The East Carolinian, April 9, 1998






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V
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CEMENTS
REGISTRATION
interested in play-
r polo needs to be
igistration meeting
M at MSC Room
from your team is
the meeting to be
I team up, (Men's,
ec). Dept. of Re
JUNIOR Recital,
soprano, Patrick
stcher Recital Hall,
7-Junior Recital,
ie, Jr baritone,
)l Hall, 9:00PM.
mporary Jazz En-
rardif, Director,
il Hall, 8:00PM.
or Recital, Walter
, A.J.Fletcher Reci-
l April 13-Feculty
heurer, trumpet,
Hall, 8:00PM
GREENVILLE
uld like to thank Pi
help during the
March 27 and 28.
ly appreciated.
iCIETY will meet
PM in Rawl Room
sted in leerning
iw school Is invit-
rsl
IENTATION TO
:S. The Career
hold orientation
sr Services Build-
raduate students
)0PM. Others will
at 4:00. Students
view of services
registering with
stablishing a cre-
WILL MEET
at 5:00PM in the
tics will include
i.
ESENTS Easter
aurnement April
teams only. Call
by April 15th.
OU ARE not in-
Veter Polo, why
ire will be en of-
I 8th at 9:00 p.m.
I 328-6387.
YONE INTER
???? Well now is
ill the fun. There
nesting on April
iC 244. Hope to
I-6387.
WORKSHOPS -
students corn-
in May or the
attend en inter-
in Wed April 8
6 at 3:00. Spon-
ices, the work
Career Services,
pre-registration
CHRISTIAN
i for you to join
at 8:30 a.m. or
al Resurrection
orbett, Pastor,
ve, Greenville.
ID THE DAY
for a kayaking'
rer. The trip is
6AM-6PM, but
io later then
i cost is $25 for
mbers$35 for
includes trens-
and leaders,
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: PLACING
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iin climbing on
.m. Register at
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its offered by
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ig at 4:00 p.m.
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Math and Sci-
THURSDAY
APRIL 9,1998
"A" Team wins SGA executive election
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Amanda Austin
news editor
Andrew LeLiever
staff writer
Campaigning together paid off for
the "A Team a group of candi-
dates in the Student Government
elections held Wednesday.
The team of Eric Rivenbark for
president, Leslie Pulley for vice
president, John Meriac for secretary
and Alan Stancill for treasurer
swept the ticket. According to Bob
Smith, elections chair, the One
Card System showed that there
were only 1150 total votes cast �
despite a campuswide campaign to
get 5000 votes cast in rhe election.
Of the 1150 votes tallied,
Rivenbark won with a total of 601
votes, Pulley with a total of 611
votes, Meriac with a total of 626
votes and Stancill with a total of 629
votes. For the first time
in many years, it
appeared the executive
offices would be no con-
test until write-in candi-
dates emerged at the
last minute. Waging
write-in campaigns for
president were Timothy
Mullcr, with 62 votes,
and Joe Phillips, with
only 10 votes. Benjamin
Rodriguez, the write-in
candidate for vice presi-
dent, received 53.
Also waging a write-
in campaign was the "B
team" of Marcus
Frederick for president,
Kevin Jordan for vice
president, Kodi
Michaux for secretary
and Tremayne Nunley
for treasurer. The team's average
was 441 votes per candidate.
Campaign manager Raymond
McGill declined to comment on the
outcome of the election.
The winning candidates were
ecstatic about their newly elected
offices and excited about the
prospect of representing the stu-
Leslie Pulley
FILE PHOTO
Alan Stancill
FILE PHOTO '
Jarvis Hall undergoes
extensive renovations
dent body.
"I am pleased; I think ail the
candidates did a great job said
Rivenbark. "It is time for me step
up and serve the students because
that is what we were elected to do
Candidates responded to the
election proceedings as having
gone well, but all were glad the day
was over.
Candidates
Eric Rivenbark
Leslie Pulley
Alan Stancill
John Meriac
Joseph Phillips
Timothy Muller
Marcus Frederick
Kevin Jordan
Benjamin Rodriguez
Tremayne Nunley
Kodi Michaux
Position
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary
President
President
Vice President
Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary
Jarvis Hall will undergo extensive interior
changes including a large student lounge.
PHOTO BY SAMANTHA SNYDER
Only building used
for original purpose
M on am e� Hussein
STAFF WRITER
Jarvis Residence Hall, the universi-
ty's oldest building, is in the
process of being renovated.
"Jarvis Hall is being renovated
to improve the building's overall
schematics and quality said Inez
Fridley, associate director of facili-
ties management
Jarvis Hall, named for a univer-
sity founder. Governor Thomas J.
Jarvis, was built in 1909. It is the
only surviving early building still
used for its initial purpose. But the
renovations will combine modern
conveniences with the look the
building had when it was new,
close to 90 years ago.
"The renovations will upgrade
the total mechanical and technical
aspects of the building Fridley
said.
The changes will include new
rooms that are similar to the ones
already there, a new office suite
and a large student lounge.
Manny Amaro, university hous-
ing director, said the renovations
will include extensive interior
changes. Repairs to elevators, fire
sprinklers, electrical heating and
cooling systems, and upgrades in
plumbing are included in the pro-
ject.
SEE JARVIS. PAGE 2
PCMH moves closer
toward privatization
Lawsuit filed against
commissioners
J E N N V V I C K F. R S
STAFF WRITER
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
(PCMH) is coming closer to being
recognized as a private, not-for-
profit institution, but some citizens
don't agree that these efforts are in
the best interest of Pitt County.
At the commissioner's meeting
Monday, both PCMH and Pitt
County Commissioners discussed a
proposal to reorganize under N.C.
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 83
low 64
TOMORROW
Showers
high 58
low S3
General Statute 131 E-8.
According to the statue, PCMH
will remain a hospital that is open to
everyone, regardless of a person's
race, religion, health insurance sta-
tus or ability to pay. A statement
made in a PCMH manuscript said:
'The PCMH you have today is
practically identical to the PCMH
you would have if this reorganiza-
tion takes place. But it would be
stronger
However Pitt county residents
Nancy Colville, Vernon Morrison,
and Jean Leigh think that the coun-
ty commissioners who will have a
hand in the decision to privitize
SEE PCMH. PAGE 3
Preacher Gary Birdsong attracted many students over a two day period of time, angering many with his views about life and religion.
PHOTO BV STEVE 10SEY
Mall preacher provokes arguments
with students, attracts large crowd
Many laugk, then
becomeangry
Steve Losev
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The mall was turned into a heated
forum on Tuesday. The heat moved
to the mall Wednesday.
Gary Birdsong visited to preach
to ECU's students, attracting a
mixed crowd, provoking some and
angering many.
Most came just to heckle and
laugh, but some came to argue
heatedly with Birdsong, a self-pro-
claimed Christian evangelist from
Raleigh. The size of the crowd
grew, dwindled and grew again
throughout the day.
Birdsong said he makes the
annual trip to Greenville as part of a
UNC-systemwide tour of college
campuses because he wants to pro-
mote the Bible.
"I come to bring awareness to
the Bible Birdsong said. "Most
college students can't quote the
Bible for you, and if they do it's out
of context
The permit Birdsong received,
which he waved to the crowd,
allowed him to speak on campus
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Around 1
p.m merely a dozen people stayed
to joke, but by 4:45 p.m around 40
people were listening, the biggest
crowd he had gathered all day.
Early in the afternoon, in a style
typical of the hecklers, Dave Meyer
provoked Birdsong when he inter-
rupted him and said, "You people
talk about your Psalms and your
John 3:16. Well, Dave 3:16 says 'I
just whupped your ass
SEE PREACHER, PAGE Z
IAr�MOUNAUNMMrrY
Dining
halls
rank 1
Grades show degpee of
cleanliness, proper -
handling of food
Mendenhall Dining Hall
PHOTO BY SABRIHA 1
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
In comparison to three other North
Carolina public universities' main
dining halls, ECU's average sanita-
tion grades at Todd and
Mendenhall dining halls for the
1997 quarters indicate that ECU
received
the high-
est sanita-
t i o n
marks.
ECU
repeated-
i y
receives
high sani-
t a t i o n
grades at
all seven
dining
locations. Although all universities
in North Carolina must have sani-
tation grades of 90 and above, ECU
has continually risen above and
beyond those requirements to sup-
ply quality services to students,
faculty and staff.
"I try to set the standard on
campus at 95 percent said Fred
Bisenger, resident district manager
of Aramark, the food service
provider.
Sanitation grades are not merely
a measure of cleanliness but also
provide an indication of whether
food is handled in a proper manner.
All seven dining locations
received Golden A's from Pitt
County's environmental health
department for receiving sanitation
grades for the four quarters of 1997
with an average of 96 percent or
higher.
"I like the place to stay clean
because I feel like less germs are
around Bisenger said.
Sanitation grades at Mendenhall
and Todd dining hall in 1998's first
quarter are not as high as previous
grades. Bisenger attributes this
decline to the number of inspectors
who. conducted this inspection.
One inspector from the Pitt
County environmental health
department usually visits each
establishment per quarter and one
inspector from the North Carolina
environmental health department
visits each location per year.
During 1998's first quarter four
inspectors visited each location,
representing ECU, Pitt County
and North Carolina's state depart-
ment. Even with four inspectors
present, ECU received higher
grades at Mendenhall than any
other dining hall at a public univer-
sity in North Carolina and Todd
tied with UNCWs main dining,
hall.
For more information concern
ing sanitation grades of restaurants
in Pitt County, contact the Pitt.
County department of environ'
mental health.
Opinion
THURSDAY
Lifestyle
Sports
University Email
not so private
after all.
Check out the
Battle of the
Bands
Efo
Dan Gonzalez
named 1998 male
athlete
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
'Are you satisfied with the service you
receive from Dining Service!? "
Do you feel safe in your dorm?
73 YES 20 NO
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, nc 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu i





2 Thur$d�y, April 8. 1998
news
3 Thundi
Thi East Carolinian
.news
briefs
Dartmouth College
ends search for new
president
HANOVER, N.H. (AP) � After a
six-month nationwide search,
Dartmouth College trustees have
picked one of their own to be the
Ivy League school's 16th president
in 228 years. Provost James Wright,
56, was named Monday to succeed
James Frecdman on Aug. 1.
Clinton wants Reno to
consider commision
on King murder
WASHINGTON (AP) �
President Clinton wants Attorney
General Janet Reno to consider
very strong arguments by the
�widow of slain civil rights leader
-Martin Luther King Jr. that a
national commission be formed to
probe his 1968 murder.
Declarations of
homosexuality
increasing
WASHINGTON. (AP) �
Defense Secretary William Cohen
has ordered new guidelines to
explain and enforce the Clinton
administration's policy barring the
pursuit and harassment of homo-
sexuals in the military.
V. Sunk! Titanic no
longer tops at North
m America theaters
LOS ANGELES (AP) � It took
three months to find a movie to
stop the record-setting, box-office
run of Titanic. It took Lost in Space.
across
the state
Brother admits firing
at officers as murder
trial begins
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
Jurors will not have to decide who
killed two law officers along
Interstate 95 last year, but they will
have to determine the mind-set of
the two brothers charged with
murder, defense lawyers say.
Trooper sues fast
food restaurant over
spit in nachos
BLACK MOUNTAIN, N.C. (AP)
� A state Highway Patrol trooper
sued Taco Bell, claiming, he was
served an order of nachos with spit
qn them. The company said a
worker was terminated and the
trooper got an apology.
Prize Patrol awards
on campus students
Students had to be
.pesent in class to win
Trisha Jones
staff white
Snap your fingers twice.
It doesn't take long, about two
seconds.
But two seconds is all it takes for
Ed McMahon and Dick Clark, aka
Frank Salamon and Manny Amaro,
to change your life.
Salamon, director of dining ser-
vices, and Amaro, university hous-
ing director, work in conjunction
with David Bailey, district manager
of Aramark (the university's food
distributor) to make possible each
year the Prize Patrol Sweepstakes
for students who live in residence
halls.
Instead of money, students win
one of seven prizes. The top prize
is free dorm rent for a semester, and
up to $1,500 value. This year the
grand prize went to Justin Ellerbe,
an Aycock Hall resident.
"I was kind of thinking about
getting off campus next semester
said Ellerbe. "But after this, no
way! I'm not going anywhere until
I graduate
Ellerbe said by the time he
walked to College Hill on the morn-
ing of April 1, the day the prizes
were announced, it began to sprin-
kle and he almost turned back.
Buthe trudged forward and became
a richer man for it
Winner of the nine-plus meal
plan, Kimberly Parrish of Umstead
Hall was u warded in her psychology
class. Parrish said she wasn't sure
how to respond when they called
her name out as a winner.
'It was the week of my birthday
ana-April Fool's Day Parrish said.
"I thought surely no one would pull
a stunt this big in front of my class
Susan Shipton of Cotten Hall
said when the Prize Patrol came to
her music theory class, she looked
around the room and wondered
who it could be. When they
announced her name as winner of a
microfridge she couldn't believe it.
"I think I sucked in all the oxy-
gen of the room Parrish said .
"Nothing like this has ever hap-
pened to me before
But it did. And it did for four
other students as well.
Claes Kindgren won a mountain
bike.
Marta Suncin now has $400
worth of free long distance calls.
And Lynn Ford will never miss
an ER episode, thanks to a new
VCR.
Ford and an individual whose-
name hasn't been made public yet
had double luck. Their names
weren't chosen as winners, but as
alternates; the original winners
weren't in class.
What happens is, the Prize Patrol
obtains all the winners' class sched-
ules. Then they contact the profes-
sor whose class they wish to tem-
porarily interrupt.
Computer
issue sparks
reactions
Students from ECU,
UNCsharefeeling
Melanie Hackworth �
STAFF WHITER
Jarvis
continued liom page)
"Since Jarvis has such a long his-
tory on campus, it's important that
we preserve it and restore some of
the fixtures it had when it was
new Amaro said.
'The actual work will not begin
until the fall of this year, but we are
taking bids right now Fridley
said.
The actual work will take about
one year to complete. But the
question is where to house the
overflow of students.
The answer is that the hall has
been unoccupied since last fall
and there has not been an over-
flow problem yet. In fact, some
students have their own rooms in
the dorms.
Officials say the work being
done to Jarvis is another milestone
in the massive renovation work
being done on the campus. They
hope that by the time Jarvis Hall is
finished, it will set a precedent for
quality on campus.
With UNC-Chapel Hill requiring
students to purchase computers,
students at both UNC and ECU
are feeling a sense of reservation,
and indicate that cost is the main
concern.
"I think it's a good idea, but I'm
kind of concerned about cost said
UNC-CH junior Jessica Griffith.
Students at ECU are also con-
cerned about finances. In a recent
survey done by TEC, 39 out of 50
students believed that computers
should not be required, typically
citing cost as the reason for their
reservations.
"I think college is expensive
enough without having to buy com-
puters freshman Heather
Williams said
ECU students also indicate that
with the many computer labs across
campus, student have plenty of;
access to computers.
"I think if students have access
to a computer, there's no reason
they should have to purchase one
sophomore Sara Singleton said.
While some students are
opposed to the idea, others wel-
come the change. Many students
said that if the cost of computers is
figured into tuition, or if financial
aid is given that computers would
be a good idea for everyone.
UNC Chapel Hill has already
put plans into action to help stu-
dents with computer costs.
According to a source at The Daily
Tarheel, UNC-CH's student news-
paper, 40 percent of students will
receive grants to pay for the com-
puters.
Some students are for required
computers in selected fields of
Study, Required computers for
some disciplines is something ECU
officials are looking at.
Preacher
continued from page!
"That boy is a rock and roller
Birdsong said. "Rock and roll is
from the devil. Rap-crap is from the
devil
"I just said it to be a smartass
Meyer later said.
At one point, Birdsong
described ECU as a "cesspool of
sin Some students laughed and
remarked that was the reason they
came here.
"I believe that the guy had some
good points, but he presented
them in the wrong manner said
sophomore Lane Freeman.
The carnival atmosphere, which
one student described as "just like
watching Jerry Springer faded as
the situation grew more and more
tense. Several students, some of
whom were wearing Cross Culture
shirts, became angry at his views,
which students felt were sexist,
homophobic and anti-semitic.
People became furious when
student Sean Hessee attempted to
say something, but Birdsong would
not let him. The crowd yelled
"Shut up" at Birdsong, but he kept
talking. Birdsong only allowed
Hessee to speak when he crawled
out of his wheelchair onto his
knees. Hessee later said that he left
his wheelchair "because some
things you just need to do to get
people's attention
When Birdsong gave the floor to
Hessee, he spoke to the crowd
about tolerance.
"No matter what race you are
and what background you are, you
should have love for one another
Hessee said. "Not everybody is
going to agree with what you say,
but you have to try to get along
Debi Neuwirth became
extremely offended when Birdsong
told her that people of the Jewish
faith are going to hell.
"I'm proud of being Jewish
Neuwirth said.
"You shouldn't be proud of
rejecting Jesus Birdsong said.
"God destroyed multitudes of
Jews
Birdsong called one student
wearing a Marilyn Manson shirt "a
disgrace to this campus
Birdsong drew sharp criticism
from the women in the crowd
when he said, "You women don't
know that your place is in the
home, cooking
Women responded that if they
work, their husband could do the
cooking.
"If you're married, you won't
have to work Birdsong said.
"Women should be barefoot, preg-
nant and in the kitchen
Lt. Louis Dale hovered around
the edge of the crowd the entire six
hours Birdsong spoke.
"I came out here to check and
make sure everything's okay, and
keep a low profile Dale said.
Dale then asked this reporter
what the time was and, seeing that
it was 5 p.m made his way through
the crowd, where he told Birdsong
that his time was up. The crowd
quickly dispersed and Birdsong left
campus without further incidence.
Accelerate
toward graduafioi
Skate through a selnesmr orcremiis.
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tt Carolinian
credits,
adviser.
uing Studies
alive action
xlates the
Usabilities
ThuntHy, April 9, 1998
news
Tht East Carolinian
PCMH
continued from page!
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have conflicts of interests that will
swing votes in favor of the privati-
zation. In a lawsuit served Tuesday,
county commissioners and staff
were named defendants in a class
action suit that alleges some of the
commissioners already have biased
opinions because of self or family
employment with the hospital and
Mcd school, and because of close
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relationships to special hospital
groups like the board of trustees.
Statute 131 E-8 provides guide-
lines that PCMH will have to fol-
low in order to become a private
not-for-profit hospital. If they fail
to meet the guidelines, then the
county could resume ownership.
If PCMH becomes private, peo-
ple may not even notice, hospital
officials say. The change will make
them more competitive, jobs will
be more secure and they will con-
tinue to provide charity and quality
care to all citizens of Pitt County.
"We will continue to treat every-
one said Doug Boyd, hospital
spokesman.
If PCMH doesn't follow
through with its reorganization
plans, then many patients will be
lost to rival private hospitals.
"Because of their ownership
structure, these rivals have com-
petitive advantages over PCMH:
access to capital, flexibility to cam
more on invested fundi, ability to
keep business dealings confiden-
tial, ability to easily form business
relationships a PCMH hospital
document said.
Business relationships are some-
thing Colville, Morrison and Leigh
name as a hot topic. The suit
alleges that consultants retained by
the Pitt County Commissioners to
advise them on the hospital's priva-
tization are being paid by the hospi-
tal, and that the consultants were
reccomended by the county's bond
issuer, who could receive possible
financial benefits from the transac-
tion.
According to the hospital, the
issue is a double edged sword, if
PCMH loses patients because pri-
vatization docs not occur, then the
CCU's medical student education
will be Aversely affected.
In order for the reorganization to
occur, both PCMH and Pitt County
commissioners must agree.
"The County feels it is in the
best interest of the citizens to reor-
ganize under N.C. General Statute
131 E-8, said Arlen Holt, informa-
tion officer. "This is the best
course of action
The hospital and the commis-
sioners' board will continue to work
on the details and negotiations.
'The hospital has to agree to
continue to reimburse Pitt County
in Medicaid Holt said. "They
also have to guarantee they will
continue to provide indigent care in
a way they have done
The commissioners approved
the proposal to ask PCMH for $30
million dollars up front. If the hos-
pital agrees, then they have to
make payments to Pitt County at a
taxable rate, although they will
become a tax exempt hospital.
The hospital also has to agree on
the way the hospital board will con-
tinue to be represented because
this is critical in the maintaining of I
hospital policy. According to the
citizen's suit the residents of the
county also have a say in the
process that is not being recog-
nized. They want a citizen's com-
mittee separate from the county
officials and the hospital to be
appointed to oversee and hate
input in any and all offers made by
the county to the hospital concern-
ing privatization, and a referendum
be held for the people to vote on
the issue.
The hospital isn't being sold to
any other organization; it will con-
tinue to be operated by Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, Inc.
S IT
YES, YES!
Maclean Restaurant
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 757- 1 666
Iviser.
.ling Studies
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Student runs for Board of Education
22-year -old education
major 'says youth no object
Nina M. Dry
STAFF WRITER
University student Mark Whichard
believes youth is no object to hold-
ing public office.
The 22-year-old education
major is running for the District 5
position on the Pitt County Board
of Education this May.
"I've been looking at this for
several years Whichard said.
Whichard said he doesn't feel that
his youth will hinder his perfor-
mance on the board.
"Age isn't necessarily a factor
Whichard said. "It's more about
intellect The board needs people
with new ideas and fresh voices
One of the ideas that Whichard
would like discussed if elected is
the Pitt County Schools' Nursing
Programs. He is hoping that the
Board of Education
could get involved and
help fund this. Also
he's very much for the
community schools
program.
According to
Whichard, we have a
system where even
though a child might
live across the street
from Rose High
School, he or she is driven 30 min-
utes away to D. H. Conley High
School to maintain racial equality.
"It's bad that students have to bear
the brunt of mistakes the Board of
Education makes Whichard said.
Whichard said overall, he wants
to represent the people.
Whichard is not running unop-
posed, however. Richard Tolmie, a
former director of engineering at
Burrows Wellcome, is running for
Mark Whichard
FILE PHOTO
the same position. He currently
holds the position due to appoint-
ment. Larry Graham, an attorney
in Greenville, resigned the
position and Tolmie is fin-
ishing out that terra
"I was one in about
eight people that applied
for the position Tolmie
said. "I'm trying to get the
word out to 14,000 voters
in District 5, let people
know about you and your
opponent Whichard and
have the people vote for
the best one
Tolmie's goals if elected are to
increase parent involvement,
decrease class sizes, more technolo-
gy, work with the county commis-
sioners to receive funds to better
the public schools in the area, and
oversee how the central office of
Pitt County is running the schools.
"Basically I want to make sure
all Pitt County children get top
quality education Tolmie said.
Student Welfare Committee removes SGA
suggestion boxes from all campus locations
Students may contact
SGA directly at office
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Andrew LeLi ever
STAFF WRITER
The students' chance to voice their
opinion to SGA through the use of
suggestion boxes is being taken
away
According to Andrew Riddle,
presidential cabinet member, the
Student Government Association
(SGA) student welfare suggestion
. boxes are not being used.
The boxes are being taken down
at certain locations, such as Joyner
Library and Minges, for reasons
dealing with convenience. Students
are having trouble voicing their
opinions about the SGA. The sug-
gestion boxes were supposed to be
located in Mendenhall, Joyner
Library, Wright Place, Minges,
Allied Health and Todd Dining
Hall, which were locations available
to the students.
Students have not submitted
any ideas in the suggestion
boxes.The boxes were designed to
connect the student body to SGA
officials.
"The mailboxes are a good idea
because students complain about
SGA but they do nothing about it.
This idea (boxes) is a way for the
student welfare committee to hear
and to voice these opinions and
improve the state of our legisla-
ture said Pam Godfrey, president
of the student welfare committee.
Eric Rivenbark,student welfare
committee member said the exist-
ing boxes have never had received
any information from the students.
"We are going to reconstruct the
suggestion boxes to simplify the
process of the students ability to
voice their opinionssaid Riddle.
Joyner Library and Minges have
not displayed the suggestion boxes,
but employees of both facilities did
accept the offer to display them the
library.
According to Margaret Foote,
interim associate director, when the
next phase began, there was no des-
ignated place for the boxes.
"We have a new renovated facil-
ity and no appropriate location for
the box said Foote.
Accordingly to Godfrey the stu-
dent welfare committee has not had
the cooperation of the staff. In the
month of January we had verbal
permission from all the locations to
house our boxes.
"With apathy you loose a bit of
freedom said Linda Coward, pro-
cessing assistant.
According to Riddle the student
welfare committee promoted the
boxes by advertising in Tkt East
Carolinian, and WZMB. Students
can get in touch with the SGA
directly, by coming to their open
meetings on monday of every
week. Riddle said It was in the best
interest of the student welfare com-
mittee to take down the suggestion
boxes and try to put them up next
semester, with changes to make
them more accessible.
Gotten Hall rape investigation remains unsolved
Student recovering
fairly well officials say
�im
Mohamed Hussein
staff writer
University police have no leads as
to the perpetrator of the February
rape of a 21-year-old student in
Cotten Residence Hall. Although
they say they are diligently working
on the case, they have had no luck
in finding the suspect
When the incident was first
reported, campus police contacted
the State Bureau of Investigation
Crime Scene Unit, who spent six
I
hours combing the student's room
for fibers, hair, fingerprints and bod-
ily fluids.
"We are still looking for new
information regarding the case and
looking for new leads said
Detective Mike Jordan of the uni-
versity police department
Jordan said that luckily the vic-
tim is recovering fairly well.
"She is doing as well as anyone
can do in this type of situation
Jordan said. Although the assailant
has not been captured, Jordan said
there are some things students can
do to somewhat protect themselves
from assault: don't walk late at night
alone in dark areas, lock doors at
night, and check windows and
blinds at night for vulnerability.
"Following some of these safety
tips can help in protecting your-
self Jordan said.
The notion of safety is a big
problem on most college campuses
across the country. Twenty percent
of all rape incidents are by
strangers; whereas 80 percent are
committed by male acquaintances.
FBI statistics estimate that one of
every three women will be sexually
assaulted at some time in her life,
and that the majority of rape victims
are between the ages of 15 and 24.
If anyone has any leads to the
Cotten Hall Rape in February
please contact the campus police
and Detective Mike Jordan at 328-
6787.
I





Tlwrtur. April 9. 1998
jQ
I
i
pinion
Till Silt C.mlinifn
eastfcarolinian
AMr L.Roister Edita
' Heather Burgess ManagingEdnoi
Amanda Austin Newj Editor Tracv m. laubach SponsEditor
Hoi.lv Harris ash.fenEdim Steve Losev Asm. Sporo Editor
Andy Turner Lilniyla Ednoi Carole Mehle Hud Copy Editor
John Davis AuisitniLiluryliEditor John murphy Stillllkntnior
Matt Hece Advertising Manager
Bo�r TUCCLE Woomaster
Saimo M ECU coaaraaxy aaica 821 lt f art CarKaaaii ptfastiai 11.000 mm aaani la and Ihnl Itakal agDrt aiaaekadaatn � Iliaapa
�onoldlaEitaonat Board the E� Caroi�.m warcomn term lo Oia adaor. lamtad to ZSO aroda. Hhait may tie adited tar detancy or bnrnty TtiaEaat
Cananan raaarvaa tna now 10 ion or raiaa lanm tor prjoocerion All larten muai be waned tanara ihoutd oa addraaaad to 0pm�n adaor ,nra f asi
Catdatan Studam ftotatma SuMng. ECU. Greeimlt. J1BS8A3S3 for alternation, call 919 328 6366
ouwiew
OPINION,
William Stacey
COCHRAN
Columnist
Smile, cope, rise above it all
want to Just stop, take a
day off to just breathe, to
realize there's more to life
than quotidian obligations, to
stop time and catch up with
the swiftly spinning planet
around me.
There are times when I feel like I
am drowning, when the work load
becomes overly demanding, when
I wonder what the hell ever hap-
pened to my childhood when
responsibility wasn't even a worry
amidst the sunshine of freedom. I
look around and realize that time
never stops, and I am so ineluctably
fastened to it that I feel like a water
skier whose . legs have gotten
wrapped in the rope but the boat
just keeps on plowing ahead
through the water.
I want to just stop, take a day off
to just breathe, to realize there's
more to life than quotidian obliga-
tions, to stop time and catch up
with the swiftly spinning planet
around me. I have a life here. I'm
sure of it. It's just buried some-
where in this stack of papers.
Somewhere. And it's normally
amidst this sea of obligations and
deadlines and indifferent mundan-
ity that I pick up a novel and turn
off the world around me, which
only puts me further behind sched-
ule.
How do you do it? How do you
cope? How do you keep from feel-
ing like anything but a gnat on a
cow's ass that is chewing its cud in
a field next to a highway that cars
go by all day and all night? I want to
know.
Most of my high school class-
mates have moved on to marriage
and cushy jobs with companies
whose tri-name names ring
sonorously of power and prestige
and fame. And the once-in-a-while
moments of triumph and glory -
like my acceptance last month of
an honorable mention for the Isaac
Asimov Award for collegiate writers
- is coupled with serious reality
checks (over a whiskey and soda at
the Miami Hilton, Ben Bova, one
of the most winsome and respected
writers alive today, a man who's
seen it all in his seventy-some
years, tells me confidentially that
women don't care about who you
are or what you do, 'They're only
concerned with security. They
want to know that you can provide
for them And despite my decry-
ing avarice and materialism and
society's aggrandizing of monetary
measures for the common man and
woman, my noble belief in
Steinbeckian promise and hope is
deflated like a ten speed inner-
tube that's happened upon a park-
ing lot of broken glass, "That's just
the way the world works. That's
just the way it is) No, no, no; it
can't be!
But alas, this is the real world.
And I suppose that, for many, that
is how the world works.
My only hope is that some-
where, sometime, I can find solace
impure human values like belief in
what is right, like family traditions,
like love and inspiration, wit, sin-
cerity, and hard work. I am looking,
always looking. It only seems that
amidst the sea of what my life has
become, a worry about how I'm
gonna pay the next utility bill on
the paltry income of a graduate
assistant and finish a paper that's
due Wednesday and read 100 pages
by Monday and grade 25 papers by
next week and somehow, some-
how, somehow, remember to tell
the ones I love that I do love them
(though I hardly ever have time to
see them anymore; "You hardly
ever call us anymore my mother
tells me) - it only seems that in the
midst of all this the one thing I can
hope to do is smile, laugh a bit sar-
castically, and say "I'll get to as
soon as I can. As soon as I can
Those students who feel that their e-mail conversations are private are sadly mistaken. A
recent proposal passed in the faculty senate meetings states that no one but the chancellor and
an individual will have access to that individual's e-mail. Technically, without the faculty sen-
ate's proposal, e-mail posted on the campus server is less like a message sent through registered
U.S. mail, and more like a note posted on a billboard.
The faculty senate's motion, subject to the approval of Chancellor Richard Eakin, sounds
reasonable to TEC. At first glance our editorial board resoundingly opposed e-mails being
treated any differently from conversations placed on the university phone system and mail
posted in the university mail system. Why then, we wondered, was the Chancellor butting
heads, so to speak, with the faculty senate? The State Attorney General's office provided some
clues. Laws pertaining to e-mail documents are unclear at best. Several attorneys offered us
very different interpretations of laws like the Public Records Act of North Carolina, which the
Chancellor cites as being in opposition to the faculty senate's proposal. Basically, without a
tremendous amount of precedence, it's any lawyer's guess how the university can legally
enforce the right to monitor e-mail documents on their server. Given this, it seems reasonable
to us that Chancellor Eakin would take a conservative approach and choose not to endorse a
proposal which may or may not be upheld in a court of law. TEC is concerned that the possi-
bility still exists that the Chancellor could check e-mail if he wanted, but we must keep in
mind that he is probably not sitting in his office all day reading students' e-mail messages and
catching up on the latest gossip. The chancellor does not want students to have a false sense
of security, and TEC thinks that's a good idea.
Given the current state of confusion, TEC recommends that in order to prevent self destruc-
tion via university e-mail it would be wise to abstain from revealing your deepest darkest
secrets over the internet � you never know who might be reading. If you are having an affair
with the president and you don't want the world to know, you should probably just keep it to
yourself. The skeletons in your closet should be discussed on the telephone, not your e-mail
account
Many students may object to this law arguing that the university is invading their privacy
and personal space. As concerned as TEC obviously is with freedom of speech and communi-
cation, it is with great hesitation that we say a false sense of security created by the faculty sen-
ate may be worse than regulated e-mail.
OPINION
BERGMAN
Columnist
Downtown needs more bars
The city wants the downtown
' area to be presentable.
Stumbling drunks are not
what the city has in mind for
the downtown region.
On April 6th the city council post-
poned a vote upon an issue that
greatly affects students. The city
council may vote to prohibit any
new taverns from opening in the
downtown area. Great idea, eh!
Some might say, "Good, we do
not need any new bars Actually
those people would probably say it
like this, "Them dad burned col-
lege kids, they don't be needin' any
new bar To which I would reply
you are wrong, we do need new
pubs.
Greenville is growing. ECU
continues to increase its enroll-
ment. More people, more action
downtown.
Simple economics (let's face it,
all economics is simple) has taught
me that competition brings price
down and a greater variety. The
more bars the lower the price of
drinks and cover charges.
Economics has also taught me
that greater competition will also
force more variety upon the music
seen downtown. More saloons
means more fighting for the
crowds, which equals bigger bands.
Nationally known bands would
draw a bigger crowd, to your place
of business.
Now here's the part that makes
me want to rip out my few remain-
ing hairs and scream, "ugh
(maybe not ugh, but some people
have a problem with the F word).
The Daily Reflector, Greenville's
other newspaper, ran an article a
few weeks ago about the problem
with bars, overcrowding.
The Reflector pointed out � and
correctly so � that often bars are
filled past their fire occupancy.
Clearly, this problem happens a lot,
as anybody who has been down-
town can testify.
Aside from the dilemma of fire
hazards, fights often happen in the
packed clubs. By now many of you
should know the scenario by heart
spilled drink, burnt by a cigarette or
talking to the wrong women and a
few fists are thrown.
Now here's the funny part. It
nearly blew my mind. The Daily
Reflector, after reporting on the
problem with the current bars
downtown, appears to come out in
favor of the new ordinance.
Maybe the council in their infi-
nite wisdom hopes students will go
elsewhere in the city for a few
drinks. Another obstacle appears
with this common sense approach.
The cab companies in this town
can barely handle the demand at
night now.
I have waited an hour and a half
for a cab on a busy Friday night.
Few among us can show that much
patience, especially after drinking
enough cheap vodka to raise
Aristocrat's stock ten points.
Hey, I have a great idea. A few
drinks probably will not kill me if I
drive home. Maybe I could get
lucky and take out a council mem-
ber (maim, not date, what kind of
pervert are you?).
Now we come to the question of
why. Why doesn't the city council
let economics take control? This
whole banning of new bars is part of
the council's downtown revitaliza-
tion act. The city wants the down-
town area to be presentable.
Stumbling drunks are not what the
city has in mind for the downtown
region.
If you have time, go down to the
city council meeting. Voice your
opinion about how you feel in
regard to this issue. I will be at the
meeting, explaining my reasoning
behind why the new zoning law is a
bad idea. They probably will not
listen; they have not yet.
Come on look at their record;
they split ECU and the surround-
ing area into FOUR separate city
districts, have a three person occu-
pancy ordinance, one member even
had an East Carolinian newspaper
box taken from campus, and anoth-
er asked if the information super-
highway was coming to Greenville
(she thought it was a "real" road).
God help our council, this might
even be beyond God's help. Bill
Gates, help our council.
OPINION
Marvellej
SULLIVAN
Columnist
City Council: Leave Fifth Street alone
"Good manners will open doors that education cannot and
WM not Even though you have strong feelings about some-
ding, that does not give you license to have bad manners
Clarence Thomas, Supreme Court justice, 1996
When streets follow a sequen-
tial order, it is senseless to
interrupt that sygem. First
St Second St Third St
Fourth St Martin Luther
King Drive, Sixth StIs
that logical?
A recent movement in city council
resulted in part of Fifth Street's
name being changed to Martin
Luther King Drive. How ridicu-
lous is this? There are a plethora of
highly logical reasons why the
street name should not be changed.
It is surprising to me that this
movement has even gained such
momentum because of the effects
such a proposal would entail. .
When streets follow a sequential
order, it is senseless to interrupt
that system. First St Second St
Third St Fourth St Martin
Luther King Drive, Sixth StIs
that logical?
Fifth Street is a historic street
that has been in place (with the
same name) for over 200 years.
Because of its historical signifi-
cance, there arc many limits to zon-
ing and modification along the
whole strip. For example, there is
actually an ordinance that prohibits
the owners of particular houses to
change the color of the house. If
the city deems Fifth Street of such
historical importance as to monitor
the painting of houses, how can the
same city find it sensible to change
the whole name of the street entire-
ly?
Along with the other two rea-
sons, it seems ludicrous to change a
street with both residential and
commercial zoning. Business own-
ers have to find the approval of this
motion to be an unneeded nuisance
to their business and its activity.
Not only are business owners
affected, but also residents of Fifth
Street as well. With the street run-
ning right beside campus and being
the heart of downtown, the pro-
posed changed would be utterly
annoying.
Councilman Rufus Huggins
wants a Martin Luther King Drive
because Greenville does not have a
memorial to King and most other
towns do. Is there some law I am
unaware of that requires that every
town in America have some type of
memorial to King? Of course he
promoted many admirable things
that indeed should be recognized,
but docs changing a street name
duly accomplish this task?
It is very disheartening that this
has become a race issue. It is not.
Whether the proposal was to
change the street name to Martin
Luther King Drive or Robert E.
Lee Boulevard, changing Fifth
Street's name is poindess � it does
not matter who or what it would be
named after! Using the race argu-
ment to further propel the move-
ment is simply a blow below the
belt.
If there is indeed an incessant
need to honor King, it would be
more appropriately done by way of
a bridge, building or prominent
monument perhaps. Since there is
such strong opposition to the
changing of the name, a different
course must be taken. No one is
debating the placement of a memo-
rial to King but rather just keeping
the norm that works so well intact,
n





�ViVBPVVBVPBBI
Till Sift Cwliniia.
i hour and a half
iy Friday night
show that much
y after drinking
odka to raise
n points,
eat idea. A few
I not kill me if I
be I could get
a council mem-
e, what kind of
i the question of
the city council
control? This
:w bars is part of
town revitaliza-
rants the down-
: presentable,
re not what the
' the downtown
go down to the
ig. Voice your
�v you feel in
I will be at the
; my reasoning
' zoning law is a
obably will not
:yet.
it their record;
I the surround-
- separate city
:e person occu-
; member even
tan newspaper
pus, and anoth-
rmation super-
� to Greenville
a "real" road),
cil, this might
id's help. Bill
.cil.
t alone
tier King Drive
Joes not have a
nd most other
some law I am
lires that every
e some type of
Of course he
durable things
be recognized,
a street name
task?
sning that this
sue. It is not.
losal was to
ime to Martin
or Robert E.
anging Fifth
Jess�it does
at it would be
the race argu-
�cl the move-
w below the
an incessant
it would be
ne by way of
r prominent
Since there is
tion to the
e, a different
1. No one is
ntofamcmo-
' just keeping
jo well intact.
9
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
6 Thursday, April 9. 1988
BwitfjAy Ufa.
comics
Thi Eiit Carolinian
VISA
Sale Starts Wednesday, April 8th
12 gallon
Breyers
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5 Currency of
gossip
11 Can opener?
14 Big galoots
15 Doing the same
old same old
16 Pemale sheep
17-Strauss
18 Weasel's kin
20 Elephant's call
22 Scottish hilside
23 Quality of taste
24 Chum
26 Ballplayer Ruth
29 Preventive
Inoculant
32 Particle
33 Schuss
36 Foxhunt cry
37 Actress Garr
38 Massachusetts
cape
39 Nurses
41 Asian holiday
42 Ice Shelf
44 Replace a
stopper
45 Ames and Asner
46 Gooey mass
47 Depended on
49 Actress Raines
50 Bribe
51 Wipe memory
55 Bryce Canyon's
state
57 Source of diner
music
59 Heretic
63 Poet Teasdale
64 Maglie of
baseball
65 Lymphoid organ
66 Winding device
67 Writer Burrows
66 Basketry willows
69 Cravings
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DOWN
1 Stops
2 Word with soap
or horse
3 Race the engine
4 "I, Robot" author
5 Full-grown
6 Component
piece
7 Game piece
8 Vain to mine
9 Roadster
feature, maybe
10 Night light
11 One-on-one
heart-to-heart
12 Inspire wonder
13 Patriot FranWin
19 City near
Casablanca
21 Talks to gods
24 Gets livelier
25 Foot-teg
connections
27 Suffering ermui
28 Gives ofl
30 Wooing periods
31 Orator executed
byOctavian
33 Military rank,
casually
34 Hillock
35 Lackmga
solution
40 Glossy
43 Sudden gush
48 Formal, casualty
52 Grow less
53 Philosopher
Kierkegaard
54 Tutor's tests
56 Besides
57 Abuse vocaily
58 Coffee servers
59 Olympics chant
60 Seize suddenly
01 Actor WaHach
62 Fork in the road






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I
I
6 Thuftdty. April 9. 1998
7 Thurtdiy, i
Thi East Carolinian
CD 4.
Jtfivifivys
Alejandro Escovedo
More Miles than
Money (Live 1994-
1996)
9 OUT OF 10
Caleb Rose
staff writer
Jolene
fn the Gloaming
7 OUT OF 10
Caleb Rose
staff writer
Have you ever noticed how one
word can paint a mural for the
grand scheme of one object? Well,
if you haven't, Jolene's latest
record, In the Gloaming, is a good
example. After band members
coming and going, a change in
name and years of unsettiement,
cjie "Gloaming" in the title marks
the twilight of Jolene's career
ahead.
, A few years ago, three members
of Jolene resided in a Charlotte
based band called the Hardsoul
Poets who had a short-lived tenure
SEE JOUME. PAGE 7
Let's get it on
Battle of the Bands
nextWednesday
Mice ah Smith
SENIOR WRITER
Shannon Meek
senior writer
ECU's Students Union will be
holding its fifth annual Battle of
The Bands next Wednesday. As
always, students will come at 8 p.m.
on the MSC Brickyard, to soak in
the air of the warm spring night and
listen to tunes of bands in the local
areas.
The bands that are scheduled to
play are Cashmere Jungle Lords (8-
8:20 p.m.). Hydro-lux (8:40-9 p.m.)
, MORdeCAI (9:20- 9:40 p.m.),
People's Fault (10-10:20 p.m.), and
Sullenspire (10:40-11 p.m).
Cashmere Jungle Lords are a
band as the trio from Richmond, Va.
describes it, of hybrid "Western
Surf jungle rock College Music
Journal called this band. "One of
the South's best secrets The
band's recent CD, Southern Barber
Supply, has been highly praised.
"We like the Ventures, Buddy
Holly, Chuck Berry, Frank Sinatra
and Frankie Lane said Band
member Dominic Carpin. Perhaps
their eclectic sound is what makes
their music so appealing. One
newspaper proclaimed their sound,
"infectious rock-n-roll
Hydro-Lux, a relatively young
band whose style runs more toward
funk, reggae, jazz and blues, hails
from Virginia.
"We like toimprovise with our
stuff, be spontaneous said drum-
mer Jon Cornwell. But don't expect
a Phish-style jam; these guys tend
to be influenced by the classics:
Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, the Red
Hot Chili Peppers and assorted
masters of jazz.
MORdeCAI's
influences are an
eclectic range of
alternative bands
including The
Smashing
Pumpkins , Rush,
311, Dave
Matthews and
Black Sabbath.
They are a band
composed of three
guys who played
"Naked toast Jam"
and various little
backyard and
garage parties. In the summer of
1997 they produced their own self-
titled album.
Also from Virginia is People's
Fault, described by lead vocalist
Daniel Hiatt as "hard core music
withmelodic vocals
Influences include Tool, the
� "?
Cashmere Jungle Lords (above) square off against Hydro-
Lux, MORdeCAI, People's Fault arid Sullenspire at the Battle.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CASHMERE JUNGLE LORDS
Deftones and Rage Against the
Machine. If you like what you see
at the Battle, drop these guys a line
at. www.swiftsite.comPeoples-
book
review
Alejandro Escovedo is a songwriter.
His life has been well suited for the
harsh times during the naturalistic
writing period in America. He has
seen many bands unite and crum-
ble, traveled many roads and in the
end has suffered the toil of accu-
mulating more miles than money.
Suffering, however, is probably
not the appropriate term for
Alejandro's life. He has served
most of his adult life doing some-
thing he loves and he does it better
than most.
To understand Alejandro's bril-
liance we must first look at his past.
Born in San Antonio, Texas,
Alejandro was a member of a rather
large musical family with 12 sib-
lings of whom several have had
some musical recognirion. His

SEE ESCOVEDO. PAGE 7
Looking for a movie:
?
A few books
may help you
A N D V T l R N E R
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
"Saturday night's all right for fight-
in so goes the song, because
"Saturday night's all right for lyin'
around on the sofa while your room-
mate's cat licks your toes, you eat
raw chocolate chip cookie dough,
drink Guinness and watch
Monstervision with Joe Bob
Briggs" somehow doesn't sound
right.
That's all right. You have to have
those boring Saturday nights to
remind you how good the good
ones are. Besides, there was quality
entertainment on the booby, name-
ly a double feature of It's Alive 2: It
Lives Again and It's Alive 3: Island of
the Alive, two twisted tales of mutant
babies and the parents who love
em
You see, I've got a sickness. I
love movies, preferably ones that
aren't Hollywood's latest formulaic
moneymaker, the ones that
Entertainment Tonight and
Entertainment Weekly get brown-lip
about. Something a tad twisted.
This incurable fascination, which
taunts me like a bad taco or Celine
Dion, needs guidance. Fortunately,
9 Thursday
Henry Acrobat at Peasant's
� . (j '
there are plenty of books written by
twisted S.O.B's who are more than
willing to help me out.
One of the best B-movie refer-
ence books is The Psychotronic Video
Guide (St. Martin's Griffin, 19),
written by Michael Weldon. He
covers blaxploitation (Truck Turner,
Welcome Home Brother
Charles), sexploitation
(Pom Pom Girls, Sweet
Sugat), horror movies
(Crazy Fat Ethel II, This
Night, I'll Possess Your
Corpse), movies you don't
know what the hell are
(Strip Tease Baby Dolls
From Cleveland Meet the
Unkillables, Vampire
Trailer Park) and plenty
of other stuff you've
never heard of.
The book is a sequel
to Weldon's 1983
Psychotronic
Encyclopedia of Film.
The video guide is not a
new edition; it's a totally
new book. Weldon pro-
vides interesting reading
and a ton of great movie
stills and posters that are
probably better (in many
cases) than the movies
they're advertising.
Along the same lines
as Psychotronic is
Videohound's Complete
Guide to Cult Flicks and
Trash Pics (Visible Ink Press, 19).
While nowhere near as extensive as
Psychotronic, Cult Flicks and Trash
Pics may be more to your liking as it
includes a rating system (WOOF!
to four bones) that helps you distin-
guish the good bad from the bad
bad. Also, it has interviews and
salutes to folks like Sam Raimi
(Evil Dead, Darkman) and Bela
Lugosi.
A more scholarly approach is
taken in Midnight Movies (DeCapo,
1983), written by James Hoberman
and Jonathan Rosenbaum.
Hoberman and Rosenbaum pro-
vide an in depth history of cult films
with chapters devoted to. among
Paul Tardiff and Co. at
Staccato
Mayflies, Starpoint at
Lizard &
Snake in Chapel Hill
The Holy Smokes at
The Cave in Chapel
Hill
10 Friday
Poetry Slam at Forum and
Function in Raleigh
Cows at Cat's Cradle in Carborro
Anna to the Infinite Power,
others, Eraserhead and George
Romero's Night of the Living Dead.
But while Midnight Movies offers
top-notch analysis of the history of
underground films, the book does
not forget fun. These are B-movies
they're talking about after all. It
also has a lot of great stills from
movies like Reefer Madness and the
most famous of the midnight
movies. The Rocky Horror Picture
Show.
Also featured in Midnight Movies
is the king of bad taste, John
Waters, the legendary director of
Pink Flamingos, Desperate Living,
and other deliciously decadent
debauchery (they pay me extra for
alliteration). Thunder's Mouth
Press re-released Waters' 1981 biog-
raphy, Shock Value, in 1995.
Shock Value, a "tasteful book
about bad taste is never uninter-
esting. Besides all the wonderful
tales of juvenile delinquency car-
ried out by Waters and his gang,
Wunderkind at Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
Bill Newton and the Big Blues
Quartet at The Cave in Chapel Hill
11 Saturday
Chris Whitleyji1 Michele Malone
at Lizard Snake in Chapel Hill
Trailer Bride at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
including his number one starstar-
let, the late Divine, Waters is infi-
nitely quotable: "Parents should
worry if their children haven't been
arrested by the time they turn 16"
and the famous line, "If someone
vomits watching one of my films,
it's like getting a standing ovation
A� chapter of Shock
Value, "Why I Love
Violence is reproduced
in Screen Violence
(Bloomsbury, 19), edit-
ed by Karl French, a col-
lection of thought-pro-
voking essays about
exactly what the title
says. Some say it's just
fine (Waters, Martin
Amis), while others
aren't too keen on it
(Michael Medved, Mary
Whitehouse).
Perhaps most inter-
esting are the essays
written by John Grisham
and Oliver Stone, each
slamming the other.
Grisham's assertion that
the "orgy of violepce"
that was Natural Born
n Killers contributed to two
teenagers slaying one of
his friends meets with
expected defiance from
Stone: "Has your father
been brutalized? Sue
Oedipus and call Hamlet
as your witness. Do you
hate your mother? Blame Medea
and Joan Crawford. Has your
lawyer-husband been unfaithful?
Slap a summons on Grisham, since,
after all, he wrote The Finn
If you want, violent films, film
noir is the place to look, and Barry
Gifford's The Devil Thumbs a Ride
(Grove Press, 1988) is the book
that'll tell you what noir to seek out.
Gifford, David Lynch's screenwrit-
ing partner for Lost Highway and
author of numerous novels, collec-
tions of poetry and biographies,
addresses noir classics like Born to
SEE MOVIE PAGE 7
Fault. They'll be playing the fol-
lowing Thursday night with Nemo
at Pantana Bob's.
Three ECU students formed
Sullenspire last October and are try-
ing to break into the local music
scene. "It's kind of cathartic at
times guitarist Shay Lorenz said
of the sweeping range of chords and
complex structure of their music,
which the band classifies as "emo-
core and indie rock
Melodic and complex bands like
Sam I Am, Inch and Sunny Day
Real Estate provide Sullenspire
with inspiration and a desire to
make music, rather than its packag-
ing, appealing to an audience.
If each band deploys their
promised "secret weapons" during
the bloody fray, this year's Battle of
the Bands will be one of the closest
yec Bring your own body armor and
see ya at the Brickyard.
rflrflfllin
This is not a rant. The goal: to write
complete sentences and hopefully
to make some sort of point. Just
another ass with an opinion
Grease
gets the
Don't cheer for the Grease gang.
PHOTO COUHTESV OFPARAMOUNT PICTURES
Its the'70s doing the j
Ws�badly
Mark Brett
SENIOR WRITER
14 Tuesday
The Cypher (open mic poetry)
at Underwater Pirate's Cove
f'ZL
Chris Whitely is at the Lizard and
Snake on Saturday.
PHOTO COURTESr OF SONY
The Peasants at Peasant's.
This nostalgia thing has gone too
far.
It was bad enough when we
were put in the grip of people who j
thought that the 70s were the;
coolest decade ever. I lived through !
it the first time, thanks, and hated
the ringer shirts and racing stripes
then, too. At least the wide lapels
haven't made a comeback
But I'm wandering away from J
my point Yes, nostalgia for the 70s, J
the tackiest decade in recent histo-1
ry, is irksome. But what are we to j
make of its latest weird permuia-
tion? The movie Grease, back in I
theaters after 20 years, has been i
enjoying wild box office success for�
the past two weeks. So are we now �
caught up in nostalgia for the 70s
nostalgia for the '50s?
Grease, for those of you who don't j
know, was the musical magnum I
opus of 1978, a loving fantasy about'
high school life in the '50s. Filled ;
with faux-rockabilly numbers and
big dance routines, Grease sent a
generation staring back into their
parents' childhoods and seemingly
cemented John Travolta's star status
SEE MEASE. PAGE 7
I
V
contir
until Jolene w
first leg of Joi
three main m
writcrguitarisi
Mike Mitschc
Mike Kenerle
playing pedal-
Burris adding
mandolin. T
Jolene's debu
Acre, a good re
Records.
After son
cess, the band
dio again with
and an adjuste
ly different, at
first record wa
bfuegrass influ
Ladd's steel
time around, ,
for steel gui
Es(
older brother;
Santana, and hi
monly known
'80s), also exp
in:the music i
was a musiciar
mdriachi bands
almost all of Ale
was, musically
way. Alejandro
punk rock ban
Javier, called Ti
After the
Believers, Aleja
Gr
forever (grantei
baby movies k
cement, but
point).
And it's not
C� ' ��
.8
Some restrtcri
Date:
Place:
TUI
THI
EC





7 Thurtdiy, April 9, 1898
East Carolinian
lifestyle
Tilt Eaat Carolinian
I playing the fol-
night with Nemo
students formed
:tober and are try-
i the local music
I of cathartic at
Shay Lorenz said
nge of chords and
: of their music,
lassifies as "emo-
k
implex bands like
and Sunny Day
vide Sullenspire
and a desire to
x than its packag-
n audience.
I deploys their
weapons" during
is year's Battle of
one of the closest
n body armor and
;yard.
The goal: to write
es and hopefully
jrf of point. Just
in opinion
we
the
i Grease gang.
AMOUNT PICTURES
doing die
badly
RETT
IITER
g has gone too
iugh when wej
i of people who
70s were the J
I lived through J
nks, and hated -
i racing stripes
he wide lapels i
:back
ing away from
gia for the 70s
in recent histo-1
what are we to
reird permuta-j
trease, back in ;
:ars, has been i
fice success for I
So are we now I
pa for the 70s �
I ,
you who don't I
sical magnum j
; fantasy about j
ie '50s. Filled ;
numbers and
Grease sent a
ack into their
ind seemingly
ilta's star status
i
Jolene
coniinued from page 6
until Jolene was later formed. The
first leg of Jolene consisted of the
three main members: Singersong-
writerguitarist John Crooke, bassist
Mike Mitschele and the drummer
Mike Kenerley, as well as Bill Ladd
playing pedal-steel guitar and Dave
Burris adding guitar vocals and
mandolin. This leg produced
Jolene's debut record Hell's Half
Acre, a good road record on Ardent
Records.
After some little-known suc-
cess, the band returned to the stu-
dio again with some new members
and an adjusted, but not complete-
ly different, attitude. Whereas the
first record was more country and
blucgrass influenced � care of Bill
Ladd's steel guitar work � this
time around, Jolene traded Ladd
for steel guitar player Rodney
Lanier, who has a less country
sound in his style.
The attitude expressed on In the
Gloaming is exactly what the title
denotes: A time when all is dark
and unclear such as dusk or twi-
light. The opening track entitled
"Pensacola soused by an unorigi-
nal Oasis guitar intro that is pat-
terned after "Wonderwall" and
every other Oasis song that has
recently been released, is nonethe-
less an appropriate sound for what
was trying to be achieved. Aside
from the arguably cheesy guitar
intro, the lyrics and vocal harmonies
are the elements that bring this
song into the light with repeated
chants of "need you now
Many of the songs are up-tempo;
however, the connotation of dusk is
retained in the musical structure.
The track "Begin 1000" caresses
the listener while the lyrics long for
an answer, "Beauty's evident and
I'll stand forever, I can hold you and
hold you and I can begin 1000
One odd aspect about the preced-
ing song is that a meaning cannot
be derived from it easily, though a
sense of want and hopelessness
protrude from the music.
The last upbeat rocker that sadly
sticks out is the cut "Star Town
This track is pure sarcasm. Crooke
wrote lyrics of promise, "Star town
for a golden boy but his tone of
voice is glum, perhaps in the
"glumming" if you will. To add to
this frenzy and to the dark imagery
on the album, at the end of "Star
Town Crooke chants a phrase that
is undetectable, but somewhere in
the midst of "forgive me now" and
"forget me not Each phrase adds
to the power of the song; however,
the true meaning would unveil
exactly what Crooke is trying to say
though he probably wanted these
to be indiscernible in order to main-
tain the gloaming theme.
In comparison to the first record,
it is pretty evident that the band
did a great deal of experimentation.
Different drumbeats were used,
aside from a standard 44 beat in
most songs on Hells Half Acre. The
track titled "16c" sounds like it was
inspired by early Pink Floyd as it
encompasses high-pitched, echoing
guitars, and a relaxed feel. One
might even term this to be a spacey
song. Crooke plays games with his
words when he sings, "What does it
sound like living with me these
days
As much as Jolene probably
wanted to create a totally dark
album, it is pretty tough to do con-
sidering their past. "Pull the
Weight Virginia (Innocent Lucille)"
seems like it doesn't even belong
on this record. It is a happy-go-
lucky, snap, crackle, poppy tune
that could brighten anyone's dark
hour. Though after several listens
to this track, if you pay attention to
the words, it is about loss. "Fool
enough to carry on, pull the weight
Virginia Virginia seems to be liv-
ing a hard life of loss; however, she
keeps on going along on the same
path as Crooke beckons, "Lead
on
Directly after "Pull the Weight
Virginia (Innocent Lucille) Jolene
come back again with a pleasant
sounding song titled "Clear Bottle
Down Opening itself with a mod-
erately crunchy guitar line that
accompanies the chorus in effect
that after Crooke sings "let me run,
clear bottle down the musical
notes fall down as if a drink from a
bottle has just been consumed.
You would think that Jolene
would conclude the record with a
poppy song such as the aforemen-
tioned; however, this is not so. The
closing number, "20th Century
Pause takes the listener back into
the dark mist: "And if I ever find
recollection in my head, I would
pray you awake me at onceThen
she steps on my feet and we
dance It is as if Crooke pulls you
"In the Gloaming" and does every-
thing in his power to make you feel
comfortable there.
This record is a good tool to help
you get away from things, it urges
you to go back into your own little
world and do your own thing. If
you think about it hard enough, col-
lege students, Crooke is giving a
helpful hint.
Movies
coniinued from page 6
Escovedo
coniinued f mm page 6
older brothers once played for
Santana, and his niece, Sheila (com-
monly known as Sheila E. in the
'80s), also experienced some fame
in:the music industry His father
was a musician as well playing in
mariachi bands in Mexico. Literally,
almost all of Alejandro's family is, or
was, musically talented in some
way. Alejandro even shared a cult
punk rock band with his brother,
Javier, called True Believers.
After the demise of f True
Believers, Alejandro had to qontin-
ue giving his gift as a solo artist.
After many record label troubles,
Alejandro found himself a foster
artist until Bloodshot Records
offered him a home with a new
recording of a collection of live
songs entitled More Miles than
Money (Live 1994-96).
The disc begins with a weary
song called "Last To Know" that
opens the album and sets the mood
� relaxed. As Alejandro begins
singing, you can hear the struggle
and toil that he has been dealing
with throughout his whole life.
There is an emptiness in his voice
that seems it can never be filled.
This song is home to the title of the
album: "More miles than money,
look at our lives and its so
funnyMore miles than money, we
fall in love and its so funny, with the
last, the very last to know
"Last To Know" is immediately
followed by another acoustic tune
called "Slip with a brooding
melody that leaves you lost in
thought. "Hey you, won't you come
and drink with me, I haven't bro-
ken anythingI just need you to slip
away with me There is still a
yearning in Alejandro's voice that
could give any soul a chill, only the
soulless would not understand.
The most surprising aspect of
this record is that there is little, if
not any, crowd noise heard whatso-
ever. After all, this is a live record
with performances from Alejandro's
homeland of Texas, some shows in
California and a closing number in
Paris, France. At each venue the
crowd was exceptionally quiet for
the recording except for maybe a
few faint whistles at the close of a
song.
"Broken Bottle" is a master-
piece example of Alejandro's song-
writing. "Pour me a drink from a
broken bottle, fill my glass with the
dirty water, what I've lost is gone,
what I've gained has no name, so
I'll take my leave once more A
life of incessant down endings is
the story of this man's life.
More Miles than Money has a few
select cover tunes that pay a little
homage to obvious influences in
Alejandro's past and present song-
writing. Covers include the
Stooges' "I Wanna be your Dog"
and the Rolling Stones' "Sway
The album is capped by one of
Alejandro's most acclaimed songs,
"Five Hearts Breaking and a
medley of material commonly
heard when playing with his latest
side project Buick MacKane (a
rawking garage rock band based in
Texas that Alejandro is again proud
to share along with his brotherex-
True Believer, Javier). "Five Hearts
Breaking" is a hopeful song that
overpowers the thoughts of a hard
life and encourages you to keep
moving. "Her name was Hopeher
hair was blacker than the sky, she
had a smile that would make the
Devil cryShe held his hands,
looked him in the eye, she said,
'Believe, Believe, and everything
will be fine Alejandro Escovedo
is a songwriter.
Grease
coniinued Itom page 6
forever (granted, a series of talking
baby movies kind of cracked that
cement, but that's beside the
point).
And it's not a bad little flick, if
you like that sort of thing. The
songs aren't unbearable, and the
dancing is well-choreographed. If
you're a John Travolta fan, it's fun
to see him with a ducktail and
leather jacket, at least. And if you're
an Olivia Newton-John fan Okay,
so I guess there probably aren't
very many Olivia Newton-John
fans left out there. But 'she does
wear a poodle skin through most of
the film, and that's gotta be worth
something.
But come on, people! Does any-
body really need to pay six bucks to
see this turkey in a theater? There
are some interesting set pieces
here, sure, but Grease is hardly the
kind of visual feast that's really
enhanced by the big screen.
"Greased Lightning" may very
well be a neat little number, but
seeing it on a movie screen just
means you're staring at a really big
Kill'and Gun Craxy with equal parts
intelligence and hard-boiled
enthusiasm. His writing style is.
powerful and to-the-point,
inspired, he claims in the preface,
by the Cahiers du Cinema reviews of
the '50s he imagined to be written;
"on the cafe or kitchen table at one;
in the morning
Videohound puts out a variety!
of genre related film reference!
guides (independent movies, vam-j
pire moviffe) science fiction, etc.);
in addition to its annual Golden
Movie Retriever, an amazing;
resource. You get cross-referencingj
up the ying (they've got penicillin!
for that, don't worry), and it lists
more movies you can shake a cat'
at In fact, you could probably kill
a cat or a small child just by tap-
ping it on the head with this bas-I
tardt'It's a whopping big book,
about the size of Toledo.
But if you're just looking for
your basic guide to movies, nicely
written, handy size, nothing fancy,
there's always Mr. Leonard Maltin.
Leo's annual Movie and Video Guide
is as dependable and reliable as
the smiling bearded face on the
cover would indicate.
As you can see, I've spent way
too much money in the name of
movies, specifically movies named
Was a Communist For the F.B.I.
Somewhere within all these;
books, however, you should be .
able to locate something you like
something you've never heard of
or, at least, something to kill a cat
with. j
The only part of Grease that I can
imagine being worth seeing in a
theater is the "Beauty School
Drop-Out" sequence. Not that the
scene is really all that great, but at
least Frankie Avalon gives it a little
period cred.
And period cred is something
this film sorely lacks. Though all
the Jayne Mansfield sweaters and
DA haircuts are in place, Grease
just sounds wrong. While a couple
of songs actually do sound like gen-
uine '50s music ("Beauty School
Drop-Out" being the best of
those), most of them are just show
tunes tweaked slightly to mimic a
'50s flavor.
And the theme song? It's disco,
people, pure and simple! Disco! I
hope you're proud.
If you really must relive the 70s
version of the '50s, watch the early
seasons of Happy Days on
Nickelodeon. It's better, and more'
accurate, than anything in Grease
And if you must watch Grease, just
go rent it. Or better yet, wait until it1'
shows on Turnervision again so you,J
can see it for free. It's swiftly
becoming the musical Beastmaster1
so I'm sure you won't have to wait'
very long '�
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8 Thundiy. April 9. 1998
The East Carolinian
I
Th� R�oruWno Rundown
What does it take?
-t
DAMON STAFFORD
S6NIOH WRITES
One of the top priorities to
running a successful athletic
program is recruiting the best
athletes the sport has to offer.
The ECU coaching staffs are
constantly
watching high
school athletes in
championship
meets and
in vi tationals
across the nation.
Most of our ECU
athletes are found
in North Carolina
or in the
surrounding east
coast states.
"Over the past
years North
Carolina has
turned into a
strong recruiting
athlete requesting information
such as academic background and
their interest in college. The
NCAA prohibits collegiate
coaches talking face to face with
these athletes until their become
seniors. However, letters of
interest and communicating with
their coaches is allowed.
"We're not only looking for the
best athletes Pirate Basketball
Head Coach Joe Dooley said.
"But were also looking for guys
whose personality's fit the
university as well as our program
state Swimming
Head Coach Rick
Kobe said.
"But we also
get a lot of
recruits from the
states around
Maryland and
Virginia
For the well-
known high
school prospect,
the process of ��RaaVHal
recruiting usually
will begin their junior year in high
school. A letter is sent to the
Year in the Life
Country Recruiter
of Cross
Mike Ford
May- Scout recruits at North Carolina
High School Championshops
June- Scout recruits at Virginia High School
Championships
July- Develop a list of new recruits from current
years championships
August- Tryouts begin, last years recruits settle
into college
SeptNov Scout one or two high school
meets, while coaching cross country
NovJan Visit new prospects at their homes,
scout Footlocker Championships
FebApril- narrow down a list of recruits,
make follow up phone colls
April- May- Signing period
Top 5 things coaches are
looking for:
I. Athletic ability
2. Academic background
3. Attitude
4. Level of determination
5. Sense of team
In many occasions, some of the
greatest high school athletes will
go unnoticed by coaches. In this
case, the prospect will
independently contact the school
of their choice.
"I would say almost 90 percent
of our incoming freshmen contact
us first Rick Kobe said.
If the athlete has interest in the
school, he will then send all of the
information needed back to the
coaching staff. The next three or
four months will involved the
athlete visiting campus and the
coaching staff visiting hisher
home. At this time all questions
by the athlete and hisher parents
will be answered. The coaching
staff will also find out all of the
information that they need to
know.
"Were looking for kids that will
achieve in the classroom, put forth
strong work ethic and dedication
as well as perform on the field
Assistant Cross CountryTrack
Coach Mike Ford said.
As the athletes come for a
campus tour they stay with
upperclassmen from their
prospective sports and learn about
the school.
There are may ways which
they decide who gets what in the
scholarship department. In ECU
swimming, scholarships are
determined soley by times, but in
other sports it is impossible to
judge scholarships by statistics.
"We don't award scholarships
unless we actually see someone
play Assistant Soccer Coach Jeff
Oberg said.
"We like to evaluate them
ourselves
Signing periods will then
follow, with an early signing
period available.
Recruiting is probably the
most important element of
putting together and maintaining
a strong athletic department.
ECU coaches are constantly
scouting games, meets, matches,
as well as contacting upcoming
freshmen to take ECU athletics to
the next level.
Former Pirate quarterback Dan Gonzalez
named 1998 Outstanding Male Athlete
FootbalPs finest to
receive award
TP.ACV HAIRR
STAFF WHITER
As part of the annual Great
PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out
Parry, the Breakfast of Champions
will be held at the Greenville
Country Club. Dan Gonzalez, the
Pirate football quarterback, has
been selected as ECU's
Outstanding Male Scholar-
Athlete of the year 1998.
Along with Christi Valevich
from the Softball team, Gonzalez
will be honored for his successes
in both the classroom and on the
field.
This award, sponsored by PCS
Phosphate, includes an athletic
grant-in-aid in name of the
recipients. Gonzalez has obtained
his undergraduate degree in
marketing, and recently earned
his "MBA last December after
maintaining a GPA of 3.8 in the
program.
Wnm H

Dm Gonzalez will be honored at the
1998 Outstanding Male Athlete of the
Year on April 18.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION
Aside from his academic
accomplishments, Gonzalez
marks the Pirate record books for
being the leader in completion
percentage at 56.7, and was
ranked No. 4 in ECU history in
passing yardage with 2, 510.
With such achievements
considered, Gonzalez is anxious
both about a prospective football
career and a job search he will
soon venture upon.
"The NFL draft pick will be
on the 18th or 19th, so I've been
thinking a lot about that
Gonzalez said.
Out in the competitive
business world, Gonzalez foresees
nothing that should obstruct his
opportunities.
"As far as a job goes, I don't
think it should be difficult to find
one related to my undergraduate
degree Gonzalez said. "Of
course, my Masters deals more
with business administration, so
I'm looking forward to seeing
where each step takes me
Regardless of the extreme
effort put forth by Gonzalez, he
admits that he is hardly the only
athlete who is worthy of this
acknowledgement.
"There are so many other
players in every sport who are
doing well in the classroom, and
they don't always get the
recognition they deserve
Gonzalez said. "It definitely took
a lot of hard work to get where I
am today, but I was fortunate to
be able to take classes offered
during the summer and other
good times, so my schedule was
always manageable
No longer an active part of the
football team or classroom studies,
Gonzalez indeed has a remarkable
history in ECU's athletic and
academic departments, and will
receive a well-deserve! award at
the Breakfast of Champions on
April 18.
Dan Gonzalez made impressive marks not only on the field, but alto in the
classroom. Ranked fourth for ECU in passing yardage with 2.510, he has been
thinking a lot lately about the upcoming NFL draft.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Spring football
practice in full swing
Team takes first steps
toward successful '98
Travis Barkley
SENIOR WRITER
On March 25th the ECU football
team began spring practice in
preparation for the 1998 season.
In addition to getting the players
in shape, spring practice allows
coaches to introduce new plays
and formations. It also allows
coaches to work closely with
young players that red-shirted last
season. Several of these players
have already had stand out
springs according to Pirate Head
Coach Steve Logan.
'Pcrnell
running game, Logan said that it
is coming along.
"Jamie Wilson, Leonard
Henry, and Damon Davis are all
splitting time Logan said. "We
feel like we have three guys that
can do the job
The defense is a little more
settled with eight starters
returning. All Conference USA
linebacker Rod Coleman is
among those returning. As a
senior, Coleman will be counted
on to provide leadership.
"Right now I'm practicing
individually and helping to coach
the younger guys Coleman
said.
Coleman was among the
national leaders in sacks last year,
but is not concerned with the
prospect of facing double or triple
teams.
Griffin at linebacker,wsl8
David
Garrard atWPHp� fpM
quarterback,
and Corey ISjSJj
Floyd has
shown he�J p
can do some
nice things atmM- "ri
tight end Logan said.vflLtfl Ijbbhjr�?
"Aaron Walker hasIn
played well
and Kevin
Ward has
made a nicer wr'
transition to
safetyE.rf
One of
the kevs this
spring will
be finding a jM1F
replacementjafT'
for last year's � : V :�-�� ��
starting quarterback 1
Dan
Gonzalez.
Garrard will
compete for.
the job with
Ernest
Tinnin and Bobby Weaver. The
trio is splitting snaps in practice,
and Logan said that no one has
the edge as of yet.
"Right now all three will play
Logan said. "We'll probably go to
Virginia Tech and play all three
guys
Garrard says that he is pleased
with his improvement and hopes
to see some playing time in the
fall.
"My confidence level is up
from last fall, and I'm staying
more patient Garrard said.
"Hopefully I'll be able to play
Garrard said that the speed of
practice is one of the biggest
adjustments he has had to make.
"In high school things are a
little more relaxed Garrard said.
"Here everything moves at 100
miles per hour
The Pirates also hope to have
an improved ground attack this
year. When asked about the
Preparations are already being made for the season opener
against Virginia Tech. Spring practices will end April 18.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
"I'm not worrying about that, if
they double me then it means I'm
being noticed Coleman said.
A major concern of spring
practice is always the threat of
injury. So far the Pirates have
been fairly lucky.
"Chris Satterfield injured his
shoulder and may need surgery
Logan said. "Other than that it's
just been bumps and bruises
As of now, Logan says they
haven't been planning exclusively
for the first game at Virginia Tech.
"Right now we're not focusing
on the particulars of what their
offense and defense does, we're
concentrating on fundamentals
Logan said. "We'll start worrying
more about Virginia Tech when
three-a-days start in August
Practice continues through
April 18th, concluding with The
Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-
out Parry.
Returning Statistical Leaders
PassingAtt-CmrlntYds Tn
Weaver8- 4-15 0
RushingAttYriRAvg TD
Wilson872923.4 3
ReceivingNo.YdsAvg )
Smith5479514.7 4
ScoringTDFGsPAT Pts
Harris Wilson5 50 00 30 0 30
SacksNo.Yds
Coleman Darden15 893 49
Baseball team defeats NC A & T for fourth straight win
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Team prepares for
Gwr& Mason games
Paul Kaplan
HNIOH WHITE!
1
I
,
Vie P?"8' Antaine Jones started
ot� Wednesday afternoon's
baseball game in style with a lead-
off home run to deep right field in
the the bottom of the first inning.
Jones's lead-off home run tied the
game up at 1-1 and was only a hint
of more things to "come.
Later in the bottom of the
second the Pirates added a run to
take the lead when Jason Howard
crossed the plate from a sacrifice
RBI off the bat of Jones giving
him his second RBI of the game.
But it was in the bottom of the
third inning when the Pirates
really went to work. Last weeks
CAA player of the week, Ryan
Massimo knocked in an RBI
double scoring Steve Salargo from
first. Then, still in the bottom of
the third Jason Colquitt put N.C.
A&T's Al Holland pitch well
over the out field wall giving ECU
a 5-1 lead and Colquitt his third
home run of the season.
The Pirates scored an
additional three runs in the
, bottom of the fifth two coming off
of Howard's two RBI triple hit
hard into the gap in right-center
field. Howard would later score on
a Colquitt sacrifice RBI bunt.
"I've been in kind of a slump
and I was just trying to drive the
ball the other way and I got a good
pitch to hit and I did, you put a
good swing on it and good things
happen,
Howard
said
The
Pirates
held the
N.C. A&T
Aggies
scoreless
until the
top of the
seventh
when ECU
pitcher
Conrad
Clark gave
The Pirates won yesterday's game 15-10 to improve their overall
record to 18-17.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
up three runs, one from a fielders
choice off the bat of Brian
Sheppard. The other two came
from a two-RBI triple smacked by
Tim Wilson, which brought the
Aggies within seven.
In the top of the eighth the
Aggies pulled together another
rally, this time against Sophomore
pitcher Jeremy Schumacher.
Schumacher was pulled after a
bases loaded walk with two outs
giving NC A&T their eighth run.
In Schumacher's 23 of an inning
performance he gave up four runs
and three hits to bring the Aggies
with in three runs of the lead.
But the Pirates did not give up
and pounded back in the bottom
eighth with four runs and four hits
to increase the lead seven runs,
SEE BASEBALL. PAGE 10





VWVWWVPMVWlBPIW
��p
9 Thursdiy, April 8, 1988
sports
The Eut Carolinian
last Carolinian
an said that it
; about that, if
it means I'm
man said,
'n of spring
the threat of
Pirates have
not give up
the bottom
md four hits
seven runs,
Alomar, Eek, Rowley prepare to close careers
Athletes reflect on
college careers
Mario Scherhalfer
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S tennis program will lose
three great athletes with the end
of the semester. Mona Eek, Nils
Alomar, and Brett Rowley will bid
farewell to ECU tennis as their
season comes to a close.
"They did a great job for our
program Head Coach Bill Moore
said. "It was a pleasure working
with them and I wish them good
luck for their future life
Eek is one of the Lady Pirates,
who said she will miss ECU and
enjoyed working with the coaches
and other athletes.
"Especially this season we did
great and I played my best
matches over the year Eek said.
According to Eek, she may
continue her education at ECU
after her 12 month practical
training.
"I also want to travel around
the country before I go back to
Norway Eek said.
Eek got recruited from St.
John's University to ECU through
Anne Svae, who plays at the No.
lspot for ECU. Svae and Eek
went to the same high school and
knew each other since they were
12 years old.
According to Eek, Michelle
Martin and Asa Ellbring both
have a lot of talent and will to step
up and take her place in the team.
"Catherine Morgan also played
some awesome matches this
year Eek said.
Unlike Eek,
the 1997-98
men's team
captain Rowley
is not
considering
persuing a
graduate school
program at
"I would like
to work in my
major
broadcasting
Rowley said. "If
that doesn't
work out, I plan
to work with my
dad in real
estate
Rowley
ended up at
recommendation of
Pirate tennis will bid farewell to three of its finest players: (L-R) Nils
Alomar, Mona Eek. and Brett Rowley.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
ECU by
the tennis
coach of Clemson University, who
told him that ECU is a good
school with a good
tennis program.
Rowley considers self-
discipline and self-
moiivarjp,n,hisaid the
teanVs . biggest
strengths.
"We always knew what
our problems were and
what we had to work
on Rowley said. "It
has been fun at ECU.
We all got along pretty
good on the team
Alomar is considered
one of ECU's strongest
players and is known
as one of the hardest
worker in the team.
"Nils is a very
ambitious athlete with
a lot of will power and
great talent Moore said. "He put
up fights and won games which
seemed already lost
According to Alomar, ECU was
a place to both have fun and learn
a lot, too.
"I also had the opportunity to
meet lots of people from lots of
different- places around the
world Alomar said.
Alomar speaks four different
languages fluently and he plans to
get his degree in Industrial
TechnologyElectronics this May.
The University of Arizona will be
the next destination in the life of
this outstanding scholar and
athlete. Alomar, however, also
plans to play more tennis before
heading out west.
Mona, Brett and Nils; thanks
for your great matches, your
talent, and dedication. We have
enjoyed watching you and we will
miss you all
Mona Eek
�Data of birth: Aug. 16, 1974
-Homatown: Nesbru, Norway
-Family: Daughter of Per and Eva Eek
High achool: Nesbru HS
-Major: Marketing
Personal 19S7-98 record 18-13 (3-1) in singles and 13-11 (2-1)
in doubles with Anne Svae
-Best gama for ECU: Matches at Hilton Head Island this spring
-Worst gama for ECU: UNC-Charlotte at beginning of this
season
-Favorite athlete: Bjoern Dehlie (cross country skier from
Norway)
Biggest moment in life: "At my first college year at St. John's I
arrived at JFK Airport in New York City and didn't know a
damn thing" (scariest moment)
Outstanding: Inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa Honorary
Serves as Secretary of the Sudent-Athlete Advisory
Council
IMember of the PCS Phosphate All-Academic Team
Brett Rowley
�Date of birth: May 10, 1976
Hornetovfh: Lighthouse Point, Fla.
Family: Son of Pike and Laurie Rowley; one
younger sister Carrie
�High school: Cardinal Gibbons HS in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Attended freshman year at Tyler JC, Texas
-Major: Business Communication
-Personal 1997-98 record: 7-6 (4-2) in singles, 5-9 f3) in
doubles with Roope Kalajo, Derek Slate and Stephan
Siebenbrunner
�Best game for ECU: Victory over West Virginia (H) in third set
- early this year. "It came down to my match and I won for
me and for the team
�Worst game for ECU: Spring '97 match against American
University. "I started to burn out and was mentally
fatigued
�Favorite Athlete: John McEnroe
�Biggest moment in life: Winning NJCAA National
Championships at No. 5 singles and No. 1 doubles with
Tyler JC
Outstanding: Won 9 out of 10 home matches for ECU in his
career as ECU athlete
Nils Alomar
-Date of birth: Oct. 8, 1976
Hometown: Mallorca, Spain
-Family: Son of Pedro and Asa Alomar
High school: Seal Magaluf in Cavia, Spain
-Major: Industrial Technology with a concentration in Electronics
Personal 1997-98 record: 8-12 (2-4) in singles, 6-4 (3-2) in
doubles with Kenny Kirby
-Best game for ECU: Won against N.C. State (spring '96)
Worst game for ECU: Lost to American University this spring
(van broke, no warm-up time, penalty)
-Favorite Athlete: Mats Wilander
Biggest moment in life: Accepted in Spanish National team
(under 14 years)
-Outstanding: Member of the PCS Phosphate All-Academic Team
Member of the Student-Athlete Advisory Council
Speaks: Swedish, Spanish, English, and German
(allfluently)
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I
10 Thursday, April 9. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Baseball
continued from page 3
making the score 15-8.
The Aggies scored two runs in
the top oftne nintn on two ECU
errors, but it was not enough for
the victory and the Pirates pulled
it out 15-10.
"After losing nine straight it
feels pretty good to come back
and win four, we just gotta keep it
going Howard said.
This Saturday the Pirates will
be playing three conference
games against George Mason (4-
5).
"I think this is a big weekend
coming up for the team, and a big
weekend as far as where were
going to finish in the
conference siad Coach Keith
LcClair. "If we can play well this
weekend, we may have an
opportunity to finish in the top
two or three
REC SERVICES
Congratulations!
Ryan Massimo of the ECU baseball team was
named the Colonial Athletic Association's Player
of the Week on Monday. A senior shortstop from
Durham, Massimo is the second Pirate to receive this
honor in the last four weeks, as teammate Randy
Rigsby was the year's first CAA Player of the Week
on March 16.
Flag football to appear on intramural
calendar for first time this spring
The Department of Recreational
Services will offer a 4-on-4 Flag
Football program for the first time
this Spring. This new activity will
get underway with a captain's
registration meeting on Tuesday,
April 14 at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room 244. Any
individuals interested in
registering also attempt to attend
in order to facilitate this process.
Four players are needed to form a
team and play will be offered on
several different days and times.
Divisions offered will include
Men's Independent Gold and
Purple and Women's
Independent. Gold leagues are
designed for participants who
have experience in competitive
play and wish to participate at a
higher level of skill while Purple
leagues are more recreational fn
nature. The activity format will be
determined by the number of
teams which register. Play will
begin on Monday, April 20 with
most games taking place between
4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Mondays
through Thursdays at the College
Hill fields. Recreational Sports
Association (NIRSA) and NFL
Air-It-Out 4-on-4 Flag Football
rules will be used.
4-on-4 Flag Football is a wide
open and high scoring game
designed entirely around the
forward year offering the 4-on-A
game, a number of other colleges
have recently added this activity
as the NFL Air-It-Out program
has gained in popularity. With
most of the members from
powerhouse teams from the Fall,
"Strictly Playaz" and "Aftermath"
either out of school this semester
or committed to other activities,
competition is expected to be
wide open. Rumor has it that
Jeremy Howard and Tommy
Johnson of the "Knuckleheadz"
will be attempting to break the
record for participation in the
most intramural activities in a
single year. Vu "Rec Center
Rifle" Donie is also expected to
enter a team if he can recover
from the euphoria surrounding his
first All-Campus men's basketball
championship. Among the Gold
teams from the Fall, the status of
"Qimdemhoez" is still in
question as Terrance Barnhill and
Darryl Collins attempt to pick up
the ashes from last semester. For
further infromation, pleas contact
David Gaskins at Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
Recreational Services to sponsor Golf
Singles Tournament for ECU community
The Department of Recreational
Services is sponsoring a Golf
Singles Tournament which will be
open to all ECU students, faculty,
and staff. Interested participants
must register by 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, April 14th in 128
Student Recreation Center. All
participants must complete a
registration form which includes
their full name, social security
number, phone number, and
division of play. Participants will
also sign up for a tee time at
registration. Competition will be
offered in both men's and
women's divisions. This activity is
in the Fraternity Point System. A
current ECU one card is required
for eligibility. The tournament
will be held on Monday, April
20th and Tuesday, April 21st at
Bradford Creek Golf Club in
Greenville. Participants will shoot
one round of 18 holes on either of
these days. A $15 fee will cover
the cost of green fees and
tournament expenses. A variety of
tee times beginning in the early
afternoon will be available for
both days. Bradford Creek Golf
Club rules require participants to
wear a collared shirt. Required
footwear is soft spikes and tennis
shoes.
Prizes will be awarded for the
lowest score in the men's and
women's divisions. All scorecards
should be turned in to 128
Student Recreations Center by no
later than 5 p.m. on Wednesday,
April 22. Participants may use
their own clubs or may check out
a set from the Customer Service
Desk in the Student Recreation
Center. Among the top players
expected to return are last year's
co-champions Jason Conner and
Todd Rademacher as well as
Chris Corrada and Grant
McMasters who were at the top of
the leader board last year.
However, there has also been
considerable rumor that
Intramural megastar Vu "Hole In
One" Donie will be retiring from
basketball and playing this event
as a warm up before joining the
PGA Tour. Other infamous
participants expected to hit the
links include Jeremy "Sand Trap
Magnet" Howard" and Shannon
"Waterlogged" Cowan. This
tourney provides an excellent
opportunity to enjoy the beautiful
weather that has descended early
on Eastern North Carolina. Golf is
a sport for all ages, interests, and
skill levels. So get into the swing
of things, and register for the
annual Recreational Services Golf
Tournament. For further
information, please contact Bobby
Woodard at Recreational Services
at 328-6387.
THE PLACE
FOR ALL YOUR
PET'S NEEDS
3I40A Moseley Or.
fBehind Parker's BBQ on
Greenville Blvd.) 0
758-6603 �
Mon -Sat: 11 to 7
Sunday: I to 5
Aquariums & Supplies
Saltwater and Freshwater fish
Reptiles, Small Animals, and Supplies
Live and Frozen Food
Tank Maintenance and Leasing Available
FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF
SILVER
JEWELRY
EASTER
atalog
Connection
n.v.sionOf miLiS.
210 E. 5th St.
758-8612
HARLEY-DAVIDSDN
1 6 YEARS
in Service
Motorcycle Sale
and Service
J&E Harley Davidson
lOOB DlCKENSON AVE.
END OF 10TH ST.
757-1345
Leathei
� Collectibles
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
108 River Bluff Rd.
Across from Trade MartABC
Store on E. 10th ST.
7S7 - 2471
Discount
Rates
5x10 -$24.M
6x10 -6.��
7x10-$30.M
8x8 - 8.
10x10 - $32-M
10x12 -$44.��
RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGES
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD RESTAURANT
Featuring appetizers, salads, sandwiches
and freshly made soups and desserts.
Grilled entrees including steaks, seafood,
pork, and chicken also unique pasta dishes
WATCH YOUR FAVORITE SPORTS EVENTS
Bring your family, office group, dinner
date, or just meet friends for neighborhood
hospitality and the easy side of life. ,
LIVE JAZZ
Saturday nights
Full service catering and banquet
facilities available
call for details 355- 7956
Turnbury Square Shopping Center
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BULLET
Doors open: 7:30 pm
Stage Time: 9:00 pm
X"
m9L "Touch OfCfosk"
756-6278
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
"Skylor"
10 OR MORE
GIRL DANCERS
EVERY NIGHT!
x
X-
X
X'
X-
X-
X-
X-
X
Located 5 miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt. (Behind Aladdin Services & Limo) )
t-Mrer
�EMOOM
2 bedroom units contain
1050 square feet
WILSON
ACRES
APARTMENTS
752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, NC 27858-0772
3 bedroom units contain
1350 square feet
These units contain a self cleaning oven, a large frost-free refrigerator,
dishwasher, washerdryer connections, utility room, large patio with private fence, extra
outdoor lighting and deadboK locks on all doors for added security, wallpapered bath-
rooms and celling fans.
All units have large walk In closets and storage areas
� . as indicated by the diagonal lines .
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � l'2Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU
WITH BUS SERVICE
AVAILABLE
II Thursday, Apr
RINGGOI
Now Taki
1 bedroom
Efficiency
CALL
"EL ROLANDC
CIOUS example
architecture. 4 t
fenced yards, wi
liage, near ECU I
524-5790
WALK TO ECU.
room unitshou
July, or Aug cal
TWO BEDROOI
with shady fenci
neighborhood, o
Two blocks from
monthly. Pets w(
TOWNHOUSE
room, 2 12 ba
washer, dryer,
6505. Available r.
SUMMER Dl!
HOUSE AT Twir
1st. $595 montt
June through A
baths, fireplace,
hook-up. Deposi
Martin at 752-28!
ROOMMATE W
2 bedroom, 2 bi
from campus. 3!
leave message.
ROOMMATE
SMOKER and
ferred. 10 min
Greenville Blvd.
you need is a b
2447.
PEONY OARI
ROOM 1 12 bi
Stove, Refrige
Washer & Dryer,
Sewer, Wainrigr
ment LLC 756-62
PARK VILLAGI
apartments $300
erator, Washer D
ECU bus route
Wainright Prope
756-6209.
NO DEPOSIT, ;
bath, cable and w
Acres Apartment
754-8315 and ask
MOVING TO
school or work
and Referral !
that move �
packet with r
ed tours of G
rental proper
more. Call S
http:www.ra
lenc.com for m
FORREST ACRI
room $300-$345
Free Water & Se
ute, Wainright P
LLC 756-6209.
FOR RENT: FOl
close to campus,
place, fenced in
for info. ASAP, 8:
FEMALE ROO
ASAP to share
brand new apart
Call 752-9703
FEMALE ROOIv
share 2 BR 1
$225, 12 phone
Route. Call Laur
May 1st.
CYPRESS GAF
room condos on
ble and water si
to ECU students
tract. Call Wainri
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COI
townhouses on
cable. Half montl
on new one-yea
right Property M
Got Som
Need soi
eas





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Confidential
inseling
Center
3d
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URANT
niches
serfs,
eafood,
a dishes
SVENTS
linner
borhood
life. '
net
iter
278
& Limo) X'

i
s contain
s feet
nee, extra
ed bath
11 Thursday, April 9, 1998
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, SPA-
CIOUS example of Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3
fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty fo-
liage, near ECU & PCMH, $999month.
524-5790
WALK TO ECU, 1, 2, 3,4 and 5 bed-
room unitshouses; available June,
July, or Aug call 321-4712.
TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX FOR rent
with shedy fenced backyard. Pleasant
neighborhood, one mile from campus.
Two blocks from the Purple Line. $400
monthly. Pets welcome. 931-9014.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bed-
room, 2 12 bath Sheraton Village,
washer, dryer, $650. Sheldon, 353-
6505. Available May 1.
SUMMER DISCOUNT) TOWN-
HOUSE AT Twin Oaks. Available June
1st. $595 month discounted to $424
June through August. 3 BRs, 2 12
baths, fireplace, patio, washerdryer
hook-up. Deposit. No pets. Call Will
Martin at 752-2851. Thanks.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom, 2 bath duplex 5 minutes
from campus. 321-8872 after 6 PM or
leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. NON-
SMOKER and responsible, 20 pre-
ferred. 10 min. from campus off
Greenville Blvd. Asking 12 bills. All
you need is a bed. Call Jeff, 919-496-
2447.
PEONY GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM 1 12 bath apartments $375.
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Washer & Dryer, Free Cable, Water &
Sewer, Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
CANNON COURT ft CEDAR
COURT, Two bedroom, 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Washer & Dryer Connections. Wain-
right Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
ATTENTION! 11 TOWNHOUSE
AVAILABLE TO sublet for summer. 1-
4 rooms available. $220month, depos-
it negotiable. Includes ac, washerdry-
er, pool, exercise-room and more. Call
355-8384 and leave message.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE FOR rent
across from the Art Building, 2 blocks
from downtown. Available in May.
Wonderful house to live in. Pets nego-
tiable. 758-1152.
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH duplex, 4
blocks from ECU, all appliances, fire-
place, wd hookups, rear patio, central
heatair. Available now, $550month.
Call 758-1921.
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. near ECU, only $375 per
month, 900 sq.ft. Free basic cable, wa-
tersewer, all appliances, pets O.K. Call
758-1921.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR rent, Wood-
cliff Apts. Washer and dryer hookup, 3
blocks from campus. Assume lease.
Call Michael, 522-4583, leave mes-
sage.
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, 3 min-
utes to GCB and REC-Center, $335
(incl. cable). Call 329-0538 (sublease
for May and June option to contin-
ue).
sSfe
Wftn prawntaUon0� this coupon, �ne wpI'M j
4JSMS not valW with nay oth�r coupon
�WESUV commo south: 1 or a bedrooms, i
i bath, range. retogeraror, free watersewer
wasrwmryer hookups, free basic cable in
some units, laundry facilities. 5 blocks from!
campus, ECU bus services.
�UNoaTON park 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
range, refrigerator dishwasher, freer
waterSewer, and basic cable, appro, gooi
sq. sA, washerdryer 'hookups, central'
heatair, 6 blocks from campus.
COMW.ETH.Y RENOVATED UNITSAVAILABLE. j
-All Pivpsnms have 24 hr emergency mamlonanco- j
onogemenr
PARK VILLAGE ONE BEDROOM
apartments $300. With Stove, Refrig-
erator, Washer Dryer Connections, On
ECU bus route free water & sewer,
Wainright Property Management LLC
756-6209.
NO DEPOSIT, 2 BEDROOM, 1 12
bath, cable and water included. Wilson
Acres Apartments. Rent by 5198. Call
754-8315 and ask for Dawn Bivens.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE FOR
school or work? Homo Relocation
and Referral Service can make
that mova easier! Relocation
packets with rental listings, guid-
ed tours of Greenville and area
rental properties, plua much
more. Call 830-5559 or visit
http:www.relocatetogreenvil-
lanc.com for more information.
FORREST ACRES ONE It two bed-
room $300-$345, Stove, Refrigerator,
Free Water & Sewer, On ECU Bus Ro-
ute, Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
FOR RENT: FOUR BEDROOM house
close to campus, half off deposit. Fire-
place, fenced in yard. Great area. Call
for info. ASAP, 830-4943.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP to share 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
brand new apartment. Must love petsl
Call 752-9703
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 2 BR 1 12 bath townhouse,
$225, 12 phoneutilities. On ECU Bus
Route. Call Laura, 756-7128. Need for
May 1st.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
FOR SALE
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 9'0" long-
board. Excellent condition, $225 OBO.
Call Mark at 758-7067.
SONY CAR STEREO CASSETTE
player for sale, 20 x 4 watts, perfect
condition. Call Man at 328-7677 to
make an offer.
RAM-72PIN SIMMS SONS NONE
DO. Two 8-meg Simms. $15ea or $25
for both. Call Manny 252-527-5237 or
e-mail ici1420@mail.icomnet.com
ONE YONEX RD-7 FOR $60 and one
Head Radical for $60. Excellent condi-
tion. Also Head tennis bag, $30. Call
353-1606, ask for Michael.
LARGE DORM ROOM REFRIGERA-
TOR, one year old, like new. For infor-
mation, call 328-7843.
DAYBED FOR SALE, WHITE, good
condition, as is. Includes mattress.
$225. Call 353-5623 before 3:00PM.
Must pick-up Thursday, April 9 after
6:00PM I
48666 WITH SVGA MONITOR,
sound card, modem MS Word, Excel
and other software. $400 OBO. Call
830-1223 or
chboyd@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
19" TV $90; SONY mini-stereo, $60;
Sony Playstation with 2 pads, TV-con-
nector and NFL Gameday 98, $125
($105 without Gameday). Call 329-
0538.
HELP WANTED
WANTED: FULL-TIME CHILD care
provider to care for infant in our resi-
dence. Child oriented degreeinterest.
Experience helpful. Safe driving
record, own transportation, non-smok-
er, swimming skills, CPR certified a
plus. Beginning JulyAugust weekly
8:00-6:00. Salary $300social security &
paid vacation. Also needed, student
with similar majorinterest & qualifica-
tions to care for 1st grader after school
beginning August weekly 3:15 to 6:15.
Salary $100.00social security. Please
send letter specifying position sought
and qualificationsinterest with phone
no. to "Nanny Post Office Box 8088,
Greenville, NC 27835.
TRAVEL EUROPE ft WORK -
TEACH BASIC CONVERSATIONAL
ENGLISH IN PRAGUE, BUDAPEST
& KRAKOW. COMPETITIVE WAG-
ES BENEFITS. ASK US HOWI
(S17) 336-0629 EXT. K53621
TRAVEL ABROAD WORK-TEACH
BASIC CONVERSATIONAL ENG-
LISH IN JAPAN, TAIWAN S. KO-
REA. MANY POSITIONS REQUIRE
NO FOREIGN LANGUAGE OR
TEACHING CERTIFICATION. EX-
CELLENT EARNINGSBENEFITS
POTENTIAL. ASK US HOWI
(617)324-3126 EXT. JB3621.
SURVEYORS WANTED. ECU
TRANSIT is looking for students to
administer surveys the last week of
April. Applications are available at
Mendenhall Student Center Informa-
tion Desk.
SUMMER JOBSI APPLY NOW! Ac-
cepting application for bartenders and
waitstaff. Full and part-time, flexible
schedules available. Send resume or
apply in person at The Reef Restau-
rant, PO Box 2772, Atlantic Beach, NC
28512, 919-726-3500.
STUDENT NEEDED TO HELP keep
our 2 year old daughter 10-15 hours
per week. Can be flexible in schedul-
ing. Will need to be available during
summer as well. For interview, leave
message at 931-7439.
SALES FOOD COUNSELOR. EX-
CELLENT opportunity for self driven
individuals who like being rewarded
well for working smart. Earn 40-60K in
your first year. Must have a very flexi-
ble schedule with the ability to work
nightsweekends. Call Bill at Rich Food
Services, Inc 823-2764.
RALEIGH AREA SUMMER JOBS.
$280wk-$422wk plus bonuses! 11 Hir-
ing crew leaders and crew painters.
Most openings filled by local students,
so call Collegiate House Painters today
at 919-460-60611 We'll do interviews
on your campus-no need to come
home to find a job. We are not one of
those student franchise companiesl
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7686.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
FIND OUT WHY MICROSOFT, Xer-
ox, & P&G recruit our students. 2.8
GPA & good work ethic required. Make
$580wk. Call 919-933-7716.
EARN S7S0-S1600WEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment &
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
CAROUNA POOL MANAGEMENT,
INC. now hiring for summer 1998.
Pool managers, lifeguards, swim in-
structors. Charlotte, Raleigh, Greens-
boro, NC; Greenville, SC; Columbia,
SC. For information, (704)889-4439
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FI-
NANCIAL PlanningInvestment and
Insurance. Northwestern MutualRo-
bert O. Baird is accepting applications
for our summer training school. Check
out our web site www.northwestern-
mutual.com and send resume to 217
Commerce St Greenville, NC 27858.
CAMP PWEW00D
COUNsllSrlrTTftcTORS
for private Co-ed
youth camp located in the beautiful
mountains of Western North Carolina.
Over 25 activities, Including All sports.
water skiing, heated pod, terns, art,
horseback, Goarts.
616 to 817Earn $1300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers callfor
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
high energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
R0. Box 370
Cove City. 28523
Mail or Fax Resume. ASAP
Fax: 252 637 2125
(Near Greenville. Kinston,
New Bern)
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext. 1 A.S.A.P.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing informa-
tion, 800-662-2122.
SERVICES
ECU PT PROGRAM IS holding a
massage clinic Wednesday, April 15
from 5-9PM at the Belk Bldg. on Cha-
rles Blvd. Advance tickets: $310 min.
Look for us selling tickets on campus.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROUNA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-2224
LIFEGUARDS WANTED. MUST BE
18 or older. Certifications required.
Call 321-0725.
HIGH ADVENTURE GUIDES SUM-
MER Employment -Eastern North Car-
olina Boy Scout camp needs kayaking,
canoeing and sailing high adventure
guides. Other camp staff positions
available. Eagle Scouts and persons
with a scouting background preferred.
References required. Salary, room and
board included. Call 919-946-4085.
GRADY WHITE BOATS IS looking
for a part-time accountant. This indi-
vidual will do general accounting and
some cost accounting. Excellent re-
sume builder. Some experience pre-
ferred. Please contact Jamie Wilson at
752-2111.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME YOUR sore, ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur needs
your back to practice on. Call Kyle 1-
800-484-8546(code 2465) or POBox
8663, Greenville, NC 27835
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD
like to wish everyone a safe and happy
Easter Break. Love, the sisters of Gam-
ma Sigma Sigma
GREEK PERSONALS
THANK YOU SIGMA, ALPHA Xi
Delta, and Zeta for attending our social
Saturday night with the brothers of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon from all over
North Carolina. We all had a great time
and hope to do it agein next year.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We N�4 T?�nJr�ri�d boot
mtd shoe) Good Jewru. �;
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
Th Etst Carolinian
THANK YOU ALPHA PHI for the
Easter basket. We hope to see you
guys soon. Love, the sisters and new
member of Sigma Sigma Sigma
SIGMA PHI EPSILON-FLASH Back
to the Eighties was a blast. We missed
hanging out with you guys, can't wait
to do it again I Love, Chi Omega
PI KAPPA ALPHA, THE social last
night was a blast. We always have so
much fun with you guysl Love, the sis-
ters and new members of Sigma Sig-
ma Sigma
PHI KAPPA TAU - Thursday night
was greatl We loved hanging out with
your guysl Can't wait until next time!
Love, the sisters of Chi Omega
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA-WE had a
great time getting crazy at the Elbo.
We can't wait to get together again
soonl Love, Chi Omega
KAPPA SIGMA, PI KAPPA Phi, Pi
Kappa Alpha, Alpha Xi Delta, and Sig-
ma Sigma Sigma, we had a great time
at the social last Thursday! Love, Al-
pha Delta Pi
ALPHA OMICRON PI WANTS to
give a sincere congratulations to all
the newly initiated officers. We are all
looking forward to a great year next
year. ,
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAKGRAD WEEK "98
Cheap ratesl www.we-can.comsand-
trap - N. Myrtle Beach. 800-645-3618.
Student representative neededl
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings. �
PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
AVAILABLE for students who want to
, travel, earn money, and gain valuable
resume experience. For more informa-
tion, call 1-800-251-4000 ext. 1576.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. CREDIT
CARD FUNDRAISERS FOR FRATERNI-
TIES, SORORITIES & GROUPS. ANY
CAMPUS ORGANIZATION CAN RAISE
UP TO $1000 BY EARNING A WHOP-
PING $5.00VISA APPLICATION. CALL
1-800-932-0528 EXT. 65. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE FREE T-SHIRT.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bill.s Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
VOLLEY FOR HEALTH! THE Ronald
McDonald House will be teaming up
with the NC Physical Therapy Associa-
tion (NCPTA) to host the third annual "
Volley for Health" tournament on Sat-
urday, April 25th at North Pitt High
School in Bethel from 8:00am-5:00pm.
Entrance fees are $100 for any 4-per-
son team and $150 for any 6-person
team playing competitive or recrea-
tional volleyball. All teams are encour-
aged to raise more than the minimum
donation fee and the team who raises
the most money will recaive special
recognition. Local sponsors will also
help in raising money and they will be
listed on tournament t shirts which are
provided to all participants free of
charge. Proceeds will be divided bet-
ween the NCPTA and the Ronald Mc-
Donald House.
TUE APRIL 7-JUNIOR Recital,
Brandy Binkley, soprano, Patrick
Howie, tenor, A.J.Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00PM. Tue April7-Junior Recital,
Cecil Allen Rascoe, Jr baritone,
AJ.FIetcher Recital Hall, 9:00PM.
Wed April 8-Contemporary Jazz En-
semble, Paul Tardif, Director,
AJ.FIetcher Recital Hall, 8:00PM.
Thurs April 9-Junior Recital, Walter
Matthew King, tenor, AJ.FIetcher Reci-
tal Hall, 9:00PM. Mon April 13-Faculty
Recital, Britton Theurer, trumpet,
AJ.FIetcher Recital Hall, 8:00PM
THE GREATER GREENVILLE
WOMAN'S Club would like to thank Pi
Kappa Phi for their help during the
Shopping Spree on March 27 and 28.
Their help was greatly appreciated. '
gj
THE ECU LAW SOCIETY will meet
Thura April 9th at 7PM in Raw! Room
1021 Anyone Interested in learning
more about law or law school ia invit-
ed I Open to all majorsi
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:30-5:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment is offering the following work-
shop on April Bth. If you are interested
in this workshop, contact the Center at
328-8661. W
.fin J
RESUME WORKSHOPS AND CM- '
TIQUES. Students who need help in
writing a resume are invited to attend
a workshop today, April 9 at 3:00 or
April 21 at 4:00PM. if you already have
a resume and would like to have it cri-
tiqued, please come by Career Servic- -
es on Tue. April 14 at 3:00PM.
PHI SIGMA PI PRESENTS Easter
Seals-UCP Softball Tournament April
18th and 19th. Co-ed teems only. Call
830-5481 or 551-6789, respond by
April 15th.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOPS �
Seniors and graduate students com-
pleting their degrees in May or the
summer are invited toattend an inter-
view skills workshop on Wed April 8
at 4:00 or Thurs. April 16 at 3:00. Spon-
sored by Career. Services, the work-
shops will be held at Career Services,
701 E. Fifth Street. No pre-registration
is required.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet Tues- - j
day April 14 at 5:30 in Speight Aud. in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Building.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH WOULD like for you to join
us on Easter Sunday at 8:30 a.m. or
11:00 a.m. for a Special Resurrection I
Service. James p. Corbett, Pastor,
1104 N. Memorial Drive, Greenville.
752-5683 a
CHOOSING A MAJOR OR A Cereer
Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-5:00. The j
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this work-
shop on April 14th. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
BRYAN ADRIAN BASKETBALL
CAMP. Final registration is now being
held for the 20th Annual Bryan Adrian
Basketball Camp. Boys and Girts ages
5-18 are eligible. Locations include ,
Rocky Mount NC: Charlotte, NC; Ra-
leigh, NC; Hickory, NC and Elkin, NC.
Included ion fea) 1998 Summer Camp
staff are: JenMRackhouse (Pro), Steve
Wojciechowefr (Duke), Shammond
Williams (UNC-CH), Matt Harpring (GA
Tech), C.C. Harrison (NC State), Nor-
man Nolan (UVA). For a free brochure
call 704372-3236 anytime.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP: TUESDAY 3:30-4:30.
The Center for Counseling and Stud- � -
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on April 14th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center et 328-6661.
ADVENTURE: SPEND THE DAY
with nature�Join us for a kayaking
trip down Alligator River. The trip is
Sunday, April 19 from 6AM-6PM, but .
you must register no later than '
Thursday, April 9th. The cost is $25 for
students and SRC membera$35 for
non-students, and this includes trans-
portation, equipment, and leaders.
Call 328-6387 for more info.
ADULT STUDENT DISCUSSION
GROUP: Monday 5:15-6:15. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment is offering the following work-
shp on April 13th. if you are interested
in this workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661.
I I) I
VI" S II I) P
Got Something to say?
Need somewhere to say it?
Write a Letter to the
Editor and let your
view be
heard!
east&roliniaii
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The Student Publications Building
WWW.TEC.ECU
I





17 Thursday, April 9. 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
Now that we have your
on.
KM SOCIETY OF
�&A PROFESSIONAL
U JOURNALISTS
Region 2 Mark of Excellence
Best ALL-AROUND Non-Daily Newspaper
F place TEC
Sports Reporting
2nd place Amanda Ross
3rd place Tracy Laubach
In-Depth Reporting
3rd place Christin Cadle
3rd place Frank Hendricks
3rd place Mario Scherhaufer
3rd place Todd Jones
STUDENT HOUSING
GETS NO BETTER!
NEW STUDENT
CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURES
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
�3 BATHROOMS
3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
�WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�SELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
�SAVE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
CHECK THESE NUMBERS:
UNITS AVAILABLE 24
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICE(ist 12 units)$91,500'
DOWN PAYMENT & CLOSING COSTS: (could be less than)$5,000' �
MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSE: (could be less than
WITH 2 ROOMMATES - EXCLUDING UTILITIES COST)$ 1 00"
COST SAVINGS TO PARENTS FOR 4 YEARS: (COULD be more than
ESTIMATED 3 ANNUAL APPRECIATED VALUE PLUS RENTAL SAVINGS)$21,000"
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF NOT
DISCUSSING THIS WITH YOUR PARENTS.
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 1998!
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL RESERVE YOUR UNIT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
ONLY 24 UNITS
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICE MAY BE CHANGED WITHOUT NOTICE
'ABOVE CALCULATION ARE NOT GUARANTEED BUT IIELIEVE TO BE
unit plan 1 230 sq. ft.
directions to site
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
wishes to announce the following
HoJy Thursday Services (April 9) 7:30 PM at St. Peter's Church
Good Friday Services (April 10) 12:15 PM Outdoor Stations of the Cross at St. Peter's
7:30, PM Good Friday Liturgy and Communion
Service at St. Peter's
Saturday Easter VTgB Service (April 11) 8:00 PM at St. Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses (April 12) 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM at the Newman Center,
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
;Sc Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th Street)
Need A
Summer Job?
If you will be a returning student in the fall and are looking
for a summer job, UHS will be hiring students to assist with
our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to paint, inspect, repair, and renovate residence
hall rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance and UHS Facilities
Management will provide training and supervision. General
knowledge of basic carpentry skills, painting, installation of
hardware, measuring and fitting components is required.The
program will be approximately 10 weeks.This is an
opportunity to have personal training and learn
successful skills in a hands-on experience. Full-
time, 40 hour positions at $5.95 per
hour will be offered.To pick up or
submit a completed application, please
come by University Housing Services
Office Suite 100, Jones Hall between 8-
5pm M-F. Selection will begin on April
24,1998. Notification of successfull
applicants will occur prior to April 30.
COULD YOU USE SOME
EXTRA MONEY?
Well, you might already have
"the ticket" to a few extra
bucks in your pocket - just in
time for the holiday weekend.
The FIONA APPLE ticket, that
is.
REMINDER: The deadline is
Thursday, April 9, 6:00 p.m
for ticket refunds on the re-
cently cancelled concert. To
get your refund, bring your
ticket(s) to the Central Ticket
Office-Mendenhall, Monday-
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
and you will get your money
back.





PPVPMHP
� Student Health says
communication
best prevention
�80 freshmen
sexually active
� Third highest NC AIDS
rate in Pitt County
� Abstinence stiP alive
on college campus


J





2 Thursday, April 9,1998
'PC US
���
The East Carolinian
"i 3 Thursday
Health educators
work for
STD education
Student Health says
communication best
prevention
LAI REN CARRIER
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
The best type of sexual
prevention can't be bought at a
drug store; there is no
prescription for it. The best
prevention against sexually
transmitted diseases (STD) is
communication.
Heather Zophy, health
educator at Student Health
Services, said, "There is never
enough communication between
partners Proper communication
involves discussing protection
methods and one another's
sexual history before becoming
sexually active. Remaining
honest and open throughout the
relationship is another step.
A graduate of ECU, and former
Pirate cheerleader, Zophy now
works to educate students and
provide them with health
information.
She believes that this type of
communication can lead to a
decline in the percentage of
individuals with STDs.
Now, ECU's percentage of
students with STD's is average
for a college campus this size.
Although, the exact percentage of
ECU students who have
5 Easy Steps To STD Prevention
W.�Communicate with your partner about your sexual history and
concerns before engaging in sexual intercourse, and continue to do so
throughout the relationship
Q�I ,jmit your number of sexual partners
w?�Always use latex or polyurethane condoms
C�Regular screening for you and your partner because symptoms
may not appear until months after exposure
Gf�Avoid mixing sexual activities with alcohol and drugs
����Remember, abstinence is the only way you can be positively safe, but
following these steps properly will place you closer to that goal
STDs . is
unknown,
Zophy says that
about one out of
every four
students across
the nation has
an STD,
whether they
are aware of it or
not.
Although, communication is
crucial, it is not enough. Other
prevention methods include:
abstinence, the use of latex or
polyurethane condoms,
monogamy and a limited number
of sexual partners, and students
should not share needles or
razors. Zophy says STD
prevention also includes being
aware of the risk factors that are
involved when mixing alcohol
and other drugs with any type of
sexual activity. All of these
methods will help protect an
individual against STD's as a
whole, yet all
STD's are different.
Therefore, students need to
educate themselves about them,
Zophy says.
For example, chlamydia,
trichomonas, hepatitis-B,
gonorrhea, and the human
immunodeficiency virus or HIV
are the most easily contracted
since all that needs to be involved
is skin to skin contact. So don't
count on a
condom alone
to protect you.
If you are
sexually active,
you may need
to be regularly
screened1 for
these viruses.
The skin
diseaserscabies,
also known as
"itch mites
can most
effectively be
prevented by
good personal
hygiene and
regular screening as we'll,
For further information or
questions the National STD
Hotline is available Monday to
Friday from 8 a.m. until 11 p.m. at
1-800-227-8922.
The Student Health Services is
(above, top) Heather Zophy teaches a class on STD's.
(above, bottom) Student Health services provides testing
PHOTOS BV SAM SNYDER AND CLAY BUCK
regarding STD concerns.
Zophy stresses the importance
of STD prevention and effective
communication to her caller. She
says that not knowing enough
about your partner can only lead
to complications in the future.
"They think they know each
also a good resource. Zophy is ()thcr so intimately, yet they tail to
constantly receiving phone calls talk� says Zophy
at her office and even at her home
More STD's for
college age
than any other
In Pitt County, the distribution of
STDs in 1997 were as follows:
AIDSSyphilisGonorrheaChlamydia
3711548540
80 percent of freshman
sexually active
Bkth Junes
mii i s sn:thin WHITER
Sexually transmitted diseases
affect college students more than
any other age group. Sixty-three
percent of those infected are
under the age of 25.
As far as ECU is concerned, it
is no different than any of the
other colleges in the nation, and
is up to the national average in
statistics. Out of 820 first year
students surveyed, over 80
percent are sexually active, but
only 44 percent of those reported
using condoms.
According to Heather Zophy,
student health educator, one out
of four college students is
infected with an STD. "ECU
runs neither above nor below the
national average. We run right
along the curve with the other
universities in the nation she
said.
Although ECU cannot give out
specific figures, Zophy said the
two most common STDs among
campuses are gonorrhea and
chlamydia. "Although it is
unfortunate to have such a high
level of any two STDs, these are
the two most treatable she said.
Gonorrhea and chlamydia are
both caused by a bacteria and can
be treated by simple medication
available at the Student Health
Center. "It is hard to be accurate
when reporting the numbers of
STDs because 70-80 percent of
women have'no symptoms she
said.
Zophy said she sees everything
from herpes to genital warts.
Although there are no specific
numbers on AIDS patients
because of the absence of
treatment at ECU, she said there
are students presently who are
infected.
With gonorrhea specifically, 75
percent of women have no
symptoms as opposed to only one
percent of men. Seventy-five
percent of chlamydia's female
victims are asymptomatic and 25
percent of men are
asymptomatic. The most
sobering fact is that chlamydia
attacks four million people every
year and infects 30 percent of
sexually active college students,
yet many of them don't know it
until it is too late. Either the
disease has progressed and
caused more damage or they have
spread it among many others.
The Pitt County Public
Health Department reports that
there are 35-50 different STDs
that exist. "In fact, North
Carolina is ranked first in the
numbers of people with
gonorrhea in the nation and
either second or third in
syphilis Zophy said. And the
United States had the highest
rate of AIDS in the industrial
world where one out of every
250 people are infected.
In the state specifically the
Health Department reported
that 1,905 were infected with
gonorrhea and 1,829 with
chlamydia in 1997. The age
group affected the most with
both diseases was the range of
15-29. Once again it includes the
college-age students and even
younger.
Kelly Knox, assistant health
educator, attributes the high
statistics to the undetectable
symptoms. "Because so many
people are asymptomatic, those
who are unaware continue to
spread the diseases at high rates.
Until more education on
prevention are available, this
problem will continue she said.
In the general population, some of
the following facts are present for
the sexually active:
One out of five Americans have an STD
20 percent of the population have herpes
40 percent have chlamydia
33 percent of women have genital warts
20 percent of AIDS victims contracted it in
their teens
110-220 people in the US are infected with
AIDS everyday
east!carolinian
AmyRoyster
Editor-in-Chief
Heather Burgess
Managing Editor
Celeste Wilson
Cover and Layout Design
focuS
Focus is a combined effort between The East Carolinian
and Shearlean Duke's Basic Reporting class in the
Department of Communication.





3 Thursday. April 9,1998
focilS
The Eist Carolinian
STD, HIV testing
readily available
in Pitt County
Chlamydia
Tests available at
Student Health Services
Time for
. � i��
Gonorrhea
Syphilis
Genital Warts (HPV)
Testing available at
Health Department
Dana Ga jowski
K)CI S SKI.IION WRITER
The usual reaction for one
entering Student Health Services
can be getting nervous and
questions racing through one's
head. More questions and more
nerves can be activated if the test
is for a sexually transmitted
disease.
STDs are transmitted through
unprotected oral,vaginal, or anal
intercourse with an infected
partner. The more sexual partners
a person has, the greater the
likelihood of disease transmission
although an STD can be
transmitted with oife encounter
"Confidentially is assured said
Heather Zophy, student health
services educator. "Educators arc
on a mission. In the case of positive
results information is readily
available and a health care provider
will explain options, while making
the student feel more comfortable
and at ease Zophy said.
The Student Health Service
offers all STD tests except for the
HIV test. Tests range in pricing
Genital Herpes (HSV)
Hepatitis B
$5
$5
$5
no charge
$29
$100
4
48 hours
48 hours
2-3 days (blood test)
on site
2-3 days (blood test)
2-3 days (blood test)
form $5 tp $100 and result time
varies from on the spot to three
days. HIV tests are available at no
cost at the Pitt County
Department of Health and results
may take up to two weeks.
Students should consider
screening if they have ever shared
IV drug needles, had unprotected
sex or had oral sex or anal sex with
someone with a history of STDs.
Also, any one who has had
intercourse under the influence of
alcohol or other drugs and doesn't
recall the incident, should be
tested.
Information on symptoms,
treatments, complications,
transmission, prevention and
procedures is available at the SHS
in a pamphlet called "What you
need or know about STDs &
Screening
SHS . is doing everything
possible to increase awareness and
education. "STDs are often a-
symptomatic, and can be spread
during that time unconsciously,
students should be tested if they
are at risk" said Kelly Knox,
assistant health educator.
SHS offers a wide variety of
services at a reasonable cost, which
is important to students on a
budget. You can contact SHS for
an appointment at 328-6317
Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday 9 a.m. to 12
p.m. and Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. For questions about health
education or testing call 328-6794.
One may ask to speak to a
health care provider for "personal
reasons" to ensure confidentiality,
and specify preference for a male
or female provider. To contact the
Pitt County Department of Health
for an HIV test you can call 413-
1300 and the National STD hot
line at 1-800-227-8922 Monday-
Friday 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Saved sex becoming
common among
college students
JAM I SHKPPARD
KM I s SKI I ION V Rll KR
You live in a sexually-oriented
society. Pick up any magazine
and look at an ad. Sex sells. Turn
on the TV. Sex means higher
ratings. And in college almost
every aspect of life is dominated
by sex. In health classes you arc-
drilled about safer sex (notice no
one calls it safe sex anymore).
But what about "saved sex"?
"Saved sex" or abstinence
won't be found in magazines or
on TV. But for a growing number
of college students, saved sex is
becoming a way of life.
Abstaining from sex before
marriage is an alternative for
some students who are worried
about sexually transmitted
diseases, unwanted pregnancy,
and emotional devastation.
"Until I find that one person I
can trust, I'll wait because having
sex with someone takes a part of
me and I can never get it back
said ECU junior Barbra King, a
theatre major.
One in five people are
presently infected with a STD.
Eighty percent do not know of
their condition, and have passed
it on to others, two-thirds of all
STDs occur in people under 25,
according to the Medical
Institute of Sexual Health.
"Statistics don't surprise me so
why put myself at risk? I can't
prove anything by sleeping
around said junior Mike
Rollins, a biology major.
According to a study by Dr.
Paul C. Reisser with Focus on the
Family, only two STDs were
present in 1965 and both could be
treated with penicillin if caught
in time. Now, more than 25
diseases exist that get stronger
everyday and have cures that are
even harder to find.
Safer sex proposes limiting the
still alive on college campus
7
number of partners one has,
which means fewer exposures to
potentially fatal diseases, but a
lethal disease can be transmitted
by a single sexual contact with
one infected partner, according to
Reisser.
Knowing something about a
person's sexual history and
avoiding sex with someone who
has had many partners can help,
but how far can you trust
someone especially if that person
has something to hide?
"If I ' was faithful and my
partner wasn't, he not only would
trample on my heart but could
kill me in the process said
senior Kathy Tcmpleton, a dance
major.
Even if you use a condom, you
can't be completely safe because
condoms have a 17 percent
failure rate, according to Karen
Jones, anatomy and physiology
professor at Pitt Community
College.
Since condoms are not 100
percent effective, not only can
you contract a sexually
transmitted disease, but also you
could get pregnant.
According to Reisser, more
than 40 percent of America's
unwanted pregnancies begin
even though some kind of birth
control is being used. There are
"Sex affects
relationships creating a
powerful bond between
two people, but can still
result in a broken heart if it
occurs before marriage
said Jones also an
abstinence educator.
Blake Honeycutt,
executive of the Carolina
Pregnancy Center said
"There is not a condom for
emotions. Birth control
no quick fixes where human life can fail. The only thing
is concerned.
According to the U.S.
Department of Health and
Human Service, getting pregnant
and catching diseases aren't the
only way sex can hurt you. Even
if you are "lucky" after practicing
"safe sex premarital sex can
leave emotional scars that you'll
feel for the rest of vour life.
truly safe is abstinence.
A second sexual
revolution may be
beginning on college
campuses and it's all about
being safe not sorry.
The Carolina Pregnancy
Center welcomes opportunities
to give abstinence presentations
to any campus groups. Services
Jami Sheppard speaks to students about
abstinence and saved sex throughout the county as
well as on campus.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
are free of charge. Appointments
can be set through Blake
Honeycutt at 757-0003.
NUMBER OF
SEXUAL PARTNERS
(if
SEXUAL EXPOSURE CHART
every person has only the same number of partners as you)
NUMBER OF PEOPLE
EXPOSED TO
1
8
1
?tm
fttt
mttmtmtftmtmttt
mm
tt!t!ttt�tttttt�tttt!ttt!t
ttftfttttmtttmtmtttttmt
tttttttttttttmtttttttmtttttmtttt
tmttttttttttmtttttttftmttttmmtt
tmtmttttmtttmttmttttmttt
ttmttttmtmtmtttmttttmtt
tmtttttttmtmtftttttttmtttttmtttt
15
31
63
127
255






ft
I
I
A normal spider can spin a perfect iiieb and catch a million flies.
A stoned spider can only hope the fly is stoned too.
NASA research shows how pot can effect a spider's ability to spin a web which makes you wonder just how harmless marijuana really is.
Talk to your kids about drugs.
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina J
FVmershlp fof Drug-Free Ameoc TWi
Toll Free 1-888-732-3362


Title
The East Carolinian, April 9, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 09, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1267
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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