The East Carolinian, April 16, 1998






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THURSDAY
Jthe I �
eastcarolmian
of Governors approves
600-seat dining hall for west campus
BuiMng COStpWJeCted million dollar food service company
Building cost projected
at $7.4 million
MOHAMED HlISSEIN
STAFF WRITER
Students on East campus won't be
the only ones to benefit from a spa-
cious new dining hall after plans for
a West campus dining hall, are com-
pleted.
At the present time,
Mendenhall Student Center hous-
es the main dining hall of west
campus. Mendenhall, first built in
1974, is still in good use today, but
is being moved in order to provide
more room in the Mendenhall
Student Center.
The dining hall will be located
on the west end of campus. It will
include a 600-seat dining hall and a
food court adjacent to Readc
Circle, where the amphitheater is
located. The food will be prepared
and served by Aramark, a multi-
million dollar food service company
already contracted with the univer-
sity.
"Construction would not begin
for another year Brown said .
Brown expects the dining hall to
be of the same caliber as Todd
Dining Hall and a major improve-
ment to ECU's west campus.
Recently, the Board of
Governors of the UNC system
approved spending more than $92
million on construction projects at
eight UNC campuses around the
state. Of that $92 million, $7.4 mil-
lion will go into constructing a new
dining hall at ECU.
The money for the projects is
coming directly from the sale of
revenue bonds. The bonds are to
be repaid from income earned by
the facilities through rent, direct
sales or fees.
"The bonds keep the universi-
ty's dining hall improvements mov-
ing forward said Richard Brown,
ECU vice chancellor of finance and
administration.
Transit
approves
raised
GPA
Requirements uppedto
23 for managers
Watt Campus's naw dining hall will be built in the area between Clement and Fletcher Hall where the old amphitheatre now stands.
PHOTO IY AMANDA AUSTIN
Lawsuit alleges commissioners
biased over PCMH privatization
Hewlett Packard
invites ideas for web site
3 residents cite
conflict of interest
Jenny Vickers
STAFF WRITER
Many Pitt County Memorial
Hospital and Pitt County
Commissioners are adamantly pro-
claiming the benefits of becoming a
private, not-for-profit hospital.
Despite these assertions, three resi-
dents of Pitt County have filed a
lawsuit against them claiming that
several commissioners cannot make
a fair decision due to conflicts of
interest in favor of privatization.
Because Pitt County
Commissioners, who have close
connections with and within
PCMH, elect the consultants to
advise them on the hospital's priva-
tization issue, several Pitt County
residents claim that there will be
biases involved in the issue of priva-
tization.
According to Gene Tranbarger,
associate professor of nursing at
ECU and former president of the
North Carolina Nurses Association,
the change will benefit the resi-
dents of Pitt County.
"PCMH will continue to serve
the indigent regardless of its organi-
zational status because this is an
integral part of its mission
Tranbarger said.
Pitt County resident Nancy
Colville, one of the citizens who has
served the commissioners with the
lawsuit, claims that the issue is not
whether they will continue to care
for the indigent, but rather who will
pay for it.
"The cost of indigent care is
negotiable Colville said. "They
Many controversial issues stand between the public and Pitt County commissioners
regarding the privatization of Pitt County Memorial Hospital, located on Stantonsburg Rd.
PHOTO BY SAMANTHA SNVOEfl
5 opening available
for U.S. students
Nina M. Dry
STAFF WRITER
The Hewlett Packard (HP)
Company has recently announced a
contest inviting engineering stu-
dents to offer their input and ideas
for a new Hewlett Packard educa-
tional web site.
"We currently have an award-
winning web site that meets the
needs of engineering educators, but
students need something differ-
ent said Marsh Faber,
education program manager
of HP's Electronic Measurements
Division. "A select group of tomor-
row's engineers can help us create a
web site that will benefit engineer-
ing students worldwide
There are 11 openings available
in this contest, five of which are
opened to students in the United
States. Eligibility extends to college
sophomores and juniors.
"I think it is difficult to offer the
contest to seniors Faber said. "At
that point, seniors are more con-
cerned about graduating and get-
ting their first jobs
However, HP docs offer some-
thing for graduating seniors. Marsh
said that HP will send a free book to
the student's first job entitled The
First Job Survival Guide by Andrea
Sutcliffe. Just send your name and
the job's address to the HP web site.
For sophomores and juniors to
participate in the contest, they must
submit a two paragraph essay to the
SEE WEB SITE. PAGE 2
William LeLiever
STAf WHITE
The university student transit
authority met Wednesday, Topics
of discussion included the academ-
ic probation policy, a cellular
phone policy, the 1998-99 budget,
and the maximum hours and salary
for student managers.
Joey Weathington, student tran-
sit adviser, proposed changes to
the transit academic probation pol-
icy, which were accepted. Transit
managers are now required to keep
a 2.3 overall GPA instead of the
previous 2.0 criteria. Drivers will
be warned if their overall GPA
goes below a 2.3. Transit managers
will be relieved of their position if
their GPA goes below a 2.3, but
may still work as a driver.
"This addition to the existing
academic probation policy will
help students become more con-
cerned with their grades while
holding a management position
Weathington said.
Two cellular phones will be
supplied to the transit system.
According to Stephen Wright,
transit manager, it will allow the
drivers' of charter buses that go
beyond city limits to reach the
Greenville office. The phones will
cost about $7.95 a month to use,
"For safety concerns on charters
we need cell phones when the
buses go outside of Greenville
said Craig Jackson, operations
manager. "The buses run outside
the city during the summer 20 to
25 times a month, and during the
school year four or five times a
month. We also have an employee
going to different towns to drop off
or pick up retail, buses and equip-
SEE TRANSIT. PAGE 3
are already putting a dollar amount
on how much they will cover. If
they claim they will continue to pro-
vide indigent care for all, why are
they placing a number on it?
Eventually, if the hospital doesn't
have enough money to cover indi-
gent care, they could retain consul-
tants and plead that they can't pay.
The county is not obligated to pick
up the cost, but morally, they will
have to. This means the property
tax owners will have to pay more in
order to compensate
Colville feels a lot of the benefits
are misleading. "People arc mis-
leadingColville said.
"I have official documents to
back up what I am saying Colville
said. "Who are you going to believe,
a person who just talks about it or a
person with documents to back
them up? A car salesman will sell
any car
Arlcn Holt, hospital information
officer, feels that the privatization is
the best course of action.
"The County feels it is in the
best interest of the citizens to reor-
ganize under N.C. General Statute
131 E-8 Holt said.
Colville disagrees and wants res-
idents to be more concerned about
the privatization issue. She said she
feels that once PCMH ceases to be
public, a lot of negative things will
occur in the community.
"They will be able to put leans
in patients who can't pay their bill in
full Colville said. "This means
that they can force you to sell your
house if you don't have the money.
As a public hospital, they arc only
allowed to invest in safe invest-
ments. When they become private,
they can invest aggressively in the
stock market. This is a risk because
SEE PRIVATIZATION, PAGE 2
Library Science degree not accredited
by American Library Association
5winSrTTi
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Program graduates
can' work at Joyner
Carolyn Rob bins Hyde
staff writer
Students attending ECU in the
library science program might have
a big surprise when they apply for
jobs after graduation.
The master of library science
degree at ECU is not accredited by
the American Library Association, a
qualification that is required
throughout most of the country for
the positions of librarian within
universities, private research, med-
ical research or various government
jobs.
Though it is possible to obtain a
job without the accreditation in
North Carolina, the degree is not
acceptable for most library posi-
tions elsewhere in the United
States. It is normally not sufficient
to meet eligibility requirements for
a faculty position as librarian, even
at Joyner Library on campus.
In 1989, Dr. Lawrence Auld,
current chairperson of the
Department of Library Studies and
Educational Technology, came to
ECU in an attempt to secure ALA
accreditation. A self-study was con-
ducted here at ECU, praised bythc
dean at that time as "brilliant"
However, the ALA refused recon-
sideration. Unfortunately, accredi-
tation was never accomplished.
"The issue of ALA accreditation
was dropped several years ago and
is no longer an issue Auld said.
When questioned as to the ben-
efits of having this degree, Auld
stressed that ECU's library science
program is approved through the
North Carolina Department of
Public Instruction, thereby giving
SEE LIBRARY PAGE 1
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There's no
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2 Thmriiy. April 18. 198�
news
Tht Cut Carolinian
.news
briefs
Student Health Center offers
emergency contraception
�VwinSfeTo
UNC's Wearier steps
down as law dean
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
Judith Wegner, dean of the
University of North Carolina law
school for nine yean, will step
down next year and return to
teaching at the school.
Supreme Court rejects
request to allow
May 5 elections
RALEIGH (AP) �A three-judge
federal panel that declared the
12th Congressional District uncon-
stitutional indicates in its detailed
order that the district probably can
be tweaked rather than totally
redrawn.
; across
the
( nation
Kevorkian brings
corpse to suburban
Detroit hospital
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Treatment must be
taken within 12 hours
Melanie Hackworth
staff write
Females at risk for an unplanned
pregnancy have the option of using
emergency contraception through
the Student Health Center. The
treatment must be administered
within 72 hours of an unprotected
sexual encounter.
Emergency contraception con-
sists of a high dose of hormones in
the form of eight pills that reduces
the risk of pregnancy by 75 percent
The emergency contraception
offered by the SHS is not the con-
troversial "abortion pill RU-486.
Contrary to reports in common
fashion magazines, women cannot
simply overdose on birth control
pills as a method of emergency con-
traception.
"People just think they can
overload on their birth control pre-
scription and be fine said Heather
Zophy, health education coordina-
tor. "Individuals need to go see a
health care provider for the pre-
scription instead of just reading an
article
Birth control pills are not a suffi-
cient substitute because only cer-
tain brands of pills can be used for
emergency contraception.
Women in need of this service
are those who have engaged in
unprotected intercourse, those that
have encountered a failed form of
birth control (ex. a broken condom),
or women who have been sexually
assaulted.
lb obtain access to emergency
contraception, a woman must make
an appointment with a health care
provider at SHS within 72 hours of
the unprotected act.
The appointment will consist of
a visit with a nurse followed by
counseling by a health care
provider. Occasionally a pregnancy
test or a pelvic exam must be
administered.
A pregnancy test is $5 through
the SHS. Emergency contracep-
tion pills are $8.
"Typically you don't need a
pelvic exam, you just need to talk
with a provider said Kathy
Whitehead, family nurse practition-
er with SHS. "You need to know
when your last period was and gen-
erally what your cycles are like
If emergency contraception is
prescribed, the provider will
explain its use and side effects to
the patient.
Not every woman is a candidate
for this option. A provider will eval-
uate the patient's family history in
addition to other factors to deter-
mine if the patient should have the
pills.
The concept of emergency con-
traception is controversial because
of the debate over when life begins.
A typical pregnancy happens
when fertilization occurs in the fal-
lopian tubes and the fertilized egg
travels down to implant along the
walls of the uterus.
Emergency contraception works
by inhibiting implantation of a fer-
tilized egg in the uterus. Many
believe that life begins with initial
fertilization, others with implanta-
tion.
"Typically it's not a pregnancy
until the fertilized egg implants in
the uterus, but the controversy still
there lies Zophy said.
Medically, a pregnancy will not
show on a test until implantation
has occurred.
Emergency contraception is
completely voluntary and other
options are discussed in detail by
providers.
The SHS is open from 8:00 a.m.
- 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday,
and 9:00 sum. - 5:00 p.m on
Wednesdays. Weekend hours are
9:00 a.m12:00 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
5tj
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Accelerate
toward gradual
Skate through a
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodates the
needs of individuals with disabilities
Kingston Place
Condominiums
3 Thundi
E A
CAROI
UNTVEF
b;r.PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) � Police
dz are investigating the death of a
Missouri woman whose body was
mj brought to a hospital by Dr. Jack
ii' Kevorkian.
Grady to speak to
WVU graduates
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP)�
Captain Scott O'Grady, an Air
Force pilot shot down over Bosnia
in 1995 will be the speaker at West
Virginia University's graduation
next month, school officials say.
Iraqi abuse likely to
continue if sanctions
are dropped
GENEVA (AP) � Saddam
Hussein's atrocities against Iraqi
citizens probably would continue
even if the United Nations drops
sanctions against Iraq, a key U.N.
human rights expert said Tuesday.
Governmentpaper
brands U.N. rights
report on Iraq silly
GENEVA (AP)� International
sanctions have not prevented
Saddam Hussein from summary
executions and other atrocities
against Iraqis, and the human
rights situation is deteriorating, a
U.N. expert said recently.
Privatization
continued from page 1
the stock market rises and falls.
The hospital has the potential of
making or losing. If the money is
lost, then where does that leave the
hospital?"
Colville said she feels that a
reduction in services will occur if
PCMH becomes private.
"Millions and millions of dollars
are put into subsidiaries in other
counties that are losing money
Colville said. "This will debilitate
the financial strength of the hospi-
tal and cause a reduction in ser-
vices
A statement made in a PCMH
manuscript states: "The PCMH
you have today is practically identi-
cal to the PCMH you would have if
this reorganization takes place. But
it would be stronger
Colville feels this is a biased
statement.
"Whether you are a private not-
for-profit or private for-profit hospi-
tal, there is little difference
Colville said. "They're both oper-
ating for money
Tranbarger feels differently
about the matter.
"To those who fear that privati-
zation of PCMH will limit access to
care or lower the quality of care, I
can say with a level of assurance
that there is nothing magic about
public or private hospitals
Tranbarger said.
Tranbarger feels that privatiza-
tion is also important to ECU
because most of the health science
operates, could possibly be receiv-
ing pressure to cast his vote in favor
of privatization from his employer
the lawsuit stated.
Colville claims that a reversion-
ary clause will occur when they go
private.
"Pitt County will never get the
hospital back Colville said. "We
will not get full value of what we've
already given them
The plaintiffs hope that the
County Commissioners will listen
to both points of view on the issue.
They want to establish a citizens
committee, separate and apart from
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tal, that will address commissioners
with their ideas concerning privati-
zation. They also want county citi-
zens to be more informed of and
able to vote for this issue.
student education occurs at the . the county officials and the hospi-
hospital.
"Students and families must rely
on it for care Tranbarger said.
"East of 1-95, PCMH is the most
comprehensive care giver and the
entire region's health requires it to
function outside of Pitt County
The plaintiffs in the lawsuit feel
that some may be pressured into
voting.
"Vice Chairman Thomas
Johnson, a professor at ECU, under
whose umbrella the medical school
Website
continued from page 1
HP web site at
http:www.hp.cominfostudentw
eb between April 15 and May 31.
The first paragraph should be on
why the student thinks he or she
should serve on the HP Student
Advisory Council. The second
should mention some ideas on
what should be on the web site.
"Each paragraph shouldn't
exceed 100 words Faber said.
"We want the contest to be easy to
enter
The winners of the contest will
receive an all-expenses paid trip to
Colorado from Aug. 8-14, stay at
the Boulderado Hotel, and get to
participate in local outdoor activi-
ties such as white water rafting,
hiking and horseback riding. They
will also receive a tour of the HP
facilities and serve on the HP
Student Advisory Council, giving
advice and ideas on the web site.
Winners will be monetarily com-
pensated for all the ideas given for
the web site.
The web site will not be com-
pleted during the week the stu-
dents are in Colorado.
"A good web site can't be
designed in a week Faber said.
"The ideas will form the founda-
tion for forming the site
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it Ciroliniin
3 Thundiy, April 16, 1988
news
The Ettt Ciroliniin
idviser.
ng Studies
ive action
lam the
abilities
ce
ns
tions,
ater,
hens
receive a
eat:
'575
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LlBRET:
5.00
Piercings
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nlrv and
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SO HAS: I
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HT ROOM I
CREAM
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1(7479
�r-M
PM
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Don't miss this�
Register for summer classesfnbvv!
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodates the
needs of individuals with disabilities
Free
'regnancy
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
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jjrjeejests essionjor firstimeuserjs
TEC tracks
-Ml- � j�"Backpack Bandit
'iflUalilk known as the "Backpack Hjjtcdlv b�en arrested for
Wan. TEC hopes to warn
Jobb's alleged crimes.
BU 328-6787.
1994: Issued afc
ticket for SIMM
Fab 3, 190JWmmW � 3
lap top in H
Fob 6, 1998:�ring his
1994 ban tickHfCobb and
charged him vm���-�
Fob 7, 1998: FO�J1 Warrants were
sworn for stolen goolatched missing
property from the studir backpacks stolen
Fob 12, 1998: Arrested 1ir warrants
Fob 17, 1998: Warrant issueattempted felonious larceny
Fob 18, 1998: Arrested for aIpted felonious larceny
Mar 7, 1998: Reported in man's locker room at Minges
Mar 9, 1998: Warrant issued for second degree trespassing
Mar 11, 1998: Arrested for second degree trespassing
April 7, 1998: First degree trespassing and misdemeanor
larceny
Library
continued from page I
graduates the ability to secure a job
in school media.
"Our chief strengths have always
been school media, preparing
school librarians Auld said.
There are three universities
within the NC educational system
which are ALA accredited: UNC,
UNCG and NCCU.
Wes Daughtry, library technician
assistant 1, is a 1993 graduate of
ECU's library science department.
Daughtry was already enrolled at
ECU in the master's program wh�,i
he realized the program was ui
ALA accredited.
"I was 23 of the way through
the program when I realized it was
not ALA accredited Daughtry
said. "I still continued with the pro-
gram, though, because I iwm no
plans for moving out of statcj
Both Auld and Daughtry Mid the
master's degree in library science at
ECU is appropriate for those who
choose school media and academic
settings.
Transit
continued from page 1
ment.
"Most ECU students receive
$1500 a semester from their jobs;
the transit managers receive $1500
a month said SGA Treasurer Lisa
Smith. "Managers must realize that
school is number one; their job is
number two
The proposed budget was pre-
sented by Weathington to "break
even" for the 1998-99 year, which
was a change from previous years.
The 1997-98 deficit was over
$172,000 which, according to
Smith, is unreasonable to run a
business.
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Kcllie Michelle Allen
Kathy L, Alligood
Amy Elizabeth Andcrtnn
Bernice Gale Bailes
Jennie L. Bajnai
Shelly I). Barrett
Carolyn Joyce Basehorc
Douglas G. Batcheltir, Jr.
Jennifer Joy Beaeham
Susie V. Beamnn
Starla Marie Bowers
Shannon Lee Boyle
Crystal Lynn Brantley
Carrie Devin Brewer
Kathcrinc E. Brownhill
Bridget Meredith Buck
Terri Lynn Carawan
April Christina Castle
Melanie Ann Caston
Aleah T. Charles
Brandy Nicole Clinard
Mil-Melc Allison Colino
Anna Brooks Collins
Erin C. Corcoran
Christopher M. Couitt
Liliana T. Covey
Kilcy Nicole Crawford
Crystal Gail Czapiga
Gordon Charles Davis
Emily Kirk Dchart
John Allen Dijoseph
Thomas C. Dixon, Iv
Tainika Naomi Dopson
Catherine B. Dnrman
Kylic I'hares Dotson
Dama E. Duprcc
William Henry Durham
Stacy Lynctte Edwards
Sara Brie Elders
Eugene Christian Elliott
Lindsey Ctflberinc Elwell
Alan Bernard Enojado
Ashley Nicole Evans
Jeffrey Shepard Iaison
John M. Elanagan
LaGina F. Flowers
Holly Annette Frye
Amanda L. Garrett
Natalie Ruth Garrison
Kristina Diane Gibson
Kayna Ivy Gordon
Brandy Gladden Grady
Sondra A. Gray
Kclli Danielle Gregory
Erica Toinctte Green
Summer Leigh Grccr
Robert Bcnton Griffin
Melanie Susan Hackworth
Jennifer Louise llagcman
TifTancc Marie Hager
Marsha Gail Harrell
Amanda Louise Harris
Jennifer Brandlce Hart
YVenna Simmons Heath
April Nicole Herring
Shawn Martin (lessee
Susan Amanda Holder
Kenneth B. P. Howe
Heather Shea Ingle
Cheryl Amanda Irwin
Christopher John James
Timothy Graham Jessen
Jennifer Leigh Johnson
Bridget Jean Katana
Jaime Kristen Kelly
Kathryn Margaret Kershaw
Karen Elizabeth Kobel
Chance Hamilton Kornegay
Christopher Chad Kornegay
Kathryn Elizabeth Knight
Jennifer Joy Kubal
Cara L. Lahti
Kendra Jamie Latham
John Patrick Lawrence
Angela Denise Lccompte
Courtney Lynnc Lcdbcttcr
Shawn Da id Lightfoot
Rebekah Evelyn Luther
Louis Joseph Marconyak, Jr
Chandra Leigh Martin
Jodie Jean Marlcy
Angela Renec MCcall
Caroline Dcvan McClaugherty
Chad Edward McCue
Jamie Lynn McKeon
Jennifer Leigh Medlin
Jennifer Lauren Mikolaitis
Tetalia Pearlinc Miles
Elizabeth Gianina Miller
Michael John Miller
Tracey Robin Miller
Amy Nicole Moore
Lisa Marie Moorhcad
Gregory Charles Morin
Andrea Nicole Morris
Lindsay Ann Mueller
Kelly Dawn Myers
Jennifer Dawn Newson
Tcrcl Newton
Amy Nichole Norman
Carol Elizabeth Overly
Lisa Michelle Parker
Heather Ann Payne
Aaron Gray Peel, Jr
John C. Phillips
Joe Jacob Poran
Ashley Michelle Powell
Matthew Clay Raines
Susan Michelle Ramsey
Cynthia Dawn Rayhum
Christopher Grady Register
Tina Leilani Register
Kristina Elizabeth Rehm
Kristal Theresa Richards
I lallic Janae Rojcski
Erin Casey Rushton
Jennifer Lee Self
David James Sharek
Susan Elizabeth Shipton
Sara Jcneane Singleton
Julie Diane Sitnik
Lindsay Rae Slate
Amanda Nichole Smith
April Maria Smith
Cara Elise Smith
Kristy Lynn Smith
Melinda Lynette Smith
Ashlynn Key Sockwcll
Wendy Elaine Stancill
Virginia Blanche Stanley
Jamie Louise Stephanko
Emily Candace Stewart
Jaymc Bruce Stokes
Laync Ashlev Summerfield
Callie C. Tart
Jason L. Thuringcr
Amy Marie Tomlinson
Kimbcrly Ann Tripp
Kathryn Anne Tritt
Amice Michele Tucker
April R. Vestal
kmicish.t Vonilcll YY'ard
Da id T. YY'aring
Caron Matthew Washington
Rachael Marie Was.kiewicz
Kathryn Denise Watson
Holly Suzanne YVebb
Glynis Joy Wells
Grant Douglas Wiles
Heather Darnell Williams
Kelly Anne YY'illiams
Mary Anne-Wright
Cortney Amber Yatcs
Brian Stephen Young
Initiation Ceremony Tuesday, April 21,1998, 7p.m in Hendrix Theatre, MendenhaU Student Center





I
I
4Tlwrrttv. April 16. 1998
opinion
Tin Ehi Cif9linim
easferolinian
Amy L.Royster Editor
HEATHER BURGESS Mlniging Edilor
Amanda Austin Nimtdirai Tracy m. laubach SpamEdim
Holly Harris ami.Hi�Ednoi Steve Losey Ant.SpomEdiioi
Andy Turner blisiyliEdu� Carole Mehle HudCapiEditor
John Davis AnnumlitatytiEditot John murphy SiiII lltotntoi
Mm r HfiGE Atrvlrliiing Minigif
Bobby Tuggle Wibmuur
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THE tfFM UMU
IrJTERPERET ViB
Atvo).
oumsw
So you got a little crazy last night, and now you are wishing you hadn't. The
ECU Student Health Center now has "the morning after" pill available, but
according to pharmacist Donna Joyner, this procedure is not one to make a
habit.
"There are dangerous side effects if the morning after pill is used too
often Joyner said. "It can lead to blood clotting, and it is not intended to
be used as regular birth control
The emergency birth control pill is sometimes mistaken as a second-hand
type of abortion. Joyner promises that this is not the case.
The pill prevents a fertilized egg from implanting in the uterus. This is
not at all an abortion because if taken within 72 hours, you are not actually
pregnant yet
The morning after pill is available at the Student Health Center for just
$8. and can be taken up to 72 hours after unprotected sexual intercourse.
The pill is most effective if it is taken within 24 hours Joyner said.
"But it is by no means 100 percent effective. It reduces your chances of
becoming pregnant by about 75 percent
Tablets are taken initially and then again 12 hours later. The side effects?
You can expect extreme nauseousness and vomiting for a day or so in most
cases. Other side effects such as severe headaches, blurred vision, speech
problems, or severe leg pain are possible but not common.
Be aware, the morning after pill is available, but its purpose is not to
replace responsibility. iPyou are sexually active, use condoms or another
form of birth control so that you can avoid this situation all together. "The
biggest thing that we are stressing is that the emergency birth control pill
shouldnot be used on a routine basis Joyner said. "It is not healthy to
make a habit of it
OPINION
BERGMAN
Columnist
Carter not man for Raleigh job
OPINION
Bntt
HONEYCUTJ
Columnist
Preacher means spring's here
We are lucky to be one of the
campuses blessed with a
deranged holy man. For
most of us, he provides a
wonderful comic relief for
our lives.
You don't truly know that spring
has sprung until the crazy preacher
comes to town. It makes me smile
to see him on the mall ranting and
damning us all to hell, because I
know that his very presence signi-
fies that summer will be here soon.
With the kind of screwed-up
weather that this place has, he's
about the only indicator we have.
It's a phenomenon on college cam-
puses Bible-belt wide that is scien-
tifically unexplainable, but fright-
eningly consistent.
Every year it's the same. The
crowd gathers 'round, all googly-
eyed like they're in the freak tent
at the carnival. It's reminiscent of
the olden days when large win-
dows were built on the lower floors
of insane asylums so that after
church on Sundays people could
stroll down and look at the crazies.
What I don't understand is the
people who get really upset over
him. I mean, it's fun to taunt him
by saying things like "What's God
think about all that prison time you
did?" and "How does God feel
about you beating your wife and
kids, Mr. Preacher Man?" But
some folks out there actually take
the things he says seriously.
You don't take the insane seri-
ously unless they have a weapon.
How many people get worked up
over the guy on the bus swatting
invisible flies? The guy in your
hometown who is convinced he's
the chief of police? The Spice
Girls? They really can't help it. All
we can do is smile and nod, and
thank our mothers for not being on
crack when we were conceived.
Now, I'll be the first to admit
that when you have somebody who
thinks he's the messiah and has
stockpiled an arsenal of firearms
and a small infantry of looney
tunes, you've got a problem. But
for the most part � if you keep the
implements of destruction out of
their hands � those who are a fewr
bricks short of a load can't really
harm those cognizant enough to
realize that these chaps are nuts.
I think that we should just let
them be. If they feel like catching a
ride on a comet, who arc we to stop
them? And who knows, those
Heaven's Gaters could be looking
down on us from Hale-Bopp right
now, thinking we are all lunatics.
We are lucky to be one of the
campuses blessed with a deranged
holy man. For most of us, he pro-
vides a wonderful comic relief for
our lives. For some, he challenges
their patience and tolerance, which
is ironic since he possesses neither
of these qualities. And for the easi-
ly excitable among us, he builds
vocal cord strength.
If you really want the demented
preacher on the mall to go away
(which would be really painful for
me � every time I look at him I
think of how few weeks we have
until classes end), then the best
idea is to keep from him that which
he craves the most � attention. If
he upsets you so much, just treat
him like that unpleasant itch in
your underwear ignore it, and it
will disappear eventually.
Carters got some problem
with people like my readers
and myself. We are
studentsevidently we are the
problem. �
As Ronald Reagan said about us,
"Well, there you go again I have
no idea what that means, but the
crowd seemed to love the saying. I
go again, about politics.
Thanks to a conservative lawyer,
the primaries may be put off until
later this year. The primary elec-
tion was supposed to be held on
-May 5th. I did not even want to
write about the primaries. Yeah, go
figure, me not wanting to write
about politics.
The reason I write is that I am
scared, truly scared. In one State
Senate race, an outrageous possibil-
ity exists. Two men are facing off in
the election: Bob Martin and Ed
Carter.
Martin is a nice guy. I have actu-
ally met him and liked what I saw.
When you tell someone who is in
politics you are with the press, you
are usually treated with the utmost
ass-kissing. Martin treated me with
respect before I told him what I do.
City council members and others in
or running for office usually treat
me with respect after not before I
tell them. But Martin was differ-
ent; I really liked him. Not to men-
tion he has a great voting record for
some causes that I like. I will not
name them; I do not want to come
off sounding like a press release or
campaign commercial.
I would not even write about
Martin if his competition did not
scare me. Ed Carter is challenging
Martin for his Senate seat. During
elections I tend not to listen to
promises and proposals; instead I
look at the past. Voting records and
what people try to do while in office
are a more accurate way of telling
what politicians will do.
Carter was mayor of Greenville
for one term. After the one term
Carter was promptly voted.out of
office.
Carter's got some problem with
people like my readers and myself.
We are East Carolina University
students, faculty and administra-
tion; evidently we are the problem.
A plague so much facing the coun-
try that we need to be contained.
For some of us enrolled in East
Carolina now, 1989 and 1990 were
high school years. If you were an
East Carolina University student in
1990 you would feel the same way I
do about Mr. Carter.
In case some of you do not know
Downtown was closed off for a cou-
ple of Halloweens. The scene
downtown was different; a lot more
people came into town. MTV even
mentioned the party that went on
here. The party got big, and some
people came to the party with
dubious intentions. Guns were
found, more fights than normal, so I
Carter decided to take action.
Carter closed downtown for
Halloween. It seemed like a good �
idea, until parties broke out all over
town. Instead of having one central
location, the police now had to deal
with several different locales. This
resulted in a few clashes between
the people antf the police.
I think Carter really likes stu-
dents, he just wishes they would
participate more in politics. His
answer: call out the National
Guard and hope a few students
were shot, thus students become
politically active. But, that is just
what I think
Along with the National Guard,
Carter wanted to help bring crime
down in Greenville. Carter was try-
ing to secure funds for the police
department. While raising money
Carter made a few suggestions to
the Greenville City Council. Some
of his proposals were either, for lack
of a better word, idiotic. One idea
sticks out like Michael Jackson at
the million man march.
The suggestion was to establish
a citywidc curfew from 6 p.m. to 6
a.m. I really like to go outside and
play some ball, sometimes after 6
p.m. With that curfew people like
myself would be criminals. As con-
servatives like to say, if you outlaw
balls only criminals will have balls.
He claims to be for civil liberties,
but any civil libertarian will balk at
such ideas.
Carter is what I like to refer to as
extremist. A proposal to impose a
type of marshal law is not what this
city needed and definitely not the
person for the job in Raleigh.
opiNior
(Columnist
Grant
WHITLEY
Advice for intramural experience
LJETTER
to the Editor
Children should be tried as adults
I am writing my opinion on what
should be done to the two kids who
murdered all those people at a
school a while back and on the
juvenile law of the United States.
The judicial system in this country
leaves a lot to be desired. I think
that kids 13 and up should be held
responsible for their actions and
suffer the same consequences that
any other offender faces when per-
forming the same crime.
Children that age should know
the difference between right and
wrong unless they arc mentally ill. I
don't see anything wrong with
sending them to a juvenile deten-
tion center until the age of 18, but
after that they should be sent
straight to a state penitentiary and
serve time like any other adult
offender.
The two boys who committed
that heinous crime should be sent
to a detention center until they
reach the age of 18 and then sent to
a state penitentiary and serve their
sentence there. I also believe that
they should be tried as adults
because, like I said before, they
should know the difference
between right and wrong and
should be held responsible for their
actions. Even if the case is that their
parents didn't raise them any bet-
ter, they should still know the dif-
ference between right and wrong.
I don't and probably never will
understand insanity like that. I
would just like to know what is
wrong with people and society
today.
Jim Phclps
encourage everyone to par-
ticipate in intramural sports.
The number of sports avail-
able is incredible
ECU has a great intramural sports
program. Anyone can get together a
group of friends and have a lot of
fun with virtually no chance of
being groped by the President.
However, as with anything, there
arc problems. That's why I've put
together some helpful hints and
tips to smooth out the bumps and
pave the way to victory. I'm writing
specifically about Softball, which is
what I've been playing the past
couple of weeks.
Tip number one: Get a good
glove. This is tougher than you
think. The glove my dad gave me
looked like a piece of dining hall
flank steak. After testing both, I
can report that the glove's texture
and flavor are outstanding, while
the flank steak is durable and with-
stands lots of hard throws. Renting
a glove from the Rec Center has its
advantages and disadvantages as
well. Advantage: it's free; disadvan-
tage: you're not five-years-old.
I don't know who buys equip-
ment for the Rec Center, but I'd
like to put forth some suggestions.
If a glove has pictures of comic
book characters on it, it's too small.
If it says something like "Saf-T-
Gluv" or "My First Spalding
again, it's too small. I mean, come
on, this is East Carolina UNIVER-
SITY! Anyone whose hand would
fit in the glove I got thinks a party
school is one that has a trampoline
and a big sandbox.
Tip number two: Pick a posi-
tion. Remember it's not whether
you win or lose, but where you play
the game. If you have comprehen-
sive dental insurance, catcher is the
way to go. Having played catcher, I
know what the position entails.
Basically you stand behind some
alpha male who takes care to miss
your head by several inches.
Occasionally he will miss the ball,
and it will hit you somewhere on
the face because you have your
eyes closed, imagining that the bat
is further away from your head than
it actually is. Check for loose teeth,
throw the ball to the pitcher,
repeat.
Tip number three: Size up the
opposition. If you sign up for the
easy league, your team will be the
only one in the league that is actu-
ally bad. The other teams are com-
posed of people who were sick dur-
ing Major League tryouts, and peo-
ple who thought their huge mus-
cles would restrict their movement.
The conversations sound like this.
"Yo, dat wuz a good hit, Vinnie
"No friggin' way, Lou. Da
cover's still on da ball. Next time
I'll moider it
Knowing your enemy's weak-
ness will lead you to victory, rather
than causing your team to be a real-
istic hitting drill for Lou and
Vinnie.
All kidding aside, I encourage
everyone to participate in intramur-
al sports. The number of sports
available is incredible, with even
dodgcball being offered. Rumor
has it that Parking Services will be
sponsoring a ticket-writing compe-
tition. Points will be awarded for
style and number of tickets written,
with bonus points awarded for
players who ticket legally parked
cars. I'm already signed up
Big






6 Thursday. April 16. 1998
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
mm ire
The Eiit Carolinian
Sale Starts Wednesday, April 15th
725 os.
Kraft
Macaroni & Cheese
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Cyber Bunny
Due to unexpected and
severe circumstances,
Cyber Bunny is unable
td run this week
With
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20oz.
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20 Citadel of
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21 Throbs
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39 Actor Ouryea
40 Ice mass
42 Nike, Reebok,
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45 Dispatch
46 Sierra
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53 Flag-raiser
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6 Thundty, April 18. 1998
cd �
reviews
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
Kevin Gordon
Cadillac Jack's 1
Son
8 OUT OF 10
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
You have to be good to write good
songs about nothing. You have to
be even better to write good songs
about something.
Kevin Gordon's better.
Cadillac Jack's ttl Son is the
Nashville-based musician's debut
album on Shanachie
Entertainment. Produced by E-
Street Band member Gary
Tallent, the album is a dazzling
effort, highlighted by blue-collar
yock-n-toll storytelling, the son
the Boss himself has used to
scorch a many of listener's hean
and send a many of ass in motion.
Think Springsteen if he was from
the country instead of urban New
Jersey
Gordon is a hell of a songwriter,
and some pretty imponant folk
think so. Rockabilly hero Sonny
Burgess recorded Gordon's "Fast
Car" and All the King's Men, a
supergroup featuring Keith
Richards, Levon Helm, Scotty
More and D.J. Fontana, did
another Gordon number, "Deuce
and A Quaner
But he doesn't need legends to
give him credibility; Cadillac Jack's
Son is testament to his ability
and a hell of a testament it is.
You won't forget the characters
in Gordon's songs. You know 'em.
There's Pauline, who "in her
mama's dress stands
underagestaring through the win-
dows of the Hip Paradebanging
on the backstage door There's
.Lucy and Andy, lovers on the lam,
2who, "with a little coffee and
some nicotine, they pack an
"overnight bag and lock the
rscreenif that motor turns over,
3forcver's gonna be a long ride
Then there are the nameless
nianators of songs like "Heaven
;and the Hanging Tree "I ran
Jfrom every preacher's hand who
ever towered over mehungry to
hold me under that water, grin-
ning litde white teethat night I'd
whisper prayers like secrets, to
something abovestruggling for
simple love, and hoping to be
There's the juvenile adventurer
of "Over the Levee "River rat
shacks, hobo firesseen my life
flash in a gator's cold eyeIndian
mounds and slave
tombstonesthrough the land of
the dead and the wild we'd
roam
The music is just fine, too.
"Looking for the Killerman"
sounds like the Blasters in their
glorious early days. A piano-dri-
ven stomper, the song is among a
handful ("Fast Train "Blue
SEE MMON. PAGE I
You can't complain about Irma Vep
Some films never make it to
the Emerald City.
Some are too controversial.
Some are too small.
Whatever the reason, we just
never get to see some mighty
good movies
on ike big screen.
When they hit video,
however, they 're ours for the
taking. This series will look
at some of the films that did-
n V make the Greenville cut,
the ones that got away
French film smart,
funny
Mark Brett
senior writer
8 OUT OF 10
I really wanted to slam something
this week. I mean, really. I've been
writing too many positive reviews
lately and I'm feeling the need to
get a little bile out of my system.
Unfortunately, I'm reviewing
Irma Vep today, and I just can't rally
Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung stars as Maggie Cheung in Irma Vep.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGGIE CHEUNG FAN PAGE
to the attack. It's such a good-
natured little film. Going after it
with the critical knives would make
me feel like the worst kind of
Revlon vivisectionist, removing
Thumper's eyes to see if the hair
dye damaged them any. So I guess
I'll have to play nice. Damn it.
Here's the set-up: Irma Vep is a
French film starring Hong Kong
actress Maggie Cheung (Heroic Trio,
Jackie Chan's Police Story) as herself,
hired by a French director to play
jewel thief Irma Vep in his new
remake of the French silent film
classic Les Vampires. Got that? It's
Maggie Cheung in a French film
about Maggie Cheung making a
French film. Those whacky Frogs.
I'd like to tell you that this con-
cept is contrived and confusing, and
that Irma Vep suffers for it. I'd like
to say that the film is just so much
artistic puffery, and should be
avoided by any right-thinking film
connoisseur. But I can't, because
Irma Vep is actually a nice, under-
stated comedic character study.
It's a quiet little film about the
cast and crew of the doomed Ijs
Vampires, with Cheung at the center
as a son of stranger in a strange
land. Cheung oh, that's too for-
mal for this film; I'll just call her
Maggie. Maggie doesn't speak a
word of French, you see, and so she
is excluded from most of the
conversations going ori
around her. She does speak
English, thankfully, and so
can speak with the bilingual
members of the crew. But site
still spends much of her time,
smiling in confusion as the
tumultuous production goes
on around her.
It would be nice to be able
to say that this role is beyond
Cheung (that's Cheung the
actress, as opposed to Maggie
the character). I wish I coulr
make some snippy commerfr
about her sticking to the
Hong Kong action flicks,
where she can act with her
good looks and stunt doubles.
I'd love that. But unfortu-
nately, Maggie � er, Cheung
is excellent in Irma Vep.
Granted, she is playing
herself, so maybe the quality
of her performance shouldn't
be so surprising. But the way
she captures that feeling of
polite confusion is fun to
watch. Mostly, I suppose, she
comes across as a very gen-
uine character, trying to stay
out of all the internal squab-
bles going on around her.
If I were inclined to be
harsh, I suppose I could say
that Irma Vep only gives us
an ego-stroking, idealized
version of Maggie Cheung
Maggie becomes an object
of fascination for the Les Vampires
crew. She seems somehow perfect
in their eyes, precisely because she
stays out of the all the petty bicker-
ing going on around her.
But Irma ,Vep is a smarter film
than that. Maggie stays out of the
squabbles because she's on strange
ground, and because she can't
understand most of the arguments
SEE MAGGIE. PAGE 1
Student Union announces
Barefoot lineup
l
A few tips to keep
out prying eyes
Barefoot (April 30) offers a diverse lineup this year with old-school rapper Biz Markie (top), Chapel Hill's Southern
Culture on the Skids (right) and the Blue Rags (left).
TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF BIZ MARKIE HOME PA6E. IEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF SU8 POP. RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF GEFFEN RECORDS
For more information
www.tececu.edu
Protedingyour
privacy on the net
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
Well, it'd be nice if, just for a few-
years, us college students could be
sheltered from the big, bad world
of hungry vultures. But it just ain't
so. The Internet is a perilous
place. Nasty, suspicious folks of all
sons can snoop in all sorts of ways.
We have "cookies" for exam-
ple, which are little programs that
web sites download onto your
computer that give marketers all
sorts of personal information: race,
age, sex, web sites hit, etc. These
are nasty, but not as creepy as just
plain old electronic peeping toms.
Most of you don't realize that
Internet stalkers out there can
probably read your e-mail.
Again, it'd be nice if ECU
would be a little forward-thinking
and provide means to keep our e-
mail private, but we, unfortunate-
ly, have an administration that
favors the peeping torn philoso-
phy. Therefore, if we want to keep
the Constitutional rights to privacy
ensured to us by the First and
Fourth Amendments, we're going
to have to take our own measures
for the time being.
A simple, quick way to at least
make it troublesome for the high-
er-ups to invade our privacy is to
utilize the password options on
word processors. It works like this:
Write your message in a word
processor (such as Word)
WordPerfect, ClarisWorks, etc.)
that you and the recipient of your
message have in common.
After you've written it, click on
the "document summary" option
under "file There'll be an option
called "set password" or some-
thing like that. Click on this and
type in a password. Then, use a
phone or snail-mail and let your
recipient know of your password.
Finally, mail the word processor
file as an attachment.
This is not sophisticated at all,
and any tenacious administrator
can get a computer geek flunky tq
decode this fairly easily. But it will
make them have to work to read
your stuff.
There are also a few Freeware
programs you can download off the
Net. One of the best is written by
PGP (Pretty Good Privacy a?
http:www.nai.eomdefaultpgp.a
sp) There are actually several good
privacy programs on their web site.
The better ones obviously cost
money, but your privacy may be
worth it to you. Information about
PGP can be obtained at this site:
http:www.cis.ohio-
state.eduhypertextfaqusenetpg
pfaqwhere-is-PGPfaq.html. You
might want to hit this site before;
you commit to any downloading, if 1
for no other reason than to find out!
if this software is compatible with
the e-mail programs you use.
There is also a nice site called1
The Anonymizer
(http:www.anonymizer.com),
which strips your e-mail of all;
identifying information so you can
send anonymous messages.
SEE DULLAHD. PAGE 7





7 Thundiy. April 16, 198S
Tha Cut Carolinian
d from most of the
ions going oK
it She does speak
thankfully, and so
with the bilingual
of the crew. But she
s much of her time
i confusion as the
is production goes
her.
d be nice to be able
this role is beyond
that's Cheung the
opposed to Maggie
ter). I wish I could
e snippy commerfc
r sticking to the
mg action flicks,
: can act with her
; and stunt doubles.
:hat. But unfortu-
ggie � er, Cheung
lent in Irma Vep.
i, she is playing
maybe the quality
ormance shouldn't
rising. But the way
es that feeling of
ifusion is fun to
stly, I suppose, she
)ss as a very gen-
cter, trying to stay
he internal squab-
on around her.
re inclined to be
ppose I could say
Vep only gives us
troking, idealized
f Maggie Cheung.
)ecomes an object
r the Les Vampires
somehow perfect
cisely because she
II the petty bicker-
md her.
is a smarter film
e stays out of the
e she's on strange
.�cause she can't
of the arguments
GIE. PAGE I
:eep
word options on
It works like this:
ssage in a word
ch as Word;
llarisWorks, etc.)
: recipient of your
common,
written it, click on
summary" option
ere'll be an option
sword" or some-
Click on this and
ord. Then, use a
nail and let your
of your password.
B word processor
lent.
iphisticated at all;
jus administrator
ter geek flunky tq
I easily. But it will
: to work to read
o a few Freeware
i download off the
best is written by
Jood Privacy at
omdefaultpgp.a
ually several good
on their web site.
s obviously cost
r privacy may be
nformation about
ained at this site:
. c i s . o h i o -
sxtfaqusenetpg
GPfaq.html. You.
it this site before j
iy downloading, if;
n than to find out:
i compatible with j
ms you use.
a nice site called;
Anonymizer;
onymizer.com),
ur e-mail of all
nation so you can
messages.
IBD, PAGE 7
iiit .ri.y i"
Th� E�t Carolinian
liivv web address
WWW.TEC.ECU.IDU
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AFTER 9PM DINE IN ONLY
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Belk, Brady's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria, plus 50 Shops
Open Mon. - Sat 10-9, Sun. 1-6
Located on Highway 11, just 2 blocks South of Greenville Blvd.
16 Thursday
Nicholas Payton and Mark
Whitficld at Wright Auditorium.
Edwin McCain at the Attic
Jazz night at Staccato
Hobex, SKWZBXX at the
Brewery in Raleigh
Rhudabega, Rhonda Bailey at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Big Joe at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
Townes, Sci-Fi at Lizard and
Snake in Chapel Hill
Dullard
continued from page 6
The Electronic Privacy
Information Center
(http:www.epic.org) is a concise
site with links to all sorts of privacy
and protection options. They also
have a page devoted to the latest
news concerning electronic privacy
and links to legal information about
electronic privacy.
Now, it may be that you'll find
no software able to protect your
messages. It would then, of course,
be' time to abandon the already
unreliable ECU server and sub-
scribe to a commercial server. Some
servers already offer privacy
options, and even those that don't
are probably more adaptable to this
software than ECU'S server.
If all of that is beyond you, don't
forget the big number one thing
you can do if you find you're being
spied upon: go to court. Get a good
17 Friday
Benny Green and
the ECU Jazz
Ensemble at
Wright
Auditorium.
Devil's
Advocate in
H e n d r i x
Theatre at 8
p.m. (through
April 18)
T.BLA at the Attic
Hipbone at the Brewery in
Raleigh
Swingin' Neckbrcakers,
Smooch, Sharking Teeth at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Burning Spear, Razor Posse at
Cat's Cradle in Carborro
Jasper, The Holy Smokes at
Lizard and Snake in Chapel Hill
Dear Enemy, The Mending
Wall at The Cave in Chapel Hill
18 Saturday
Spyro Gyra at Wright
Auditorium.
Poetry Slam at Percolator at 8
lawyer and take the whole darn
school to court. Though you may
have heard the opposite, there are
actually laws to protect your priva-
cy. While they may be open to
interpretation, there are provisions
in the Fourth Amendment to pro-
tect you from government tyranny,
which, since ECU is a state school,
could apply to the Chancellor's
potential antics.
The Fourth Amendment pro-
vides: "The right of the people to
be secure in their persons, houses,
papers, and effects against unrea-
sonable searches and seizures, shall
not be violated, and no Warrants
shall issue, but upon probable
cause, supported by Oath or affir-
mation, and particularly describing
the place to be searched, and the
persons or things to be seized
This basically says that the
Chancellor (or anybody) has to get
a warrant and serve it to you before
heshe can snoop. A Supreme
Court case (Katz v. United States,
p.m.
Jazz at the Attic
Gibb Droll, Jump Little
Children, Sister Hazel at Walnut
Creek Amphitheatre in Raleigh
Hipone, Nymbus at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Mumblefish, Tuckered at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Camber, Sorry About Dresden at
Lizard Snake in Chapel Hill
Wake at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
19 Sunday
2 Skinnee J's at the Attic
Guant, Nashville Pussy, Murder
City Devils at the Brewery in
Raleigh
Eight Eyes, Stuart Hoylc at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
20 Monday
Fastball at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
21 Tuesday
The Cypher (open mic poetry)
at Underwater Pirate's Cove
1967) interpreted electronic media
(in this case, telephones) as pan of
"papers and effects The Court
wrote: "For the Fourth
Amendment protects people, not
places. What a person knowingly
exposes to the public, even in his
own home or office in not a subject
of Fourth Amendment protection
But what he seeks to preserve as
private, even in an area accessible
to the public, may be constitution-
ally protected
You have a lot of options, none
of them easy, but then it all comes
down to how much you want to
protect your privacy. If you're just
sending notes home to the folks,
maybe you needn't bother. No
matter what the content though,
the principle remains.
(Much of my information
regarding information laws comes
from a rather helpful article by
Susan E. Gindin in the San Diego
Lou Review AugustSept. 97 issue.)
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I





8 Thursday. April 16. 1998
The Ent Carolinian
Gordon
continued fiom page 6
Maggie
continued from page 6
Collar Dollar "Dissatisfied")
Gordon wrote with another talent-
ed Nashville songwriter, Gwil
Owen. "Fast Train a talc of
excess and lost love, taps the same
vein as the Rolling Stones' "Rip
This Joint
Cadillac Jack's Son is an
album you should own. The music
isn't wholly original. You've heard
it before; you'll hear it again. But
Gordon's voice is unique. His grit-
ty tales of lives that beat on from
the outside, who know "the things
you do for love or hate; you don't
stop to think will stick with you.
anyway. Though we never really
see her bad side, she's certainly not
an angel.
In one particularly strange
scene, we see Maggie sneaking
around her hotel in the black latex
costume she wears for Les Vampires.
Before even she knows what's hap-
pening, she's eavesdropping on a
woman's phone conversation and
stealing a jeweled necklace.
Whether she's driven by boredom,
loneliness, or a simple desire to bet-
ter understand her jewel thief char-
acter, we never learn. But it makes
her a lot more interesting.
Not that the characters sur-
rounding Maggie are boring.
Between Rene the director, who's
on the verge of a nervous break-
down, and Zoe the costume
designer, who's in love with Maggie
and wants desperately to know if
she's "into girls Irma tp is filled
with great characters.
I just wish I could find some-
thing about the film to slam. If I
have any complaints with it at all,
it's that there's not much story to
speak of. It's really a character
piece, though, so even that's not too
big a problem.
Crap. I guess I'm just doomed to
watch movies I like. What's a critic
to do?
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the greates
Head Coac
said. "He i
and he doesi
win or lose
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team and h
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Massimo.
So where
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TEC set on
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3 Thursday, April 16, 1998
sports
Tin Em CaraMaa
f
f
i
�4
Dowdy-Ficklen to host 15th annual
Pigskin Pig-Out Party this weekend
�f
Activities and events
set to ben Friday
Tracy Hairr
STAFF WRITER '
On April 9, the 15th Annual
Great Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pig-Out Party began its
series of events with a
luncheon that recognized
media, sponsors and volunteers
who aid in coordinating
selected shows. The
continuation of the party's
events are scheduled for April
1?-19 at Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium.
For.the seventh year now,
Eastern Carolina Toyota
dealers have pledged their
support of ECU by sponsoring
the Pig-Out portion of the
upcoming action.
"Their support to assist to
underwrite this event is crucial
to our ability to raise funds for
student-athlete scholarships
said ECU Director of Athletics
Mike Hamrick in a press
release.
Also behind the Pirates,
United States Cellular is
sponsoring the Golf Classic
that will be played Friday, April
17, at Brook Valley Country
Club, and is hosting special
appearances from professional
athletes and ECU alumni.
Then on Saturday morning,
PCS Phosphate holds fast to
their support of the Breakfast
of Champions where the All
Academic team and
Outstanding Male and Female
Student-Athletes of 1998 will
be honored.
"One cannot leave this
event without feeling proud of
East Carolina Univeristy and
the student-athletes that are on
our campus Hamrick said.
Other businesses along with
these, plus individual Pirate
supporters, have graciously
offered gifts and donations to
help in accommodations for the
weekend.
The events planned for this
annual party range from the
musical entertainment of the
Band of Oz and Tin Pan Alley
to ECU teams in action. The
soccer team will host UNCW,
the baseball team is slated to
participate in a 3-game series,
and fans can get a sneak
preview of the football team's
performance as they compete
for positions. Before these
games, some ECU athletes will
be featuring an autograph
session, and after practicing,
the football team will be
involved.
Assisting the festivities will
be a military display of vehicles
and equipment from Camp
Lejeune in Jacksonville.
The ECU mascot, PccDee
the Pirate, is going to be
celebrating his birthday, and
everyone is invited to help him
enjoy his birthday cake.
A Home and Garden show
will exhibit services and items,
a craft show is also planned,
and Minges Coliseum parking
lot, full of rides for both
children and adults, adds still
more excitement to the
anticipated events.
On Friday evening, there is
a scheduled Pig-Cookin'
contest to be held under the
stadium that will be
highlighted by fireworks, rides,
and music during the night.
Then the food concessions last
all weekend until Sunday
afternoon.
With such an eventful
agenda lined up, all ECU fans,
friends, and family are
encouraged to come out and
participate in the fun-filled
activities.
For more information call 1-
800-DIAL-ECU or (919) 328-
4500.
Schedule of Weekend Events
Thu, April W 7 p.m.
Fri. April 17
Sat. April 18
Baseball's biggest fan shows
community what spirit is all about
Greene takes extra
step for Pirate ball
Jason Thi'ringer
SENIOR WRITER
Jerry Greene, a local truck
i driverdock worker, is by far
the biggest fan of ECU
baseball. That's no big deal,
you might say. Well, what is a
big deal is that Greene has
seen every baseball game the
Pirates have played since the
start of the 1993 season.
As of April 14, his streak
stands at 315 consecutive
games arid still going. That is
not home games only or the
not-so-far-away away games
in Raleigh or Wilmington, but
every game the Pirates have
played from Florida to West
Virginia and many other states
in between.
"No question, he is one of
the greatest fans we have
Head Coach Keith LeClair
said "He is there every day
and he doesn't care whether we
win or lose
"He is a great lift to the
team and he really helps our
spirits out said senior Ryan
Massimo.
So where does this Pirate
fan's spirit come from? We at
TEC set out on a mission to
find out.
Q: How or why does a streak
like this get started?
A: When the '93 season
started, Coach Overton and I
were going over the schedule
trying to decide what I could
do to help out and I just
jokingly said, "You know I can
go to every one of these games
Sun, April 19
6-11:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30-11:30 p.m
8:45 p.m.
9:16 p.m.
10 p.m.
11:45 p.m.
. 7-9 a.m.
9-10:30 a.m.
9 a.m5 p.m.
10 a.m6 p.m.
10:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
11 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
11:30-12 p.m.
12 p.m.
12-1 p.m.
12-2 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1-1:45 p.m.
2-3 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:15-3:45 p.m.
3-5 p.m.
4-4:30 p.m.
3:30-6 p.m.
12-5 p.m.
1 p.m.
Ticket good for admission to Saturday
Golf Clastic Social 8- Auction
Golf Classic sponsored by United States
Cellular
Carnival opens-Aides for all ages)
Public invited to walk stadium 'midway'
Live radio shows
Band of OZ "Live Show"
Fireworks-sponsored by Toyota
Parade of Pigs
Pig Cookin' Contest begins
Activities area closes
Judging of the pigs
PCS Phosphate Breakfast of Champions
Greenville Home 8 Garden Show ($3.00
adults12 8 under free)
Craft ShowSports Card Show
Carnival Children 8 Adult rides
Free Health Screening
Concessions open
Barbecue Plates served until sold out
($3.50advance-$5.00event)
Local performance group-TBA
Pig Cookin' Contest winners announced
Military Equipment Display
Jr. Pure Gold and Pure Gold Dance Teams
PS. Jones Middle School CheerDance Team
ECU Cheerleaders autograph session at Toyota
Tent
ECU Baseball vs. UNCW (DH) $1.50 adv$3.00
gate (combination ticket)
Student-Athlete autograph session
Dunkin' Booth
Kelly Lilley-local performing artist from
Winterville
Pirate Soccer vs UNCW
Tracendia Sauls-local performing artist- ECU
Student
Birthday Party for PeeDee
ECU Football Passing Game Practice $1.60
adv$3.00 gate (combination ticket)
Pirate Sports Network Live Remote
Broadcast from Bagwell Field
ECU Football Players sign autographs-
Bagwell FieldDowdy-Ficklen Stadium
New Upper Deck OPEN HOUSE
Kiddie Games
Tin Pan Alley "Live Show"
1998 Greenville Home 8 Garden Show
($3.00 adults12 8 under free)
CarnivalConcessions open
ECU Baseball vs. UNCW
baseball DH and football practice.
CONGRATULATIONS!
Congratulation to ECU freshman swimmer Alicia
Harris, winner of the 1998 Kristi Overton Female
Scholar-Athlete Award! Alicia has shown exceptional
character, scholarship, and dedication to athletic
competition, setting ECU freshman records in the 100
and 200 yard breaststroke while maintaining a 3.0 GPA.
She also recieved the swimming team's 1998
Iron Woman award. Keep up the good work, Alicia!
Men's and women's track
prepare for season closing
Pirates look to finish
season on a strong note
Jerry Greene has dedicated the past six years of his life to ECU baseball. He has attended every home and away
game since 1993, and is considered by coaches and players as a part of the team.
PHOTO �1 CLAY BUCK
Q: What is the driving force
behind keeping the streak
alive?
A: The kids on the field.
Since this is the sixth year of
the streak, none of the kids out
there have ever taken a swing
or thrown a pitch without me
being there to cheer them on
and support them. I've always
said that baseball is a family
sport and I've been fortunate
to be part of the family here at
ECU over the past five years.
The coaches and players have
made me feel like part of the
family.
Q: What is the most
memorable road trip you have
made?
A I've had some interesting
road trips. One of the most
memorable was in 1993. We
played in Raleigh on a
Wednesday night and came
back. I had to be back in
Raleigh Thursday morning for
a meeting and we played in
Burlington Thursday night.
The game was over about
10:30 that night and I drove
straight to Atlanta because my
brother-in-law had tickets for
me to see Michael Jordan and
the Chicago Bulls play Friday
night and I couldn't pass that
up. 1:30 Saturday afternoon I
SEE SUPEHFAM. PAGE 11
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's men's and women's track teams
have gone through hell and high water
to gee to this point in their season. The
high water came during a stretch where
rains washed out practices. The hell
was the lackluster performances and
disappointing finishes that followed.
However their seasons can become
successes with a strong showing at this
weekend's CAA Championships.
Both teams had their final meets
marred by bad weather. The men's
team traveled to Tempe, Arizona for the
Sun Angel Classic. The teams
competed against each other and a
thirty mile per hour wind in their faces.
"That's the most wind I've ever
been exposed to at a meet It destroyed
the meet. Usually it will be bad in the
morning and then die down, but this
didn't said head men's track coach Bill
Carson.
The Pirates managed five top ten
performances en route to a third place
finish overall.
The women's team had worse luck
with the weather. The meet that most
of the team went to was snowed out.
The rest of the team traveled to Liberty
and scored three top five finishes.
Jennifer Prevatt finished second in the
hammer throw. Teammate Crystal Fryc
finished second in the shot put while
Saundra Teel won the heptathalon.
These strong performances bode
well for the Pirates as they head into the
conference championships. Differing
levels of emphasis are placed on the
CAA meet.
"This is one of the meets we shoot
for said head women's track coach
Charles "Choo" Justice. "We want to
do as well, as we can, and have each girl
do as well as we can
Heading into the meet the Pirates
suspect depth is a concern.
"I don't know about our depth, I like
to think we have enough but I don't
think we have the numbers to make a
big impact Justice said.
The men's team does not place as
much emphasis on the CAA meet.
Because it is built around the track
events and does not compete in every
event, the Pirates are not made for a
meet of this size.
"We'll run our stuff and be about
fifth. The conference is getting more
competitive. It's getting tough to find
places to score points Carson said.
The Pirates will head to the meet
without one of their major weapons.
"We'll be without Ramondo North.
He is a Prop 48 player, and our
conference doesn't allow prop 48
players to compete. We'll have to go
without a big chunk of our team. That
will make it rougher Carson said.
Another concern is the condition of
the team after two straight weeks of
extensive travel.
"Going to the Texas Relays and
Tempe back to back was not a good
idea, Carson said.
Both teams head to the CAA meet in
Williamsburg, Virginia rested and
confident.
"We're in good shape, we're not
hurt, we're not beat down, we're ready
for it Carson said.
Lady Pirate softball extends winning streak
to 11 with Charleston Southern sweep
Both games called on
eight-run merry rule
Travis barkley
SENIOR WRITER
Charleston Southern proved to be
no match for the ECU softball
team as the Pirates rolled to a
doubleheader sweep at home on
Monday.
ECU won 10-2 in the first
game and 12-0 in the second.
Both games were halted in the
fifth inning due to the eight-run
mercy rule.
Charleston Southern actually
led the first game, jumping out to
1-0 lead in the top of the first.
However, their lead didn't last
long, as Pirate slugger Isonette
Polonius blasted a two-run home
run to left field. ECU would
never look back, allowing
Charleston only one run the rest
of the afternoon. The Pirates
scored three runs in the third and
four runs in the fifth before the
game was called.
Starting pitcher Jami Bendle
got the win and improved to 12-6
on the season. Bendle allowed
only three hits while striking out
five.
ECU benefited from an
aggressive running game, stealing
6 bases in the game and 10 on the
afternoon. Polonius had two of the
steals and said the team knew
they could run effectively early
on.
'The catcher sets the play
Polonius said. "When the first
throw comes in you can usually
tell
Charleston catcher Jennifer
Tompkins had trouble throwing
all day. Several of her throws to
second were cut off because they
were so late.
ECU senior right fielder Dawn
SEE SOFTBALL. PAGE 10
Big South
Pitcher of tit
Denise Reagan 1
2-0 0.00 ERA In






I
f
10 Thursday. April 16. 1998
spork
The East Carolinian
Women's tennis concludes
season with Old Dominion loss
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edy
Team looks to
improve CM finish
Mario Scherhaiker
SENIOR WRITER
Since the beginning of the series
in 1983, the Lady Monarch tennis
team has always left the court as
winners against the Lady Pirates.
Coming to Norfolk, Va. with a
backup of a five-match winning
streak, the Lady Pirates came
close to ending that series on April
6, 1998.
The ECU women's team took
two of three doubles matches.
Softball
continued from page 9
Conrad said that ECU tries to run
in every game.
"We try to run on every team
Conrad said. "We would run on
anybody
Conrad sparked the Pirate
offense in the first game with a
two-run double in the first. ECU
scored three runs in every at-bat,
banging out 12 runs on 12 hits.
Big South Player-of-the-Week
Keisha Shepperson continued her
hot hitting, going two for three
with two doubles. Senior Christi
Valevich finished 3-4 with two
RBIs.
Freshman pitcher Lisa
Paganini allowed only two hits
and struck out six to get the win.
Paganini's shutout Was her sixth of
the year and raised her record to
7-5.
Polonius finished a combined
6-for-7 at the plate, with two
doubles, six RBIs and six runs
scored. Her double in the first
game set a new school record for
career doubles. Earlier-this year,
Polonius set the career home run
record.
Top-seeded Anne Svae and Mona
Eek defeated Luciana Araujo and
Iva Beli 8-3. The No. 3 duo of
Catherine Morgan and Gina
MacDonald won their seventh
consecutive match, with an
impressive .8-4 decision over
Michelle Wells and Lacey Lee.
Sophomore Michelle Martin
and junior Morgan both recorded
singles wins, too. Martin, playing
at the No. 4 spot, defeated
Stephanie Smith 7-5,6-2. Morgan,
on the other hand, won her fifth
straight match, topping Wells 6-4,
6-1 at the No. 6 position.
"After my third year playing
tennis for ECU, I'm having a lot
of experience and I feel
confidence coming into my
game Morgan said. "All singles
matches were a constant up and
down for us. We were really close
to beating them for the first
time
Both their scheduled matches
against No. 67 UNCG on April ff
and against No. 35 N.C. State on
"As a player, I don't keep track
of how many doubles or home
runs I hit Polonius said. "It feels
good, but I don't really pay
attention to records
The sweep extended ECU's
winning streak to 11 games,
winning 27 of their last 32 games.
Overall, ECU stands at 34-16, 9-1
in the Big South.
Charleston Southern dropped
to 2-37, 0-8 in the conference.
Polonius said the Pirates have
enjoyed
their recent
home stand
after playing
on the road
much of the
season.
"In the
long run it
gets tiring
(playing on
the road)
Polonius
said. "It's
nice to have
fans there
for vou
The
home stand
will be the
last for the
Pi rate
Tuesday were postponed due to
inclement weather and may be
made up at a later date.
According to Morgan, the team
is in good shape and ready for this
weekend's conference
tournament, where the sixth-
seeded Lady Pirates will take on
third-seeded Richmond in their
first match at noon on Friday.
Their matches will go through
Sunday and will take place at
Richmond's Byrd Park and the
University of Richmond tennis
courts.
"We have a good chance of
doing really well this year
Morgan said. "We have been
practicing very hard and I think
that we could do better than we
did last season
The team looks to improve
from 1997's fifth place finish in
the CAA standings. Overall, the
Lady Pirates concluded the spring
with a 9-6 (3-1 CAA) record, their
sixth straight winning season.
seniors. Conrad is one of three
seniors on the team. She says she
has mixed emotions about playing
her final home games.
"I've had a fun time, but I'm
ready to move on Conrad said.
"I've had a good career
ECU will continue Big South
play this weekend with
double-headers at UMBC on
Saturday and at George Mason on
Sunday.
The Lady Pirates picked up two wins against Charleston
Southern. ECU now holds a 9-1 conference record.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
SERVICE EXCELLENCE
FORD
QUALITY CARE
Quality Care Standards address your needs. We try to provide you with an
appointment that fits your schedule and begin writing your repair order within
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Right now, we are offering great prices on
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Singles
Nam
Anne Svae
Asa Ellbring
Mona Eek
Michelle M
Gina MacDonald
Catherine Morga
Corissa Cheek
Karen Williams
IMo.1
11-3
No.2 No.3 No.4 No.B
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Chart doesn't include results from the.Tuesday game against NC State
� � � CAA Championships start the weekend of April 17 at Richmond, va. as part of the CAAs
Pioneer Spring Sports Festival. Both the men and women will compete from April 17-19 at Byrd
Park at the University of Richmond.
1 1 Thursday
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8 Cylinder $5095
Vans, Aerostar and
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Sales Department Hours
Monday-Saturday
9:0OAM-7:OOPM
Service, Parts & Body Shop
Monday - Friday - 730 AM - 5:30 PM
758-0114
VIsH our web site at www.rnsAngsford.com
1998 Ford Escort ZXZL
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and grad students get $400 cash back toward the purchase or Ford Credit
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As always, cl
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"�Won not vallfon special





The East Carolinian
IUT
jom
THE PERFECT RECIPE FOR
THE PIGSKIN PIGOUT.
Take a Few Thousand Pirate Fans;
Add a Dash of Purple and Gold;
Mix Well; Enjoy
Get Ready for the Pigskin Pigout!
Thursday, April 16 through Saturday, April 18,
Take 20 OFF All Regular Price
Purple or Gold Apparel
Student Stores
As always, check out the clearance
rack for 50 - 70 savings!
Ronald E. Dowd
Spring Semester Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Saturday: 9:00 a.m. � 3:00 p.m.
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wright Building 328-6731 www.studentstores.ecu.edu
pneo pty to main store location only. Souvenir trailer merchandlw excluded. Coupom not valid in conjunction with this ofer. In-stock merchanclse only;
"�� not vaHajion special ordere. '
Superfan
continued from page 9
pulled into Harrington Field to
watch us play a doubleheader
against Richmond.
Q: Which game stands out as
the most memorable that you
have seen?
A: I can't say which one stands
out; there have been so many.
There have been so many of
them. I've seen games where we
were playing here and we were
down six runs in the bottom of the
ninth with two outs and nobody
on and we end up tying the game.
Playing in the regional (the
qualifying tournament to the
College World Series) was a lot of
fun. Winning the CAA
tournament in Wilmington was a
lot of fun. I enjoyed that. As for
picking one I can't really do it.
After 312 games they tend to run
together. Beating Tennessee
when they were ranked second in
the nation was memorable. We
beat a team that people said
couldn't be beat. That was a
wonderful moment. Beating
Clcmson for Keith's first victory in
Clemson was memorable. It
was the first time they had lost a
home opener since 1984. That
was fun. They've all bcerTa lot of
fun.
Q: What helps make the streak
possible?
A The biggest reason I can do
it is because of my wife. She is
wonderful. She supports me and.
allows me to do it. Without her I
could never do it. And my work
schedule allows me to do it. They
work real well with me. They
allow me to get off work early for
some afternoon games and I have
vacation days saved for the away
games that are a problem.
Another supporter is the coaching
staff. They are real friendly
toward me and I thank and
respect them for that.
Every sports team hopes to
have fans like Greene. It is
apparent that the ECU baseball
team is lucky to have this fan on
its side. Congratulations, Jerry, on
being a rabid supporter of
Piratebaseball. I hope I'm there to
see the day his streak reaches 400.
Need a
Summer
If you will be a returning student in the fall and are looking
for a summer job, UHS will be hiring students to assist with
our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to paint, inspect, repair, and renovate residence
hall rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance and UHS Facilities
Management will provide training and supervision. General
knowledge of basic carpentry skills, painting, installation of
hardware, measuring and fitting components is required.The
program will be approximately 10 weeks.This is an
opportunity to have personal training and learn successful
skills in a hands-on experience. Full-time, 40 hour positions
at $5.95 per hour will be offered.To pick up or submit a
completed application, please come by University Housing
Services, Office Suite 100,Jones Hall between 8-5pm M-F.
Selection will begin on April 24, 1998. Notification of
successfull applicants will occur prior to April 30.
STUDENT HOUSING
GETS NO BETTER!
NEW STUDENT
CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURES
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
� 3 BATHROOMS
�3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
� WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�SELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
�SAVE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
CHECK THESE NUMBERS:
UNITS AVAILABLE24
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICE(ist 12 units)$91,500
DOWN PAYMENT & CLOSING COSTS: (could be less than)$5,000
MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSE:(could be less than)$100
(WITH 2 ROOMMATES - EXCLUDING UTILITIES COST)
COST SAVINGS TO PARENTS FOR 4 YEARS:(COULD BE MORE THAN)$21,000
(ESTIMATED 3 ANNUAL APPRECIATED VALUE PLUS RENTAL SAVINGS)
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF NOT
DISCUSSING THIS WITH YOUR PARENTS.
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 1998!
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL RESERVE YOUR UNIT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
ONLY 24 UNITS
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE MAY BE CHANGED WITHOUT NOTICE
'ABOVE CALCULATIONS ARE NOT GUARANTEED BUT BEIIEVE TO BE
RELIABLE
unit plan 1230 sq. ft.
directions to site
J





12 Thuraday, April 16, 1998
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CAUL 752-2865
SUBLEASE FOUR BEDROOM house
from June 1 - August 1. Only two
blocks from campus O 187.50 per per-
son. Great location with lots of room.
758-6274.
PLEASE! SUBLEASE 1 bedroom. 1
bath apartment. Walk to campus. Only
$240 deposit, $340 rej)U�ets ok! W
D hookup. Very energy efficient. Need
to rent ASAPI Call 413-0573.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM apart-
ment. Wesley Commons off First
Street. Available May first. Rent
$425.00. Pets allowed. Free cable.
WD hook-up. central AC. Call Chris
758-3838.
ATTENTIONI TOWNHOUSE
AVAILABLE to sublet for summer. 1-
4 rooms available. $220month de-
posit negotiable. Includes AC,
washerdryer, pool, exercise-room and
more. Call 355-8384 and leave mes-
sage.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, spacious
example of Frank Lloyd Wright archi-
tecture. 4 bedrooms. 3 baths. 3 fenced
yards, washer, dryer, pretty foliage,
near ECU 6 PCMH $999.00month.
524-5790,
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT for rent
Woodcliff Apts Washer and Dryer
hookup; 3 blocks from campus. As-
sume lease. Call Michael 522-4583.
Leave message.
FORREST ACRES ONE 8 Two bed-
room $300-345. Stove. Refrigerator.
Free Water & Sewer. On ECU Bus
Route. Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
CANNON COURT b CEDAR Court.
Two Bedroom 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route.
Stove. Refrigerator. Dishwasher &
Dryer Connections. Wainright Property
Management LLC 756-6209.
SUMMER DISCOUNT! TOWN-
HOUSE at Twin Oaks. Available June
1st. $595month discounted to$525.
June through August. 3 BR's. 2 12
baths. Fireplace, patio, washerdryer
hookup. Deposit. No pets. Call Will
Martin at 752-2851. Thanks.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apart-
ment $275 per month. Free water
sewer, range, refrigerator, pets ok. Call
7581921 ask for Ken.
TWIN OAKS 3 bedroom 2 12
baths, fireplace, all appliances, very
large quiet pool close to park. $595
month. 756-3009 after 6:00 p.m.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER school
from June to August. One bedroom
apartment located within walking dis-
tance from ECU campus. If interested,
call 752-8240 and leave a message.
SUBLEASE 4 BEDROOM flat in
Player's Club Apts. Available May 15.
WD. pool, exercise room and more.
Call Lisa for more information 353-
2723.
DUPLEX WINDHAM CIRCLE 2 bed-
room. 2 full bath, cathedral ceilings,
washerdryer hookup, fireplace, ceil-
ing fans. Almost new. beautifully deco-
rated. $550month. 756-3009 after
6:00 p.m.
classifieds
Tht East Carolinian
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your
Area. Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext.
A-3726 for current listings.
HELP WANTED
Security Deposit
�h pmwiuflan � this mipoa oflsr npims
laundry facilities. 5 blocks from
services
ranr� PAfWZbedfo
wal
sq ft. wasfiirdtyer
neatr�fcblcSf� from campus.
C53�?ENOWIfED "NITS WILABLB.
�AU Prvfmvt haw 24 ht. mrmptncy BMhMaanes
ncpnty 1 li
lsassL
ROOMMATE
FEMALE TO SHARE furnished
townhouse. April rent free. $225
month plus 12 utilities. 353-6806
ask for Brigitte.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
needed for summer at Player's Club.
321-6215 for info.
Female Roommate needed to share
2 BR. 1 12 bath townhouse. $225,
12 phoneutilities, on ECU bus route.
Call Laura. 756-7128. Need for May
1st!
Female roommate wanted ASAP to
share 2 BR, 2 bath, brand new apart-
ment. Must love pets! Call 752-9703.
Roommate needed to share a two
bedroom duplex three blocks from
ECU. $200 a month plus half of utili-
ties and phone. Call Ryan at 758-5756.
SUMMER WAIT STAFF and banquet
staff - day and evenings. No phone
calls. Reply at the Ramada Plaza Ho-
tel.
PART-TIME FRONT desk position
available - nights and weekends. No
phone calls. Reply at the Ramada
Plaza Hotel.
LOCAL COMPANY EXPANDING in
Greenville area. Sales experience help-
ful but not necessary. College stu-
dents welcome. For personal inter-
view call 356-7469.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
and Parks Department is recruiting in-
dividuals with some background
knowledge with in-line hockey. Ap-
plicants will be responsible for over-
seeing both the skateboard park and
with-line hockey rink at the Jaycee
Park. Salary rates ranges from $5.15
to $6.50 per hours. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 8304550 after 2 PM.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN finan-
cial planninginvestment and insur-
ance. Northwestern MutualRobert
0. Baird is accepting applications for
our summer training school. Check
out our web site
www.northwesternmutual.com and
send resume to 217 Commerce Street.
Greenville. NC 27858.
TRAVEL ABROAD t work-teach ba-
sic conversational English in Japan.
Taiwan and S. Korea. Many positions
require no foreign language or teach-
ing certification. Excellent earnings
and benefits potential. Ask us how!
(517J-324-3125 Ext. J53621
EARN $750-Sl5O0week. Raise all
the money your student group needs
by sponsoring a VISA Fundraiser on
your campus. No investment and very
little time needed. There's no obliga-
tion, sojwhy not call for information
today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
RALEIGH AREA SUMMEr Jobs.
$280wk - $422wk plus bonuses!
Hiring crew leaders and crew paint-
ers. Most openings filled by local stu-
dents so call Collegiate House Paint-
ers today at (919) - 460 - 6061! We'll
do interviews on your campus - no
need to come home to find a job. We
are not one of those student franchise
companies.
ter surveys the last week of April. Ap-
plications are available at Mendenhall
Student Center Information Desk.
UFEGUARDS WANTED. MUST be
18 or older. Certifications required.
Call 321-0725.
SUMMER WORK. PAINTERs
wanted. The Color Works Collegiate
Painters $7.00 per hour, 40 hours
week. No experience necessary. Con-
tact Michael Fryar, phone 1-800-477-
1001.
PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIPS avail-
able for students who want to travel,
earn money, and gain valuable resume
experience. For more information call
1-800-251-4000 ext. 1576.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGEMENT,
INC. Now Hiring for Summer 1998
�Pool Managers 'Lifeguards "Swim In-
structors Charlotte: Raleigh; Greens-
boro. NC; Greenville. SC; Columbia, SC
For Information (704) 889-4439
FERGUSON ENTERPRISES, THE
nation's largest supplier of Pipe Valves
and Fittings has an opening in
Greenville, NC for a part-time ware-
house worker. Summers would be full
time with flexible hours to fit around
your school schedule. Career poten-
tial and advancement opportunities.
Mail resume to Personnel, Ferguson
Enterprises, Inc P.O. Box 8207.
Greenville. NC 27835.
SUMMER AND AFTER school child
care giver needed for four children,
ages 6-11. Reliable transportation a
must. Please respond to 758-3077.
SUMMER JOBS! APPLY Now! Ac-
cepting applications for bartenders Er
wartstaff. Full or part-tie. flexible sched-
ules available. Send resume apply in
person at The Reef Restaurant. PO Box
2772, Atlantic Beach, NC 28512, 919-
726-3500.
GET ON BOARD NOW, the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill
pha Omicron Pi- New officers and all
new sisters Alpha Phi - Kaki Winstead.
Jen Cooper, Tiffany Person, Julie Guy
Alpha Xi Delta- All big sisters Chi
Omega-Leslie Burke. Jen O'Connor.
Carrie Craig. Lauren Causey Delta
Zeta- Ashley Smith. Lisa Waterfield.
Brook Owens. Amanda Karam Sigma-
Melissa Hamlett. Missy Maxwell. Sage
Hunihan. Ann Jennings; Zeta- Kara
Gleason. Lindsay Bost. Alison
Gurganus. all new members; Pi Delta-
Tina Overbee, Jennifer Kwaitkouski. all
new officers Congrats!
THANK YOU CHRISTINA Lacy. Andi
Davidson and Allison Greenwood for
representing us during Greek Goddess.
You guys did a great job. We love You!
Love, your Sigma Sisters
ALPHA XI DELTa thanks everyone
who helped make All-Sing such a suc-
cess Tuesday nite! Congratulations to
our winners: 1st place-Sigma Sigma
Sigma; 2nd place: Chi Omega and 3rd
place-Zeta Tau Alpha! An extra special
thanks to those fraternities who
showed up and gave their support! You
guys are the best!
THANK YOU TO all the members of
Pi Delta who either played the Easter
bunny or took the pictures at The
Plaza. Love, your sisters
TO THE BROTHERS and pledges of
Tau Kappa Epsilon: the play wrestling,
the table dancing, the ring game, and
the cool bucks�what a great time! You
guys always know how to do it up
right. We had the best time at the
social with' y'all. We love ya! The sis-
ters of Pi Delta
GOOD JOB Pi Delta pledge Jennifer
Demon on your win at the ring game
during the Tau Kappa Epsilon social.
We love you. the sisters
PI DELTA HOPES everyone had a
great holiday break. Have a fantastic
Greek Week!
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Thanks for
a great Softball game and thanks for
being such wonderful sports. We had
a super time! Love, the sisters of Pi
Delta
WAY TO GO Pi Delta softball players
on your win against Sigma! you guys
did great and we're very proud of you!
Love, your sisters.
TO PI DELTA sister Ann Elms: Just
one question�was the leg injury worth
the pain? You go girl! Love, your sis-
ters
i
THE RAY DELTAS would like to thank
all the members who participated in I
Sunday's (45) social at Perkin's. A ,
special thank you goes to "Alexis" for i
driving the Ray Ray van. Didn't we have
a great time and a great waitress? Let's
all get together again very soonl
i
PI DELTA SORORITY will be hosting �'
a Male Wild "N Crazy Towel Contest !
at The Attic on Tuesday night. Come j
out and see who looks the best in only
t the I � �
eastcarolinian
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
PART-TIME CHILDCARE needed
weekdays in our home for 3 y.o. trip-
lets. Hours flex. References required.
Call 321-8578.
SUBLEASE PLAYER'S CLUB apt.
starting in May. Perfect for summer
school. Free half a months rent. Call
Carla for details at 353-6167.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE for rent. Across
from the Art Building. 2 blocks from
downtown. Available in May. Wonder-
ful house to live in. Petsnego. 758-
1152.
ROOM FOR RENT - available for sum-
mer 1998. Unfurnished room in fur-
nished apartment near downtown and
across from campus. Must be non-
smoker, responsible and able to pay
your bills. Upperclassmen or graduate
preferred. Call 752-5912.
TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX for rent
with shady fenced backyard. Pleasant
neighborhood, one mile from campus.
Two blocks from the Purple Line. $400
monthly. Pets welcome. 931-9014.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE for school
or work? Home Relocation and Refer-
ral Service can make that move easier!
Relocation packets with rental listings,
guided tours of Greenville and area
rental properties, plus much more. Call
919-830-5559 or visit http:
wwwrelocatetogreenvillenc.com for
more information.
NO DEPOSIT. 2 bedroom. 1 12 bath,
cable and water included. Wilson
Acres Apartments. Rent by 5198.
Call 754-8315 and ask for Dawn
Bivens.
WALK TO ECU, 1. 2. 3. 4. & 5 bed-
room unitshouses; available June,
July, or Aug. Call 321-4712.
PEONY GARDENS TWO bedroom 1
12 bath apartments $375. Stove. Re-
frigerator. Dishwasher. Washer &
Dryer. Free Cable. Water. Sewer.
Wainright Property Management LLC
756-6209.
PARK VILLAGE ONE bedroom apart-
ments $300. With Stove. Refrigerator.
Washer Dryer Connections. On ECU
Bus Route Free Water 6 Sewer.
Wainright Property Management LLC
756-6209.
1 BEDROOM, 1 bath apartment. 3
blocks from campus on 2nd St.
$265.00 a month. Call 759-1921.
FOR SALE
FULL PHOTOSHOP CD 4.01 New
academic license unregistered PLUS
classroom in a CD 2 free Adobe
fonts. $240. 754-8167. Leave mes-
sage.
POOL TABLE 4 ft. by 8 ft. $600
nego; weight bench with 260 pounds
of weight $225 nego: five drawer
dresser $35. Ask for Matt 754-2829.
19" TV $90; Sony mini-stereo $50;
Sony Playstation with 2 pads. TV-
connector and NFL Gameday 98,
$125 ($105 without Gameday) Call
329-0538.
LARGE DORM ROOM refrigerator.
One year old, like new. For informa-
tion call 328-7843.
RAM-72 PIN Simms 60ns Nonedo.
Two 8-meg simms. $15eachor $25
for both. Call Many (252)-527-5237
or email ici1420Gmail.icomnet.com
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 90"
longboard. Excellent condition. $225
or BO. Call Mark at 758-7067.
SONY CAR STEREO cassette player
for sale. 20 x 4 watts, perfect condi-
tion. Call Matt at 328-7677 to make
an offer.
CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR sale,
good condition, asking $95 or best
offer. If interested, call Paul at 353-
2885.
MOVING SALE: ELECTRIC dryer.
$100: washer-needs belt. $25; 27'
console TV $100. dual reclining
couch, $50, kitchen table and chairs
$30, Tandy computer with printer
$300, Moped $200. Call 353-4244
after 5:00 p.m.
PLUSH IMITATION WHITE leather
sofa and loveseat for sale. Good con-
dition. Like new. $150 negotiable. Call
931-9004. Must sell.
MUST SELL TELESCOPe $90. 19"
color TV with stand $45. futon $50.
3-disc Sony stereo. $100. 10 gallon
aquarium setup $50. Panasonic por-
table CD player with car attachment
$60. James. 328-3178.
MAKE $2125MO. Looking for 3
ECU students to work with UNC stu-
dents. Must be willing to travel and
work overtime. Call 919-933-7716.
NEED A SUMMER job? Play at day
and make money at night! Work
nights andor weekends and have
your days free with The ECU Telefund.
Make your own schedule! $5.50hr.
plus bonuses! Call 328-4212 for more
info.
THE EAST CAROLINA University De-
partment of Recreational Services is
currently seeking individuals inter-
ested in working as counselors at the
1998 Summer Youth Sports Camp.
Applicants should possess some
sports knowledge in the following ar-
eas: basketball, tennis, ultimate
frisbee. softball. flag football, track &
field, soccer, badminton, and adven-
ture skills. All applicants will need to
be available to work full time. Mon-
day through Friday, from June b
through July 31. Pay for this position
is $6.00 per hour. Anyone taking day
time summer school classes need not
apply. For more information contact
Brian Weingartz , at 328-1565.
STUDENT REP - AT&T Authorized
Agent needs 20 students now! No
exp, will train. $100-300week. PT
FT (800) 592-2121 x 197.
SURVEYORS WANTED. ECU Tran-
sit is looking for students to adminis-
i
CAMPPHEWOOD
lor private Co-ed
youth camp located in the beautiful
irttaTtatisJweslem North Caroana.
Over 25 activities, including All sports,
water skiing, heated poet, terns, art.
616 to B17Eam 11300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great fun!
Non-smokers call lor
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
SAY NO TO noisy dorms. Say Yes to
privacy; 2 Bedroom Apartment avail-
able: free cable, wd hook-up; disposal,
dishwasher, central heat and air. pa-
tio, lots of light. 6-month sublease,
monthly thereafter. 561-7646.
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT. 3 min-
utes to GCB and Rec Center. $335 (in-
cludes cable). Call 326-0538. (Sub-
lease for May and June and option to
continue).
20 GALLON AQUARIUM, large and
small heatrocks. heat lamp and Vita-
Lite lamp. In good condition. Great for
small reptile. Will not sell separately.
$75 for all. Call 752-5912.
POWER PERFORMA 6300, 28.8
modem. 15" monitor, color scanner,
color printer, zip drive. CD rom.
$2,000 worth software! Paid $6,000.
asking 1990. Like newt Call 363-7473.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
. Cadillacs. Chevys. BMW's,
Porsche. I
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
high energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
PO. Box 370
Cove City, 28523
Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
Fax: 252 637 2I25
(Near Greenville, Kinston,
New Bern)

FREE CASH GRANTS! College.
Scholarships. Business. Medical Bills.
Never Repay. Toll free 1-800-218-9000
ext. G-3726.
TRAVEL EUROPE b work- Teach ba-
sic conversational English in Prague.
Budapest 8 Krakow. Competitive
wages benefits. Ask us how! (517)
336-0629 ext. K53621
SUMMER PART TIME water analy-
sis lab position available. Greenville
Pool and Supply has two retail and wa-
ter lab positions available. Job involves
water lab analysis, retail floor mainte-
nance, customer service, retail sales
and some clerical duties. Lab training
is on-the-job. Must be available to work
from 8-1 or 1-6 weekdays and from 8-
2 on rotating Saturdays. Call Carol or
Andie at 355-7121 for information.
SUMMER JOB. COLORWORKS
Commercial Manager seeking paint-
ers, pressure washers and carpenters
to work in triangle area. Free on-site
room for summer. Make $3500
working 40 hrwk � $7.00hr. Con-
tact Jason Arthur (919) 353-2381.
AIRLINE EMPLOYMENT - ENTRY
levelskilled. Excellent travel benefits.
Ask us how! 517-336-0968 ext
L53621.
LOCAL LAW FIRM has a part-time
long-term, mail roomrunner position
available. Duties include general office
support and errands. Own transporta-
tion a must. Hours 1-6. M-F. Send re-
sume to: Legal Administrator. 1698 E.
Arlington Blvd Greenville. NC 27858.
(919) 321-2020.
AIM HIGH AIR Force. Put your sci-
ence or engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider be-
ing an Air Force officer. Excellent train-
ing and benefits. For a free informa-
tion package call 1-800-423-USAF.
CRUISE SHIP b land-tour jobs - Ex-
cellent benefits. World Travel. Ask us
how! 517-324-3090 ext. C53624.
GREEK PERSONALS
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON once again
we had fun hanging out with your
guys! The cookoutpre downtown was
loads of fun. Love. Chi Omega)
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE newly
elected executive council of Zeta Tau
Alpha! President - Carrie Rogers; VPI -
Kate Clay; VPII -Alison Gurganus; Sec-
retary - Wendy Melton; Treasurer - Beth
Wolfgang: Membership - Lee Anne
Vaughan; Historian - Katie Caffrey;
Ritual - Kristin Mayer: Panhellenic -
Taryn Cavaco. You girls will do a great
jobl Love, your sisters.
THANK YOU DONNA Gail Cooper.
Mary Stallings and Sarah McConnell
for representing us in Greek Goddess.
You girts did a great job! Love. Zeta
Tau Alpha.
SISTERS OF THE week: Alpha Delta
Pi - Nikki Noren, Amy Miller, Julie Tan-
ner, Melissa Home. Shana MaxonAI-
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1827 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-3526 -
Services: Worship 11 a.m
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF CHRIST
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE
752-6376
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m 6
p.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednes-
day
WE WELCOME YOUI LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAY
FROM HOME
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Corner of Crestline Blvd. &
Greenville Blvd.
756-6545
Services: Bible School 10 a.m
morning worship 11 a.m
evening worship 6 p.m.
REACHING OUT TO
GREENVILLE WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)
756-6600
Services: Sunday School 9:45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. 6 7 p.m.
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAY
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 AM.
EACH SUNDAY
THE MEMORIAL
BAPTIST CHURCH
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
756-5314
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinner
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHER
STUDENTS FOR AWESOME
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANT
WORD
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
752-1898
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP 8 SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
ECU CAMPUS
ST. JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
752-6154
Services: Worship-Sunday
8:30 a.m 11 a.m Sunday
School 9:45 a.m.
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS
ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
A VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FOR INSPIRATION
UNITARIAN UNIVER-
SALIST CONGREGA-
TION OF GREENVILLE
131 Oakmont Drive
355-6658
Services: 10:30 a.m. each
Sunday
A CHURCH GROWING IN
CHRIST. CARING FOR PEOPLE.
PROCLAIMING THE WORD
GREENVILLE CHRIS-
TIAN FELLOWSHIP
1411 S. Evans Street
752-2100
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
13 Thursday,
a towel! Doo
1 hope to see e
Unity!
TOTHEBRC
Pi Lambda F
1 social last w
seeing guys r
and can't wa
Love, the sis!
CONGRATU
members of
Caskey. Marie
Jennifer Scoi
pha Betas w
sisters.
THANK YOI
the great gift
heart. Love.
' Pi.
KAPPA ALPI
ing our adopt
' Love, the sist
'GOOD LUCK
Pink Ladies.
Zeta Tau Alpr
� ZETA TAU A
' had a great E
' ALPHA XI Dl
recently elect
99 school tet
Carrier; VP-CI
Treasurer: De
' "grams: Sarah (
' -Kate Jones: Vf
"say Wilder;
.Catherine San
tary: Nikki
Achievement:
Members: Ke
ponding Se
-Chaplain: Shi
t;�Catie Sweet Pi
'Marshal: Betsy
Meredith Gallt
CONGRATU
MEREDITH C
OT school! Al
Jenn Boyd at
your acceptan
ment! Love '
. members of A
I
t
D
FOR USE
TOMMY
We also bu)
� Stereos, (Syi
DOWN
HRS. TT-
Come into the
SINGLE VSON-PBCS-
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY
ECU STUDENTS 8 SINGLES
WELCOME
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST
CHURCH
1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-2822
Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
10:45 a.m 6:30 p.m
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
COME AND JOIN US IN
PRAISING THE LORD!
SYCAMORE HILL
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
226 W. 8th Street
758-2281
Services: Every Sunday
For information about being included in our Church Directory call 328-6366
ri
Dot
we a
Now
De
li





The Eiit Carolinian
the best time at the
I. We love yal The sis-
Delta pledge Jennifer
win at the ring game
Kappa Epsilon social.
e sisters
PES everyone had a i
reak. Have a fantastic i
V SIGMA: Thanks for
game and thanks for
derful sports. We had
eve, the sisters of Pi
Delta softball players
�inst Sigma! you guys i
are very proud of you! 1
s.
i
lister Ann Elms: Just i
as the leg injury worth 1
o girl! Love, your sis-
i
(
kS would like to thank �
; who participated in �
social at Perkins. A
U goes to "Alexis" for i
ay van. Didn't we have
a great waitress? Let's
again very soon!
i
IRITY will be hosting �'
Crazy Towel Contest ,
iiesday night. Come
looks the best in only ;
13 Thursday, April IB, 1998
classifieds
The Eiit Carolinian
W US FOR
SSUNDAY
NVENIENT TO
WPUS
INITED
' CHURCH
eet
ip-Sunday
Ti Sunday
RELIGIOUS
DRAWING ON
TRADITIONS
'RATION
IfNIVER-
GREGA-
�ENVILLE
iva
a.m. each
ROWING IN
' FOR PEOPLE,
THE WORD
CHRIS-
rsHip
eet
a towel! Doors open at 9:00p.m. We
' hope to see everyone there! Go Greek
Unity!
TO THE BROTHERS and pledges of
Pi Lambda Phi: Thanks for a great
'social last week! We always enjoy
seeing guys run. We had a super time
and can't wait to get together again.
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE new
members of Zeta Tau Alpha: Misty
Caskey. Marie Davis, Kelly Noftsinger.
Jennifer Scott and Mandi Knox. Al-
pha Betas we love you! Love, your
sisters.
THANK YOU HILARY Watson for
the great gift. You're the best sweet-
heart. Love, the brothers of Sigma
'Pi.

KAPPA ALPHA THANK you for be-
ing our adopt a fraternity last week.
Love, the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha
' GOOD LUCK TONIGHT T-birds and
Pink Ladies. You'll do great! Love,
Zeta Tau Alpha.
2ETA TAU ALPHA hopes everyone
' had a great Easter break!
' ALPHA XI DELTA congratulates our
recently elected officers for the 1998-
99 school term: President: Lauren
Carrier: VP-Chapter Life: Any Frye:
� Treasurer: Denise Reeves; VP-Pro-
' "grams: Sarah Evans; VP-Membership:
1 'Kate Jones: VP-Public Relations: Lind-
�"say Wilder; Panhellenic Rep:
Catherine Sanders; Recording Secre-
tary: Nikki Schmitt: Academic
Achievement: Becky Thomas; New
Members: Kerri Augustino; Corre-
sponding Secretary: Kim Noucas:
Chaplain: Shelley Bissette; Ritual:
tJKatie Sweet Publicity: Amy Flanagan:
Marshal: Betsy Bickers, and Historian:
Meredith Galloway!
CONGRATULATIONS TO
MEREDITH Caines for getting into
OT school! Also, congratulations to
Jenn Boyd and Dana Menture for
your acceptance into Health Manage-
ment! Love your sisters and new
. members of Alpha Xi Delta.
I
ALPHA DELTA PI hopes that every-
one had a fun and safe Easter Break!
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA we had a blast
at the social last Tuesday! Can't wait
to get together again soon! Love. Al-
pha Delta Pi.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA hopes every-
one had a great Easter break.
GET READY, SIGMA new members,
to get your big sisters. We can't wait
to tell you! Love, your Sigma Big Sis-
ters.
SERVICES
ATTENTION! LOSE WEIGHT before
summer. Incredible All Natural Weight
Loss Program. I lost 17 pounds in 1
month. For free samples call 830-
2303.
PERSONALS
Ladies: Lend me your sore aching
muscles. Amateur masseur needs your
back to practice on. Call Kyle 1-800-
484-8546 (Code 2465) or POB 8663.
Greenville, 27835.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE ECU POETRY Forum will meet
on Wednesday. April 22nd in
Mendenhall Student Center, room 248
at 8 p.m. Open to the general public,
the Forum is a free workshop. Those
planning to attend and wanting criti-
cal feedback on their work should
bring 8 or 10 copies of each poem.
Listeners welcome.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS. Do
you want to get involved? SGA needs
one energetic student to sit on the
Greenville Bike Task Force. For more
information call Cliff Webster at 328-
4719. The bike laws in ureenvnie are
changing and this could affect you.
CHAT GROUP FOR adolescent chil-
dren of HIV parents. Wednesdays at
4 p.m. at the Catholic Social Minis-
tries. 3219 Landmark St7A.
Greenville. Please call Lenore at Catho-
we Need Timiwrtmd boot
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
V
lie Social Ministries to register at 355-
5111.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
Parks summer tennis programs 830-
4559. Registration April 28 thru May
June. Programs run 616-731. Youth:
5 year-olds TUTH 8 a.m.9 a.m 6-
10 year-olds MWF 8910 a.m 11-
18 intermediateadvanced TWTH
10 a.m 11-15 beginners TUTH 5:30
p.m adult beginner MW 6 p.m in-
termediate MW 7 p.m.
APRIL CONTRA DANCE: Sat April
18. Willis Bldg. (First and Reade Sts).
Music by Uncle Sam's Band (from Tri-
angle). Calling by Tim Grant. Free in-
struction 7:00; dance 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Sponsors: ECU Folk and Country Danc-
ers. 328-0237
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:30-5:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment is offering the following work-
shop April 16th. If you are interested
in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent-Test Prep Workshop: Thursday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
the following workshop April 16th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP: Tuesday 3:30-4:30.
The Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the following
workshop April 21st. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A MAJOR OR A Career
Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop April 21st. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
center at jo-oooi.
BUSINESS FELLOWSHIP, MON-
DAY, April 27. 7 pm - Community
Christian Church. 1104 North Memo-
rial Drive. Greenville. NC. This fellow-
ship is designed for entrepreneurs to
have interactions and to learn how to
apply biblical business principles to
your establishments. For more infor-
mation call (919) 551-9143.
ADVERTISE IM
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
Sfo
W
EL TORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe-
Est 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
PIR.ATE gP'gclAl
$7.00
Haircut
Full line Professional Hair Care Products
Say Pirates &
2800 E. 10th St. o' Hair r.t
Eastgate Shopping Center , -� "�" KAXl
Across From Highway Patrol for $7 Every time.
MonmTe Regular $10
Walk-Ins Anytime
752-3318
Set your parents up in luxury
for the weekend
Weekend rentals
$250
call for
monthly rates
Efficiency suites:
2 bedroom,
Ibath
All appliances
On site laundry
University Apartments 758-7436
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 4964224
Uphold
your 1st
amendment
right:
Freedom
of the
press!
Apply for a
job at
oaslcarolinian
today!
HARIEY-DAVIDSON
j&e harley Davidson
1 008 DlCKENSON AVE.
END OF 10TH ST.
757-1345
1 6 YEARS
in Service
Motorcycle Sales
and Service
Apparel
Leather
Collectibles
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
$6 PVZ47SSW
SvutOtf ttt
gamu and Pitt
&�utt Stxct
t9gS
WALK-IN S WELCOME OR CALL FOR APPT. 75
Sunday
9N-PBC'S
US MINISTRY
I & SINGLES
)ME
PTIST
vd. SW
DIN US IN
IE LORD!
ILL
BAPTIST
nday
II328-6366.
Wyndham Court Apartments
"DOW'T GO HOmi
WITHOUT OHir
asint! tin Summer .11
i.impus
�IVts O.K. n iih ilep
561-RENT
Don't Strike Out with other Apartments!
x
We charge no application fee
Now Offering $300 Security
Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit
for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom
Town houses � 1.5
Baths, Water, Sewer,
and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, NC 27838-0772
1998 REGGAE JAM
FRIDAY APRIL 24tfl
AT THE UNDERWATER JAMAICAN COVE
5T1CtTANCHEST.
ROLLY GRAY and SUNFIRE
donovan and the posse
AFRICAN CHILDREN
STECIA168EST
DJ SPECIAL K
PHIL DIED
8PM-UNTIL
TICKETS �T CE ALLEY ��IBIWLLi. HC MMI IHFE819 754 2207
CARIBBEAN
FOOD
�HALi j
TICKETS:
$6 ADVANCE
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2 Thur.d.y, April 18. 1988
cuS section
The East Carolinian
Smokers say they're part
of secret society
Non-smokers say
downtown full
of smoke
GRANT ZAl'NER
FOCUS SECTION WHITER
Scott Lyons knows what it's like
to be part of a minority. From the
outside, you can't tell any
difference between Lyons and his
friends. They share common
interests and look like ordinary
college students. Lyons hangs
out with his friends so much that
he even smalls like them. "I can't
escape it he says. He smells
like his friends because most,
including his roommate, are
smokers. And Lyons is part of the
non-smoking minority.
Non-smokers such as Lyons
are greatly out numbered in
downtown Greenville. On a
typical night most bar patrons,
like Matt Dillon, are cigarette
smokers whether they smoke a
pack a day or only smoke while
consuming alcohol.
Dillon, an ECU junior, has
tried to quit, but the power of
nicotine was"too great. "I light a
smoke in my car, after a good
meal, and about a pack when I'm
drinking he said. Dillon's New
Year's resolution was to quit
smoking, but his resolve lasted
less than an hour.
Dillon and his roommate,
fellow nicotine addict, Fonzie
Weninger, have adopted a smoke-
free homeplace, vowing, no
matter how cold, not to smoke
inside.
"Me and Fonz got some new
furniture a while back and we
don't want to stink it all up said
Dillon.
Perhaps Dillon and Weninger
should be more concerned with
their health than their new
furniture. According to the
American Cancer Society,
smoking is a leading cause of lung
cancer. But they still have time to
quit. A 1990 report by the
Surgeon General says that after
15 years off cigarettes, the risk of
death for ex-smokers returns to
nearly the same level of those
who have never smoked.
In recent years, there has been
According to the
American Lung
Association,
secondhand smoke
is responsible for
an increase in
smoke free
environments.
People can no O
longer smoke in
some malls or even
at work. At ECU, the only places
to smoke on campus are in some
faculty offices, residence halls,
and outside. This is because of a
concern about secondhand
smoke. According to the
American Lung Association,
secondhand smoke is responsible
for about 3,000 deaths each year.
In the fall of 1995, Donna
Walsh, director of Health
Promotion and Well Being,
conducted an informal survey of
300 ECU students, asking them
about smoking. There turned out
about
,000 deaths
to be slightly more non-smokers
than smokers. "The interesting
part is that the majority of non-
smokers we surveyed said they
would have a serious relationship
with a smoker she said.
When asked about secondhand
smoke, Lyons said his roommate
doesn't smoke in their house, but
he is still exposed to secondhand
smoke at his friends' houses, in
their cars, and especially at'
parties and downtown. Joked
Lyons, "If I didn't hang out with
smokers for one whole day, I'd
probably crave a cigarette
Students addicted
to nicotine
Quitting options
available to smokers
Amy Wagner
FOCUS SECTION WHITE.
She wanted it when she woke up
and went to bed. She craved it at
least 20 times a day. Alison
Koppel, an ECU sophomore, was
addicted to nicotine.
Nevertheless, after three years of
smoking, she quit 14 months ago.
"I have so much more energy
Koppel said. "Now I can keep up
with the hot guys when I work
out Koppel acknowledges her
decision to quit as the best one
she has ever made.
Quitting not only adds years to
your life, but has immediate
benefits as well. The American
Red Cross points out that within
20 minutes of your last cigarette
there is a drop in your blood
pressure and heart rate. After 48
hours, damaged nerve endings
start to regrow, enhancing your
ability to smell and taste.
According to the American
Cancer Society, more than 38
million adults have already quit
smoking; It was Koppel's 1997
New Year's resolution. "I just
quit cold turkey Koppel said.
For others, quitting may not be
that easy. That is why many
smokers rdjy on over-the-counter
nicotine replacement drugs.
These drugs, help ease the pain of
nicotine withdrawal without the
tar and other chemicals in
cigarettes.
Nicotine gum cost around $50
for 100 pieces, and like cigarettes,
you must be at least 18 years old
to buy it. Nicorette, a popular
brand, suggests using the gum
with a support program. To find
one in you area there are toll free
numbers to call. Nicorette reports
that only about five percent of
users continue chewing the gum
Where to call for help on quitting smoking
American Lung Association: 1-800-5864872
American Cancer Society: 1-800-227-2345
American Heart Association: 1 800-242-8721
after they quit smoking.
Nicotine patches costs around
$50 for 14 patches, or two weeks
worth. One patch is placed on
your arm or hjp � a day to
continually pump nicotine into
your blood stream. Nicotrol, a
brand, of patches, warns that
people with sensitive Skin may
not be able to use this product.
The American Lung
Association recommends a
nicotine inhaler, called Nicotrol
Inhaler, which you actually suck
on regularly to get the nicotine
into your body. The FDA
recently approved this product,
and it should be on the market
within a few months.
The American Heart
Association cautions that nicotine
replacement drugs should not be
used by people with heart
problems or ulcers, In addition,
there is a high risk for nidotine
overdose if the user continues to
smoke or use other products
containing nicotine.
Trevor Van Meter, an ECU
senior, smoked for two years.
Four months ago he quit smoking
with the help of his doctor. He
was prescribed pills that do not
contain nicotine. "I tried the
patch, but they made me feel sick
and restless Van Meter said.
"These little pills worked like a
charm His doctor informed
him that the treatment last from
seven to 12 weeks, but it only
took' him five.
k is difficult to quit smoking,
but not impossible. Both Koppel
and Van Meter are successful
quitters who enjoy working out
and maintaining their new
lifestyles. "Now my girlfriend
doesn't cringe when I kiss her
Van Meter said with a smile. "She
doesn't have to taste the smoke
anymore - If this sounds like .
you, maybe you should join the
millions a year that put out their
last cigarette.
new year, new address, new look
www.t6c.ecu.edu
new source of news & information.





3 Thursday. April 16, 1998
frcUSfrsodioi)
The East Carolinian
Lawsuits threaten
eastern NC tobacco
Tobacco farmer believes
regulation will mean
industry's devastation
Nikki Hayes
� FOCUS SECTION WRITER
S. G. Hayes of Henderson is
afraid that he may be on the
endangered species list. That's
because he is a. tobacco farmer.
ft number of states attorney
generals are suing the United
States . cigarette industry for
money paid by the states to treat
smoking related illnesses. The
settlement proposed could cost
cigarette manufacturers $368.5
billion over 25 years. It could cost
Hayes and other farmers their
entire way of life.
If the proposal is approved,
cigarette companies will be
buying less tobacco. This is bad
news for small' farms, like
Hayes's.
In order for the farmers to
break even or better, the
government will have to buy their
allotments from them. An
allotment is the number of
pounds that one can grow on a
farm in a year. If the farmer wants
to grow more tobacco than his
allotment will allow, he must rent
or buy an allotment from another
farmer.
Cigarette companies must
know two years in advance how
much tobacco they are going to
purchase. Allotments are
assigned accordingly. The more
open land a farmer has, the larger
his allotment.
Almost three percent of the
United States population makes a
living working with tobacco, from
the farms to the cigarette
manufacturers.
North Carolina produces 60
percent of the flue-cured (dried
with artificial heat) in the United
States. Hayes estimates that 90
percent of North Carolina farmers
probably grow some tobacco.
"North Carolina would die
without tobacco he said.
According to Mitch Smith, of
the North Carolina Cooperative
Extension Service in Pitt County,
there are about 200 active
producers of tobacco in Pitt
County. Last year, tobacco
generated $62 million here. Pitt
County ranks tenth in the state in
farm cash-receipts. That adds up
to a large portion of local income.
Hayes began farming tobacco
as a boy with his father. Then
when he married in 1957, he
purchased his first land for
growing tobacco. He split half an
acre of land with another farmer
and each grew a quarter of an acre
of tobacco.
Hayes now owns farms in
Franklin County and leases farms
in Vance and Warren counties.
Together his four farms total 264
acres. He also leases allotments
from other farmers. Last year, he
grew more than 390 acres of
tobacco and 900 acres of
soybeans. However, Hayes said
he would never grow soybeans if
he didn't grow tobacco. There
simply isn't enough money in
soybeans. While an acre of
soybeans brings a farmer $150 -
$180, an acre of tobacco may
bring in $3,500 - $4,000.
Hayes is a member of the
Tobacco Growers Association of
North Carolina, which supports
the concept of a tobacco
North Carolina
produces 60 percent of
the flue-cured (dried
with artificial heat) in
. the United States.
Hayes estimates that
90 percent of North
Carolina farmers
probably grow some
tobacco. "North
Carolina would
die without
tobacco' he said.
settlement.
In the event
of a
government
buyout, the
association
supports
provisions
granting the
farmers $12 a
pound if they
own
allotment
and planted
the tobacco,
$8 a pound if
the own the quota, or allotment,
and $4 a pound if they planted
the tobacco. While this may
sound like more than reasonable
compensation, Hayes points out
that if he had to stop growing,
tobacco, he would have $1 million
of useless farm equipment and
not enough land to grow anything
else that could make him a living.
Hayes said tobacco's effect on
the average person is not
recognized. "The average person
doesn't realize where taxes would
come from if they did away with
tobacco Hayes said.
I
I
His point? Every acre of
tobacco grown in the U.S. for
domestic consumption generates
more than $46,000 in state and
federal excise taxes when sold as
cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.
If tobacco were regulated and the
amount of tobacco grown and sold
in North Carolina is cut, taxpayers
will have to pick up the tab.
Hayes wonders if his son Mike
and Mike's three sons will be able
to carry on the family business or
if legal battles will put an end to
their tradition.
gar
up in
goes
Shop owners says
soaring market steadies
Carl Mothes
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Everyone from Wall Street
millionaires to college students
have been
lighting up their stogies. Cigar
smoking has become the trend of
the 1990s.
But think twice before buying
your $300 humidor.
According a Greenville cigar
store manager, Richard Peterson,
the cigar smoking trend, which
began five years ago in urban
areas, is now on the decline. For
the past few years urban cigar
profits have continued to fall two
to three percent each year.
Peterson, manager of Onix, a
cigar and tobacco store located
downtown, has attributed the rise
and fall of the trend to a feeling of
nostalgia. Cigars are also a
backlash against conservatives, an
affordable luxury, and status
symbol. "In the 1980s people
Would indulge in Porsches, but
now the money isn't available
Peterson said. He feels the cigar
market has reached a point of
saturation, and everyone who will
smoke cigars are smoking them.
Despite the urban decline
Onix has continued to increase
profits 15 percent to 20 percent
each year for the past three years
that it has been open. Peterson
attributes- the increase to there
being no other competitors
nearby. As for the trend's decline
Peterson said, "It's been a hell of
a ride; a lot of people have made
a lot of money"
While Peterson has enjoyed
the cigar smoking trend, Joel
Duncan, who has been smoking
cigars for six years, resents it. "I
hate to do what trends are; prices
have gone up; costs have
doubled Duncan said. He can
often be caught sitting in front of
his flashing computer screen with
thick smoke wafting from an El
Rey Del Mundo in hand.
Duncan spends about $20 a
week on cigars which may appear
modest when compared to
individual cigar prices averaging
$5 to $10 and reaching upwards of
$20 to $30 for a 'fine' cigar.
For him cigar smoking is all
about pleasure. Duncan said
there are risks and costs
involved with everything,
and you have to weigh both the
costs and the benefits.
Some current health risks for
cigar smokers as determined by
the American Cancer Association
include: higher tar and nicotine
concentrations, up to 40 times
that of cigarettes; cigar smokers
are more likely to develop
persistent coughs, phlegm, and
peptic ulcers than cigarette
smokers; and cigar smokers are
up to 10 times more likely to die
from laryngeal, oral, and
esophageal cancer than cigarette
smokers
Duncan, a graduate student in
the counseling school and
graduate coordinator of Slay and
Umstead residence halls,
believes that many statistics
about the health risks from
smoking cigars are manipulated.
And this causes cigar smoking to
appear more harmful than it is.
"Statistics lie he said. "You can
make numbers say anything you
want them to say. The minimal
health risks don't outweigh the
maximum pleasurable benefits
Both Peterson and Duncan
agree that smoking is a personal
thing. In addition to cigars, both
also smoke a pipe. Peterson feels
that when the cigar smoking
trend is finally over, pipes will be
their successor as the next fad.
"Pipes give you more to do
Peterson said. "It's a busy habit
Accordingly, Peterson is
preparing Onix for the projected
pipe smoking trend by stocking
the store with quality pipes,
premium pipe tobacco, and pipe
accessories.
.the
ithe 1 � �
eastcarolinian
Amy Royster
Editor-in-Chief
Heather Burgess
Managing Editor
Celeste Wilson
Cover and Layout Design
focus
Focus is a combined effort between The East Carolinian
and Shearlean Duke's Basic Reporting class in the
Department of Communication.





4 Thursday, April 16. 1998
focus section
Tha East Carolinian
Cancer warnings go
unheeded by students
Smoking poses
threats to health
Angela Powell
FOCI'S SECTION tt R I T �: R
Everyone has read the warnings
about smoking and cancer, but
many people believe that they
are invinceable, and say, "It can't
happen to me, I'm too young.
Besides, I'm not addicted, I'll
quit smoking tomorrow But for
a lot of people, tomorrow may be
too late.
"I don't think that I"ll ever get
lung cancer said sophomore
Amanda Laeng. "I don't smoke
that often anyway. I probably
just threw away my last pack
This is the attitude of many
smokers.
But the damage may already
be done. Symptoms may not
appear for years after the disease
has already set itself up,
according to medical experts and
the American Cancer Society.
Cigarette smoking also can
lead to laryngcal, oral and
esophageal cancer, and is
associated with cancer of the
pancreas, urinary bladder and
kidney, according to the Surgeon
General's office.
Tobacco smoking is by far the
leading cause of lung cancer,
accounting for up to 90 percent
of all cases of the disease,
according to the
American Cancer
Society. Lung cancer,
however, is the
leading cause of 1
cancer death among
both men and women
in the United States, m
and is the second leading "w
cause of death in the US.
In Pitt County, for 1997, it was
projected that there would be 60
new lung cancer cases diagnosed,
and there would be 60 lung
cancer-related deaths, according
to a study performed by the
North Carolina Central Cancer
Registry.
The American (lancer Society
estimates that for the I IS in 1998,
about 171,500 new cases of lung
cancer will be reported. 91,400
among men and 80,100 among
women. Iung cancer will
account for about 14 percent of
all new cancers and about 29
percent of deaths from cancer.
A n
estimated
160,100 deaths are expected from
lung cancer: 93,100 among men,
and 67,000 among women,
accounting for 28 percent of all
cancer deaths.
Since 1987, more women have
died each year of lung cancer
than of breast cancer, which had
been the major cause of cancer
death in women for the past 40
years. The cancer death
rate for womea smokers
is 67 percenthigher than
for non-smokers.
The following
percentages show the
increase in respiratory
and digestive ailments
among women smokers, as
jjj compared to non-smokers:
bronchitis 300 percent;
emphysema: 300
j percent; chronic
I sinusitis: 75 percent;
peptic ulcers: 50
percent.
More and more data show
- cigarette smoking during
pregnancy can damage to a fetus,
causing helath and
developmental problems in
newborns and children. Studies
show that women who smoke
"I don't think that
l"ll ever get lung
cancer said
sophomore Amanda
Laeng. "I don't
smoke that often
anyway. I probably
just threw away my
last pack
mortality rates due to low birth
weight, which is directly related
to smoking.
Non-smokers are also at risk of
developing lung cancer by being
in contact with smokers. The
Environmental- Protection
Agency estimated of 4,000 lung
cancer deaths annually �nearly 3
percent are caused by
secondhand smoke.
Secondhand smoke also causes
heart disease, aggravates
asthmatic conditions, and impairs
blood circulation. "Lung cancer
can also be caused bv other
have srgmg.eantly more stillbirths faetors in non.smokerS) but an
and more babies that die during incrcasinRv ,arge amount is a
the first month of infancy, 20 resu,t ()f secondhand smoke-
percent of unsuccessful accdrding to the American
pregnancies that would have Caficer Society!
been successful if they had not
been regular smokers and higher
Copy Editor &
Head Copy Editor
Positions
�must have excellent grammar
& editing skills
�head copy editor must have
excellent knowledge of AP style
�Communication & English
majors preferred
�apply at 2nd floor student publications
building or call 328-6366
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positions
available
�required experience w photography
�owns camera equipment
�good organizationtime management skills
�apply at 2nd floor student publications
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Summer vr
Sports Editor ty
Position
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�interest in all sports
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�summer work only
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building or call 328-6366
we want to cover vou
ft
Did you see news happen? Did you make news happen? Do you belong between our covers? Calloasllcarolinianat 328-6366.


Title
The East Carolinian, April 16, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 16, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1269
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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