The East Carolinian, April 2, 1998






THURSDAY
APRIL 2,1998
eastcarolinian
Candidates for SGA executive
council run unopposed in election
CandidateMarcus
Frederick drops out of
running
Andrew LeLiever
staff writer
For the first time in many years
the positions for Executive Council
on the Student Government
Association (SGA) will run unop-
posed.
Candidate Marcus Frederick,
Psychology
professors
find justice
is not blind
Study determined
physical appearance
does affect verdict
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
According to ECU psychology pro-
fessors Ronald Poulson and Karl
Wuensch, physical attractiveness,
social desirability and mental sta-
bility of a defendant affect how a
jury reaches a verdict.
Poulson, Wuensch and col-
leagues have conducted studies
using mock courtrooms to assess
how these factors influence a jury's
decision in both criminal and civil
cases.
Poulson has primarily
researched jurors' attitudes toward
the insanity plea in criminal cases.
Over the past 15 years, Poulson
and colleagues at Emory and the
Medical University of South
Carolina have conducted studies
using students, community mem-
bers and judges as mock jurors.
The jurors were presented with
real cases to deluSerate. These
cases were presented using videos,
slide shows and audio tapes.
"Jurors are quite complex in
reasoning about a verdict
Poulsoi. aid. "Jurors tended to
take the mock cases quite serious-
ly
Poulson and ECU student
Henry Brown concluded that there
are many factors which impact the
jury's decision including race and
age of defendant, prior hospitaliza-
tions, expert testimonies and dif-
ferent verdict options such as the
"guilty by mentally ill" plea.
-Over the past 10 years,
Wuensch has conducted research
SEE JUSTICE. PAGE 4
who was on a ticket by himself,
dropped from the election for rea-
sons unknown.
"Never can I remember when all
positions in the spring elections ran
unopposed said Milli Murphcy,
SGA secretary.
Candidates who will be running
unopposed are Eric Rivenbark for
president, Leslie Pulley for vice
president, Alan Stancill for treasur-
er and John P. Mcriac for secretary.
Write-in candidates are still eligi-
ble for these elections.
"A write-in candidate must fill
out an expense report by April 6 at
5 p.m stay 25 feet away from the
election booth, cannot put their
name on the bailor and basically
abide by the election rules to be eli-
gible for the elections said Bob
Smith, election chair.
As part of the "Vote 5000" cam-
paign initiated by Senior Class
President Jonathan Muggins, candi-
dates who are on the ballot will be
available to the student body to
answer questions about their cam-
paigns in front of the Wright Place
on April 8.
Think 5000 has been designed
for students to ask the candidates
questions about issues concerning
them.
"It is an excellent campaign
because so many students are the
first to complain and the last to do
anything about it said Leslie
Banners promote unopposed csndidates
PH010 IV SABRINA THOMAS
Pulley, candidate for vice presi-
dent. "So now with the booth,
there is a chance to do something
about SGA
Eric Rivenbark hopes to receive
3,000 votes for the office of presi-
dent
"It the booth is a great oppor-
tunity for students to get informa-
tion about the candidates running,
and I hope that this year more stu-
dents will get involved with the
election Rivenbark said.
The voter turn out has been
extremely low for the past few
years. In the combined years of
1995 to 1997 the student body has
SEE ELECTIONS. PAGE 4
Where
have all the
students
gone?
Merit Scholarship Campaign
aims to recruit incoming freshmen
more competitively
Jenny Vickers
staff writer
A campaign to increase the competitiveness of
ECU's merit scholarships follows last year's disap-
pointing loss of five out of seven high school seniors who chose better
offers from other universities is underway. At the heart of the campaign
is a push to increase ECU's endowment.
While the endowment, responsible for funding scholarships, has
tripled over the last ten years reaching $24.88 million, it ranks 398th
nationally. University officials, including Chancellor Richard Eakin, say
increasing the amount of gifts and donations to the endowment is the
key to increasing the quality of merit scholarships and in return attract-
ing more bright, young leaders.
ECU's endowment fund ranks 398th nationally. As his top priority.
The university is pushing to increase acceptance of scholarships and the endowment.
punrn av Mm uii i M
PHOTO BY BEN MIUER
Eakin aims to raise the merit scholarship endowment over the next three
years to $10-15 million. The endowment fund board feels that the schol-
arship's low amount is steering away the kind of future leaders who can
make the university a better place. Some fear these kinds of students are
being lured away by more attractive scholarships. More gifts to the
endowment will help increase the amount used on merit-based scholar-
ships.
The Morehead Scholarship,
offered by Chapel Hill, is the most see scholarship page 4
prestigious in the south and has an
Rebel mm
Pacemaker
pvo years
running
Award equivalent of
Pulitzer on college level
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
The Rebel, ECU's literary and arts
magazine, was recently awarded
what has been called the collegiate
Pulitzer, a National Pacemaker
Award, for the second year in a row
by the Associated Collegiate Press
(ACP).
The Pacemaker Award is the
most prestigious prize for college
journalism and is awarded for gen-
eral excellence. The ReM was one of
50 college magazines competing in
the competition and received one
of five Pacemakers for 1997.
The Rebel is a student-created
magazine and is currently in its
40th year of production. This is the
fourth time The Rebel has won this
prestigious award.
The 1997 issue was edited by
Julie Spivey, who is now a graduate
student in the School of Art.
When asked how this award
made her feel, Spivey said, "It
makes me feel like all that hard
work was worth it
Long hours paid off for Spivey,
editor and designer for last year's
issue. Other designers on 1997's
staff included Pollie Barden and
Tim A. Jones. Jones also served as
illustrator director. Randall
Martoccia was the issue's copy edi-
tor.
The content of The Rebel is
determined each year through
competitions. Winning works
appear in the magazine.
Literary entries are judged by
SEE REBEL. PAGE 4
Ordinance outlaws upholstered
furniture on residential porches
Few warning for
violations handed out
Hollv Harris
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Greenville city officials are making
a concerted effort to turn Greenville
the grimy into Greenville the glim-
mering.
Last October the city council
passed a package of ordinances that
included 20 code violations that are
viewed as nuisances or dangers to
the public health. Among those
measures approved was an ordi-
nance that makes it illegal to have
upholstered furniture on the porch
or in the yard of a residence.
Surprisingly enough, there have
been few warn-
ings given for �
violations of the
ordnance and
none of the $50
fines incurred for
refusing to relo-
cate furniture
have been hand-
ed out.
Mark
Johnson, coordi-
nator of
Greenville's new
Neighborhood
Services division, said that the low
number of problems with the rule is
because citizens arc basically com-
pliant and that city officials have
more pressing things to do.
"It's not a major issue, we
It's a health issue.
Upholstered furniture,
can get soggy and with
lice and mosquitoes
Mark Johnson
Coordinator of Greenville's new
Neighborhood Services division
haven't had any confrontations
Johnson said. "It's like
writing a ticket for jay
walking when you have
murders going on every
day, we have to priori-
tize
Ron Kimble,
Greenville city manager
said that the ordinance is
enforced in much the
same way as noise viola-
tions � there is no action
taken unless someone
complains.
"My guess is that if
you put it couch out in the yard
and sun yourself and then drag it
back in at night you won't have a
SEE COUCH. PAGE 4
Barefoot on the Mall
moves to Mendenhall
Beautification work
takingplaceonmall
MOHAMED HUSSIEN
STAFF WRITER
This year the annual ECU event
known as Barefoot on the Mall will
be held in front of Mendenhall
Student Center instead of on the
mall. The April 30 event is in its
19th year, but due to beautifica-
tion efforts by the university, it will
not be held in its namesake loca-
tion.
"Due to reseeding and other
various work being done to the
mall. Barefoot will be held outside
the front grassy area of
Mendenhall said Venessa
Cullers, event coordinator.
"The new work is being done
to make ECU pleasing for the
incoming freshman in the fall
Barefoot will retain its original
name because of tradition and the
fact that it will be held on the mall
once again after the work is done.
"Barefoot will still have all of its
previous events Cullers said.
As in past years, Barefoot will
still offer the same eclectic fare of
booths and performances.
Mainstays of the day include the
inflatable slider, various club
booths, artisan booths with face
painters and the as-of-yet
unnamed quartet of musical acts.
SEE BAREFOOT PAGE 4
TODAY
Cloudy
high 83
low 56
TOMORROW
Cloudy
high 74
low 54
Opinion
Bid farewell to
your outdoor
upholstered
furniture
Lifestyle
Pepsi celebrates
100th anniversary
Sports
Rigsby and
Williamson shine
for ECU Baseball
�io
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
'Should the atheistic department complete all
the additions to the stadium before funding
10.S million for the new athletic facility?
Do you feel safe in your dorm?
87 YES 13 NO
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu






2 Thiridiy. April 2. 1988
news
Thi East Carolinian
3 Thurid
news
briefs
Society supports
moving Cape Hatter
lighthouse
as
ICAPE HATTERAS (AP) � The
(U.S. Lighthouse Society has
expressed its support for moving
; the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.
$100,000 pledged
for UNC Black
Cultural Center
'CHAPEL HILL (AP) � The
William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable
Trust has pledged $100,000 to the
construction of a black cultural cen-
ter at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
across
Health Department
stops Medicaid pay
for sex-change
operations
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) � The
state health department will no
longer allow Medicaid to pay for
sex-change operations. Officials
said Monday there arc medical
arguments that a sex-change opera-
tion is an experimental treatment.
Processor donates
$120,000 to
University for
Fishery Tech Center
KODIAK (AP) � A seafood pro-
cessing company has donated
$120,000 to the University of
Alaska's Fishery Industrial
Technology Center for sea lion
research and education programs.
� U.N. Chief thanks
China for support in
dealing with Iraq
BEIJING (AP) � Affirming its
Support for diplomacy instead of
fcrce in dealing with Iraq, China
�raised visiting U.N. Secretary-
general Kofi Annan on Tuesday for
eacefully resolving the recent
andoff over Iraqi weapons inspcc-
tScientists find ozone
� contamination over
South Pacific
WASHINGTON (AP) � Smog-
ausing ozone chat plagues many
ties around the world is spreading
gross the Pacific and contaminat-
ing even the air high over such par-
adise South Sea islands as Fiji, two
scientists report.
Refund expected
from costs of
Apple advertising
Will sign contracts with
middle agents in future
Craig D. Ramev
SENIOR WRITER
The Student Union expects to get
most of the $4000 spent on adver-
tising for Fiona Apple's concert
back before the end of the fiscal
year.
All stops from the March tour,
including ECU, have submitted
claims to Apple's management in
California. Once the total cost has
been figured for all of the March
dates, Apple's management is
expected to give a refund close to
the full amount � or at least most
of the funds.
"We have been calling them
once a week trying to find out when
we will get the money said
Stephen Gray, director of Student
Activities. "It will be this fiscal
year
The university spent more
money in television, newspaper,
and radio to promote the canceled
show than any other show. So much
money was spent because the can-
cellation came so close to the
show's slated date.
"I have a good feeling they will
reimburse said C.W. Jameson,
Chair of the Popular Entertainment
Committee.
Approximately 3,000 tickets
were sold for the event, just enough
to cover the expenses of the Fiona
Apple show. Some of the expenses
included advertising, audio equip-
ment and catering.
Apple isn't the first performer to
cancel on this university after
money has been spent on promo-
tions. Busta Rhymes and A Tribe
Called Quest canceled, and then
paid back any money that was lost.
"These things can't be prevent-
ed Gray said. "It's just a misfor-
tune. I've been in this business for
a long time and it just happens
The Popular Entertainment
committee would feel more com-
fortable if a clause were in the con-
tract
"We are going to try to sign con-
tracts with middle agents in the
future Jameson said.
University officials do have the
option of turning to the National
Association of Campus Activities
for help, if Apple's management
decides to argue the $4000 figure.
"My hope is that we don't have
to go there Gray said.
If Fiona's agency failed to pay
back an acceptable amount, the
Student Union has a reserve fund
they can rely on, built by $11 taken
out of each student's fees annually.
Money not spent from the fund car-
ries over to the next year.
11 Mttcfel
Monday, Mar. 30 Meeting of Legislation Room 221 Mendenhall
�Candidate information booth will be outside the
Wright Place beginning April 2.
�SGA will have booth during minority recruitment
weekend
�New SGA logo is being decided on
�Organization of Milan has been appropriated $250
LEGISLATORS SAY
"I have my own dress" -Adam Hofheimer
ABSENTEE LEGISLATORS
Keisha Fennell, Dianne Hill, John Lynch, Jen
O'Conner, Micheal Papara, Warren Shirmen, Kate Smith,
Derek Stone, James Sturdivant, Robin Wilson, Chuck
Windell, Leslie Brewer, Joe Donlevy
Elections
continued from page 1
voted 6,252 times, which is about
13 of the student body. Only once,
in 1993, has a presidential candi-
date run unopposed.
eastcarolinian.
Best
Coverage
of Campus
Early childhood educatio
leader to speak
Dr. Richard M. Clifford, president
of the National Association for the
Education of Young Children will
discuss trends in early childhood
education tonight. The presenta-
tion will take place at 7 p.m. in
Room 101 of the Rivers Building,
and a reception will follow in the
Child Development Laboratory.
Speaker to relive 1930s
"Scottsboro" case
James A. Miller, director of the
African Studies program at the
University of South Carolina, will
present a lecture dealing with his
study of Alabama's "Scottsboro
Boys a case that charged nine
young unemployed black men with
the gang rape of two unemployed
white women. The talk will take
place at 4 p.m. in Room 1028 of the
General Classroom Building. For
more information contact Dr.
Lillian Robinson at 328-6681.
Sigma Alpha lota offers
the "Charlie Horse Music
Pizza Experience" at the
Plaza Mall
Sigma Alpha Iota, a national music
fraternity for women, in conjunc-
tion with the Plaza Mall and
MacFayden Music will present a
program of musical learning for
children in the Plaza Mall from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. The presentation
and activities will center around
characters from the show The
Charlie Horse Music Pizza. For
more information contact Emmalee
Iden at 328-7960.
Annual Competition for
Fulbright Grants Opens
The United States Information
Agency, the J. William Fulbright
Foreign Scholarship Board and the
Institute of International Education
announce the official opening on
May 1, of the 1999-2000 competi-
tion for Fulbright Grants. These
grants are for graduate study or
research abroad in academic fields
and for professional training in the
creative and performing arts. The
grants include international travel,
maintenance for the duration of the
grant, a research allowance and
tuition waivers. For more informa-
tion contact U.S. student programs
at (212) 984-5327.
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3 ThurnUy, April 2, 1998
news
Thi East Carolinian
Campaigning is universal idea
Author speaks at symposium
Candidates spend time
talkingwithgrvups
Melanie Hackworth
staff whiter
A recent survey of SGA presidents
at four universities in the
University of Nortb Carolina sys-
tem shows that campaigning for a
collegiate office has some universal
aspects. Student Government pres-
idents at N.C. State, UNC-Chapel
Hill, UNC Wilmington and ECU
all have election practices that are
very similar in terms of financing
and campaign management.
"Organization is the key ECU
SGA President Scott Forbes said
about campaigning.
Forbes said that with a campaign
manager, staff members, posters
and flyers to deal with, a candidate
must be organized.
N.C. State President Karen
Taylor's campaign was so organized
that it was planned out to the day.
One day she spoke to campus
groups; another she handed out fly-
ers.
"You want to make sure people
know you're running said UNC-
Chapel Hill President Mo Nathan.
"I spoke to any and every group
that I could Forbes said. All four
presidents indicated that speaking
to campus organizations is an
important part of �
campaigning.
at
and
Hill
just
Candidates
N.C. State
UNC-Chapel
did more than
speak to groups; they
went door to door
talking to campus
residents. At ECU,
door to door cam-
paigning is prohibit-
ed.
Some candidates,
like UNC-Chapel
Hill's Nathan, use
modern technology to campaign.
Nathan said that in his campaign he
used the
web.
Each can-
didate had
passed out sample ballots to show
voters how to vote.
Nathan's tech-
nique was to stand
in an area on cam-
pus .with a lot of
foot traffic and just
talk to anyone he
could.
Forbes' idea
was a little more
radical. "My
biggest tip would
be on the day of
the election to
have attractive,
motivated females
to hand out your
flyers
Candidates don't go in alone on
"My biggest tip would
be on the day of the elec-
tion to have attractive,
motivated females to
hand out your flyers
Scott Forbes
ECU SGA President
campaigns. Each candidate has a
campaign manager, usually a friend
or a volunteer with experience.
Nathan said that close to the elec-
tion, the campaign manager works
24 hours a day.
In addition to the campaign
manager, candidates have a volun-
teer staff of anywhere from 10-50
people. Volunteers do anything
from posting flyers to speaking to
students about candidates.
Posters and banners cost money.
Money is an important part of cam-
paigning for candidates. Most col-
leges have a spending cap that can-
didates use to regulate their
finances which range from $150 to
$500. Campaigns are funded by the
individual candidates or donations.
Discussion focused on
chemical dependency,
family
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Mohamed Hussein
� staff WRITER
unique cam-
Paigning
ideas.
Taylor hand-
ed out plat-
form flyers
and partici-
pated in a
debate.
UNC
Wilmington
President
Zeke Pittard
Si Campaigning
Campaign manager Staff members Spending
University

UNCW
UNC-CH
NCSU
$225 additional limit if there are multiple elections (primaries)
$300-$400
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A rehabilitation symposium orga-
nized by the department of rehabil-
itation was held on March 30 to dis-
cuss family therapy for chemical
dependency.
Dr. John T. Edwards, distin-
guished speaker and
author of Treating
Chemically Dependent
Families: A Practical
Systems Approach for
Professionals and
Working With Families,
came to the Greenville
Hilton Monday to
address the eighth
annual university
Rehabilitation Symposium.
"Dr. Edwards' books are used in
the ECU Rehabilitation curricu-
lum, so it was very appropriate to
have him as a speaker for the sym-
posium said Dr. Paul Alston,
event organizer from the depart-
ment of rehabilitation.
Edwards is a highly sought after
lecturer and presenter, and is on the
cutting edge of innovative practift
therapy. Dr. Edwards has led more
than 400 family therapy training
programs across North America and
has conducted and supervised fam-
ily therapy for the past 20 years
Edwards is also an approved
supervisor in the American
Association for Marriage and
Family Therapy (AAMFT), and
has been on the faculty of the South
Carolina, North Carolina and
Southeastern Schools of Alcohol
and Drug Studies, as well as the
Duke University Summer Institute
of Alcohol and Drugs.
The symposium lasted from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m and was free for stu-
dents, $25 for non-students.
"We have the symposium once a
year as part of our curriculum,4'
Alston said.
The sympo-
sium was spon-
sored by the
department of
rehabilitation
studies in the
School of AJUcjjgf
Health Sciences
cooperation with
the Student
Rehabilitation
Association. Dr. Paul Alston and
Dr. Lloyd Goodwin played the key
roles in organizing the function.
"The event is primarily attended
by ECU undergraduate and gradu-
ate students as well as anyone who
has an interest in social work or,
nursing, as well as rehabilitation
studies Alston said.
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Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ






4 Tlwriay. April 2, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Two from facility services finish
three week long national program
Designed to develop
leadership skills
Ckaig D. Ramkv
StNQI WHITE
Two members of the Facilities
Services Department recently com-
pleted a national program with the
Institute for Facilities
Management. The program con-
sisted of three week-long work-
shops in Los Angeles, Miami and
Houston'where over 500 partici
pants took four core courses and a
choice of electives all focusing on
facilities services and management.
The curriculum was designed to
give participants a more in-depth
overview of the possibilities of facil-
ities services on university campus-
es. R.V. Parker, manager of build-
ings department, and Ricky Hill,
facilities service manager, complet-
ed the program in January.
It helped develop leadership
skills and employee relations Hill
said.
While in the program, Hill com-
pleted courses in grounds designs,
building and' renovation cost, as
well as
building
design and
legal
issues.
All par-
ticipants
are
required to
take four
core class-
es involv-
ing general
adminis-
tration and
manage-
ment,
operations
and main-
tenance,
energy and utilities and planning
design and construction.
"It was very worthwhile Hill
said. "I had the least amount of
experience in energy and utilities
Attendance of the institute is
"Facilities managers who
are fortunate enough to have
the support of management
to attend the institute come
away with a much better
understanding of the job they
have to accomplish
R.V. Parker
Manager of Buildings Oepanmem
considered an honor among facili-
ties services managers. Currently
three other members are attending
the institute.
"I became aware of
the program and was
very interested Parker
said.
Both Hill and Parker
agree that general
administration and
management was the
most beneficial seg-
ment of the course.
"Facilities managers
who are fortunate
enough to have the sup-
port of management to
attend the institute
come away with a much
better understanding of
the job they have to
accomplish Parker
said.
This program is strictly for uni-
versity facilities managers and is
designed to give middle manage-
ment an overview of ways to better
the university's grounds. �
Scholarship
continued from page 1
annually. ECU's largest scholar-
ship, the Chancellor's Scholarship,
is $5,000 annually. This doesn't
even cover the entire cost for an in-
state student.
Resources of merit-based schol-
arships are different than resources
for need-based scholarships. The
former receives money from gifts
and donations to the endowment
fund, and the latter receives money
from a type of federal program.
This creates an imbalance between
loans and scholarships.
� "Out of the $24.88 million in the
endowment, $10 million is used for
scholarships, and only $3 million of
that is for unrestricted merit
awards said Jim Lanier, vice
chancellor for institutional
advancement. "$51.8 million was
given in financial aid last year. $34
million of this was in loans and $17
million was in need-based scholar-
ships that didn't have to be paid
back. Over 50 percent of students
received financial assistance
ECU spends 44 percent on
scholarships.
"The rest of the endowment is
specifically endowed for chairs of
departments and specific schools
said Gene Rayfield, Board of
Trustees chairman.
"An endowment is like a savings
account Lanier. "The money
invested is never spent, but the
portion of the earnings is. We don't
spend all of the income. We make
sure to continue growing the princi-
ple so that the buying power keeps
up with inflation. Our total return
over the last seven years is 11.9 per-
cent. We spent six percent annually
and invested the rest
ECU is the third largest univer-
sity in the state, with a scholarship
fund ranking
with or ahead of
U N C -
Greens boro,
UNC-Charlotte,
U N C
Wilmington and
Appalachian;
however, ECU
ranks below
UNC-Chapcl
Hill, Wake Forest
and Duke.
"Looking at
the merit scholar-
ships awarded
versus the aver-
age merit scholar-
ship amount, we
are giving more
scholarships and
less money and
UNC-Charlotte
is giving less
scholarships and
more money
Lanier said.
In records
from the Merit
Scholarship
Campaign
Steering
Committee
meeting, Eakin is
quoted as having
discussed the
"brain drain" and
how many N.C. col-
leges and universi-
ties are losing students to out-of-
state institutions who have more
scholarship funds.
"We are excited about the con-
cept of a scholarship campaign
Lanier said. 'This campaign is the
chancellor's highest priority, one
that he is really committed to. A
merit scholarship is an investment
that raises the entire academic
quality of an institution. This will
help us recruit better students.
Bright, young leaders who are well-
rounded, good students, positive
role models and strong influences
in the communities tend to bring
other bright students with them
Rebel
continued from page I
faculty members of the English
department and art entries are
judged by faculty in the School of
Art.
Various forms of literature and
art are in each issue. Both fiction
and poetry are included. Entries in
each genre are judged separately.
Various forms of art entries are
included in the competition and
displayed in the magazine. Wood
design, photography, sculpture,
printmaking, graphic design, paint-
ing, textile design, ceramics, metal
design and illustration are all
included in the 1997 The Rebel.
"It working on The Rebel's staff
is a great way to get real-world
experience Spivey said. "More
people should get involved
If you are interested in joining
the staff of The Rebel ot submitting a
work for entry in the magazine,
contact the current editor, Jackie
McBride, or go to the Media Board
office.
Barefoot
continued from page I
Couch
continued from page I
problem Kimble said.
If the issue is no big deal then
why bother to pass an ordinance at
all?
"It's a health issue Johnson
said. Upholstered furniture, can get
soggy and with lice and mosqui-
toes
The package that the uphol-
stered furniture ordinance was part
of listed other things that the city
council and its advisors view as
public health hazards or annoy-
ances. Included are weeded lots,
i
stagnant water, trash and debris,
appliances kept outdoors, and cars
parked on front lawns.
Kimble said the city council
wanted to review the old codes and
make additions to them in order to
clean up and beautify Greenville.
The list of violations was gener-
ated by city agencies that deal with
the health and safety of citizens,
like the police, city managers office,
and the division of neighborhood
services. It was then voted in by
the city council.
A similar rule which met harsh
criticism in Wilson, has garnered
mixed views in Greenville. Some
of those who still harbor the illegal
couches in their yards or on their
porches think the rule is invasive
and unfair while others agree that

the furniture is indeed a nuisance.
"I didn't know anything about it
the ordinance, but we were
already going to move it because it
looks like a piece of trash on the
front porch said Steven Rycc of
Delta Sigma Phi.
Ryce says he thinks the rule is
fair because it prevents the neigh-
borhood from looking run down.
However student Dan Haught
said he thinks the furniture is use-
ful, and provides a hangout for
guests to his 10th street house.
For now, the ordnance has been
in place relatively uncontested for
five months and city officials say
they can't see that changing.
"People understand what the
rules are and for the most part they
follow them Kimble said.
But the one difference this year
is that the event will not be shaded
from the sun by the branches of the
trees in the mall. However, offi-
cials promise that it will be as fun
and exciting as ever.
"After the reseeding of the
grass and the new sprinkler system
is set up, then next year we should
Justice
continued from page 1
relating to physical appearance and
social desirability of the plaintiff
and defendant in both civil and
criminal cases. He first became
interested in studying these factors
when he served as a juror for a crim-
inal case.
"Why is it that physically attrac-
tive people are given breaks in
court?" Wuensch said.
After conducting mock studies
using photographs to represent liti-
gants, he and fellow researchers
concluded physical appearance of
both litigants does influence the
verdict.
"An attractive person is given
the benefits Wuensch said.
Research shows that jurors are
influenced by physical attributes
and the social standing of litigants.
5 Thundi
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Saturday Eastar Vigil Service (AprilH): 8:00 pm at St. Peter's
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To their
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In this d
rules, whic
about the ;
think. Don
Quite pi;
LETT
On April l
Business and Pi
Organization
Business Owm
American Bi
Association, Wo
women in Gre
ing other wome
to raise awarer
pay. The day m
it's the point,
months into the
woman's earnin
to a man's earni
year. President
proclamation di
"National Pay
Day Governor
mayor, Nancy t
similar proclaim
According to
a woman earns
each dollar a
African-Americ;
Hispanic womei
64 and 57 cents.
r






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;iven breaks in
tid.
g mock studies
to represent liti-
low researchers
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person is given
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that jurors are
sical attributes
ling of litigants.
5 Thur.div. April 2. 1998
a
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OS
pinion
Thi till C.roliiii.n
eastCarolinian
Amv. L.Rovster Editor
HbAI'IIEH HnKCEiJi MmagingEdinr
Amanda Austin NmnEdim Tracv m. lauiach SponsEd.iiK
llnu.v Harris Asit.D�nEdiioi Steve Losev Ami SponiEdiioi
And Turner uliiiyi.Ednoi Carole Mehle m Copy Eduoi
John Davis tauuniUlmyhEdiM John murphy Suffllkirnim
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Cmdmn lewm rta lahi 10 ed,i o iiiki liniii lor pubhcii�r AH linm muu la ugmd Uniri ihould la iddrttfad to Quian alooi .na Eih
Cuohnan. Siudtoi Pubratam Bulibno, ECU. Grumai. 2JB5n43S3 For nhxnatiw. call 819.3M 6388
oumew
Thankfully, the season of rebirth, spring, is finally here. As a result, more students are
spending much more time outside. Whether to get a tan, to throw a Frisbee or baseball, to
people watch or to simply enjoy the beautiful weather, there are sufficient reasons to pry
you away from your couch and televisions. Those enterprising enough may remedy this by
hauling their favorite couch out of their home and plopping it down on the front porch. But
you better think twice; it could end up costing you $50.
Last fall, the Greenville Town Council felt it necessary to pass an ordinance that
admirably seeks to make Greenville more pleasing to the eye. Among its provisions is one
that forbids persons from leaving upholstered furniture outside their homes.
"Persons" should probably more appropriately read "students This is
an unnecessary provision that unfairly targets students, who are likely the most infamous
of the "couch offenders
Some folks may call outside couches "eyesores blaming them for (the always popular)
"bringing their property values down A couch isn't an old car without any tires except for
the ones lying on the ground around it. No, a couch serves a purpose: it is a comfortable
place to sit, talk, rest, sleep or simply to enjoy the outside. The outside couch is popular
among students, who don't always have the appropriate funding to make their front porch-
es resplendent with charming patio sets. Couches, then, are an economical and intelligent
choice.
To their credit, the Greenville Police supposedly only enforces the ordinance when a
complaint is made by a neighbor. They give the offending party the opportunity to remove
the couch. But if they refuse, it could cost them $50.
In this day and age, we seem to quick to solve our problems by simply just making more
rules, which often leads to more problems. The easiest thing to do if you are concerned
about the appearance of your neighbor's home is to confront them. Tell them what you
think. Don't hide behind a silly ordinance that will only lead to more resentment.
Quite plainly, don't be a couch narc.
R
to the Editor
Women deserve equal pay
On April 3, Greenville-Pitt
Business and Professional Women's
Organization (BPW), Women
Business Owners of Pitt County,
American Business Women's
Association, Women's Network and
women in Greenville will be join-
ing other women across the country
to raise awareness about unequal
pay. The day marks Equal Pay Day,
it's the point, three and a half
months into the new year, when a
woman's earnings finally catch up
to a man's earnings in the previous
year. President Clinton has issued a
proclamation declaring the day as
"National Pay Equity Awareness
Day Governor Hunt and our own
mayor, Nancy Jenkins, have issued
similar proclamations.
According to the census bureau,
a woman earns only 74 cents for
each dollar earned by a man.
African-American men and
Hispanic women fare worse at only
64 and 57 cents. These are stagger-
ing numbers, especially when you
consider that the Equal Pay Act was
passed 35 years ago.
And here in North Carolina, the
wage gap for women is even lower
than the national average. In North
Carolina, women earn 71.7 cents for
every male dollar.
Although women's earnings
have been slowly catching up to
men's over time, the National
Committee on Pay Equity tells us
that this reduction in the wage gap
has more to do with a fall in men's
earnings than with an increase in
women's earnings.
Working women deserve equal
pay Unfair pay is a bankrupt policy.
But more than that, it's against the
law. In this country, we frequently
espouse the notion that if you work
hard and play by the rules, you can
get ahead. But too often, although
women play by the rules, employ-
ers do not.
Working women deserve equal
pay because when a paycheck
comes up short, their children feel
the loss. Today middle class work-
ing families are often just one pay-
check away from disaster, and
increasingly that paycheck is a
woman's. The stability of our fami-
lies is undermined when we don't
pay women fairly for the work they
do.
Two bills, the Fair Pay Act and
the Paycheck Fairness Act, have be
introduced in Congress to strength-
en existing equal pay laws, but we
can make gains sooner than it takes
a bill to get through Congress.
Employers have a responsibility to
analyze their compensation prac-
tices and eliminate any wage bias in
the system.
Elisa P. Burgess
Greenville-Pitt Business and
Professional Women's Organization
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VIEBSITE
1
:I
A
'A
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
SULLIVAN
Sexual harassment out of hand
when every day someone is
accusing someone else of sexu-
al harassment it just gets to
be a monotonous drone.
Sexual harassment lawsuits, allega-
tions, etc. have been taken entirely
too far in this country over the past
few years. There is only so much
sexual harassment that any reason-
able person could actually believe
to be in fact transpiring in the way
in which the laws were designed to
prevent and to protect.
I am not saying that sexual
harassment does not occur or that
its occurrence is not a serious mat-
ter, but when every day someone is
accusing someone else of sexual
harassment it just gets to be a
monotonous drone.
If anyone ever takes time to
research what most of the incidents
entail, they would find a consider-
able number of those incidents to
be very petty and very subjective.
For instance, in 1993, a graduate
student was forced by the
University of Nebraska to remove a
picture from his own desk of his
own wife in a bikini because two
fellow grad students complained
that the picture was in violation of
the school's sexual harassment poli-
cy. That is just ridiculous. What is
more ridiculous though is that the
university was compelled to inter-
pret any policy to the degree where
that poor fellow had to remove that
totally harmless picture. Whose
rights are really being violated
here?
Contrived sexual harassment
allegations do not only effect the
accuser and the accused, but they
also affect entire administrations,
companies, universities, not to
mention you and me. Advisers can-
not even counsel a student with the
door shut in fear of the possible
consequences. It would be differ-
ent if a person accused of sexual
harassment could go on with his or
her life and career, but that is a feat
that could only be accomplished by
the president of the United States
perhaps. The accused will always
have a somewhat tarnished record
even if he is found to be totally in
the clear.
Even feminists (which, by
the way, I am not) are now saying
that the American workplace is.
becoming like a sexual police state
Women with high degrees of intelji
ligence are being conditioned to-
run like babies at any type of look'
or innuendo that may � if
stretched � have some sort of con-i
notation not conducive to the work?
ing environment instead of actually
addressing the situation in a mature
and competent manner. This cry
baby mentality is crippling women
in ways that may only materialize in'
years ahead. j.
Once again, when sexual harass-
ment does occur, it does need to be
dealt with accordingly, but when
does the madness stop? Nexti
there will lawsuits filed against
employers for having Sporttn.
Illustrated magazines and halitosis
The laws concerning sexual harass,
ment in this country need to be.
revamped and revised in order to.
avoid an utter outbreak of further
accusations and misconduct on,
either part i
OPINION
Britt
HONEYCUTT
Violence needs to stop at home
m f�
1
-fcil1
Until we stop condoning vio-
lence, breeding violence, living
with it daily, it will worsen
It won 'tgo away by itself�
we have to make it.
Jimmy Royal ate his Trapper
Keeper in the third grade. There
were rumors that Seth Mouton ate
an abondoned house and had start- -
ed on his neighbor's barn, but
nobody really believed them.
Danny Myers brought a real eye-
ball to school and dropped it on the
floor in Mrs. Harris' room. And
these were the most atrocious
things to take place throughout my
elementary school years.
That is the kind of headline
news that should be gossiped about
through the monkey bars on the
playground. Eleven-year-olds
should be in the girl's bathroom
applying the wrong color eyeshad-
ow that they stole from their moth-
ers' purses. They should be hud-
dled in a corner of the schoolyard
giggling over nudie pictures ripped
from an older brother's Playboy.
They should be throwing spitballs,
passing notes, whispering behind
the teacher's back, and being, in
general, kids. These are the crimes
that 11-year-olds commit. They
don't kill each other.
Has the world really changed
this much in the short ten years
since I left elementary school?
Think about what we did after
school when we were eleven. I
spent most afternoons in a tree,
with my dog, or - I really hate to
admit this- playing with Cabbage
Patch dolls (everybody else was
doing it too, OK?). So what hap-
pened?
Maybe the answer lies in what
kids do after school now. My first
inclination upon getting off the bus
was to go play in tha yard. More and
more, kids seem to favor flopping
in front of TV and watching moral
gems like The Mighty Morphin
Power Rangers and about a dozen
spin-offs, all of which involve beat-
ing or killing something violently. I
went to the movies to see E.T.
They go to see Mortal Kombat.
But you can't blame TV or the
movies (although the producers
who aim these things at such a
young age group aren't exactly can-
didates for sainthood). The fault
lies with unattentive parents who
don't have the time or the inclina-
tion to moniter what goes into their
kids' heads; the ones who allow the,
viewing of the kind of stuff that �
makes adults shudder, and don't
provide the knowledge that this is ,?
not the way the real world works.
They let kids continue to believe
the best, way to get rid of a problem"
is to shoot it, and back up this beleif
with a shiny new shotgun for
Christmas.
These are the formative years
when kids are still learning the dif-
ference between right and wrong.
At a period that is crucial to teach-
ing them a respect for life in every
form, they instead see Mom & Dad, jj,
come home slamming doors and
hear "I'm gonna kill that S.O.B
and turn to the television to see the
hero stab the bad guy. How can
anyone learn to respect life in this
popular, coflict-infested environ-
ment?
It is not one thing in our system
that has produced children who
kill. It is a compilation of factors in
an increasingly violent society that
has become increasingly more
lenient to violent offenders. These
kids don't need to be executed or �
made an example of. They need,
help. Their parents need help
Until we stop condoning violence, ,
breeding violence, living with it .
daily, it will worsen. Ask any inner i
city mother who watches her kids '
walk to school every day. It won't go .
away by itself � we have to make
it
I
I
T





9 Thursday. April 2, 1998
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16 Teheran
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17 Cooking smell
18 Sphere of power
19 Polite
20 Last Russian
dynasty
22 Murkiness
24 Open position
25 French subway
27 Lupino and
Tarbell
28 Not restrained
31 Country: abbr.
34 Machu Piochu
honcho
35 Excuse
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41 Three of the
infielders
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3 Play replay,
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4 Part of a BLT
5 Hand's breadth
6 French region
7 Paddle
8 Native
9 Isinglass
10 Monty Python
member
11 Giant killer
12 Playwright Loos
13 Tomlin and
Pons
21 Portents
23 Escape vehicle
26 English meal
29 Spinet, e.g.
30 Lightened �
31 Seize suddenly
32 Show on TV
33 Make an attempt
36 Minor devil
37 Actress Arthur
38 Lodging house
40 Like Nureyev's
moves
41 Bungling
42 Entertain
44 Bite the dust
47 Bother
persistently
48 Acts the bad
winner
49 Last
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spectacularly
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way
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VISA
With
nc
7 Thuud�y. April 2, 1998
lifestyle
TIM Eitt Cirolinlin
book PePsi festival may quinch your interests
review
Pepsi celebrates
WOyears
Doug De Bias
Coming of Age in
Babylon, Finding
Your Own Reality
8 OUT OF 10
Jennifer L. Tafe
STAFF WRITER
Picture sitting down to have a long
chat with your dad. Picture asking
his thoughts about sex, drugs, reli-
gion and politics. Now throw in
music, money and finding a job just
to make things interesting. Sound
like fun yet?
Okay, now imagine having the
same discussion with someone
else's cooler, hipper, totally-unin-
volved-in-your-life dad. Any bet-
ter?
For those of you who answered
yes, Coming of Age in Babylon,
Finding Your Own Reality by Doug
De Bias is worth your time.
Although he is not completely suc-
cessful in bridging the generation
gap, De Bias tackles the trickiest
SEE BABYLON PAGE 9
Pat Reid
senior writer
Chances are that when you run into
the Wright Place or The Spot for a
quick thirst drencher you never
stop to think about the origins of
the drink in your hand. In fact,
chances arc you probably never
knew that Pepsi, one of the most
popular soda beverages in the
world, was invented right here in
Eastern North Carolina. Despite
Pepsi growth in the past century,
the company has kept its heritage
alive. This weekend marks the cel-
ebration of that growth as well as
the memory of the past with a gala
weekend of events scheduled in
and around the drink's hometown,
nearby New Bern.
In 1898, drugstore soda foun-
Pepsi through the ages
PHOTO COURTESY OF PEPSI
tains were popular places for people
to gather. In an effort to win over
more customers, pharmacists often
tried to come up with new concoc-
tions to lure in the crowds. It was
one such pharmacist named Caleb
Bradham that invented Pepsi in his
little store on the comer of Middle
and Pollack Street in New Bern. As
part of the weekend celebration,
the restored store, Bradham
Pharmacy, will be open for
tourists throughout the
weekend. Of course, Pepsi
will be served and memora-
bilia will be sold.
Other sights to see during
the weekend include the
town's historic Tyron Palace
gardens and New Bern
Academy Museum. Also, at
the Bank of the Arts build-
ing, there will be a free
exhibit of 100 years of Pepsi.
This exhibit will feature all
the bottle styles Pepsi has
ever been sold in as well as
the first ever Pepsi ad, a 1909
straw holder and an original
letter signed by Bradham
himself.
But there's more to the
weekend than Pepsi nostal-
gia. Friday evening, there will
be balloon rides available at
the Sheraton Hotel, as well as live
music downtown. Combine with
this the play, The Caleb Bradham
Story, and a free concert by Mighty
Saints of Soul, and you have a night
that offers something for everyone.
Friday's festivities will end with
fireworks over the Trent River at 9
p.m.
Saturday's events start off at 8
a.m. with a Pepsi Walk and a 5K
Road Race for the athletic types.
Or, if spectator sports are more your
type, you can take in the mountain
bike race in Cherry Point or the
Softball tournament at Fort Torten
Park. Both of these events son at 9
a.m.
Saturday continues with a
parade at 10 before the carnival
atmosphere takes over at noon.
This is when the Street Scene will
start up. This portion of the week-
end will include amusement rides,
costumed street strollers, games
and other assorted entertainment
downtown and will run until 6 p.m.
Following an evening aerial
show over the Trent River,
Saturday's events will climax with a
show by North Carolina native
Charlie Daniels at New Bern High
SEE FIPSI PAGE t
Lecture details
different kind of activism
Role of NC wonen
emphask
Shannon Meek
senior writer
The slogan "A vote for women's
suffrage is a vote for women nag-
ging forever" briefly describes soci-
ety's attitudes in the late 1800s and
early 1900s.
Anastatia Sims, a history profes-
sor at Georgia Southern University,
presented a lecture entitled, "The
Power Of Femininity: Women,
Clubs and Politics in Eastern North
Carolina, 1880-1930
Her lecture focused on how
North Carolina women, acting
through women's clubs and other
voluntary associations, helped
shape public politics long before
they were given the right to vote.
Through her lecture, Sims
brought to life an unsung heroine,
Sallie Southall Cotten. Sallie
Cotten, a farmer's wife, was not a
militant crusader for women's
rights. In fact, she did not get
involved in the crusade until late in
her life. She fervently believed in
the power of femininity, the power
of women in the world to bring
about positive change.
In 1892, at the ripe age of 46,
Sallie Cotten was selected by the
Governor of North Carolina to be a
lady manager for Columbus Fair in
Chicago. It was during this fair, that
Mrs. Cotten came in contact with
the ideas of women's clubs, clubs
that she would start in North
Carolina to shape the state for the
better.
The clubs that Mrs. Cotten start-
ed did many things for the state of
North Carolina. They persuaded
state legislators to help delinquent
boys. The clubs established public
libraries. In fact, 80 percent of the
public libraries are kept alive by
these clubs today.
They lobbied for better educa-
tion for their children. The clubs
were responsible for longer school
terms, attendance laws and estab-
lishing teacher colleges such as
ECU. This interest for education
led to political involvement.
Sallie Cotten, along with
the women's clubs, crusaded for the
right to serve on school boards.
According to Sims, they were told
simply that they could not serve on
these boards because they couldn't
vote.
With a ladylike decorum they
rallied to be given the right to serve
on school boards. They would smile
sweetly to reporters as they patient-
ly sat outside the legislature.
Underneath that facade was a brew-
si E ACTIVISM. PAGE I
tube
BOOB
You �itrh TVT Of course you 4a- jouVe an
Amman. You witch TV. sank TV. In TV.
become TV Everyone knows that. Whit yn
don't know is that TV fc, witching )�i
Superman more
than guys in tights
Animated Series
close to perfect
Mark Brett
SENIOR WRITER
10 OUT OF lO
is getting
Lamenting the loss of joysticks
This is
the col-
umn where
we discuss the
stuff we miss and
the stuff you missed. We
will examine the books, albums,
television shows we feel desrve fur-
ther exploration. The stuff we dug
back in the day
WinnrtTp
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
Another shameless Ws
rememberance
The orginal munch
PHOTO COURTESY OF ATARI
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
These days I can't understand the
dang things. Sure, I try, but the
multitude of buttons on the con-
trollers is confusing enough to
induce some sort of psychosis. I'm
talking about video games. My
roommate is a whiz at all the new
ones: Madden Football, Tomb Raider,
Twisted Metal, March Madness,
Me, I can't figure 'em out. There
are, on an average Playstation or
Sega controller, four or more but-
tons just for steering whatever char-
acter you have to steer, whether it
be a high-powered armed-to-the-
teeth-Mad-Max death car or an
archaeologist
with the mea-
surements of
Barbie.
Then there
are the various
buttons for firing
weapons, jump-
ing, running and
throwing a pass.
This is all
severely compli-
cated by the fact that each video
game has specific combinations of
these tens of buttons that enable
one to do a running jump, jump
while running, run while shooting
and jumping or completing a jump-
pass while shooting someone run-
ning by.
Gimmie the old school Atari joy-
stick anyday. Pac-Man is a game I
can handle, and even score a few
points on. Way back when, in the
dawning of the 1980s, I was even
privileged enough to see my initials
glowing from the screen of arcade
games set up in the pizza restaurant
near mypartment complex.
"JPD" the screen would display
in a happy, hummy sort of way.
"10,057" it would say to the
extreme right of my initials.
Sometimes I'd even get to have the
honorific "High Score" attached to
my initials, letting everyone know
that I was, at least in the memory of
that particular machine, the best of
the best.
The arcade
was the primo
hangout spot for
the kids in my
neighborhood.
Pole Position (a
racing game),
Tron (based on
the Disney
movie), Pae-
Man (and, for
the ladies,
Afs.Pac-Man), Spy Hunter (about,
well, a guy hunting spies), Galaga (a
fancified arcade version of Space
Invaders Asteroids (which featured
a neato turny control rather than a
joystick) were just a few of the
, more popular video games in the
arcades back then.
While it's true that some of the
richer kids had Ataris they could
attach to their televisions, nothing
would beat going down to the
arcade and slappin' the old joystick
around for a few hours. Arcades
became the cultural center of eight-
SEE JOYSTICK. PAGE I
Children's television
awfully complicated.
At least that's what I find myself
thinking as I'm being drawn to the
TV set every Sunday morning at
10:30 to watch Superman: the
Animated Series. This is no screech-
ing, hyperactive
cartoon show I'm
talking about here.
Superman is fasci-
nating, subtle and
many-layered.
Don't get me
wrong; it ain't
Shakespeare. It
does feature a guy
in blue tights beat-
ing up super-vil-
lains and all the
other nonsense
you'd expect from
a Superman ear-
lier perfect match. Clark, unfortu-
nately, is just her reporter-sidekick
buddy.
So the relationship circles. Lois
wants to ask Superman out on a
date, but she's nervous. Supes
responds, but wants Co woo her a
Clark. And Clark, though able to
melt battleships with his eyes, isn't
subde enough to figure out how to
get Lois to notice him as more than
a friend.
Granted, we got a lot of this soap
opera stuff on the live-action Lob
and Clark series, sort of, but it was-
n't even close to being this well-
written. And that show didn't make
the relationship nearly as believ-
able as this cartoon version, either.
This is a problem with most
Look! Up above the writing, dingy. It's Superman. Can't ypu
bleedin' read?
au
PHOTO COURTESY OF SUPERMAN: THE ANIMATED SERIES
When games were good
, PHOTO COURTESY OF ATARI
toon's creators have succeeded in
making Superman something the
kids can enjoy, while still doing
serious adult drama on some level.
Mosdy that seriousness comes
from their handling of the classic
Clark KentLois Lane relationship.
These two characters have been
circling each other for 60 years now,
and finally married a couple of
years back in the comics. You'd
think there would be nothing new
to do with them.
But on this show we're seeing
the relationship develop in a differ-
ent way. Lois wants a man who's as
smart, strong and brave as she is.
Clark can't be attracted to anyone
who's not as dedicated to fighting
the good fight as he is. They're
obviously made for each other.
There's just one problem:
Superman. To Lois, Superman is
romantic fiction. Too often we're
told that two people love each
other but aren't shown why. But
since the characters certainly seem
to be in love, we accept it and move
on. That's not the case orf;1
Superman.
Then, of course, there's the sex
Nobody's doing the horizontal
rumba on-camera, mind you; this is
a children's show we're talking
about, after all. But whether it's
Metallo lamenting his inability to
enjoy the pleasures of the flesh in
his new robot body or Lob Lane's
veiled references to Lex Luthor's
disappointing mattress skills, the
innuendo flies. "
My favorite bit of sexual banter
comes when Superman shows up
SEEIUKRNM.PUES
!





8 Thursday. April 2. 1998
lifestyle
Tht East Carolinian
Thunda
April
2 Thursday
Melvin I. Urofsky,
Pkysician-Assisted Suicide:
Is Then a Right to Die? at
7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall
Great Room
Money Talks at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre
(through March
Donna the Buffalo at
Peasant's
Agents of Good Roots,
Mike Corado Band at
The Attic
Live Jazz at Staccato
Go Wheels, Grand
Pricks, Ape Foot Groove
at Lizard & Snake in
Chapel Hill
Sharking Teeth,
Ceiling Fan at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
Superdrag at Cat's
Cradle in Carborro
3 Friday
Mishap at
Peasant's
The Gibb Droll
Band, The
Ultraviolets at
The Attic-
Fishbone,
Al's Not Well
at Lake
Boone Country
Club in Raleigh
Jump Little Children
at Cat's Cradle in
Carborro
Disband, Reflex Point
at Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
The Crow Flies at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
4 Saturday
Growing Up on the
Prairie at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
hipbone at Peasant's
Far Too Jones at The
Attic
Supergrit Cowboy Band,
Boot Hill at Deadwood
Doc Glass at Lizard
Snake in Chapel Hill
Pissing Razors, Pro-
Pain at the Brewery in
Raleigh
Blue Rags at Cat's
Cradle in Carborro
Two Dollar Pistols at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
5 Sunday
Trophy Wife, Faustina
at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
6 Monday
Rhudabega at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
7 Tuesday
The Cypher (open mic
poetry) at Underwater
Pirate's Cove
Lamego at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
Decon Brody at
Peasant's
Pepsi
continued from page 7
Marshall Tucker Band,
VA
School. The CDB is scheduled to
play their legendary blend of coun-
try and rock from 9 p.m. until 11,
though some reports have the show
lasting as long as 12.
Sunday things will slowly wind
down, as the slower portions of the
weekend will prevail. The
Bradham Pharmacy, Tryon Palace
gardens and the New Bern
Academy Museum will remain
open for people to stroll through.
Or, if the slower pace just is not for
you, you can take in the Chairmen
of the Board at the Craven County
Fairgrounds at 1 p.m.
In all, Pepsi has tried to offer
something for everyone in their
effort to have a celebration that will
span the Carolinas. Regardless if
you drink Pepsi or not, there is
plenty being offered this weekend
to lure you down for a few fun-
filled hours. Besides, how often is it
that a world famous product comes
out of your back yard?
Directions to New Bern:
Take 43 (Charles Brvd)
out of Greenville.
Stay on 43 through
Vanceboro and it will take you
straight into New Bern.
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IS)
Friday
10 a.m4 p.m 6pm-9pm: 100
years of Pepsi exhibit
10 a.m9 p.m Pepsi Store
open
5 p.m8:30 p.m Hot Air
Balloons
5 p.m. -9 p.m Alive at Five
(music and entertainment)
7 p.m Mighty Saints of Soul
9 p.m Fireworks
Saturday
10 a.m Parade
10 a.m6 p.m 100 Years
exhibit
10-6: Pepsi Store open
12-6: Street Scene
7:30: Aerial Extravaganza
9-11: Charlie Daniels Band
Sunday
1 p.m Chairmen of the Board
1-4: Pepsi Store open
Activism
continued from page 7
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ing conflict.
Men who claimed to be south-
ern gentlemen ripped up the
women's written request. Sallie
Cotten, in a private letter, wrote
"It seems so blind and stupid of
men But these attitudes were
never brought to public light.
Women were considered to be
"conservative progressive
according to one newspaper jour-
nalist
Sims said, "Sallie Cotten
extremely believed that women
could have a role beyond home
and family. Women could take on
a public life while maintaining
more traditional roles
In 1913, womqn won the right
to be on school boards. This posi-
tion was won not bypopular vote,
but by appointment This means
that if a woman was to serve on a
school board, she would have to be
appointed by a man. This fight
showed the women that their
rights were only going to be won
by a strong battle.
In 1920, the 19th ammendment
granted women the right to vote.
North Carolina was one of the last
states to ratify the amendment
(eventually ratifed inl971).
Cotten's spirit is still alive
today. Many of her clubs are still in
existence, such as the End of the
Century Book Club. Recently,
Donna Whitley, an active member
of the PTA, coordinated a group of
women who lobby for the better-
ment of education. The group
named itself after Sallie Cotten to
honor the work that she had done.
Sims said, "She Sallie Cotten
should not only be remembered
for what she accomplished, but
also by how she accomplished it
in a non-con
fight the ele
(voiced by L
jfjuips, "the 1
lection
Anyway, t
to the show
There's also I
ing and hitt
and they do t
The action
paced and e-
'does it just tx
tights poundi
When gi
power level s
damage is a
Now that we BUI
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�SOCIETY OF
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lH JOURNALISTS.
Region 2 Mark of Excellence
BestALL-AR
FplaeeTE
Sports Repor
2nd place Am;
3rd place
In-De
3rd place Ghristin Cadle
3ri place Frank Hendricks
3 place Mario Scherhaufer
3rd place Todd Jones
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issues with c
fabulous sen
Drugs, se
and racism a
of the topic
attention to.






lit Carolinian
ivism
from page 7
� - J Thursday, April 2, 1998
med to be south-
ripped up the
i request. Sallie
'ate letter, wrote
id and stupid of
e attitudes were
to public light.
msidered to be
progressive
newspaper jour-
"Sallie Cotten
ed that women
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oards. This posi-
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cnt. This means
m to serve on a
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man. This fight
men that their
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th ammendment
he right to vote,
is one of the last
he amendment
I inl971).
t is still alive
r clubs are still in
; the End of the
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i active member
inated a group of
y for the better-
on. The group
Sallie Cotten to
at she had done.
5 Sallie Cotten
be remembered
:omplished, but
xomplished it
per
Tha Eait Carolinian
Superman
continued Irom page 7
in a non-conductive rubber suit to
fight the electrical villain Livewire
(voiced by Lori Petty). "Look she
quips, "the boy scout brought pro-
tection
Anyway, there are other aspects
to the show than the kissing parts.
There's also the running and shout-
ing and hitting parts to consider,
and they do those every bit as well.
The action in Superman is fast-
paced and exciting. Very seldom
does it just boil down to two guys in
tights pounding on each other.
When guys of Superman's
power level start a ruckus, property
damage is a given. So when our
Babylon
continued irom page 7
issues with complete honesty and a
fabulous sense of humor.
"I Drugs, sexuality, discrimination
and racism are only a small sample
of the topics De Bias turns his
attention to. Instead of a list of do's
hero takes on Kalibak, son of
Darkseid, buildings erimble and
subway tunnels collapse. And
when a massive Space Giant
splashes down in the Atlantic, he
causes tidal waves up and down the
east coast The.word of the day
here is "epic
The epic feel particularly comes
through in the superpowers. They
seldom settle for a run-of-the-mill
depiction. Even such "standard"
powers as super-strength are made
awe-inspiring here. Through cam-
era angles and foreshortening, they
make you feel the weight and mass
of the things Superman picks up,
even when he isn't straining with
them.
And strain he does. Even the old
save-the-person-(Lois)-falling-out-
the window gag can be a challenge
for our hero. After all, if he just
snatches them out of the air with-
and don'ts, De Bias simply pro-
vides the readers with straightfor-
ward discussion of his views and
thoughts.
Most important, perhaps, is De
Bias' insistence that people owe it
to themselves to experiment, try
things out and form opinions based
on their convictions.
One of the best things about
Coming of Age however, are the
random bits of knowledge De Bias
chooses to drop. This book is a ver-
out matching their falling speed, he
could snap their necks. So there's
no boring swoop out of nowhere
saves for this Man of Steel. He's got
to work for his derring-do.
None of this would work,
though, if it weren't for the quality
of the animation. The character
designs are deceptively simple;
each line is essential and packs a lot
of power. The motion of figures is
fluid and complex, a far cry from
the still bodymoving lips of
Superfriends. It's not quite Disney-
quality, but it's still the best on tele-
vision.
With its attention to detail and
well-paced character development,
Superman is series television at its
best. Granted, that's not saying
much when your competition is The
Smart Guy, but still, this is good
stuff. I like it a lot. But then, you
probably already figured that out.
Joystick
continued Irom page 7
to thirteen-year-olds; kids at school
would even trade game tokens for
desserts at lunch.
The epitome of arcades was the
ingenious mixture of two prepubes-
cent necessities: pizza and video
games. Called Chuck E. Cheese's,
this mecca of all that was good and
entertaining featured not only video
games, but also sloppy, slathery
pizza, Skee-Ball and those cluky
animatronic animals that sang diss-
appointing renditions of oldies
tunes.
There waefthat one year when
every single one of my friends had
his or her birthday party at Chuck
E. Cheese's. The animatronics and
the pizza got old, but the video
games, they were always there to
glow and make spacey sounds and
make you happy.
The combination of restaurant
and arcade produced interesting
innovations on arcade games. The
introduction of food into the equa-
tion soon led to the table-video
games, where one could play Ms.
Pat-Man while eating. Pretty soon
there were the sit-down versions of
Pole Position, complete with life-
sized steering wheel, gas and brake
pedals � and a stickshift. The
panoramic screen helped complete
the illusion that one was really in an
Indy race.
Nothing could really compare to
the cacphany of squeals, buzzes,
laser-ray sounds, beeps, and synthe-
sized music saturating the air.
Nothing could compare to the
ecstasy of finally, after all this time,
beating Daniel Butler's high score
on Centipede. Nothing could com-
pare to playing the two-player Tron
and beating Adam Lester at the
motorcycle stage.
itable dictionary of cool ideas. A
review of Coming of Age would not
be complete without passing along
some of the quirkier thoughts De
Bias shares.
On why one should find a job:
living with your parents "just gets
too embarrassing On drugs: stay
out of Granny's medicine cabinet.
On boy toys: fancy cars and boats
are often phallic compensations for
the absence of real skills or talent.
On flying solo: "the Declaration of
Independence calls upon you to
masturbate
Moments like these make
Coming of Age in Babylon, Finding
Your Own Reality worth suffering
through the more condescending
parts. While De Bias generally
avoids sounding like a lecturing
father, he sometimes misses the
mark. Who uses the word "dude"
in the '90s?
. It's also hard to take, a book
when the first chapter warns you to
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beware of those over 30 and the
next 25 chapters are full of advice
from an aging babyboomer; even if
the author did do a pile of drugs in
the '60s.
Those minor problems
aside, Doug De Bias' Coming of Age
in Babylon, Finding Your Own Reality
is a great read. At the very least, it's
entertainment. At best, it can real-
ly make you think.
Throw in some Grandmaster
Flash or Michael Jackson being
piped in from some unseen stereo
system, breathe in the sharp pep-
peroni and cheese smells wafting
from the kitchen, blink your eyes to
focus on the screen.
Ahh, to recall challenging stagey
in Galaga, which were like taking
candy from a baby if you were able
to get the double-fighter in the pre-
vious level. Ohh, the bliss of getting
Mario or Luigi all the way up to
Donkey Kong without getting hit
by a barrel. Is there anything better
than an empty Asteroids screen,
devoid of everything other than the
drifting triangle of a spaceship?
Video games permeated the
entire American cultural landscape,
so that pretty soon E.T. was taking
apart and re-assembling video game
machines to "phone home" and
other aliens were using video games
to scout for young warriors in The
Last Starfighter. There was even an
ABC Afterschool Special about the
poor middle school student who got
so addicted to video games that he
went nutso and couldn't compre-
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I
I
10 Thursday. April 2, 1898
sports
Th� Eatt Ciroliniin
A Tale of Two
Rigsby and
Williamson shine
for ECU
JASON THUR1NGER
SENIOR WHITE
lUlll bUM 0
ticL'Uf far.
Yaai to Date ttltl it of
Max 31
According to
Head Pirate
Baseball
Coach Keith
L cC I a i r,
senior first
baseman
Randy
Rigsby "has
the complete
package
LeClair is not
the only one
who thinks
that Rigsby is
good
baseball
player. On
March 16,
Rigsby was selected as the
CAA player of the week.
"He certainly deserved
it LeClair said. "Randy
carried us in the three-game
sweep over William and
Mary. He came up with
some big hits
As of March 26, Rigsby
had a .390 batting average
with 24 RBIs and five
homeruns, to rank first and
second respectively among
his teammates.
"He's got a combination
of both power and contact
hitting LeClair said. "He
can hit the ball in the gap
and steal some bases
"I've always loved
hitting and I work hard at
it Rigsby said. "I don't
know whether or not I was
born with it, I just like
doing it
There is a chance that
Rigsby's career in the field
will not end when it comes time to
leave ECU.
"Hopefully I'll have a chance
John Williamson and Randy Rigsby are years apart
PHOTO
to play at the next level Rigsby
said. "It's something I've always
wanted to do and I think I've got
a decent chance of doing it
in age, but both have the talent to play professional ball.
BY CLAY BUCK
LeClair agrees that Rigsby's
talent will lead him to a bigger
field.
"I think that he will get that
opportunity (to play
professional baseball)
LeClair said.
"Randy is known as a
quiet guy, who goes
about his business and
does it well LeClair
said. "He lets his play
speak for him. He is a
very good defensive
first baseman
Rigsby added that
playing hard and setting
a good example is what
is important to him.
"I'm not much of a
rah-rah type of guy
Rigsby said. "I just
come out here and play
hard everyday.
Hopefully everybody
follows my example
One of the younger
players who has been
following in Rigsby's
footsteps is a freshman
from Wilmington, John
Williamson. Williamson was
recruited to play ECU ball by
LeClair when he was with
Western Carolina.
"John has added a lot to the
,team offensively LeClair said.
"He has surprised me with his
power
The freshman has played right
field in
every game
for the
Pirates so
far this year.
"I just
try to hit
the ball
hard and
good things
are going to
happen
Williamson
said.
Williamson
started the
season with
an 0-10
stump at
the plate.
Unlike
most
athletes,
Williamson
Randy Rigsby
PHOTO SY HAY BUCK
SEE TALE ON PAGE I
Men's and women's track teams take
big steps toward ultimate goals
Athletes compete at
Raleigh Relays
Stephen schramm
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's men's and women's track
teams took big steps toward their
ultimate goals at this past
weekend's Raleigh Relays. The
women's team used it to search for
any progress from the athletes it
has. Meanwhile, the men's team
used the meet to try new
combinations of runners and give
younger team members
experience at a big meet.
"We're at the stage of the
season where we're looking for
progress said Head Women's
Track Coach Charles "Choo"
Justice. "We're getting speed in
our legs. We're not looking at
what we do each week, just what
we will do at the championship
meets, and we're on track
Progress was evident in the
performances of the relay teams
on the first day. The 4x100 team
finished 15th at 48.47. The 4x200
team overcame a miscue on a
baton hand-off to finish 11th with
a time of 1:42.
"Our relays did well Justice
said. "We didn't have great hand-
offs but we're getting better and
we will get the timing down pat
The Pirate throwers also
competed well. Freshman Crystal
Frye finished 19th in the shot put,
with a throw of 39'2 Frye was
followed by fellow freshman
Margaret Clayton, who finished
21st with a toss of 38'8 In the
hammer throw, Jennifer Prevatt
placed 22nd with a throw of
134'11
The best performance of
Friday's action belonged to
Marshari Williams, who finished
11 th in the triple jump with 37'6
The second day saw the
distance medley relay team break
the school record with a time of
4:09.50 en route to a 10th place
finish. Junior Missy Johnson
placed 11th in the 400 meter high
hurdles with a time of 1:03.50.
Williams followed up her stellar
first day with a 14.82 in the 100
meter high hurdles that was good
enough for a 21st place finish.
Johnson finished 25th in the
event with a time of 14
"We did, pretty well Justice
said. "Our' performances are
beginning to come around. We are
getting some speed in our legs
and we had some high finishes
The men's team entered the
meet placing an emphasis on
youth. Head Coach Bill Carson
decided to shuffle the lineups so
he could get experience for the
younger members of the team.
However, the same usual faces
still led the Pirates into the top 10.
In the 100 meter dash,
Ramondo North placed 10th with
a time of 10.78. North finished
just in front of fellow Pirate Titus
Haygood, who ran a 10.80. Tyrone
Dozier led a host of high Pirate
finishes in the 400. Dozier ran a
team best 46.67. He was followed
by teammates Darrick Ingram and
Michael Miller, who finished sixth
and 11th respectively.
"Dozier is going to be a great
athlete much earlier than we
thought Carson said.
Saturday saw the retooled
Pirate relay teams take center
stage.
"We didn't load the relays so
we could look at some of the
younger guys Carson said. "The
younger guys will give us more
depth
The 4x100 team placed fifth
with its best time of the season at
40.55. They dropped more than a
second from last week's time of
41.58. The 4x400 team finished
third despite concerns over team
member Lynn Stewart's injured
hamstring.
The 4x200 relay team finished
sixth with a time of 1:21. The
most pleasant surprise of the meet
was 4x200 team member John
Twitty's strong performance.
"Twitty ran well he shows
great promise for the future
Carson said. "He also gives us
more depth
CONGRATULATIONS!
1998 Outstanding Female and Male
Scholar Athletes of the Year
ECU softball player
Christy
Valevich
Pirate football
quarterback Dan
Gonzalez
Both will be honored at the Breakfast of
Champions on April 18 at the Greenville
Country Club, along with the PCS Phosphate
All-Academic Team.
Men's tennis suffers disappointing 4-1 loss to
conference rival Old Dominion university
Siebenbrunner posts
only victory of die day
scott Rose
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU men's tennis team
hosted conference rival Old
Dominion on Tuesday. ODU
defeated the Pirates 4-1. Stephen
Siebenbrunner was the lone ECU
victory, winning 6-1, 1-6, 6-3 over
Nikola Laca.
"Today just wasn't our day
Siebenbrunner said.
The Pirates may have lost the
match 4-1, but the outcome was
closer than the score appeared. At
No. 1 singles, Roope Kalajo, still
playing with an injury, lost the first
set in a tiebreaker. At No. 2
singles, Nils Alomar had to retire
in the third set after splitting sets
with Johan Varverud. At No. 3
singles, Kenny Kirby did not
finish, and was up in the second
set 3-1 before play was stopped.
Play was stopped when ODU
earned their fourth point of the
match. Brett Rowley also split sets
with his opponent and lost it in
the third set 6-2. Oliver Thalen
was tied in the third set 3-3 before
his play was stopped.
The Pirates also lost all three
doubles matches. Kalajo and
Rowley dropped the closest
doubles match 9-7 and Alomar
and Kirby along with Derek Slate
and Thalen lost by the same score
8-3. This
was the
first point
for ODU.
"It was a
very close
match and
we played
well, we
just had
some bad
luck
Assistant
Coach
Matt Rowe
said.
ECU is
7-8 overall
for the season and 3-2 in the
conference. The Pirates will host
Barton College on Thursday April
2, at 2:30 p.m. As ECU's season
TENNIS
1 Roope Kalajo
2 Nils Alomar
3 Kenny Kirby
4 Brett Rowley
5 Oliver Thalen
6 Siebenbrunner
Alexandra Cancado ODU
Johan Varverud ODU
Niclas Kohler DNF
Patrick Boza ODU
Hieronymus Rodriguez DNF
Nikola Laca ECU
7-6, 6-0
6-3, 5-7, 0-1 Ret.
6-7, 3-1
64. 5-7, 6-2
6-1, 5-7, 3-3
6-1, 1-6, 6-3
New sport to be
added in 2000
Addition to be
announced next year
TRACY HA1RR
STAFF WRITER
winds down they have four more
matches left before the CAA
Conference Championships. Of
the four matches, two are against
CAA opponents, Richmond and
William & Mary.
Golfers unable to recover after shaky first round
Team finishes 14th at
Furman Invitational
STEVE LOSEV
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The golf team finished the
Furman Invitational in 14th place
on Sunday. After winning third
place at Bradford Creek, the
Pirates were hoping to play
another impressive tournament,
but couldn't seem to get it
together. They began the
tournament strongly, placing in
fifth place out of 26 after the first
round, but fell to 14th during the
second round, where they stayed
through the third and final round.
The Pirates arrived in
Greenville, S.C with a nine-over
par performance Friday, shooting
a 297 on the first 18 holes. Virginia
Commonwealth shot a 280,
finishing the first round in first
place with eight under par.
Standing between the Pirates and
VCU was Coastal Carolina
University by one stroke, College
of Charleston by two and Ohio
State University by four. VCU was
too far gone for anybody to catch
them by that time. They led Ohio
State by 13 strokes after Friday.
Sophomore Marc Miller, junior
Scott Campbell and junior co-
captain Daniel Griffis all finished
the first round tied for 16th with a
two over par 74. One stroke
behind them was sophomore
Brian Crawford, tied for 39th.
"We started off real well on the
first day Head Coach Kevin
Williams said. "What hurt us was

something that's been
hurting us all year. We had
one � bad round, and
couldn't recover from it.
We've got to work that
out
The Pirates were
unable to close the gap for
the rest of the weekend.
They dropped to 14th
place on Saturday with a 23
over par 311 performance.
"Our best player, Marc
Miller, had a bad day
Williams said. "We're not
deep enough to cover him
when he has an off day. We
go as Marc goes
Sunday was no better
for the golf team. They
took nine strokes off their game,
improving to an 11 over par 302.
Coastal Carolina wound up tied
with the Pirates with a score of
, GOLFfrrokV
XjrJ
PIaceName Score iBS PIir
14(t) East Carolina 297-311-30291046
46(t) Scott Campbell 74-76-7722711
46(t) Marc Miller 74-80-7322711
57(t) Brian Crawford 75-76-7822913
72(t) Kevin Miller 78-79-7423115
81 (t) Daniel Griffis 74-80-7823216
910. M. Miller shot a one over par
73 Sunday, which pulled him up
from 69th to 46th. Campbell shot
a five over 77 and Crawford
grabbed himself a 78. Senior co-
captain Kevin Miller recovered
from a difficult weekend with his
SEE G01F ON PAGE �
v
By the year 2000, ECU's athletic
department plans on adding a
new varsity-level women's sport
to its roster.
Because of the tremendous
support and organization
required for such an introduction,
it is reasonable to expect some
passage of time before it can be
officially instated to the athletic
program.
Although discussions have
been held among the department
of athletics, as of this time, no
definite decisions have been
made concerning which specific
sport will be added.
Various questions have arisen
concerning the the addition of a
new sport, and the answers are
associated with ECU's growth as
a Conference USA member.
Since its initiation two years ago,
this intercollegiate athletic
conference has achieved notable
results including increased
attendance at games and
numerous appearances on
television.
With such accomplishments at
stake, ECU hopes to expand its
competitive field and invite more
people to participate by allowing
a new sport to take effect. Several
fellow members of the program
have intentions on expanding
their athletic programs as well,
and consequently, further actions
regarding ECU's new sport will
depend upon and relate to the
directions taken in other schools.
SEE NEW iFOIIT ON PAGE I
H
11
Stjc
PHILADE
Arthur "Ya
freshman
Joseph's to i
decades, h
school rathe
season with
Davis, 2(
agent and
eligible for l
He hi
Schwartzma
Bryn Mawi
Schwartzma
get Davis
NBAs pre-d
June 2-5.
"If thing;
YOUR
Feati
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��������





tA
il
�F
11 Thufiday, April 2, 1998
:PQC
s
Tin Eatt Carolinian
St Joe's Davis, star for one season, tries for NBA
PHILADELPHIA (AP) �
Arthur "Yah" Davis, who as a
freshman in 1996 helped St.
Joseph's to its finest season in two
decades, has decided to leave
school rather than miss a second
season with academic problems.
Davis, 20, has signed with an
agent and declared himself
eligible for the NBA draft.
He has hired Glenn
Schwartzman of Sports Pro in
Bryn Mawr to represent him.
Schwartzman said he would try to
get Davis an invitation to the ,
NBAs pre-draft camp in Chicago
June 2-5.
"If things go well, he'll get an
invitation Schwartzman said. "If
not, he'll probably go to Europe to
play so he can build up his
resume. We believe he has the
ability to. play in the NBA.
"But because he missed a year,
we know there will be some
questions about his ability he
said.
St. Joseph's coach Phil Martelli
met with Davis several times in
the past two weeks to talk about
his future.
"By mutual agreement, we
decided it would be best for him
to sign with an agent and pursue a
professional career Martelli said
Monday. "No one here has any
animosity toward Arthur. If he can
do something that will help him
take care of his family, then that
would be great
Davis quickly earned a
reputation as a dangerous shooter
and solid defender during his
freshman season, when the
Hawks broke into the top 25 for
the first time in 24 years and
ended up in the NCAA
tournaments' Sweet 16.
He averaged 14.7 points a
game � 17.7 points in the
Hawks' three NCAA tournament
games.
But he was declared ineligible
last fall and his midterm grades
this spring made it clear that he
would not be able to play in 1998-
99.
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AffRjUff;
Golf
continued from page 10
two over par 74.
M. Miller and Campbell botfi
scored a total of 11 over par 227,
New Sport
continued (torn page 10
It has been suggested that
women's golf headed the list of
possibilities, and this is probably
due to the fact that it is one of
Tale
continued from page 10
did not let his bad luck bother
him, and has turned his streak
around in the other direction.
"John's the type that does not
let a lot of things get to him
LxClair said. "Pressure situations
don't bother him and he's gotten
some big hits this year
tieing for 46th place.
Virginia Commonwealth won
the tournament. They finished
two strokes ahead of second place
Ohio State.
The Pirates now must recover
from Furman and get ready for
the CAA Championships. The
final tournament of the year will
ECU's current sports with no
female counterpart. However,
according to Assistant Athletics
Director Dr. Henry VanSant, this
is purely just a rumor.
"Golf is certainly an option,
but there are other sports being
considered VanSant said.
Competition is widely
encouraged throughout the
One of those big hits was
during the Campbell game, where
Williamson was credited for a
winning two run home run in the
bottom of the eighth inning.
"He has taken it upon himself
to improve his defense and he has
improved since last fall LeClair
said. "He is one of our best
defenders in the outfield
Much like his older teammate,
Williamson hopes that his future
holds a chance to play professional
baseball as well.
be held April 17-19 at the
Hermitage Country Club in
Richmond, Va.
"It's Virgina Commonwealth's
tournament to lose Williams
said. "We've got good records
against most of the other teams,
but we could have a bad day
existing teams at ECU, so
exciting debates are expected in
with the addition of a new one.
The anticipation remains to be
placed aside though, for there can
be no acknowledgement of the
prospective women's,sport now.
"We will probably be able to
announce more about the plan
sometime during the next school
"I hope to play pro ball
someday, Williamson said. "It's
always been a dream of mine
"lie has a chance (to play
professional baseball), but it's a
long way off yet LeClair said.
"Those things tend to take care of
themselves
With these two players on the
team, it appears that hard work
and determination are taking care
of the Pirates and helping them
toward the top to the CAA
Check out
our new web address
WWW.
Kr


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Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. Touch Of Class'
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ACTUAL REALITY
April 6th & 7th, 1998
6:00pm - 8:30pm
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Oppression
l






I
I
12 Thursday. April 2, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
WPHL team to begin play
in October
Students protest exam Chip Caray carries on for
during World Cup grandfather
Check out
our new web address
WWW.TEC.ECU.EDU
ALEXANDRIA, La. (AP) � A
team in the Western Professional
Hockey League will begin play in
the Rapides Parish Coliseum in
October.
An agreement was reached
Monday between the coliseum
and the yet-to-be-named team.
The ownership group includes
Chris Roy Jr who represented
the team at the meeting.
"We are going to ask the
community to get involved in
naming the team Roy said. "We
plan to have a name-the-team
contest, and it's really going to be
up to the community to name
Alexandria will be the WPHL's
16th team.
"We can now stop talking
about leases and start talking
about hockey players and slap
shots said league official Steve
Cherwonak. "Now that we've
crossed the final hurdle (the arena
lease), it's fast forward ahead, and
we don't foresee any other
problems
England denies Monaco
approach to hire coach
LONDON (AP)�Glenn
Hoddle's agent and England-
soccer officials Tuesday denied
reports that AS Monaco had made
a 3 million pound (dlrs 5 million)
offer for the English coach to
move to the French club after the
World Cup.
Hoddle is a former Monaco
player and reports, starting in
France but denied by the club,
suggested he would replace Jean
Tigana.
French national coach Aime
Jacquet will quit after the World
Cup and reports suggest Tigana
will succeed him, even though
Monaco has offered him an
extension to his contract until
2002.
"Glenn is under contract with
the Football Association until the
year 2000 when, he will take
England into the European
Championships and hopefully
longer than that said Hoddle's
agent, Dennis Roach.
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) �
About 200 students rampaged
through downtown Dhaka
Tuesday to protest having to take
annual school exams during the
soccer World Cup that kicks off in
France in June.
The protesters damaged at
least 20 cars during the 30-minute
rampage before baton-wielding
police dispersed them. A
passenger in one of the damaged
cars was injured.
Nearly 300,000 students across
Bangladesh are scheduled to take
the month-long 12th-gradc exam
in late May and June.
"We will miss some important
matches of the finals because of
the tests said Abdul Karim, a
protesting student.
The demonstrators demand
that the exams be postponed until
after July 12, the final day of the
World Cup.
In Bangladesh, soccer is one of
the most popular sports, second
only to cricket.
Harness driver convicted
of conspiracy, cleared of
fixing races
ATLANTA (AP) � As the
Chicago Cubs play the Florida
Marlins in the season-opener
today, Chip Caray finds himself
following in the footsteps of a
legend � his grandfather.
He had expected to be Harry
Caray's partner in broadcasting
Cubs games on WGN in 1998, not
his successor. But Harry Caray
died in February.
Chip Caray, 33, has clearly
established his own identity as a
sportscaster, including play-by-
play work on TNT's NBA
playoffs coverage and Fox Sports
Net's baseball package. And he
has been host of Fox's Game of
the Week telecasts.
"I'm smart enough to know
there will never be another Harry
Caray. I have a sense of nervous
anticipation right now Caray told
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
on Monday. "It's like I'm sad, bue
excited all at once. I was really
looking forward to working with
my granddad. We all lost
something with his passing. But at '
the same time, we all cherished
what he brought to the game. I
know all he would want me to do
now is have fun and do the best
job I can
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j
TIAA-CREE
FREEHOLD, N.J. (AP) � A
leading harness driver for
Freehold Raceway has been
convicted of conspiring to fix
races there in 1995 but cleared of
charges that he tried to rig them.
Richard Wojcio, 37, of
Freehold, faces up to five years in
prison when he is sentenced June
19. He was charged in September
in a 10-count indictment with
conspiracy, theft by deception and
rigging an exhibition contest.
"The conspiracy conviction
disqualifies Wojcio from ever
getting a license to compete,
meaning his racing career in New
Jersey is over said Frank
Zanzuccki, executive director of
the New Jersey Racing
Commission.
Zanzuccki said the conviction
could also prompt racing officials
to ban Wojcio from entering a
New Jersey racetrack.
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Utah Utes try to look past
disappointment
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) � The
pep rally and parade are still on for
the Runnin' Utes, who made it
further than any Utah team in 54
years before falling 78-69 to
Kentucky in the championship
game Monday night.
"Win or lose, they did an
outstanding'job said Donna
Tanner, one of 4,000 fans who
watched hope fade as the Utes let
a 10-point half-time lead slip
away. Fans gathered at the
Huntsman Center, where the
game was broadcast' from San
Antonio.
Coach Rick Majerus and the
Utes were due back in town late
Tuesday afternoon, and fans were
preparing to descend on them at
the airport and at a pep rally in the
Huntsman Center on the
University of Utah campus.
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13 Thursday,
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Efflcien
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Visit us on the Internet at www.tiaa-cref.org
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it
I
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jfulfy before you invest or send money.
Read thei
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' QUALITY i
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BATTERIES
KADSAl
3205 E. 10tr
758-5237
Hours: 8 a.m
a.m. - 1 p.m.
THIRD GEh
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ACADEA
BROWN a
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329 Greenvill
355-6080
Hours: 8:30
.





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13 Thursday, April 2. 1998
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
! Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 6
' Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
! "EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, SPA-
! CIOUS example of Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3
) fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty fo-
1 Mage, near ECU & PCMH, $999month.
j 524-5790
i WALK TO ECU, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 bed-
; room unitshouses; available June,
i July, or Aug call 321-4712.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bed-
; room, 2 12 bath Sheraton Village,
washer, dryer, $650. Sheldon, 353-
6505. Available May 1.
I SUBLEASE ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT ASAPI Walk to cam-
pus. Pets OK. WD hookup, very ener-
: gy efficienti Only $240 deposit, $340
' rent. Call Angela, 413-0573.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
, 2 bedroom, 2 bath duplex 5 minutes
: from campus. 321-8872 after 6 PM or
leave message.
RIVEROAK ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENTS $295. With Stove, Re-
frigerator, Central Air 8t Heat, Five
blocks from ECU Free Mot Water, Basic
Cable, Water & Sewer, 756-6209.
PEONY GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM 1 12 bath apartments $375.
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Washer & Dryer, Free Cable, Water &
Sewer, Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
:
j PARK VILLAGE ONE BEDROOM
� apartments $300. With Stove, Refrig-
; erator, Washer Dryer Connections, On
: ECU bus route free water & sewer,
: Wainright Property Management LLC
756-6209.
NOW AVAILABLE, 1 ROOM efficien-
cy with kitchen and bathroom, near
ECU on Tenth St. Only $295.00 per
month, all utilities included. Call 758-
1921 ask.
NO DEPOSIT, 2 BEDROOM, 1 12
bath, cable and water included. Wilson
Acres Apartments. Rent by 5198. Call
754-8315 and ask for Dawn Bivens.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Two houses in excellent
condition; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
6 -$1600.00 per month; sleeps 8-$2200
per month. (757) 850-1532.
i MOVING TO GREENVILLE FOR
school or work? Horn Relocation
and Referral Service can make
that mova aaaiarl Ralocation
i packets with rental listings, guid-
I ad tour of Greenville and area
I rantal properties, plus much
1 more. Call 830-5559 or visit
I http:www.relocatetogreenvil-
i Janc.com for more Information.
FORREST ACRES ONE & two bed-
� room $300 $345, Stove, Refrigerator,
Free Water & Sewer, On ECU Bus Ro-
ute, Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
FEMALE TO SHARE FURNISHED
�townhouse. April rent free.
�$225month plus 12 utilities. Call 353-
6806, ask for Brigitte.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED I
RESPONSIBLE, easygoing, neat fe-
'male wanted to share fully furnished 2
BR. townhouse with washerdryer, in
May. Pets negotiable. $217 mo. Call
Julie @ 756-6556.
1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH apartment, 3
blocks from campus on 2nd St.
�285.00 a month. Call 758-1921.
Security Deposit
�th pmmutlen �l this coupon, offw wpirM
' M V98 not vaM with any oth� coupon
WESLtV COMMON SOUTH: tor 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, range, ralrigerator, free watersewer,
wastierdryer hookups, free basic oane in
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
-MMMrfON PARK: 2 bedrooms, 1 bath
rang, refrifjoralor, dishwasher, free
wattrsewer. and basic cable, approx. 900
sq. ft washerdryer hookups, central
heatair, 6 blocks tram campus.
COMPLETELY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
�All Properties have 24 hr emergency maintenance-
12t.M
rrpparty I I
onooernert
ALnrrnJsiAEs.au rouse
FOR SALE
TICKET: USAIR, RALEIGH TO Indi-
anapolis, cheap, one way. 758-5413
Tl LAPTOP COMPUTER, 100 MHZ
Pentium, 24meg RAM, 810HD, Hewlett
Packard Deskjet printer, 33K modem,
case. All for $850 OBO. Contact 931-
3711.
THINKING OF BUYING YOUR first
computer? For sale: 10 black and white
PC monitors, various manufacturers.
$25 each. Excellent for beginning com-
puters. Contact JW Blair, 757-2157.
SOFA BED, LOVESEAT, COFFEE
TABLE, 2 side tables, and 2 lamps.
$500 for entire set, negotiable. Call
Jammie, 355-0454 (E), 816-8081 (D).
ONE YEAR OLD WHIRLPOOL wash-
erSears dryer for sale, $500 OBO.
Please call 413-0390 after 6:00 PM.
IBM CS II TYPEWRITER, student
desk, comforter set. Call 758-8844.
FREE LARGE IGUANA, APPROX. 3
12-4 feet long. Female. Not used to
being handled. Cage not included. Call
752-8033.
I the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AUTO SALESSERVICE DIRECTOR
' QUALITY SERVICE AT A FAIR
PRICE - OIL CHANGES,
BATTERIES. NC INSPECTIONS
KADS AUTOMOTIVE
3205 E. 10th Street
758-5237
Hours: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. M-F; 8
a.m. -1 p.m. Sat.
THIRD GENERATION PIRATES
SUPPORTING ECU THROUGH
SHARED VISIONS-BOTH
ACADEMIC & ATHLETIC
BROWN & WOOD
PONTIACCADILLAC
GMCJEEP
329 Greenville Blvd. SW
355-6080
Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
.
For information about being included in
our Auto Directory call 328-6366.
TOTAL QUALITY SERVICE
STEVE BAILEY'S AUTO-
MOTIVE SERVICE CEN-
TER
3142-A Moseley Drive
752-5043
Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
, V
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR summer school or before to sub-
lease two bedroom apartment at King-
ston. For more Information, call 561-
7824 and leave a massage.
ECU AREAI TWO OR three bedroom
house. Fenced In backyard, central
heat and air. Pets OK, yard work in-
cluded. $475 month. Call 830-9502.
Available mid-May.
DOCK8IDE FOR RENT: 2 bedroom,
2 bath. If interested, please call 752-
9901.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 1 & 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-yeer contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT ft CEDAR
COURT, Two bedroom, 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Washer & Dryer Connections. Wain-
right Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
ATTENTION LADIES! PRIVATE
DOWNSTAIRS bedroom with private
bathroom now available at Players
Club. Rent and deposit negotiablel
Call 717-1966 to leave a message. Very
inexpensive!
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH duplex, 4
blocks from ECU, all appliances, fire-
place, wd hookups, rear patio, central
heatair. Available now, $550month.
Call 758-1921.
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. near ECU, only $375 per
month, 900 sq.ft. Free basic cable, wa-
tersewer, all appliances, pets O.K. Call
758-1921.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR rent, Wood-
cliff Apts. Washer and dryer hookup, 3
blocks from campus. Assume lease.
Call Michael, 522-4583, leave mes-
sage.
FOR SALE: OLDSMOBILE CUT-
LASS Supreme (1983), automatic,
59,000 miles. $2200 OBO. Please con-
tact 413-0390 after 6:00 PM.
CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR SALE,
good condition, asking $95 or beat, off-
er. If interested, call Paul at 363-2885.
BEARDED DRAGON LIZARD. SIX
months old. All lights and accessories.
Forty gallon tank included. Call 758-
8879.
HELP WANTED
"OTTIS' DOCKSIDE WATERFRONT
BAR' of Morehead City is now inter-
viewing for professional cocktail serv-
ersbartenders. Live music weekly.
Positive attitude, enthusiasm, and ho-
nesty required. 919-247-3474.
WANTED: FULL-TIME CHILD care
provider to care for infant in our resi-
dence. Child oriented degreeinterest.
Experience helpful. Safe driving
record, own transportation, non-smok-
er, swimming skills, CPR certified a
plus. Beginning JulyAugust weekly
8:00-6:00. Salary $300social security &
paid vacation. Also needed, student
with similar majorinterest 8t qualifica-
tions to care for 1st grader after school
beginning August weekly 3:15 to 6:15.
Salary $100.00social security. Please
send letter specifying position sought
and qualificationsInterest with phone
no. to "Nanny Post Office Box 8088,
Greenville, NC 27835.
TRAVEL EUROPE & WORK -
TEACH BASIC CONVERSATIONAL
ENGLISH IN PRAGUE, BUDAPEST
ft KRAKOW. COMPETITIVE WAG-
ES BENEFITS. ASK US HOWI
(817) 336-0629 EXT. KS3621.
TRAVEL ABROAD Si WORK-TEACH
BASIC CONVERSATIONAL ENG-
LISH IN JAPAN, TAIWAN Si S. KO-
REA. MANY POSITIONS REQUIRE
NO FOREIGN LANGUAGE OR
TEACHING CERTIFICATION. EX-
CELLENT EARNINGS BENEFITS
POTENTIAL. ASK US HOWI
(517)324-3126 EXT. J53621.
SUMMERFALL INTERNSHIPS:
LOOKING FOR Health Related Majors
for three month internships with hos-
pital weliness progrem. Experience
businessindustry, employee weliness
and exercise programs. Contact 816-
6506.
SUMMER WORK: PAINTERS
WANTED The Color Works Collegiate
Painters, $7.00 per hour, 40
hoursweek. No experience necessary.
Contact Michael Fryar. Phone 1-800-
477-1001.
SUMMER JOBSI APPLY NOWI Ac-
cepting application for bartenders and
waitstaff. Full and part-time, flexible
schedules available. Send resume or
apply in person at The Reef Restau-
rant, PO Box 2772, Atlantic Beach, NC
28512, 919-726-3500.
SUMMER CAMP IN WESTERN NC
is looking for motivated individuals to
be camp counselors. Positions avail-
able in aquatics, high adventure, first
year camper program, rifleshotgun
shooting, and handicrafts. Salary,
room and board provided. Call Cliff @
551-3769 for more information.
SUMMER AT THE BEACHI T-Shirt
World in Duck and Corolla, NC hiring
salespeople for summer employment.
Excellent payincentives. Apply in per-
son, Loblolly Pines in Duck or Monter-
ey Plaza in Corolla. Or mail resume to
3848 Ivy Lane, Kitty Hawk, NC 27949.
STUDENT NEEDED TO HELP keep
our 2 year old daughter 10-15 hours
per week. Can be flexible in schedul-
ing. Will need to be available during
summer as well. For interview, leave
message at 931-7439.
SALES FOOD COUNSELOR. EX-
CELLENT opportunity for self driven
individuals who like being rewarded
well for working smart. Earn 40-60K in
your first year. Must have a very flexi-
ble schedule with the ability to work
nightsweekends. Call Bill at Rich Food
Services, Inc 823-2764.
RALEIGH AREA SUMMER JOBS.
$280wk-$422wk plus bonuses!II Hir-
ing crew leaders and crew painters.
Most openings filled by local students,
so call Collegiate House Painters today
at 919-460-60611 We'll do interviews
on your campus-no need to come
home to find a job. We are not one of
those student franchise companies!
OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE IS NOW
accepting applications for experienced
hostesses. Full and part-time positions
are available. Please apply in person
M-Th 1:00-3:00PM.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7686.
NEED NONSMOKER CAREGIVER
FOR five year old with mild lung dis-
ease. Must have own transportation,
references. Criminal check. Hours are
12:00-5:00p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days for two months, possibly longer.
Leave message after 5:00 p.m. at 830-
9082.
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
hii energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
R0. Box 370
Cove City, 28523
Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
Fax: 252-637 2125
(Near Greenville, Kinston,
New Bern)
A
CAMPPIEW00D
COUIflr&TlS
for private Co-ed
youtfi camp located in the beautiful
mountains oTwestem North Carclna
Over 25 activities, including All sports,
water skilngtedtxfi tar, art,
616 to 817Earn $13of1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers call lor
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
BOB EVANS
WANTS YOU!
Now Hiring Team Players
All positions
Apply in person today
Great Pay
Flexible Schedules
305 SE Greenville Blvd.
BARTENDER FOR OLD COUNTRY
bar and pool room. Minimum wage
plus good tips for the right person.
Players Retreat, 758-6856.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext. 1 A.S.A.P.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month, housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing informa-
tion, 800-662-2122.
ON LINE
Computtr taetmlcal tupporl
Online Information Services hat an immediate open-
ing lor a computer technical support person lo assist
our Utility Exchange sales stall with the sale and
installation ol computer interlaces between our pro-
prietary database and their PCs and mainframe sys-
tems. You should be weN versed in computers, par-
bcularty Windows and be at to work with networks
You will be working with Software companies as wea
IS end users. Exceptional company, pay, and bene-
fits. Send resume to Jim Blair, PO Box 8048,
Greenville 27835 or cal 757-2100.
Database Management
(Part-time Position)
It you know SQL and have some programming
experience, particularly Ct. we have a position
available to meet your school schedule assitsakng
with maintaining our database and assisting w
downloads of information and running reports.
Flexible hours. Exceptional experience. Cal Jason
Bruner at 757-2107 lor Interview
The East Carolinian
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
Part time HANDYMAN 3 hours
dolly. ONUNE Information services
seeks a person to help with cleaning
leaves off lot, keeping windows
clean, going lo get mail and other
minor errands.
M-F 7AM-10PM
Call Henry Porker at 7572151
HIGH ADVENTURE GUIDES SUM-
MER Employment -Eastern North Car-
olina Boy Scout camp needs kayaking,
canoeing and sailing high adventure
guides. Other camp staff positions
available. Eagle Scouts and persons
with a scouting background preferred.
References required. Salary, room and
board included. Call 919-946-4085.
GRADY-WHITE BOATS IS looking
for a part-time accountant. This indi-
vidual will do general accounting and
some cost accounting. Excellent re-
sume builder. Some experience pre-
ferred. Please contact Jamie Wilson at
752-2111.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 7477686, Snow Hill.
EARN S7SO-S150OWEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment &
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGEMENT.
INC. now hiring for summer 1998.
Pool managers, lifeguards, swim in-
structors. Charlotte, Raleigh, Greens-
boro, NC; Greenville, SC; Columbia,
SC. For information, (704)889-4439
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FI-
NANCIAL PlanningInvestment and
Insurance. Northwestern MutualRo-
bert O. Baird is accepting applications
for our summer training school. Check
out our web site www.northwestern-
mutuel.com and send resume to 217
Commerce St Greenville, NC 27858.
ADVERTISE IH
l the l � �
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
SERVICES
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-2224
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME YOUR sore, ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur needs
your back to practice on. Call Kyle 1-
800-489-8546(code 2465) or POBox
8663, Greenville, NC 27835
GREEK PERSONALS
THANK YOU TO ALPHA Phi, Pi Kap-
pa Alpha, and Kappa Alpha for the
great Quad last Thursday. Let's gat to-
gether again soon. Love, the sisters
and new members of Delta Zeta
x
TAU KAPPA EPSILON: WE'RE real-
ly looking forward to the social Satur-
day night. We always have a great
time with you guysl Get your bucks
readyl I Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
TAU KAPPA EPSILON: WE'RE real-
ly looking forward to the social Satur-
day night. We always have a great
time with you guysl Get your bucks
readyl I Love, the sisters of Pi Delta.
ROB- THANK YOU FOR represent-
ing us in the Sexy Boxer Contest. You
did a great job! Love, the sisters of
Zeta Tau Alpha
PI DELTA WISHES TO congratulate
Frankye Hubbard on your recent en-
gagement and upcoming marriage.
We love you, the sisters
PI DELTA SAYS MARK your calen-
dars! Save the night of April 21st for a
great time at The Atticl Look for more
information next week.
PHI TAU, SIGMA. AND Sigma Alpha
Epsilon, thanks for a great Quad last
Friday. We had a blast. Love, Zeta Tau
Alpha
KAPPA SIGMA. PI KAPPA Alpha,
Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi, and Delta
Zeta, Thursday night was so much
funl Thanx to everyone, let's do it
again! Love, Chi Omega
HEY LITTLE SISTERS OF Delta Zetal
We are looking forward to the Big Sis
Party this Saturday and can't wait!
Love, your big sisters
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD
like to congratulate Amber James; Del-
ta Chi of the Year and Most Dedicated
Sister, Amanda Worsham; White Rosa,
Shanita Anderson; Colonel Vanlon
Scholarship, Karen Floves; Elderly Ap-
preciation and Jennifer Krumbein
Children's Appreciation.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA AN-
NOUNCES their annual car wash for
St. Jude's this Friday 11-2 and Satur-
day 10-4. Will be held at the Shell Sta-
tion across from The Plaza Mall.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: CONGRATU-
LATIONS on another super Tunnel
Party! We had a great time as usual!
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO KELLY
WOODELL for winning the Budweiser
Bikini Contest at the Cellar last Thurs-
day. You did a great job! Love, your
Delta Zeta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO DANA
PATE for your acceptance into the BFA
program and also to Brook Owens for
your acceptance into the OT program.
We are proud of you guys. Love, your
Delta Zeta sister
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALPHA
OMICRON Pi's newly elected officers:
President-Tina Justice, VPA-Mindy
Schaefer, VPE-Kim Register, New
Member Educator-Cat Anderson,
Treasurer-Jessica Williams, Chapter
Relations-Leigh Hancock, Risk Man-
agement-Meredith Holden, Corre-
sponding Secretary-Erin Reddic,
Recording Secretary-Laura Krepps,
Alumnae Relations-Krista Claggett,
Public Relations-Jensina Sturz, Schol-
arship-Colleen McCool, Philanthropy-
Bonnie Forsyth, Keeper of Ritual-Noell
Ellingsworth, Historian-Michelle Got-
tschalk. Social Chair-Tracy Auten,
House Manager-Kristina Vincik, Song
Leader-Ashley Grickis, RRR-Heather
Stancil, Activities Chair-Tawni Hines,
and Assistant New Member Educator-
Jessica Orsini.
CONGRATULATIONS CHRISTY ON
GETTING into Occupational Therapyl
I am so proud of youl Love, your lit'
sis, Alison
CONGRATS TO ALPHA OMICRON
Pi's newly initiated sisters: Jennifer
Feldhaus, Bonnie Forsyth, Ashley
Grickis, Candace Jones, Colleen Mc-
Cool, Erin Reddic, and Kristina Vincik.
Love, your sisters
CHI O CATCH WAS a blast again this
yearl Thanx to ail of our awesome
dates! Csn't wait until cocktaill Love,
the sisters of Chi Omega

ALPHA XI DELTA. THANKS for a
great time at our social last Thursday.
Let's do it again. Love, Sigma Pi
ALISON GURGANUS AND BETH
Zodun, Congrats on getting into
School of Social Work, and Christy
Lee, Congrats on OT School. We love
youl Love, your Zeta sisters
A SPECIAL THANK YOU goes to Pi
Delta sisters Terrell Floyd, Melissa
Thomas, and Linda Wong for partici-
pating in Saturday's altruism event
We love you, your sisters
A BIG THANK YOU Goes to all our
dates who attended the Stranger Mix-
er on Saturday. You guys are greatl
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta
LOST & FOUND
$300 REWARD FOR GOLD and sil-
ver watch left in the ladies' room lock-
er at the Rec Center. 561-7646.
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAKGRAD WEEK 'SB
Cheap ratesl www.we-can.comsand-
trap - N. Myrtle Beach. 800-645-3618.
Student representative needed!
���SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing! 11 Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink
parties! Sell 5 & go freel Book nowtll
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
http:www.endlesssummertours.com
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3728
for current listings.
PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
AVAILABLE for students who want to
travel, earn money, and gain valuable
resume experience. For more informa-
tion, call 1-800-251-4000 ext. 1576.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. CREDIT
CARD FUNDRAISERS FOR FRATERNI-
TIES, SORORITIES & GROUPS. ANY
CAMPUS ORGANIZATION CAN RAISE
UP TO $1000 BY EARNING A WHOP-
PING $5.00VISA APPLICATION. CALL
1-800 932-0528 EXT. 65. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE FREE T-SHIRT.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bill.5 Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ON BEHALF OF THE Office of Health
Promotion and Weil-Being, we would
like to sincerely thank Darryl's, Anna-
belle's, and The ECU Student Stores
for their prize contributions to our Sate
Spring Break Campaign. We would
also like to thank Students Against De-
structive Decisions (SADD), and the
brothers of Epsilon Chi Nu for for ad
their help!
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS. ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
Wo also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR s, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM KMJO-lOO
Come Into the parking lo! iii front of Wachovia downtown, dnve to back door ring buzzer-





I
14 Thursdsy. April 2. 1998
TUE MARCH 31-SENIOR Recital.
Laurie Buchele, flute, A.J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7:00PM. Thurs April 2-Per-
cuasion Ensemble, Mark Ford, Direc-
tor. A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. 8:00PM.
Sat April 4-Graduate Recital, Chuck
Page, string base, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 12:00PM. Sat. April 4-SenioM Re-
cital, Scott Peoples, percussion, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 5:00PM. Sat
April 4-Student Recital, Jason Pickard,
guitar, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00PM. Sun April 5-Sunday at the
Gallery Concert: Strong Chamber Mu-
sic, Fritz Gearhart, Director, Greenville
Museum of Art, 802 South Evans
Street, Greenville, 2:00PM. Sun April
5-Graduate Recital, Michael Weaver,
viola, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00PM. Sun April 5-Graduate Recital,
Gary Parsons, Percussion, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 9:00PM. Mon April 6-
TueadayThuraday Jazz Ensemble,
Vaughn Ambrose, Director, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 8:00PM.
THE PITT COUNTY CHAPTER of the
American Diabetes Association will
meet Monday, April 6, 1998 at 7:00PM
at the Gaskin-Lsslie Building, next to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital. This
month's topic is "Handling Diabetes
Emergencies We will also have our
monthly "Heart Healthy Eating Tip as
well as door prlzea. For more informa-
tion call 816-5136 or 1-800-682 9692.
THE OFFICE OF HEALTH Promotion
and Well-Being would like to congratu-
late Ian McCollum, Deidra Blanks, and
Tracy Morgan for being winners in our
Safe Spring Break Pledge prize draw-
ing. Ina won dinner for two at Oarryl's,
Deidra won dinner for two at Anna-
belle's, and Tracy won a sweatshirt
from the ECU Student Stores.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY 3:30-5:00 p.m.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ant Development will be offering this
workshop on April 2nd. If you are in-
terested in this workshop contact the
Canter at 328-6661.
SOCIETY FOR ADVANCEMENT OF
Management & Career Services
proudly presents Business Etiquette
Wednesday, April 8th at 6:00 pm.
Sweetheart's, College Hill. Registration
deadline is Tuesday, March 31, GC
Room 3015, $15.00person (or)
$10SAM member (or) S12.50ECU
Meal Plan. Limited spaces available.
MILAN, INDIAN STUDENT OR-
GAN. Is putting on a performance at
Hendrix Theatre on Sun April 5th at
6:30. The ahow includes a play, Indian
dances, traditional to hip-hop music.
Ticket prices are S2.00student;
$4.00aduft. Tickets sold at door.
INTRAMURAL: IF YOU ARE not In-
terested in playing Water Polo, why
not be an Official. There will be an of-
ficials meeting on April 8th at 9:00 p.m.
in SRC Room 202. For more info, call
328-6387.
INTRAMURAL: ANYONE INTER-
ESTED IN Water Polo???? Well now is
your chance to get in all the fun. There
will be a registration meeting on April
8th at 5:00p.m. in MSC 244. Hope to
see you there. If you have any ques-
tions, call 328-6387.
COME AND SKATE THE night away
with the sisters of Gamma Sigma
Sigma. We would like to invite all to
our Skate Party on Thursday, April 2, at
Sportsworld. The cost Is $3.50 at the
door, make aure you mention it's with
Gamma Sigma Sigma.
CHOOSING A MAJOR or a Career
Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling an Student De-
velopment is offering this workshop
on April 7th. If you are interested in
this workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL
STUDENT: Note Taking: Thursday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on April 2nd. If interest-
ed, contact the Center at 328-6661.
B-GLAD BISEXUALS GAYS LESBI-
ANS and Allies for Diversity will be
meeting Wad. 7:30 p.m. Mendenhall
Room 14. Come by and meet new and
old friends. We promise you will have
a great time I Hope to see you there I
ADVENTURE: FREE PLACING
PROTECTION Seminarlll Experience
the next level in mountain climbing on
Monday, April 6 at 7:00p.m. Register at
least one day in advance. Call 328-
6387 for more info.
ABSOLUTELY UNBELIEV-
ABLEIMIIIFREE tutoring sessions
available for all students offered by
ECU professors every Monday, Tues-
day, and Thursday starting at 4:00 p.m.
at the Ledonia Wright African-Ameri-
can Cultural Center. Math tutoring on
Monday and Tuesday, Math and Sci-
ence tutoring on Thursday.
What people were not looking for
on the first Easter
Instead, people were searching for the body of Jesus of Nazareth. Was he an actual person? Did he arise from the dead? Did He
claim to be God? Find out about this remarkable person by contacting one of us or by visiting the web site
http:www.leaderu.comTellMeMore
Sam Adkins
Family Medicine
816-5457
Bonnie
Eshelman
Industry &
Technology
328-6704
Brenda
Killingsworth
Decision Sciences
328-6235
Tope Bello
Management
328-4856
Rhonda Bode
Nursing
328-4307
Deborah Gladson Frederic Hebert
Registrar Management
328-6527 328-6582
Dana King
Family Medicine
816-5505
Ralph Scott
Library Services
328-0235
Alan Larkins
Physics
328-6316
Cynthia Smith
Political Science
328-6189
Donna Bongo
Student Life
328-6824
Anne Heritage
Mathematics
328-1890
Lauretta (L.L.) Lewis
Social Work
328-4197
Pat Spain
Computing &
Information Systems
328-5402
John Bradley
Decision Sciences
328-6801
James Hix
Chemistry
328-1658
Jeffrey Marshall
University Unions
328-4715
Dan Sprau
Family Medicine
816-2236
Elaine Briley
Central Motor Pool
328-0147
Edward Huechtker
Physician Assistant
Studies
328-4423
Sandra Martin
Summer Ventures
328-6036
Lynn Caverly
Student Union-
Mendenhall
328-2306
Robert Hunting
Mathematics
328-1896
Brian Mennecke
Decision Sciences
328-6599
Scott Dellana Susan B. Emory
Decision Sciences ScienceMathematics
328-4893 Education Center
328-6885
Ben Irons
University Attorney
328-6940
Dean Patton
Family Medicine
816-2600
Martha Jackson
Nursing
328-6075
Wanda
Scarborough
Student Stores
328-6731
Perry Ennis
Materials
Management
328-1012
Lillian Jenkins
Facility Services
328-6776
Nancy Scott
Library Services
328-0297
Slue
George Yiznitski
HVAC
328-4217
V. Elizabeth Vaughn Judy Bohannon
Undergraduate Child Development
Admissions Office & Family Relations
328-1717 328-1356
The B.ble say. that on that fir Easter morning, � some of the guard came into the city and reported to the chief priests all that had happened. And when they had assembled with the eider, and
counseled together, they gre a large sum of money to the soldier, and said, "You -re to say, 'His disciples came by night and stole Him away while we were asleep And if this should come o the
governor ear we wtll �m hun over and keep you out of trouble And they took the money and did as they had been instructed Maohew 211 However, Jesus .aid, 'Thu i is wri�e�Thl" Z
Chnst should .�ffer and rue again from the dead the third day Luke 24:46 Then "He appeared to more than five hundred brethren at one rime" I Corinthian, 15-6
Sponsored by Christian FacultyStaff Fellowship - 328-6801
t
Campus Crusade for Christ - 830-1186






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Jenkins
Services
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Students find outrageous jobs
�Program targets time management
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� Student aircraft mechanic vvorls at Seagraves





2 Thursday, April 2. 1998
tall S sec
The East Carolinian
Majority of students
say work
a necessity
12-13 thousand
students work
on campus
Gerri ashe
FOCI'S SECTION WHITE
Bills, bills, bills � many ECU
students have bills to pay. So
getting a job is often as important
as getting into that class you
need to graduate.
'About 12,000 to 13,000
students work on campus. Many
qf these students start job
; hunting in the office of financial
aid, located in the Old Cafeteria
Building on Central Campus.
The office offers 500 work-
study jobs, each year, aoefefrding to
Rose Mary Stelma, director of
financial aid.
"I wish we could have 2,000
students working Stelma said.
"More students do want jobs on
campus and the response is
better this year. Work-study
students feel more of a part of
ECU
"Students can apply for the
work-study program on the Free
Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) form. The student
receives
a financial
aid summary
report
indicating whether
or not the student has
received the aid.
The federal government only
allows a certain amount of money
a year for this program. This is
the reason the number of work-
study students on campus is
limited.
If the student has received
work-study, he or -
she is allotted a
certain amount of
money per year to
work. For the
1997-98 school
year, students
were allowed
$1600, which is
an increase of
$600 over what
was offered last
year. This was a
result of the
increase in
minimum wage.
But finding the
job is up to the
student.
Job positions
are posted on the
bulletin board
outside the
office. Students
can choose from a
variety of jobs
including office
computer data
She
works at Minges Coliseum in the
Recreation and Leisure Studies
Office.
"I went to the office of
financial aid and looked on the
board for the highest paying
job
E v c r e 11 e
said. "I
wanted to
work on
campus
because it
w a s
convenient
and I didn't
need a car to
get to my
job
Other jobs
on campus
are called
"self-help"
and are
offered by
organizations
that have
allotted a
certain
amount of
funds for a
'7 wish we could
have 2,000
students working.
More students do
want jobs on
campus and the
response is better
this year. Work-
study students feel
more of a part of
ECU
Rose Mary Stelma
director of
financial aid .
A student worker at the Center Court Cafe in the Rec Center serves a fellow student.
PHOTOS BV JASON FEATHER
assistants,
assistants and
video production assistants.
Each posted position includes
a phone number, address and a
contact person. Job descriptions
are listed along with the salary.
Crystal Everette, a sophomore
majoring in therapeutic-
recreation, found her job by
searching the bulletin board.
student
worker. The Financial Aid
Office is not involved in this
process. Students must inquire
about these jobs through the
department for which they are
interested in working.
Still more campus jobs are also
available. These, jobs are
obtained the same way you'd get
a job anywhere. You must go
through an application and
120 mph
Swain works fast
interview process. For example,
working in the dining halls or the
Wright Place would not require
work-study.
Crystal Moore, a sophomore
biology major, works as a cashier
at the Wright Place. She decided
to work on campus because she
lives on campus and has no
transportation. Moore said her
job was easy to get through the
regular application and interview
process.
"I decided I wanted a job and
applied at the ARAMARK office
in Mendenhall Moore said.
And what do students think
about jobs on campus?
"On-campus jobs are iust a
way for students to make
money Moore said. "They
can't provide experience. The
employers cater to your schedule
and this is not like the real world.
In the real world, you must go to
work whether you want to or not.
No one will work around your
classes or exams
But Everette believes you can
get some valuable experience
working with the public.
"Some jobs can provide
experience Everette said. "You
can learn to deal with different
attitudes of the public
Theodis Broddy, a junior
history major, works at
concession stands at football,
baseball and basketball games at
ECU. Fie wanted a job because
he needed money. He opted to
work on campus because other
places he tried were not hiring.
"I meet a student and am given about five
minutes to earn their trust enough to make the
jump. I have not had one dissatisfied customer
yet
Desson Swain
Skydiving offers
unusual job
A LICU WILFONG
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Deeson Swain has a weekend job
free falling at 120 mph from
airplanes 14,000 ft in the air. He
is one of many ECU students
with unusual jobs.
Swain, a junior business major,
is a skydiving instructor for
Carolina Sky Sport in Louisburg,
N.C. Most college students earn
money as sales clerks, waiters and
waitresses or at other common
jobs. But like Swain, some
students find unique ways to pay
their bills. As an instructor, Swain
teaches basic jumping techniques
then makes a tandem jump with a
student. The jump includes
being harnessed to a student,
ensuring a safe return to the
ground.
"I meet a student and am given
about five minutes to earn their
trust enough to make the jump
Swain said. As an instructor, he
has made about 200 tandem
jumps. "I have not had one
dissatisfied customer yet he
said.
First-time jumpers are his
favorite.
"They are the most exciting
according to Swain. "You only get
one first jump
Skydiving as a hobby or as a job
continues to be an adventure
evey time. Swain says, each time
you step out of the plane,
"you bet your life" that
everything is going to go
according to plan.
Swain, 20, has made
approximately 700 solo jumps
since he first began skydiving.
Other types of jumps he has
completed include
demonstration, ' free-falling
photography, night jumps and
water jumps. His highest jump
was 19,000 feet in the air, which
required breathing in oxygen on
the way up.
Another unusual job is plaaying
PeeDee the Pirate, ECU's
mascot, Senior Anthony Bailey,
who plays PeeDee, was the back-
up mascot for the Carolina
Mudcats AA baseball team last
ECU junior
summer.
To most people PeeDee is
simply a character. But kids do
not see him the same way.
"When you're looking through
the eyes of a child, it's like seeing
Santa Claus said Bailey.
PeeDee was recently in a
parade and gave a hug to one of
the children in the crowd who
was in a wheelchair. This simple
gesture left a lasting impression
on the community and on the
child, Bailey says. Bailey later
found out the child had cerebral
palsy and accepted an invitation
to visit the child's house on
Christmas Day. Bailey arrived as
PeeDee, bringing sparkles to the
young boy's eyes. v
Bailey does not receive a
paycheck for his work, but he says
it's worth carrying around an extra
15-pound wardrobe. It's not just
for the love for ECU; it's for the
kids also, he said!
Similar to Swain and Bailey,
Brent Anderson also has an
unusual job. Anderson, a junior
public relations major, is a soccer
coach and referee for Greenville
Recreation and Park for youth
ages 5-18 years old. Working with
the youth during the week,
Anderson has become a role
model in their lives. "They look
up to you he said. "It's very
rewarding
These are just a few of our
students who have out of theJ





3 Thursday. April 2, 1998
taUSscdion
The East Carolinian
Students find experience
helps face real work
Associate (degree
provides Smith
with skills
Chris Tltino
FOCUS SECTION WRITEK
Like most ECU students, Nathan
Smith holds down a job while
going to college.
"I work for the money said
the senior industrial technology
major. Smith, an FAA certified
aircraft mechanic at Seagrave
Aviation, received his associate of
science degree in aircraft
maintenance from Embry-Riddle
Aeronautical University in
Daytona Beach, Fla. He has
worked several jobs in the
aviation industry including ones
at Dillon's Aviation and Mounftin
Air Cargo in Kinston. Working at
Seagrave has provided Smith with
a flexible work schedule and a
convenient job location.
The reasons for working and
going to school depend on the
individual. While working does
provide money for tuition, books,
bills and spending money,
students also derive other
benefits such as gaining valuable
work experience.
"More and more I'm finding
that the experience is a lot more
valuable than the money I'm
making Smith said, whose
interests are in the technological
advancements of the
transportation industry. "The
immediate income is necessary
now, but the income I will be
receiving due to my education is
more important
Holding down a job while
going to school can also teach
students how to manage their
time.
Sophomore music major Bert
Williams works two jobs and is a
part-time student at ECU.
Williams works more than 30
hours a week at J.C. Penney and
Sappari Japanese Steak House.
"I feel that if I have too much free
time I'm not being productive
Williams said.
Shannon Slade, a junior
decision science major and part-
time data entry specialist at
Eastern Area Health Education
Center (EAHEC), works'to earn
money and gain experience in her
field. "I don't know how students
don't work Slade said, who
found her job through the
Cooperative Education ' program
at ECU.
Results from a survey
conducted during last summer's
freshman orientation showed that
students wo&k to pay for theif -students to manage their time
expenses and gain valuable work better Assistant Director of
Financial Aid
Services Karen
Barbee said.
"You have to
budget your
time Williams
said. "When you
get out of work
you don't want to
go straight to the
books. You want
to just sit down
and relax. But
that time that you
have out of work
need to use for
that's why it's
experience. More
than half said there
was some chance
that they would
work to pay for
college expenses,
said Kris . Smith,
assistant vice
chancellor for
Student Life and
director of Research
Assessment and
Testing. Less than
half said that their
plans included
employment during their first
semester. Of the students who
said they would work, more than
half said they plan to pay for
clothing and other personal care
items, tuition and books and to
gain valuable work experience.
Working and going to school is
not easy With tests, class
assignments and a job, many
students find themselves with full
schedules that can create stress.
.Such stress might cause them to
perform poorly in school, but
studies prove otherwise.
"Studies show that students
who work generally make better
grades than those who do not
work, I think because it helps
"More and more
Vm finding that
the experience is a
lot more valuable
than the money
Vm making
Nathan Smith
ECU senior
ITEC major
you really
studying, and
important to manage your time
wisely
"Once you develop a routine
with work and school, it's much
easier to maintain a schedule
Smith said. "If you have a varying
routine with your workload each
week, it can be much more
difficult to maintain a schedule
than if you have a steadily-paced
work and test schedule
Williams and Smith
acknowledged that some students
do not need to or want to work
while in college.
"The friends that I have that
don't work either have
scholarships
and live in the dorms, or their
parents pay for college Williams
said.
Other students may already
have jobs lined up after
graduation so they don't need the
experience, Smith said.
Other non-working students
may have limits set by their
parents.
"I hear a number of parents
saying, 'Is it O.K. if we don't
accept the work-study part of
financial aid?' because they want
them to spend all of their time
studying Barbee said.
Williams notes that employers
look for students who have a good
work ethic.
"I think students should work
at least part-time and go to school
because when you get out of
school you're going to have to go
to work anyway, " Williams said.
"Why not show an employer that
Some benefits of time
management, according
to Sturm, are more
free time
Program targets
time management
Sturm offers
free seminars
Daryl cherry
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
If finding time to study is a major
problem, then help is at hand.
The answer to your problem may
be summed up in two words: time
management. According to James
Sturm, director for the student
leadership development programs,
everyone � especially students �
needs to be better time managers.
Studies show that students spend
70 percent of their time outside of
class. That's why it's important for
them to plan ahead. Sturm
recommends that each student take
at least 15 minutes each day for each
class to read or do problems that
pertain to the subject. Doing this
keeps the material fresh in your
mind and will allow you to ask
questions in class to better
understand the subject.
"It's OK to go over the 15-minute
mark as long as you accomplish your
goal for the 15 minutes said Sturm.
and better
grades. If one devises a good plan
of time management for your
schedule and apply the 15 minute
plan, one will discover that one
naturally obtains a better knowledge
of each subject and will not find
oneself trying to cram for hours to do
homework or study for a test. This,
in turn, will result in better grades
and more free time.
Students will also have less stress
.md they will be healthier, Sturm
said. By developing such a plan you
will feel more confident that you are
ready for tests. One will also find
that one has more time to eat good
meals instead of just having time to
pick something up, and one won't
be stuffing oneself with doughnuts
and coffee to stay awake the night
before a test.
To form a successful plan of time
management one must first get
organized. Determine your most
productive time of the day and plan
to do your most important tasks
then. Don't try to take on
everything in one day; rather,
prioritize your tasks for each day and
make sure the tasks with the highest
priority are completed.
Take advantage of the resources
provided by the university to make
your day-to-day tasks simpler. For
example, you can find books on time
management at the library or get
information from the Center for
Student Development and
Counseling or the Student
Leadership Development Programs.
Use a day-to-day appointment
calendar, a note pad for reminders
and a daily "To Do" list planning the
events of the day or even week.
"I like to list my activities for the
day on my calendar from most
important to least important Sturm
said.
Make the most of short bits of
time through the day. For example,
you can read a letter while waiting in
line. For those people who go to
school and work it is even more
important that they have a thorough
plan of time management, according
to Sturm.
Experts recommend six basic
steps:
Prioritize your tasks. You have to
determine the urgency and
importance of each task.
Use your time effectively. You
should make productive use of your
free time and set time aside for a
work hour and time-off hour.
Avoid procrastination. You should
set deadlines other than the ones
assigned for yourself and award
yourself when they are met.
Organize yourself in a manner
that is time efficient and beneficial
in completing your task.
Practice efficiency. You should
work as if you were self-employed.
Delegate by assigning deadlines
and ongoing responsibilities for a
certain time period.
Students needing help with time
management can go to the Center
for Student Development and
Counseling on the third floor of the
Wright Building or contact the
Student Leadership Development
Programs in 109 Mendenhall
Student Center at 328-47.
I the
line l � �
eastcarohnian
Amy Royster
Editor-in-Chief
Heather Burgess
Managing Editor
focilS
Celeste Wilson
Cover and Layout Design
Focus is a combined effort between The East Carolinian
and Shearlene Duke's Basic Reporting class in the
Department of Communication.
i





Now that we have your
Attention
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�lH JOURNALISTS
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Sports Reporting
2nd place Amanda Ross
3rd place Tracy Laubach
In-Depth Reporting
3pd place Christin Cadle
3rd place Frank Hendricks
3rd place Mario Scherhaufer
y place Todd Jones
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 2, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 02, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1265
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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