The East Carolinian, April 7, 1998






HUBUMW
"I
east&rolinian
per
IS.
increased Alleged robbery, assault in Belk
pnvacy
fore-mail
Many pott e-mails with the misconcep-
tion that all conversations are private.
FILE PHOTO
Proposal states only
chancellor, individual
given access
Andrew LeLiever
staff writer
The, Faculty Senate recently
passed a proposal to give campus
computer users increased confiden-
tiality by decreasing access to per-
sonal files.
Previously university statutes
declared the Chancellor, and any
designee of the chancellor could
have access to any student or facul-
ty member's e-mail. The new pol-
icy states that no one has access to
an individual's e-mail except the
chancellor or that individual unless
there is cause for investigation.
Accordingly, if there is no'com-
plaint filed the persons computers
should not be tampered with by
the Chancellor, said member of the
faculty senate and head of philoso-
phy department George Bailey.
"The faculty wanted a policy
that recognized that e-mail and per-
sonal files were in fact confiden-
tial Bailey said.
Chancellor Richard Eakin spoke
to the faculty senate about the
expectations of the faculty regard-
ing confidentiality and privacy and
the fact that these rights were not
protected under the law in a public
forum like university servers.
Eakin disagreed with the faculty
senate, and maintains that he does
not want to support a false sense of
security among users of the univer-
sity server. Eakin said some people
feel his interpretation of the law is
too strict.
"I will not stand for indiscrimi-
nate monitoring of e-mail, but I
cannot endorse the policy as cur-
rently written said Eakin.
According to Ben Irons,
University attorney, the informa-
tion generated on machines owned
by the state is public record with
exception as defined by law. The
law is still being interpreted to say
just what those exceptions are.
And it seemed unfair to the faculty
and students to say there was confi-
dentiality when there is not.
"E-mail messages are not pri-
vate messages at all. Students talk
on them like talking on a tele-
phone. They should not write any-
SEE E-MAIL PAGE 4
Assailant entered
disguised in ski mask,
armed with knife
Holly Harris
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
After a semester of highly public
crimes on campus, yet another inci-
dent occurs in a campus residence
hall.
Friday night around 10 p.m stu-
dent Regginald
Redfern allegedly
entered the Belk
Residence Hall room of
two female students
disguised in a ski mask
and armed with a knife.
Redfern is 18 years
old and a resident of
Belk Residence Hall.
Redfern reportedly
assaulted one of at least
five females who were
present in the room
when the alleged rob-
bery and assault took
place. He then proceeded to steal was held up to
"The knife was held
up to the victim's neck
and she was
scratched
Mike Jordan
Detective of the university police
department
one of the
females' purse:
Detective
Mike Jordan of
the university
police depart-
ment said the
knife was
described as
being several
inches long and
was allegedly
used to assault
one of the inhabi-
tants of the room
"The knife
the victim's neck
and she was scratched Jordan
said. "He did know the victims
Redfern was arrested on
Saturday, April 4 in connection with
the incident and charged with one
count of robbery with a dangerous
weapon and one count of assault
with a deadly weapon, both of
which arc felony charges.
Jordan said no light has been
shed on Redfern's motives, and it is
not known if the act was perpetrat-
ed out of anger or desire for the
stolen property.
At this time police officials are
not able to release much informa-
tion regarding the robbery.
"This case is still under investi-
gation, we can't give out much
information, it (the motive) could
have been either way Jordan said.
Redfern has been incarcerated
in the Pitt County Jail under a
secured $26,000 bond.
He made his first appearance
before a judge Monday so that his
charges could be explained to him,
and so that he could discuss legal
options and council. His next court
date has yet to be set.
Anyone with any information
regarding this incident should call
the ECU police department at 328-
6787.
ECU ranks eighth in
south, second in state
OlWHTflrtTD
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
University excluded
from ranking on
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
According to US Nem and Worid
Reports, ECU ranks eighth among
public universities in the South.
Colleges were ranked using various
HUAtef,
Number of Professional Accredited Programs
offered by selected NC Universities:
University
criteria including reputation, the
percentage of freshmen who return
their sophomore year, percent of
entering freshmen who graduate
within six years, class size, student
to faculty ratio, acceptance rate and
alumni contributions.
In their studies, US News excludes
ECU from the national compar-
isons because it docs nor offer as
many doctoral degrees as some
other universities, such as the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
ECU has a 77 percent accep-
tance rate, higher than eight out of
11 universities in N.C. with which
it was compared.
Gerald
Clayton, associ-
ate director of
admissions, said
that ECU
accepts 2,800
students a year.
Criteria consid-
ered for accep-
tance at ECU
include a mini-
mum academic
regulation
requiring certain
course work in
high school and a
high school
unweighted GPA
minimum of 2.0.
SAT scores also
play an impor-
tant role in
acceptance as
SEE RANKINGS. PAGE 2
programstank
Cyclists often ride bicycles without i helmet without realizing the high rate of accidents that result in serious injuries and fatalities.
PHOTO BY JMMTHM MECM
Two local community groups work on
law requiring use of bicycle helmets
-5wioSrWr
West Fifth Street
renamed for MLK
City Council passes
request 5 to 1
Andrew Leliever
staff writer
Amy L. Rovster
ti�na�.m-cttf
Last night the Greenville city
council passed a request to change
West Fifth Street to Martin Luther
King Jr. Memorial Drive, in honor
of the slain civil rights leader.
The request to change the name
of West Fifth St stretching from
Evans St. to Memorial Dr passed
in a 5 to 1 vote. The only dissenting
vote came from council member
Blanche J. Forbes.
West Fifth St, first nsmed in
1772, will be dedicated in King's
memory on Jan. 18, 1999, the
anniversary of his assasination in
SEE DR. KING PAGE 5
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Helmet usage decreases
bicycle deaths, injuries
Jennv Vickers
staff writer
Between 1992 and 19, five peo-
ple were killed in bicycle crashes.
Out of 130 patients treated in 1995
at Pitt County Memorial Hospital's
emergency department for bicycle-
related injuries, the three percent
who died were not wearing bicycle
helmets. Out of 22 percent admit-
ted for serious injuries, 18 percent
were also not wearing bicycle hel-
mets.
The Pitt County Safe
Communities Coalition, one out of
two federally funded programs in
the entire country, in conjunction
with Greenville Urban Area Bicycle
Task Force, is working on ways to
decrease the number of bicycle-
related injuries. The groups plan to
design an appropriate bicycle hel-
met ordinance and bike path sys-
tem.
The various data concerning
bicycle-related incidents imply that
Pitt County has a serious problem.
"Between 1991 and 1995, 870
people from Pitt County were seen
in the PCMH emergency depart-
ment for injuries related to bicycle
use said Dr. Herb Garrison, asso-
ciate professor at the university
School of Medicine. "Eighty had
injuries severe enough to require
administration to the hospital.
About 40 percent of the injured
were between the ages of six and 15
years. Of 130 injured bicyclists
seen at the PCMH emergency
department in 1995, only six per-
cent were recorded as wearing a
helmet
The Coalition has conceived the
P.E.D.A.L initiative to prevent
bicycle injuries: parental involve-
ment, education campaign, distrib-
ution of helmets, access to bike
lanes and laws requiring helmet
use.
"Since head injuries account for
so many of the hospitalizations and
deaths related to bicycle crashes,
P.E.D.A.L has an emphasis on
improving helmet use Garrison
said.
In the entire country, 15 states
have bicycle helmet laws. Most of
the laws apply to an age group of
below 16 years of age and include
penalties such as confiscation of
bicycles and fines up to $100.
The first bicycle law, passed in
New Jersey, didn't come into effect
until 1992. Just one year after this
mandatory law was passed, fatalities
for bicyclists under age 14 dropped
by 80 percent and helmet use rose
from three percent to almost 70 per-
cent
"We are trying to figure out
what age group the ordinance
should be applied to said Ron
SEE BICYCIE PAGE 4
TODAY
Sunny
high 76
low 46
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 76
low 54
Opinion
Lifestyle
Sports
What will happen
to tradition of
Barefoot on the
Mall?
School of
Medicine sponsors
Drinkwise.
Efo
Valevich selected
Outstanding
Female Athlete
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Are you satisfied with the service you
receive from Dining Services? "
Do you feel safe in your dorm?
73WCW20WWF
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, greenville, NC 27858 across from Joyner library � newsroom 328-6366 advartiiing 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu






2 Tundiy. April 7. 1998
news
Thi East Carolinian
Small Business Institute wins award
.news
briefs
Two drug dealers
plead guilty to killing
government informant
GREENVILLE (AP) � Two drug
dealers who prosecutors say ran
hundreds of pounds of marijuana
from Texas to North Carolina in
the mid-1990s have pleaded guilty
to drug and murder charges.
1Grisham draws crowd
at UNC Literary
1Festival
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � Best-
selling author John Grisham read
from his latest novel but divulged
little about himself to a crowd of
about 3,000 at the N.C. Literary
Festival on Saturday. Grisham's
appearance Saturday on the cam-
pus of the University of North
Carolina was one of several events,
including a talk by former U.S.
Poet Laureate Rita Dove, five
panel discussions and readings by
more than SO writers at the festival,
which ends Sunday.
across1
Anheuser-Busch tries
beer for women
ST. LOUIS (AP) �Beer giant
Anheuser-Busch is offering the
ladies a drink.
The St. Louis-based brewery is
test marketing Catalina Blonde,
alow-caloric, low-alcohol beer
aimed primarily at women.
A bottle of the brew has 86 calo-
ries, about 10 fewer than any of the
company's other light beers. Its
alcohol content by volume is 2.5
percent, much less than Bud
Light's 4.2 percent and
Budweiser's 5 percent.
Elkins to help
Davis&Elkins College
sell $12 million bond
ELKINS, W.Va. (AP) � Elkins
city officials have agreed to help
Davis & Elkins College sell a new
$12 million bond issue. About $6.5
million would be used for new con-
struction on campus, including a
new gymnasium, according to col-
lege President Dorothy
MacConkey. The rest would be
used to refinance the college's out-
standing bonds.
Millikin University
formalizes exchange
with Taiwanese
University
DECATUR, III. (AP) �Millikin
University has formalized an agree-
ment to exchange students, teach-
ers and research with Tunghai
University in Taiwan. The univer-
sities' presidents Signed the agree-
ment Friday.
Ugandan army says
rebels eating abducted
villagers
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) �
Rebels in remote western Uganda
who are short on food have slaugh-
tered, cooked and eaten a number
of abducted villagers, a Ugandan
army commander said Saturday.
Students put into real
world situations
Laura Lee Hines
staff white
The ECU School of Business's
Small Business Institute (SBI)
received the "Case of the Year
Award" for the southeast region of
the U.S. and was a finalist for the
national award of the same title.
This award is presented by the
Small Business Institute Directors
Association, a professional associa-
tion for programs such as SBI.
Since 1974, this SBI-sponsored
business class has provided the
opportunity for students to analyze
local businesses and their indus-
tries. Students identify problems
with the business andor industry
and then propose a solution to the
problem.
"The actual class enabled us to be
put in a real world situation
Cohen said.
Throughout the semester, stu-
dents identify the problems a com-
pany is having. Once the problems
are identified, the students and the
business owner decide which prob-
lem area(s) need to be addressed.
Following research, the students
complete a written report including
suggestions for improving the busi-
ness. This report is given to the
business owner. The students also
give an oral presentation conveying
their findings.
"The proposal we wrote was
very real in dealing with a non-prof-
it organization Cohen said.
Cohen found this experience to
be a valuable one. She is now the
marketing coordinator for FreBon
International Corporation near
Washington, D.C.
"We sec it as a win-win type of
situation where students get a real
world experience Childers said.
At the end of the semester,
Childers selects cases to be entered
in competition sponsored by the
Small Business Institute Directors
Association. Annually, regional and
national competitions provide the
opportunity for students to receive
recognition for their work in classes
such as the one offered through the
SBI at ECU.
This is the fourth time the SBI
has won regional case competitions.
The Institute has also won two
National Finalist awards and an
award for national runner-up.
U.S. Surgeon General to speak
at Medical School convocation
Chosen because of role
in health care policies
Craic D. Ramey
SENIOR WRITER
Dr. David Satcher, newly appoint-
ed U.S. Surgeon General, will trav-
el to the convocation at ECU's
School of Medicine in May to give
an address to the graduating class.
Satcher accepted the invitation
while he was still director of the
Centers for Disease Control. Last
February he was appointed as the
U.S. Surgeon General.
"We are very fortunate to have
him here said Thomas Fortner,
director of news and information
for ECU's med school. "Since he
accepted, his stature has continued
to grow
Convocation is a ceremony
" where student accomplishments
up to the end of their senior year of
med school are celebrated.
Professors who have been deemed
exceptional also receive awards
from students.
Many. influential
people have spoken
for past convoca-
tions, including for-
mer Surgeon
General Joycelyn
Elders, astronaut
and N.C. native
William Thorton
and world-
reknowned heart
surgeon Dr. Michael
Bakey.
"We chose
Satcher because of
his involvement with
the CDC said Mary Sedgwick,
ECU med school senior. "We were
looking for someone with out-
standing leadership in the medical
community, and he fits that
description
While at the CDC, Satcher led a
fight to increase childhood immu-
nization rates to from 55 in 1992
to 78 in 19. He also improved
the country's ability to respond to
new infectious diseases and began
a new early warning system to pre-
vent food-born illnesses. Satcher
the
Dr. Nathan B. Davis
Award in the
Executive Branch
Member Serving
by Presidential
Appointment cate-
gory for outstand-
ing public service
to advance public
health.
Seniors in the
School of Medicine
took a poll to
decide on a speaker
for the convocation.
Some of those
nominated includ-
ed Dr. David Kessler from the
National Institute of Health and
Colin Powell.
"We chose Dr. Satcher because
he is on the cutting edge of medi-
cine said Fred Shulski, chair of
the speaker committee. "We were
concerned that he would back out
after being appointed Surgeon
General
Med students contacted Satcher
the day after his appointment as
surgeon general and he was "more
than happy" to keep his promise
Or. David Satcher
PHOTO COURTESY OF MEDICAL SCHOOL
Plans under way for inauguration of
UNC system president Molly Broad
Formal event at NC
State on April 29
Melanie Hackworth
. staff writer
Plans are under way for the inaugu-
ration of UNC President Molly
Corbett Broad. Broad will be the
15th President of the UNC system
which encompasses 16 campuses
statewide. The event will take
place on April 29.
The inauguration is a two-day
event taking place at several uni-
versities throughout the system.
Festivities begin at UNC Chapel
Hill on April 28 with a dinner and a
speech by Dr. Barry Munitz, presi-
dent of J. Paul Getty Trust and for-
mer chancellor of California State
Universities' 23 campus system.
On the morning of April 29,
N.C. Central University will hold a
special event honoring teaching
and learning within the system.
Rankings
continued from page 1
well as class rank.
a The average SAT score for
incoming freshmen at ECU is 1016.
This score is higher than the aver-
age SAT score in NC and in the
nation.
Criteria for acceptance into ECU
has risen over the past 10 years.
The average GPA of incoming
freshman used to be 2.8 and is now
3.2.
Performance of students at ECU
is also on the rise. Last year's fresh-
men class had lite highest GPA than
any other freshmen class in ECU's
Delegations from each school with-
in the system will attend the gath-
ering.
During the event, special faculty
members from each of the schools
within the system will receive the
fourth annual Board of Governors
Awards for teaching. The rewards
include a bronze medal and a $7500
cash award.
The Board of Governors will
also honor one faculty from any of
the schools with a special O. Max
Gardner award, consisting of a
bronze medal and a $10,000 cash
prize. The prize, established in
1949 by Gov. Oliver Max Gardner,
retains his name.
The formal inaugural event
begins at N.C. State University's
Reynolds Coliseum at 7:30 p.m.
with an academic procession. The
procession will include chancellors
of the schools in the system, SGA
presidents, faculty senate chair and
members, the Board of Trustees as
well as various other important sys-
tem members.
ECU Faculty Senate Chair Don
Sexauer, a member of the proces-
history.
"We are a selective institution
said Marion Sykes, associate direc-
tor of admission at ECU.
This is apparent from the
increased academic performance of
ECU students.
"ECU is a rising school fresh-
man Barbara Hoessle said.
Many university officials were
consulted concerning the statistics
and none approve of the method in
which US News uses.
"It's like trying to compare
apples to oranges Sykessaid.
US Newts uses interviews with
school officials at various schools to
derive a score representing reputa- V
tion. Some said information may be
sion, said Broad is doing a good job
of integrating university personnel
into the event.
"She's Broad making a real
effort to include faculty in all
aspects of her inauguration
Sexauer said.
ECU is planning its own festivi-
ties to celebrate the inauguration.
A reception will be held the
evening of the April 29 in the Willis
building beginning at 7:30 p.m
"The campus community is
excited about the inauguration of
our new president and will have a
reception inviting students, the
public and faculty at which time we
will view the inauguration live
said Henry Peel, associate vice
chancellor for academic affairs.
In a special addition to the
reception, "President Broad is
sending a video tape in which she
will welcome the reception to the
inauguration and discuss ECU's
contribution to the UNC system
Peel said.
The public is invited and
encouraged to attend the inaugura-
tion at Reynolds Coliseum.
skewed by recent publications,
sports and other political factors.
Sykes and Clayton feel the num-
ber of professional accredited pro-
grams is a more accurate means of
measuring a school's reputation.
Without accreditation, transfer stu-
dents cannot earn credit for their
work.
Another factor Sykes noted that
is not considered by US Neves when
constructing its college rankings is
the stamina of specific programs.
"We've (ECU) got the finest
School of Art in the southeast
Sykes said, "and the finest School
of Education in North Carolina
WE BLOW ON SITE!
(GLASS THAT IS)
tobacco Hotter
Chau
Body
Piercing
�YKMSIfM
(OVER 8 YEARS EXPERIENCE)
Prk� Include Jewelry
C�ll Iw Appointment 561-7473
ecstacy
a revolutionary alternative
that Is taking the nation by storm
�CMM nightly Mews
ENERGY ALSO HAS:
�WATERPIPES
�BODY PIERCINC
�CLASS BLOWER
�BLACKLICHT ROOM
�WHIPPED CREAM
CHARGERS
�U0C.fMMMnMtMll
Mt-WV 747�
12-8 PM
EAST i
CAROLINA
UNivEHsrrv
Accelerate
toward graduations
Skate through a semester of credits.
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodates ihe
needs of individuals with disabilities
Kingston Place
Condominiums
FOR THE PLACE TO LIVECOME AND CHECK OUT KINGSTON PLACE!
All Newly Remodeled
2 BR Condos
2 12 Baths
Large Kitchens
1088 square feet
Furnished or
Unfurnished
Free Water Sewer
Basic Cable
Pool - Clubhouse
Bus Service
& Much More
KINGSTON is the place to be, and If you say you saw us In the
East Carolinian you will receive a $100 security deposit discount
Call Ken or Steve at:
KINGSTON RENTALS CO. 758-7575
Dress To Impress
Cocktail
and
Formals
We also carry Bridal,
Pageant and Tuxedos.
Arlington Village, Greenville; NC 27858
919 321-1714-Fax 919 321-1719
L!u
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Don't miss thi!
Register for su
Contact y
viser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodates the
needs of individuals with disabilities
o





Tueidiy, April 7, 1998
news
Thi Eilt Carolinian
VJA CaJlulu
What goals do you plan to
reach if you win the election?
NAME: Benjamin Rodriguez
POSITION: Vice President
YEAR IN SCHOOL Sophomore
MAJOR: Education
POSITIONS, HELP: Sophomore GJas
Vice President
How do you feel about the
parking situation?
lIDeakup
What do you think about rVhere do you stand on
"To get more involvement within stu-
dent body and more information dis-
tributed to the students to get them
involved
requiring computers?
"I don't think bad things, it is harder for
students, I have been on the Parking
and Traffic committee and I think the
staff puts students second. We are here
for an education not a parking spot
"If they have cheaper costs,
or permanent computers in
the dorms it would help
the issue. It will be a
must for the future
dining issues?
"I don't believe in monopolies and I
think that there should be other
places to eat to on campus than
Aramark. When you give the stu-
dents a choice they start to care
NAME: Eric Rivenbark
POSITION: President
YEAR IN SCHOOL: 1st semester gradu-
ate student (MBA); undergrad Finance.
POSITIONS HELD: Day rep. for 2
years, screenings and appointments com-
mittee, Sophomore Class VP, Junior Class
President, and student body VP,
"With the diverse group of
people I am working with,I
know we will have a successful
year. If anything, I want to
!k leave this place better
J than the way I found it
mt
"I was really disappointed how the
administration handled it. They need
money to pave the new lots, but I do
not understand why the Pirate Club
does not help out with those costs if
they charge over $1000 for each space at
home games
"With the resources ECU has on cam-
pus it can be recommended, but it
should not be required. The wafech
noiogy is gojng,whatw new today is
history tomorrow
"Aramark does a good job as far as
quality food for low prices. I would like
o see more selection on our campus
nd.Mthfemnf. tUlMfcday after day
NAME: Alan Stancill
POSITION: Treasurer
YEAR IN SCHOOL: Senior
MAJOR: Accounting
POSITIONS HELD: Member of the leg
islature, co-chairperson for the appropria-
tions committee.
"I hope to make the funding process
more understandable and clarify it to
the student body Stancill said. He
hopes to inform students where the
money goes that SGA ae�njircs and let
them know hove their groups and orga-
nizations can receive fandirip�:��'
"I feel if the Pirate Club is
going to make money off our
spaces they should help out
with the payments
It is a good idea, but the cost might
be overwhelming. The university
should have some plan that may
allow getting one (A computer)
more economically feasible
"It is wrong for the university to give
ARAMARK a monopoly over dining
then require all freshmen to buy a meal
plan. It is a conflict of interest
NAME: Leslie Pulley
POSITION: Vice President
YEAR IN SCHOOL: Junior
MAJOR: Public Relations
POSITIONS HELD: Co-chairperson on
screenings committee, Secretary of the
student body.
"I would like to implement a confer-
ence with all North Carolina Colleges
and Universities. This will allow the
schools to get together and offer differ-
ent ideas. I would like to keep good
ties with The East Carolinian arid post
a monthly newsletter on theljtreb page
"I do not support it at all, the parking
and traffic office makes a profit so they
really do not need any extra money
from the students
"I don't agree simply because every-
one does not have the funds. For this
to happen would mean the university
implementsa specific payment policy.
"I think they are OK.
They do a good job and
I've been impressed
with their ability to
please customers
NAME: John Meriac
POSITION: Secretary
YEAR IN SCHOOL: Sophomore
MAJOR: Pre- Medicine
POSITIONS HELD: Member of the
legislature, Chief of Staff to the Speaker
I of the House.
"Besides wanting to get more involved
at ECU, I also wanted a more hands-on
experience in the goings-on on campus
I hope to keep students and the
University as a whole on top of what is
going on with SGA, keep good ties with
TEC and keep information up to date
n-
"I have no problem
with the increase as
long as students don't
have trouble finding a
Ik place to park
"A better idea would be to supply com-
puters in the dorms, possibly add them
to all dorms and make accessing them
easier
"The food is pretty good, but we need
more variety. It is not the food we are
sick of; it is the variety
NAME: Timothy J. Muller
POSITION: President
YEAR IN SCHOOL: Junior
MAJOR: Science Education
POSITIONS HELD: Junior class presi-
dent, Fraternity positions: Rush Chair,
Historian, Chaplain, Philanthropy chair
"To work for the students and try not
to be a namedropper. I am doing it for
the students and this school, present
myself well, have high morals stan-
dards, and get along with people. I
handle pressure well and 1 am a good
listener
"There is always a'good reason for an
increase in stickers; I am sure this will
make it easier for people who commute.
fe cannot do anything without money.
At ECU things do hot come cheap
"I agree. This day
and age everything
is moving to com-
puters
"It may be nice to have other compa-
nies on campus, but so far they are run-
ning pretty well. Service is good. When
their contracts do end I would like to
see if other chains could get involved
NAME: Joseph Phillips'
POSITION: President
YEAR IN SCHOOL: Senior
MAJOR: Management Information
Systems
POSITIONS HELD: None
"I signed up after I found out the can-
didates were running unopposed. I want
to see something done next year. I plan
on setting goals and getting them
accomplished. I want to open the lines
of communication with students to show
how easy it is to make a difference
"It is pretty unfortunate the way they
have it now. If people want to buy a
ticket and park; it is their prerogative.
People should really know that it is a
rip off. "
"There is no way to make sure it is
available to all students. I think this
requirement should bjf given in maybe
live years. The administration may not
be ready to implement it to the syl-
labi I. JK
"Certain things at all
schools just suck. I am a
vegetarian and it is real
bird to find any food
IRATE
UNDERGROUfcJD





T�n.iy, April 7, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Bicycle
continued from page 1
Svejkovsky, transportation planner
for Greenville's Public Works and
chairman of the Task Force.
In North Carolina, Black
Mountain, Carolina Beach, Chapel
Hill and
tion the needs of the entire com-
munity.
"We have various questions that
need to be answered before coming
up with an ordinance Svejkovsky
said.
If the ordinance is applied to all
age groups and the entire commu-
nity, then all 5,000 to 6,000 of
ECU's students who ride bicycles
will have to wear helmets. These
groups question the implications
this type of ordinance will imply.
The Enforcement in Education
and Promotion Working Group, a
sub-committee of the Task Force,
consists of various members of the
community who go out into the
community to address these issues
in order to figure out the best bicy-
cle helmet ordinance for the entire
community.
Southern
Shores penal-
ize people ages
IS and under
for not wearing
helmets. At
P C M H ,
between 1991
and 1995, out
of 790 bicy-
clists treated,
over half were
over the age of
15.
The Safety
Coalition
group and Task
Force group
are working to
come up with a
bicycle helmet
law that takes
into considera-
bicycle SAFETY
EFFECTIVENESS OF BICYCLE HELMETS
'Reduce the risk of head injury by 85
"Reduce the risk of brain injury by 88
"Reduce risk of injury to face by 67
'Effective for cyclists of all ages
'Effective in collisions that involve motor vehicles and those that do not
(New England Journal of Medicine - August 21, 1997)
1995 BICYCLIST DATA PCMH EMERGENCY DEPART
130 patients
'helmet used 6; helmet not used - 62; unkown 32
Bike only, roadway 43
Bike v. motor vehicle, roadway 41
Bike only, off road 12
"In any ordinance, there will be
two sides of it Svejkovsky said.
"In our case, one side concerns
whether the bicycle helmet ordi-
nance should be applied to road-
ways only. The other side is
whether this law will invade per-
sonal constitutional rights
The groups are unsure of when
the ordinance will come into effect.
"It will take time to work
through all of the issues
Svejkovsky said. � "We will be
speaking to various groups in order
to get different perspectives. We
will be discussing bike routes from
an ecological and safety stand-
point
The first official bikeway system
was built in 1979.
"Some of them shouldn't even
be there Svejkovsky said.
Despite efforts made to build
bike paths such as the ones by the
town commons and Aycock, many
aren't being used in the extent they
should be. Senior class President
Jonathan Huggins supports a bicy-
cle helmet ordinance and feels
that all members of the communi-
ty should voice their opinions
about it.
"The public has a tremendous!
amount of influence in the deci-f
sions we make Huggins said. "i
have a firm belief in listening to our
public community. I don't want the
community to think their voice
doesn't mean anything. It's your
voice we represent, and if the pub-
lic wants to speak out against any-
thing we will listen
It's Smooth And Sexy,
CUBA
irs THE BEST ANSWEII
FOR THE CHIN AMO UPPER
LIP AREA
IMAGINE. HAIR FREE
UNDERARMSI
E-MAIL
continued from page I
thing that they do not want to
� appear in public records Irons
a said.
"In relation to the public records
j act, the fact it is e-mail is of no con-
J sequence. E-mail is just like every-
� thing if it fits the realm of the pub-
i lie records act said Tomas Ziko,
4 special deputy of the Attorney
' General of North Carolina.
� Ziko said he was not certain
� what the Chancellor could legally
j check on a student's e-mail posted
on a university server. He said the
J Chancellor or anyone else could
t not read mail sent through the post
� office, but a memo posted on a
board in the post office is fair game.
Ziko said a specific case would be
necessary to be examined for any
specific law to be made.
Bailey said the faculty senate
passed these policy revisions to
increase academic freedom within
the faculty.
The state law provides that e-
mail or any form of record generat-
ed by a state machine is normally
public record excluding telephones
and library terminals.
The policy the senate proposed
gave limited confidentiality, but
the chancellor did not believe this
expectation is in agreement with
the law.
"Any action taken by the faculty
senate is not passed into law with-
out the Chancellors approval said
Dr. Don Sexauer, chair of the facul-
ty senate.
Ihings Really Move
In the Classifieds!
AT : R 0 SSROAD S
Set aside politics
for the beauty
and magnificence
of Cuba.
Monday, April 13, 1998 Hendrix Theatre, 4 pm & 7:30 pm
All-you-cjn-eat dinner menu: Monteria (pork and plantain stew). Came enrollada (Cuban-style beef
roulade), chicken with black bean puree, arroz con lentejas (rice with lentils), col rellens (stuffed
cabbage), Brazilian nut cake, and caramel flan.
IT fl 0 F Q Kl ' T FUmI t0 ltud,nu "t,h � � "I'd ICU 10. Dlnntr tickets in 112 ttch.
I V U L J 11 I To rattrv. your dlnnfi tlctot. com. 0own to thi CT0 In Mindtnhttl Studtnt Ctnm
by Wtdotldly, Ottootr b, 1997 lira my .with fipt, t mul card, o, you, declining
bilinct. (linn will lit lltvod tt t:00pm In th� Grtlt Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Mondly - Frldjy l:10im to 600 pm
919.12S.47U oi l.MW.ECU.ARTS; 0�,lip�chimp,l�d call 919.12t.471t
MATTER HOW
YOU GET THERE
SMOOTH. SEXY CEOS
The new EpiLaser� hair removal system
lets you get rid of that unwarned hair lhat
has been bothering you for a long lime.
It's fast, simple and exciting laser
technology everyone is talking about-
and it's here now! Cel your own easy
answer. Call us today. plflSEft
1
Aesthetic
Ptastir Howard Dawkins.MD, FAB
1 IcKUK, BcMMCtrrilaJSiiilwri
SuTEerV iuwitidaivkifu.com
1-800-553-2772
Advertise
wit li us in
The East
Carolinian
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
COULD YOU USE SOME
EXTRA MONEY?
Well, you might already have
"the ticket" to a few extra
j bucks in your pocket - just in
time for the holiday weekend.
The FIONA APPLE ticket, that
is.
REMINDER: The deadline is
Thursday, April 9, 6:00 p.m
for ticket refunds on the re-
cently cancelled concert. To
get your refund, bring your
ticket(s) to the Central Ticket
Office-Mendenhall, Monday-
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
and you will get your money
back.
Se!ors
Don't forget to Show your
Purple Pirate Pass
on Tuesday, April 7 from
9 till 2 in front of the
student store
and you shall receive.
-���
Our last giveaway for the
semester.
Come early before they
disappear and don't miss
out on this chance for
something free!
Tuudiy,
Tennesse.
Citizens
meeting voii
than an hoi
Jenkins open
Jean Will
business on
naming the 1
Martin Lutl
instead. Wilk
Commons
Greenville's I
; church and u
! black and i
shipped.
"I am opf
black white is
"The West si
percent black
percent. Whiti
man who st�
name him
; street?"
Other citi;
; opposition cite
i ing letterhead
sion to those
area as reason
Weekenc
$25
calif
monthly
Truth,Equalit)
102B East
Bedford Par
3(X
Green
Full C
ketchup,
Home Coc
1 Meat, 2
Homemade
hushpi
$4.i
Legal
Warjoriv A
Sand ridge
itoJtjjfeVfcl





it Ciroliniin
as a tremendousl
nee in the deci-l
-luggins said. "i
in listening to our I
. I don't want the
link their voice I
'thing. It's your)
t, and if the pub.
out against any-
Tundiy, April 7. 1998
news
'S THE BEST ANSWER
� THE CHIN ANO UPPER
PARE
. IMAGINE. HAIR FREE
UNDERARMS)
- SMOOTH, SEXY LESS
ITS PERFECT FOR
BIKINI LINES AND OTHER
�REAS
(IY10VAI.
ir removal sysiem
unwanted hair that
u for a long time,
citing laser
talking about-
your own easy
EPIUkSER
ml Dawkins, MD. FACS
txjrd Certified Surgeai
wvw.luUnvkins com
3-2772
3
ir
ii
Tenncsse.
Citizens who attended the
meeting voiced opinions for more
than an hour after Mayor Nancy
Jenkins opened the floor to debate.
Jean Wilkerson, who owns a
business on Fifth St suggested
naming the Town Commons in Dr.
Martin Luther King Jrs honor
instead. Wilkerson said the Town
Commons was the sight of
Greenville's first African-American
church and was a place where both
black and white citizens wor-
shipped.
"I am opposed to making it a
black white issue Wilkerson said.
"The West side of Fifth St. is 90
percent black. The East side is 95
percent. White. How can you take a
man who stood for everyone and
name him after a segregated
street?"
Other citizens who spoke in
opposition cited the cost of reprint-
ing letterhead and possible confu- .
sion to those unfamiliar with the
area as reasons not to change the
name.
Dr. Dave Hambar of Greenville
spoke in favor of the request.
"Greenville says, Greenville has
it all Hambar said. "You don't
have it all until you have a Dr.
Martin Luther King Drive
Some in favor of changing the
name of Fifth St. opposed changing
only portions of the street. Dwight
Foster was among the citizens who
said they wanted the entire street
named in King's honor.
"If the city of Greenville show-
cases a confederate statute that
overtly states anti-America, anti-
social harm, then surely they can
unopposedly approve not only the
west side of Fifth St but the entire
street
Tim Barbar said he brought a
"petition signed by 2,000 Greenville
residents, who opposed the change.
"This is a three part issue
Barbar said. "The first is should we
have a memorial for Martin Luther
King Jr.? The second, should we
rename Fifth St, and the third, is it
appropriate to have this Fifth St. as
his memorial?"
The East Carolinian
Set your parents up in luxury
for the weekend
Weekend rentals
$250
call for
monthly rates
Efficiency suites:
2 bedroom,
1 bath
AH appliances
On site laundry
University Apartments 758-7436
� V Free Pregnancy Test
�flnV � While You Wait Free And Confidential 1 ���� Services and Peer Counseling t Carolina Pregnancy Center
209-B S.Evans St. Pittman Building (near courthouse) Greenville. NCHours Vary as Needed Appointment Preferred 757-0003
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS AT I.
Truth,Equality,Justice
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
1UZB Last. Victoria Ct. -i r r rr r r�
Bedford Park, Greenville OLl-)yO
300 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
757-1716
New Item
Courtside Half Pounder
Full 8oz lean hamburger served with mustard,
ketchup, and chili on a bun. Lettuce and tomato extra.
$2.50
limited time only where to find us
Tar River
Home Cooked Meal couni coC Dl In sag!
1 Meat, 2 Veggies 1 wimt ?
Homemade biscuits or c�un"d�c" 9 A I s
hushpuppies � s as 1
$4.65
Open from 8:00a.m. � 5:00p.m.
311
LegafiProfessional. If n Paralegal.
u� rewarding nen career � One ill 1 he Million's fastest-growing field � lifetime profession or a
1 � One-semester postgraduate stud)
4� lineman liar Vssociation approved � lor women vtiili a bat helm's degree in an)
hirjnrh' kurltuisoH
huali'fifil. ttimible c�iV
Sillldliilxc C- Klir
Mi-mlilli legai L-sittllltS
I'mxrum uiuduale
Meredith (ollegv
INW) mllsliomiifih lnvl
Knlrieli. f J"MI i "is
(919)829-8353
iVfSREpiTH
Phi Kappa Psi fraternity rhakes sizeable
donation to Greenville Community Shelter
Fraternity presented
deck totaling $1,217
Carolyn Hyde
staff whiter
Phi Kappa Psi continues the tradi-
tion of donating funds to the
Greenville Community Shelter
with the presentation of a check for
$1,217. The March 30 event
marked the eighth year the frater-
nity has contributed to the Shelter.
Bryce Wagoner, philanthropy
and public relations chairperson for
Phi Kappa Psi, was on hand to offi-
cially present the check to Lynne
James, executive director of the
shelter.
James said the money was
received at a very needed time.
Beyond the everyday needs and
expenses of the shelter; approxi-
mately three weeks ago, the shelter
had a break-in resulting in almost
$4,000 worth of property damage.
"We will use some of the money
towards our insurance deductible
James said. "A portion will be
applied to the general operating
budget, and allocated portions will
be used for repairs needed due to
the recent break-in
She praised the members of the
fraternity saying that a bond has
emerged between the two organiza-
tions.
"A relationship has formed with
members of the fraternity over the
last few years James said. "Not
only do the fraternity brothers show
up on cleaning days, but other days
as well
Phi Kappa Psi was founded at
ECU on Oct. 26,1991. According to
Wagoner, the fraternity is technical-
ly a social association, but also
serves as a well rounded member of
the community and said their motto
"the great joy of serving Sifters"
holds true.
"At present, there are 19 active
brothers and six pledges Wagoner
said. "Members of the fraternity
gave much time and energy to
make this fund-raising event a real-
ity: more than 500 hours on this par-
ticular project. The wheels of
motion began in October 1997.
Mark Fcrrell, manager of Pantana
Bob's, was a big help
The benefit, held at Pantana
Bob's sponsored by the members
of the fraternity is known as
"COOL-AID This project serves
a dual purpose�not only docs it
promote up and coming bands, but
also the money raised is con-
tributed toward the community
activity in which Phi Kappa Psi is
involved. Along with donations of
time and money, several local busi-
nesses, such as Kinko's, and 103.7
HOT FM, also lend support to this
project.
Wagoner said the event was part
of the fraternity's goal to give back
to the community, and not a race
against other university clubs.
"After much hard work and
planning, I want to stress that this is
not competition among the
Greeks Wagoneer said. "Our ulti-
mate goal is unity. Returning good
deeds to the community is a com-
mon purpose we share
The fraternity's donation last
year was $650, but that total was
doubled this year. Wagoner said
the goal for next year's fund raising
event is $1,500 to $2,000.
"This is the largest donation by
any one single fraternity on cam-
pus, and we are really proud of this
accomplishment Wagoner said.
"We are such privileged people: it
feels nice to give something back
AL KATZ
THURSDAY
APRIL 16-$10
TOO SKINNEE J'S
SUNDAY
APRIL iy $10
vnmammuMiii
CDAUPl.SKUUrs
EAST COAST MUSC1VDK)
Available Wherever Music Is Sold
NEW STORE!
NEW
ARRIVALS!
NEW BACH
ENTRANCE!
BETTER
PARKING!
atalog
"bnnection
Division CX DUTy
210 E. 5TH ST. 758-8612
IA5SK? �1 j UNDERWAMPIRATES GOVE m
3 Jamaican Restaurant & Bar
Of 511 S. Cotanche St.
Tjifc Greenville, NC
J (919) 754-2207
Of
J5.95
PINNER BUFFET
OB'S m
41"
'THE POSSE a�
PERWATER ��
IME 1O:J0 PM C
DININC HOURS:
JO PIKOUKT ON DINNIR IMTRIIS W CTVPfNT ID
MON 6. TUIS 11:30-5WED & THURS 11:30-9 FRI & SAT 11:30-10 SUN 3-7
UNDERWA'
� �
YE
AT
TH
WSPEC
$60 AD
POORS OPEN AT
505 South Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27858
iSNlB;
(919)-413-0900
fax (919) 413-0901
Moving Sale
25 to 50 off selected items
Onix is moving and will be changing its name to:
The Tobacco Guild
conveniently located at Arlington Village
-featuring-
Cigar Lounge - Dart Room-Fine Men's Gifts






6 Tuiid.v April 7, 1MB
I
I
I
npi n i nn
east&rolinian
Amv L.Rovster Editor
Heather Burgess MinigmgEdtnr
Amanda Austin NiwsEdmx Tracv M. laubach SpamEdiui
Holly Harris Aw.Nwi.Ediw Steve Losev Aui. Spons Edim
ANDY Turner Ulnryli Editor Carole Mehle Head Copy Editor
John Davis AnnumlittityUEditor John murphy Surf lllusitator
Matt Hege Adwnning Minagir
Bobby Tuoole Wotaumr
Sim . StU nuaci� 8�. �� Eat C��� Mtalw 11.000 cow nn Irtvln �d rruoan. Tin Ind ���!�iKh id.ri� 11 rl lg�
ion Bl U EdrtOMl 8Mrd Tht Em Corohflron Mlcginn Itnm to rho odw. iNinttd u ZSO ��lft. irtidl intr !m idrlld lor dtoncr or btnily Tht En
Conlwon morvoj On nghr to �l or rtna IMiri for puokirion �s Irtten mult bi nanod Lonori should bo oddmttd to Opinion odrtot .Too Em
Contain. Sordont Piitanono Mho. ECU Gnomrlo. Z78SW3B For inlormotion, till 9r9 328 6366
ouwiew
Consistency is important to us human beings. Nobody can argue that notion. Against any
opinion all those psychologists, sociowhatsits and pundits may have about human nature, there
are certain things we as a people and as an individual always do.
Consistency is ingrained in our spirits� the need to find stability, a finite thing, an end if
you will, drives us from an even deeper level of our minds than our need for change. When
things shift and snap and become terribly different it makes us uneasy. Just like plate tecton-
ics, that geological system involving earthquakes. Remember the San Andreas fault in
California? You get the picture.
In keeping with the consistency in our natures, we tend to assign importance to regular
occurrences, and this (very generally) is where tradition is born. When something happens on
a regular basis, like the holidays or birthdays or weddings, we humans observe the event with
certain customs and practices. Springtime is here again, and we at ECU celebrate its onset out
of doors with an event called Barefoot on the Mall.
Now the tectonic plates are shifting madly beneath us. Barefoot is approaching but our mall
will be inaccessible. The university's department of keeping up with the Joneses have decid-
ed that a mall beautification makeover must take place. This is fine, see, they've done a smash-
ing job on Wright Plaza and that corner of 5th and Reade, but their timing is a little screwy
regarding this mall rehaul.
Half the poirjt of having Barefoot is having it on the Mall, you know, thus the name. The
event will take place around Mendenhall. Barefoot on the Mendenhall just doesn't sound right.
It's all clinical and sterile and institutional. Such a phrase invokes shudders. Barefoot on the
Mendenhall sounds more like a corporate workshop for Dilbert disciples (complete with PC
jargon and plenty of motivational aphorisms) than a fun, shirtless day in the sunshine.
This violation of our human need for consistency could have been avoided by a touch of bet-
ter consideration when the beautification thingummy was planned. If there is a reason why the
facilities services department was instructed to begin revamping the mall when they and the
entire city of Greenville knew that Barefoot was due to occur, it would be nice to know. Letters
to the editor regarding this matter are welcome and encouraged.
OPINION
Britt
HONEYCUTT
Columnist
Chocolate controls columnist
there is something about
chocolate I can't explain. It's
a primal urge that will not
rest until it's quenched.
There is absolutely nothing in the
entire world that is even remotely
comparable to the delicacy that is a
Chocolate Chip Paradise Pie from
Chili's. I have tasted many things in
my lifetime, but never had any-
thing truly made me drool like a
dog at the sound of the can opener
until I wrapped my lips around a
warm, buttery hunk of Paradise
covered with ice cream and a sauce
that I wish came out of my tap
every time I turned it on. Yes, my
friends, this is Paradise.
I know what month it is. I realize
that in weeks, mere WEEKS, I will
be on a beach, mounds of pasty
skin hanging over my bathing suit,
forcing small children to shriek and
run away in horror at the very sight.
Should this deter me from
indulging in my love, my one and
only vice? Probably. Does it? Nope.
I really try to be healthy. I do. I
exercise daily � well, almost.
Three times a week. Sometimes.
All right, I go when I have time,
okay? And I eat very sensibly �
almost all fruits and veggies (and
Spaghetti-O's, but only when I'm
in a hurry). But there is something
about chocolate I can't explain. It's
a primal urge that will not rest until
it's quenched. So I believe I am
completely absolved of any and all
responsibility when it comes to the
gooey brown substance. Anything
that I do when chocolate is
involved is beyond my control.
For example, most people try to
impress their dates, especially
when it's a first date, with stuff like
table manners and general cleanli-
ness. I also subscribe to this philos-
ophy, until some poor fool brings
around the dessert cart. It's every
man for himself after that, and I'll
be damned if anybody is getting a
bite of my cake. Whether it's
Ragazzi's Kentucky Derby Pie or
The Olive Garden's Tiramisu (not
chocolate, but close enough), my
lucky date gets to witness the most
indecent display of disgusting
pigishness this side of the mud pie
eating contest. I don't eat it. I wal-
low in it. Then I lick the plate.
Public events also pose a prob-
lem. Wedding receptions in partic-
ular are a big threat. A big steaming
pot of chocolate fondue surrounded
by strawberries and other such
foods which really only serve as
vehicles for the chocolate in my
mind, makes me smile like nothing
else. Every Easter some little kid
doubts my complete lack of self
control and maturity and loses a fin-
ger or two trying to take a Cadbury
cream egg out of my basket. If
there's is a pinata with Tootsie Rolls
inside, someone is going to get hurt
if they so much as attempt a grab at
one.
When I was little, I used to have
this reoccurring dream that every-
thing in my house was made of
chocolate and I could just go from
room to room eating furniture.
Sound like a sickness? It is. But
I take comfort in knowing that I am
not alone; there are others who
share in my plight. And deep down
I know some day I will find that
house where everything is made of
chocolate and I will go from room
to room eating furniture. Until
then, it's a good idea not to come
between me and the fondue pot If
you want to keep all your fingers.
iTSroT
wonwtR
UJWiiS
oRWSE
S
-ITS WoWAMJCH
coKrRAcTs.sUoE
W,WrYl.GAES,
T0URMA�OTS.
,1UEV.SON !?.6fiTS,
MERcUANpiSi,
OPINION
Keith
COOPER
Columnist
Clinton's Africa trip a success
President Clinton, a brother
who was just born white, is a
hero in the minds and hearts
of millions of sub-Saharan
Africans. His recent six-
nation tour of Africa was met
with glee and a renewed sense
of hope.
For innumerable decades, United
States presidents have neglected
and ignored sub-Saharan Africa
becuase of mythical stereotypes,
which have been debunked time
after time. Too many Americans
regard Africa as a place where sav-
ages and ignorant dark-skinned
people run around in a rambunc-
tious fashion. Due to ignorance,
many college students buy into
those unfair stereotypes and fail to
learn about the wealth of talents
and rich resources on the continent.
Well, college students and others
must wake up, "smell the coffee
and get a dose of reality. President
Clinton, a brother who was just
bom white, is a hero in the minds
and hearts of millions of sub-
Saharan Africans. His recent six-
nation tour of Africa was" met with
glee and a renewed sense of hope.
Clinton, the first American presi-
dent to to make such a tour of
Africa, received a warm welcome in
Accra, Ghana, his first stop. There
well-wishers were falling, calling,
stumbling and fumbling to get a
handshake from the charismatic
President Clinton, so reminiscent
of John F. Kennedy. About half a
million people pushed forward, in
almost a stampede, to meet and
greet the young visionary president
who wants to open the floodgates of
opportunities for Africa. As a matter
of fact, Clinton promised to loan
Ghana $67 million to help them
build power plants and other neces-
sities. Ghanaian President Jerry
Rawlings was elated. Clinton's trip
was designed to bolster trade and
investments. After all, investments
mean opening markets and provid-
ing jobs for the African people and
Americans.
The Clintons visited Uganda,
the second leg of the tour. There,
Clinton met with President Yoweri
Musevini and apologized for the
way America has neglected Africa.
He also said that the buying of
slaves by Americans was wrong. In
a local village, a two-day old baby
was named "Bill Clinton Clinton,
well-received, promised $120 mil-
lion to help train Ugandan teachers
and connect classes to the Internet.
He also pledged $16 million to fight
AIDS and malaria. Uganda, who
lost over 800,000 people during
brutal dictatorships of the 1970s
and 1980s, has come a long way.
Clinton urged the government to
embrace economic reforms.
Clinton proceeded to Rwanda, a
country recently torn due to geno-
cides involving Hutus and Tutsis,
Clinton pledged $30 million to
build a strong judicial system
around the Great Lakes area of the
Congo, Rwanda and Burundi. He
also promised $2 million for the
genocide survivor fund. Rwandans
gladly welcomed Clinton's arrival.
On Wednesday, March 25,
Rwandan President Pasteur
Bizimungu and Ugandan President
Musevini joined Clinton to listen to
their national anthems. Bizimungu
and Musevini see Clinton as a
respectable friend available to offer
their people a touch of humanitari-
anism.
Many sub-Saharan Africans suf-
fer from poverty, malaria and other
diseases, hunger and malnutrition,
educational deficiencies and
numerous other woes. Millions of
children go to bed hungry and die
like flies because of neglect from
the West and other countries that
should have come to the aid of
Africa long ago. If Americans can
send billions of dollars to countries
like Israel and Egypt (Northern
Africa), surely they can help mil-
lions of "down-and-out" Africans
help themselves. I admire Clinton's
courage, benevolence and heartfelt
commitment to the good, atjibi-
tious people of sub-Saharan Africa.
Had Kennedy not been assassinat-
ed, he probably would have gone
into the Congo or neighboring
African countries on a goodwill mis-
sion. In any event, Clinton deserves
an A for a job well done.
"Possibly I can learn something about myself; although that something will
never be that I am not a writerbecause I am writing. Nobody can deny me
that. I may not be a good writer but one other thing is for sure: Practice makes
possible
John Taylor, musician, 1998
3TT
Got Something
To Say?
Write a Letter to the Editor
All letters to the Editor must be typed,
250 words or less, and must include your
name, major, year, and phone.
Send to:
The East Carolinian
2nd Floor Student Pub. Building
Greenville, NC 27858
7 TuiSday, Api
Do)
Til
you
FAULK
THE PI
OF MA
EMERAL
JAZZ Ft
FIFTH ANNUAL Pll
WEDNESDAY, APR
Hendrix Th






Th, Em Ciriffjp
:cess
reforms,
ed to Rwanda, a
rn due to geno-
itus and Tutsis,
$30 million to
udicial system
.akes area of the
id Burundi. He
million for the
und. Rwandans
Clinton's arrival.
March 25,
lent Pasteur
mdan President
inton to listen to
:ms. Bizimungu
: Clinton as a
vailable to offer
1 of humanitari-
an Africans suf-
alaria and other
id malnutrition,
ciencies and
cs. Millions of
hungry and die
f neglect 'from
� countries that
to the aid of
Americans can
ars to countries
;ypt (Northern
can help mil-
l-out" Africans
dmire Clinton's
:e and heartfelt
e good, arpbi-
Saharan Africa,
cen assassinat-
uld have gone
r neighboring
a goodwill mis-
linton deserves
done.
; will
ty me
makes
7 Tuesday, April 7, 1998
comics
The E�t Carolinian
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
wishes to announce the following
Holy Thursday Services (April 9) 7:30 PM at St. Peter's Church
Good Friday Services (April 10) 12:15 PM Outdoor Stations of the
Cross at St Peter's
Saturday Easter Vigil Service (April 11) 8:00 PM at St. Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses (April 12) 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM at the
Newman Center, 953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
(St. Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th Street)
88
92
96
100
104
108
��
I 111 I I I I 111 I I I I I fl I II I I I II MM I Mill I I I Mill I III
nHl.ni,lllii,illJM.i.i�muniii��I
91.3 F
VOLUME
Do you like live music?
Then listen to WZMB for
your chance to win tickets
to upcoming shows!
TUNE IN TO
THE JAZZ SHOW
WEEKDAYS
FROM 12-1PM
FIONA APPLE
REFUND!
CHEW
TICKET REFUND DEADLINE IS THURSDAY, APRIL 9,1998
CONTACT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN THE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER, OR CALL 328-4788
"To the Romans:
Where Are Your Bathrooms?"
OH THIS
Presenter: Don Whitten
i 12 Moon TOD A Yl, Tuesday, March 31st, Mendenhall Underground
FREE DESSERTS AMD REFRESHMENTS!
FAULKNER'S WORLD:
THE PHOTOGRAPHS
OF MARTIN J. DAIN
ON DISPLAY THROUGH
APRIL 9TH IN THE
MENDENHALL GALLERY
tMtRALO CITY
APRIL 16 -18,1998 IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
APRIL 16 - MARK WHITFIELDTRIO & NICHOLAS PAYTON QUINTET
APRIL 17 - 6ENNY GREEN ft ECU JAS ENSEMBLE
APRIL 18 - SPYRO GYRA
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE, MENDENHALL STUDENT
JV. . ,i 1 .1 CByTER-MCHIM ACCEPTED. FOR MORE HFORMATION CALL 828 - 4788
FIFTH ANNUAL PIRATE UNDERGROUND
BATTLE OF THE BANDS '98
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1998, 8 PM ON THE MENDENHALL BRICKYARD
CASHMERE JUNGLE LORDS HYDO-LUX NIORdeCAl PEOPLE'S FAULT SULLENSPIRE
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
FOR MORE INFO CALL 328-4715
iRJMsr
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail: uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
Tronco.
Tfafbel Santos
carrSyeT ' t.&sAsris-
d!dTr)ir
W. Hd25
i
6
10
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
22
23
24
28
31
32
33
35
36
38
40
43
45
49
51
53
55
56
57
59
60
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
ACROSS
Hobo
Dads
Attention-getting v,
sound �
Defy authority
Fiery gem
Take to the sky
Yellowish white
Dashing runners
Fireside yam
Foot pounder
Samuel's
teacher
Distinct stage
L'chaim or
prosit, e.g.
Dull
Blackthorn
Violin virtuoso
Menuhin
Gullible dupes
Country hotel
Prohibits
Observe
Neon or xenon,
eg.
Why not?
Site of the
Comstock Lode
Theatrical
lament
Loser's scornful
attitude
Scenarios
Clean one's
feathers
da deux
Frlml and
Nureyev
Indira's garb
Birthday party
video, e.g.
Removes skin
Pension accts.
Salacious stare
Brittany seaport
Turner and
Danson
Does wrong
Epsom
O 1008 Tnbun M�a S�rvicoo, Inc.
All niu rawvad.
Answers from Thursday
RESTsBjro1MEDAi.
0RLOpRN1RANi
AR0MABlC1V1L
R0MANHQ HDAC1TY
SL0TMETro1DAS
QUrjaQdnDQ
NAT� l BANCIAHA L1 1 Bl 1
A1RsIlMbA T5TS EMEN
BRYANnTqDOErantn
OR1 TuHa
D1AIalejc qioUhs TNAT0
UNDERAD1ER
MALTA? aL EDJUDEA
PIA1NNARENT
sLJCKjSAGREDYE
DOWN
1 In a hackneyed
fashion
2 Reappraise
3 Do away with
4 Slight
5 Layer
6 Part of USPS
7 Stands up to
8 Cheese choice
9 Inadvertent error
10 Houston team
11 Gardener's tool
12 Com serving
13 Fern, address
19 Trawling device
21 Sacred sites
23 Pump a bike
25 The Greatest
26 Chip off the old
block
27 Half a score
29 Bathroom fixture
30 Lives on the
generosity of
others
34 Back of the boat
37 Break in a
journey
39 Gabor sister
40 Hiatus
41 Every last one
42 Paulo, Brazil
44 More churlish
46 Clothing
47 Most pricey
48 Helps out
50 Tension
52 Pertains
54 Totality
58 1996 loser
59 Actress Gilbert
of �Roseanoe"
60 Strike
61 Flaw mineral
62 Frenzied
83 Network of
"Nature"
I






8 Tuesday, April 7.
lifastvlo
Tuesday, i
The East Carolinian

CD
reviews
New program helps prevent alcoholism
OiWiSSWn
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
School of Medicine
sponsors DrinkWtse
Miccah Smith
senior write
Trailer Bride
Smelling Salts
lO OUT OF 10
In November, the ECU School of
Medicine, working through the
Center for Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Studies, introduced a revolutionary
new program called DrinkWise to
the region.
Aimed at stopping "problem
drinkers" before they become
true alcoholics, DrinkWise origi-
nated eight years ago in Canada and
has become an effective way, of
reducing habitual drinking among
non-alcoholics in Great Britain,
Australia and Canada.
Dr. Fredrick Glaser of the
Center for Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Studies praised the program's
"extraordinary benefits" and suc-
cess rate, which he cited at better
than 70 percent.
"It's a preventive program he
said. "Most of the participants
understand at some level that
drinking is a problem for them
Although the aim of DrinkWise
is to help heavy drinkers gain con-
trol of their habits, alcoholics are not
treated. Participants usually have
jobs, friendships and marriages
which are not threatened by the
drinking. The problem is that their
lives are not functioning at an opti-
mum level. Often, participants are
diabetics for whom drinking pre-
sents a health problem.
Unlike the traditional
Alcoholics
Anonymous
approach to
drinking, which
caters to alco-
holics and
demands total
lifelong absti-
nence from alco-
hol, DrinkWise
targets people
who can still
make their own
decisions about
drinking.
"People arc
allowed to
select their goal: abstinence or mod-
erate drinking said Glaser.
According to Program Director
Teresa Edmundson, the important
Stopping the problem before it starts
PHOTO COURTESY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
thing is to bring a person's decision
to drink up to a conscious level.
Participants are taught to identify
situations in
which drinking is
used to cope, or in
which drinking is
an automatic
action.
Edmundson
advocates "using
your mind and
your actions to
alter your behav-
ior She uses a
stoplight as an
analogy to explain'
to participants
what she means:
certain people
and situations can automatically
activate drinking. They give
drinkers the "green light"
Participants keep a journal
of
Jennifer Leggett
STAFF WRITER
As sophomore efforts go, second
releases are never expected to be as
11 strong as the debut. However, as
recent signees to Chicago's
Bloodshot Records label, Melissa
Swingle and her band have defied
the odds and put out another per-
fect album with Smelling Salts.
What is most compelling about
this fine band from Chapel Hill is
that on the surface they may seem
like just another jangly, twangy,
country-rock band. However,
Trailer Bride is not a band that you
can decide if you love or loathe on
the first listen, and they are not to
be dismissed as redneck shtick.
With a lineup including Melissa
Swingle singing and playing her
many guitars, Brad Goolsby on
drums and Daryl White on stand
up bass, the talent alone is enough
to push this album forward.
Frontwornan Melissa Swingle's
lyrics arc captivating and her jangly
way of playing her several guitars
like they were a pedal steel give
SEE TRAILER. PAGE I
j Mishap.
I
Morning Ride
3 OUT OF IO
Miccah Smith
SENIOR WRITER
Mishap's new release. Morning
Ride, sounds like familiar territory
to me. This stagnant roots-rock
tour de force consists of the blend-
ed influences of Hootie as well as
the Spin Doctors.
Unfortunately, this album can
be acquired at any music store, but
please don't bother. Just save the
$15 and listen to those old Hootie
CDs you pretend you don't have.
The opening track, "Statue
sounds like the theme song to
some Gen-X TV drama series. I
never thought two chords, used
SEE MISHAP. PAGE IB
G0neeftreiew
Despite tornado, Gibb
fans enjoy show
Droll
Gibb and crowd feel it
Friday nigk
Caleb Rose
STAFF WRITER
their drinking habits and, through
individual and group counseling,
determine how to use what
Edmundson calls "pacing strate-
gies" to cut back.
DrinkWise can help teens get a
handle on their drinking as well as
adults, but by recognizing and treat-
ing adolescent drinking problems,
the program exposes itself to criti-
cism. Although, according to Glaser,
DrinkWise does not condone
underage drinking, "It seems a
shame that underage drinkers
would be barred from this kind of
help on a technicality he said.
Controversy aside, DrinkWise
offers new options to the 40,000,000
Americans who are not alcoholics
but who simply want to reduce
their alcohol intake for health, psy-
chological, work or relationship rea-
sons.
Boogie
Nights
accurately
portrays
70s
IfHuck wore
bell bottoms
The Gibb Droll Band graced a
small crowd of downtown-ees with
an all but explosive show last
Friday night at the Attic. As the
town natives might recall (that is if
they were not already plastered),
there was a tornado warning in Pitt
County effective for that evening
which might have led to the small
numbers about that night.
Nevertheless, they should all have
been at the Attic.
Our evening began with the
smoothadelic sounds of Sunny
Wheat, a Greenville based band
that philled the phorum with phat
phunk jams. They arc a five-piece
(the fifth and newest member
plays bongos and percussion).
They have a funkrock style com-
parable to Widespread Panic and
God Street Wine with groovy bass
lines and wah wah guitar that calls a
horde of hippies from the masses
out to dance. Sunny Wheat deliv-
ered for about 45 minutes and then
handed the stage over to the Gibb
Droll Band.
The first note of the song "Bama
Gray from the band's first record
Dharma, erupted like a volcano and
the show was underway. Gibb is not
known to use a set list and it is quite
impressive to watch this man lead a
group of four of the greatest musi-
cians from this area through song
after song that are in GDBs reper-
toire.
Gibb rattled off a few other
tunes and then changed pace and
flowed into a new tune called
"Mexico With a voice of pure soul
Blues brothers
PHOTO COURTESY OF METRO TALENT GROUP
and a melody lonely enough to
make one cry, "Mexico" elevated
the crowd to another state of mind
as Gibb moaned, "I am broke down
in old town New Mexico
The most excellent quality of
the Gibb Droll band is how well the
musicians play and improvise
together. As in Jazz, when musi-
cians improvise, they have a certain
etiquette so that a solo is not too
long or short and so on. It is the
same within the Gibb Droll Band;
each member will get a shot at a
solo and they all shine in their own
special way, always being awed at
and applauded by the crowd.
SEE DROLL. PAGE 9
jnfrtttfe
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
'80s wasn't all cheese
Our last story about
uthaf decade
This is the column where we dis-
cuss the stuff we miss and the
stuff you missed. We will exam-
ine the books, albums, television
shows we feel desrve further
exploration. The stuff we dug
back in the day
John Davis
assistant lifestyle
EDITOR
Ahhhh the 1980s. The
Me Decade. The Reagan
years. The time of the
"second British invasion
Michael Jackson, Atari video
games, Thirtysomething, Teenage
Mutant Ninja Turtles and parachute
pants. For most of us born in the
70s, the '80s were the bedrock of
our formative years, when our aes-
thetic identities were solidified.
When I look back on the '80s, I
get that oddly warm but embar-
rassed feeling Jerry
Springer's parents
must get when
they see those
commercials for his
"uncut" shows.
The '80s is mine.
I'll admit it. I
enjoyed break-
dancing and
Voltron as much as
the next guy, but I
will also have to
admit that by the
late '80s, when the
Yuppie Decade
was culminating in
the utmost expression of that
decade: hair metal, the cheese was
starting to get me culturally consti-
pated.
Lucky for me, just about when I
could've hurled all the Def
Bono and the boys meet Homer.
PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX
Leppards, Poisons,
Cinderellas,
Extremes and
Motley Crues out
in a sticky, sloppy
mess onto the psy
chic floor of
Entertainment's
kitchen, in 1987,
Rolling Stones Bund
of the 80s released
what is to date their
most popular
album, Tie Joshua
Tree.
To this day, I can
find no reason why
the Duran Duran loving masses of
America fell in love with U2. The
Joshua Tret was everything the '80s
wasn't: In a time when Reagan was
SEE U2. PAGE I
Mark Whalberg gives good
vibrations in Boogie Nights.
PHOTO COORTESY OF NEW LINE CINEMA
The only difference between
Boogie Nights and Huckleberry Finn is
all the sex. Well, okay, not really.
Boogie Nights doesn't have any river
rafts, either. But they're both classic
American coming-of-age tales;
Huck just doesn't get laid as much.
Set in the wonderful world of
70s porn, Boogie Nights chronicles
the rise and fall of Dirk Diggler
(Mark Wahlberg), a young man
with a little something extra
between his legs. "Everyone has a
special talent Dirk philosophizes,
and he decides to share his talent
with the world.
But this film isn't just about sex;
like all good coming-of-age talcs, it
paints a portrait of its times. And
the picture Boogie Nights paints of
the 1970s isn't pretty. Or rather, it's
very pretty, but not much else. To
the delight of me and everyone else
who hates our nation's current wor-
ship of the decade, Boogie Nights
exposes the shallowncss of the 70s,
as exemplified through its pornog-
raphy.
Our hero gets pulled into the
porn industry by director Jack
Horner (Burt Reynolds), who wants
to make "meaningful" films that
will keep the audience in their
seats after the actors have shot their
SEE BOOGIE PAGE 10
i
1
the hero of
Blue Sky" wi
of American
t of America'
' cocaine and
; Stand Still" ri
stark despair c
The love s
usually so
' Compared to
'80s pop radio
Without You"
' In the heyday
sism of the M
' songs about c
' of workers, Si
' squads and ap:
' rational atheii
' Found What
song that revei
" al (and very,
' yearnings spei
' on the charts.
Perhaps it is
of U2's music
J
continui
the band a sc
Melissa has i
: voice. Some
j Mississippi dra
say it had chara
Truly an or
has personality
almost deadpa
bined with her
creates an inte
becomes evidei
sings about he
being a stay-ai
rock star on tl
Song" she sin
who can only s
on her porch, '
under them hoi
Sam A
Family U
816-5
Bom
Eshel
Indus!
Techni
328-6
Bren
Killings
Decision E
328-6
The Bib
counsel
governc
Sponsored
-
aBMM





Tuesday, April 7, 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
a East Carolinian
ism
ibits and, through
group counseling,
t to use what
Is "pacing strate-
n help teens get a
Irinking as well as
ognizing and treat-
rinking problems,
ases itself to criti-
xording to Glaser,
s not condone
ng, "It seems a
derage drinkers
from this kind of
ility he said,
iside, DrinkWise
i to the 40,000,000
ire not alcoholics
want to reduce
;e for health, psy-
r relationship rea-
fits
ately
rays
3s
won
toms
tRETT
(RITES
gives good
ogie Nights
EW LINE CINEMA
:nce between
wkleberry Finn is
ikay, not really.
t have any river
y're both classic
of-age tales;
:t laid as much,
lerful world of
qus chronicles
f Dirk Diggler
a young man
nething extra
Everyone has a
philosophizes,
hare his talent
just about sex;
-of-age talcs, it
its times. And
tights paints of
f. Or rather, it's
much else. To
I everyone else
i's current wor-
, Boogie Nights
lessof the'70s,
igh its pornog-
ulled into the
director Jack
ds), who wants
ul" films that
ence in their
fiave shot their
USE II
U2
continued from page 8
the hero of the day, "Bullet the
Blue Sky" was dangerously critical
of American politics. At the height
of America's fascination with
' cocaine and heroin, "Running to
; Stand Still" revcaTeid'the blistering
stark despair of drug addiction.
The love songs of the '80s were
usually soaringly romantic.
' Compared to the epic romances of
'80s pop radio, a song like "With or
Without You" was surprisingly dark.
' In the heyday of the intense narcis-
sism of the Me Decade, U2 wrote
' songs about corporate exploitation
of workers, South American death
' squads and apartheid. In a nation of
rational atheists, "I Still Haven't
' Found What I'm Looking For a
song that reveals the band's spiritu-
al (and very, dare I say, Christian)
yearnings spent considerable time
on the charts.
Perhaps it is because the character
of U2's music was so opposite to the
cultural atmosphere of the 1980s
that it caught on. Perhaps The
Joshua Tree was the aesthetic aspirin
our nation needed. Who knows, but
eleven million Americans picked
the album up. The band filled foot-
ball stadi-
ums all over
the country,
became the
third rock
band ever to
appear on
the cover of
Time
Magazine,
won the
Grammy for
Album of
the Year in
1988 and
became the
objects of
parody in the famous comic strip
Bloom County.
1988 was most certainly the Year
of U2. With the Time cover, the tour
and the Grammy Award, American
culture became saturated with U2.
The band swept the Rolling Stone
readers and critics polls three years
"Psst Bono, I've got it. We'll dress like morons
and wear silly glasses and aluminum pents
PHOTO COURTESY OF ISLAND RECORDS
in a row. Bono's lyrics became the
topic of in-depth discussions every-
where from music magazines to
highschool lunch tables.
The culmination of U2's
American popularity was the
release of
their fdllow-
up album to
JTfc Joshua
' Tree, Rattle
and Hum.
. Tecrfhically,
Rattle and
Hum was the
soundtrack to
the movie
the band
released by
the same
name.
Ireland's fab
four graced
the silver screen in late November,
and although the film didn't do so
well in the theaters, it made its
money back and was a powerhouse
in video sales. As a movie, it chron-
icled the band through their recent
tour, offering powerful concert
footage, interviews and sneak
peeks at the band in the studio.
Overwhelmed by their sudden
popularity and eager to pay homage
to their rock and roll predecessors,
the band recorded a few new songs
in the legendary Sun Studios
(where Sam
Phillips, Elvis
Presley,
Johnny Cash
and Roy
O r b i s o n
recorded) that
focused on
their rock her-
itage. "Angel
of Harlem"
was a tribute to
jazz legend
Billie Holiday; "Love Rescue Me"
was co-written by Bob Dylan;
"When Love Comes to Town" fea-
tured bluesman B.B. King.
Rattle and Hum also featured live
covers of the Beatles "Hclter
Skelter Dylan's "All Along the
Watchtower" and the live version of
"Bullet the Blue Sky U2's searing
criticism of the US's South
American politics, was prefaced by
Hendrix's equally heated rendition
'We're going
PHOTO C0URTEST
of "The Star Spangled Banner
The band also included some out-
takes from The Joshua Tret and some
concert footage.
There was considerable critical
backlash against Rattle and 'Hum,
since most
critics read
the rever-
ence to rock
legends as
arrogance,
but the pub-
lic lodged
their vote in
favor of the
band by buy-
ing almost as
many copies
of it as they had of The Joshua Tree.
Pretty soon U2 got tired of it all
though, and at the end of the 1980s,
during their New Year's Eve con-
cert, Bono announced that the band
was going to have togo away "and
think it all up again
Fans worried that this statement
was a harbinger of U2's demise, and
though the band didn't break up, in
a way, it was the death of U2. When
the band finally emerged from her-
to wear what?"
OF ISLAND RECORDS
mitage in Berlin in 1991, it was clear
that they were not the same band
they were when they walked off-
stage in early 1990. The band that
U2 had been in the '80s was no
more, and with Achtung Baby, the
band began their almost decade-
long experimentation with what we
'90s folks now call "electronica
There is no doubt that they have
gone on to make music as equally
powerful as their '80s catalogue
(despite what pop radio may think),
but I still get that old familiar feel-
ing when I listen to The Joshua Tree.
I can still remember being thirteen,
peeling the cellophane off the cas-
sette tape (remember those?) and
clumsily loading it into the tape
deck. The smell of new tape filled
my nostrils as the otherworldly
sounds of "Where the Streets Have
No Name" filled my ears. Bono's
voice wailed out the lyrics: "I want
to run, I want to hide and boy oh
boy, I wanted to run with him. And
even today, ten years later, I find
that sometimes, I still do.
Trailer
conlinued from page 8
the band a sound like no other.
Melissa has an unusual singing
. voice. Some would say her
I Mississippi drawl is flat, but I would
say it had character.
Truly an original, Trailer Bride
has personality. Melissa Swingle's
almost deadpan seriousness com-
bined with her crazy cowgirl outfits
creates an interesting mixture that
becomes evident on this CD as she
sings about her conflicts between
being a stay-at-home mom and a
rock star on the road. In "Porch
Song" she sings about someone
who can only sing "true and right"
on her porch, "Cause I get scared
under them honky-tonk lights On
"Wildness perhaps the best song
on the CD, Melissa and the band
are really rocking with Melissa's
powerful signature chord changes
and her Mississippi-born drawl
coming out.
This album is perfect. Sweet
melodies, just the right amount of
twang and that catchy jangle make
it nearly impossible to get this
music out of your head. With a per-
cussion section including tam-
bourine, and an amajigger (Trailer
Bride aptly names this the shaker
thing in their credits) and other
instruments like the banjo, man-
dolin, harmonica, and saw (yep, a
real saw that Melissa plays with a
violin bow) how could you not be
interested. Some songs are more
like lullabies while others take the
rock 'n roll approach. "Yoohoo
River "Cowgirl" and "Show
Bizness" are good old foot stom-
pers. Hell, they all are.
Droll
continued (torn page 8
A great number of new songs
were played Friday night. "New"
meaning not yet released on an
album. Among these were an
unusually poppy song titled "Left
Side revealing an inner Stevie
Wonder that Gibb has been keep-
ing in .the closet. In past shows, the
band has been known to cover the
song "Big Brother" from Stevie
Wonder's Talking Book album, so
perhaps this is the reason that the
song emerged. The other tune is a
hard rocker Gibb referred to as the
"Indian Song Let's hope this is on
their upcoming album.
When you see Gibb Droll in
concert, you are forever changed.
Those who are musicians or have a
deep love for music
can probably best
understand how
Gibb feels the
music. The man
feels every note that
resonates from his
fingers, whether he
is mournfully play-
ing a slow solo in a
B.B. King feel or
whether he is scurry-
ing across the stage
and shaking his head
in a frenzy in a SRV
pose.
Gibb Droll is usu-
ally always on a mis-
sion to please the
crowd (as all per-
formers should try to
consider) and he
accomplished this
by playing some fre-
quently requested
"I shouldn't have eaten that burrito
PHOTO COURTESY OF METRO TALENT GROUP
songs, "Gentry Song" from Dharma
and "Carrie" from Narrow Month
Jar. To spice things up he per-
formed these tunes .solo on an
acoustic guitar and though he
lacked his band mates, he still
packed a punch.
There have been plans for a
while to release a live record so that
fans can capture this unique experi-
ence on a record and reminisce
about the time they saw Gibb, or
hope for a future time when they
can. The live CD has been on hold,
however, because the band just
cannot agree on songs and a good
sound for a live record. Whether
this happens or not, we fans will
always have the experience of see-
ing the Gibb Droll Band imprinted
in our long term memory as our
brains call out for more, as if addict-
ed to a drug. Until then, we play our
memory like the piper and wait
anxiously for the next show.
What people were not looking for
on the first Easter
Instead, people were searching for the body of Jesus of Nazareth. Was he an actual person? Did he arise from the dead? Did He
claim to be God? Find out about this remarkable person by contacting one of us or by visiting the web site
http:www.leaderu.comTellMeMore
Sam Adkins
Family Medicine
816-5457
Tope Bello
Management
328-4856
Rhonda Bode
Nursing
328-4307
Bonnie
Eshelman
Industry &
Technology
328-6704
Brenda
Killings worth
Decision Sciences
328-6235
Deborah Gladson Frederic Hebert
Registrar Management
328-6527 328-6582
Dana King
Family Medicine
816-5505
Ralph Scott
Library Services
328-0235
Alan Larkins
Physics
328-6316
Cynthia Smith
Political Science
328-6189
Donna Bongo
Student Life
328-6824
Anne Heritage
Mathematics
328-1890
Lauretta (L.L.) Lewis
Social Work
328-4197
Pat Spain
Computing &
Information Systems
328-5402
John Bradley
Decision Sciences
328-6801
James Hix
Chemistry
328-1658
Jeffrey Marshall
University Unions
328-4715
Dan Sprau
Family Medicine
816-2236
Elaine Brlley
Central Motor Pool
328-0147
Edward Huechtker
Physician Assistant
Studies
328-4423
Sandra Martin
Summer Ventures
328-6036
Lynn Caverly
Student Union-
Mendenhall
328-2306
Robert Hunting
Mathematics
328-1896
Brian Mennecke
Decision Sciences
328-6599
Scott Dellana Susan B. Emory
Decision Sciences ScienceMathematics
328-4893 Education Center
328-6885
Ben Irons
University Attorney
328-6940
Dean Patton
Family Medicine
816-2600
Martha Jackson
Nursing
328-6075
Wanda
Scarborough
Student Stores
328-6731
Perry Ennls
Materials
Management
328-1012
Lillian Jenkins
Facility Services
328-6776
Nancy Scott
Library Services
328-0297
George Yiznltski
HVAC
328-4217
V. Elizabeth Vaughn Judy Bohannon
Undergraduate Child Development
Admissions Office & Family Relations
328-1717
328-1356
The Bible says that on that first Easter morning, some of the guard came into the city and reported to the chief priests aU that had happened. And when they had assembled with the elders and
counseled together, they gave a large sum of money to the soldiers and said, "You are to say, �His disciples came by night and stole Him away while we were asleep And if this should come to the
governor's ears, we will win him over and keep you out of trouble And they took the money and did as they had been instructed Matthew 28:11 However, Jesus said, "Thus it is written that the
Christ should suffer and rise again from the dead the third day Luke 24:46 Then "He appeared to more than five hundred brethren at one rime" I Corinthians 15:6
Sponsored by Christian FacultyStaff Fellowship - 328-6801
ii�
Campus Crusade for Christ - 830-1186
I
I





-s�
10 TmU.Y, April 7.1998
The Etit Carolinian
Theyconquered
everything Exit death.
Past world rulers like Alexander the Great, Tutankhamen and Julius Caesar have all had one thing in
common: the past. They're stuck in it. It makes more sense to follow a ruler who has conquered
deathand a world leader who promises to someday rule the world through peace.
Jesus Christ is that ruler. He claimed to be God, was crucified for our sins, and then rose
bodily from the grave. And he promises to return to rule over the earth.
1-800-236-9238
escmail@ccci.org
http:religions.everystudent.com
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ

Boogie
continued from page 8
wads, so to speak. To do this, he
creates characters with lives that
they sum up in 20-words-or-Icss
speeches before they get naked.
In Dirk's screen debut, for
example, he plays an aspiring
young porn actor (quite a
stretch!). The female casting
director, five seconds after he
walks in the door, tells him,
"This film has to be a success.
If it's not, I'll be kicked out of
my house Then she strips and
gives Dirk a test run on top of
her desk.
Wow! Now that's depth!
Unfortunately, the people
behind the scenes of these porn
masterpieces aren't much deeper
themselves. They really think
they're making art here, and chang-
ing people's lives with it. "I've
saved thousands of relationships
with my films Dirk says when he
accepts his porn Oscar for "Best
Cock And he really believes it.
Fortunately for the viewer,
though, writerdirector Paul
Anderson and his actors give the
characters hidden depths that even
they don't suspect. Wahlberg
shines as the painfully stupid Dirk,
and Bun Reynolds gives a career-
saving performance as Horner.
Fargo's William H. Macy is also
great as the cuckolded assistant
director Little Bill, and even real
life porn star Nina Hartley is good
as Little Bill's blatantly unfaithful
wife.
"You want ma to do what with my what?"
PHOTO COURTESY OF NHW LINE CINEMA
But the standout performance in
Boogie Nights comes from Julianne
Moore as cocaine-addicted porn
queen Amber Waves. Amber,
denied contact with her son
through a divorce settlement,
craves a child and thus takes young
Dirk under her wing as a surrogate
son. Of course, she also wants to
sleep with him, but that contradic-
tion never seems strange to her.
These frustrations play out across
Moore's face in every scene, and
make Amber by far the most inter-
esting character in the film.
Amber's blindness to her own
emotional problems is common to
all the characters in Boogie Nights,
however. Despite their lives of con-
stant sex and drugs, they're inno-
cents, more like children than
adults. But that innocence exem-
plifies the 70s. In a time when
birth control was plentiful and
most venereal diseases could be
taken care of with a shot of peni-
cillin, sex was the most innocent
thing in the world.
But that innocence couldn't last.
With the '80s came more serious
diseases, and a more conservative
nation. Porn had to change, and not
ail of our heroes cope with those
changes well. Dirk, in partMMiT,
falls pretty far before the film's end.
So if you're a 70s fanatic, see
Boogie Nights but be wary. Its view of
everyone's favorite decade, though
loving, is not all sweetness and
�light. And if, like me, you hate the
70s and everything they stand for,
laugh at the clothes and go along for
the ride. It's well-worth the price of
the rental.
Mishap
continued from page B
repetitively to the point of hypno-
sis, could be so mundane.
Naturally, the overrated standard
roots-rock instruments (organ and
harmonica) are used to excess on
this track.
"April's Cold" is also chock-full
o' used-up riffs set to the usual
insipid drum loop. "Soleless" is an
unexciting, recycled version of
"Statue" tuned down a step and
"freshened up" with a new intro.
The madhouse quality of
"Sterile Jacket" very nearly
redeems the track, but "sterile" is
the best adjective for this one. The
grainy, grimy rawness of blues and
rock are sanded away for a
smoother presentation of an old-
fashioned song. Bad idea.
"Sick of My Head" is another
listless echo of bad-ass rock, clever-
ly disguised as elevator music for
hippies. I found myself wondering,
"Do these people just sit down in
the morning and scramble the same
five chords around until they get a
combination they didn't use the
day before, then congratulate them-
selves on having written 'original'
material?"
The only songs I really liked
were the lasts two. "Disturbance"
opens with some mean mandolin
pickin then evolves into a decent
instrumental hoe.down1Mjshap dis-
play fine musiciarTsnip, as this song
demonstrates.
The quiet, retrospective "School
Bus" is a good closing track, but the
song is not as fully developed as it
could be. Some of the more beauti-
ful moments are sandwiched
between harsher chords which
make the song a bit awkward and
restrict the flow of the music.
Roots rock is becoming one of
those musical trends which starts
by rehashing itself and borrowing
heavily from its own style, creating
an unnatural inbred child whose
demise is certain. The question is,
when, oh, when will that be?
STUDENT HOUSING
GETS NO BETTER!
NEW CONDOMINIUMS
FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURE
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
�3 BATHROOMS
�3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
�WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�SELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
YOUR PARENTS SAV
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS TOWARD
YOUR EDUCATIONAL COSTS:
�SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE
�LOW DOWN PAYMENT
�LOW INTEREST RATE
�TREMENDOUS RESALE VALUE
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 1998!
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL RESERVE YOUR UNIT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
ONLY 24 UNITS
unit plan -1 230 sq. ft.
directions to site






Em Carolinian
ms strange to her.
ns play out across
i every scene, and
I far the most inter-
in the film,
idness to her own
ems is common to
rs in Boogie Nights,
:c their lives of con-
rugs, they're inno-
kc children than
f innocence exem-
. In a time when
vas plentiful and
diseases could be
ith a shot of peni-
the most innocent
Id.
cence couldn't last.
:ame more serious
more conservative
to change, and not
those
fore the film's end.
i 70s fanatic, see
be wary. Its view of
te decade, though
ill sweetness and
: me, you hate the
ing they stand for,
es and go along for
-worth the price of
s cope with thoS
)irk, in parti
e mean mandolin
Ives into a decent
downJVljshap dis-
rfship, as this song
respective "School
ising track, but the
ly developed as it
f the more beauti-
are sandwiched
:r chords which
bit awkward and
if the music,
becoming one of
:nds which starts
:lf and borrowing
wn style, creating
red child whose
, The question is,
vill that be?
11 Tuesday, April 7. 1998
The Eut CtroMtn
Valevich honored as 1998 Outstanding Female Athlete
Softball player selected
as female recipient
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
SENIOR WRITER
Each year, ECU honors two
athletes as the Outstanding Male
and Female Student Athletes of
the Year. This year's female
recipient is softball player Christi
Valevich.
The Oregon native is playing
for her fourth year on the team
and is in the midst of her finest
offensive season. Valevich holds a
3.5 grade point average as a
biology major and is shown as a
example of ECU athletic's
commitment to academics and
the well-rounded student athlete.
The Outstanding Student
Athlete of the Year is sponsored by
PCS Phosphate and the Pirate
Club. It provides a grant in aid in
the name of the winners.
However, the
award stands for
more to Valevich.
"It means
you're a scholar
off the field and
that you're good
both athletically
a n d
academically
Valevich said. "It
means you're
well-rounded.
It's a really
prestigious
award. I applied
for it last year and
I didn't get it. It file pi
means that all
that you have been working for
means something to you and it
means something to other
Christi Valevich is a biology
major and holds a 3.5 GPA
people
A member of three national
honor societies and the PCS
Phosphate All-Academic team in
1997, Valevich has
successfully balanced
her time between
softball and
academics, though it
wasn't always easy for
her to master the art
of time management.
"Time
management's
something you have
learn Valevich said.
"My freshman year I
had trouble balancing
the schoolwork and
my grades reflected
that. I had to find that
point where I can do
well in school and in
The whole reason I'm
for school and it's the
softball.
here is
number one priority. You've got to
Pirate baseball puts end to
nine game losing streak
Conference record
improved to 6-6
Jason thuringer
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU baseball ream swept a
three-game weekend series from
conference rival Old Dominion
University on April 4th and 5th.
ECU came into the weekend
carrying a nine game losing streak.
"We came off a couple of hard
losses aijd it feels good to get this
earn winding again senior Ryan
lassimo aid after Sunday's
victory.
"We're onlygonna be as good
as our pitching and our defense
head coach Keith LeClair said.
"And overall we played pretty
well
In the series opener, junior
Brooks Jernigan stared a trend of
good pitching that lasted
throughout the weekend.
"I think that it was our best
effort of the year LeClair said
about Jernigan's performance.
"It's the kind of effort that were
going to have to have to stay
competitive
Jernigan's performance, a
complete game, raised his record
to 5-1. It was the Pirates first
complete game of the year.
"The defense
played really well
and I felt good on
t h e
moundJernigan
said. "It's just one of
those things,
everything clicked
right and I was able
u.2fcvi�aKt � :S
KrfWKTfs fir i

4 m

aBBBBBBBVfl

The ECU baseball team swept a three-game series over ODU this weekend.
FILE PHOTO
went 8 13 innings in picking up
the win. After a shaky start that
saw Old Dominion strand five
base-runners in the first two
innings Minton settled down and
gave up only one run.
"I relied on my defense a lot
Minton said. "They really
supported me
Fulcher pitched came in with
one out and a runner on first in the
ninth inning. After hitting a batter
and yielding a single to load the
bases, Fulcher was able to get a
game ending double play and
picked up his first save of the
season. Overall for the weekend
the Pirate pitchers were able to
stand 27 Monarch base-runners.
In addition to the excellent
pitching, senior shortstop Ryan
Massimo had a good series at the
plate. Overall Massimo went 6-9
with 5 RBI's.
"I'm just seeing the ball real
good right now Massimo said.
"I'm trying to wait for my pitch in
my zone
"Ryan made great adjustments
at the plate and really picked us
up at the plate LeClair added.
Overall the Pirates are now 17-
17 overall and 6-6 in the CAA.
The next game is scheduled for 4
p.m. on Wednesday at Harrington
Field.
to go all the way
In the nightcap
four Pirate pitchers
continued the trend.
Junior Travis
Thompson,
normally the closer,
started and yielded
the only earned run
of the game in 4 13
innings pitched.
Juniors Bill Outlaw
and Kevyn Fulcher
threw for a
combined total of
two innings. Senior
Brian Fields
covered the
remaining 23
inning. Fulcher
picked up his first
win of the season.
Freshman Foyc
Minton kept the
tradition alive on
Sunday. Minton
BASEBALL
ECU Pitchers lines from weekend sweep of Old Dominion University
Saturday's 1 st game IP Hits Runs ER BB SO
Brooks Jernigan 9.0 7 1 13 10
Winner Jernigan 5-1
Saturday's 2nd game IP Hits Runs ER BB SO
Travis Thompson 413 6 5 10 2
Bill Outlaw 23 0 0 0 2 1
Brian Fields 23 0 0 0 2 0
Kevyn Fulcher 1.1 2 0 0 0 2
Winner Fulcher 1-0
Sunday's game IP Hits Runs ER BB SO
Foye Minton 813 9 1 0 1 5
Kevyn Fulcher 23 1 0 0 0 0
Winner Minton 3-1
Save Fulcher First
Men's tennis posts eighth win of
the season against Barton College
ECU sweeps strong
doubles matches
Mario scherhaufer
STAFF WRITER
The Pirates' tennis season seems
to be determined by ups and
downs this spring.
After their disappointing 4-1
loss last Tuesday, the Pirate
Netters came back and defeated
Barton College 5-2, posting their
eighth win of the season.
Despite their victory, the
Pirates suffered another
drawback�losing Stephan
Siebenbrunner to an injured
ankle for the upcoming match
against longtime rival William &
Mary.
"I saw the ball coming while I
was running backward. I tried to
get it and twisted my ankle
Siebenbrunner said. �
Nevertheless, the remaining
six Pirates won all three doubles
against the Tribe on Saturday. But
ECU senior Brett Rowley was the
lone Pirate to win in singles.
Rowley, playing at the No. 5
position, defeated Patrick Brown
in straight sets, 6-3,6-0.
"I was very fired up and got
SEE TENNIS, PAGE 12
balance your priorities
Valevich grew up in Eugene,
Ore. and decided to come across a
continent to attend ECU.
"I came out here on a
recruiting trip and I liked the
atmosphere Valevich said. "I
enjoyed the people, I enjoyed the
faculty, the athletic directors and
the people in the softball program.
But most of all I enjoyed the
weather
In her first years on the ECU
softball team, Valevich was used
as a pitcher. Though she was a
successful pitcher who ranked in
the toplO in many collegiate
pitching categories, pitchers do
not get to bat often. Valevich was
no different. Her rare at-bats led
to anemic offensive numbers.
This year, Valevich moved from
pitcher to first base. The move
gave her more frequent at-bats
and led to a batting average of
.274, 14 runs batted in and many
Christi Valevich
Year: Senior
Position: PitcherFirst Base
Hometown: Eugene. Oregon
Major: BiologyPre-Med j
GPA: 3.5
Honors: Member; Gamma Beta Phi, Omicron Delta
Kappa. Golden Key and PCS Phosphate All-Academic
Team 1997
of the best offensive numbers of
her career.
"It has to do with batting every
game Valevich said. "My first
three years when I was a pitcher I
didn't get to bat. Now I can bat
every game
Valevich and Male Student -
Athlete of the Year Dan Gonzalez
will be honored at the PCS
Phosphate Breakfast of
Champions. She plans to graduate
in May of 1999 and attend ECU
Medical School.
Tennis stands at 3-0 in CAA
Wilmingon, Elonfall
to Lady Pirates
Damon Stafford
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU women's tennis team
continued their undefeated CAA
play as they matched up against
UNC Wilmington on the road
April 2. The Lady Pirates
grabbed their third conference
win over the Seahawks, 9-1.
ECU's Ann Svae, Asa Ellbring,
and Mona Eek controlled the top
three singles matches by winning
in straight sets. In the No. 4 spot.
Lady Pirate Michelle Martin went
on to take her win in three sets
after dropping the second. In the
No. 5 singles, ECU's Catherine
Morgan battled back from an
opening loss in the first set to
victories in the second and third.
For the third time in four
matches, the ECU women
towered over their opponents in
the doubles match-up. Lady
Pirates Svae and Eek tramped
Wilmington's Wendy Kulp and
Katie Brinkman, 8-1, while ECU's
Ellbring and Martin claimed their
victory over Vara Hartley and
Samantha Thompson, 8-4.
An 8-0 shutout was recorded
over Wilmington as Catherine
Morgan and Gina MacDonald
reigned over Elizabeth Perry and
Stephanie Phelps in their
respective doubles matches.
After frustrating postponed
matches against Barton College,
the Lady Pirates tennis team
hosted the Fighting Christians of
Elon on April 4. The Pirates
dominated by winning four of five
singles matches and all three of
their double matches with a final
score of 7-1. For the second
straight match, ECU's top three
singles opponents were handled
with 'straight set victories. Svae,
Eek and Ellbring slammed Eton's
Kristen Fleming, Jenny Thigpen
and Sarah Collins with only one
Seahawk scoring above one in any
set. This match brings Eek and
Ellbring their fifth and fourth
straight victories respectively.
"This is Monas last home
meet of the year Head Tennis
Coach Bill Moore said. "And I
think she played exceptionally
well
The only other singles win
came in the No. 5 spot, where
Gina MacDonald claimed her
straight set win over Elon's
Roberta McCue. For the fourth
time in the last five matches, the
Lady Pirates' doubles teams have
continued to bully their
opponents. ECU's Svae and Eek,
Ellbring and Martin, and
MacDonald and Morgan all
grabbed their doubles wins, 8-2,
8-4 and 8-3 respectively.
"This is one that you like to
put away strong Moore said.
"This was a good match for us,
and all our girls played really
well
This brings the Lady Pirates'
CAA record to 3-0 while their
overall record improves to 9-5.
Mona Eek played in the last
home match of her career.
PHOTO BY CUV BUCK
Dominating Lady Pirates
SINGLES MATCHES
Position Score
No. 1 Ann Svae 6-1,6-0
No. 2 Mona Eek 6-4,6-1
No. 3 Asa Ellbring 6-0.6-1
No. 5 Gina Mac Donald 6-3,6-1
DOUBLES MATCHES
No.1 Ann Svae. Mona Eek 8-2
No.2 Asa Ellbring,Michelle Martin 8-4
No.3 Gina MacDonald.Catherine Morgan 8-3
Lady Pirate softball kicks off
conference play with three wins
Team goes 3-1 over
the weekend
TRAVIS BAKKLEY
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU softball team began
Big South Conference play on a
tear, winning three of four games
in Virginia over the weekend.
The Pirates were led by ace
Dcnise Reagan, who got the
decision in all three victories.
On Friday the Pirates split a
doubleheader with Radford. ECU
was shut out in the first game by
Highlander pitcher Jennifer
Shellhammer, 2-0. Shellhammer
allowed only three hits while
striking out five in the complete
game victory. Pirate starter Jami
Bendle took the loss and fell to 9-
6.
The second game saw ECU
score single runs in the first, third
and sixth innings en route to a 3-2
victory. Pirate starter Reagan
struck-out five in the complete
game four-hitter.
At the plate the Pirates were
led by Junior slugger Isonette
Polonius and Freshman leadoff
hitter Keisha Shepperson.
Polonius went 2-3 with a stolen
base, run scored and RBI.
Shepperson went 2-4, scored a
run and drove in one.
Shepperson said Shellhammer
was successful in the first game,
but not overpowering.
"She didn't throw slow
Shepperson said. "She threw a
riseball that kept us off balance
On Saturday the Pirates
traveled to Lynchburg for a
doubleheader against Liberty.
The Pirates had to rally from a
3-0 deficit in the first game before
winning 6-5 in extra innings.
Nicki Andrews hit an RBI double
with two outs in the seventh to
draw the Pirates within one.
Shepperson followed with a
clutch RBI single to left that tied
the score at three. ECU scored
twice in the eighth, only to see
Liberty score two of their own.
Reagan then replaced starter Lisa
Paganini and shut down Liberty
the rest of the way. Shepperson
hit another RBI single in the
ninth for the game-winner.
SEE SOFTBALL. PAGE 13
SOFTBALL
Friday's Games Game 1 12 3 East Carolina 0 0 0 Radford 0 1 14 5 6 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 xR H - 0 3 - 2 6E 1 0
Game 2 1 East Carolina 1 Radford 02 3 0 1 0 04 5 6 7 0 0 10 0 0 2.0R H - 3 9 2 4E 0 3
Saturday's Games Game 112 3 East Carolina 0 0 0 Liberty 1 2 04 5 6 7 0 0 12 0 0 0 08 9 2 1 -2 0 -R H E 6 7 3 5 3 3
Game 2 1 East Carolina 0 Liberty 02 3 1 0 0 0 f4 5 6 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0R H - 2 8 - 0 4E 1 2






12 Tueiday, April 7. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
I
13 Tui
Tennis
continual) from pageII
lucky to hit some big bombers out
there today Rowley said. "They
are considered our biggest rival
and it also was my last home game
for ECU
Whereas the Pirates posted
wins at No. 2, 3, 4 and 6 singles
against Barton College, two days
later they also suffered losses at
the same No. 2, 3, 4 and 6 singles
spots against the Tribe of William
and Mary. All eight matches were
decided in two straight sets.
The No. 2 match between
senior Nils Alomar and W&M's
Alexander Socters was the
clincher, with Soeters winning 7-
5,5-2.
The men's team current
strength lies in their doubles
performance. The Pirate Netters
won the doubles point against
Barton College by winning at No.
2 and No. 3 doubles, and they
swept all three doubles for the
first time this season against
W&M.
"I think we found the right
mixture for our doubles now
Head Coach Bill Moore said. "If
everybody recovers from injury,
we will win some of those close
matches we had over the last
weeks
According to Moore, the
Pirates should put up some good
fights at the conference
tournament on April 17. "VCU is
the undisputed favorite for the
conference title, but we will fight
for the second spot with ODU,
W&M and Richmond Moore
said.
Richmond will also be the
opponent in the Pirates' next
season match which will be
hosted by the Spiders today at
2:30 p.m.
If their series of ups and downs
keeps going on, the Pirates should
return from Richmond with their
ninth victory in their pocket.
&-�- TENNIS
April 2, 1998 ECU Tennis Courts
ECU
Singles
No. 1 Kenny Kirby
No. 2 Nils Alomar
No. 3 Oliver Thalen
No. 4 Brett Rowley
No. 5 Siebenbrunner
No. 6 Derek Slate
Doubles
No. 1 Roope KalajoRawley
No. 2 AlomarKirby
No. 3 SlateThalen
final: ECU 5 - BC 2
April 4, 1998 ECU Tennis
ECU
Singli
No. 1 Kalajo
No. 2 Alomar
No. 3 Kirby
No. 4 Thalen
No. 5 Rowley
No. 6 Slate
Doubles
No. 1 KalajoRowley
No. 2 AlomarKirby
No. 3 SlateThalen
final: ECU 2 -W&M 4
Current overall record: 8-9
Next match: Tuesday, April 7
Barton College
Ben Cooper
Dominic LaFlamme
Martin llluzzi
Jeff Watson, Jr.
Hugh Allen
Hruoje Knezovic
CooperLaFlamme
IlluzziWatson
AllenKnezovic
Courts
William & Mary
Trevor Spracklin
Alexander Soeters
Tim Csontos
David Kenas
Patrick Brown
Christian Jordan
result
6-4, 2-3 ret.
6-4, 6-1
6-2, 6-4
6-0, 6-1
6-1 ret.
6-0, 6-0
6-8
8-3
8-0
winner
BC
ECU
ECU
ECU
BC
ECU
BC
ECU
ECU
ruc$�W
&&3&8&�"
sv
PAIN KILLER.
F or fast relief from the nagging ache of taxes, we
recommend TIAA-CREF SRAs. SRAs are tax-
deferred annuities that can help you build additional
assets �money that can make the difference between
living and living urll in retirement.
Contributions to SRAs are conveniently deducted
from your salary on a pretax basis. The result? More
money invested. Fewer taxes now. And since investment
earnings are tax deferred until you receive them as
income, the money you don't send to Washington can
work even harder for you.
What else do SRAs offer? A full range of investment
choices, a helpful luan feature, and the financial expertise
of TIAA-CRKF, the world's largest retirement system.0
GORDON'S
doll and Ski
Vppun I � I � 111ir111 nl � Iti'nt.il
756-1003
r
DWI Assessments, Evaluations And Treatment Programs
�Counseling services include
Individual, Family, and Group Therapy
Your assessment & treatment (if required) will
e done in a professional yet laid back manner in
a private, comfortable setting for less money
than you would spend with some larger agencies.
Appointments Scheduled Around YOUR Work or School
Schedule
b
All services Are Fully Licensed & Credentialized By The State
of North Carolina
Fees based upon income
Located on Evans Street Mall
Within Walking Distance of Campus
�MWffrtttttttfrHS
Michael G. Morris, CDWIE, CRT, CSAC
315 S. Evans Street; Suite B; Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: (919) 752-1333 Fax: (919) 757-3995
.
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7 & 8 FROM 10-6
n THURSDAY, APRIL 9 FROM 10-3
p.��. ECU STUDENT STORE
Mywlotaamwpawmfafall
I
"It v
shortsto
said. "A
going to
Pirate
said she
because
"I try
relief), b
innings:
second
brought
down
Reags
dominan
B'cching
awn (
second i
single by
That
need as
win in h
"Deni
confiden
"She has
her pit
comman
ECU
Wednesc
doublehe
return h
home sta
"I thir
be playir
Kee said,
home in
be nice to
in a row
For n
website G
SCOTTS
his 24 yc
Tour, Gi
himself ir
Thatli
on the Si
Morgan h
player.
Morgai
the secc
Sunday, g
in his last
Morgai
two shot
finished i
his third
Senior PC
He also v






Carolinian
13 Tunday. April 7, 1998
Tha Eiat Carolinian
Softball
continual! from paga II
IS&
F investment
ncial expertise
ii-nt svstem.0
GlKtls
"It was a blooper over the
shortstop's head Shepperson
said. "At first I thought it was
going to be caught
Pirate Head Coach Tracy Kcc
said she pitched Reagan in relief
because of extra innings.
"I try not to (pitch Reagan in
relief), but we had gone into extra
innings and she was loose for the
second game Kee said. "We
brought her in and she shut it
down
Reagan continued her
dominance in the second game,
pitching a four-hit shutout. Senior
Dawn Conrad tripled in the
second inning and scored on a
single by Andrews.
That was all Reagan would
need as she cruised to her 12th
win in her last 13 decisions.
"Denise is playing with a lot of
confidence right now Kee said.
"She has a lot of movement on
her pitches and has great
command
ECU will be in Hampton
Wednesday to play a
doubleheader. The Pirates then
return home for an eight game
home stand.
"I think wc will be excited to
be playing on our home field
Kee said. "Wc haven't played at
home in over a month, so it will
be nice to have eight home games
in a row
For more quotes visit our
website @ www.tcc.ecu.edu
Kenyan Jackson Kabiga
wins Paris Marathon
PARIS (AP) � Kenya's Jackson
Kabiga won the 22nd Paris
Marathon on Sunday in a record
time for the race of two hours,
nine minutes and 36 seconds
while Australia's Nicole Caroll
won the women's race. Kabiga
swept away the earlier record for
the Paris Marathon that was set in
1992 by Luis Soarcs of France
with a time of two hours, ten
minutes and three seconds. Caroll
also broke the previous time for
women in the Paris Marathon,
running the race in two hours, 27
minutes and six seconds. The
earlier record had been held by
Man Tanigawa of Japan, who won
in 1994 with a time of two hours,
27 minutes and 55 seconds. Some
22,000 participants took off
promptly at 9 a.m. (0700 GMT)
on the Champs Elysees. The
finish was on the elegant Avenue
Foch.
Damian Rhodes makes 21
saves, records fifth
shutout this season
BUFFALO, NY. (AP) �Damian
Rhodes made 21 saves and
recorded his fifth shutout this
season as the Ottawa Senators
beat the Buffalo Sabres 1-0
Sunday. Daniel Alfredsson scored
the only goal when he deflected a
shot from the point past Dominik
Hasek in the second period as the
Senators extended their unbeaten
streak to four games. Ottawa
moved four points ahead of the
Carolina Panthers for the final
playoff spot in the Eastern
Conference while Buffalo missed
an opportunity to move into a tie
for fourth place in the conference
with Washington.
Rhodes played well but was
hardly tested in picking up his
eighth career shutout. In his last
one, Rhodes stopped 23 shots in a
0-0 tie with the Pittsburgh
Penguins.
NY Rangers beat Chicago
CHICAGO (AP) � The New
York Rangers beat Chicago on
Daniel Goneau's goal 1:24 into
overtime but were eliminated
from playoff contention when
Ottawa defeated Buffalo.
Goneau's goal, which ended an
eight-game winless streak for the
Rangers (0-7-1), was set up by
Niklas Sundstrom, who scored the
Rangers' other goal.
New York, outs hot 31-17, got a
strong effort from goaltender
Mike Richter. It was the first time
the Rangers missed the playoffs
since 1993 and just the third time
since 1978. The Rangers defeated
Chicago for the first time since
Jan. 16, 1994 and ended a six-
game winless streak (0-5-1)
against the Blackhawks. Tony
Amonte scored his 200th career
NHL goal for Chicago, which has
lost four of its last five.
New Jersey snaps
losing streak
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) � Patrik Elias scored his
second goal of the game early in
the third period and New Jersey
snapped a season-high three-
game losing streak with a win over
Phoenix. Martin Brodeur, who
picked up his third assist of the
season on Elias' game-winner,
made only 13 saves in winning his
43rd game of the season, four shy
of Bemie Parent's single-season
NHL record set 23 years ago.
Scott Niedermayer also scored
for New Jersey, which surpassed
the 100-point mark (101) for the
second straight year and moved a
little closer to winning its first
President's Trophy for best
regular season record. The Devils
hold a four-point lead over both
Dallas and Detroit. Cliff Ronning
and Jeremy Roenick scored for
Phoenix, which lost for only the
second time in six games (4-2),
both times to the Devils.
Panthers claw Penguins
MIAMI (AP)�Kirk Muller
scored the game-winner with 4:30
left and Kirk McLean had 33
saves as the Florida Panthers
defeated the struggling Pittsburgh
Penguins. The victory, Florida's
fifth in its last six games, couldn't
prevent the Panthers from being
eliminated from the playoffs for
the first time in three years.
Earlier in the day, Ottawa
defeated Buffalo 1-0, officially
knocking the Panthers from the
playoff race. Pittsburgh, which is
on its way to the Northeast
Division tide with 91 points, lost
for the third time in four games
and is 1-4-2 in its last seven.
British star wins
Freeport-McDermott
NEW ORLEANS (AP) � Lee
Westwood now has victories on
every continent but two. After
getting his first U.S. victory and
seventh overall title Sunday by
winning the Freeport-
McDermott Classic, the 24-year-
old British golfer now only needs
titles in South America and Africa
to run the board.
"Maybe I'll get Africa this year,
but my main goal now is a major
Westwood said after pocketing
the dlrs 306,000 first-place check.
Westwood shot a 3-under 69
Sunday to win the tournament by
three strokes. It was his sixth
consecutive round in the 60s,
dating to the third round of The
Players Championship. His scores
for the week were 69, 68, 67 and
69 for a four-round total of 273,15-
under par. Steve Flesch, a left-
handed rookie who led after two
rounds and was one-stroke back
starting the final round, shot a
bogey-free 71 Sunday to finish
second.
"Did I think a bogey-free
round would do it? Only if I made
five or six birdies to go with it
Flesch said. "I knew the way Lee
has been playing I was going to
have to go out there and shoot. I
figured it would take 16-under to
Morgan stays on Senior PGA hot streak with five recent victories
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) � In
his 24 years on .the regular PGA
Tour, Gil Morgan often found
himself in the role of bridesmaid.
That has changed dramatically
on the Senior PGA Tour, where
Morgan has become a dominating
player.
Morgan won The Tradition for
the second straight year on
Sunday, giving him five victories
in his last nine tournaments.
Morgan, who started the round
two shots behind Tom Wargo,
finished at 12-under 276. It was
his third victory in seven official
Senior PGA Tour events this year.
He also won the Senior Slam in
March.
The win at the first senior
major of the year was worth
$210,000 and brought Morgan's
earnings to a tour-leading
$674,580 this season.
Including the Senior Slam, he's
won 11 events and more than $3
million in less than two senior
seasons.
That's a far cry from his seven
wins and total of $5.25 million in
24 years on the regular tour. He
also failed to win a major on the
PGA Tour, where he finished
second or third more than 20
times each.
Hale Irwin was the Senior
player of the year in 1997 when he
won a record-tying nine events
and earned $2.34 million, the
most ever by a golfer on any tour.
But Morgan seems to have
moved ahead of Irwin in the
dominance department.
"I was pretty good this week,
but I don't know about being the
best out here Morgan said. "In
some respects maybe I am
because I'm getting the ball up
and down and putting well.
"I've been practicing a lot and
maybe after 30 years it's starting to
pay off. I'm able to get home on
the par 5s and that's a big plus
Wargo, who held the lead after
each of the first three rounds,
struggled to a 74 and finished two
shots back. He still received the
biggest paycheck of his career,
$123,200.
Vicente Fernandez of
Argentina finished three shots
behind at 279 with a closing 69.
Irwin, with a 68, was four shots
back and Ray Floyd six behind
Morgan at Desert Mountain.
Wargo, who had made just two
bogeys in the first three rounds,
had four bogeys and a double-
bogey on Sunday. He was still
holding a two-shot lead through
six holes, but double-bogeyed the
par 3 seventh when he hit his tee
shot over the green into the water.
That left Wargo and Morgan at
11-under. Both birdied the eighth
and Wargo lost the lead for the
first time at the ninth with another
bogey when he hit an errant drive
into some rocks off the fairway.
"I'm making bogeys and he's
making birdies � that's a hard
combination to stop Wargo said.
"The putter turned cold and that
was it.
"It was the kind of round that I
really was trying to put pieces
together and I never could find all
the pieces. It was like somebody
dumped my puzzle upside
down
Morgan stretched his lead to
four shots with a birdie at No. 14,
but bogeyed the 13th and 16th,
leaving the door open for Wargo.
Leading by two, Morgan then
gambled on his approach shot at
18, putting his ball in a waste area
in front of the green. He left his
chip shot in the rough, but
managed to get up and down,
sinking a 10-foot par putt to close
out the win.
Wargo had put his chip shot 3
feet from the pin for a birdie, but
missed the putt and settled for a
par.
�� 5 UKsjfS 5s�f fcWS SSIEiff S Ml :� IB M.
WJJU1GI
Copyright 1998KronerMW-Attantlc ttemsi PrmaoMnOmn.WtwtrtteTtttotomquMMes.Honex�iluteliers
Kami Prlc�GoodTlmjAprt 11.1998 ww a I Tnur 9 I Frt 10l S�ttl I
Assorted Varieties
Breycr's
ding only
m Akit�r
m
hi
92-024CP-?10�
K
h

H

E
IS
m
& t YfcuiR Jazz �m
Don't miss the Emerald City Jazz Festival: Volume I.
Some of the genre's top acts will play � Nicholas Payton, Mark Whitfield, Benny
Green, the ECU Jazz Ensemble with Carroll Dashiell,and Spyra Gyra.
Tickets.ThursdaySaturday,12 for ECU studentsfaculty; Friday, free for ECU
studentsfaculty who present their ECU One Card at the CTO prior to 6 p.m.
APRIL 16-18 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Hake a Virtual 3Mp,
See the beauty of Cuba when filmmaker John Holod presents Cuba at the Cross-
roads as part of the ECU Travel-Adventure Film and Theme Dinner Series. An all-u-
can-eat theme dinner is served at 6 p.m. for just $12. Dinner tickets must be re-
served by 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8 with meal cards, cash, check, or credit card.
MONDAY, APRIL 13 AT 4 OR 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Ctaion Tfas
"Roman Coliseum Bathroom"presented by Don Whitten.
Admission is free and gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
TODAY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
LrT'S GwT PtAvY TO PUHtlLF
Many bands were called, but only five were chosen for the Fifth Annual Pirate
Underground Battle of the Bands. Watch Cashmere Jungle Lords, Hydro-Lux,
MORdeCAl, People's Fault, and Sullenspire grind out the jams until one band is left
standing! WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15 AT 8 P.M. IN MSC BRICKYARD
llfifcAfl"
;
"Meeting of the Minds Meet with Dean of Students Dr. Ron Speier and other
student leaders to talk about campus issues which affect you. Although free, this
program requires pre-registration, so call 328-4796.
THURSDAY, APRIL 16 AT NOON IN MSC MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
CfarUfonTbte,
"Mountain BikeMotorcross" presented by Mark Sprague.
' Admission is free and gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
. TUESDAY, APRIL 14 AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
AlX-U-cAU GLoW" BoWL
Unlimited bowling under black light every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month
from 8-11 p.m.at Outer Limitz. It costs just $6.25 from 8-11 p.m $5.50 from 9-11
p.m. (includes shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
ttj
Ha
���
m

53
���
m
53
FOOD & DRUG
Always Fresh
FCallfomia
fctsM
6-Pine Half Bats S4.99 Ea.
All VARIETIES FROZEN
Jeno's Crisp 1
Tasty Pizza
6.9-8.1 -02.
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Kroger Premium
Orange 3vic
12-Gaiton
79
In Store Baked
Cinnamon
Rolls
MX
$199
1 ' �' hum�1 �� 1
Vlue HcM Rsh Portions or
Gortons
Fish Sticks
24.5-or, Pkg.
Chunk Light In Springwater
Kroger
Tuna
6-oz. 12-oz.
21 $P
All Varieties Frozen
Hungry Jack
Waffles
I39
ft
Pillsbirry
Toaster Sti udcl
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.ml 2 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m,
m MM l S Ml :W 5 Ml mil & Ml E:i75 Mll2
"FIRST OF THE SEASON"
yellow
Sweet Corn
Ears
11
lOWERFAT
Valleydale
Sliced Bacon
12-oz. Pkg.
$99






H Tuesday, April 7, 1998
classifieds
FOR RENT
RINGCOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, SPA-
CIOUS example of Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3
fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty fo-
liage, near ECU & PCMH, $999month.
524-5790
i
WALK TO ECU. 1. 2, 3,4 and 5 bed-
room unitshouses; available June,
July, or Aug call 321-4712.
TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX FOR rent
with shady fenced backyard. Pleasant
neighborhood, one mile from campus.
Two blocks from the Purple Line. $400
monthly. Pets welcome. 931-9014.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bed-
room, 2 12 bath Sheraton Village,
washer, dryer, $650. Sheldon, 353-
6605. Available May 1.
SUMMER DISCOUNTI TOWN-
HOUSE AT Twin Oaks. Available June
1st. $896 month discounted to $424
June through August. 3 BRs, 2 12
baths, fireplace, patio, washerdryer
hook-up. Deposit. No pets. Call Will
Martin at 752-2851. Thanks.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENT. Wesley Commons off
of First Street. Available Mid-May or
June. Pets allowed. No deposit. Rent
$340. Please call Becky, 752-2830 or
717-6034.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER
SCHOOL from June to August one
bedroom apartment located within
walking distance from ECU campus. If
interested call 752-8240, leave a mes-
sage.
SAY NO TO NOISY DORMS, say yes
to privacy. 2 bedroom apt. available.
Free cable, wd hook-up, disposal,
dishwasher, centrel heat and air, patio,
lots of light. 6-month sublease, month-
ly thereafter. 561-7646.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom, 2 bath duplex 5 minutes
from campus. 321-8872 after 6 PM or
leeve message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. NON-
SMOKER and responsible, 20 pre-
ferred. 10 min. from campus off
Greenville Blvd. Asking 12 bills. All
you need is a bed. Cell Jeff, 919-496-
2447.
RIVEROAK ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENTS $295. With Stove, Re-
frigerator, Central Air & Heat, Five
blocks from ECU Free Hot Water, Basic
Cable, Water & Sewer, 756-6209.
ECU ARSAI TWO OR three bedroom
house. Fenced in backyard, central
heat and air. Pet OK, yard work In-
cluded. $476 month. Call 830-9502.
Available mid-May.
DOCKSIDE FOR RENT: 2 bedroom,
2 bath. If Interested, please cell 762-
9901.
CYPRESS GARDENS. 1 A 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Helf month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT A CEDAR
COURT, Two bedroom, 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwaaher,
Washer & Dryer Connections. Wain-
right Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
ATTENTION Ml TOWNHOUSE
AVAILABLE TO sublet for summer. 1-
4 rooms available. $220month, depos-
it negotiable. Includes ac, washerdry-
er, pool, exercise-room and more. Cell
355-8384 and leave message.
ATTENTION LADIESI PRIVATE
DOWNSTAIRS bedroom with private
bathroom now available at Players
Club. Rent end deposit negotiablel
Call 717-1966 to leave a message. Very
inexpensive!
4 BEDROOM HOUSE FOR rent
across from the Art Building, 2 blocks
from downtown. Available in May.
Wonderful house to live in. Pets nego-
tiable. 758-1152.
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH duplex, 4
blocks from ECU, all appliances, fire-
place, wd hookups, rear patio, central
heatair. Available now, $550month.
Call 758-1921.
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. near ECU, only $375 per
month, 900 sq.ft. Free basic cable, wa-
tersewer, all appliances, pets O.K. Call
758-1921.
1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH apartment, 3
blocks from campus on 2nd St.
$285.00 a month. Call 758-1921.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR rent, Wood-
cliff Apts. Washer and dryer hookup, 3
blocks from campus. Assume lease.
Call Michael, 522-4583, leave mes-
sage.
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, 3 min-
utes to GCB and REC-Center, $335
find cable). Call 329-0538 (sublease
for May and June option to contin-
ue).
The East Carolinian
WANTED: FULL-TIME CHILD cere
provider to care for Infent in our resi-
dence. Child oriented degreeinterest.
Experience helpful. Safe driving
record, own transportation, non-smok-
er, swimming skills, CPR certified a
plua. Beginning JulyAugust weekly
8:00-6:00. Salary $300social security &
paid vacation. Also needed, student
with similar majorInterest & qualifica-
tions to care for 1st grsder after school
beginning August weekly 3:15 to 6:15.
Salary $100.00sociel security. Please
send letter specifying position sought
and qualificationsinterest with phone
no. to "Nenny Post Office Box 8088,
Greenville, NC 27835.
TRAVEL EUROPE A WORK -
TEACH BASIC CONVERSATIONAL
ENGLISH IN PRAGUE, BUDAPEST
A KRAKOW. COMPETITIVE WAG-
ES BENEFITS. ASK US HOWI
(S17) 336-0629 EXT. K63621.
TRAVEL ABROAD A WORK-TEACH
BASIC CONVERSATIONAL ENG-
LISH IN JAPAN, TAIWAN A S. KO-
REA. MANY POSITIONS REQUIRE
NO FOREIGN LANGUAGE OR
TEACHING CERTIFICATION. EX-
CELLENT EARNINGSBENEFITS
POTENTIAL. ASK US HOWI
1517)324-3126 EXT. J63621.
THE EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSI-
TY Department of Recreational Servic-
es is currently seeking individuals in-
terested in working as counselors at
the 1998 Summer Youth Sports Camp.
Applicants should possess some
sports knowledge in the following ar-
eas: basketball, tennis, ultimste fris-
bee, sofnall, flag football, track &
field, soccer, badminton, and adven-
ture skills. All spplicants will need to
be available to work full time, Monday
through Friday, from June 8 through
July 31. Pay for this position is $6.00
per hour. Anyone teking day time sum-
mer school classes need not apply. For
more information contact Brian Wein-
gertz, at 328-1565.
SURVEYORS WANTED. ECU
TRANSIT is looking for students to
administer surveys the last week of
April. Applications are available at
Mendenhell Student Center Informa-
tion Desk.
SUMMERFALL INTERNSHIPS:
LOOKING FOR Health Related Majors
for three month internships with hos-
pitel wellness program. Experience
businessindustry, employee wellness
and exercise programs. Contact 816
6506.
SUMMER JOBSI APPLY NOWI Ac-
cepting epplication for bartenders and
waitstaff. Full and part-time, flexible
schedules available. Send resume or
epply in person at The Reef Restau-
rant, PO Box 2772, Atlantic Beech, NC
28512, 919-726-3500.
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
high energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
P0 Box 370
Cove City, 28523
Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
Fax: 252-637 2125
(Near Greenville, Kinston,
New Bern)
MALEFEMALE HELP WANTED 15-
20 hoursweek. Apply at Big Splash,
758-1341.
LIFEGUARDS WANTED. MUST BE
18 or older. Certifications required.
Cell 321-0725.
HIGH ADVENTURE GUIDES SUM-
MER Employment -Eastern North Car-
olina Boy Scout camp needs ksyeking,
canoeing and sailing high adventure
guides. Other camp staff positions
available. Eagle Scouts and persons
with s scouting background preferred.
References required. Salary, room and
board included. Call 919-946-4085.
GRADY WHITE BOATS IS looking
for e part-time accountant. This indi-
vidual will do general accounting and
some cost accounting. Excellent re-
sume builder. Some experience pre-
ferred. Please contact Jamie Wilson at
752-2111.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
hsve what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
FIND OUT WHY MICROSOFT, Xer-
ox, & P&G recruit our students. 2.8
GPA & good work ethic required. Make
$580wk. Call 919-933-7716.
EARN S780-S1600WEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment &
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGEMENT,
INC. now hiring for summer 1998.
Pool managers, lifeguards, swim in-
structors. Charlotte, Raleigh, Greens-
boro, NC; Greenville, SC; Columbia,
SC. For information, (704)889-4439
PLAYERS CLUB APT. FOR sublease,
male or female roommate wanted.
Call 353-2885, ask for Travis.
PEONY GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM 1 12 bsth apartments $375.
Stove, Refrigeretor, Dishwasher,
Washer & Dryer, Free Cable, Water &
Sewer, Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
PARK VILLAGE ONE BEDROOM
apartments $300. With Stove, Refrig-
eretor, Washer Dryer Connections, On
ECU bus route free water & sewer,
Wainright Property Menagement LLC
756-6209.
NOW AVAILABLE, 1 ROOM efficien-
cy with kitchen and bathroom, near
ECU on Tenth St. Only $295.00 per
month, all utilities included. Call 758-
1921 ask.
NO DEPOSIT. 2 BEDROOM, 1 12
bath, cable and water included. Wilson
Acres Apartments. Rent by 5198. Cell
754-8315 and ask for Dawn Bivens.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE FOR
school or work? Horn Relocation
and Referral Service can malt
that move easier! Relocation
packets with rental listings, guid-
ed tours of Greenville and area
rental properties, plue much
more. Call 830-5559 or visit
http:www.relocetatogre.mvil-
lenc.com for more Information.
FORREST ACRES ONE A two bed-
room $300-$345, Stove, Refrigerator,
Free Water & Sewer, On ECU Bus Ro-
ute, Wainright Property Menagement
LLC 756-6209.
FOR RENT: FOUR BEDROOM house
dose to campus, half off deposit. Fire-
piece, fenced in yard. Great area. Call
for info. ASAP, 830-4943.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 2 BR 1 12 bath townhouse,
$225, 12 phoneutilities. On ECU Bus
Route. Call Laura, 756-7128. Need for
May 1st
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
I summer school or before to sub-
i two bedroom apartment at King-
ston. For more information, call 561-
7824 end leave a message.
�m PitpBm ftm� � �r. mtmr ihhmw
3&S
lonagemert
FOR SALE
THINKING OF BUYING YOUR first
computer? For sale: 10 black and white
PC monitors, various manufacturers.
$25 each. Excellent for beginning com-
puters. Contact JW Blair, 757-2157.
ONE YONEX RD-7 FOR $60 and one
Heed Radical for $60. Excellent condi-
tion. Also Head tennis bag, $30. Call
353-1606, ask for Michael.
LADIES' BIKE: $46, 9 month old
Huffy, in good condition. I can give you
two locks for free. Call 328-3496.
GIANT MOUNTAIN MKE ATX840,
2 months old, like new. Front suspen-
sion, factory warranty. $700 new, will
sell for $550. 752-8383.
DAYBED FOR SALE, WHITE, good
condition, as is. Includes mattress.
$226. Call 353-5623 before 3:00PM.
Must pick-up Thursday, April 9 after
6:00PM I
CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR SALE,
good condition, asking $95 or best off-
er. If interested, call Paul at 353-2885.
BEARDED DRAGON LIZARD. SIX
months old. All lights and accessories.
Forty gallon tank included. Call 758-
8879.
48666 WITH SVGA MONITOR.
sound card, modem MS Word, Excel
end other software. $400 OBO. Call
830-1223 or
chboyd9ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
HELP WANTED
SUMMER CAMP IN WESTERN NC
is looking for motivated Individuals to
be camp counselors. Positions avail-
able in aquatics, high adventure, first
year camper program, rifleshotgun
shooting, and handicrafts. Salary,
room and board provided. Call Cliff @
551-3769 for more information.
SUMMER AT THE BEACHI T-Shirt
World in Duck and Corolla, NC hiring
salespeople for summer employment.
Excellent payincentives. Apply in per-
son. Loblolly Pines in Duck or Monter-
ey Pleza in Corolla. Or mail resume to
3848 Ivy Lane, Kitty Hawk, NC 27949.
STUDENT NEEDED TO HELP keep
our 2 year old daughter 10-15 hours
per week. Can be flexible in schedul-
ing. Will need to be available during
summer as well. For interview, leave
message at 931-7439.
RALEIGH AREA SUMMER JOBS.
$280wk-$422wk plus bonusesI Hir-
ing crew leaders'and crew painters.
Most openings filled by local students,
so call Collegiate House Painters today
at 919-460-60611 We'll do interviews
on your campus-no need to come
home to find e job. We are not one of
those student franchise companies!
OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE IS NOW
accepting applications for experienced
hostesses. Full end part-time positions
are available. Pleese apply in person
M-Th 1:00-3:OOPM.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE oam greet money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7686.
NEED A SUMMER JOB? Play at day
& make money et nlghtl Work nights
andor weekends and have your deys
free with The ECU Telefund. Make your
own schedule! $5.50hr. plus bonusesl
Call 328-4212 for more info.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FI-
NANCIAL PlanningInvestment and
Insurance. Northwestern MutualRo-
bert O. Beird is accepting applications
for our summer training school. Check
out our web site www.northwestern-
mutual.com and send resume to 217
Commerce St Greenville, NC 27858.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext. 1 A.SA.P.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing informa-
tion, 800-662-2122.
TO PI DELTA SISTER Tyler Black-
welder: You demonstrated an aspect
of whet being a sister is ell about dur-
ing officer elections! We love you,
your sisters.
THE SISTERS OF GAMMA Sigma
Sigma would like to congratulate the
following sisters: Amber James, most
dedicated and Delta Chi of the year,
Amanda Worsham; White Rose, Sha-
nita Anderson; Candy Vlllorente
Memorial Scholarship, Tara Butler and
Terese Messick; Best Big end Little
Sister, Karen Flores; Elderly Apprecia-
tion, Jennifer Knumbein, Children's
Appreciation end Jessies Offner, Relay
for Life. Love, your sisters of Gamma
Sigma Sigma
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA Phi would
J like to thank Jill and Warren for the
great job in Singled Out Tuesday
night. We love you guys!
THANK YOU SIGMA ALPHA Epsi-
lon for the social on Saturday, it is al-
ways so fun to see you guys. Can't
wait to do it again soon. Love, the sis-
ters and new members of Sigms Sig-
ma Sigma
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON THANK
you for a great time Thursday night,
we really enjoyed hanging out with
your guysl Can't wait until next timel
Love, Alpha Phi
PI LAMBDA PHI BROTHERS: we are
looking forward to the social with you
guys tomorrow night. We're sure it's
going to be a blast! Love, the sisters of
Pi Delta
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to
thank everyone who took part m our 3
on 3 social last Thursday night. Hope
to do it again real soon.
PI DELTA THANKS SISTERS Ann
Elms, Kelly Goodman, and Alexi Hasa-
pis for taking time out of your day and
attending the meeting at The Attic on '
Thursday. Love, your sisters
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, PI Kappa Al-
pha, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Chi Ome-
ga, it was so great to see everyone last
Wednesday night. We had such a great
time. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Sigma Sigma Sigma
KAPPA SIGMA, PI KAPPA Alpha, PI
Kappa Phi, Alpha Xi Delta, Alpha Delta
Pi. The social last Thursday was a
blastl The Band of Oz was great and
everyone had such a good time. Love,
the sisters and new members of Sig-
ma Sigma Sigma
FOR A WILD 'N Crazy time - be at The
Attic on the night of April 21stl Love,
the sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEWLY elected Executive Board of Pi
Delta for the '98 '99 school yearl Pres-
ident-Ann Elms, Vice President-Kelly
Goodman, Secretary-Kathleen Mean-
ey, Treasurer-Leslie Garris, Pledge Ed-
ucators-Ami Brasure and Kathleen
Meaney, Member at Large-Anne Lu-
cas, Panhellenic Representatives-Kelly
Goodman (executive) and Tyler Black-
welder, and ParentAlumni Contact-
Leslie Garris. Good Luck, girls, on your
positions! We know you will do a fan-
tastic jobl Love, your sisters.
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM Si 78. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. CREDIT
CARD FUNDRAISERS FOR FRATERNI-
TIES, SORORITIES & GROUPS. ANY
CAMPUS ORGANIZATION CAN RAISE
UP TO $1000 BY EARNING A WHOP-
PING $5.00VISA APPLICATION. CALL
1-800-932-0528 EXT. 65. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE FREE T-SHIRT.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bill.s Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WATER POLO REGISTRATION
MEETING: anyone interested in play-
ing Intramural water polo needs to be
sure to attend the registration meeting
on April 8 et 5:00PM at MSC Room
244. One member from your team is
required to attend the meeting to be
eligible to sign that team up, (Men's,
Women's, and Co-rec). Dept. of Re-
creation Services
TUE APRIL 7-JUNIOR Recital,
Brandy Binkley, soprano, Patrick
Howie, tenor, A.J.Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00PM. Tue April 7-Junior Recital,
Cecil Allen Rescoe, Jr baritone,
A.J.Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00PM.
Wed April 8-Contemporary Jazz En-
semble, Paul Tardif, Director,
A.J.Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00PM.
Thurs April 9-Junior Recital, Walter
Matthew King, tenor, A.J.Fletcher Reci-
tal Hall, 9:00PM. Mon April 13-Faculty
Recital, Britton Theurer, trumpet,
A.J.Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00PM
THE GREATER GREENVILLE
WOMAN'S Club would like to thank Pi
Kappa Phi for their help during the
Shopping Spree on March 27 and 28.
Their help was greatly appreciated.
THE ECU LAW SOCIETY will meet
Thurs April 9th at 7PM in Rawl Room
102! Anyone interested in learning
more about law or law school is invit-
ed! Open to all majorsl
REGISTRATIONORIENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES. The Career
Services office will hold orientation
meetings in the Career Services Build-
ing for seniors and graduate students
on Wed. April 8 at 2:00PM. Others will
be held on Mondays at 4:00. Students
will receive an overview of services
and instructions on registering with
Career Services and establishing a cre-
dentials file.
RCLS SOCIETY WILL MEET
Wednesday, April 8th at 5:00PM in the
Old Pirate Club. Topics will include
First Aid and elections.
PHI SIGMA PI PRESENTS Easter
Seels-UCP Softball Tournament April
18th and 19th. Co-ed teams only. Call
830-5481 or 561-6789, by April 15th.
SERVICES
WEEKEND SCUBA CLASS BEGIN-
NING April 24. Learn to dive in two
weekends. Contact Tom Younce at 328-
4390 or 243-4061.
ECU PT PROGRAM IS holding a
massage clinic Wednesday, April 15
from 5-9PM at the Belk Bldg. on Cha-
rles Blvd. Advance tickets: $310 min.
Look for us selling tickets on campus.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROUNA SKY SPORTS
(919) 49642X4
PERSONALS
00D
for private Co-ed
Over 25 adMses, Including AH sports,
water f&i$J&,r art,
616 to 817Earn $13Qr1700 plua
room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers cantor
" ittwVbroehure:
5539 anytime!
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD
like to thank everyone that got jiggy
wit us at our Skate Party on April 2. We
had a blast, we hope to have another
one real soon. Love, the sisters of
Gamma Sigma Sigma
ALPHA OMICRON PI IS having e
bone marrow drive todey at Menden-
hall from 12:00 to 6:00p.m. Come, and
help save a life.
GREEK PERSONALS
ZETA TAU ALPHA WE had a good
ol' time gfttin' down witchaw at duh
Redneck Hodown. Y'ell come back
now, ya hear? Love, Delta Chi
TO THE SISTERS OF Alpha Delta Pi,
thanks for the wonderful LEI at the Is-
land Party. Love, the brothers of Delta
Chi
CONGRATULATIONS TO PI DEL-
TA'S newly elected non-executive of-
ficers for the '9899 school yearl Ser-
geant at Arms-Anne Lucas, Rush
Chairs-Shelly McCutcheon and Ashley
Dix, Special Events Coordinator-Ami
Brasure, Social Chair-Tyler Blackweld-
er. Scholarship Chair-Shelly Mc-
Cutheon, Fundraiser Chairs-Leslie Gar-
ris and Shelly McCutcheon, Publicity-
Anne Lucas, Intramural Chair-Liz Gre-
no, Altrusim Chair-Meredith Dowty,
Sister Activity Director-Ashley Dix, Rit-
ual Chair-Anne Lucas, Historian-Tina
Overbee, Alternate Panhellenic Repre-
sentative-Linda Wong, and Chapter
Advisor-Jennifer Thompson. Good
Luck to all of youl We love you, your
sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS JENNIFER
LANIER ON your acceptance to OT
schooll We are so proud of youl Love,
your Sigma sisters and new members!
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA OMI-
CRON PI on your win at softbail last
Monday. We enjoyed the game with
you guysl Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
ALPHA PHI WOULD UKE to thank
all who participated in Singled Out
Tuesday night! It was a great success
thanks to your support.
ALPHA PHI AND THETA Chi: you
did another greet job with Singled Out.
We had a super timel Love, the sisters
of Pi Delta
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAKQRAD WEEK '98
Cheap rates! www.we-can.comsand-
trap - N. Myrtle Beach. 800-645-3618.
Student representative needed!
���SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink
parties! Sell 5 & go free! Book now
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
http:www.endlesssummertours.com
INTRAMURAL: IF YOU ARE not in-
terested in pleying Water Polo, why
not be an Official. There will be an of-
ficials meeting on April 8th et 9:00 p.m.
in SRC Room 202. Call 328-6387.
INTRAMURAL: ANYONE INTER-
ESTED IN Water Polo???? Well now Is
your chance to get in all the fun. There
will be a registration meeting on April
8th at 5:00p.m. in MSC 244. Hope to
see you there. Call 328-6387.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOPS -
Seniors and graduate students com-
pleting their degrees in May or the
summer are invited toattend an inter-
view skills workshop on Wed April 8
at 4:00 or Thurs. April 16 at 3:00. Spon-
sored by Career Services, the work-
shops will be held at Career Services,
701 E. Fifth Street. No pre-registration
is required.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH WOULD like for you to join
us on Easter Sunday at 8:30 a.m. or
11:00 a.m. for a Special Resurrection
Service. James D. Corbett, Pastor,
1104 N. Memorial Drive, Greenville.
752-5683
ADVENTURE: SPEND THE DAY
with nature�Join us for a kayaking'
trip down Alligator River. The trip ir
Sunday, April 19 from 6AM-6PM, but
you must register no later than
Thursday, April 9th. The cost is $25 for
students and SRC members$3S for
non-students, end this includes trans-
portation, equipment, and leaders.
Call 328-6387 for more info.
ADVENTURE: FREE PLACING
PROTECTION Seminar Experience
the next level in mountain climbing on
Monday, April 6 at 7:00p. m. Register at
least one day in advence. 328-6387
ABSOLUTELY UNBELIEV-
ABLEIIIIIIFREE tutoring sessions
available for all students offered by
ECU professors every Monday, Tues-
day, end Thursday starting at 4:00 p.m.
at the Ledonia Wright African-Ameri-
can Cultural Canter. Math tutoring on
Monday and Tuesday, Math and Sci-
ence tutoring on Thursday.
i
THURSDAY
APRH 9,1988
dfna
fkdnkli
A MA
Andr
si
Campaigning
, the "A Tear
dates in the
elections heli
The team
president, L
president, Jol
and Alan S
swept the tic
Smith, elect
Card Systerr
were only 11
despite a can
get 5000 vote
Of the
Rivenbark wi
votes, Pulley
votes, Meriar.
votes and Stai
Jan
exte
Jarvis Hall will
changes includii
PHOTO B'
Onlyh
fororigi
M O H A M
ST
Jarvis Residen
ty's oldest h
process of beii
"Jarvis Hal
to improve ri
schematics am
Fridley, associ
PC
to1
Lawsuit
comm
J E N N 1
STAF
Pitt County 1
(PCMH) is cor
recognized as
profit institutioi
don't agree thai
the best interes
At the com
Monday, both
County Commi
proposal to reoi
the eest


Title
The East Carolinian, April 7, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 07, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1266
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy