The East Carolinian, March 31, 1998






TUESDAY
MARCH 31,1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
University makes move to Doctoral II status
Change expected to
occur in April or May
Jenny Vickeks
staff wiitei
After years of setting and achieving
goals in order to reach doctoral sta-
tus, ECU will soon move from
being a comprehensive university
to a Doctoral II university.
Despite the failed expectation
that the university would be pro-
claimed as a doctoral institution last
January, Dr. Richard Ringeisen,
vice chancellor for academic affairs,
expects this change to occur in
April or May.
"It isn't a big issue that the gen-
eral administration didn't grant us
this in the past Ringeisen said.
"What is really happening is that
we are carefully proceeding with
the university system administra-
tion to make this happen in the
best way
In order to be considered a doc-
toral institution, universities must
average over ten doctoral degrees
per year over a three year period.
The university will achieve this
goal
In April of next month two new
PhD programs will be granted:
Coastal Resource Management
(CRM) and Biophysics. Graduates '
from these programs can be expect-
ed in the year 2000.
"This is an important change for
us Ringeisen said. "We'll be
instituting the first steps of the pro-
gram this spring. Biophysics and
Alumnus establishes
$100,000 scholarship
Awarded to hospitality
management students
Laura Lee Hines
STAFF WHITER
William H. Bodenhamer, Jr presi-
dent of USA Parking, recently gave
ECU $100,000 as a scholarship
endowment The newly-estab-
lished academic scholarships are
for students pursuing a hospitality
management degree or the hospi-
tality management option in the
MBA.
Bodenhamer, an alumnus, for-
mer SGA president, university
football player and university
trustee, has been actively involved
in the university since graduating
in 1974. As SGA president, he
appropriated funds to place blue
lights on all ECU police cars so
they could reach crime scenes
more quickly. He was a political
science major but pursued a career
in the hospitality industry. In 1976,
he started his own company, USA
Parking, which reaps an excess of
$50 million a year in parking, man-
ages over 60,000 parking spaces,
has about 800 employees and is
active in five states and Puerto
Rico. USA Parking headquarters
SEE SCHOLARSHIP, PAGE 4
Fire scare in Fletcher
Cigar improperly
extenguished is cause
Holly Harris
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Fletcher residents got a sudden
chance to enjoy the warm weather
outside Monday when they were
evacuated to escape an even hotter
situation�
a fire in
their dorm.
Around
2:30 p.m. a
hall smoke
alarm went
off in the
building
due to a
fire in the
mainte-
nance
break room.
University police officer Andrew
Lucas was called to the scene and
extinguished the fire with a dorm
fire extinguisher before the
Greenville fire department arrived.
Investigations revealed that the
flames were started by a.cigar that
was not put out properly, said cam-
pus officer Sgt. Joe Horst. Some
flammable material in the room
caught fire, but the only area dam-
aged by the incident was the break
room.
Students evacuated from the
building had to stay outside for
close to an
hour until
officiaIs
gave the
word for
them to
return to
their resi-
dences.
worker's

Students sit outside Fletcher Hall Monday.
PHOTO IV JOMTHA MEEK
Communication Sciences and
Disorders (CSDI) arc the first PhD
programs within the medical
school. A few years ago we were
given a Doctorate of Education
(EdD) in the School of Education
Proclamation of doctoral II sta-
tus means being in a higher league,
having better opportunities for
external funding, and increased
competitiveness for faculty mem-
bers and federal grants.
"It's important to be called a
doctoral university Ringeisen
said. "It's the biggest thing hap-
pening at ECU academically. If
this all goes well it will have a
tremendous affect on ECU and our
ability to service this region. One
complication is the amount of
money involved; doctoral universi-
ties are funded at a higher rate than
comprehensive ones
"This is an extremely important
recognition of achievement Gene
Rayfield said, chairman of the uni-
versity trustees. "This will be good
for staff, students, and our future
In the Carnegie Foundation
Classification, the higher level of
the institution, the higher the num-
ber of student faculty. This means
there will be an increase in periph-
eral funds.
"The numbers are probably in
the 70s or 80s for additional faculty
positions at ECU Ringeisen said.
'The number of graduate students
will go up, but this doesn't translate
as more students teaching in the
classroom. Some will be working
on research, tutoring, and others
will be teaching for their assistant-
ship. Then there will be peripher-
SEE TRUCKERS. PAGE 7
Projected Doctoral Student Enrollment

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51015 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Enrollment
� School of
Medicine
0 Coastal
Resource
Management
? Bio. Physics
iComm.
Sciences &
Disorders
I Doctorate of
Education
Plans unveiled for new facility
Slated for completion
in about two-and-a-
halfyears
Ian Robson
senior writer
ECU officials recently unveiled
plans for a new athletic facility to be
built in front of Minges Coliseum.
The 22,000 square foot building
will take the place of the bleachers,
and will enclose the west end of the
stadium.
The facility is estimated to cost
$10.5 million, collected from private
donations, and is expected to be
finished in about two and a half
years. Presendy the final drawing of
the facility is being finished, and
ECU will be able to put it out for
bids to find a contractor.
"We haven't kicked off the fund
Th facility has an estimated cost of $10.5 million, money from private donations.
PH0T0 COURTESY OF FACILITIES SERVICES
raising just yet, there are still some
issues that will come first
Associate Athletics and
Administration Director Henry
Van Sant said.
The facility is modeled after the
athletic facility at West Virginia
University, which encloses
Mountaineer Field. Athletes can
SEE FACILITY. PAGE 10
7E� takes
first place in
professional
competition
Paper will now
compete at national
level for top 10 spot
Backpack bandit caught in Minges
Marks fourth campus
arrest since Feb.
Craig D. Ramey
SENIOR WRITER
The alleged backpack bandit was
arrested for trespassing in the men's
locker room at Minges on March
11, marking his fourth arrest on
campus since early February.
ECU police received a phone
call that a suspicious person was in
the men's locker room at Minges.
En route to Minges, Sgt Joe Horst
stopped Cobb who was crossing
Charles Blvd. Horst identified John
Stanley Cobb and then let him go.
"I knew I could find him again if
I needed to Horst said. "Once I
arrived at Minges, I was given a
description fitting Cobb. Three
days later he was arrested for sec-
ond degree trespassing
Police are
unsure about
the reason
Cobb was
allegedly in
the men's
locker room.
Cobb
made news
last month for
alleged ly
stealing text-
books and
money out of
students'
backpacks
and then dis-
carding the backpack in a nearby
bush.
"Cobb was issued a ban warning
in 1994 for suspicious behavior at
the Messick building Horst said.
Once banned from campus, a
person would be guilty of first or
Stanley Cobb
FILE PHOTO
second degree trespassing anytime
he or she stepped onto ECU soil
after that.
"Anybody can be
issued a ban from any-
where Detective Mike
Jordan said. "A student
could be banned from a
certain building and a non-
student could be banned
from the entire campus
The length of a ban can
be permanent, as in
Cobb's case, or temporary,
as in the case of most stu-
dents who have been
issued bans.
Since being banned in
1994, Cobb has been
charged with attempted felonious
larceny, second degree trespassing
and possession of stolen goods,
totaling up to seven misdemeanors
SEE BACKPACK. PAGE 4
Amanda Austin
news editor
ECU's own campus newspaper, The
East Caroliman, was named Best
Ail-Around Non-Daily Student
Newspaper by the Society of
Professional Journalists. (SPJ).
SPJ is the country's largest and
most broad-based journalism orga-
nization. Schools are divided into
10 regions; TEC is in Region 2.
Awards won by TEC were first
place for Best-All Around Non-
Daily Student Newspaper, third
place for In-Depth Reporting on
designer drugs (Focus Section).
Second and third place awards
were also given to former sports
editor Amanda Ross and current
sports editor Tracy Laubach.
"Winning these awards is very
special to us because it says a lot
about all trie hard work we put in
Laubach said, "A lot of students on
campus fail to realize all that we do
to make the paper the best it can
be
"The value of this award is that
it comes from professional journal-
ists said Paul Wright, media
adviser. 'This and the Pacemaker
that are truly and totally judged by
professional journalists
Editor-in-Chief Amy Royster is
ecstatic about receiving this award
and feels the student body should
be too.
"I think it is something the
SEE COMPETITION. PAGE 3
9St
TODAY
Sunny
high 83
low 63
TOMORROW
Sunny
high 82
low 64
Opinion
Lifestyle
Sports
TEC works hard
and it is now
beginning to pay
off
English faculty,
staff read from
new books
Efo
Bob vs. The World
volleys through
town
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
Should the atheistic department complete all
the additions to the stadium before funding
10.5 million for the new athletic facility?"
Do you feel safe in your dorm?
87 YES 13 NO
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu
3 Tueiday, I
Dis
Inaugu
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ASSIST
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departments o
tality managi
ARAMARK, t
contractor, are
gant scholarshi
gural event
Distinguished
series.
The April 2
held at 6:30 p.i
Todd Dinnin
Dining with I
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Everyda
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Tal
Governm
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3 Tuesday, March 31,
1998
news
Tin East Carolinian
Disney dines with students
Competition
continued from page 2
Inaugural event for
chef scholarship
HolLY Harris
ASSISTANT NEWS Et5tTOH
Disney is coming to dine. The
departments of nutrition and hospi-
tality management along with
ARAMARK, the university's food
contractor, are presenting an ele-
gant scholarship dinner as the inau-
gural event in the new
Distinguished Chef scholarship
series.
The April 2 event, which will be
held at 6:30 p.m. in Sweetheart's at
Todd Dinning Hall, is called
Dining with Disney because two
award-winning chefs from the Walt
Disney World resort in Orlando,
Fla. will be helping student volun-
teers prepare the meal.
Chefs Jason and Michelle Lucas
will be coordinating a spread that
includes .hors d'eouvres, lobster
"nicoise" cocktail, a grilled fillet of
beef with caramelized orange onion
relish and a dessert of coconut
creme caramel and chocolate truf-
fles.
u But for all of you with discern-
ing pallets, you're out of luck if you
haven't already purchased a $45
ticket from the Central Ticket
Office. Students, faculty members
of the community and those in the
hospitality industry have already
helped the dinner become a sold-
out affair. Dr. Linda Grove, dean of
the school of Human and
Environmental Sciences, says the
Tripp's Seafood
Fresh Market and Restaurant
353-0011
Steamed Specials
Monday Crab Legs All-U-Can-Eat $17.95
AVe?day Free 12 doz. Clams w Crab Legs Dinner
Wednesday Free 12 Ib- shrlmp w Ful, p&� 0ystm
liiursday Free 12 b Cfab Leg$ w Fu� peck Qystm
nday Free 12 Doz. Clams w Full Peck Oysters
Saturday j lb Shrimp & Full Peck Oysters$18.95
Sunday��� $2.00 OFF on Seafood Combos (Fried Only)
Everyday Special - Full Peck of Oysters
$1152
student volunteers who have
worked to make this meal a success
are at the core of its success.
"They have been first-class pro-
fessionals in all aspects of this
Grove said. "They have stepped
forward to' do this because they are
proud of their curriculum
Around 70 students have offered
their talents to assist with the event,
doing everything from marketing
and making room arrangements to
food service. Grove said she thinks
the event will give planning partic-
ipants an opportunity to demon-
strate their skills in their area.
"They're very excited about it
Grove said. "It's a wonderful way
to showcase what they've learned;
it's something the curriculum just
can't provide
Not only will the guest be privy
to fine food and wine, but faculty
members from the School of Music
will be on hand to provide enter-
tainment.
This is the first year that this
scholarship fund raiser has taken
place. Grove says it has not yet
been decided how the money will
be allotted or how many students
from the School of Human and
Environmental Sciences will be
awarded a portion of the earnings.
S
Take out orders welcome
Government inspected since 1981 - Grade A
Hwy 43 S BeUs Fork
DON'T BE
FOOLISH!
WAKE UP
AND GO
TO CLASS.
7 overslept and wasn't in class last year
when the Prize Patrol came looking for
me. I lost out on a free room for spring
semester
�Stan the Snoozer
Tomorrow could be
your lucky day.
You could be the winner of one of seven fabulous prizes,
including a free room for spring semester 1998.
Be sure to go to class tomorrow, April 1. The Housing
and Dining Prize Patrol will visit the classrooms of
the lucky winners in the Housing and Dining Sweepstakes.
BE A WINNER
WITH CAMPUS LIVING.
University Housing and Campus Dining Services
. Telephone: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
f
whole school should be proud
of. It is an award-winning
paper; they should be proud every
Tuesday and Thursday Royster
said.
Judges' comments on TEC'were
that the paper has "good general
coverage of issues, things students
need to know and-what will be fun
to read This staff does a solid
job in all areas, perhaps with less
money and fewer people
AH first place winners will
advance to the national Mark of
Excellence competition against
first place winners from the 11 SPJ
regions.
"This award is evidence of the
continued improvement of the
paper and a sign that we are mov-
ing in the right direction Wright
said.
"It is an honor for us because it's
a culmination of a tremendous
amount of effort on a lot of people's
parts Royster said.
All categories entered in the
competition were judged by jour-
nalists in SPJ's Region 10, includ-
ing Washington State, Oregon,
Alaska, Montana and Idaho.
Other awards issued to ECU
publications were to The. Rebel for
Best Student Magazine Published
Once a Year and third place to
Expressions for Best Student
Magazine Published More Than
Once a Year.
Other schools included in
Region 2 as a non-daily paper
include American University,
George Washington University,
Howard University, James Madison
University, Towson University,
University of Delaware, University
of North Carolina-Charlotte,
University of North Carolina-
Pembroke, Virginia Tech and
Washington and Lee University.
news
briefs
;i c r o s s;
e state
Nearly 400 UNC
students treated
after meningitis scare
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � Nearly
400 students at the University of
North Carolina have been treated
with antibiotics after a female stu-
dent w'as diagnosed with acute
meningococcal meningitis last
weekend, administrators said.
Karen Ellis, a member of Alpha Chi
Omega sorority, was in good condi-
tion Saturday at UNC Hospitals,
said nursing supervisor Gloria
Vaughan.
Student arrested after
pipe bomb found in
dorm room
WILMINGTON (AP) � A stu-
dent at the University of North
Carolina at Wilmington has been
indicted for possession of a weapon
of mass destruction after a pipe
bomb was found in his dorm room.
Michael Scott McBride, 19, of
Darlington, S.C was arrested last
month and indicted this week.
Jones' attorneys
allege White House
cover-up of Willey
papers
WASHINGTON (AP) -4
President Bill Clinton obstructed
justice by withholding correspon-
dences with a former White House
volunteer until after she accused
him of making a crude sexual
advance on national television,
court papers allege.
around
the world
In last Thursday's
edition of TEC, Kenneth
Anselmi, Assistant
Professor in the
Department of Marketing,
was incorrectly identified.
Murder suspect's
brother not charged
in college
student's death
FRANKLIN, Ind. (AP) � A
Johnson County grand jury has
decided not to indict the brother of
a man charged with killing a
Franklin College student.
Six Rwandans on
trial for killing of
U.N. Monitors
KIGALI, Rwanda (AP)� Six Hutu
rebels have been charged with the
1997 killing of five U.N. human
rights monitors, state-run Rwandan
radio reported today. A Briton, a
Cambodian, two Rwandans and a
driver working for the U.N. High
Commissioner for Human Rights
were killed in a Feb. 4, 1997,
ambush near Cyangugu, 150 miles
southwest of the Rwandan capital,
Kigali. The six rebels � five men
and one woman � appeared in
court Friday in Cyangugu, on
Rwanda's border with Congo, the
radio said. It was not clear from the
report whether or how they plead-
ed.
Inspectors go near
Saddam's hometown
for palace searches
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) � U.N.
arms experts inspected another of
President Saddam Hussein's palace
compounds Sunday as they contin-
ued to search for information oh
Iraq's weapons of mass destruction.
Copyright 1998 Kroger Mid-Atlantic items! Prices good In CfwnvHt We natm the right to Imlt quantities. None jjjj to dealers
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. 4 Tlwrtty, March 12. 1898
news
Thi E�it Cirollnitn
ROTC, Pi Delta help
Habitat for Humanity
build homes
Scholarship
continued from page 2
Organizations help for
secondtime
C�AIG D. Ramev
SENiOH WHITE!
Habitat for Humanity got by with a
little help from their university
friends last Saturday when the
ROTC and Pi Delta sOYority
teamed up to help an unfortunate
family build a new home.
This marks the second time the
two organizations teamed up to
help in the construction and man-
power needed to build Habitat for
Humanity homes.
Habitat for Humanity is a non-
profit organization that helps put
low-income families into a new
home of their own. These families
often work hand in hand with
Habitat for Humanity volunteers in
the construction of the home.
"We like community service,
and we wanted to give something
back said Ami Brasure, president
of Pi Delta. "It makes me feel real
good to be able to help these peo-
ple get a house
The Arnold Air Society is a ser-
vice organization of cadets char-
tered in the ROTC, and a leading
force in campus volunteer work
with contributions both on and off
campus.
"It's hard work, but a lot of fun
said Scott Hopkins, member of
ROTC. "We get a sense of accom-
plishment, being out there and see-
ing the family working with us
University volunteers helped
put on a roof, painted and did some
of the finishing work on one home
before beginning another.
Some construction professionals
make up the pool of volunteers,
but most of the workers are inexpe-
rienced and learn how to do the
work the day they show up.
Habitat for Humanity always
has projects under construction and
all volunteers are welcomed. Those
interested in future projects can
contact Habitat for Humanity at
758-2947.
are in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Parking spaces managed by USA
Parking include those at various
hotels such as Marriott, Hyatt and
Ritz-Carlton, as well as parking
spaces at the Miami Motor Sports
Complex and airports in Florida
and North Carolina. In North
Carolina, USA Parking is responsi-
ble for parking spaces at the
Greenville and Greensboro air-
ports.
By establishing two new schol-
arships for hospitality management
juniors, seniors and students pursu-
ing the hospitality management
option in the MBA program,
Bodenhamer and faculty members
hope students will be attracted to
the program.
"I love East Carolina and the
hospitality management industry is
very important to me
Bodenhamer said. "I hope by giv-
ing these scholarships that it will
make it easier for East Carolina to
recruit students in the hospitality
field
Dr. Helen Grove, dean of the
school of Environmental Sciences,
received the gift along with
Chancellor Eakin on Feb. 11 in
Fort Lauderdale at the USA
Parking headquarters.
"We are verphpased to receive
this gift Grove said. "It will make
a wonderful contribution to the
education of many students over
the years and help us attract talent-
ed and promising students to the
program
One $4,000 scholarship, renew-
able for a second year, will be
awarded to a junior or senior hospi-
tality management student pursu-
ing the option in the MBA. A
$2,000 nonrenewable scholarship
will also be awarded.
Both scholarships will be award-
ed annually beginning in 1999.
Bodenhamer also hopes to set
up internships for hospitality man-
agement students and hopes this
scholarship will help recruit more
students from this university for
full-time positions at USA Parking.
m&HH&rt&
5 ToUiv, I
March 26,1998
Assist Rescue �. A student was
transported from Joyner Library to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital by
Greenville Rescue after complain-
ing of chest pains.
Larceny � A staff member report-
ed that her parking permit was
taken from her vehicle parked
south of Mendenhall.
Larceny � A resident of Scott Hall
reported the larceny of his cellular
telephone from the General
Classroom Building. 98-0239
Harassing Phone Call � A faculty
member reported receiving an
obscene telephone message on her
answering machine in her office in
Backpack
continued fiom page 2
����� ��





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I
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���Kft&
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
'SI Touch Of Class'
756-6278
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
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Sfy(ar�
10 OR MORE GIRL
DANCERS EVERY
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Ucatod 5 Miln H'tit of Cr.tnvillf m 264 Alt (Behind Aladdin Limo S�Wi�)
















Momlay, Mar. 31 Meeting of legislation Room 221 Mendenhall
�Bill passed to get rid of the book stipend and
prorate the SGA officers' stipend for those who
serve a month or less.
�Inter-Fraternity Council and Panhellenic hire
speaker for campus unity.
�Barefoot on the Mall has been moved and now
is Barefoot on Mendenhall.
and one felony. All of these charges
occurred on the ECU campus.
"Cobb hasn't been convicted of
any of these charges Horst said.
"All charges are pending, but he is
Brewster.
Larceny � A student reported the
larceny of his wallet from the vol-
leyball court at Scott Hall. 98-0240
Assist Rescue � A student was
transported from Clement Hall to
PCMH after running into a wall,
injuring himself.
Tampering with Motor Vehicle
An officer observed two students
enter another student's vehicle at
Allied Health. The two students
filled the vehicle with paper. The
owner of the vehicle did not want
to press charges, stating that it was
a practical joke.
Breaking & Entering Motor
Vehicle - A non-student was arrest-
ed for breaking into a vehicle in the
Fourth and Reade Street parking
lot
banned permanently. If anyone
sees him on campus, they should
call the ECU police
Horst also said that Cobb is a
suspect for numerous other larce-
nies, but not enough evidence is
available to press charges. Horst
also said that Cobb doesn't appear
to be violent and when questioned,
he invokes his Miranda rights.
"Even though there is only one candidate on the
ballot, write ins are acceptable. It is upsetting to
know this is happening with the election, f hope
the elections will be better on April 8 -Bob Smith
M-HdH-fl-MUfVN
Alison Brodwich, John Lynch, Tim Moore, Jason
Smith, Kate Smith, Robin Wilson, Leslie Brewer,
Micheal Rowe
1994: Issued a ban ticket for suspicious behavior in Messick.
Feb 3,1998: Charged with attempted felonious larceny of a laptop
in Howell Science Complex.
Feb 6,1998: Second degree trespassing for ignoring his 1994 ban
ticket. Officers found stolen property on Cobb and charged him
with possession of stolen property.
Feb 7, 1998: Four additional misdemeanor warrants were sworn for
stolen goods (textbooks) that matched missing property from the
students who had their backpacks stolen.
Feb 12,1998: Arrested for the four warrants
Feb 17,1998: Warrant issued for attempted felonious larceny
Feb 18,1998: Arrested for attempted felonious larceny
Mar 7,1998: Suspect reported in men's locker room at Minges
Mar 9,1998: Warrant issued for second degree trespassing
Mar 11,1998: Arrested for second degree trespassing
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from the Is
working no
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information on i
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Tuesday, April 1
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LETHE
I am choosing th
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This may be a wee bit shameless, but let us tell you why TEC is so excited. The Society of
Professional Journalists (SPJ) named us the Best Ail-Around Non-Daily Student
Newspaper in our region; North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and The District
of Columbia. Aside from an overall award, several individuals won reporting awards. To be
honest, we're a bit of an underdog and would have been proud of an honorable mention.
Now, we move on to the national competition to compete with the top newspapers from the
nation's other nine regions. If we place last then we're still the tenth in the nation, and quite
frankly, that feels good.
There are about 60 students who work at TEC as reporters, section editors,
photographers, designers and advertising reps. Like you, we struggle to-balance school,
work and a social life often with another job. While recognition has temporarily gone to our
heads, we all realize that awards are not the best motivator for working hard. Walking across
campus on a Tuesday or Thursday morning and watching readers pick up their copies, tote
them underneath their arm, or pull them out during class � knowing that the paper they're
reading is our best effort � well, that's a feeling no award can match.
It's our aim to keep you informed. We want to provide a range of coverage, from news
from the latest Board of Trustees meeting to the best band to catch downtown. We're
working not only on covering news, but on asking important questions too. We take our
responsibility to our readers seriously and because of this we're becoming increasingly
aware of the importance of filtering news through our own brains and asking questions
which our readers would ask if they had the time or the chance. 7fcC is proud to be
� supported by self-generated advertising revenue. This places us in a position to more freely
Question campus organizations. We have also ventured into the frontier of the internet by
placing our entire paper on-line at www.tec.ecu.edu. Our webmaster Bobby Tuggle counts
over 3,000 hits a day. Another priority at TEC is to provide readers with a more modern
design, including charts and graphics which provide information at a glance. We are also
.striving to offer readers in-depth coverage of issues which the editorial board feels are
important to the campus community. The Focus inserts � a combined effort between
Shearlean Duke's Basic Reporting Classes and TEC� which provide a series of articles on
a related topic, won a third place in-depth reporting award. If there's a subject you would
like to see explored on our pages call us and let us know.
Our goals are lofty, but we want our readers to know what we're striving for so they can
point.it out to us should we fall short. Send us your letters to the editor, if there's something
on your mind. We want to hear from you. We know our readers lead fascinating lives and if
something's interesting to you it's probably interesting to someone else. If you have a story
idea or think you would be an asset to our staff call us at 328-6366.
We want our readers to look on TECs awards as another aspect of ECU we can all be
proud of.
OPINION
Columnist
William Stacey
COCHRAN
Violence mars our nation
As I've had time to let it sink
in, I have begun to wonder
how far must we, as a
society, let violence go before
we decide to check our
governing system.
My father used to own a gun. It was
a .45 caliber hand gun, a Spanish
make. It.possessed a certain aura
around our home. We (my brothers
and I) were told about it, warned of
its power. We were told never to
handle it, to stay away from it, yet it
stayed there in our home, where we
lived, like a volatile relative who'd
decided to move in with us without
our full consent.
As far as I can remember, my
father never once used it, not even
in practice. It just sat there in my
mom and dad's bedroom closet
pumping out this aura of power and
death and fear. Until I came to
college, I'd never come into contact
with another gun. And during the
last six years I've only seen two.
For the longest time, I abhorred
the idea of owning a gun. I didn't
want to possess anything capable of
such efficient destruction. What
the hell do I need with something
suited for killing another person �
something that's purpose is to cause
injury? And I've had heated
arguments with one of my brothers
on the issue.
- Last week, when I watched the
news of the 11- and 13-year-old
Arkansas boys who ambushed their
classmates and teachers, I was filled
with anger. My thoughts were that
they should fry � that no matter
whether 11 or 50, terrorism is
terrorism. And terrorism must not
be accepted on any level in
America.
As I've had time to let it sink in,
I have begun to wonder how far
must we, as a society, let violence
go before we decide to check our
governing system. Sure, violence
has been always been a part of
humanity. The Romans used to
throw Christians into an arena filled
with hungry lions for fun. We've
come a long way in 2,000 years,
right?
So what is the next step?
Because just as sure as violence has
been a pan of humanity, so too has
change. How far must terrorism be
allowed to spread before we make
some change in the measure of
responsibility and freedom
accorded to us as citizens? And
doesn't it make you frightfully wary
when talk turns to changing
freedom and responsibility? K
ought to.
Perhaps, this more - than
anything else has been what has
stymied any serious change in gun
control. Because when you start
talking about changing the measure
of freedom accorded each and
every citizen, you are talking about
changing what it is to be an
American�what it is to be human.
But the fact of the matter is
terrorism within the United States
has been on the rise in recent
decades. Whether violence has
gotten out of hand is certainly
arguable. But when seemingly
normal kids go to ambushing and
slaughtering teachers and
classmates for no motive other than
"fun it's time to think long and
hard about some son of positive
change.
Working toward a common good
is an arduous task when the roads
are not certain. And no one is
promising an end to violence. It
would be pretentious to think that
such an end is within human
capabilities. But if owning a gun (oi
reasons of fear or fun become;
central motives to upholding a;
constitutional right, then it may-
very well be time to think at
changing the system within which
that constitution works.
LETTER
to the Editor
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
Columnist
Don't be apathetic; register, vote
SGA encourages voters to act
Several members of the student
government association would like
to ask all the students of the
university to vote for their student
body representatives next
Wednesday, April 8.
We arc currently trying to get as
many people as possible to show
their support for the university by
becoming active in this once-a-year
event. We have acknowledged your
concerns about knowing the
candidates before actual voting.
Therefore, we arc going to provide
information on every candidate in
this year's election. Between the
dates of Friday, April 3 and
Tuesday, April 7, members of the
SGA will be at the entrance of the
Wright Place with information on
every candidate. Information such
as previous leadership, previous
SGA involvement and goals for the
following year will be provided.
Others are concerned about not
knowing the candidates on a
' personal level. Some may say, "I've
never met these people, so why
should I vote for them?" We feel no
matter who you decide to vote for,
East Carolina University, and
ultimately every student at the
university can benefit from a
better-than-avcrage turnout. By
voting we are giving the university
an image of active, energetic
student involvement. We have the
ability to make our own education
more valuable by panicipating in
this event. In essence, by voting for
a candidate, you are voting for
yourself. One minute of your time
could actually increase your
chances of getting a job with East
Carolina University on your
resume. Will your future employer
think you attended a university full
of active students?
The SGA has worked hard this
year to meet student concerns. We
are more than glad to give you the
information so you can better
choose for whom to vote. Hopefully
the students of the university can
meet us halfway and show us your
approval. Remember, when you
vote Wednesday, April 8, you are
actually voting for yourself. Thanks
from the Student Government
Association. Go Pirates!
David Bucci '
Freshman Class President
Benjamin Rodriguez
Sophomore Class Vice President
Timothy Muller
Junior Class Vice President
Michael Papera
Junior Class President
Jonathan Huggins
Senior Class President
LETTER
Westmoreland an asset to university
I am choosing this forum to let the
East Carolina community be made
even more fully aware of how
fortunate it is to have a man of the
caliber of Dr. Jim Westmoreland in
charge of the Career Placement
office.
In January I was given the
opportunity to interview with
Parke-D vis Pharmaceuticals, a
division of Warner-Lambert, for a
position to sell anti-epileptic
medications throughout Eastern
North Carolina.
I called Jim to see if he could
I
work me in for a session on
interviewing. He made the
adjustments to his schedule and
walked me through what was about
to happen. The session was the
difference in my ability to go in
confident and self-assured instead
of from the seat of my pants.
Some five weeks later, I flew to
Atlanta, met the Southeast area
business manager and, after 40
minutes, accepted this much
coveted position.
My family and I will remain
indebted to Dr. Westmoreland. I
I
The people with the loudest
opinions often do not
vote challenge you �
dare you � registerand
vote in both the primary
and general elections.
I sat down to write my article.
Numerous ideas popped into my
head: campaign finance reform, the
always entertaining Greenville City
Council and their hate of couches,
blood thirsty Kenneth Stan, or the
Spin Team that works for the
Clinton White House. Then I
thought, why bother?
Nobody seems to care anymore.
Nothing is important. Apathy
appears to be the only cause people
are concerned with. ,
Think you are not apathetic?
Quick quiz, hot shot: name both
US Senators (from your home
am certain that my time with him
made significant differences in my
interviewing style when compared
to the other candidates, who were
not fortunate enough to have this
opportunity.
East Carolina's cunent students
and graduates can be certain at least
this department is piloted by an
extremely capable individual.
Mike Radford
Class of 197
Wilson, N.C.
state), name a cause you recently
gave money to, attended a rally or
actually gave a second thought
about any political commercial you
have seen on television.
The primaries arc coming up
soon. Do you know anything about
who is running? Or do you even
plan to get oft your fat butt and
vote?
Not knowing anything about the
politicians running for office is no
excuse. The Internet is full of
information about those running for
higher office. If you arc unsure
about any candidate call the person
up and ask a few questions. �
You do not have to be a political
know it all. A firm grasp of the
obvious would be helpful.
People have numerous opinions
about every political issue, taxes,
abortion, welfare, the military
industrial complex, just to name a
few. Often these opinions are very
strong. Yet, for all those people
who have opinions, tew actually
vote.
The people with the loudest
opinions often do not vote.
Rush Limbaugh ranks Ronald
Reagan as one of the greatest
?residents, yet never voted for him.
n fact he did not even register to
vote until Reagan was in his second
term. Is this you, some ignorant,
hot-aired fool, who would rather
dispense opinions than actually
vote?
Voting is not that hard. You
register, all two minutes it takes!
you go to your respective place td
vote, go in a litde booth and vote;
When I voted last year the whole
voting process took about fifteen
minutes. '
Fifteen minutes � are you that
lazy? Are you so busy you can't
spare the time to vote? Maybe you
feel that voting onjy encourages
the politicians. Perhaps the!
Democrat and Republican panics;
do not represent your particular
needs. Then vote for someone
from another party.
Damn, people. Are you so;
moronic that politics is out of you�
grasp? Since a lot of you cannot
even grasp basic college algebra, t
guess so. I challenge you � I dare;
you � register to vote and vote in�
both the primary and general"
elections.
I will darn near guarantee that
less than 20 percent of the ECU
student population will vote in this!
year's November election. I willj
bet that less than five percent will;
vote in the primary election.
Those of you who do not like!
my columns, now is your chance
You now have a chance to prove me;
wrong, but I do not think you will"
be able to prove me wrong.
Oh well, I do not care. The!
leaders will lead and the lemmings
will follow.
LETTER
to the Editor
Keep retorts inside classroom
Stacey Cochran's recent opinion
left me flabbergasted. I am
appalled at his lack of
professionalism by attacking his
students' papers via The East
Carolinian
His retorts were ones that should
remain within the classroom and
not in the public eye. Instead of
motivating his students, he has
humiliated them. I believe Mr.
Cochran should apologize to his
students and realize the effects of
his carelessness.
i
I
Jennifer Bonnev
Graduate student
English
�I
I





I
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Jake 9mp, USA
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Tht Eitt Carolinian
pu.t?umimeaMicaRe
Rafael Santos
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Music in Greenville
-Greenville Times
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31
33
36
37
38
39
41
42
43
45
47
49
50
55
57
58
62
63
64
65
66
ACROSS
Practical sci.
class
Knock
Pacify
Goof up
Actress Gardner
Battle of
Manassas
Prima donna's
problem
Hamilton bill
Like tap shoes
Regional
cooking
traditions
Mrs. Nixon
So as to assist
Pockmarks
Cereal grass
Removes with
caution
Drained of color
Waste conduit
Individual
Farm pen
Metal fasteners
Brief rest
Light knock
Simon and
Tsongas
Fewer
Refined grace
Darjeeling, e.g.
Spruce juice
Subjective
writers
White lie
Chosen one
Be suitable
Disney dwarf
"The Naked '
Novelist Moravia
African antelope
Debit's color
67 Slippeo
sideways
68 Psychic's power
69 Crucial fact
DOWN
1 Bloodsucker
2 Bicker
3 Cook over a grill
4 Endorse
5 Saks Fifth
6 Board
7 Letters openers
8 "Fiction"
9 The ones who
beg
iO Brings joy
11 Fine work
12 Take to court
13 Ultimate act
21 Chipper
22 " m Seattle"
25 Two-masted
vessels
27 Nary a soul
28 Albacore and
Wuefin
29 Staircase
32 Visualize
33 Fall flower
34 Hackneyed
35 Overdoes the
publicity
36 Pesto, e.g.
39 Man of La
Mancha
40 Light brown
shade
44 Non-dertc
46 Talented
Answers from Thursday
58 Fathers,
casually
59 Fraternal order
member
60 Slugger's stat
61 Soundless
agreement
I �
7 Tuitdn
Cl
re'
Gangst.
9 C
An
LIFE
Initially, yoi
dealing with
you pick u
debut albi
Georgia's Dri
the band nai
sweaty, homi
mandos.
Gangsfadify.
in a leather j;
ain't my cup i
Next, you ta
titles: "Wife
Your Purse
You think you
FoxworthyTI
bastard mutati
Then, you
(even on the
starts. And y
dead wrong.
Sure, the
that's a point
Athens bands
O-Nuts, etc.).
Truckers will
gut with the
with lone
Gangstabilly, t
from Sailor
Lynch's Wild
than Georgia
songs about c
erners who dri
in love with ti
could have jus
a Harry Grev
novel.
Lead singt
who wrote mo
has an aching, i
cures perfectly
songs. Bobby
SEE TRI
This is the
column ar
stuff we mi
stuff you m
will exarr
books, albu
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deserve
exploration
stuff we du
the day






The Eait Carolinian
fael Santos
7 Tuesday. March 31, 1998
CD
review
tafo�l Santos
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54

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If
1 Drive-By Truckers
i
yfoknotts Gangstabilly
9 OUT OF 10
A n d v Turner
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Initially, you might think you're
dealing with a novelty band when
you pick up Gangstabilly; the
debut album from Athens,
Georgia's Drive-By Truckers. First,
the band name inspires images of
sweaty, homicidal 18-wheeler com-
mandos. Second, there's
Gangstadilfy. You think, "OK, Ice-T
in a leather jacket, flicking a Zippo
ain't my cup of Southern Comfort
Next, you take a look at the song
titles: "Wife Beater "Panties in
Your Purse "Why Henry Drinks
You think you're dealing with a Jeff
FoxworthyThey Might Be Giants
bastard mutation.
Then, you hear record crackle
(even on the CD) and the music
starts. And you realize you were
dead wrong.
Sure, they're irreverent, but
that's a point of pride for many
Athens bands (BBQ Killers, Jack-
O-Nuts, etc.). But the Drive-By
Truckers will just as often fill your
gut with the giggles as they will
with lonesome teardrops.
Gangstabilly, to borrow a phrase
from Sailor Ripley in David
Lynch's Wild at Heart, is "hotter
than Georgia asphalt filled with
. songs about down-and-out south-
erners who drink too much and fall
in love with truckers� folks who
could have just as easily fell out of
a Harry Crews or Larry Brown
novel.
Lead singer Patterson Hood,
who wrote most of the song lyrics,
has an aching, raspy twang that cap-
tures perfectly the emotions of the
songs. Bobby Helms might have
SEE TRUCKERS. PAGE 7
lifestyle
The Eait Carolinian
Girls Kick
Classes prepare women for
attackers
M I C C A H S M I T II
SEMOI WRITER
If you're a woman, you've been hearing the same
old schpiel ever since your freshman yean keep to
well-lit areas, never walk alone at night, call for a
police escort, run away from danger and, if all else
fails, scream bloody murder.
This sensible advice usually works to keep
women safe, but you can't always depend on it, and
don't ever discount the possibility of an attack.
So what happens when the safeguards of society
fall away and leave you exposed to a very real phys-
ical threat from an attacker? Do you know how to
actually defend yourself when it counts?
Here's the scene: you're walking home late at
night, just minding your own business, when sud-
denly you feel a hand clamp down on your shoul-
der.
You gasp and try to pull away, but some creep's
got you by the arm and it's pretty obvious by now
he wants more from you than the time of day.
What's the best thing to do in a situation like this?
According to Mitch Ammons, the suntanned
and confident instructor of Wing Chun at the
Greenville Wing Chun School, you should already
Ass
"have some kind of preparedness
This includes sensitivity to changes in your
environment that may indicate a threat. Alertness
can give you the advantage in flight-or-fight situa-
tions.
"If you can, avoid the situation advised
Ammons. But if it's already too late for that, them's
nothing else to do but make your attacker sorry he
touched'you.
Time is short in a combative situation, so choose
a counterattack and follow through. "You can either
grab and twist the groin or you can go for the eyes
and gouge he said.
The use of hands to exploit an opponent's pres-
sure points and weaker physical features is a
premise of Wing Chun, a Kung Fu technique
developed three centuries ago by a Chinese
woman.
Ammons claims that Wing Chun is "the ulti-
mate form of self-defense" because it enables
smaller people to use a larger opponent's weight
against them.
Because street fighting often occurs in cramped
conditions and with minimal time to react, low,
short kicks and sharp jabs are more useful to Wing
Chun students than are the momentum-powered
high kicks and chops used in other martial arts.
Students learn to maximize their own reflexes
�and strengths, even if they are short or small. They
condition their hands and fingers to become
SEE ASS. PAGE I
"If you don't get mean, that person has an advantage over you
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
English Department honors
published professors
12 volumes higfiligfit
stelllaryear
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
It's a first
for the
English
deparc-
m e n t
here at
ECU.
Although
English
profes-
sors reg-
u I a r I y
publish
both books and articles, in the past
calender year, the department has
produced an unprecedented twelve
volumes.
This past Wednesday, the
department celebrated in the facul-
ty lounge with a champagne toast
and readings from the works by
their authors. The selections cov-
Kathryn Fladenmuller and Dr. Douglas McMillian
PHOTO BY JOHN DAVIS
ered a wide variety of genres. Books
of scholarship, collections of essays,
poetry, creative nonfiction and a
handbook have all been published
since March 1997.
The first to read were Dr.
Douglas McMillan and graduate
student Kathrvn Fladenmuller,
who edited a collection of
essays entitled Regular
Life: Monastic, Canonical,
and Mendicant Rules. Joked
McMillan when he began
to read, "We were going to
sing this in Gregorian
chant
Patrick Bizzaro, who
edited two different books
last year, The Harcourt
Brace Guide to Writing in the
Disciplines and Dream
Garden: The Poetic Vision of
Fred Chappell, read from
Dream Garden.
One of the more color-
ful books published was
written by Dr. James
Holte. The book, Dracula
in the Dark: the Dracula Film
Adaptions, compares the
vision of Bram Stoker with
the subsequent Dracula movies, as
well as tracing the acceptance of
Dracula and vampires into
American society. The first line of
the study reads: "It was a dark and
stormy night
Professor Lillian Robinson pub-
lished two books of multicultural
Pow wow
sees drop
in turnout
Festival celebrates
Native Americans
ream
Garden
T�� Pntte Viiion of Fnd C.hipttii
P�KBilO �� �3i0tjf G����TT
Miccah Smith
senior writer
criticism, In the Canon's Mouth:
Dispatches from the Culture Wars, and
Night Market: Sexual Cultures and the
Thai Economic Miracle. Robinson
read selections from the introduc-
tion to Night Market.
Professor William Hallberg read
from his offbeat account of a nation-
al golfing pilgrimage, The Soul of
Golf. The novelist was followed by
professors Dale Jacobs and Peter
SEE PROFESSORS. PAGE 7
A call for '80s awareness
This is the
column and the
stuff we miss and the
stuff you missed. We
will examine the
books, albums, tele-
vision shows we feel
deserve further
exploration. The
stuff we dug back in
the day
Rememberme
material
decade
Miccah Smith
senior writer
Every time I turn around the nation
is in the midst of celebrating some
different variety of Awareness
Week or Pride Month.
Many socially conscious stu-
dents around campus affix colored
ribbons to their clothing to show
their support andor
awareness of various
groups andor conditions.
Global citizen though
I may be, I am woefully
unable to keep up with
the different ribbon color
I'm supposed to be sport-
ing during a given month.
I feel inadequate and
out-of-step when I can't
remember whether a
green ribbon indicates
Earth Consciousness or
Kermit the Frog Pride.
The time to create my
own National Awareness Week has
come. It's time to rip off those out-
fit-killing ribbons and load up on
Debbie Gibson is pregnant with my two-headed love
child.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ELECTRIC YOUTH
jelly bracelets, mousse, ruffly skirts,
tight-rolled jeans and blue eye-
shadow.
I declare this week to be
National '80s Awareness Week.
Of course, I realize it's quite
possible you've all forgotten how to
be Material Girls and Pet Shop
Boys, but just make the effort to
show your support, please. I won't
even ask for donations. Let's just
take a breather from all this '90s
guilt.
Check out The Wedding Singer,
Purple Rain or The Breakfast Club to
get yourself into the right mood,
then let your heart (certainly not
your brainbe your guide
1. Grab some hairstyling prod-
ucts. Stiff, shiny and spiky are in.
SEE AWARENESS. PAGE 9
Students who remember last year's
intertribal powwow at the bottom
of College Hill were a bit disap-
pointed at the lack of school
enthusiasm and participation at
this year's powwow, which began
at noon on Saturday.
A large chunk of ECU's Native
American population, as well as
others from around the state, gath-
ered to celebrate their heritage
with dance, drum and chants, but
not many others showed up.
"They should have advertised
more commented Amy Paradise,
a non-Native American student
who also attended last year's pow-
wow.
"What happened to the food?"
sophomore Becky Charney want-
ed to know.
The Stony Creek drummers,
who chanted and sang as well,
accompanied traditional dancing in
which all Native American stu-
dents were invited to participate.
Silverhawk, who is of the
Cherokee bloodline, was one of
two vendors at Saturday's pow-
wow. He attends several of these
each year, selling leather hides,
vests and pipes.
Bill Freeman, who is affiliated
with the Blackfoot tribe, makes
and sells beaded jewelry, some of
which is amazingly intricate. "I do
it for enjoyment more than any-
thing else he said.
Although few people witnessed
the spectacle, dancers arrayed
themselves in ceremonial gar-
ments whose colors ranged from
SEE POWWOW PAGE I
I





I Tutidey, March 31.
1938
r
rargjlin
lifestyle
The Eitt Carolinian
This is not a rant. The goal: to write
complete sentences and hopefully to
make some sort of point. Just another
ass with an opinion
The beast is dead
"That time oftJ&year"
finally over
Mark Brett
SENIOR WRITE
Thank God' it's over. Every year
around this time. I breathe a sigh of
relief. The season has passed once
again, and I can come out of my
hole to breathe freely. Aahh.
What? No, I'm not talking about
winter. I love winter! I love a gqod,
bracing cold wind and bundling up
under piles of warm clothing.
Winter is cool!
No, the season I'm talking about
is awards season. From New Year's
to Easter, the entertainment indus-
try plagues the populace anew with
award show after award show. The
Emmys, the Grammys, the Golden
Globes, the People's bloody Choice
Awards And, of course, the
grandaddy of them all, the most
hyped, most bloated, most disgust-
ing spectacle in the lot, the Oscars.
I hate them all.
This might seem an odd senti-
ment from someone who stays as
immersed in the media as I do. I
love movies, music, television, the
whole blasted entertainment
industry. I make money writing
about it, and I enjoy it. But I'm no
entertainment hack. I know crap
when I see it, and it offends me. I
am more than willing to call a spade
a spade, eager, in fact, to point out
that the emperor has no cjothes.
And, buddy, that fat-ass enter-
tainment overlord is never more
naked than during award season.
It's at award time, you see, that
the hypocrisy of the business is at
its most blatant. Theoretically,
these shows arc supposed to recog-
nize the best things done in the
preceding year. But, more often
than not, it's really all about who
made the most money.
The habit is at its worst in tire
music industry. Nobody's going to
win a Grammy unless their record
label spent a I6t of money hyping
them. And the only people who get
a lot of hype-money are the people
doing the kind of music that the
record industry thinks will sell that
year.
Once every fifteen years, some-
body breaks through on talent
alone; but that's rare, and it usually
signals a sea-change in the public's
listening tastes. The last act to do
that was Nirvana back in '92, "the
year alternative broke
And what have we gotten since
then? Prepackaged alterna-goo.
Bands shaped by their labels to
sound as much like each other as
possible. The same sound-alike-
philosophy crap,we had back in the
late-80s era of the hair bands,
except without all the androgynous
macho posturing and excessive
cleavage. In other words, Bush.
Thank you, Grammy awards.
The other industries really
aren't any better. Emmys go to
shows with high ratings, which is
why ER and NYPD Blue continual-
ly get Best Drama while shows like
Homicide or Law & Order languish in
obscurity.
And it's why a melodrama like
Titanic wins Best Picture.
Everybody knew the big boat was a
lock at this year's Oscars, and why?
Because it was a cinematic master-
piece? Well, no. Titanic is a good
movie, but that's about it, alright? It
tells a nice love story and engages
its audience well. I liked it a lot.
But would it have won Best
Picture if it hadn't also been so
wildly successful? Of course not. If
it had been the colossal bomb that
everyone expected it to be, it
wouldn't have even gotten a nomi-
nation. We'd be laughing about it
like we are about The Postman. You
know, that Kevin Costner thing
about the post-apocalyptic mail-
man? No? Oh yeah, it was a bomb;
nobody remembers bombs.
1-ah! Even talking about award
shows leaves a bad taste in my
mouth. And I haven't even gotten
to the shows themselves. The
awful musical numbers. The
pathetic jokes the presenters strain
to read off cue cards. The inter-
minable acceptance speeches. The
wretched excess of the diamond-
draped starlets and stretch limos,
enough to make me want to bring
back the guillotine, just for one
night.
And the running time. They can
never finish any of these things on
time, even though they give away
the "unimportant" awards before
they go on the air. Maybe they
could cut out oiie of those crappy
vaudeville numbers, or one of the
ten million other annoyances of the
evening. Or maybe they could just
stop having the show at all, and
announce the winner via press con-
ference. At least then they wouldn't
be flaunting tlie emperor's nudity
quite so boldly.
But that's okay. It's over now.
They're done for another year.
Award season is finished.
Of course, now there's pollen
season to contend with, but that's
okay. I can kick back in the sun
with my box of snot rags and enjoy
myself again. Aaaahhhh
BINGO NIGHT
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st, 1998
160 H CASH PRIZES, $60 JACKPOTI � M. in the mindinhau omat room
FIFTH ANNUM PIRATE UNDERGROUND
BATTLE OF THE BANDS '98
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1998, 7 PM ON THE MENDENHALl BRICKYARD FOR MORE INFO CAU 328-4715
CASHMERE JUNGLE LORDS HYDO-LUX MORdeCAl PEOPLE'S FAULT SULLENSPIRE
OiHrFIA "Shades ofHuck Finn: Rafting the Mississippi"
w � � -L f � Presenter: Andrew Riddle
AN Til IQ 12 Hoon T0DA�! T"�sday, March 31st, Mendenhall Underground
yJl I III Or FREE DESSERTS AM REFRESHMENTS!
FAULKNER'S WORLD:
THE PHOTOGRAPHS
OF MARTIN . DAIN
ON DISPLAY IIIKOUCII
REFUND
TICKET REFUND DEADLINE IS THUR80AY, APRIL 8,1898
CONTACT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE H THE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER, OR CALL 3284788
THURSDAY - SATURDAY
APRIL 2 - 4
All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise
noted and are free to students, faculty, and
staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
"money talks"
STARRING CHRIS TUCKER AND CHARLIE SHEEN
RATED R
EMERALD CITV
Ik
nil mum
til��i 11
APRIL 16 -18,1998 IV WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
APRIL 18 - MARK WHITFIELDTRIO 81 NICHOLAS PAYTON QUINTET
APRIL 17 - RENNY GREEN ft ECU JAZZ EN8EM8LE
APRIL 18 - SPYRO 6YRA
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE, MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER. MCVISA ACCEPTED. FOR MORE MFORMATION CALL 828 - 4788
TONIGHT! TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 1998 8:00
IN CELEBRATION OF WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
&
�.?.
USTI
P TWO I I WHf N VAI II
Ml! Cl NTRAI
�fl by ih.
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 3284004. E-mail: uuunion@eciivm.cis.ecu.edu
Professors
continued from page 7
Truckers
continued liom page 7
Makuck, who read from their books
of poetry. Jacob's Beneath the Horse's
Eye was published early this year,
while Makuck's Against Distance
was published in 1997.
All of the books published by
English department professors are
available in the Student Store.
The rest of the band is equally
impressive. Mike Cooley (guitars),
Adam Howell ("big ole" upright
bass), Matt Lane (drums) and John
(sho-nuff) Neff (pedal steel) are
bonafide hoedown heroes. Many of
the songs (especially "Late For
Church" and "Panties in Your
Purse") have a primitive rawness
that would have made even the
Louvin Brothers proud.
Drive-By Truckers lay it down
straight, b.s. free on "The Living
Bubba The song is dedicated to
Gregory Dean Smalley, a musician
and founder of "Bubbapalooza
who took the big sleep after a battle
with AIDS. From Smalley's poinr
of view, the song states bluntly, "I
ain't got no political agendaain't
got no message for the children of
America, 'cept 'Wear a rubber and
be careful who you screw'and
come see me next Friday cuz I got
another show
Hood and the Truckers slam
Alec Baldwin and pay tribute to a
man who never had "an empty bot-
tle or an empty bed" in "Steve
McQueen a sing-and-drink along
number that'll have you racing to
the video store to rent Bullit.
The Truckers get out their frus-
trations with the abrasive boogie of
"Why Henry Drinks" and
"Buttholeville where Hood tells
us about "the best looking woman
in Buttholeville truly a special gal.
A couple of lines from "The
Living Bubba" seems to also cap-
ture the spirit that drives the Drive-
By Truckers: "Some people keep
saying I can't last long, but I got my
bands, I got my songs, liquor, beer,
and nicotine to help me alongand
I'm drunkVand stubbornlas they
comechain smoking, guitar, play-
ing, til I'm gone Hopefully, we
won't have o worry about the
Drive-By Truckers pulling out any
time soon.
500o OFF
EAST CAROLINA MOTOR SPEEDWAY
APRIL 4 th, ff 1th, 18th, A 25th
$4.00
EXPERIENCE THE EXITEMENT
AT THE STOCK CAR RACING
CAPITAL OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
MOTOR SPEEDWAY
HIGHWAY M WEST ROOERSONWLLE
WWW.ECMSracing.com
SILVER
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Iff
(2u(a: Hote Zkan ieat Stogies
You may know America's neighbor in the Caribbean only for its terrific - if
unavailable - cigars. Get to know Cuba a little better when filmmaker John Holod
presents "Cuba at the Crossroads" as part of the ECU Travel-Adventure Film
and Theme Dinner Series. An all-u-can-eat theme dinner is served at 6 p.m.
. for just12. Dinner tickets must be reserved by 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8
with meal cards, cash, check, or credit card.
MONDAY, APRIL 13 AT 4 OR 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
On the Big Screen
Chris Tucker and Charlie Sheen star in Money Talks (R). Your ECU One Card gets you
and one guest in for free. APRIL 2-4 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Chew on this
"Shades of Huck Finn: Rafting the Mississippi" presented by Andrew Riddle. Admis-
sion is free and gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
TODAY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
Wiii'Nojoicc
April Fools Day isn't only meant for pulling pranks and fast ones. It can also be pay
day. But only if you try your luck at Bingo Night. Admission is free and cash prizes
will be given. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1 AT 8 P.M. IN MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
L�"&nS�
"Womyn With Wings" is the title of a stimulating lecture.Tickets are free with your
ECU One Card at the Central Ticket Office. TONIGHT AT 8 IN HENDRIX THEATRE
� ��
Mi
HMfc,
www
Ml
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�a
:
liftR&ft'
:
m
m
"Meeting of the Minds Meet with Dean of Students Dr. Ron Speier
and other student leaders to discuss current campus issues which affect
you and your organization.
Although free, this program requires pre-registration, so call 328-4796.
THURSDAY, APRIL 16 AT NOON IN MSC MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
GLOBALL AURA - Come to Outer Limitz bowling center every Friday
from 7-11 p.m.for exciting theme nights for just $2 per game. Shoe rental is free.
Bring a CD, or dress the part.This week's theme: Rockabilly
ALL-U-CAN BOWL - Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday
of each month from 8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just five bucks (includes
shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS - Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m.
with 50-cent bowling (shoe rental included).
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�it Carolinian
t Friday cuz I got
& Tueiday, Mitch 31. 1988
lifestyle
Tht Eltt Carolinian
e Truckers slam
I pay tribute to a
td "an empty bot-
bed" in "Steve
�-and-drink along
ive you racing to
rent Bullit.
�et out their frus-
ibrasive boogie of
Drinks" and
there Hood tells
t looking woman
truly a special gal.
lines from "The
ems to also cap-
drives the Drive-
me people keep
ong, but I got my
mgs, liquor, beer,
:lp me alongand
tubbornlas they
mg, guit play-
" Hopefully, we
'orry about the
i pulling out any
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atalog
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Ass
continued from page7
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weapons.
Any amount of martial arts
training helps to improve reflexes
and strengthen muscles, increas-
ing a student's chance of surviv-
inganattack.
Sophomore Cece Valrie stud-
ied Karate last year, and the
things she learned will benefit
her for life. "I'm not that big and
I have to find ways of defending
myself she said. "I feel a lot
more confident now walking
around campus, especially with
all the attacks going on she said
of her training.
Meaghann Brown, also a
sophomore, trained in Tae Kwon
Do for four years and acquired "a
mind-body connection" that
could help her get out of bad sit-
uations quickly. Her physical
strength has improved and she
said with confidence, "If I need-
ed to, I'd know what to do
Apparently, the point is that
size should not be an issue in self-
defense; what really counts are
control, strength and coordina-
tion, according to Ammons. Good
Two local martial arts training centers offer classes In
self-defense:
�Bemjo Karate (BUI McDonald, Instructor) 752-5192
Greenville Wing Chun School (Mitch Ammons, instructor)
�Classes are usually offered at night and on
Saturdays. Degrees can be attained in Karate but not in
Wing Chun. 9k
�Taj X'
at��
Making the right choice about self-defense training
can be difficult and confusing, but you certainly want
to get the most out of your experience.

�A teacher should be well-trained, with credentials,
and able to convey meaning to his or her students in an
effective way. Sitting in on a class is a good way to get a feel
for a teacher's style.
�The class should offer strength and concentration
training, not just technique. In other words, it should help
you train your entire self, according to Ammons, "how to
react properly in a situation that's threatening
Pow Pow
continued from page7
hot pink to safety orange, and the
chilling cries of the drummers
charged the warm air with their
wild beauty.
New Bern Lumbee John I pock,
17, heard about the event from a
cousin. He enjoyed the Stony
Creek drummers, of whom he is a
fan, choosing to watch and enjoy
instead of dance.
At the end of Saturday's festivi-
ties, Native American student
organizers were honored with a
special song.
Awareness
continued from page 7
Soft 'n natural are, like, out.
2. One glove is all ya need. So
buy a cool pair and share with a
friend.
3. Instead of smoking pot, blow
yout mind by trying to figure out a
Rubix Cube. It's healthier.
4. Spritz on some Electric Youth
cologne. Now you'll be tres chic
while singing along to your old
Debbie Gibson tapes.
5. Tube top, tube skin and tube
of lipstick, all in fuschia.
6. Drool over impractical, gas-
guzzling sports can with awesome
features (i.e. those doors that open
from the top).
7. Be seen eating tofu or sushi in
the food court of the mall.
8. Wear your sunglasses at night
9. Bring back the Electric Slide
at the Elbo Room this Friday night.
10. Safety orange looks good on
you. Honest.
Hey, throw caution to the wind.
Throw mama from the train. Throw
a big party. Throw up on the new
carpet.
Just do it like they did back in
the day, when "radical" was an
adjective, not a noun, back when
words like "right-wing" and "left-
wing" applied to 747 jets.
And if you feel that creeping
desire to succumb to social con-
sciousness within the next seven
days, just pick up a copy of the
album that started it all, "We Are
the World I think I saw a used one
at CD Alley.
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10 Tuaiday. March 31. 1998
sports
Thi East Carolinian
Board of Trustees approves salary increases for
men's and women's basketball coaches
11 Tiiti
Numbers vary
consistentlyformen's
and women's teams
Steve Losey
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
On March 13, the ECU Board of
Trustees voted to raise the salaries
of men's head basketball coach
Joe Dooley and women's head
basketball coach Anne Donovan.
Dooley's salary was increased
"Ml state employees
receive about four
percent. It's really more
of a cost of living
adjustment "
Henry VanSant
Assistant Director of Athletics
from $78,150 to $80,495 and
Donovan's salary was increased
from $66,462 to $68,456. The
difference between the two
coaches' salaries is just over
$12,000.
"The raise is about a three
percent raise Associate Director
of Athletics Henry VanSant said.
"Most state employees get a four
percent raise, and they (Dooley
and Donovan are state
employees
VanSant declined to comment
on the differences between
Dooley's and Donovan's pay.
TEC investigated the
basketball salaries of five other
CAA schools and found similar
pay differences, even when men
coached the women's basketball
team. The only school that paid
the same for men's and women's
positions was James Madison
university. Both receive annual
salaries of $90,000. However,
men's head coach Sherman
Dillard and women's head coach
Bud Childers are both men. Gary
Michael, director of sports media
relations at JMU, maintained that
the salaries would be equal if
Childers' position were staffed by
a woman.
"We hired two new coaches
last year and the administration
considered them similar
positions Michael said. "I think
we were hiring at the same time,
and it was decided the salaries
would be the same �
Dooley's and Donovan's raises
were given at the same time their
contracts expired and come after a
difficult and disappointing season , about four percent. It's really more
by both teams. of a cost of living adjUKmcfittl"
"I wouldn't call them
significant raises VanSant said.
"All state employees receive
Men's & Women's Basketball
Coaches Salaries
120,000
Bob vs. the World
visits Greenville
Difference in Salaries
Schools
work out
conditioni
over the g
will also
walkway
connectin
The f
weight ro
an indoo
second flo
that accoi
There wi
Bagwell F
windows
school � re
games.
"It's ah
this. We
Men's tennis defeats JMU Dukes
Volleyball professional
wins two sets
TRAVIS BARKLEY
SENIOR WRITER
One-man volleyball phenomenon
Bob Holmes brought his show to
Williams Arena on Wednesday,
March 25 to play several teams
comprised of ECU students.
Holmes travels around the
country on his "Bob vs. The
World" tour, challenging various
professional and collegiate teams.
Holmes has beaten teams from
the Toronto Blue Jays, Pittsburgh
Steelers, Washington Redskins
and even a team from the
Baltimore Orioles led by Cal
Ripken. Since beginning in 1986,
Holmes has won over 10,200
games, while losing only 174.
Over 1.5 million people have
watched him play.
"I beat the odds on the court to
illustrate beating the odds in life
Holmes said.
On Wednesday he did just
that, winning two out of three
one-set games.
In the first game, with ESPN's
Jock Jams blaring from the
loudspeakers, Holmes defeated a
team from the Student Athlete
Advisory Council, 22-15.
Using a variety of serving
styles, Bob jumped out to an 11-0
lead. He then extended the game
to 22, before allowing them to go
During breaks in the games,
Bob spoke to a somewhat hostile
crowd made up mostly of ECU
athletes. It seemed that Bob
wanted the crowd to root against
him, as he would ask, "Don't you
feel sorry for me?"
"They get to substitute, but I
don't Holmes said.
In the third game, Bob was
over-matched and fell to the
men's club team 15-10.
In between the second and
Bob Holmes showed his talent .at
Minges on Wednesday night.
PHOTO BY SAMANIHA SNYDfR
CAA record improved
to 3-1 with victory
Mario SCHERHAIEER
STAFF WRITER
The Pirates held confidence after
their 5-2 victory over the
Seahawks from UNC Wilmington
last Wednesday. ECU's men's
tennis team looked to improve
their record to 3-0 in conference
play as they prepared to take on
the Eagles of American
University at a neutral site in
Raleigh on Friday.
Nevertheless, the Pirates
dropped their first CAA match of
the season, 6-0. The match was
set for 2 p.m but the Pirates were
late to hit the court, and began at
2:30 p.m. with a game penalty in
all singles and- doubles games.
"The van broke down and when
we finally got to the courts, we
had no time to warm-up and wc
got the penalty, too assistant
Coach Matt Rowe said.
Junior Kenny Kirby, playing at
No. 3 singles, was the only Pirate
player to take his match into three
sets. He fell to Nils Broering, 4-6,
6-2, 5-7.
The team returned to
Greenville to host another CAA
match on Saturday. They
defeated the Dukes of James
Madison University. The Pirates
" beat the odds
on the court to
illustrate beating
the odds in life
Bob Holmes
One-man volleyball phenomenon
on a 15-0 run. Bob even let the
entire team play at one time. He
then scored the next eleven
points in a row to secure the
victory.
Next, Bob took on the ECU
women's club volleyball team.
Holmes took the second game a
little more seriously and won
easily 15-8.
third games, Bob addressed the
crowd on the dangers of drug and
alcohol abuse. He encouraged the
crowd to stay away from drugs
and premarital sex.
"Life is more important to me
than any volleyball game
Holmes said.
"I want to help kids make the
right choices in life
Former ECU volleyball player
Erin Lenker attended the games
and was impressed by Bob's
success.
"Although some of his
techniques were questionable, his
outstanding ball control and
unique serves allow him to
compete Lenker said. "He can
make solid contact and hit the ball
hard no matter what position he is
in on the court
Holmes will be 42 years old on
May 1, but doesn't plan on halting
his court time anytime soon.
"I want to keep playing until
I'm 80 years old, Holmes said.
"I've played in over 10,000 games
and I want to play 10,000 more
The men's tennis team made a strong showing on
home court against James Madison.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
REC SERVICES
won the doubles point, then took
three singles points to clinch the
match, 4-3.
"It wasn't really difficult to
motivate them for this match
today. They were all still upset
from yesterday's trip to Raleigh
Rowe said. "I was really satisfied
with the doubles performance
today. They played with a lot of
heart and we were
unlucky not to win all
three doubles
The double team of
Brett Rowley and Roope
Kalajo won at the No. 1
slot, 8-3. At the No. 2
spot, Kirby and Nils
Alomar pulled out a
close one, winning 9-8.
ECU's third doubles
team of Derek Slate and
Oliver Thalen missed
some very close shots
toward the end of the
match and lost in the
tiebreaker for a 8-9 final
result.
According to Thalen,
who captured his first
singles victory of his
collegiate career on
Wednesday against the
Wilmington Seahawks,
they played very well
but got unlucky in the
tiebreaker.
"My ankle isn't
bothering me any more
and I hope to be able to
improve my game in the
upcoming matches
Thalen said. "I like to
play for ECU. The guys
in the team
are really
cool
ECU singles
winners
included
Kirby at No.
3, who won
the clinching
match over
the Dukes'
Jamie Elliott,
7-6, 6-2. No.
5 Rowley
and No. 6
Stephen
Siebenbrunner also posted
victories for ECU, both winning
in straight sets.
"Overall we had some ups and
downs this season Rowley said.
"We were not doing really well at
the same time as a team. But the
more matches we play, the better
we get, I hope
With this win, ECU improved
its record to 7-7 overall and 3 1 in
the Colonial Athletic Association.
The team plays at home again on
Tuesday, taking ui CAA
opponent Old Dominion at 2:30
p.m. The next Saturday home
match against the college of
William & Mary will start at 9 p.m.
and will be the last one tor seniors
Rowley and Alomar.
TENNIS fe
March 27. 1998, Raleigh, N.C.
Singles
ECU
No. 1 Roope Kalajo
No. 2 Nils Alomar
No. 3 Kenny Kirby
No. 4 Derek Slate
No. 5 Brett Rowley
No. 6 Siebenbrunner
Doubles
No. 1 KalajoRowley
No. 2 AlomarKirby
No. 3 SlateOliver Thalen
Final result:0-6
American University
Claus Thenfors
Jarred Snyder
Nils Broering
Jason Moon
Evan Schwartz
Zachary Sears
BroeringSnyder
MoonThenfors
SearsSchwartz
Score
5-7.0-6
DNF
4-6. 6-2. 5-7
3-6. 3-6
4-6, 4-6
2-6. 4-6
5-8
2-4
4-8
March 28, 1998, ECU Tennis Courts, Greenville
Singles
ECU
No. 1 Kalajo
No. 2 Alomar
No. 3 Kirby
No. 4 Slate
No. 5 Rowley
No. 6 Siebenbrunner
Doubles
No. 1 KalajoRowley
No. 2 AlomarKirby
No. 3 SlateThalen
Final result.4-3
James Madison
Luis Rosado
Brian Nelsen
Jamie Elliot
Tim Brown
Marty Pfanmuller
Chell Lamm
NelsenElliot
LammPfanmuller
RosadoBrown
Score
6-3, 4-6. 2-3 ret
4-6, 7-5, 5-7
7-6, 6-2
6-2, 5-7. 0-3 ret.
6-3. 6-1
6-4. 6-2
8-3
9-8
8-9
current team record: 7-7 overall and 3-1 in conference
mm
.St
DOES ANYONE WANT TO PLAY
TENNIS?????
Just find a partner and be sure to register for
tennis doubles on April 1. Registration is at 5 p.m. at the
Student Recreation Center (room 128).
For more information, call 328-6387.
Intramural indoor soccer season set for kick off
BASEBALL
REMINDER!
The ECU baseball team has recently added a
game to it's schedule. The Pirates will play
N.C. State on Wednesday, April 1 at Fleming
Stadium in Wilson. Game time is set for 7:30
p.m. and will be sponsored by the Wilson
Elks Club.
t
The 1998 intramural indoor
soccer season will gee underway
with a captain's registration
meeting today at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 244. Any individuals
interested in registering a team
should plan on attending this
meeting.
Unaffiliated players who are
seeking to join a team should also
attend. Six players are needed to
form a team and leagues will be
offered on a variety of playing
dates and times. Several divisions
of skill are available in order to
accommodate the diverse
interests of all participants.
Divisions offered wilt include
Fraternity Gold and Purple,
Men's Independent Gold and
Purple, Residence Hall, Sorority
and Women's Independent Gold
leagues are designed for
participants who have experience
i
in competitive play and wish to
participate at a higher level of
skill, while Purple leagues arc
more recreational in nature.
All teams will play a minimum
of two games in pool play prior to
advancing to a single elimination
tournament within each division
and all-campus finals. Regular
season play will begin on Monday,
April 6 and all games will be held
in Christenbury Gymnasium.
The rules of the National
Federation of State High School
Associations will be in effect with
indoor soccer modifications.
The game of indoor soccer is a
fast-paced, action-oriented game
with extremely quick transitions
from offense to defense. The
element of using the walls to play
the ball, defend the goal and pass
the ball add an extra dimension of
skill and strategy to the game. In
1997, 55 teams battled for
divisional and all-campus titles in
an effort to wear the prized
"Intramural Champion" t-shirt.
The fall outdoor season
provided some interesting
subplots leading to the indoor
season. For the first time in
several years, Christy Hamilton
and The Krush faced a stiff
challenge in the women's division
as Luscious took them to the wire
before falling. However, Heather
Bennett and Rebecca
Chlebanowski return for Luscious
in an attempt to wrest the crown
away.
Meanwhile, the Cheese Nips
are considered a dark horse in the
tide chase despite being the only
team with game programs,
uniforms, a pep squad and season
ticket holders. In the men's
independent, Tappa Kegs once
again established their dominance
during the outdoor season as Chris
$
Libert lurked in goal and Pasha
Kamalifard, Steve Parker and
Kevin Parrish provided the
offense.
Among the sororities. Alpha Xi
Delta will attempt to rebound
from their stunning defeat in
basketball as Sara Hudgins is
expected to anchor the defense
and Alicia Marhlo to provide the
scoring. They will be opposed by
Alpha Omicron Pi, who will be
lead by speedy Michelle "Chalk"
Gottschalk and Tina Justice.
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Lambda
Chi Alpha met in both the
Fraternity Gold and Purple finals
and should have strong indoor
teams as well. For further
information, please contact Brian
Weingartz of Recreational
Services at 328-6387 or visit the
Student Recreation Center.
" 1
i
Some restrict
Date:
TUl
TH






East Carolinian
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11 Tiiatday, March 31, 1998
Facility
continued from page 2
work out in the strength and
conditioning center and look out
over the gridiron. The new facility
will also be equipped with a
walkway to Minges Coliseum
connecting the two structures.
The facility will contain a
weight room on the first floor and
an indoor 40-yard track. The
second floor will be a banquet hall
that accommodates 500 people.
There will be seats overlooking
Bagwell Field through huge glass
windows so prospective high
school � recruits can watch the
games.
"It's a huge thing for us to have
this. We really want to make an
s
pori
The East Carolinian


6
1-2. 5-7
1-6
-6�1
-6
:
i � i
Leonard comes from five
back to win Players
Championship
PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla.
(AP) � Put that rivalry between
Tiger Woods and Ernie Els on
hold. Dallas native Justin Leonard
proved once again that when the
stakes are high and the conditions
are tough, he can be as good as
anyone.
One week after Els got the
best of Woods at Bay Hill in a
battle between young major
winners, Leonard won The
Players Championship on Sunday
with a final round that stirred
memories of his victory at the
Britnh Open.
It Was at Royal Troon where
Leimafa became the third player
in XfiisN2j)s t0 win a major
championship in 1997, joining
WooSi (Masters) and Els (U.S.
Open)7
And it) was there that Leonard
rej�k on a hot putter to come
fron tWe strokes behind to win on
the finikdav.
.Jrfidught a little bit about it
Leonard,25, said of the British
Open. J0n a very difficult golf
coursesuch as this, three or four or
five shifts is not safe
i he proved Sunday on a
Stadiumf Course that took its toll
.on so niiny others, the leaders are
never safe whenever Leonard is
lurkm
three strokes behind when
impression University Architect
Bruce Flye said. "This isn't your
ordinary weight room; it doubles
the square feet of the first floor of
the Recreation Center
Also in the artist's rendition of
the future Dowdy-Ficklen,
another upper deck is shown on
the south side of the stadium.
"That addition is well down
the road, maybe ten years Flye
said. "It's not tied to the other
projects; the facility will come
first
However, ECU officials might
be forgetting that they still have to
finish the north end upper deck
before they start "another $10
million-plus campaign.
With all of these new plans .
people might be getting a little I
too overzealous. Last season it did
not even look like the stadium
m
he made
the turn,
Leonard
o n e -
putted the first six greens on the
back nine to win going away. He
got some help from Len Mattiace,
who put two in the water on the
island-green at No. 17 for a
quintuple-bogey 8.
Leonard closed with a 67 to
finish at 10-under 278 and a two-
stroke victory over Tom Lehman
and Glen Day. He won the richest
prize on the PGA Tour, $720,000
from a purse of $4 million.
Woods closed with a 72 and
tied for 35th, while John Daly had
a 69 and was tied for 16th.
"I've been in this position a
couple of times and been able to
come out and play well Leonard
said. "Anytime I think you have
experience in doing something,
you're going to try to draw upon
that experience
Leonard was five strokes back
at the Kemper Open, where he
closed with a 67 and won when
Mark Wiebe three-putted the last
two greens. And he was five
strokes back of Jesper Parnevik at
the British Open, where he closed
with a 65.
In both cases, Leonard needed
a little help from those in front.
But when the tournament was on
the line, Leonard was at his best.
needed an upper deck,
considering that the main stands
were rarely filled and the
bleachers sat lonely at the ends of
the stadium, the only exception
being the South Carolina
Gamecocks game.
With many plans underway for
both the near and extended
future, the athletic facilities on
Pirate grounds are on their way to
becoming among the best in the
state of North Carolina.
The facility will contain a
weight room on the first floor
and an indoor 40-yard
t&ttk. The second'floor will
be a banquet hull that
accommodates 500 people.
Fast Facts: The New Athletic Facility
Location: Iri front of Minges coliseum over looking the football field.
fhaf s In Jt 1st floor will be a workout facility. 2nd floor will be a 600 person
capacity banquet hall
Purpose: A new strength and conditioning facility is needed, and it will impress
high school recruits.
Estimated completion duration: About two and a ha years.
1
With Arizona
Diamondbacks, Phoenix
arrives as a big-league
city
PHOENIX (AP) �Melissa
Housmyer stood in the sprawling
brick-lined plaza outside Bank
One Ballpark, gazing upward and
marveling at the sparkling new
home of baseball's fledgling
Arizona Diamondbacks.
"It's like the Luxor (hotel-
casino) opening in Las Vegas �
it's just awesome, so cool said
Housmyer, who grew up here
then lived out of state for 16 years
before moving back four years
ago. "It's just overwhelming for us
cowboys and cowgirls in
Phoenix
For more than five decades,
major league teams have come to
Phoenix to train in the warm
desert sunshine, only to depart for
their home cities when April 1
rolled around. Baseball fans here
had to be content to spend sweaty
summer nights with the Phoenix
Firebirds, the San Francisco
Giants' Triple-A farm club �
decent baseball, but not the
majors.
Come Tuesday night, however.
Phoenix officially joins the big
leagues when the Diamondbacks
take the field against the Colorado
Rockies in their season opener
before 50,000 fans in Bank One
Ballpark, a $354 million wonder
rising out of a ragged downtown
warehouse district.
The Phoenix Suns put this city
on the sports map when they
arrived as an NBA expansion club
30 years ago. Phoenix also has
professional hockey and football,
plus Arizona State athletics.
But cab driver Pete Thomas
subscribes to the theory that no
matter how many sports teams a
city has, it isn't complex without
a major-league baseball club.
"Baseball is America's original
game, and if you don't have major-
league baseball, you can't be
classified as a major-league city
said Thomas, gazing out at the
emerald outfield grass from the
left-field bleachers during a
stadium open house last week.
"But we're in the bigs now
Phoenix was awarded an
expansion franchise in 1995 due
to the behind-the-sceneswork of
Jerry Colangelo, the city's most
powerful business figure and
president of the Phoenix Suns.
He holds the title .of managing
general partner of the
Diamondbacks.
Choosing a nickname for the
team (coiled diamondback
rattlesnakes have struck fear in
more than a few unsuspecting
residents of the Sonoran desert)
and uniform colors (purple,
turquoise, copper and black) was
far easier than getting a stadium
built.
Resentment still lingers over
the Maricopa County Board of
Supervisors' approval of a quarter-
cent sales tax that raised $238
million for the stadium�without
a public vote. Polls had shown 2-
to-1 opposition to the tax increase.
Basketball players took
innocence with them
SAN ANTONIO (AP)
never learn. Every
generation of college
basketball manages
They
to produce a new bunch of kids
who figure they can beat the
system, shave some points here
and there, make a few bucks and
get away with it.
Last week, it was
Northwestern. Before that,
Arizona State. Tulane dropped its
program for a while over a betting
scandal, and that was after a point-
shaving case at Boston College.
They're junior wise guys and
they need a lesson in history, the
kind of history that is like a punch
to the stomach. They need to
know they didn't invent this stuff,
that it has all happened before.
They need to hear about CCNY.
Nearly half a century' has
passed since that bunch of New
York City kids swept the NCAA
and NIT championships and,
while they were at it, stole the
game of its innocence.
These were the City College
fixers, seven scared kids who
shaved points and shook the
foundation of their game. They
grew up to become productive
members of society, one a dentist,
another a coach, others successful
in business and industry. But with
the mistakes of youth, they
stained the sport they loved.
HBO Sports has produced a
riveting documentary on the
fixers, airing at a time when the
college game is crowning a new
national champion. It is a chilling
peek behind the scenes of how a
bunch of college kids got
suckered by gamblers.
The attraction of the Final
Four is the innocence of ell
event�four college tea
chasing a championship,
played out against a glo
landscape, a heritage of UCl
dynasty, longshot champions '
Texas Western in 1966, No
Carolina Sate in 1983
Villanova two yean later,
was the joy of the buzzer-bean
and emotional games that don
this show from start to finish.
They will jam the Alamo
Monday night for the conclusk
of the chase. And in the glare
the 63rd and final game of
tournament, college basketb
will try to forget the other :
stuff that started with the Cii
College fixers.
These were ordinary kids i
played ball for the joy of
game. New York kids who playel
basketball with a passion bom i
the playgrounds and nurtured ol
the hardwood at Madison Squai
Garden.
At a time before integratjcl
was widespread in sports, coacl
Nat Holman assembled thesl
middle-class youngsters, some l
them black, some of them whitl
and molded them into the bc
college team in the country.
Each week, the CCNY kids ll
up the Garden with their enenJ
and understanding of the garni
their ability to work together ar
succeed together.
'Pttutacte 'Prafieitcf
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
�fferinf
c�wlcrt to ECU, Pitt
the Medical District
convenient to Pitt Community spacious 1 & 2 bedroom:
JOSTENS
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7 & 8 FROM 10-6
n.ty. THURSDAY, APRIL 9 FROM 10-3
� ECU STUDENT STORE
M

Me�wKh�ur)a�efKrepn�mUitlvefofrulldeWls.SeecM
I !
03-8MCP 710)
convenient to Pitt Community
college and Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
no pets
Wyinihiim Court
-turn�
i from tCU
2 bedroom opts,
energy efficient
on ECU bus route
pets ok with deposit
3 milts to ECU
1 mile to hospital
back deckpatio � no pets
Doikiik- Dupl. i �
3 bedroom units
2.5 baths
5 blocks from ECU
washer & dryer in each unit
back deck
carport parking
2 bedroom 2 bath
washerdryer hookups
dishwasher
THE OFFICIAL
MS. HAWAIIAN TROPIC
BIKINI CONTEST
AT
CHASER'S LOUNGE
STARTING FRIDAY APRIL 3rd
AND
EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL FINALS
ON MAY 1st
RAMATMC
l-LAZA HOTEL
FOR DETAILS
JOSH MARSHALL
355 8300





.11
I
12 Tutidiy. March 31. 1991
rlassifjpfk
Ths East Carolinian
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efflclencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, SPA-
CIOUS example of Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3
fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty fo-
liage, near ECU & PCMH, $999month.
524-5790
WALK TO ECU, 1,2, 3, 4 and 5 bed-
room unitshouses; available June,
July, or Aug call 321-4712.
UPPER LEVEL OR GRADUATE
student needed to share recently reno-
vated two bedroom apartment in May
or June, 1998. Responsible, non-smok-
er. No pets. 1 12 blocks from campus.
$280 person plus utilitiesphone. Call
Kate ASAP at 752-9205.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bed-
room, 2 12 bath Sheraton Village,
washer, dryer, $650. Sheldon, 353-
6505. Available May 1.
SUBLEASE ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT ASAPI Walk to cam-
pus. Pets OK. WD hookup, very ener-
gy efficient! Only $240 deposit, $340
rent. Call Angela, 413-0573.
SMALL 1 BEDROOM APT. out in
country, $325 a month. Private proper-
ty. Pets welcomed. For more details,
contact Curtis Suggs at 758-3319 or
916-2909.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3
bedroom apt 2 baths. Two blocks
from ECU. Rent $165 & 13 utilities. For
more info, call 754-2487.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom, 2 bath duplex 5 minutes
from campus. 321-8872 after 6 PM or
leave message.
RIVEROAK ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENTS $295. With Stove, Re-
frigerator, Central Air & Heat, Five
blocks from ECU Free Hot Water, Basic
Cable, Water & Sewer, 756-6209.
PEONY GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM 1 12 bath apartments $375.
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Washer & Dryer, Free Cable, Water &
Sewer, Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
PARK VILLAGE ONE BEDROOM
apartments $300. With Stove, Refrig-
erator, Washer Dryer Connections, On
ECU bus route free water & sewer,
Wainright Property Management LLC
756-6209.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New
Rec Centerl 2 bedroom apt. available
now above Percolator Coffeehouse-
$450 a month I Will lease for May 1st
with one month deposit! 3 bedroom
available now above BW3'S, $775 a
month. Will lease for May 1st with 1
month sec. dep. Call Yvonne at 758-
2616
NOW AVAILABLE. 1 ROOM efficien-
cy with kitchen and bathroom, near
ECU on Tenth St. Only $295.00 per
month, all utilities included. Call 758-
1921 ask.
ECU AREAI TWO OR three bedroom
house. Fenced In backyard, central
heat and air. Pets OK, yard work In-
cluded. $476 month. Call 830-9602.
Available mid-May.
DOCKSIDE FOR RENT: 2 bedroom,
2 bath. If interested, please call 762-
9901.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT. 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Menagement, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT ft CEDAR
COURT, Two bedroom, 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher,
Wesher & Dryer Connections. Wain-
right Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH duplex, 4
blocks from ECU, all appliances, fire-
place, wd hookups, rear patio, central
heatair. Available now, $550month.
Call 758-1921.
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT AVAIL-
ABLE in May, 6 month sublease,
month by month after, free cable, wa-
ter, WD hook-up, AC, patio sunlight,
walking distance from campus. 561-
7646
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. neer ECU, only $375 per
month, 900 sq.ft. Free basic cable, wa-
tersewer, all appliances, pets O.K. Call
758-1921.
1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH apartment, 3
blocks from campus on 2nd St.
$285.00 a month. Call 758-1921.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR rent, Wood-
cliff Apts. Washer and dryer hookup, 3
blocks from campus. Assume lease.
Call Michael, 522-4583, leave mes-
sage.
yAuu inauam
IWJwW nifllrvU
747-
PLAYMATES MAS
money. Confi-
employment. Call
WANTED: FULL-TIME CHILD care
provider to care for Infent In our resi-
dence. Child oriented degreeinterest.
Experience helpful. Safe driving
record, own transportation, non-smok-
er, swimming skills, CPR certified a
plus. Beginning JulyAugust weekly
8:00-6:00. Salary $300social security &
paid vacation. Also needed, student
with similar majorinterest & qualifica-
tions to care for 1st grader after school
beginning August weekly 3:15 to 6:15.
Salary $100.00social security. Please
send letter specifying position sought
and qualificationsinterest with phone
no. to "Nanny Post Office Box
PART-TIME TESTING ADMINIS-
TRATOR NEEDED to snswer phone,
schedule tests, etc. Must have posi-
tive, professional attitude. Possible
hours: Monday-Friday 2-8PM and
some Saturdays. Pick up application at
Sylvan Learning Center, 2428 S. Cha-
rles Boulevard
OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE IS NOW
accepting applications for experienced
hostesses. Full and part-time positions
are available. Please apply in person
M-Th 1:0O-3:O0PM.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing informa-
tion, 800-662-2122.
Greenville, NC 27835.
NOW HIRING
TEACHERS at Hi
Preschool ancrXirti
mtorrnation call
number 7455138.
SUBSTITUTE
Mid Care,
or more
License
Security Deposit
sjahprwutionoimi, coupon, omrnpta
�omeunifr, laundry facilities. 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
rtajratOK dishwasher, free
mi bisfc.oabte. appro. 800
UblSTcars
ttTlWIUiNOTEO UNITS AVAILABLE
-u ne�MW imm v aassjsnar mutomnc.
rropTtu,
B
onoQsOTent
��� 4 ftrti ru�ai
FOR SALE
NO DEPOSIT, 2 BEDROOM, 1 12
bath, cable and water included. Wilson
Acres Apartments. Rent by 5198. Call
754-8315 and ask for Dawn Bivens.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Two houses in excellent
condition; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
6 -$1600.00 per month; sleeps 8-S2200
per month. (757) 850-1532.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE FOR
school or work? Home Relocation
and Referral Service can make
that move easier! Relocation
packets with rental listings, guid-
ed tours of Greenville and area
rental properties, plus much
more. Call 830-5559 or visit
http:www.relocatetogreenvil-
�enc.com for more information.
FORREST ACRES ONE ft two bed-
room $300-$345, Stove, Refrigerator,
Free Water & Sewer, On ECU Bus Ro-
ute, Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-8209.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEDI
RESPONSIBLE, easygoing, neat fe-
male wanted to share fully furnished 2
BR. townhouse with washerdryer, in
May. Pets negotiable. $217 mo. Call
Julie @ 756-6556.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR summer school or before to sub-
lease two bedroom apartment at King-
ston. For more information, call 561-
7824 and leave a message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to take over lease until May.
Large room in house one block from
campus. Rent only $195. Call Ericka at
830-6921.
TICKET: USAIB, RALEIGH TO Indi-
anapolis, cheap, one way. 758-5413
Tl LAPTOP COMPUTER, 100 MHZ
Pentium, 24meg RAM, 810HD, Hewlett
Packard Deskjet printer, 33K modem,
case. All for $850 OBO. Contact 931-
3711.
THINKING OF BUYING YOUR first
computer? For sale: 10 black and white
PC monitors, various manufacturers.
$25 each. Excellent for beginning com-
puters. Contact JW Blair, 757-2157.
RADAR DETECTOR $20. ENTER-
TAINMENT center $10, electric guitar
$45, AT&T phone $10, bookshelves
$10, Abercrombie and Fitch jacket $40.
Call Brian 758-3931.
ONE YEAR OLD WHIRLPOOL wash-
erSears dryer for sale, $500 OBO.
Please call 413-0390 after 8:00 PM.
LASER DISCS, TOMMY HILFH3ER
shirt, never worn, comic books. Call
John, 757-0610.
KING SIZE WATERBEO. NEAR mint
condition, best offer over $150. Call
931-0925.
FOR SALE: OLDSMOBILE CUT-
LASS Supreme (1983), automatic,
59,000 miles. $2200 OBO. Please con-
tact 413-0390 after 6:00 PM.
COMPAQ 4700 PRESARIO COM-
PUTER, 17" monitor and Canon BJC
4200 printer, 1 yeer old, paid $3200;
sell for $1750. Rockshox Judy SL'97
model, $250. XTR V-Brakes, $30. Call
830-3952.
ATTENTION FORMER REDUX ft
Phen-Phen users; we now have an alt
natural, aafa way to lose weight with-
out the side effects. Dr. recommended
& guaranteed. I went from a size 12 to
a size 6 in 7 weeks I Call now & ask me
how. 1-888-648-5831.
486, SSMHZ. 540MB HARD drive,
CD-ROM, floppy, modem, Windows
and MS Office, keyboard, SVGA moni-
tor, mouse, speakers, $500. 758-9928.
TRAVEL EUROPE ft
TEACH BASIC CONVERS
ENGLISH IN PRAGUE, BUC
ft KRAKOW. COMPETITIVE WAG-
ES BENEFITS. ASK US HOWI
(SI7) 336-0629 EXT. KS3621.
TRAVEL ABROAD ft WORK-TEACH
BASIC CONVERSATIONAL ENG-
LISH IN JAPAN, TAIWAN ft S. KO-
REA. MANY POSITIONS REQUIRE
NO FOREIGN LANGUAGE OR
TEACHING CERTIFICATION. EX-
CELLENT EARNINGS BENEFITS
POTENTIAL. ASK US HOWI
(617)324-3128 EXT. JB3621.
TEACHER ASSISTANT-REAP, A
child care center for preschool special
needs children, is in need of part-time
help to' assist with children in the
classroom. Contact Dr. Jim Taylor or
Ms. Kim Braddy at 328-6186 or 6195.
SUMMERFALL INTERNSHIPS:
LOOKING FOR Health Related Majors
for three month internships with hos-
pital wellness program. Experience
businessindustry, employee wellness
and exercise programs. Contact 816-
6506.
SUMMER WORK: PAINTERS
WANTED The Color Works Collegiate
Painters, $7.00 per hour, 40
hoursweek. No experience necessary.
Contact Michael Fryar. Phone 1-800-
477-1001.
SUMMER JOBS! APPLY NOW! Ac-
cepting application for bartenders and
waitstaff. Full and part-time, flexible
schedules available. Send resume or
apply in person at The Reef Restau-
rant, PO Box 2772, Atlantic Beach, NC
28512, 919-726-3500.
SUMMER CAMP IN WESTERN NC
is looking for motivated individuals to
be camp counselors. Positions avail-
able in aquatics, high adventure, first
year camper program, rifleshotgun
shooting, and handicrafts. Salary,
room and board provided. Call Cliff @
551-3769 for more information.
SUMMER AT THE BEACHI T-Shirt
World in Duck and Corolla, NC hiring
salespeople for summer employment.
Excellent payincentives. Apply in per-
son, Loblolly Pines in Duck or Monter-
ay Plaza in Corolla. Or mail resume to
3848 Ivy Lane, Kitty Hawk, NC 27949.
STUDENT NEEDED TO HELP keep
our 2 year old daughter 10-15 hours
per week. Can be flexible in schedul-
ing. Will need to be available during
summer as well. For interview, leave
message at 931-7433.
RALEIGH AREA 8UMMER JOBS.
$280wk-$422wk plus bonuses!II Hir-
ing crew leaders and crew painters.
Most openings filled by local students,
so call Collegiate House Painters today
at 919-460-60611 We'll do interviews
on your campus-no need to come
home to find a job. We ere not one of
those student franchise companiesl
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FI-
NANCIAL PlanningInvestment and
Insurance. Northwestern MutualRo-
bert 0. Baird is accepting applications
for our summer training school. Check
out our web site www.northwestern-
mutual.com and send resume to 217
Commerce St Greenville. NC 27858.
NEED NONSMOKER CAREGIVER
FOR five year old with mild lung dis-
ease. Must have own transportation,
references. Criminal check. Hours are
12:00-5:00p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days for two months, possibly longer.
Leave message after 5:00 p.m. at 830-
9082.
NATIONAL PARK EMPLOYMENT -
WORK in the Great Outdoors. Forest-
ry, wildlife preserves, concessionaires,
fiefighters, and more. Competitive
wages benefits. Ask us howl 517-
324-3110 ext. N53621.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
JOB POSITIONS AVAILABLE.
GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Dept. Youth Indoor Soccer Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches for the
spring youth indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of soccer skills and have the abil-
ity and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 4-18, in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are from 3:00-7:00
p.m. with some night end weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours accor-
ding to class schedules. This program
will run from mid March to April. Sal-
ary rates start at $5.15 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550 af-
ter 2:00 p.m.
HIGH ADVENTURE GUIDES SUM-
MER Employment -Eastern North Car-
olina Boy Scout camp needs kayaking,
canoeing and sailing high adventure
guides. Other camp staff positions
available. Eagle Scouts and persons
with a scouting background preferred.
References required. Salary, room and
board included. Call 919-946-4085.
ON LINE
Punipiaw Jetlmkal euppmt
Onfcw kitomulion Services ties on Immedisle open-
ing lor a computer MnM support pea lo auto
our UMy Exchange Mm ttsf wsn tie sat and
Inilimun e) ccmpuHt rosrtooss bootoon our pro-
prietary MtM and fa PCi an) mortreme sys-
laro. You should be ml versed in oornpuesis, per-
tfcularty Wlnoows and be able lo work wh networks.
You wi be working with Software companies as wel
as end users. Exosptionat company, pay, and bene-
fits. Send resume to Jim Bla, PO Box 80W,
GmenvB 27835 or cat 757-2100.
(Part-time Poson
II you know SOL and have some programming
experience. parfcularty C, we have a position
available to meet your school schedule assenting
with maintaining out database and assisting with
downloads of information and running reports.
Flexible hours. Exceptional experience. Cal Jason
Bruner a 757-2107 lor interview.
SERVICES
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
(WJ
GREEK PERSONALS
TO THE BROTHERS OF Pi Lambda
Phi- Congratulations on 103 yrs. of
brotherhood. Happy Birthday from
The Five
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA HOPES eve-
ryone had a great Spring Break
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON . PHI Kap-
pa Tau, and Zeta Tau Alpha, the Qued
on Fridey was a blast. It was so great
to see you guys. Can't wait to do ft
again soon. Love, the sisters and new
members of Sigma Sigma Sigma
PI KAPPA PHI, THANK you for the
social on Thursday. Everyone had so
much fun. We can't wait to do it again
soon. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Sigms Sigma Sigma
LOST& FOUND
GRADY WHITE BOATS IS looking
for a part-time accountant. This indi-
vidual will do general accounting and
some cost accounting. Excellent re-
sume builder. Some experience pre-
ferred. Please contact Jamie Wilson at
752-2111.
EARN $750-$150OWEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment &
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
for private Co-ed
youth camp located in the beautiful
mountans of Western North Caroina.
Over 25 activities, including All sports,
water skiing, heatedpaX terns, art,
616 to 817Earn $1300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers call lor
applicationbrochure:
806-832-5539 anytime!
LOST: PRESCRIPTION EYEGLASS-
ES IN green leather hard case lost on
Tuesday, 3-24-98 between Brewster
and GC. If found please call Nicole at
830-6068! Reward!
DOG FOUND ON CAMPUS 32598.
Call to identify, 752-5235 or 975-6464.
$300 REWARD FOR GOLD and sil-
ver watch left in the ladies' room lock-
er at the Rec Center. 561-7646.
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAKGRAD WEEK '98
Cheap ratesl www.we-can.comsand-
trap - N. Myrtle Beach. 800-645-3618.
Student representative needed I
�"SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink �
parties! Sell 5 St go freel Book nowlll
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
http:www.endlesssummertou rs.com
CAROLINA POOL MANAGEMENT.
INC. now hiring for summer 1998.
Pool managers, lifeguards, swim in-
structors. Charlotte, Raleigh, Greens-
boro, NC; Greenville, SC; Columbia,
SC. For information. (704)889-4439
BARTENDER FOR OLD COUNTRY
bar and pool room. Minimum wage
plus good tips for the right person.
Players Retreat, 758-6856.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Averege earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext. 1 A.S.A.P.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE at
Players Club Apts. for May, June, July.
Call Heather, Monday-Thursday after
12:30PM for more Info.
DOCKSIDE WATERFRONT
BAR" of Morehead City it now inter-
viewing for professional cocktail serv-
ersbartenders. Live music weekly.
Positive attitude, enthusiasm, and ho-
nesty required. 919-247-3474.
DocftrsVisionCenter
Busy Optometric practice needs individual to do clerical
duties and patient recalls, Monday through Friday from
late afternoon to early evening hours. Duties also
include chart purging and record storage. Candidate
must have excellent verbal and telephone skills. Send
resume or apply in person to:
DodorsVsonCener
499 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27858
Attn. Mark Weitzel
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM 8178. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. CREDIT
CARD FUNDRAISERS FOR FRATERNI-
TIES, SORORITIES & GROUPS. ANY
CAMPUS ORGANIZATION CAN RAISE
UP TO $1000 BY EARNING A WHOP-
PING $6.00VISA APPLICATION. CALL
1-800-932-0528 EXT. 65. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE FREE T-SHIRT.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bill.s Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
sisters of Ladies Elite: Bridgette Ander-
son, Karla Jones, Tory Bryant,
Marshari Williams, Rondica Brown, Er-
ica Pratt, Angela McCail, Kelmira
Gibbs. We love you 11
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
TUB MARCH 31 SENIOR Recital,
Laurie Buchele, flute, A.J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7:00PM. Thurs April 2-Per-
cussion Ensemble, Mark Ford, Direc-
tor, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00PM.
Sat, April 4-Graduate Recital, Chuck
Page, string bass, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 12:00PM. Sat, April 4-Senior4 Re-
cital, Scott Peoples percussion, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 5:00PM. Sat,
April 4-Student Recital, Jason Pickard,
guitar, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00PM. Sun April 5-Sunday at the
Gallery Concert Strong Chamber Mu-
sic, Fritz Gearhart, Director, Greenville
Museum of Art, 802 South Evans
Street, Greenville, 2:00PM. Sun April
5-Graduate Recital, Michael Weaver,
viola, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00PM. Sun April 5-Graduate Recital,
Gary Parsons, Percussion, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 9:00PM. Mon� April 6
TuesdayThursday Jazz Ensemble,
Vaughn Ambrose, Director, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 8:00PM.
THE TOWN OF AYDEN Arts 8. Re-
creation Department has several job
opportunities available for ECU stud-
ents who are eligible for Federal Work
Study assistance through the office of
Student Financial Aid. The positions:
summer camp instructors, recreation
services assistants, and arts, crafts,
and theatre teachers, are for up to 40
hours per week and pay from $5.15-
$6.00 per hour. Call 328-6610 or 746-
7002 for more information.
THE PITT COUNTY CHAPTER of the
American Diabetes Association will
meet Monday, April 6, 1998 at 7:00PM
at the Gaskin-Leslie Building, next to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital. This
month's topic is "Handling Diabetes
Emergencies We will also have our
monthly "Heart Healthy Eating Tip as
well as door prizes. For more informa-
tion call 816-5136 or 1-800-682-9692.
THE OFFICE OF HEALTH Promotion
and Weil-Being would like to congratu-
late Ian McCollum, Deidra Blanks, and
Tracy Morgan for being winners in our
Safe Spring Break Pledge prize draw-
ing. Ina won dinner for two at Darryl's,
Deidra won dinner for two at Anna-
belle's, and Tracy won a sweatshirt
from the ECU Student Stores.
SOCIETY FOR ADVANCEMENT OF
Management & Career Services
proudly presents Business Etiquette
Wednesday, April 8th at 6:00 pm,
Sweetheart's, College Hill. Registration
deadline is Tuesday, March 31, GC
Room 3015, $15.00person (or)
$10SAM member (or) $12.50ECU
Meal Plan. Limited spaces available.
PLEASE JOIN THE ADULT Student
Association Meetings are held each
2nd and 4th Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. This
association is for all students 24 years
of age or older.
ON BEHALF OF THE Office of Health
Promotion and Weil-Being, we would
like to sincerely thank Darryl's, Anna-
belle's, and The ECU Student Stores
for their prize contributions to our Safe
Spring Breek Campaign. We would
also like to thank Students Against De-
structive Decisions (SADD), and the
brothers of Epsilon Chi Nu for for all
their helpl
INDOOR SOCCER REG. MEETING:
Intramurals is "Kicking" the month of
April off with indoor soccer. Anyone
interested in playing indoor soccer
needs to attend the registration meet-
ing on March 31 at 5:00 p.m. in MSC
room 244. For info call the SRC at 328-
6387.
INDOOR SOCCER OFFICIALS
MTG Interested in being an indoor
soccer official? Then this is your
chance. There will be a meeting for all
interested on March 31 at 9:00pm at
the Student Recreational Center in
room 202, 328-6387.
B-GLAD BISEXUALS GAYS LES-
BIANS and Allies for Diversity will be
meeting Wed. 7:30 p.m. Mendenhall
Room 14. Come by and meet new and
old friends. We promise you will have
a great timel Hope to see you therel
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSO-
CIATION WILL meet on Wednesday,
April 1. We will have a resume writing
workshop and free Papa John's pizza
and drinks! So come see what AMA is
up to in GCB 1024 at 2:00 p.m. Wed
nesdsyl See you therel
MATCH POINT
When building a campfire,
clear a 5-foot area around
the pit down to the soil.
CAMPING TRIP FOR INDIVIDUALS
with physical or sensory disabilities
April 25th and 26th at Brice's Creek
Landing, Croatan National Forest just
outside of New Bern. Fee is $10; dead-
line April 15. Call Terri Edwards at 328-
6387 (ECU) Emmette Powers at 514-
4806 (Independent Living). Activities
include fishing, volleyball, canoeing,
kayaking, hiking, biking, having fun,
eating and lots more. Sponsored by:
Spinal Cord Injury Assoc. of Eastern
NC, Regional Rehab Center at PCMH,
Independent Living Rehab Program,
ARISE of ECU'a Dept. of Rec Services
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
e
A PuMc SojrvM of t-a U6DA Fore
tmm in
eastcarolinian





Tht Eait Carolinian
H 31 SENIOR Recital,
, flute, A.J. Fletcher Re-
�M. Thurs April 2-Per-
ible, Mark Ford, Direc-
or Recital Hall, 8:00PM.
raduata Recital, Chuck
ss, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Sat April 4-Senior4 Re
spies, percuaeion, A.J.
il Hall, 5:00PM. Sat
Recital, Jaton Pickard,
:letcher Recital Hall,
April 5-Sunday at the
Strong Chamber Mu-
art. Director, Greenville
lit 802 South Evans
lie, 2:00PM. Sun April
:ital, Michael Weaver,
letcher Recital Hall,
pril 5-Graduate Recital,
'ercussion, A.J. Fletch-
9:00PM. Mon April 6-
iay Jazz Ensemble,
le. Director, A.J. Fletch-
1:00PM.
F AYDEN Arts & Re-
ment has several job
ailable for ECU stud-
gible for Federal Work
b through the office of
al Aid. The positions:
instructors, recreation
mts, and arts, crafts,
:hers, are for up to 40
and pay from $5.15
Call 328-6610 or 746
iformation.
WTY CHAPTER of the
Mas Association will
ipril 6, 1998 at 7:00PM
islie Building, next to
morial Hospital. This
i "Handling Diabetes
Ve will also have our
Healthy Eating Tip as
es. For more informa-
3 or 1-800-682-9692.
: HEALTH Promotion
rauld like to congratu-
n, Deidra Blanks, and
' being winners in our
ik Pledge prize draw
ler for two at Darryl's,
ier for two at Anna-
:y won a sweatshirt
jdent Stores.
ADVANCEMENT OF
li Career Services
I Business Etiquette
ril 8th at 6:00 pm,
lege Hill. Registration
�day, March 31, GC
$15.00person (or)
ier (or) S12.50ECU
d spaces available.
-HE ADULT Student
tings are held each
Jay at 12:30 p.m. This
all students 24 years
THE Office of Health
'ell-Being, we would
hank Darryl's, Anna
ECU Student Stores
Iributions to our Safe
mpaign. We would
Students Against De-
is (SADD), and the
in Chi Nu for for all
R REG. MEETING:
eking" the month of
loor soccer. Anyone
ying indoor soccer
is registration meet-
at 5:00 p.m. in MSC
i call the SRC at 328-
CER OFFICIALS
in being an indoor
Than this is your
be a meeting for all
ch 31 at 9:00pm at
eational Center in
7.
:UALS GAYS LES-
for Diversity will be
0 p.m. Mendenhall
1 and meet new and
imise you will have
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In Celebration of women's History Month, the ECU Student
Union Cultural Awareness and Lecture Committees present
womyn with wings
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ECU students, faculty, and staff may pick up two free tickets with your
valid ECU ID, at the Central Ticket Office. Public tickets are $3:00
ECU students, faculty, and staff may pick up two free tickets with your
valid ECU ID, at the Central Ticket Office. Public tickets are $3.00.





1
I
As campus life runs along each day, photographers
will be out and about to capture us, the students, at
our best. If you can identify yourself in any of our
pictures, present yourself to MSC 109 (Student
Leadership) and pointk'yMl" out to the staff there.
Rewards will be on hand for your efforts, so keep a
close eye on those pictures!
When You're in
Need - How to
Proceed
Have you ever had that "deer in the headlights" look
because you didn't know what to do or where to go?
I know I have. And, my gosh, what would I do if a
crisis ever occurred? Like what if something drastic
happened to someone in my family or there was an
emergency? There are many things that could have
you asking that question�WHO DO I TURN TO?!
The answer is the Dean of Students Office. Dr.
Speier and his crew do much more than oversee the
judicial process on campus. This office provides
assistance and referrals to students with personal
crises. The Dean of Students Office works in
collaboration with Division of Student Life
Departments and University Police Services.
Students or their families may come by the office in
Whichard or call 328-6824 to request help.
The Dean of Students Office can help in the following
ways: medical and emotional needs; withdrawal from
school; accommodations for temporary andor
permanent disabilities; granting class excuses during
time of a crisis; notifying residence hall staff or a
professor in case of an emergency and providing
crisis interventiondisciplinary response for victims
and alleged offenders for sexual abuseassault
victims. In fact, the office offers the student victim an
advocate to help the student understand, evaluate and
choose the services available.
You know, it's great that we have this type of service
on our "purple and gold" campus. At least now I
know that in an emergency situation I'll know to call
the Dean of Students Office.
What's Up
With
Creatine?
The pressure to look good on the beach and to
perform well in athletic competition has led to a number of over-the-counter drugs and supplements in the past
few years (just look at Redux and Phen-Phen). Creatine has become the latest fad in an effort to "pump you
up
It's in the headlines, in the stores, and in our athletes. What is it? Is it safe? It is legal? Creatine is a
relatively new supplement, usually taken orally, only on the market since 1992. With a normal diet, red meat is
ingested and as it is broken down, is assembled into creatine by the liver and kidneys. This is then used to help
the muscles manufacture ATP, the body's primary source of energy. In theory, the more ATP, the more work the
body can do. To athletes and bodybuilders, this means the better the body can perform. Fueled by creatine,
muscles absorb more water, and become bigger, fuller, and rounder. For this reason, many are choosing to
increase their daily intake of creatine with oral supplements (in powder, capsule or candy form) rather then rely
on dietary sources. In reality, because of the relatively new availability, the long-term effects of creatine use
are, as of yet, unknown. Often, users complain of dehydration, nausea, diarrhea, muscle crampsspasms, pulls,
and strains. Some users have even noted a decrease in performance, and it is important to note that creatine has
not been found to increase endurance.
Creatine is not regulated by the NCAA, US Olympic Committee, or professional leagues. An estimated 85
of physicians do not recommend using supplements, stating that normal dietary intake is adequate and
overdoses could possibly be toxic. If creatine is part of your daily regimen, you may consider consulting your
family doctor or personal trainer to help you make an informed choice about its safety. Other information on
creatine is also available in 210 Whichard at the Office of Health Promotion and Well-Being (328-6793).
There is still nothing that can take the place of a balanced diet and regular exercise. Fad supplements and diet
drugs are one type of March Madness you can avoid.
Joe Student Gets His Day
In Court
How do I get myself into these things? One minute, I'm studying
quantum physics and the next, I'm leaning up at the bar ordering
an innocent study-break cocktail. Just one drink - no biggie. And
then, it happened. She (my dream girl) smiled at me. You know
the smile, the one that says, "hey, you actually might have a
shot So, I stayed longer than planned. By 2:00 a.m. I had not
only lost track of time, I had lost my dream girl. Anyway, I figure
the night's a study waste, so I might as well find this girl. Probably
not the best idea, but it sure seemed like the thing to do at the time. I
headed to Greene Hall, thinking, "hey, a lot of girls live there How
hard could it be to find her (or someone like her)? All I knew, was
that when I showed her my brand new tattoo - the one that I got
from a biker named Luger and his girlfriend Dixie while on spring
break (the memories were coming back) - she would be mine.
Naturally I had to take off all my clothes so that she could get a good
view of the tattoo. Funny how RAs react to a naked man walking the
halls of an all-female residence hall shouting "hey, girl from the Elbo,
it's me Go figure.
So, I'm standing there in the parking lot with an ECU cop, my clothes in a wad, my very bad fake ID, facing a bunch of charges,
and, literally, caught with my pants down. I had my ticket punched for a trip through the ECU Judicial System. I had no idea
what to expect. First, I had a warm chat with the Associate Dean who explained the charges: obscene and disorderly conduct,
public intoxication, furnishing false information blah, blah, blah. She also outlined possible punishment - three weeks of
community service. Well, I think I know a thing or two about lawyering, so I chose to take my case to the Judicial Board for a
hearing.
Now, I've seen plenty of "L.A. Law" and I saw "My Cousin Vinnie" three times .1 can per se, object to, your honor, rest my
case .with the best of them. That Judicial Board didn't have a chance against the likes of me. They offered me a student defense
counsel and the option of calling on character witnesses, but who needs all that? I was going to enter a plea of temporary insanity
brought on by quantum physics and March Madness. Geez! Was that a bad move. With my defense down the drain, the Judicial
Board dropped three weeks of community service on me.
If you see me on campus pulling weeds on Wright Circle, let me be a reminder that if you get caught doing something wrong, take
advantage of the legal services that are there for you. The students really know their stuff and the system works a lot better than
that other judicial system we hear so much about. Plus, you get a chance to really know the Dean.
Oh yeah, and when you see me, just ask, and I'll show you my tattoo.
Who Savs "March
Madness" Only
Means Basketball?
It's March and the madness is everywhere! Since not everyone gets to
go to the "Big Dance the Department of Recreational Services is
offering several exciting alternatives to make you feel like you're on the
road to the Final Four. For starters, you can walk your way there with
with the Power Walking Clinic April 1st at the SRC indoor track.
Come dressed ready to sweat! Also from Fitness Programming is an
Aerobic Instructors Training Program (ATTP) slated for April 4 and 5.
This is a clinic designed to teach the basics of leading your own
exercise class, and bring your team to championship form.
Other areas of instruction include ARISEAdapted Recreation's
basketball and racquetball classes. These activities offer adapted rules
and methods of play that incorporate all combinations of players.
Wheelchairs and equipment can be reserved in advance for these
programs. Also, Intramurals are in full swing this time of year, kicking
off Indoor Soccer, Tennis Doubles, and Water Polo in the next few
weeks, and taking down names for Softball. Everyone has a chance to
take the title!
Club Sports are trying to take the title for ECU in a variety of sports.
Rugby matches up against the Marine Corps team from Cherry Point
on the fields behind Ficklen on April 4, while that same weekend
Lacrosse, looking to win another North Carolina State Championship,
travels to UNC-Charlotte for a tournament Coming up April 25, the
Martial Arts clubs team up to host a multi-discipline tournament here.
Get out and show your support for ECU Club athletes!
If the Ides of March has you crazy for something to do (when you're
not studying), it's time to suit up and check out Recreational Services
(328-6387). With activities like these going on, everyone can create
their very own "Madness
Jr.


Title
The East Carolinian, March 31, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 31, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1264
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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