soror-
ity. Alpha Omicron Pi. for helping us
with the Boy's & Girl's Club Easter
Egg Hunt. We had a lot of fun. Love
the sisters and new members of
Delta Zeta
RUGBY TEAM: WE are really look-
ing forward to the social with you
guys tonight! Will you be wearing
what you usually wear? Love, the
sisters of Pi Delta
OTHER
FREE CASH GRANTS! College.
Scholarships. Business. Medical:
bills. Never repay. Toll Free 1-800-
218-9000 ext. G-3728.
0
Seized cars from $176. Porsches.
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PERSONALS
Ladies: lend me your sore aching
muscles. Amateur masseur needs
your back to practice on. Call: Kyle
1-800-484-8646 (code 2466) or
POB 8663. Greenville. NC 27836.
Need to sublease
your apartment for
summer?
Need to find a
roommate to share
your apartment?
Need to unload the
manual typewriter
your parents gave
you?
You've come to the right spot The
East Carolinian classifieds are the
perfect place to sublease your apart-
ment, find a roommate, or sell your
useless stuff.
But hurry. There's only 3
issues left.





Th� Em CaraHalan
4
IEDY. SHANNON
Varfle. you guys did
VH-Sing. Low. your
� 1
ON PI would like to
erested in rush next
de social. For more
764-0966.
:o
A PI for the social
. Let's do it again
i sitters and new
laZeta
i-
O the brothers of
ha for sharing our
us. We had a great
tars and new mem-
a.
INE, SUMMER
jdra Kennedy, you
job in Greek God-
Delta Zeta sisters.
) our sister Soror-
n Pi, for helping us
Girl's Club Easter
i a lot of fun. Love'
new members of
WE are really look-
le social with you
II you be wearing'
i wear? Love. the:
IANTS! College,
isiness. Medical;
. Toll Free 1-800-
1726. ,�,
(.
$176. Porsches.
's. BMW'S. Cor-
ps. 4WD's. YourK
00-218-9000 ext.
INALS
four sore aching
r masseur needs
ice on. Call: Kyle .
(code 2466) or
ille. NC 27836.
ise
for
a
ire
t?
the
ter
ive
The
; the
ipart-
your
y 3
13 Thursday. April 23. 19BB
ANNOUNCEMENTS
4S8ERTIVENE8S TRAINING
WORKSHOP: Tuesday 3:30-4:30.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the
following workshop April 28th. If you
aw interested in this workshop, call
328-6661.
CHOOSING A MAJOR OR a Ca-
rper Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-6:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop April 28st If you
are interested in this workshop, call
the Center at 328-6661
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Taking Work-
shop: Wednesday 11:00-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop April 23rd. If you are
interested in this workshop, call the
Center at 328-6661.
ADULT STUDENT DISCUSSION
Group: Monday 5:15-6:16. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop April 27th. If you are in-
terested in this workshop, call 328-
6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:30-6:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop April 23rd. If you are
interested in this workshop, call 328-
T ,
STUDY IN SWEDEN NEXT year.
Courses in marry subjects are taught
in English. Representatives from
ECU'S exchange partner, Mid-Swe-
den University, will be in the ECU
Office of International Affairs, 306
E. Ninth St. Thursday. April 23.3:30-
5:00p.m. to meet with students and
faculty who want more information.
Call 328-1937 for information.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
TlfURS APRIL 23- GRADUATE
RftCITAL. Hyoun-Joo Song, organ.
First Presbyterian Church, Herritage
Stfeet, Kinston, 8:00 P.M.
THURS APRIL 23- GUITAR EN-
SEMBLE. Elliot Frank. Director. A. J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.8:00 P.M.
FBI APRIL 24- FACULTY RECITAL.
Yvonne Dechance, soprano, A.J.
I
classifieds
Tht Eset Cirahstoi
Fletcher Recital Hall. 8:00 P.M. PG-
13 guidelines suggested, some
language and adult topics.
FRI APRIL 24- JAZZ AT NIGHT.
Carroll V. Dashiell Jr Director.
Mendenhall Student Center, The
Great Room. 8:00 P.M.
SAT. APRIL 25- SENIOR RECITAL
Bradford Myers, tuba, A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 4:00 P.M.
SAT APRIL 25- GRADUATE RE-
CITAL. Jane Kline, mezzo-soprano.
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 P.M.
SAT APRIL 25- JUNIOR RECITAL,
Kym Ledford. flute, A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 9:00 P.M.
SUN APRIL 26- EAST CAROUNA
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA Douglas Morrison, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 3:00 P.M.
SUN APRIL 26- SENIOR RECITAL.
David Antkowiak. horn. A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 9:00 P.M.
MON APRIL 27- BEDDINGFIELD
HIGH SCHOOL CHOIR. Meredith
Ezzard. Conductor and UNIVERSITY
CHORALE, Janna Brendell. Conduc-
tor. Wright Auditorium, 8:00 P.M.
LIFEGUARD AND CPR-PR Re-Cer-
tification - Friday. April 24, 6-10PM
Along with that, on Saturday, April
25th from 9:30AM-1:30PM in
Minges pool, the Lifeguard Re-certi-
fication class will be held. It is only
$15 for one day and $25 for both.
Register before April 22. Questions,
call SRC at 328-6387,
ECU OPEN MARTIAL Arts Tourna-
ment - Come join in all the fun on
Saturday. April 25th . Adult, junior,
and children's divisions. Registration
begins at 9:00AM and the tourna-
ments begin at 11:00. Questions, call
SRC at 328-6387.
RCLS SOCIETY WILL meet Thurs-
day. April 23rd at 4:00PM in the Old
Pirate Club. Topics will include the
deadline for the King's Dominion
trip, picture names and games.
GAMMA BETA PHI will meet Tues-
day, April 28 in Mendenhall Room
244 at 5:30 PM.
PLACE YOUR NEXT meeting or
workshop in the announcements
section of the classifieds. It's free
of charge. Take advantage of this
powerful means of letting the cam-
pus know of your event. Come by
The East Carolinian office in the Stu-
dent Publications Building for details.
Type these addresses into your browser
and visit us on the web
u.edu
then bookmark them and come back
frequently. We constantly improve them
to better serve you.
k�J TWO IMPORTANT THINGS
�mfjL YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO LOSE!
Save Money On Food
And Move Through The Check-Out Lines Faster
At All Campus Restaurants Using
The ECU Advantage Account.
0
1
��
-�t
check out faster! money-saving specials!
budget your food dollars! discounted prices!
�a
w
��v
u
:i
.7
SUPERCHARGE YOUR ONE CARD!
Open a new Advantage Account account or add money to an existing account
by calling or visiting the Dining Services office in Todd Dining Hall MonM 8 AM-5 PM.
You can also stop by our temporary remote office in The Wright Place April 22-24
between 8 AM and 3 PM. Call ECU-FOOD for more infomation.
i
j





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scholar 'ska-tar n ME scoer, fr. OE scolere & OF escoler, fr. ML
scJioans, fr. LL, of a school, fr. L scioa school (bef. 12c) 1 : one
ho attends a school or studies under a
: one
person
earned
udent (as
yity, or
e and
E
coi
uf has done advanced study
3 a hMer of hoh Jfcip
si4 'x - "(1 ?): o
p sc IS : E INEU AC EMIC I
scl ol ir�? i ship ca. 151
b a ' ge r f nd n)
attainments c cho
learning (drawing on the
Scholarship level n (1947): s
i$cholastic scala�-tik adj ML & L; Ml j school-
men, fr- L, of a stftool, fr. Gk scholastikos, frTscHnto keep a
school fr. schole school (1596) 1 a often cap: of or relating to Scho-
lasticism theology) philosophy) b : suggestive or characteris-
tic of a scholastic esp. in subtlety or aridity : pedantic dull reports)
2 : of or relating to schools or scholars; esD : of or relating to high
school or secondary school � scholasticaMy -ti-k(a-)le adv
Scholastic n (1644) 1 a cap : a Scholastic philosopher b : pedant
formalist 2 NL scholasticus, fr. L scholasticus, adj. : a student in a
scholasticate 3 : one who adopts academic or traditional methods in
art
�cholasticate Xska-Mas-takjit, -tj-kat n NL scholasticatys, h scho-
lasticus student in a scholasf-
general study for those
religious order
scho�las�ticism Xska-Ma-tasL-zpmVn (ca.
sophical movement domi
9th until the 1,7th centuw an
mystical and intuitional 4a&i
Augustine and later with
: close adherence to the tJTOTtrotf
sect b : pedantic adhereHi!�
scho�liast Vsko-least, -le-as
write scholia on, fr. Gk Of?
MENTATOR, ANNOTATOR
$cho�li�um sko-le-3m rit
lion comment, scholium, Si Hi
pnal annotation or com
grammarian) 2 : a rema
to a demonstration or a traiftaL
'school VskiilX n ME scotfrfr
sure, discussion, lecture, S$KftS6&
more at scheme (bef. 12c) 1 : an organization that provides instruc-
tion: as a : an institution for the teaching of children b : COLLEGE
university c (1) : a group of scholars and teachers pursuing knowl
edge together that with similar groups constituted a medieval univer
�ty (2; : one of the four faculties of a medieval university (3) : anj
lnVSdigfaBI9dfedttBt' education often associated with a
iBfeffelSSfi&ffiP at a sch�o1 : attendance at a
nWn yrr �se3?f&n of a Stfiool b : a school building c : the stu-
d�iMfekAtoAj0601aCUdeffflifearilpdr&cbCiPAdaEl students 3 : a source
of knowledge Experience jvas his)� 4 . apersons who hold a com-
rSortftModlO theology, or
medicine) the Arristotelian b j a group of artists under a common
n (ca. XJ&Q CQP a : a Pl�-
wail536 civilization from the
aiadaffft.n'nf l�e
w &iftffWcf)JWl�TOfrr�sp. or M.
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2 tjjgjjt April 23. 1898
tocUggsoclion
The Eilt Carolinian
I
J
Unusual scholarships
help specific
situations
Full 4-year award to
asthmatic
MYRA WOOTEN
FOCUS SECTION W1ITEI
Checking his pockets, Jonathan
, Easterlin, an ECU freshman
smiles. "I left it on my desk. I
never leave my room without it. I
carry it in my backpack all the
time
Easterlin does not mean his keys
or his one card, he means his
inhaler� the medication that not
only helps to clear his bronchial
tubes but also cleared his way to
college.
Unlike other scholarship
recipients, Easterlin is not an
athlete or a genius. He is,
however, asthmatic, and thanks to
the North Carolina Division of
Vocation Rehabilitation, Easterlin
is also a full four-year scholarship
recipient due to his illness.
As a child born with asthma,
Easterlin spent long periods in the
hospital hooked up to a nebulizer
and being given Provental, a drug
that helps relax the bronchial
tubes.
"Anything can trigger my
attacks Easterlin said. "Just
having a cold or even coughing can
start an attack
Easterlin, a music education
major from Laurinburg, was
selected from
hundreds of
other North
Carolina high
school students
who had any
physical disabilities
to receive this
scholarship,
based solely on a
physical exam
and medical
history.
"I never
applied for the
scholarship
Easterlin said.
"I think
they
got
my name
from a
school list
of kids that
had
asthma
never applied
for the scholarship,
I think they got my
name from a
school list of
kids that had
asthma.
Jonathan Easterlin
Easterlin
believes he
would still have been able to attend
college without the scholarship,
but admits it's a lot easier since he
would have had to get a job in
order to attend ECU.
Because of his illness
Easterlin is limited in the jobs he
can perform. He cannot work
outdoors due to the severity of his
allergies.
"I'm allergic to everything
except goat saliva he said,
laughing, "which is okay since I
haven't met any goats
But Easterlin's illness does
not stop him from playing the
guitar, his first love. Easterlin
began playing in the 10th grade,
teaching himself to play both
acoustic and electrical guitar.
"One day I'd like to teach
other kids to play the guitar
as well � maybe give
private
lessons out of
my house
he said.
For now
Easterlin is a
guitarist in a
local band
called
Immunity, and perfects his
trombone playing, his instrument
of concentration.
When Easterlin plays in
smoke-filled clubs he deals with
the problem the same way he deals
with anything connected to his
illness, with a calm and level head.
"I can't go to clubs because of
my asthma, but I still love to play
with my band he said. "If the
smoke from the other members
gets too bad I just go outside and
get some fresh air
Although Easterlin's four-
member rock band was formed
only this past fall, he sees great
things ahead.
When it comes to his
illness, Easterlin takes a positive
attitude and jokes, "Now that it's
got me to college, I hope I grow
out of it
even
PHOTO BY SABRINA THOMAS
Financial Aid Office
provides information
Various scholarships
available
LEE NOLES
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
From local scholarships, such as a
$100 award for math majors, to
national scholarships, such as a
$5,000 award for minority
accounting students, ECU offers a
range of opportunities.
To find out about these
opportunities just visit the financial
aid office, where you can pick up
folders full of information. Or
better yet, browse the World Wide
Web, which allows students a free
search sponsored by the College
Board.
"We encourage students to
explore every avenue of
opportunity for sources and
scholarships said Maryann
Jenkins, assistant director of
student financial aid. Students can
stop by Financial Aid from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m Monday through Friday,
and look through folders that tell
about the scholarships each
department offers. One can find
out how much each scholarship
provides and for how long and
about the requirements by
browsing through the folders. In
the future, one will be able to find
out about university and
departmental scholarships by
clicking on the East Carolina home
page, www.ecu.edufinancial. The
page is now under development.
One can also click on the World
Wide Web and visit different
locations such as
www.rams.comsmsearch.htm and
www.collegenet.commach23.
Both are free searches that can help
you learn more about national
scholarships. To find out about
other web sites visit the financial
aid office.
Students can also ask within
their own departments.
Departmental scholarships range
from $100, such as the John B.
Davis Award for math majors with
an interest in statistics, to $1,000
for the Richard C. Todd
scholarship for full-time
outstanding seniors who are history
majors.
Another source is the Office of
National Fellowships and
Scholarships (NFS), which is part
of the College of Arts and Sciences
and is located in Brewster Hall A-
212. The program, founded in
1996, is geared to helping both
East Carolina graduate and
undergraduate students receive
national scholarships for graduate
programs.
"Anyone who is thinking about
graduate school will benefit from
this program said Dr. Lorraine
check out these web sites for
national scholarships
www. ramscomsmsearch. htm
www. collegenet. commach23
for other sites visit the
financial aid office
Aragon, head of NFS. "Going to
graduate school is a tough job and
my office helps people plan for
getting ready to go into a graduate
program"
The NFS offers a selection of
national scholarships to choose
from. The office also helps prepare
students for graduate school by
writing supporting letters and
teaching students how to write
essays. Scholarships range from
$500 to $20,000 a year, Aragon
said.
The NFS not only offers
information on national
scholarships but also gives free
workshops. Any ECU student
interested in a graduate program
can attend the workshop, held at
the Community Service Building.
The workshops, led by Aragon and
Dr. James Westmoreland of Career
Services, help students choose a
graduate program and a university.
They also teach students how to
write a strong application.
"Students have said that it has
helped them said Aragon, who
has seen 100 students come
through the office in the fall of
1997. However, she warns
students that it is very important to
begin the process of testing and
writing applications at least a year
in advance. If students have further
questions about graduate
scholarships they can go by
Brewster A-212 of call 328-1074
or go by Career Services on Fifth
Street.
Got Something to say?
Need somewhere to say it?
Write a Letter to the
Editor and let your
view be
heard!
eastcarolinian
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
Ite Student Publications Buildiog
5
pply iiblic
i'ft
2 w
it 5. 3
M r
a.
t
$
K
3
a
a
o






3 Thufidiy, April 23, 1988
frcilS section
Thi Eilt Ciroliniin
Over 300 athletes
receive grants
Football awards most
money
Brent Anderson
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
because they have more players, it's
the biggest sport, and it has more
fan support, which brings money to
the university said Marvin
Mitchell, assistant athletic director.
Some athletes receive a full grant,
which consists of tuition, room,
board and books. An athlete can
also receive a partial scholarship,
which can consist of
�Z7� 77 7 7 any of the above. A
rootball has the fuii out-of-state
If you can throw a fastball 90 mph,
catch three touchdowns a game, or
dunk a basketball, then you might
be able to get
your college
education and
EUC st grants because SM
For the they have more
ecu spent biggest sport, and it
more than $2.6 �9, r
million in
athletic grants
grant
has more fan
support, which
brings money to the
university,
More than 300
student
athletes receive
athletic grants
each year.
Even so, East
Carolina's
athletic budget
is one of the
lowest in the
state, said
Athletic Director Mike Hamrick.
The football program offers the
most athletic grants at 85.
"Football has the most grants
Marvin Mitchell
assistant athletic director
full in-state
costs 16,530.
"We don't base a
scholarship on in-
state or out-of-state
status Mitchell
said. "We base it on
the quality of the
athlete both on and
off the field. If we
have two athletes
that are the same
position and ability,
one being in-state
and one out-of-state,
we'll take the in-
state athlete because
it will save us a little
money
Athletic grants play an important
role in the East Carolina athletic
program. "I believe without
� J
scholarships, the athletic program
would be very mediocre Mitchell
said. "It would be more like an
intramural program. We wouldn't
be able to attract star potential
without scholarships
One important fact about
athletic scholarships is that they arc
on a year-to-year basis. "If an
athlete doesn't perform on or
especially in the classroom, he or
she will lose their scholarship
Hamrick said.
The only way athletes can receive
a scholarship for their entire college
education is if they receive a career-
ending injury. "We here at East
Carolina feel an obligation to
continue an athlete's education so
they can become a competent and
successful member of society
Mitchell said.
ECU spent over $2.6 million on athletic grants for the 1997-98 school year. ECU'S athletic budget is
one of the lowest in the state. Athletic scholarships are awarded on a yeer-by-year basis.
HI PHOTO
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association regulates how many
athletic grants can be rewarded and
also regulates academic standards.
For the first two years, athletes must
follow the same academic standards
as all ECU students. If they don't
have a 1.8 grade point average by
fall of their junior year, the athlete
will be ineligible to play. "The
higher NCAA academic standards
help create an all-around athlete
Mitchell said.
Being a student athlete isn't all
fun and games. It takes a lot of
heart and dedication to be
triumphant. "East Carolina's
typical student athlete is an honor
roll student, from North Carolina,
carries an average course load of
fifteen hours, and graduates in four
and one half years Hamrick said.
Amount of money spent on athletic grants this year by each sport
Football11,098,000Women's Basketball $195,000
Men's Basketball$201,000Women's Cross Country and
Baseball$116,000Track $139,000
Men's Swimming$91,000Women's Volleyball $115,000
Men's Track$80,000Women's Swimming $108,000
Men's Soccer$67,000Softball $106,000
Men's Tennis$50,000Women's Soccer $73,000
Men's Golf$48,000Women's Tennis $71,000
Men's Cross Country$25,000� . ,
Soccer player says
s come at a price
Sports Medicine
Department helps with
athletic injuries
Rebecca Glenn
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
When Michael Holloway walked
into the student store to get his
books this semester, they were
already bagged up and ready to go.
This may not sound like much, but
on those hectic first days of school,
it helps.
Scholarship athletes such as
Holloway receive such benefits to
compensate them for their
dedication and hard work at ECU.
Many athletes on partial
scholarships receive perks as a
reward for their time and effort put
into the school both athletically and
academically.
"It saved me time and money this
semester said Holloway, a junior
on the men's soccer team.
Medical benefits are a rnltfor�
advantage for scholarship athletes
at ECU. The sports medicine
department covers all varsity
sports-related injuries.
"I hurt my knee during a game
last season and fortunately the
school paid for most of my surgery
and all my rehabilitation said
Robert Schwartz, a member of the
men's soccer team.
But if you find yourself envying
athletes who get such perks, think
again. For example, many athletes
do not take 8 a.m. classes because
they have to practice in the
mornings.
"Most of the time I set my alarm
for 5:30 a.m. to make sure I make it
to my mandatory weight training
session at 6 a.m Holloway said.
The average day of an athlete at
ECU is chaotic and includes
practices, classes, schoolwork and
games.
"If you would like to go through
a typical day in the life of a
scholarship athlete, I'd be glad to
show you what it's like said
Marvin Mitchell, assistant athletic
director.
Unlike many athletes, Holloway
didn't come to ECU with a
scholarship to play soccer. He was a
walk-on looking to obtain a
position on a Division I soccer
team. Since Holloway was not
"I hurt my knee
during a game last
season and fortunately
the school paid for
most of my surgery
and all my
rehabilitation,
Robert Schwartz
men s soccer team
recruited by ECU, he had to work
hard to a spot on the team.
Don't be fooled by the
misconception that scholarship
athletes primarily concentrate on
the field of play and not in the the
classroom.
"Here at East Carolina there
is a higher percentage of
student athletes that graduate
as opposed to that of the
general population of the
student body Mitchell said.
All student athletes are
rewarded by the athletic
departments by making the
honor roll. Holloway, who
currently has a GPA of 3.2, is
one of the many athletes who
have been given recognition
for academic performance and
academic talents.
Holloway feels he would not be a
student at ECU if the athletic
department did not help him
financially.
e n t e r p i e c e Designer
terpiece Designer
� u n t e r p ve ce D e s i g
10 hours per week
�CA major preferred
�Minimum GPA 2.0
�Must be able to meet
weekly deadlines
�Experienced in Photoshop,
Illustrator, Quark XPress
i the
line I � �
eastcaroliman
AmyRoyster
Editor-in-Chief
Heather Burgess
Managing Editor
Celeste Wilson
Cover and Layout Design
focuS
Focus is a combined effort between The East Carolinian and Shearlean
Duke's Basic Reporting cless in the Department of Communication.





I
4 Thundly, April 23, 199B
CUS section
The East Carolinian
More than 1,000 students
earn perfect GPA's
Seniors score higher than
anyone else
Becky Glenn
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
ECU had 14,707 undergraduate
students last fall and 1,126 of them
are definitely making the grade.
These students have spent endless
hours studying and reading, while
some were out partying and
watching television. And it paid off.
They earned a perfect 4.0 grade
point average during the fall
semester.
Claudia McCann of the ECU
Office of Planning and Institutional
Research said the percentage of
students with 4.0 GPAs by class
ranking were:
freshman � 3.3 percent,
sophomore � 4.9 percent, junior �
6.8 percent and senior � 14.1
percent.
Colleen McColl, a freshman
communication major, was part of
Claudia McCann of the ECU Office of
Planning and Institutional Research said
the percentage of students with 4.0 GPAs by
class ranking were:
freshman 3.3 percent
sophomore 4.9 percent
junior 6.8 percent
senior 14.1 percent
those statistics. "It's not something
that I set my mind to and knew I
was going to do; it just happened
McColl said.
The GPA is the ratio between the
numbers of hours attempted and the
number of quality points earned.
That means for every class these
determined 1,126 students took,
they earned the highest possible
quality points.
"I probably study two or three
doesn't have a test the next day.
McColl, who recendy pledged for
Alpha Omicron Pi, said, "Instead of
waiting until the last minute of the
night before a test I study every
afternoon
That way she really learns the
material instead of cramming the
,pight before a test.
Most students feel a 4.0 grade
point average is unattainable and for
some of us it is. But, not for Alecia
hours a day McColl said. That -Page, a senior accounting major;
means she studies even when she V, "I just have to manage my time
and make sure my priorities are
straight. That way I am able to
study and have fun said Page.
Page, a member of Sigma Sigma
Sigma sorority and three honor
fraternities: Beta Gamma Sigma,
Beta Alpha Phi. She was recently
inducted into Phi Kappa Phi.
"Study habits are the key the good
grades and my roommates
influenced me a great deal with
mine Page said.
Need soanrjewlhere to
Write a Letter
to the Editor
and let your
view be heard!
eastcarolinian
Bring all letters to!
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The Student Publications Building
Still haven't found a good job?
Well you're in luck!
oastcarolinian
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING
positions: Production Assistant
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TUESDAY
APRIL 28,195
in1
Aware,
higfio
Will
Recent S
Association
ushered in s
tives who s:
dance of id'
the organizai
Accordini
SGA's forem
student orga
the funding
Cor
Westl
did
Jan
Crai
SE
West Fifth !
after Dr. Mai
year, leaving
dents upset.
County
Savage and I
County presi
Christian Le
(SCLC) led i
Fifth Street
Gar
Succes.
praise
MOHAV
STA
The career s
has gained pr
job recipients.
Paul Powei
dent of First C
ated from EC!
business in 19
business in 19
vices departmi
mc Powers
everything po:
my job hunt. "
Lisa Bentoi
with a bach
administration
in human re;
works for Wa
department of
"The caree
very helpful w
for help Bern
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' i


Title
The East Carolinian, April 23, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 23, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2809
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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