The East Carolinian, March 26, 1998






THURSDAY
MARCH 26,1998
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENylUt NORTH CAROUNA
TTT f . T7ri t . Increase in parking
Webster wins Vr election fees approved
252 votes counted, 22
which appeared twice
Amanda Austin
NEWS EDITOR
' )
The Student Government
Association (SGA) election to
replace former SGA Vice President
Scan McManus, did not go as
smoothly as had been planned.
Cliff Webster had officially been
named vice president and will fill
tne position tor the remaining time
before the April 8 election, where
the new executive branch will be
elected.
"The only votes that are going to
count are Cliffs said Robert
Smith, SGA elections chair.
The elction brought in 252 vot-
ers, with 22 voting twice. Official
votes stand at 230; 160 were for Cliff
Four arrested
for burglary
during break
Estimated 51 crimes
linked to suspects
Craio D. Ramkv
SENIOR WRITER
Putting a suspected ring of burglars
behind bars during Spring Break
did not silence the crime wave in
the campus community surround-
ing Tar River and Wyndham Court.
The campus area has been hit With
48 counts of breaking and entering
since early January, including six
reports that were filed just over the
break.
"The campus community is
always at risk said Detective C.S.
Candeler. "We estimate that about
51 cases in the area can be linked to
the suspects (arrested over break)
This arrest couldn't be more of
a step in the right direction than it
was for ECU student Heather
Sauls.
"I left for break On Friday and
when I came back on the following
Thursday, I saw that 1 had been
robbed Sauls said. "They took
all of my electronics: my laptop, my
TV and my VCR
The four burglars suspected of
targeting the campus area had
already been arrested at the time of
her burglary, but they are .still
linked to many others.
Charlie Durham, Donna
Chaffee, Arron Carmon and Gary
Roach were all arrested on March
16, 1998. Greenville Police had
been following Durham and
Chaffee for sometime before serv-
ing the warrant. Carmon and Roach
were with the other suspects and
were brought in for questioning after
it was discovered that one had assist-
SEE BURGLARY. PAGE 3
Webster and the remaining 70
write-in votes are null and void.
The write-in votes will not be
counted due to the fact that the
constitution states that all write-in
candidates must submit an expense
report. All write-ins in the March 3
election failed to do so, therefore, all
of these votes will be null and void.
Voting polls appeared to located
in' very discreet locations. They
were located in the One Card office
in the back of Dowdy Student
Stores, inside the recreation center,
inside the library entrance, Todd
Dining Hall and on the far corner of
the Mcndenhall Student Center,
where the automatic teller
machines are located.
"Some (poll locations) were not
accessible through the One Card
system Smith said. "The universi-
ty is systems accessible to the places
where the students are, thus creat-
ing low voter turn out and an upset
student population
According to a recent change in
11 students, including a TEC reporter, successfully voted twice in Tuesday's VP
election. All write-in candidates were disqualified for not following procedure.
the constitution, Article 8, Section
1, Polls are required but not limited
to the Wright Place, the Croatan,
Mendenhall Student Center.the
front of Joyner Library and Todd
Dining hall located on College Hill.
Whether or not the voting poll in
One Card office is actually in the
Wright Place, where it is required to
be, is a debatable issue.
"The Wright Place and the One
Card office are not in the same
SEE SGA. PAGE 4
Behind Closed Doors
Should male professors be wary of having close relationships with
their female students in or outside the classroom?
Holly Harris
assistant news editor
Social indiscretions
may not affect cam-
pus attitudes as much
as you might think.
Amid the swirl of
sexual harassment
controversy Hinging
from Clinton's seem-
ingly endless stream
of misconduct
charges, to university
conflict surrounding
Dean of Students
Ronald Speir's
alleged sexual harass-
ment of a fellow
employee, it might be
expected that both
students and faculty
would be on guard.
However, a recent
TE� survey revealed
that the pervading
attitude on campus is
substantially more
relaxed.
University policy
prohibits the sexual
harassment of any
student by a faculty
member with clearly outlined rules in the faculty
manual. Professors of either sex are forbidden to
make unwelcomed sexual advances or requests as a
condition of a student's
grade, progress or recom-
mendation, thereby
attempting to avoid the
possibility of making the
learning environment
seem hostile.
There are 759 male
faculty members and
427 female faculty mem-
bers to 10,485 female
students and 7,361 male
students at this universi-
ty. But most students
and professors don't
believe the large num-
ber of people on campus
or the current politically
correct "walking on
eggshells" approach to
avoid sexual harassment
charges is a problem on
this campus.
Accounting Professor
Kenneth Johnson says
he has not really given
the issue much delibera-
tion at all.
TEC found relationships between professors and students
relaxed.
PHOTO BY BfN MILLER
SEE DOORS. PAGE
(jfrjMale Profesor 759
i Ftmal Students 10,485
i Female Profttors 427
,rVUI� Students 7,631
1mt tt�.mmmit�my
Board of Trustees
voted in meeting before
Spring Break
Andrew I, e l t e v f. r
STAFF WRITER
The Board of Trustees approved a
parking increase of $24 a year for
Faculty, staff, commuters, residence
and Freshman registered vehicles.
The increase was approved during
the Board of Trustees meeting on
Triday, March 13.
The new fee would be $120
yearly. They also increased the
Limited Decals to be increased
from $42 to $60 annually and
Private Decals increased from $288
to $360. This increase will not be in
affect untill July 1, 1999. This
approval acts as a one year notifica-
tion.
"This request for fee increase is
driven by two major construction
projects: Reade Street and Dowdy-
Fir klin Stadiumsaid Layton
Getsinger, Associate Vice
Chancellor.
Reade Street is an estimated
$1.2 million dollar surfacing project
of existing spaces that will include
security cameras, blue light phones
and landscaping to compliment the
surrounding area and lighting
scheme. This project will also cre-
ate 120 additional spaces.
Dowdy-Ficklin Stadium is an
estimated $1.5 million project that
will create 810 new spaces on the
north side of the stadium. The lot
will be utilized by commuter park-
ers during the week and athletic
events in the evening and on the
weekends.
"Students will pay for the park-
ing at Dowdy-Finklin but during
the six home games those 810 new
space will be sold by the pirate club
for over $1,000 each, which will
SEE PARKING. PAGE 2
ECU'S Parking Rates
MB
1. Commuter $96
2. Limited
3. Private
$42
$288
$120
$60
$360
Trustees cover many topics
concerning school's future
Distinguished professor
joins university with
permanent tenure
A N D R E W L E L I E V F R
STAFF WRITER
During the Mar. 13 board of
trustees meeting many issues con-
cerning the schools future were
discussed and decided on.
The approval of the appoint-
ment and permanent tenure of Dr.
J. Kregel, professor of pathology
and laboratory medicincwas voted
on. The ifpproval of Dr. Emmetc
M. Floyd's request to retire, be re-
employed at one-half rate.
Dr. Kregel has a B.A. fromJohns
Hopkins University and a M.D.
from Georgetown Universities
School of Medicine. In 1997 he
also received the, Southern
Medical Association, Medical
Excellence Award
"I respectfully request the
members of the Executive and
Audit Committee consider the rec-
ommendation of Peter J. Kregel,
M.D Professor and Chairman of
the Department of Pathology and
Laboratory Medicine James
LeRoy Smith, executive assistant
to the Chancellor.
Floyd has requested permission
Highlights of
Meeting
� Parking decals increase
$24 a vegT:
Requestrto-acguire W.C.
Clark, 3fu�rjUfcejy, 907
Forbes Sfcraw 92
E.Uth St approved.
� Plans for new merit
scholarship campaign
discussed.
to retire effective February 1.1998
and to be re-employed at one-half
rate as an associate professor in the
Department of Educational
Leadership in the School of
Education. Floyd intends to seek
election to the N.C. House of
Representatives.
"I have reviewed this matter and
recommend your approval said
SEE MEETING. PACE 2
I
I

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low 45
TOMORROW
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high 82
low 55
Opinion
Lifestyle
Should professors
be wary of
relationships with
students?
Solas shine light
on Irish music
Sports
Ei
Golfers capture
third at Pepsi
Intercollegiate
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
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survey on
the web!
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2 ThurtJiy. M.rch 28.
1998
news
Thi Ent Carolinian
3 Thundiy. I
Bu
news
briefs
a cross1
e� state
California's high
court says Scouts
can ban gays, athe-
ists
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) �The
Boy Scouts are not covered by
California civil rights laws and can
exclude gays, agnostics and athe-
ists, the state Supreme Court
ruled Monday.
Six children killed as
house burns to
the ground
BLANKS, La. (AP) � A rural
home with no telephone and no
nearby neighbors burned to the
ground Monday in a fire that
killed six children.
Britain on alert for
possible Iraqi germ
warfare attack
LONDON (AP) � Britain's air
and sea ports have been put on
alert to the threat of deadly
anthrax being smuggled into the
country by Iraq, the prime minis-
ter's office said Monday.
Kenya closes
University after stu-
dent riots
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP)� Police
clashed with thousands of stu-
dents who threw stones and
burned cars in the Kenyan capital
Monday to protest lower admis-
sion requirements to their med-
ical school.
Greenville area gets new area code
919functional for six
coniinu
Duke University files
appeal after suit
DURHAM (AP) �Duke
University is appealing a $142,500
award to a South Carolina family
who sued the school after doctors
there performed an autopsy on a
relative without ever notifying
the family.
Abraham Faircloth
bet on Michigan
State-North Carolina
game
NC (AP) �When the Michigan
State Spartans took to the basket-
ball court against North Carolina
Thursday, they played for
peanuts. Michigan Sen. Spencer
Abraham and North Carolina Sen.
Lauch Faircloth had made a
wager on the outcome of the
NCAA East Regional tournament
game between Michigan State
and the top-ranked Tar Heels.
across.
March 9,1998
Larceny - A vendor reported the
larceny of 17 dozen bagels deliv-
ered.to the Galley.
Missing Person - A relative of a stu-
dent reported the student missing.
, The student was last seen in
Greene Hall.
Larceny - A resident of Tyler Hall
reported the larceny of her wallet
and keys from the Student
Recreation Center.
March 11.1998
Underage Possession ofAlcohol - A
student was served a criminal sum-
mons for underage possession of
alcohol in the Messick Building.
Harassing Phone Calls (Off
Campus) - A non-student reported
that her ex-boyfriend, a staff mem-
ber, has been calling her from a
telephone on campus. The
employee's supervisor was notified.
Possession of Marijuana,
Paraphernalia & Weapon on
Campus - A resident of Garrett Hall
was issued a state citation for pos-
session of marijuana and parapher-
nalia in a room in White Hall. A
resident of White Hall was issued a
campus appearance ticket for pos-
session of a large combat knife.
moremonths
Public Urination - A resident of
I 'instead Hall reported that some-
one urinated on the door of his res-
idence.
March 16,1998
Intoxicated Male - An intoxicated
male was found passed out in the
lobby of the Human Resources
Center.
March 18,1998
Damage to Property - A staff mem-
ber reported finding a small hole in
a window behind her desk. Several
rocks were found lying next to the
window.
March 23,1998 from 7:00
am until March 24,1998
at 7:00 am
Breaking & Entering & Larceny -
A resident of Scott Hall reported
the breaking and entering of his
room and the larceny of his stereo.
Panhandling - A non-student
was banned from campus for pan-
handling north of Mendenhall
Student Center.
Melanie Hack worth
staff writer
Greenville and Pitt County resi-
dents will have to get used to not
dialing the old 919 area code. Now,
Pitt and other eastern Carolina
counties will be under the 252
code.
One possible reason for' the
change is an increased amount of
traffic in many of the former area
codes.
Residents will have six months
to get used to the change. After
September, if the 919 code is dialed
for a 252 area a message will
Parking
continued from page 1
generate money for the athletic
department. This parking increase
does not benefit the students, it
uses them Scott Forbes, SGA
president.
An additional reason for the
increase in parking fees is to
increase the patrols in and around
campus parking lots.
"The fee increase is also needed
to provide increased police cover-
age in our parking lotssaid Jordan
Whichard, chairman.
Meeting
conitnued from page 1
onei
Mini Med-School
The School of Medicine held a
Mini Med-School on March 23 in
the Brody Building that provided
guests with a simulated experience
of a being a med student. The
topic was "Answering the Why in
Medicine
Astronomer to visit ECU
Sethanne Howard, the director of
Extragalactic Astronomy and
Cosmology for the National
Science Foundation, will be a
guest speaker at 7 p.m. in in
Mendenhall Student Center Great
NEW STORE!
NEW
ARRIVALS!
NEW BACK
ENTRANCE!
BETTER
PARKING!
Catalog
Connection
Division Of l2!iiSi&
210 E. 5TH ST. 758-8612
Room on march 26. In her talk
Howard will give a description of
the telescope, explain some of the
early problems with the instru-
ment's mirrors and describe how
astronauts were able to make
repairs. Some of the latest pho-
tographs and discoveries made
with the telescope will also be pre-
sented.
Howard's presentation is spon-
sored by the Department of
Physics, the American
Astronomical Society and the
Harlow Shapley Endowment
Fund.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin. "I
further recommend that upon your
favorable response that the recom-
mendation be forwarded to the
Board of Governors for their con-
sideration
The board of trustees alsol
decided on issues dealing with
finances, athletics. Health Science,
and future Student life at ECU.
The name of University Printingl
and Graphics Building is to bel
called Harris Building. Both Joel
Dooley and Ann Donovan , men I
and womens basketball coaches!
respectively, received raises. Alsol
increased were merit scholarships!
to spark interest among academi-j
cally gifted prospective freshmen.
National Linen Service
Outstanding Leadership Opportunities
National Linen Sendees a the leafing total linen service provider serving hospitality, industrial,
commercial, institutional and healthcare companies. Its corporate office is located in Midtown Atlanta
wth AS commercial laundry facilities located in chits within the southeastern area. National linen
Services is a division of National Service Industries (NSI), a $2 billion NYSE listed company whose
subsidiaries include Atlantic Envelope, Selig Chemical, Zef Manufacturing and Uthonia lighting.
National Linen Service is seeking graduates and alumni with exceptional leadership and
"people" skills to join their team. Outstanding career opportunities exist for persons in the
following areas:
Plant Controller Trainee
A Plant Controller Trainee program is available to train candidates for the position of Plant
Controller. At the conclusion of the training program, trainees will relocate to one of the 45
commercial laundry facilities within the southeastern area. Responsibilities of the Plant
Controller include but are not limited to preparing entries and assisting In the general ledger
close, preparing budgets and forecasts, auditing payroll and other financial reports and assure
that the day-to-day functions of the office are performed timely and in accordance with
company policies and procedures.
Plant Manager Trainee
The Plant Management Trainee program will prepare candidates for the position of Plant
Manager. Trainees witf relocate to one of the company's 45 commercial laundry facilities
within the southeastern area at the conclusion of the program.The trainees will participate
in a cross-training opportunity which will include working in four different areas of the
laundry facility to gain a more comprehensive knowledge of the overall plant operation.
Corporate Accounting Career
Staff Accountant positions are available at the corporate headquarters of NSI Center in
Midtown Atlanta. Staff Accountants will support the company's 45 commercial laundry facility
operations in the area of finance and accounting. Enjoy a great team-oriented work
environment while providing quality service to customers.
National Linen Services provides an attractive compensation package which includes
401 (k) plan, stock purchase program and relocation assistance.
On-campus interviews will be held March 31st.
K unable to attend on-campui session, please mail resume to: National Linen Service,
A ttn:HR Manager (MS 418), 1420 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, GA 30309. Fax:(404)
853-6031. EOEMFDV. v '
answer instructing the caller to
redial using the new code.
This change presents problems
for more people than the phone
company. Local businesses will
have to change stationery, mailings
and other printed materials.
Tom Matthews, a regional Sprint
representative, believes the change
can be handled. Sprint is already
making changes to incorporate the
new number.
"The electronic portion is
already in place Matthews said.
"The printed portion will come out
as usual with the changes
The new area code will also
affect campus communications.
The university will have to reprint
all information with the 919 code
on it, but because September
comes during a new semester, the
change can be managed.
'The new numbers will be in-all
the literature going out for the fall
semester said yVoody Bolton,
director of operations.
The change is, however, going
to be an expensive one for the uni-
versity.
"It's going to cost the university
money to upgrade the switch
Bolton said.
vJJecausc the change is so monu-
mental, officials will hire an outside
vendor to upgrade'and make the
necessary changes to the switch.
But officials promise that students
will not have to bear the cost of the
change on their phone bills.
"It will not affect the students'
costs Bolton said.
When asked about the difficulty
of the changeover, Bolton said "We
have to do similar types of things all
the time
Parking
and Expense
.JaaaaHaaaHaaBBaHBI
?lectio
1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000
Actual Projected Projected Projected
Beginning Cash SI.520.424 $1.488.108 $1,123.426 $861.160
Revenue:
Fees 980.327 972,152 981.874 1,200,000
Fines 420,616 425,000 425,000 425,000
Parking Meters 49,307 47,000 50,000 50,000
Surplus Property
Return Check Fee 380 400 500 500
Miscellaneous
Total Revenues 1A2Q&Q. 1441552 1.457.374 L&L15QQ
ed Durham in
while the other
crack cocaine.
According ti
pects and other
target students.
"The studc
Candeler said
Chaffee would
When build
clear a 5-fo
the pit do
REMEMBER,
PREVENT F
ARE YOU AN
ASTHMA SUFFERER!
If You Are At Least 12 Yrs Old & Have Suffered
From Asthma For At Least One Year,
Dr. W. James Metzger, ECU School Of
Medicine, Invites You To Participate In A
With An Investigational Medication
For The Treatment Of Asthma.
FREE
Asthma Medications, Allergy Testing,
Lung Function Tests, Blood Work,
Physical Exams & Peak Flow Meter.
You Will Receive Up To '810.00
for Completed 16-Mo Program.
Contact Research Personnel At (919) 816-2573.
VanCliburn
�SILVER MEDALIST
Russian Yakov Kasman
brought home the silver
medal at the Van Cliburn
International Piano
Competition and brings a
stellar performance to ECU
Advance Student Tickets $7
Tickets at the door $15
Friday, March 27, 1998 8:00 pm Wright Auditorium
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
919.328.47S8 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS: Deafspeech-impaired access 919.328.4736
Student discount tickets available with ECU ID at the Central Ticket Office until 6 pm
on the day of the event providing tickets remain. All tickets at the door are full-price.
Tell your folks how much you're studying.
Then get back to the party
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Ttiuridiy, Mirch 26. 1998
news
The ��it Carolinian
tt Carolinian
)de
will be in all
t for the fall
xly Bolton,
vevcr, going
; for the uni-
le university
lie switch
is so monu-
e an outside
d make the
the switch.
tiat students
c cost of the
bills.
ie students'
he difficulty
on said "We
of things all
J99-2000
Projected
861.160
200,000
425,000
50,000
500
&2JL5QQ
er:
uffered
h
Of
nA
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im
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ECU
um
Opm
.328.4736
ntit 6 pm
ill-price.
Burglary
continued from page 1
ed Durham in an armed robbery
while the other was in possession of
crack cocaine.
According to officials, these sus-
pects and other criminals frequently
target students.
"The students are easy prey
Candelcr said. 'They Durham and
Chaffee would sit in the parking lot
and wait for people to go downtown.
Then they would go kick the door
down
Candeler also said that loud par-
ties and frequent pedestrian traffic
make it difficult for people to spot
when -someone doesn't belong in
the area.
Both Durham and Chaffee have
admitted to committing larceny as
means to support their crack habits.
Greenville police have recovered
some of the stolen property, but a
lack of serial numbers on record,
handicaps them from finding the
majority.
S
MATCH POINT
When building a campfire,
clear a 5-foot area around
the pit down to the soil.
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
ADVjERTISE IM
eastcarolinian
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Full service catering and banquet
facilities available
call for details 355- 7956
Turnbury Square Shopping Center
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Parks and ftec
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presents Job Fair '9
Saturday, March 28
10 AM-3 PM at North Hills Mall in Raleigh
Interview on Site to Find That Perfect
Summer Job
Camp Directors Camp Counselors
Asst. Camp Directors Concessions
Amusements Operator Lifeguards
And many more
For more information on summer jobs if you cannot
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WE USE HIGH QUALITY CARQUEST REPLACEMENT PARTS
Alpha Omicron Pi sorority
organizes bone marrow drive
$2,0Q0has been raised
for those who can't pay
Jenny Vic k er s
ST.UF WRITE!
Alpha Omicron- Pi, along wirh the
National Marrow Donor Program,
are organizing a recruitment drive
on April 7 from 4 2-6:00 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Multi-purpose room.
Alpha Omicron Pi is sponsoring
and funding the drive to help
increase the number of leukemia
survivors.
"One of our sisters was diag-
nosed with leukemia at the begin-
ning of this school year said Noell
Ellingsworth of Alpha Omicron Pi.
Any person who wants to donate
must sign a consent form, pay a $40
laboratory fee, and give a small
amount of blood. Donors must be
between 18 and 60, in good general
health and not excessively over-
weight.
"The procedure is not even as
bad as giving blood Ellingsworth �
said. "They don't take as much, so
you don't feel weak or tired after-
wards. When people hear the term
bone marrow, they think it's much
worse, but you're only giving a
small amount of blood
The sorority has raised $2,000
for volunteers who can't afford to
pay. They are asking businesses to
donate money and sponsor poten-
tial volunteers.
"We will test people for free
until our money runs out
Ellingsworth said. 'Those who
don't liave the laboratory fee but
want to help can give platelets.
This is a free procedure that helps
with the treatment patients go
through
Presently there are 3,101,314
donors on the Registry and 6,721
transplants have taken place.
Thirty percent of patients have a
family member who is suitably
matched and
able to donate
marrow; how-
ever, the
chances ofany
two unrelated
individuals
matching vary
widely,
Tw e n t y
percent of the
patients can't
find a match
on the reg-
istry. NMDP
urges people
to volunteer.
NMDP has facilitated 6,721
unrelated marrow transplants
throughout the world.
"As the Registry has increased,
so has the number of transplants
facilitated Andrea Carter, public
relations spokesperson for NMDR-
said.
"Potential matches outside of
the family are greater within the
same racial ethnic group Carter
said. "Minority patients are less
likely than non-minorities to find
matched donors on the Registry
NMDP stresses the fact that
there is a special need for volunteer
marrow from the American
IndianAlaska, Native, Hispanic,
African American, and AsianPacific
Islander communities.
If antigens in the donor's blood '
match, then they are given the
decision whether to donate marrow !
or not. If so, they are given coun-
seling about the donation process.
Marrow is extracted from the back
of the donor's pelvis at an NMDP-
approved hospital. The donor's
marrow replenishes itself within a
few weeks.
Marrow transplantations have
become the only real "cure" for
many diseases.
"The survival rates are in the 40
to 60 percent range for diseases that
would be fatal without marrow
transplants Carter said.
Wk wp
NMDP
RegistryTransplants by Race
Racialethnic designation� off donora of transplant
African American
American IndianAlaska Native
AsianPacifac Islander
Caucasian
Hispanic
Multiple RaceOther
Unknown
240,545
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2.630
220,988
306
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4 Ttmndiy, M�rth 26. 1998
news
SGA
I
I
continued from page I
I place, however, they are under the
same roof said Haden Jehnings,
iSGA attorney general.
The Voting poll did appear at
the Croatan during this election
�because it would have been a fire
hazard to run a cord from the inside
;of the building to the outside. The
;poll was replaced and placed at the
'Student Recreation Center.
! According to Smith this was a
I violation of the rules, but could not
'be helped.
Ballots from one voting poll
;were accidentally locked inside the
;One Card office over night, delay-
ing votes being counted officially
I until the next day.
According to Smith this was his
"fault. He was attending an IFC
Judicial Board meeting until 7:30
p.m. and the doors to the Wright
Place were locked at 7:00 p.m.
One TEC reporter found that it
was easy to vote more than once
and without your student I.D
though the location at Mendenhall
did deny the reporter access to vote
without his I.D,
The ballots will be checked
carefully to determine whether
students voted more than once.
Those votes that appear more than
once will be wiped clean from the
election and will not count at all.
"There have been kinks in
whether or not people have voted
twice Smith said.
This election has been very
helpful in determining what
changes need to be made before
the April 8 elections.
"There will be no glitches in the
t April 8 election Smith said.
"Those who vote twice will be
brought in front of the honor
board
SGA President Scott Forbes
hopes that the April 8 election will
go much smoother, though prob-
lems were expected to occur durinj;
this election.
"We knew we were going to
have problems, but hopefully we
won't have the same problem on
April 8 Forbes said. "The univer-
sity changed our voting system,
SGA had to adapt
In the next election, SGA is try-
ing to ensure that there will be
more places outside where stu-
dents will be gathering, therefore
having a much higher voter
turnout.
Doors
continued from page 1
, "It isn't that I've given it special
consideration Johnson said. "I
think its important that all students
be treated with respect. I do make
sure students feel comfortable; I
don't distinguish between male and
female students
The university's policy on sexual
harassment issues is consistent with
North Carolina general statutes
about creating a favorable work
environment for everyone involved.
Most say it's just a matter of main-
taining a professional attitude. But
with no large cases of professorstu-
dent harassment on this campus
recently there seems to be an atti-
tude that the issue here has been
handled well so far.
"I think things have changed,
but changed for the better said
English Professor Dr. Marie Farr.
"I think more people are aware of
the potential for charges, and the
need to protect particularly women,
from sexual harassment
Women on campus, however, say
they don't feel particularly threat-
ened.
"I've never felt sexually
harassed by any of my male profes-
sors said student Cindy Rayburn.
"I do feel a little more on guard, but
none of them have been suggestive
to me in any way
Most of the women interviewed
felt that while they might feel a lit-
tle differently about their male and
female professors, they had never
had grounds to feel afraid or
uncomfortable either in class, or a
more intimate advisee setting.
"I haven't had an Experience
like that sexual harassment, said
student Natalie Dennis. "It just
hasn't occurred, but I'm aware that
it does happen
Male professors replied that
while they too were aware that sex-
ual harassment was a hot topic, they
continued to go about things the
way they always had.
"I'm more aware of it now, but I
still do things the same said
English professor Hal Snyder.
For now students and faculty say
that on this campus there is a fairly
good system of respect and profes-
sionalism functioning in the
teacherpupil relationship, and until
that is threatened, business will go
on as usual.
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How to Keep Your Kids Free of Drugs.
K 11II I I "PI A 111 ftPkP! Ill 1
I whaFC UADDPN Mi
Rule4.
Set The Rules.
Kids need to know exactly what the rules are. The
rules have tjp be clear, consistent, reasonable. And
enforced. Every kid will try to find out exactly
how far he or she can go. And drugs are no place
for trial and error. To learn more about what kind
of rules to set and how to enforce them, call for a
free parent's handbook.
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina i�S
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1 -888-732-3362
g at Mendenhall Student Center
K
ffleautifid Atated,
4 ROUND 1'
f- . OF.TH&-
THURSDAY - Mar. 26th
Ta
Russian pianist Yakov Kasman earned the silver medal at the prestigious Van
Cliburn International Piano Competition last May and has won numerous
international competitions. Don't miss his virtuoso performance.Tickets are
$7 for students and can be purchased at the Central Ticket Office
FRIDAY, MARCH 27 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Cellar
Underground Sound
Hear some cool music from up-and-coming bands for free at The Pirate
Underground.This week: NothiriFancy TONIGHT AT 8 IN MSC SOCIAL ROOM
:
I
m
:
m
K
jit
K
Cuba Unplugged
There's much more to Cuba than great cigars and communism. See Cuba's
splendor when filmmaker John Holod presents "Cuba at the Crossroads"as part of
the ECU Travel-Ad venture Film and Theme Dinner Series. An all-u-can-eat theme
dinner is served at 6 p.m. for just $12. Dinner tickets must be reserved by 6 p.m. on
Wednesday April 8 with meal cards, cash, check, or credit card.
MONDAY, APRIL 13 AT 4 OR 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Chew on This
"Shades of Huck Finn: Rafting the Mississippi" presented by Andrew Riddle.
Admission is free and gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
TUESDAY, MARCH 31 AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
Chew ori This, XX
"Mountain BikeMotorcross" presented by Mark Sprague.
Free admission and gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
TUESDAY, APRIL 14 AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
WIN CATH - NO KIDDING
It might be April Fools Day, but you can bet that there's serious money to be won
at Bingo Night. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1 AT 8 P.M. IN MSC GREAT ROOM
GLOBALL AURA - Come to Outer Limitz bowling center every Friday
from 7-11 p.m. for exciting theme nights for just $2 per game. Shoe rental is free.
Bring a CD, or dress the part.This week's theme: trie Jam
ALL-U-CAN BOWL - Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday
of each month from 8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just five bucks (includes
shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS - Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m.
with 50-cent bowling (shoe rental included).
OENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity"
RS: Mon Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 1 2 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.mll p.m
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FRIDAY
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Penny Imports & Micro Brew's on tap!
5 Thundiy. I
Tel
Firsti
college
making
NlN
STA
Sophomores h
help the univc
to improve
Currently a te
geting sophoi
ducted in ore
school's perfon
The survey
March 16 and
sophomores an
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shoppli
Across From Hfgi
Behind Stain Gla
Mon Frl. 9-6
Walk-ins Anytln
752-3318
Dear St
rankinj
J.D. anc
to cndi
after at
one gra
dimcn.s
may be
law anc
school,
you to s
Amendi
to you a
a result
issue
of
� Shipping'Hi





5 Thundiy, March 26. 1998
news
The Ent Carolinian
e Eaat Carolinian!
n7
tUGS.
or a
!(th
v
t
TTIC
-ree
I
aft
tap!
Telephone survey targets
sophomore response
First two years of
college critical in
making career choices
Nina M. Dry
STAFF WRITER
Sophomores have been chosen to
help the university find more ways
to improve their services
Currently a telephone survey tar-
geting sophomores is being con-
ducted in order to evaluate the
school's performance.
The survey went into effect on
March 16 and will continue until all
sophomores are called.
"We began calling those who did
not have local' phone numbers list-
ed said Dr. Ken Wilson, a sociolo-
gy professor and director of the sur-
vey research lab. "Since it was
spring break, the chances of getting
in touch with them at home would
be greater
According to Wilson the
research lab chose to survey sopho-
mores because the first two years of
college arc considered the founda-
tion to career choices and planning.
"The sophomores can give us an
overview of their first three and a
half semesters Wilson said. "This
gives us the opportunity to improve
things and also get the opinions of
different aspects such as orienta-
tion, classes, faculty and recreation-
al activities
This is the second time ECU
has participated in this type of sur-
vey. Wilson said if things go well, it
probably won't be the last.
- "We are now making plans on
participating in this survey annual-
ly Wilson said.
The research lab isn't the only
one interested in the opinions of
the sophomore class. Chancellor
Richard Eakin also looks over the
data'compiled in the surveys.
"Your the students'l views will
be used to evaluate ECU's perfor-
mance and will help me decide
where we should make further
improvements Eakin said.
Along with ECU, all the other 16
campuses in the University of
North Carolina system will partici-
pate in the new system of surveys.
Accounting Department offers
free income tax assistance
Students prepare
returns with faculty
guidance
Laura Lee Hines
STAfF WRITER"
The ECU accounting department
is sponsoring free income, tax assis-
tance for students. Beta Alpha Psi,
the National Honor Accounting
Fraternity, provides this annual ser-
vice called Voluntary Income Tax
Assistance (VITA).
Beta Alpha Psi is a new organi-
zation at ECU. VITA is just one of
the many service projects Beta
Alpha Psi members support This
is the third year the accounting
department at ECU has sponsored
VITA, making free income tax
assistance available to students. By
setting up services in the afternoon
to help students with simple
income tax forms for state and fed-
eral income taxes, both Beta Alpha
Psi members and other ECU stu-
dents reap benefits. This service
can save time and prevent
headaches for students as they try
to. meet the deadline for filing their
taxes.
Dr. Mark McCarthy and Dr.
Doug Schneider are the sponsors of
Beta Alpha Psi and oversee VITA
sessions. One of these two profes-
sors is present at all times during
the VITA sessions.
"Students prepare the returns
with guidance from the faculty
McCarthy said.
Accounting students who are
members of Beta Alpha Psi have
the opportunity to get some experi-
ence helping others with their tax
returns by participating in VITA
These students have to take a class
,
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Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Est. 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
2800 E. I0th St.
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Mon Frl. 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say Pirates &
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PIRATE SPECIAL
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Full Line Professional Hair Care Products
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
Fred Drasner
Chief Executive Officer
An Open Letter to Students
Planning to Attend Law School
from
U.S.News& World Report
Dear Student:
DON'T YOU JUST HATE TO BE GRADED? Well, by their shrill protests about U.S.Ncws & World Report law school
rankings, so do most of the deans of the law schools you are considering. However, as a law school graduate with both a
J.D. and a LL.M. degree, I can tell you that these same deans will subject you to rigorous grading. You will be required
to endure lectures from tenured professors who have not changed their class notes since the Battle of Hastings. Then,
after attending class for a full semester, you will be given one exam to determine your grade. One exam, one semester,
one grade. One roll of the dice to measure your performance.
At- U.S.Ncws & World Report we are far more equitable (to use a legal term). We have a multi-faceted, multi-
dimensional, sophisticated ranking system developed and evolved over many years to give you guidance on what
may be one of your largest financial investments and certainly one of the most important choices for your career in
law and perhaps beyond. While our law school rankings should not be the only criteria in your choice of a law
school, they should certainly be an important part of the analysis.
�;
Get your copy of U.S.Ncws & World Report's Best Graduate Schools guide on newsstands now. Or, to make it easier for
you to sec the book that 164 law school deans would prefer you not see (notwithstanding their commitment to the First
Amendment), call 1 800-836-6397 (ask for extension 5105) and 1 will arrange for a copy of the book to be sent directly
to you at $1 off the newsstand price This will also ensure that you have a copy of these important rankings because, as
a result of publicity surrounding the deans' determination to have you ignore the rankings, they are a very hot item.
These law school rankings are a small part of our philosophy of News You Can Use information we bring you in each
issue of the magazine to help you manage your life.
. Good luck in law school and good luck on making the right choice.
Kindest Regards.
Sincerely,
CANNABIS
STUPIDA
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina -aSS
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1-888-732-3362
www.drugfreeamerica.org
� Shipping .tml h.tiullmn charfijea .Kltlltion.il.
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in addition to their regular class
load and pass a test to demonstrate
their proficiency in tax form prepa-
ration prior to helping with VITA.
"VITA is helpful in getting prac-
tice in helping other people with
their taxes said Leslie Messcrli,
vice president of service activities
for Beta Alpha Psi.
Students who need assistance
with filling out basic tax forms such
as 1040A, 1040EZ, and other sim-
ple 1040's can get assistance from
students and faculty in the General
Classroom Building Room 3006 the
next three Thursdays from 3:30
until 5:30. The dates arc March 26,
April 2 and April 9. All students
needing assistance in preparing
1040's are encouraged to attend one
of these sessions. Bring your tax
booklet if you have one, your wage
statement (W2) and savings interest
statement for this year. Remember,
the deadline for submitting your
tax return is April 15.
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I
8 Thunday. March 25. 1998
�vtyJUy Ufa
comics
Till Eilt Carolinian
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peKotioHfnnii? had mr Ken cm swots.
Sale Starts Wednesday, March 25th
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CVMCNBUHNT AND A 1.1. RCI.ATKO OMAKACTBUB COPYlCtHT I 998 TMOMMV QahpncR. Act. NiOHTS
BUZZ COIBIBHT 1998 KtViN WYNN�. ALU WIOMT� KC�KMVKQ,
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145-15 Q2S.
Franco
American
Spaghettis
S2oz.
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Toothpaste
ACROSS
1 Young boy
A Belgian diamond
center
11 Question
14 Exist
15 Small Spanish
ship
16 Caustic solution
17 Affirmative vote
18 Tidal wave
19 "Sliver author
Levin
20 Not lifted up
22 Serviette
24 Warhead of a
missile
25 Dramatic scene
26 Plains antelope
27 Virile
28 Donates
31 Picture border
32 Schuss
35 Smell
36 Fathers
37 Adolescent
38 Outlaw
39 Natural talent
40 Practical joke
41 Domesticated
guanaco
42 Forty Thieves'
leader
43 Italian dish
46 Small carpet
50 Combination
punch
51 Intensify
52 Links org.
53 Earhart and
Bloomer
55 Expected ,
56 Building
extension
57 Pertinent
58 Tax grp.
59 Mayday!
60 "Lou Grant" star
61 Single
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DOWN
1 One-handed
basketball shot
2 Type ol stage
3 Sweetie
4 Exploits
5 Long Island
county
6 Lined up '
7 Magic stick
8 Marie Saint
9 Leftover pieces
10 Easily shaped
11 The same
12 Assad's country
13 Actor Reeves
21 Infamous Hiss
23 Double over
25 Potato
27 West Side
Story" song
28 Gooey mass
29 Cider-sweet
woman
30 Erich
Stroheim
31 Florida city
32 Salton
33 Writer Kesey
34 Squid's defense
36 Skied a zigzag
course
37 Court action
39 Floodgate
volume
40 Happiness
bringer
41 Illuminated
42 Esoteric
43 Uses a lasso
44-Saxon
45 Calf meats
46 Thai or Korean,
e.g.
47 Wireless
48 Vehicular 180
49 V-formation
flyers
51 "Desire Under
the"
54 Historic period
Drink Feature
9 oz. Farm Rich
French
Toast Sticks
Krispieg Treats USu
Don't Forget
To Have Your
Card Stamped!
3 liter
Diet Repei, Rgpsi or
Mountain Dew
Prices Effective Through March 31 �95
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7 Timdav, Mirch 26. 1998
7S
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I Stamp
opinion
Thl Ea.t Ciraliiiijp
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Amv L.Rosstkr Editor
Mr Uiim BlRtits.s Managing EdiUr
Amanda Austin MawsEdiior Tract m. LAUaACH SpomEditor
PHoi.lv Harris Ami. NewEdna. STEVE LdsBV Ami.SportsEr)imi
Andv Turner Ulesiyfa Editor Carole Mehle H�d Copy Editor
John Davis AsiraaotlilostyH Editor . John murphy Stall Illustrator
Matt Heoe AdeermingManager
Bobbv Tuogi.k Webmaster
St�, rh, ECU ��r�� m. Iht twtaeRaan auMoha. II000 c�,s � min �d frejaaar. Ha Had .�(�,?! . ,� eatan , da apa
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Cactaiai Smdenl Puctatioiis sMIoi. ECU, Gteeaeile. 27BSB43S3. fa intamlw, call 918378 6366
ouwiew
In between the latest Monica Lewinsky jokes on late night comedy shows and catching the
updates on various sexual harassment trials, people nationwide are torn over a very serious
subject. It seems as if every time we turn on the TV, another allegation is being raised, and
the President is not the only one being accused. Recently, Sgt. Major Gene McKinney, the
highest ranking Army soldier was acquitted of sexual harassment and convicted of obstruc-
tion ot justice in a ruling that left a lot of people scratching their heads. At Arizona State
University, Dr. Jared Sakren claims he was fired for violating the school's sexual harassment
laws. His crime? Creating a hostile environment for women by teaching too many works by
Shakespeare and other European men. The issue has come to our own backyard with the
recent lawsuit brought against Dean of Students Ronald Speier.
Certainly, nobody should be forced to work in a hostile environment, but where is the
line between punishing the irresponsible and innocent until proven guilty? People all over
are asking themselves that same question. While that form of behavior is unacceptable
under any circumstances, the possibility exists that the accused could be innocent ECU
students were reminded that false allegations are very reaf when a student admitted she
nade up charges of assault. Just as the ClintonWilley situation seems to be a case of he-
aid-she-said, the difficulty in proving those kinds of charges is creating hostility. Tensions
re rising in the workplace, and if current trends continue, it could become quite a serious
roblem for everybody, including ECU students.
In some classes here, especially in the more creative curriculums, a loose structure and
Intormal atmosphere contributes to a student's education. By dropping the fear of saying
the wrong thing, students and their professors participate in a free exchange of ideas
Anybody would agree that this has helped them to see other sides of issues that they had
Jot considered. When an entire company can be sued because of the conduct of one of their
employees, you have to wonder how long it will be before a teacher gets sued for allowing
�,a student to say something that could be considered sexist. If teachers and students con-
antly worry over whether their ideas are acceptable, the quality of education could take a
nous blow.
"It's something that's on everybody's mind English professor Peter Makuck said in a
ecent interview with TEC. "You'd be foolish not to be concerned. You wonder how you
ould defend yourself in that situation
The best professors are the ones who continue teaching outside of the classroom,
rofessors should be able to cultivate a close teacherstudent relationship with their female
tudents without being afraid of a word being taken out of context, and as a result, having
heir reputation permanently stained.
"Teachers aren't going to close the door when a coed is in the room, for that reason
akuck said, "but obviously, you aren't going to stop caring
OPINION
William Stacey
C0CHRAN
Fight better for drinking ag
to the Editor
Dorms provide good experience
In regard to the column by Jeff
Bergman, "Campus Housing Not a
in I would like to offer a dif-
ferent point of view. My opinion
comes from looking back over 25
years. I spent two and one-half
years in a dorm while attending col-
lege. My junior year and fall semes-
ter of my senior year was spent in a
fraternity house and my last semes-
ter in an apartment.
My best years were in the dorm.
I made more friends and had more
fun. The friends I made were more
varied and interesting. In looking
back, I realize I was more a part of
campus life while in a dorm than in
the fraternity house and apartment.
We had a lot of fun while in the
dorm. In the late '60s and early 70s,
we had hippies, panty raids, streak-
ers and you name it; we had it.
However, there was a limit since we
were in a dorm. You could get to
sleep and you could still study in
your room. Not so in the fraternity
house.
Once one decided to live in the
fraternity house, one pretty much
limited one's self to those in the
house. There was no way to study
in the fraternity house and if your
roommate decided to party all
night, you were out of luck because
there was nowhere to go.
By the time I entered my last
semester, I had enough of fraternity
life; my roommate and I moved out
and into an apartment. We went
from one extreme to the other. It
was like going from a rock concert
to a piano recital. I guess it was a
quick transition to adulthood and
the working world. In reflecting
back, I feel dorm life offers the best
campus experience.
Oh, regarding the cost � dorm
living is the cheapest in money, but
the richest in memory and experi-
ences.
Bill Fleming
Class of 1975
there are politicians who do
have something to gain by
lowering the age to 18.
The problem is the majority
of citizens who actually
use their right to vote
are not 18, 19 and 20.
During the break I took the oppor-
tunity to grade a set of papers from
an English 1200 course I teach.
Duly, a quarter of the papers were
written on the drinking age; partic-
ularly; most argued to rescind the
law that states one should be 21
years old to legally drink and to
reestablish the pre-Reagan drink-
ing age of 18. However, the issues
raised have only recently become
more realized in my mind's eye
(mostly due to the insight of the 18-
and 19-year-olds in the class).
The chief arguments were that
if a citizen has the right to vote and
. the right to defend hisher country
in the military, then that citizen
should have the right to purchase
and consume an alcoholic beverage.
However, these are weak grounds
for developing an argument. In
effect, it's not too unlike a sixteen-
year-old who wants to take daddy's
Mercedes out on a date arguing,
"Well, you let me drive my Honda
Civic; why can't I drive the
Mercedes?" And perhaps this type
of wheedling occasionally precipi-
tates dad's handing over of the
keys. Unfortunately, in politics,
laws are not annulled quite so
effortlessly.
Yes, politicians are using 18 to
21-year-olds. The reason they can
allow (in effect use) citizens in this
age bracket to die for their country
yet slap them with $90 fines for
possessing alcohol is because they
allow this age group to vote. And
certainly, there are politicians who
do have something to gain by low-
ering the age to 18: The problem is
the majority of citizens who actual-
ly use their right to vote are not 18,
19 and 20.
Furthermore, for the middle
class 35-to-60-year-olds who com-
prise the bulk of America's voting
population, to elect politicians who
might rescind the current law, the
benefits must outweigh the risks.
No doubt, major alcohol distribu-
tors would love an 18-year-old
drinking law and would stand to
gamer larger profits if such a law
were passed (and in turn politicians
who passed such laws would stand
to make money from these distrib-
utors). But the benefits do not out-
weigh the risks.
Fact is, there would
undoubtably be an increase in traf-
fic fatalities for this age bracket �
an age bracket already marked by
the highest incidences of traffic
fatalities each year. And to major
alcohol distributors who make
enough, from 18-year-olds who can
purchase alcohol anyway (albeit not
as easily as many 18-year-olds
would like) and over-21-year-olds,
the need to fight arduously for 18 as
a permissable age is not pressing.
For such a law to pass, 18-21 year
olds would have to overwhelm
elections in support of politicians
who have connections to alcohol
manufacturers � politicians who
would have something to gain by a
lower drinking age. Unfortunately,
most voters in this age bracket
aren't reading up on Newsweek
and Time, nor arc they studying C-
SPAN to find the politicians that
might change the drinking age. No,
most 18-21 -year-olds, if they arc
anything like I was at 20, are look-
ing for the nearest keg party and
the hottest bar.
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
H0NEYCUTT
It's no fun being an idiot magnet
SIGNE
PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS
Philadelphia
'A
1W lPofc CSS 3uT ONCE -faEVRE oHEt Mo&ToF IftEM
3usr siaRT Abusimg and neglects "Weir TWb again
If l had a dollar for
every beer sloshed all over nyr
by drunken idiots,
I could buy myself a
comfortable yet stylish plastic
beer- proof suit.
I sometimes feel that I am made of
some sort of magnetic material that
pulls stupid people directly into my
path of travel. I had no idea that this
breed was growing so numerous
until I got my driver's license.
Something must be done to stop
the stupid from reproducing.
We all know the feeling of dri-
ving along behind the genius who
thinks that 55 is a speed to be
attained only by missiles and space
rockets. We've all been stalled at a
green light behind the brainiac
applying lipstick instead of paying
attention to the world around her
(or him). One of my personal
favorites is the gigantic 1972 hoop-
ty that pulls out in front of me to go
15 miles an hour, then turn off thir-
ty feet later. If these people walked
they would get there faster. And
you people � I know you're out
there � who think that you
become invisible when you step
inside your car, so it's okay to pick
your nose. Yep, I can see you.
Then there are the jerks. They
ride so close to your bumper that
you can see their nostril hair in your
rearview mirror. They slow down
on the double yellow line and
speed up in the passing zone. They
refuse to let you merge when your
lane is ending.These folks do it on
purpose. That's worse than stupid.
It's not only when I'm behind
the wheel that I've noticed the
strange attraction that idiocy has to
my general area. It seems to occur
with great frequency at the "10
items or less" lane at the grocery
store. No one who is ever in front of
me at a checkout knows how to fill
out a check or count out change. It
makes me want to take away their
checkbook and do it myself.
Let's talk about stupidity down-
town. If I had a dollar for every beer
sloshed all over me by drunken
idiots, I could buy myself a com-
fortable yet stylish plastic beer-
proof suit. Oh, and I was innocent-
ly opening my mail the other day
when I came across "The
Downtown Scene a free maga-
zine someone had graciously
shoved through my door. After a
few minutes of wading through
page after page of adolescent potty
humor, I'm about to use it to prac-
tice my hook shot at the garbage
when suddenly I see the "Dream
Shot I think that this is perhaps
the best definition of stupid that I
have come across yet. These pic-
tures are to true pornography what
a line of coke is to true drug addic-
tion � the first step. Okay, give the
general, unpaying public a look at
your almost naked body for anyone
to defile in any way, then tell us
where we can find you on Saturday
night? What is this, a want ad for a
psychotic stalker? Why not go
ahead and list your address, phone
number, and favorite pet so that
your psycho won't have so much
work to do?
It seems to surround me, the
stupidity. People who walk in the
exit door and directly into me.
People who seem to have mis-
placed their turn signal blinker.
People who spit bubble gum on the
ground for me to spend a produc-
tive evening scraping off of my
shoe. It is truly everywhere, and I
can feel it pulling me in. I fear that
soon it will be me who drives in the
turn lane for six miles while simul-
taneously playing incredibly loud,
obnoxious music and picking my
ears. Oh well. You know what they
say. If you can't beat'em, join'em.
But first I've got to go spit off a
bridge into oncoming traffic and
buy a cup of coffee with no lid.







8 Thursday. March 25, 1998
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom a
Efflciencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
-EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT. SPACIOUS
example of Frank Lloyd Wright architecture.
4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3 fenced yards, wash-
er, dryer, pretty foliage, near ECU 81 PCMH,
S999month. 524-5790
WALK TO ECU, 1. 2, 3, 4 and 5 bedroom
unitshouses; available June, July, or Aug
call 321-4712.
TOWNHOUSE PON RENT: 3 bedroom, 2
12 bath Sheratofi Village, washer, dryer,
$660. Sheldon, 353-6505. Available May 1.
SUBLEASE ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT ASAPI Walk to campus. Pets OK.
WD hookup, very energy efficient! Only
$240 deposit, $340 rent. Call Angela, 413-
0573.
ROOMMATE WANTED. 3 BEDROOM
apt. off 1st Street, $130mo� 13 utilities.
Available now. Call Jimmy, 752-9376.
the
I trie 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1827 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-3526
ServicesWorship 11 a.m
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED,
LIVES ARE CHANGED 8
FRIENDS ARE MADE .
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF CHRIST
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE
752-6376
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m 6
p.m. Sunday: 7 p.m. Wednes-
day
WE WELCOME YOU! LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAY
FROM HOME
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Corner of Crestline Blvd. &
Greenville Blvd.
756-6545
Services: Bible School 10 a.m
morning worship 11 a.m
evening worship 6 p.m.
REACHING OUT TO
GREENVILLE WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)
756-6600
Services: Sunday School 9-45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAY
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 AM
EACH SUNDAY
THE MEMORIAL
BAPTIST CHURCH
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
756-5314
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinner
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHER
STUDENTS FOR AWESOME
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANT
WORD
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
752-1898
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS
ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
A VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FOR INSPIRATION
UNITARIAN UNIVER-
SAL I ST CONGREGA-
TION OF GREENVILLE
131 Oakmont Drive
355-6658
Services: 10:30 a.m. each
Sunday
A CHURCH GROWING IN
CHRIST, CARING FOR PEOPLE.
PROCLAIMING THE WORD
GREENVILLE CHRIS-
TIAN FELLOWSHIP
1411 S. Evans Street
752-2100
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
SINGLE VISIONPBCS
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY;
ECU STUDENTS & SINGLES
WELCOME
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST
CHURCH
1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-2822
Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
10:45 a.m 6:30 p.m
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP 8 SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
ECU CAMPUS
ST. JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
752-6154
Services: Worship-Sunday 8:30
a.m 11 a.m Sunday School
9:45 a.m.
COME AND JOIN US IN
PRAISING THE LORD!
SYCAMORE HILL
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
226 W. 8th Street
758-2281
Services: Every Sunday
COME BE A PART OF OUR
COLLEGE SUNDAY SCHOOL
CLASS - 9:45 A.M. SUNDAYS
IMMANUEL BAPTIST
CHURCH
1101 South Elm Street
758-1240
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wed. night supper 8- activities
5:30-7:20 p.m. (supper
reservation required)
"WHERE EVERYBODY IS
SOMEBODY IN THE LORDS
BODY
WESTSIDE CHURCH OF
CHRIST
400 W. 5th St. Suite 200
757-3788
Services: Sunday School 9
a.m Sunday 10: 30 a.m. & 6
p.m Wednesday 7'p.m.
The East Carolinian
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER SCHOOL
from June to August one bedroom apart-
ment located within walking distance from
ECU campus. If Interested call 762-8240,
leave a message.
SMALL 1 BEDROOM APT. out in country,
$325 a month. Private property. Pets wel-
comed. For more deteils, contact Curtis
Suggs at 768-3319 or 916-2909.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3 bed-
room opt 2 baths. Two blocks from ECU.
Rent $185 6V 13 utilities. For more info, call
754-2487.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: $375 INCLUDES
rent, utilities, local phone and cable. Private
bed and bath. 5 minutes from campus. Call
321-8872 after 6 PM.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE a two
bedroom duplex three blocks from ECU.
$200 a month plus half utilities and phone.
Coll Ryan at 758-5756.
RIVEROAK ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENTS $295. With Stove, Refrigerator,
Central Air & Heat, Five blocks from ECU
Free Hot Water, Basic Cable, Water & Sewer,
756-6209.
NO DEPOSIT, 2 BEDROOM. 1 12 bath,
cable and water included. Wilson Acres
Apartments. Rent by 5198. Call 754-8315
and ask for Pawn Bivens.
PEONV GARDENS TWO BEDROOM 1 12
bath apartments $375. Stove, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Washer & Dryer, Free Cable,
Water & Sewer, Walnright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
PARK VILLAGE ONE BEDROOM apart-
ments $300. With Stove, Refrigerator,
Washer Dryer Connections, On ECU bus ro-
ute free water & sewer, Wainright Property
Management LLC 756-6209.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New Rec
Center! 2 bedroom apt. available now above
Percolator Coffeehouse-$450 a monthl Will
lease for May 1st with one month depositl 3
bedroom available now above BW3'S, $775
a month. Will lease for May 1st with 1
month sec. dep. Call Yvonne at 756-2616
NOW AVAILABLE, 1 ROOM efficiency
with kitchen and bathroom, near ECU on
Tenth St. Only $295.00 per month, all utili-
ties included. Cell 758-1921 ask.
NO DEPOSIT. 2 BEDROOM, 1 12 bath,
cable end water included. Wilson Acres
Apartments. Rent by 5198. Call 764-8315
and ask for Dawn Bivens.
NEW WASHER AND DRYER for rent
$40.00 a month. Four-month minimum
rental with a $20.00 delivery fee. For more
informotion, call 321-4008.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group together
early. Two houses in excellent condition; ful-
ly furnished; washer & dryer; dishwasher;
central AC; available May 1 through August
31; sleeps 6 $1600.00 per month; sleeps 8
$2200 per month. (7571 850-1532.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE FOR school
or work? Homo Relocation and Referral
Service can make that move easier! Re-
location packets with rental listings,
guided tour of Greenville and area
rental properties, plus much more. Call
830-5569 or visit http:www.reloc�te
togroenvillanc.com for more informa-
tion.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO share large 3 bedroom house 12 block
from campus. Great house, very convenient.
Looking for someone mature, responsible,
and easy-going. $238month � 13 utilitiea.
758-8677
FORREST ACRES ONE two bedroom
$300 $345. Stove, Refrigerator, Free Water Si
Sewer. On ECU Bus Route, Wainright'Prop-
erty Management LLC 756-6209.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEDI RE-
SPONSIBLE, easygoing, neat female want-
ed to share fully furnished 2 BR. townhouse
with washerdryer, in May. Pets negotiable.
$217 mo. Call Julie @ 756-6556.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
take over lease until May. Large room in
house one block from campus. Rent only
$195. Call Ericka at 830-6921.
ECU AREAI TWO OR three bedroom
house. Fenced in backyard, central heat and
air. Pets OK, yard work included. $475
month. Call 830-9502. Available mid-May.

DOCKSIDE FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, 2
bath. If interested, please call 752-9901.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 1 2 bedroom
condos on 10th Street. Free cable and water
sewer. Half month free to ECU students on
new one-year contract. Call Wainright Prop-
erty Management. 756-6209.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM town
houses on ECU bus route. Free cable. Half
month free to ECU students on new one-
year contract. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT A CEDAR COURT,
Two bedroom, 1 12 bath Townhouses. On
ECU Bus Route, Stove, Refrigerator, Dish-
washer, Washer & Dryer Connections.
Wainright Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED ASAPI Players
Club! Master bedroom wprivate bathroom
and medium bedroom available. Rent $220
plus 13 utilities. Call KellyJennifer: 353-
1670 or KatieJeanna: 353-7934.
2 BEDROOM. ,2 BATH duplex, 4 blocks
from ECU, all appliances, fireplace, wd
hookups, rear patio, central heatair. Avail-
able now, $550month. Call 758-1921.
FOR SALE
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT AVAILABLE
in May, 6 month sublease, month by month
after, free cable, water, WD hook-up, AC,
patio sunlight, walking distance from cam-
pus. 561-7646
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1 bath apt.
near ECU, only $375 per month, 900 sq.ft.
Free basic cable, watersewer, all applianc-
es, pets O.K. Call 758-1921.
1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH apartment, 3 blocks
from campus on 2nd St. $285.00 a month.
Call 758-1921.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR rent. Wood-
cliff Apts. Washer and dryer hookup, 3
blocks from campus. Assume lease.
Call Michael, 522-4583, leave mes-
sage.
Security Depoi
-r-l�it
Wh presentation of this coupon, offer expires
,pMoX:?r2CS8?oom.
:��rP;aiLa
rancentlSL? j�rra, !�lh
�SfW JHEN?Vi!(rED UNITS AVAILABLE
riopartu I j,
Tl LAPTOP COMPUTER. 100 MHZ Pent!
urn, 24meg RAM, 810HD, Hewlett Packard
Deskjet printer, 33K modem, cose. All for
$850 OBO. Contact 931-3711.
RADAR DETECTOR $20, ENTERTAIN-
MENT center $10, electric guitor $45, AT&T
phone $10, bookshelves $10, Abercrombie
ond Fitch jacket $40. Call Brian 768-3831.
PREPARING FOR THE MCATT MCAT re-
view books end moterials for sole. Brand
new condition. Very cheep. Call Joe @ 353-
5416, 5 8PM.
LASER DISCS, TOMMY HILFIGER shirt,
never worn, comic books. Call John, 757-
0610.
KINO SIZE WATERBED. NEAR mint con
dition, beat offer over $150. Coll 931-0925.
COMPAQ 4700 PRESARIO COMPUTER.
17" monitor end Conon BJC 4200 printer, 1
year old, paid $3200; sell for $1750.
Rockshox Judy SL'97 model. $250. XTR V-
Brakes, $30. Call 830-3952
r-c
480, oftMHZ. 540MB HARD drive, CD-
ROM, floppy, modem, Windows ond MS Of-
fice, keyboard, SVGA monitor, mouse,
speakers, $600. 758-9928.
HELP WANTED
-OTTIS' DOCKSIDE WATERFRONT
BAR" of Moreheod City is now Interviewing
for professional cocktail serversbartenders.
Live music weekly. Positive attitude, enthu-
siasm, and honesty required. 919-247-3474.
TRAVEL EUROPE & WORK - TEACH BA-
SIC CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH IN
PRAGUE. BUDAPEST A KRAKOW.
COMPETITIVE WAGESBENEFITS.
ASK US HOWI (5171 33tV0629 EXT.
K53621.
TRAVEL ABROAD A WORK-TEACH BA-
SIC CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH IN
JAPAN, TAIWAN A S. KOREA. MANY
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TION. EXCELLENT EARNINGS BENE-
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(517)324-3125 EXT. JS3621.
TEACHER ASSISTANT-REAP, A child
care center for pre-school special needs
children, is in need of part-time help to ass-
ist with children in the classroom. Contact
Dr. Jim Taylor or Ms. Kim Braddy at 328-
6186 or 6195.
SUMMERFALL INTERNSHIPS: LOOK-
ING FOR Health Related Majors for three
month internships with hospital wellness
program. Experience businessindustry, em-
ployee wellness and exercise progrsms.
Contact 816-6506.
SUMMER WORK: PAINTERS WANTED
The Color Works Collegiate Painters, $7.00
per hour, 40 hoursweek. No experience nec-
essary. Contact Michael Fryar. Phone 1-800-
477-1001.
SUMMER JOBSI APPLY NOWI Accepting
application for bartenders and waitstaff. Full
and part-time, flexible schedules available.
Send resume or apply imperson at The Reef
Restaurant, PO Box 2772, Atlontic Beech, NC
28512, 919-726-3500.
SUMMER AT THE BEACHI T Shirt World
in Duck and Corolla, NC hiring salespeople
for summer employment. Excellent payin-
centives. Apply in person. Loblolly Pines in
Duck or Monterey Plaza in Corolla. Or mail
resume to 3848 Ivy Lane, Kitty Hawk, NC
27949.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS FOR GREEN-
VILLE Recreotion Si Parks Department Adult
Spring Softball League. Clinics will be held
to train new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and understanding
of the gome is necessary. An organizational
meeting will be held Wednesday, March 25
at 7:30 p.m. For more information, please
call 830-4550 after 2:00 p.m. Softball season
will run from May thru August.
SALES FOOD COUNSELOR. EXCEL-
LENT opportunity for self driven individuals
who like being rewarded well for working
smart. Earn 40-60K in your first year. Must
have a very flexible schedule with the abili-
ty to work nightsweekends. Call Bill at Rich
Food Services, Inc 823-2764.
PART-TIME SUMMER JOBS. Recreation
6V Parks Department. The following posi-
tions will be available during the Summer of
1998. Applications will be accepted through
April 17. Day Camp Counselors ond Super-
visors for children ages 6-12. Cheerleading
Instructor, Youth Bosebell Supervisor and
LeadersCoaches. Tennis InstructorsCoach-
es. Csmp Sunohine Doy Camp Coun-
selorsSpecial Populations. Eppes Recreo-
tion Assistont. River Park North Day amp
Counselors. Bus Drivers. Aquatics Program
Personnel, Pool Manager, Assistont Pool
Manager, Lifeguards, and Swim Instructors.
Most jobs are 20-30 houro per weak for 7-8
weeks, beginning June 15th. City Pool be-
gins June 5th. Salary: $5.15 to $7.00 per
hour. Apply by Friday, April 17,1998, to City
of Greenville, Personnel Department, 201W.
5th Street, PO Box 7207, Greenville, NC
27835-7207.
PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR NEEDED TO
provide individualized instruction In e posi-
tive learning environment. Possible hours:
Mon-Thurs. Individual must be competent
in the areas of literature and SATcollege
prep. Teaching certificate required. Pick up
application at Sylvan Learning Center, 2428
S. Charles Blvd Greenville.
Doctors VisionCenter
Busy Optometric practice needs individual to do clerical
duties and patient recalls, Monday through Friday from
late afternoon to early evening hours. Duties also
include chart purging and record storage. Candidate
must have excellent verbal and telephone skills. Send
resume or apply in person to: �r
DoctorsVisionCenter
499 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27858
Attn. Mark Weitzel
j
orogemem
OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE IS NOW ac
ceptlng applications for experienced host-
esses. Full and part-time positions are avail-
able. Please epply in person M-Th 1:00-
3:00PM.
NOW HIRING SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS
at Harmony Child Care, Preschool end Kin-
dergarten. For more information coll 758-
6229. License number 7455138.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great monay. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
NORTH WESTERN MUTUAL LIFE is offer-
ing Internship opportunities. Students will
participate in a training program, geining
experience in the insurance industry and
preparing them to become licensed agents.
For information contact Jeff Mohoney, 355
7700 or jeffmahoney@greenvillenc.com
NEW RESTAURANT A OYSTER BAR
opening on Morehead City Waterfront.
Looking for experienced prep people, wait
staff, bus boys, oyster shuckers, dishwash-
ers. Pleose apply at Rockefellers, 403 Aren-
dell Street, Morehead City, 10AM 7PM or
coll 919808-2292 for appointment.
NEED NONSMOKER CAREGIVER FOR
five year old with mild lung disease. Must
have own transportation, references. Crimi-
nal check. Hours ore 12:00-5:00p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays for two months, possibly
longer. Leave message after 5:00 p.m. at
830-9082.
NATIONAL PARK EMPLOYMENT -
WORK in the Groat Outdoors. Forestry,
wildlife preserves, concessionaires.
fiefightere, and more. Competitive
wagesbenefits. Ask us howl 517-
324-3110 ext. N53621.
BARTENDER FOR OLD COUNTRY bor
and pool room. Minimum wage plus good
tips for the right person. Players Retreat,
758-6866.
AUTISM SOCIETY OF NC seeks interest-
ed students to be Camp Counselors for
summer residential camp. Internship credit
possible. Needed May 25 -August 8. Contact
David Yell @ 919-542-1033 or ASN-
CYell@aol.com.
JOB POSITIONS AVAILABLE. GREEN-
VILLE Recreation & Parks Dept. Youth In-
door Soccer Coaches. The Greenville Re-
creation & Perks Department is recruiting
for 12 to 16 part-time youth soccer coaches
for the spring youth indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some knowledge
of soccer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 4-18, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3:00-
7:00 p.m. with some night and weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours according to
class schedules. This program will run from
mid March to April. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informotion,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
HIGH ADVENTURE GUIDES SUMMER
Employment -Eastern North Carolina Boy
Scout camp needs ksyaking, canoeing and
sailing high adventure guides. Other camp
staff positions available. Eagle Scouts and
persons with a scouting background pre-
ferred. References required. Salary, room
and board included. Coll 919-946-4085.
HELP WANTED: PART-TIME Carpet clean-
er. Clean cut person who must pass drug
screen. Heavy lifting required. Coll 756-9857
before 5:00PM.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top adult
entertainment is once again searching for
beautiful ladies. If you hsva what it takes to
be a Playmate, call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
EARN $750 $1500WEEK. RAISE All the
money your student group needs by spon-
soring o VISA Fundraiser on your campus.
No investment Si very little time needed.
There's no obligation, so why not coll for in-
formation today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
DID YOU KNOW THAT North West-
ern Mutual Life was rated by the Prirtc-
ton Review as one of the top 10 intern-
ships in America. Come join us for the
experience of a lifetime. For info con-
tact Jerry at 355-7700 or www.north-
westernmutual.com
CRUISE SHIP BV LAND-TOUR Jobs �
Discover how to work in exotic loca-
tions, meet fun people, while earning a
living in these exciting industries! For
more information: 517-324-3092 ext.
C53622.
CAROLINA POOL MANAGEMENT,
INC. now hiring for summer 1998.
Pool managers lifeguards, swim in-
structors. Charlotte, Raleigh, Greens-
boro, NC; Greenville, SC; Columbia,
SC. For information, (704)889-4439
iT
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FINAN-
CIAL PlanningInvestment and Insurance.
Northwestern MutualRobert 0. Boird is ac-
cepting applications for our summer train-
ing school. Check out our web site
www.northwesternmutuol.com and send re-
sume to 217 Commerce St Greenville, NC
27858.
for private Co-ed
youth camp located In the beautiful
mountains of Western North Carolina.
Over 25 activities, including All sports,
water ski'rSd1IP8rris, art,
616 to 817Eam $1300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers callTor
applicationbrochure:
600-832-5539 anytime!
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE BUSI-
NESS STUDENTS. Now interviewing on
campus for managers across Virginia. North
and South Carolina for summer 1998. Aver-
age earnings last summsr $8,000. Call 800-
393-4521 ext. 1 A.S.A.P.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. PITT COUNTY
Memorial Hospital is seeking qualified indi-
viduals to teach aerobic classes through its
Employee Recreation and Wellness Depart-
ment. Persons will contract to teach on a
part-time basis. Intereoted candidates
should contact Rose Anne between 8:00
am4:30 p.m. at 12521816-6601. Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Bonks of North Caroli-
na (Nogs Heodl. Call Dona for application
ond housing information, 800-662-2122.
ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL PRO-
GRAM Assistant for private club ond events
facility; entry level position with opportunity
to grow. Must have strong secretariat, or-
ganizational, and desktop publishing skills,
with a polished, outgoing personality. Mail
or fox resume with cover letter, references;
and salary requirements to Director, Rock
Springs Center, 500 Aaron Circle, Greenville,
NC 27834. (Fox: 919-752-98951
ON LINE
Computsr technical support
Online Inlormation Services has an immediate open
lug lor a computsr technical support person lo assist I
our utility Exchange sales suit with Die sale and j
installation ol computer interlaces between our pro- i
phetory database and their PCs and mainframe sys-
tems. You should be well veiled in computers, par-
lie ularty Windows and be able to work with nelwoixs.
You will be working with Software companies as wed
as end users. Exceptional company, pay, and bene-
fits Send resume lo Jim Blair, PO Box 8048,
Greenville 27835 or cal 757-2100.
Dstsbass Hsnagsmem
(Part-time Position)
II you know SQL and have some programming
experience, particularly Ctt, we have a position
available to meet your school schedule assitsating
with maintaining our database and assisting with
downloads ol Information and running reports.
Flexible hours. Exceptional experience. Cal Jason
Bruner at 757-2107 for Interview.
SERVICES
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky
PERSONALS
Marin, "Felix Cumpleanos
Mi Amor �wwb)
Yo amor ti siempre,
YLuan
GREEK PERSONALS
WELCOME BACKII HOPE EVERYONE
hod a fun and safe Spring Break. Love, Ah;
pha Delta Pi �'
S1
WELCOME BACK SIGMA ALPHA Epsilort'
brothers. Let's work hard and have a great,
ending to our semester. Congratulations te '
Chad Hamilton; Brother of the Weak.
wloh to than
i of her apartt
THE SISTERS OF PI Delta wloh i
sister Anne Lucas for the use of her apart
ment on Wednesday night, during Big Sii
Hunt Weak. We love youl
THANKS TO CHI OMEGA, Alpho XI Derni
and the brothers of Sigma Pi for the Quad
Social Friday night. We had a morvelouf
time. The brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
9 Thursday, Ml
HANK YOU TOI
oted In and ouppoi
oxer Contest. It wi
�n't wait until nax
rid new members i
AU KAPPA EPS
Ivorce was a lot
ve, Zeta
IOB CARRIER T
ontest last Tueada
b, and we are pro
leant usl Love, th
era of Alpha XI Do
1 KAPPA ALPHA
ist Tuesday, it w
nissed you guysl L





Trie East Carolinian
r
to do clerical
1 Friday from
Duties also
. Candidate
) skills. Send
3r
rUNITIES IN FINAN
jslment and Insurance.
alRobert 0. Beird is ac-
i for our summer train-
k out our web site
nutual.com and send re-
isrce St Greenville, NC
BfOOD
ate Co-ed
atod in the beautiful
stem North Carolina
including All sports,
iatedj lamb, art
m$130r1700 plus
undry & great fun!
kers calllor
inbrochure:
539 anytime!
ERORAOUATE BUSI
. Now interviewing on
rs across Virginia. North
for summer 1998. Aver-
immer $6,000. Cell 800-
�R
CTOR. PITT COUNTY
B seeking qualified indi-
?bic classes through its
n and Wetlness Depart-
contract to teach on a
Interested candidates
te Anne between 8:00
i2)816-6501. Pitt County
II PLUS $150.00 per
wance. Largest rental
- Banks of North Caroli-
II Dona for application
ition, 800-662-2122.
AND CLERICAL PRO
private club and events
)sition with opportunity
strong secretarial, or
sktop publishing skills,
going personality. Mail
:over letter, references
lents to Director, Rock
Varon Circle, Greenville,
752-9895)
LINE
Khntaal support
cashes an immediale open
lical support person to assi
ales stall witti the sale and
interlaces between our pro- .
air PCs and mainframe sys-
II versed in computers, par-
i able to work with networks.
Software companies as well
at company, pay. and bene-
JimBlair.PO Box 8048,
5 or cat 757-2100.
Management
� Position)
have some programming
I C, we have a position
chool schedule assitsaeng
itabase and assisting with
Son and running reports,
nal experience. Cal Jason
1107 for interview.
riCES
INTO
DIVE!
Ikar
19434
ONALS
Cumplearros
(3-27-96)
nor ti siempre,
YLuan
RSONALS
I HOPE EVERYONE
ipring Break. Love, At .
1
IOMA ALPHA EpsiloiJ'
hard and have a great.
Mr. Congratulations te'
wr of the Week.
� S;
1 Delta wish to than
r the us of her apart!
night, during Big Sl
rout
MEGA, Alpha Xi Delta!
Sigma Pi for the Quad
We had a marveloul
Delta Sigma Phi
HANK YOU TO EVERYONE who panic
ated In and eupported our 4th Annual Sexy M otLTA WISHES TO sand a special thank
oxer Contest. H waa � huge success & we you ,0 K�nda JonM for rep�Mntng u, in
m't wait until nsxt yearl Love, the sisters th conW� You m 9nttU lmtf ,ne
rid new members of Delta Zetal sisters
OB CARRIER THANKS FOR doing the � om:fA G� yJuf �� da� rMdy.
ontest last Tuesday nightl You did a great Strang,r Mixr orUy M0 y, ,way
b, and we are proud to have had you rep- ;
9 Thursday. March 25. 1998
classifieds
The East CinfcilM
AU KAPPA EP8ILON, MARRIAGE and � XLrA ,��, bvebyone had a super
ivorce was a lot of funl Until next time - Sprlng BrMk Good ,uck on the �� o( the
�� Z"� semester!
�sent usl Love, the sisters and new mem-
�rs of Alpha Xi Delta
1 KAPPA ALPHA. THANKS for the aocial
ist Tuesday, it waa a lot of funl We've
nissed you guysl Lova, Alpha Xi Delta
PHI KAPPA TAU, THANK you for the
wonderful Pre-Spring Break Social last Sat-
urday nightl We all had a great timel Love,
the sisters of Alpha Phi
OREAT JOS, DELTA ZETA. on your boxer
contestl It was a blastlt Love, the sisters of
Pi Delta
KAPPA ALPHA. THANKS FOR a great St.
Patty's Day Social. We cen't wait until next
timel Love, Zeta Tau Alpha
GOOD LUCK ON SATURDAY. Pi Delta
"home buildera Hope you guys havs a
great morning working hard for a good
cauael We love you, your sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS
of Delta Zeta's Sexy Boxer Contest: Eric
Layne-1st; Cress Bell-2nd; Bleze Thompeon-
3rd. You guys were awesome end we hope
to see you again next yearl Love, the sisters
and new members of Delta Zete
Graduation
weekend
Give your ECU family the best
that greenville has to offer
Greenville's finest open their homes for
a truly memorable weekend. Southern
hospitality at its best! Let your family
relax and enjoy the festivities. Give
them the comfort, private and luxury
of a home. Most within walking distance
of main campus. Comfortable bed and
breakfast arrangements for 1 to 8
people. 2 night minimum please
�Gracious, spacious guest homesrooms
�Unique accommodations for families
�Special requests welcomed
758-5738
Robin Palmer
Rcsources.Referrals
Attention Student Organizations,
It's Time to Set Ready for
Simply pick-up your
Barefoot Registration Packet
from the Student Leadership
Development Programs Office
in the Mendenhall Student
Center, room 109,
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Any questions?
Call The Student Union Office
at 328 - 4715,
Monday - Friday 8 a.m -5 p.m.
CONGRATULATIONS TIFFANY HADLEY
ON getting pinned by Christ We love youl
Love, the sisters and new members of Alpha
Omicron Pi
ALPHA XI DELTA HOPES everyone had
fun during Gamma weekl We also thank
Kappa Alpha and Theta Chi for welcoming
everyone to their houaeal
ALPHA DELTA PI (WOULD like to thank
and congratulate Cress Bell and Eric Layne
for winning first and second place In the
Sexy Boxer Conteetl I
ALPHA PHI (WOULD LIKE to thank the
brothera of Sigma Pi for the great time Wed-
nesday night. It was nice meeting all of you
guys. We will definitely have to do it again
soonl
ALPHA OMICRON PI (WOULD Ilka to
thank everyone who came out to support
Gamma Weak. Wa had a great timel
LOST & FOUND
$300 REWARD FOR GOLD and sil-
ver watch left in the ladies' room lock-
er at the flee Center.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CA
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We Also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry it Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10fl0-l:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door ft ring buzzer.
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAKGRAD WEEK M Cheep
rateal www.we-can.comsandtrap - N. Myr-
tle Beach. 800-645-3618. Student represen-
tative neededI
"�SPRING BREAK 'SB GET Goinglll
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, & Florida.
Group discounts It frsa drink parties! Sell 5
at go freel Book now!I! VlsaMCDiecAmex.
1-800-234-7007. httpVwww.endlesssum-
mertours.com
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsches, Ca-
dillacs, Chavys, BMW's, Corvettes. Also
Jeepa, 4WD's. Your Area. Toll Free 1-800-
218-9000 Ext. A-3726 for current listings.
PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIPS AVAIL-
ABLE for students who want to travel, earn
money, and gain valuable resume experi-
ence. For more Information, call 1-800-251-
4000 ext. 1676.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. CREDIT CARD
FUNDRAISERS FOR FRATERNITIES, SO-
RORITIES & GROUPS. ANY CAMPUS OR-
GANIZATION CAN RAISE UP TO $1000 BY
EARNING A WHOPPING $6.XWISA APPLI-
CATION. CALL 1-800-932-0528 EXT. 65.
QUALIFIED CALLERS RECEIVE FREE T-
SHIRT.
FREE CASH ORANTSI COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical bills
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. G-
3726.
QUALITY SERVICE AT A FAIR
PRICE - OIL CHANGES.
BATTERIES. NC INSPECTIONS
KADS AUTOMOTIVE
3205 E. 10th Street 0
758-5237
Hours: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. M-F; 8
a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat.
THIRD GENERATION PIRATES
SUPPORTING ECU THROUGH
SHARED VISIONS-BOTH
ACADEMIC 3 ATHLETIC
BROWN & WOOD
PONTI ACCADILLAC
GMCJEEP
329 Greenville Blvd. SW
355-6080
Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
For information about being included in
our Auto Directory call 328-6366.
TOTAL QUALITY SERVICE
STEVE BRILEY'S AUTO-
MOTIVE SERVICE CEN-
TER
3142-A Moseley Drive
752-5043
Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART Time.
At home. Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. T-
3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
VOLLEY FOR HEALTH! THE Ronald Mc-
Donald House will be teaming up with the
NC Physical Therapy Association (NCPTAI
to host the third annual " Volley for Hearth"
tournament on Saturday, April 25th at North
Pitt High School in Bethel from 8:00am-
5:00pm. Entrance fees are $100 for eny 4-
peraon team and $150 for any 6-person
teem ploying competitive or recreational
volleyball. All teams are encouraged to raise
more then the minimum donation fee and
the team who raises the most money will re-
ceive speciel recognition. Local sponsors
will also help in raiaing money and they will
be listed on tournament t-shirts which are
provided to ell participants free of charge.
Proceeds will be divided between the
NCPTA end the Roneld McDonald House.
STRESS MANAGEMENT (WORKSHOP
Thursday from 3:30-6:00 p.m. Th Center for
Counseling end Student Development wilt
be offering this program March 26th. If you
are interested in this workahop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
THE TOWN OF AYDEN Arts & Recreation
Department has several job opportunities
available for ECU students who are eligible
for Federal Work Study assistance through
the office of Student Financial Aid. The posi-
tions: summer camp Instructors, recreation
services assistants, and arts, crafts, and
theatre teachers, are for up to 40 hours par
week and pay from $5.15-$6.00 par hour.
Call 328-6610 or 746-7002 for more Informa-
tion.
SPRING MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE.
MARCH 29th, 10:00 a.m. Divisions: kids, ju-
niors, first timers, beginner, sport, vet, and
expert. Sponsored by The Bicycle Post. For
info, call 756-3301 or 757-3616.
PLEASE JOIN THE ADULT Student Asso-
ciation Meetings are held each 2nd and 4th
Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. This association la for
all students 24 years of age or older.
BGLAD MEETS THIS AND EVERY WED-
NESDAY AT 7:30 p.m in Room 14, Men-
denhall Student Center.
JB'
&rm
m&
v
�m
VJDEV-
THE DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION
IS FRIDAY, APRIL 17, BY 5:00 P.M
i





wmmmmmm
Check The.
its
Fun You
RAMURAL SPORTS
SPORTS
Date
Tues 324
Tues 331
Tues 331
Wed 41
Wed 48
Wed 48
Tues 414
Tues 414
Event Time
Softball Preview (M,W,CR) Reg Meeting 5;00pm
Indoor Soccer Registration Meeting 5:00pm
Indoor Soccer Officials Meeting 9:00pm
Tennis Doubles Entry Deadline 5:00pm
Water Polo Reg. Meeting 5:00pm
Water Polo Officials Meeting 9:00pm
Golf Singles 5:00pm
4 on 4 Flag Football Reg Meeting 5:00pm
Room
MSC 244
MSC 244
SRC 202
SRC 128
SRC 244
SRC 202
SRC 128
MSC 244
ARISE PROGRAM
Date
Wed 325
Thurs 326
Event
Adapted Recreation Committee Meeting
Handcrank & Tandem Biking Workshop
���
Time
7-9pm
3:00pm
Room
SRC 202
TBA
FITNESS PROGRAM
it
pom
Date
325-424
325-429
41 -430
41
47
Event
Yoga (Session III) Tuesdays
Yoga (Session IV) Wednesdays
Rowing Incentive im
Power Walk Clinic
Bike Maintenance
Reg. by Room
SRC 238 324
SRC 238 324
SRC Fitness 324
SRC Classroom 331
SRC Brickyard 46
ADVENTURE PROGRAMS
Date
41
41-430
43-44
44
45
49-412
Event
Tar River Canoe
Rowing
Kayak Clinic
Pilot Mountain
Sea Kayaking
Mt Rogers Backpacking
Time
Place
5:00pmSRC Adventure Center
Own Your OwnSRC Classroom
7pmSRC Pool
TripAdventure Center
TripAdventure Center
TripAdventure Center
,J JJJ I
1 f
H �
11 Thursday, I
CE
re
Big Bad Vi
Big Bad
Daddy
9 Ot
w
A few facts frc
music has oc
percent of ra
grandparents
tors back in tl
swing was at it
has continual!
top of the po
ness since tho;
D.)
What with i
icy of our greai
Nut Zippers, i
Swingers and tr
new swing-ori
the country, it
that the big
upswing yet ;
with me, since
nally got me i
place.
BigBadVoc
ally "the s
Swingers as th
on the front o
inform you. B(
are featured in
SEEVO
Destiny's C
Destiny's
9 OU
Mai;r
STAF
So these are D(
Stemming a
the group now
Child, La Tavia
and Kelly alwa;
were destined 1
It was a sign fro
when a picture
of a Bible, there
tiny" in boldfac
picture laid. (T
started to for
"Destiny's Ch
SEE DEI






11 Thursday. March Jff. 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Solas shines their light on Irish music
CD
review
Big Bad Voodoo Daddy
Big Bad Voodoo
Daddy
9 OUT OF 10
John Davis

A few facts from jazz history: swing
music has occupied at least five
percent of radio airplay since our
grandparents were young go-get-
ters back in the thirties. Although
swing was at its height back then, it
has continually risen back to the
top of the pop culture conscious-
ness since those days. (Thanks Mr.
D.)
What with the national popular-
ity of our great state's own Squirrel
Nut Zippers, the recent hit movie
Swingers and the rise of hundreds of
new swing-oriented clubs all over
the country, it's probably safe to say
that the big bands are on the
upswing yet again, which is fine
with me, since swing is what origi-
nally got me into jazz in the first
place.
Big Bad Voodoo Daddy are actu-
ally "the swing band from
Swingers as the advertising sticker
on the front of the CD cover will
inform you. Both of the songs that
are featured in the Swingers sound-
SEE VOODOO. PAGE 10
Destiny's Child
Destiny's Child
9 OUT OF 10
Maurice Blue
STAFF WRITER
So these are Destiny's kids.
Stemming as far back as 1990,
the group now known as Destiny's
Child, La Tavia, Le Toya, Beyonce
and Kelly always thought that they
were destined for success in music.
It was a sign from God that one day
when a picture of the group fell out
of a Bible, there was the word "des-
tiny" in boldface next to where the
picture laid. (That's how the group
started to formulate the name
"Destiny's Child) Since then,
SEE DESTINY. PAGE 11
Group peforms this
weekend in New Bern
Ron Cherubini Jr.
SENIOR WRITER
Saint Patrick's Day may have been
on March 17, but for Solas, every
day is an Irish celebration. Their
music was born in Ireland, but is
growing up in America and is
rapidly gaining popularity.
Made up of five highly talent-
ed, energetic young musicians,
Solas is considered one of the
nation's premier Irish-American
bands. With the rising tide of
appreciation for the Celtic arts, the
band, whose name in Gaelic
means "light serves as a youth-
ful, yet no less authentic, represen-
tation of the traditional music of
Ireland.
What began as a quintet playing
a few festival concerts has grown
into a full-time, nationally-touring
band which presents traditional
songs, reels, jigs, and airs. That the
five members�Seamus Egan,
Winifred Horan, John Doyle, Karan
Casey, and newest member Mick
McAuley�are well received is no
surprise, but to what degree they
have been accepted is phenomenal.
With the release of their second
CD, Sunny Spells and Scattered
Showers (1997), the group solidified
itself as the leader in contemporary
Solas: (L to R) Karan Casey, Seamus Egan, John Doyle, Win Horan and Mick McAuley.
PHOTO BY ROSS HAMILTON
Irish music. Coming on the heels of
their debut, self-titled album, Solas
(19), the band showed every bit
the talent that had the Wall Street
Journal touting them as being des-
tined for the level of greatness that
such Irish groups as the Chieftans
Some films never make it to the Emerald
City.
Some art ton controversial .Some tire too
small. Whatever the reason, vejusl
never get to see some mighty good movies
on the big screen.
When they hit video,
hovever. they're ours for the taking. This
series wilt look at some of the films that
didn 'I make the Greenville rut.
the ones that got away
and Altan have achieved.
The band formed as a quartet
when Egan, Horan, Doyle and for-
mer member John Williams, came
together to play a few festivals. The
four musicians had all gained valu-
able experience in such venerated
Celtic music groundbreakers as
Cherish the Ladies, the Sharon
Shannon Band, the Chanting
House and Greenfields of America.
However, they were short a
vocalist. After searching for one, the
band found Casey not too far from
where they all
came together. In
fact, Casey was
Egan's neighbor
in Manhattan.
Casey's impact
on the group was
instant. The
young singer, who
grew up in
County Waterford
in Ireland,
brought a haunt-
ingly enchanting
and crystal clear
sound to the
already fine-
tuned music of
the group. Her
ability to tap into
the emotional
underpinnings of
a song and then
convey them to
the audience is
impeccable, tak-
ing listeners on an
exciting, winding
emotional ride.
For example,
her voice rattles
the soul in Love is
No More, a deep
song of sadness,
only to be fol-
lowed by a blasting of emotional
uplift in Cradle to the Grave. Perhaps
Casey's knack understanding emo-
tion springs from her background in
SEE SOLACE. PAGE 9
The Full Monty reveals more
than saggy bums
In tk Company of Men
can't be ignored
Oscar does the Monty
wrong
Film examines corporate
life in the '90s
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
Indignant bitching, take 342. Loosely
translated. Independent Spirit
Awards means recognition for small
films that have a Banana-Berry
Slurpee's chance in hell at ever
making it to Greenville theatres.
Held this past weekend (and
regional office,
"restore a little
Bastards at work.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SONY PICTURE CLASSICS
televised for the lucky few who
have the Independent Film
Channel), the ceremony featured a
who's who of indie hipsters: Kevin
Smith (who dedicated his Best
Screenplay award to all the women
who have ridiculed his itsy bitsy
teenie weenie), Parker Posey, Atom
Egoyan, John Turtorro, etc.
In the Company of Men, which
recently landed in local video
stores, picked up a couple of
awards, including Best Debut
Performance (Aaron Eckhart) and
Best First Screenplay (Neil
LaBute). The film has already
received recognition from the New
York Film Critics Circle Awards and
it took the Filmmakers Trophy at
the 1997 Sundance Film Festival.
If you want to, you could call it a
more intelligent, indie Falling
Down (the mad-as-hell-and-I'm-
gonna-wear-horn-rimmed-glasses
Michael Douglas vehicle).
Chad (Eckhart) and Howard
(Matt Malloy) are dissatisfied cor-
porate climbers on a six-week
assignment to their company's
Chad, aiming to
dignity" to their
lives, convinces
Howard to go
along with a lit-
tle proposal,
which has the
two finding a
girl of particu-
larly vulnerable
stock, both dat-
ing, wining and
dining her
"until she's
dizzy then
(upon comple-
tion of their six-
week stay)
dumping her.
Their victim
is Christine (Stacey Edwards), a
deaf secretary. While charming to
her face, Chad mocks her behind
her back, claiming she sounds like
Flipper when she tries to talk.
Edwards, who appears in the just
released Primary Colon, is terrific.
Her character is attractive, sweet
and easy to fall for.
Even though he is Chad's super-
visor on their assignment, Howard
is an ineffectual follower; he laughs
SEE COMPANY. PAGE I
Mark B r etf
SENIOR WRITER
9 OUT OF 10
John Cleese once remarked that
the greatest fear of British men is
getting caught naked. I don't know
how accurate he is, but keeping his
comment in mind sure made The
Full Monty a lot funnier. Just
released on videothis low-budget
British comedy has all the naked
British men you'd ever care to see.
For those not in the know, The
Full Monty is about six unemployed
British steelworkers who decide to
put on an all-male strip revue for
cash. And they're not just going
down to g-strings like those wimpy
Chippendales; they're going for the
full monty of the title: complete
nudity. They're average-looking
guys who don't know how to dance,
not exactly the kind of people you
really want to see naked, and there-
Cheeky monkeys.
PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX SEARCHLIGHT
March
26 Thursday
Know What you Did Last
Summer at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre (through March 28)
Six String Drag, Soulmites at
Peasant's
Live Jazz at Staccato
in lies the humor.
It's that simple, really. Naked
men are inherently funny some-
how, and this film takes advantage
of that fact. But it's not Dumb and
Dumber in a g-string; this film was
worthy of the Best Original
Screenplay Oscar it was nominated
for. And that's because the
Pee, Track Star at
Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
27 Friday
Van Cliburn
Silver Medalist-
Pianist at 8 p.m. in
Wright
Auditorium
Elephant Boy at Peasant's
Backdoors at The
Attic.
Glory Fountain at
Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Horace Pinker at
Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
28 Saturday
Dayroom at
Peasant's
Everything at The
Attic
British still practice a film genre
that seems mostly dead in America:
the comedy-drama.
You know, the kind of film that
tells a good story in addition to its
humor? With well-rounded charac-
ters who make you laugh because
SEE MONTY. PAGE 10
Hi Mom Film Festival plus
Hellbender, Sankofa at Local 506
in Chapel Hill '
29 Sunday
Spider Venus at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
31 Tuesday .
The Cypher (open mic poetry)
at Underwater Pirate's Cove
6 String Drag performs Thursday at Peasant's.
PHOTO COURTESY OF E StUMtO





12 Thyridiy. March VS. 1998
lifestyle
13 Thundiy,
Th� East Carolinian
PANTANA BOB'S
PRESENTS
THURSDAY
MARCH 26TH
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Answers:
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Solas
continued from page 8
jazz, a genre known worldwide for
its emotional connections Her
vocal abilities are highlighted in
"The Unquiet Grave" and
"Vanished Like the Snow two of
the tracks on the group's latest
release. She also- breaks out her
Gaelic in one of Solas' songs.
As breathtaking as Casey's
vocals are, the musicianship dis-
played by the other members of
Solas is no less awe-inspiring.
Egan's ability to dazzle with no
fewer than eight instruments�
flute, tin whistle, low whistle,
nylon-string guitar, four-string
banjo, mandolin, bodhran (a hand-
held frame drum) and uilleann
pipes allows Solas to offer a contin-
ually varied sound.
Egan's music can be heard in the
films, The Brothers McMullen and
Dead Man Waiting and, as is the case
with all the members in Solas, he
has released his own solo projects,
including his latest entitled, When
Juniper Sleeps, on which he
employed the help of fellow Solas
member Doyle, guitar-picking is
characterized as hard-driving and
his virtuosity in the Celtic style of
play is clearly evident.
McAuley, who replaces button
accordion player Williams with his
own unique musicianship, is a mas-
ter on the Kilkenny box bringing a
more homegrown sound to the
group.
Horan brings to the Irish music
presentation an element of authen-
ticity that few performers could.
Her expertise on the fiddle com-
bined with her ability to Irish step-
dance lends itself well with the
overall band concept of energy and
action on stage.
Horan's talents were put to use
in the classics, performing with a
number of string quartets and
orchestras including the Boston
Pops, before she returned to her
roots performing Irish song and
dance.
First shocLplayed with an all-
female Irish-American ensemble,
Cherish the Ladies, then left to
help form Solas. Her fiery, feisty
fiddle play helps highlight a stage
show that coaxes the audience to
get off their feet and truly take part
in the music.
With Sunny Spells and Scattered
Showers, Solas took a big step, show-
ing that they may indeed have what
it takes to stick around for a while.
The lyrics and music are rich with
story and maturity. The CD has
received critical acclaim in Irish
Echo magazine, topping its list of
top 10 Irish traditional recordings in
1997.
What also gives the group hopes
for staying power is their stage
show.
The five performers are comfort-
able performing as an ensemble,
but when they break into seeming-
ly impromptu duets and trios, the
musical presentation takes on a
whole new element�as if the audi-
ence was being treated to shows
within the show. When Egan and
Horan get together for a flute-fiddle
piece, the impact on the crowd is
stunning. Or when Eagan and
Doyle pair, the acoustics become
near-overwhelming. But there is
more.
The music of Solas elicits, by its
very nature, dance. Dancing is a
large part of the Irish song celebra-
tion and the band does nothing but
encourage it with its expert rendi-
tions of the traditional Irish song.
Crowd-pleasing music, awe-
inspiring vocals, and a contagious
level of energy bring to the stage an
ethnic performance nearly
unequaled.
Virtuosity and versatility, energy
and soulfulness�Solas has only
been around for a few years, yet
they present al that is Irish music
with a maturity that seems to have a
thousand years of history behind it.
Note�Solas will be performing at
7:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 28, at
Graver C. Fields Middle School in New
Bern. Tickets are $12 for General
Admission. For more information on
tickets, call 919-514-6891 or919-631
1817. This performance is sponsored in
part by the Irish American Club of
Eastern North Carolina.
Company
continued from page 8
at Chad's jokes, weakly going along
with all of Chad's cruelty. Malloy
(Simple Men, Mrs. Parker and the
Vicious Circle) is the perfect weenie
(insert second weenie reference).
Eckhart may look like a rich
man's Vincc Vaughn, but his acting
talent goes way beyond that of the
swinger. Eckhart's Chad is king of
the bastards: cruel, hateful, deceit-
ful, selfish and any other character-
istic of the stereotypical "anything
goes" businessman you can think
of.
Dear business majors, watch this
movie. You don't want to be Chad.
Certainly, the movie suggests that
Chad's behavior is a result of the
corporate, power-hungry environ-
ment he is a part of. He goes as far
as to make a trainee "reveal" him-
self before he will recommend the
trainee to a management training
program.
The emotional investment of all
those involved in Chad's ploy
comes to a head at the conclusion of
the film as characters (and audience
alike) must decide how they really
feel.
LaBute has fashioned an
uncompromising story that is often
funny and unsettling at the same
time. Take it to the bank, you will
be riled one way or the other after
you watch it. And when a movie can
have that effect on you, that's an
accomplishment.
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13 Thundiy, March X. 1998
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
Monty
continued from page 8
they remind you of people you
might know? The sort of thing that
feels like real life?
Yeah, I know. Doesn't really ring
a bell with me, either. Comedy-dra-
mas are few and far between these
days, probably because they
require a little talent to write and
produce, and don't easily lend
themselves to explosions and sili-
con breasts.
But that's why The Full Monty is
so very enjoyable. With its wrinkled
faces and saggy butts, it's a refresh-
ing change from the usual
Hollywood fare. It's a lot easier to
see our own lives reflected in these
men concerned about impending
financial doom and whether they're
really attractive enough to take
their clothes off.
If the humor inherent in naked
men is at the core of the film's com-
edy, then that fear of being naked is
at the core of the drama. All the
men arc a little nervous about strip-
ping, as could be expected. When
Gaz (Trainspottings Robert Carlyle),
" the "mastermind" behind the strip-
ping scheme, brings the idea up, he
meets with resistance and laughter.
But eventually, the men who
signed on out of desperation come"
to sec it as a way to reclaim some
control over their lives.
It's Gaz's best friend Dave
(Mark Addy) who has the biggest
problem adjusting. Dave is over-
weight, and when confronted with
public nudity, he has to face a seri-
ous problem with his own body
image. This kind of problem is
addressed often with women, but
for a big strapping lad like Dave,
even having the problem is embar-
rassing. Though Gaz is struggling to
get visitation rights' with his son and
the other four men involved in the
plan have their own problems as
well, it's Dave who has the most
moving plight.
But The Full Monty is not all
heavy drama and male social issues.
It is a comedy, after all, and a good
one at that. While the film does
poke fun at the men's relatively
unappealing bodies, it does so
good-naturedly. Most of the humor
derives from the strange situations
Gaz and pals find themselves in.
The scene in which our heroes buy
their red leather g-strings is hysteri-
cal, as is a sequence when they get
arrested forpublic exposure during t
practice.
If I sound like I'm avoiding the
details, it's because 1 am. The Full
Monty is, filled with nice moments,
but they're subtle and I don't want
to ruin them with clumsy explana-
tions. Just take my word for it and
see this movie. It's well-worth the
cost of the rental, and will probably
leave you wondering why the only
Oscar it won Monday night was for
Best Original Score.
Lord knows I am.
Check out
c our new web address
WWW.TEC.ECU.EPU
Voodoo
continued from page 8
track are here on their debut
album, as well as ten other high-
energy tunes of equal (if not better)
quality.
B.B.V.D. are actually a small
"big band with only eight mem-
bers. There arc four horns: trum-
pet, alto and baritone saxes, and a
trombone. The rhythm section
consists of the swing standard,
piano, guitar, upright bass and
drums. The band is straight up
Kansas City despite its smallness.
Though. B.B.V.D. are clearly not
just along to ride the current wave
of swing popularity. These cats are
consummate swingers. They really
know how to put it in the pocket.
The songs are bright, jumpy
happy dance numbers, despite
being unusually lyric-heavy. Like
the Squirrel Nut Zippers,
B.B.V.Ds lyrics have been influ-
enced by modern rock and pop
lyric writing. With the exception of
"Go Daddy-O vocalist Scotty
Morris stays away from the basic
repetition and call-and-response
that most classic swing songs had.
Instead, Morris tends to become a
sassy, sarcastic storyteller.
There isn't a bad song on the
whole disc. Fans of Swingers will
remember "You and Me and a
Bottle Makes 3 and "Go Daddy-
0" from the movie. These, of
course are fast-paced, high-steppin'
numbers. Other notable tunes
include "Mr. Pinstripe Suit a
sparkin' spunky song, "Maddest
Kind of Love a creepy but catchy
warning against too much casual
sex (Morris' voice is soooo smooth
on this track) and "Jump with My
Baby which features some of the
best solos on the whole album.
There's some nice collective solo-
ing at the end of the tune that gives
a kind nod back to Dixieland.
This music is above and beyond.
If folks started playing this at senior
proms instead of inviting local disc
jockeys to play the same old tired
radio songs, the world would be a
better place.
Just imagine what the world
would be like if kids everywhere
started swinging instead of joining
gangs. Then, when a totalitarian
dictator wooed the whole country
under his evil, purist, socialist spell,
the "swing kids" alone would be
the ones to resist his evil plans,
even though they, too, would even-
tually fall to his evil schemes.
OK maybe not. But Big Bad
Voodoo Daddy is definitely worth
adding to the CD collection.
ATTENTION:
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96
WTmfU�Y, M�rch6. 1998
The Ettt Carolinian
Destiny
continued from page 8
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
$MewfaNdt�h ffihcy
LIVE!
THURSDAY
MARCH 26th, 1998
8:00-10:45 pm
Mendenhall Student
Center Social Room
they have been determined not to
let anything stop them from suc-
ceeding in music.
So far, they've done a good job
of that.
Taking the world by storm with
their highly anticipated self-titled
debut album, though the group is
still in their teens (16-17 to be more
precise), Destiny's Child is ahead of
their time by dropping an album
filled with smooth beats, sensuous
lyrics and that unparalleled soulful
sound. Though the album only
contains 13 tracks, it is well worth
its price tag. With Beyonce singing
lead, the group delivers what it
promises, that being four lovely
ladies just doing what they love.
The first single off the album,
"No, No, No is a sweet song that
helps you relax a; you listen to its
mellow overtones and smooth lyri-
cal flow. It tells the story of a man
that is in love with his woman, but
hides his affection for her in front of
his boys. (Don't front. You know
you really want it.) The song's
remix, featuring Wyclef Jean of the
Refugee Camp, is also featured on
the ajbum. It tells the same story,
but it is set to a faster beat and is
intended for you to dance to.
Another nice song is "Killing
Time which tells of lost love, but
she hopes that he will return to her
and as long as she still loves him,
she'll be waiting. The song is beau-
tiful and a little down in the same
loop, but it encourages the idea that
true love will never die.
What is bad about the album? Is
there one? Oh, yeah. The only mis-
fire on the album was part two of
the song "With Me The song is
actually good, part one featuring So
So Def CEO Jermaine Dupri, is
cool, but part two featuring Master
P, is a big turn-off. (Actually, if they
dumped Master P and got someone
with talent on the song, it would
have been much better.) That's tlffe
only negative thing about the
album.
But if the sound of the group
isn't enough, the CD includes a
couple of bonuses. The CD not
only has music, it has multimedia.
If you have access to a CD-ROM,
you can watch and listen to the
group's bios, a documentary that
tells of the group's history, and the
entire video of "No, No, No" (part
two). Also included is a bonus
three-track CD entitled Young Soul
Power which features tracks from
Destiny's Child, Jagged Edge and
Kimberly Scott. It's a nice plus.
Wrapping this up. Destiny's
Child will achieve their goals as
long as they keep performing the
best they can possibly do. Keep you
eyes open for anything new that the
group is involved in. When you
pass by the CD at the music store,
pick it up, and when you're pon-
dering whether or not to buy it, say,
"Yes, Yes, Yes








East Carolinian
ill return to her
still loves him,
e song is beau-
vn in the same
;es the idea that
die.
t the album? Is
. The only mis-
ras part two of
The song is
nc featuring So
aine Dupri, is
maturing Master
Actually, if they
id got someone
song, it would
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lg about the
I of the group
D includes a
The CD not
as multimedia,
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listen to the
umentary that
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led Young Soul
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their goals as
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��;�
I
15 Thursday. March 28, 1998
CTAT'iC
hrT ilii wiiiiJi u ii mmmr
Thf Eatt Carolinian
Bronze at Bradford
Golf team captures third place finish at Pepsi Intercolligiate
Tournament, held at the Bradford Creek Country Club
School Score
tracy hairr
Staff Writer
Spring Break involved no rest
for the ECU golf team this year.
Instead, on March 14 the players
traveled to Charlotte where they
competed in the Birkdale
Collegiate Classic, a 54-hole
tournament hosted by UNC-
Charlotte. Saturday was
scheduled to include the first
two rounds, but due to
uncompromising weather, the
action was not continued until
Sunday. The Pirates finished in
14th place, but their game
playing did not
1 M WLm 0n Monday the
Jl. -wjygolf team
4 f km participated in
m the Cleveland
Golf Collegiate
Championship,
held at
Palmetto Golf
Kevin Miller Club in Aiken,
S.C. This was
another 54-hole event
completed in two days. Senior
Kevin Miller and sophomore
Marc Miller were listed among
Marc Miller
, the top ten
players in the
I tournament.
"Both Kevin and
Marc did really
well this week.
For Kevin
especially, this is
a time when he's
got a lot of
pressure on
him Coach Kevin Williams said.
By the end of the third round,
M. Miller was tied for 17th place
and K. Miller dropped from the
eighth position and tied for 27th.
ECU carded 11 th place out of the
12 teams that competed.
The eventful pattern did not
stop for the team, though, since
they were back on the road and
traveling back home to prepare
for the Pepsi Intercollegiate
Friday and Saturday. This
tournament was a participant in
the Rolex Collegiate Tour,
including over 200 men's and
women's regional and national
golf championships.
Once on the familiar grounds
of Bradford Creek Golf Club, the
team's performance improved
dramatically.
"We had a pep talk that wasn't
real nice Williams said. "I
questioned the competitiveness
of the players and told them I
hoped to get more. It's time to
show we're worthy of playing golf
here
This last tournament also
featured three rounds in a two-
day period.
"Back-to-back rounds are
really tiring M. Miller said. "It's
better when 54 holes are
stretched out for three days. And
the weather wasn't real good
either. It was either cold or
raining on and off so we couldn't
play easily
Regardless of these
uncomfortable conditions, ECU
ended the Pepsi tournament in
third place, capturing their best
finish this season.
"I think everyone felt better
about the way they played at
home. We were more relaxed
M. Miller said.
There is only one senior
on the golf team this
year, Kevin Miller from
Erwin, m: Miller was
selected in 1997 as BCU's
Most Valuable Athlete.
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Lady Pirates go
undefeated in Florida
Softball improves
record to 16-11
Scott Rose
SENIOR WRITER
The Softball team traveled to
Florida for a round robin
tournament over spring break
where they put their wining
streak on the line. After all was
said and done, the Lady Pirates
continued rheir winning streak to
14 games.
This tournament is not like
any other, lasting for the entire
month of March. When school let
out for spring break, the athletes
traveled to Orlando. There they
play 10 games in five days of
doubleheaders. There were no
winners or losers in the
tournament.
There were over 30 teams in
Orlando. Although the Lady
Pirates did not play every team,
they are the only team to go
undefeated in the month of
March.
"I am extremely pleased with
the way my girls played this
week Head Coach Tracey Kee
said.
On the first day of the
tournament, ECU won both of its
games, defeating Fordham 8-3 in
the first game and Rhode Island
in the second game.
After the first inning in game
number one, ECU was down 3-1,
then scored three runs in the third
and four more runs in the fifth.
After giving up three runs in the
first, Jamie Bendle took control of
the game by keeping Fordham
scoreless. Bendle improved her
record to 5-3 on the year.
In the second game ECU
two runs in both the third and
sixth innings. In the top of the
sixth with a tied score. Dawn
Conrad hit her first career home
run to give the Lady Pirates the
lead in the final inning. The play
proved to be the game winner
along with the solid pitching of
the ECU staff.
Day two was much like the
first, with two opponents and two
Fantastic on the
field!
"I am
extremely
pleased with
the way my
girls played
this week
Tracey Kee
Head Softball Coach
outscored Rhode Island 4-2 to
complete the sweep of the first
day of play. Pitching for the
Pirates was freshman Lisa
Paganini, who held Rhode Island
to just four hits. ECU scored in
So far the Lady Pirates are undefeated
in the month of March.
PHOTO BV CUV BUCK
ECU wins. In the first game
ECU shutout Manhattan 7-0, and
in the second they beat Southeast
Missouri State 2-0. Once again
Paganini pitched an outstanding
game, giving up only three hits
and keeping Manhattan off the
scoreboard. This was her second
win in as many days. In the
second game ECU scored one run
in both the second and fifth
innings to chalk up the victory.
Starting pitcher Denise Reagan
took the victory by giving up just
five hits and no runs. It marked
her third victory in a row and
evened her record for the season
at 4-4.
For the third day in a row the
Lady. Pirates won both games,
beating Rider in the first game 8-
0 and Vermont in the second 4-0.
In the first game Niki Andrews
hit her first career home run to
extend the lead to three after two
innings of play. ECU scored in
every inning of the game.
Bendle's pitching marked her
70th victory here at ECU.
In the second game the Lady
Pirates scored two runs in the first
and fifth innings to defeat
Vermont, Reagan once again kept
the opponent off the scoreboard
for the second day in a row.
On the fourth day ECU beat
Yale 7-5 and Fordham once again
9-1. Yale broke the 31-inning
scoreless streak with three runs in
the third inning to make the game
4-3 pirates. In the fourth inning
the Lady Pirates scored three
runs to build the lead back up to
four. Bendle came in and pitched
two innings, earning herself the
SEE IADY PIRATES ON WE II
Randy Rigsby of
the ECU baseball team
was honored as CAA
Player-of-the-Week on
March 16 as the first
selection of the season
for the conference.
Denise Reagan of
the ECU softball team
was chosen as the
conference's Pitcher-of-
the-Week.
Isonette Polonius
of the ECU softball
team was also
selected as CAA
Player-of-the-Week.
Christi Valevich of
the ECU softball team
was selected the Big
South Co-Player-of-the-
Week.
Congratulations!
Baseball team picks up
five wins over break
Thomson breaks
school record for saves
in a season
Jason Thlringer
SENIOR WRITER
During spring break while most
of the ECU student body was
relaxing, the baseball team was
very busy. From March 11- 22, the
Pirates played nine games,
winning five and losing four.
The first of the nine games
was played at Wake Forest. Senior
Randy Rigsby led the Pirates by
bringing in three RBIs on two
sacrifice flies and a single. ECU's
pitchers were stung for 13 hits in
the 11-5 loss.
On Saturday, March 14, the
Pirates opened the conference
section of their schedule with a
three-game series at William and
Mary. In the opener ECU bats
came alive to the tune of 20 hits
which yielded 13 runs. Pirate
pitchers held the Tribe to four
runs on six hits. The nightcap of
Saturday's doubleheader was a
much closer game, but the result
was still the same: an ECU
victory. �
The Pirates completed the
sweep of William and Mary on
Sunday with a 5-3 victory. For the
series Rigsby was 7�13 with 5
RBIs. This strong showing
helped Rigsby earn the first CAA
Player-of-the-Week nomination
of the year.
On the March 17, Campbell
University came to Greenville for
one game. Though the Camels
led for most of the game, the
Pirates came out on top 10-9 with
tremendous efforts from
freshman John Williamson, who
scored a dramatic two-run home
run in the bottom of the eighth
inning. Junior Travis Thomson
pitched the ninth inning to pick
up his fourth save of the season,
which ties a school record for
saves in one season.
The day after beating
Campbell the Pirates continued
their winning streak with an 8-5
victory over Coastal Carolina.
Thomson picked up his fifth save
of the season, posting a new
school record.
The following game was
scheduled for Friday, March 19
against Coastal Carolina in
Conway, S.C, but it was rained
out with no make-up date set.
Eager to reschedule a game date,
Coach Keith LeClair was able to
schedule a game with N.C. State
for April 1 to be played in Wilson
at Flemming Stadium.
The Pirates' CAA home
opener was held on Saturday,
March 21 with the Virginia
Commonwealth Rams coming to
town. ECU's winning streak was
put to a halt at five games with a
12 inning 8-9 loss.
On Sunday the two teams
squared off in a doubleheader.
VCU came out on top in both
games with 7-4 and 5-3 victories.
In the first game on Sunday,
Williamson hit his eighth home
run of the season, which has him
tied for second place in the CAA.
Highlights of the Rebel Games
ECU 10-0 only undefeated team
31 scoreless
Outscored their opponents 60-12
14 game winning streak kept alive
F�9-
Baseball
March 11 @ Wake ForestL 5-11
March 14 @ William and MaryW 13-4
Double headerW4-3
March 15 @ William and MaryW5-3
March 17 CampbellW 10-9
March 18 Coastal CarolinaW8-5
March 21 VCUL 8-9
March 22 VCUL 7-4
Double headerL 5-3
FOOTBALL NOTES
The ECU football team will begin its 1998 spring
practive today. Their 15-practice drill session will
come to a close on Sat. April 25. Returning to field
from last season will be five offensive and eight
defensive starters, while both the punter and the
placekicker will return as well. Head coach Steve
Logan will mark his seventh year at ECU, and has
compiled a 36-32 record to date.
I
f





18 ThtittEiy, Mtrcti 28, 1998
m
The East Carolinian
Kentucky debate remains unresolved
ECU STUDENTS
imr
A �
NEEDED!
i COUNTY
To Be Part-time Census Workers 1 i NORJH'CAROLINAi 1
Pitt County is looking for 265 people to help conduct a
Special Census during April and May.
Pay Scale:
Census Takers and Office Workers will be paid $9 per hour.
Crew Leaders will be paid $10 per hour.
If you drive your car, you'll be reimbursed 31 cents per mile.
To Be Eligible You Must:
, Be eligible to work in the United States.
Have transportation for use at work.
Be at least 18 years of age.
Be able to pass a general knowledge test.
. Be available up to 25 hours per week evenings and weekends.
To Apply:
Recruiters will be in the lobby of The Student Store
on Thursday, March 26th and Friday, March 27th
Or visit one of the following locations:
The Pitt County Office Building
ECU's Mendenhall Student Center
Employment Security Commission
Attorney General
requests additional
information
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs, Award Winning Fajitas
Grande, New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks, Fresh Vegetable Rasta,
ryvRRYjs
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800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
Roadside Chicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese
Sandwich, Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts, it's ail specially priced for
ECU s'udents. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
'Does not Include Alcoholic Beverages
Travis bark ley
SENIOR WRITER
While ECU's football schedule
has been completed for more than
a month, questions regarding
Kentucky's withdrawal remain.
The Pirates will play the
University of Tennessee
Chattanooga on Sept 12th, but
ECU officials are still pursuing
possible legal action against
Kentucky.
Kentucky backed out of the
ECU game because of a
scheduling change with arch rival
Louisville. For the first time in
many years, Kentucky will play in
Louisville. As a result, Kentucky
decided they needed to schedule
another home game, and sent a
check to ECU for 175,000 dollars
to go along with a broken three-
game contract
University Attorney Ben Irons
said that investigation of the
matter is ongoing.
"The Attorney General is still
gathering information from
Kentucky and the University of
Louisville Irons said. "The
Attorney General has requested
that Louisville provide
documents related to the
situation
Irons said that legal action
against Kentucky would depend
on the information that they get
from Louisville.
"Right now it is a matter of
wait and see Irons said.
The cancellation of the 1998
game has disrupted the 1999
schedule as well. ECU was slated
to play in Kentucky next year.
"At this point there are several
holes in the 1999 schedule said
Norm Reilly, sports information
director at ECU. "It would be
premature to rule out going to
Kentucky
Even though Chattanooga is a
Division 1-AA school, a new rule
instituted by the NCAA will allow
a victory over the Moccasins to
count as a Division 1-A win.
To qualify for a post-season
bowl game, a team must have six
wins against Division 1-A
opponents. The new rule will
allow 1-A schools to count one
win against an 1-AA school
towards bowl eligibility every
three years. That makes the loss
of Kentucky easier to handle,
even though a team from the SEC
would be a bigger draw than
Chattanooga.
Irons said that this situation is
highly unusual, but could give no
time-table as to when the
situation will be resolved.
Football
i 3ST ha CIS
'Spring Practice starts March 26.
� Pirates return five starters on offense, eight on
defense, as well as their punter and placekicker.
Center Danny Moore named first-team All-
Conference USA.
� Linebackers Roderick Coleman, Jeff Kerr,
cornerback Dwight Henry, and punter Andrew Bayes
were named to the second team.
� Pirates set home attendance mark. An average of
32,875 attended home games in 1997, breaking the
old mark of 32,814 set in 1992.
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17 Tht

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East Carolinian
ved
i vision 1-A
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to count one
1-AA school
;ibility every
takes the loss
r to handle,
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could give no
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jived.
17 Thursday, March 26, 1998
0
The Eaat Carolinian
Mens and womens track teams open outdoor season on the "right foot"
Piratesbegnwith
Weems Baskin event
sw Bayes
jrage of
king the
STEPHEN SCHRAMM.
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU men's and women's
track teams kicked off their
outdoor seasons last weekend at
the Weems Baskin Invitational at
the University of South Carolina.
Despite some personnel problems
and a shaky indoor season, the
Pirates enter the outdoor season
feeling confident. The move to
the outdoor circuit gives the
teams a clean slate and formats
that fit their style.
The mens team started off the
REC SERVICES
first day of the competition with
the 4x300 relay. The Pirates'
strong team was hoping for a good
showing from senior Marcus
Gladden, who suffered an injury
in practice the previous week.
"We had a fairly good sized
lead in the 4x3 and then Marcus
just ran as hard as he could said
Head Coach Bill Carson.
Unfortunately, the Pirates lost
the lead due to Gladden's leg.
"Derek Ingram caught up to
the South Carolina guy but
stumbled towards the � end,
because he really gave all he
could Carson sa'd.
ECU finished second in the
event. � �
On Friday the Pirates also saw
freshman Steve Arnold take third
in the 3,000 meters.
The second day saw the Pirate
relay teams shine. The 4x400
team finished first with a time of
3:16.03. The 4x100 team finished
second with a time of 41.58. The
team's finish was made more
impressive by (he fact that one of
the team's regulars was injured
and another was not with the team
at the meet. The 4x200 team
finished third with a 1:26.50,
while the B squad was sixth at
1:28.49. Also the Pirates distance
medley relay team came in
second. The four top-five finishes
on the second day enabled the
Pirates to finish second overall to
host South Carolina.
"We ran fairly well, but we
didn't pass the baton well
Carson said. "We thought we
could win the whole meet
The Pirates come from the
meet with a few key injuries but
confidence from a good showing.
"Now we have to regroup and
get back on the same level with
the guy that we've got Carson
said.
The womens team
experienced a slow start to their
outdoor campaign.
"We didn't run great, but I
didn't expect them to run good
times right off the bat said Head
Coach Charles "Choo" Justice.
On the first day the team was
led. by the 4x300 meter relay
team, which finished third with a
time of 2:47.05. The first day also
saw the field events take center
stage. Freshman Marshari
Williams placed third in the long
jump with a jump of 10.64 meters.
The Pirate throwers got their first
chance of the season to compete
in events such as the javelin and
the hammer throw. Junior Jennifer
Prcvatt placed sixth in the javelin.
Teammate Eva Eiroma followed
in eighth. In the hammer Prcvatt
finished eighth and teammate
Margaret Clayton placed ninth.
Saturday the throwers
continued their strong
performances. Freshman Crystal
Frye placed ninth in the shotput.
Frye also placed 10th in the discus
behind Eiroma, who wound up
ninth.
The Pirates also fared well in
the jumps. Junior Saundra Teel
placed fourth in the high jump,
clearing 1.60 meters. Williams and
Teel finished third and fourth
respectively in the long jump
rounding out a v strong ECU
showing in the field events.
"Our field event girls did
well Justice said. "The jumpers
and throwers did a great job
In the distance events,
freshman Fran Lattie finished
sixth in the 800 with a time of
2:24.94. Senior Barbara Wood
placed third in the 5,000 at
20:17.90.
The 4x200 relay team finished
fourth in 1:45.35. The distance
medley also finished fourth in
4:38.48.
The relays suffered from a lack
of practice due to spring break.
"Our- relays didn t click
Justice said. "Our .handoffs
weren't there because they hadn't
practiced together for a week
Though the meet was not one
of the team's finest, it will prove
valuable later in the season.
"We took 20 girls down there,
and 13 or 14 were freshmen
Justice said. "The experience of
their first college meet should
count for something
ECU rugby program dominates in
Savannah Shamrock tournament
EC,
'iption desired
ime, address,
sck or money
an dept.
'ubs Bldg
le, NC 27858
ht
The ECU Men's Rugby Club
traveled to Savannah, Ga over
the March 14 weekend to
participate in the 20th-annual
Savannah Shamrocks St. Patrick's
Day tournament.
The annual trip by the team
proved to be a successful one as
the Pirates came home with the
championship trophy in the
college division.
Using an intimidating defense
and a potent offensive attack, the
Pirates outscored all of their
opponents by a combined score of
70-10 on their way to the
championship.
The Pirates set the tone of the
tournament in the first game by
defeating Wabash College of
Indiana with a score of 21-0. Eric
Kunkel started the scoring by
taking a pass from Brian Kennedy
35 meters into the try zone for a 5-
0 lead. Brian Best added the
conversion to give ECU a 7-0
halftime lead. The second half
would see continued ECU
dominance as the Pirates added
two more scores by Brian
Kennedy and captain Robert
Manning. The 60-meter run by
Manning late in the second half
capped a nearly flawless game by
ECU as they cemented their
place in the winner's bracket
going into the second game.
The second game for ECU
would prove to be their only test
of the tournament. Facing the
determined and quick offensive
backline of Mary Washington
College, the Pirates were forced
to rely on the aggressive play of
their defensive pack led by
Manning. Mary Washington took
the early lead with a score from 30
meters out and added a
conversion to take a 7-0 lead. The
Pirates would not be denied,
though, and tied the score two
minutes later with a score from
flanker Matt Webb.
With the score tied going into
the second half, ECU kept up the
momentum and kept the
offensive threat of Mary
Washington out of the Pirate zone
for the rest of the game. The
defensive pack of ECU would
once again rise up and save the
day for the Pirates when Kevin
Sellers scored from five meters
out to give ECU a 12-7 win.
In the championship game,
ECU faced a Georgia Southern
team full of confidence coming off
a convincing victory over the
University of Wisconsin. ECU
would dominate the game from
the start, though, and cruise to a
37-3 victory.
The Pirates combined ah
intimidating offensive attack with
a smothering defensive pack to
keep Georgia Southern at bay the
entire game. Georgia Southern
never established an attack and
were harassed all day by a
determined Pirate game plan.
Best led all scoring with one try,
two penalty kicks and three
conversions. Kunkel and Sellers
added one try each, and Kendall
Jones rounded out a successful
day for the Pirates with two trys.
Fans can still see the ECU
rugby team in action at Aycock
Middle School. The Pirates' next
home game is April 4 against
Cherry Point. Additional home
games include Cape Fear on April
18 and the University of Maryland
on April 25. All home games start
at 1 p.m.
Come out and see one of the
most successful international
sports and the sport that American
football came from.
Copyright 1998 Kroger Mkt-Atlantk: Items I Prices good In Creemfle. We reserve the right to limit quantities None sold to dealers
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f
18 Ttamsiy, Mirch 28. 1997
0
The Eait Carolinian
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MUST PRESENT COUPON �T7V 99
EXPIRES 400798 " � EXPIW4&098
SUCCESS
STORY
Monday, March, 30 1998
"at 12:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
Enjoy a free lunch and the opportunity
to hear Ms. Lisa D. Benton, the
current Regional Personnel Manager
for Wachovia Bank, tell her personal
ECU Success Story
I
Tennis season continues
strong as finale approaches
Pirates prepare for -
weekend of conference
action
Mario Scherhaifer
STAFF WRITER
The Lady Pirates used their time
off during spring break to recover
from a five-game tournament held
at Hilton Head Island. The
women's tennis team ended up
with a 2-3 record, defeating
Toledo and Charleston Southern,
while losing their final three
matches to the College of
Charleston, Indiana State and
Bowling Green State.
Their match at UNCW last
week was canceled due to heavy
rain, giving the Lady Pirates
enough time to prepare for their
upcoming games.
"If everybody gets their game
together we can win all three
games in Washington this
weekend senior Mona Eek said.
The Lady Pirates, currently 4-
5 (0-0), will play two conference
games against George Mason
University tomorrow and against
American University on Saturday
in Washington, D.C. They will
finish their tournament at the
nation's capital on Sunday against
Georgetown University.
Lady Pirates
continued (ram page 15
win and improving her record to
7-3.
As the week closed, ECU
played Fordham and once again
beat them. In only five innings
the Lady Pirates scored nine runs.
The game was called due to the
eight-run rule. Isonette Polonius
had two RBIs in the second and
Eek is preparing for her last
home game as a college athlete
coming up on April 4 against Eton
College.
"It will be a very emotional
match for me, but I'm sure that
we'fl do very well, especially if we
can- continue our good game
Eek said.
Unlike the men's team,
nobody in the women's team
suffers any injury. According to
Eek, the women are very
optimistic for their upcoming
games. "Our team has a very solid
bottom, which helps us out in a lot
of our matches Eek said.
"Additionally, Anne Svae and I
are playing our best matches for
ECU in a long time
According to Eek, the doubles
will be the crucial factor for their
matches. "We were working on
that this week Eek said. "I only
hope that the weather will be
good so we can start playing our
first conference games. We are all
fired up
Bad weather also was the
reason for the cancellation of the
men's game last Tuesday against
Campbell University.
The men's team started out
their trip to Columbia, S.C the
week before spring break by
losing against No. 28-ranked
South Carolina University, 0-5.
"Three of the four singles
gamSs were decided in a close
third set, and we even had the
chance to win the doubles
built the lead to four. After one
run in the fourth, the Lady Pirates
scored four more in the fifth.
Conrad and Andrews had RBI
hits in the fifth inning before the
game was called.
On the fifth and final day of
the tournament, ECU beat Army
7-1 and Fairfield 4-0. The Lady
Pirates scored four runs in the
second and three more in the fifth
to give Bendle a seven-run
cushion. Bendle took the win and
improved her record to 8-3 on he
season.
match Stephen Sicbcnbrunner
said.
The Pirates defeated George
Mason 4-1 in its CAA league
opener two days later at Hilton
Head Island, S.C. The match,
delayed throughout the day due
� to inclement weather, included
only six singles .matches. The
Pirates took four of the six,
winning at the No. 2, No. 4, No. 5
and No. 6 positions. Brett Rowley,
Derek -Slate and Stephen
Sicbenbruriher won in straight
sets, while Roope Kalajo came
back to win at No. 2 singles, 4-6,
6-1, 6-1. Kalajo almost had to
forfeit the game due to an Achilles
tendon injury.
"I couldn't even run and had to
drop the first set Kalajo said. "I
don't know how long it's going to
take to be all right, but it doesn't
look too good for the next few
games
On their way back to
Greenville the team played
Charleston Southern University
in Charleston, S.C. Although
ECU's top three singles players
won their matches over the
Buccaneer opponents, they
couldn't compensate Kalajo's
absence and suffered a close 4-3
loss.
On Friday the men's tennis
team will battle American
University in Raleigh before the
team comes back to Greenville
the next day to host James
Madison University at 2 p.m.
In the second game Polonius
hit two home runs to play the hero
role for the Lady Pirates. This
was her third home run of the day.
Solid pitching along with the bat
of Polonius gave ECU an easy
time with Army and Fairfield.
"Even though there are no
winners, we were the only team to
go undefeated Kee said.
The Lady Pirates improved
their record to 16-11 after the
Rebel Games and will play in the
Sports Plus Classic this weekend.
lL�D
ATTIC � MARCH 3l,lW8
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10 4X11' Be J 1010X15
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WILSON
ACRES
APARTMENTS
752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, NC 27858-0772
4TM
i
2 bedroom units contain
1050 square feet
3 bedroom units contain
1350 square feet
These units contain a self cleaning oven, a large frost-free refrigerator,
dishwasher, washerdryer connections, utility room, large patio with private fence, extra
outdoor lighting and deadbolt locks on all doors for added security, wallpapered bath-
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All units have large walk In closets and storage areas
as indicated by the diagonal lines .
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � 1'2Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU
WITH BUS SERVICE
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at air
Use your
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Terms ai
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January 1
indicated
participa
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tutesfrai
only whe
Applicab!






jilt Carolinian
es
hes
iiebenbrunncr
eated George
CAA league
uer at Hilton
The match,
: the day due
her, included
natches. The
of the six,
I, No. 4, No. 5
Brett Rowley,
id Stephen
n in straight
Kalajo came
2 singles, 4-6,
most had to
to an Achilles
tin and had to
Kalajo said. "I
g it's going to
but it doesn't
the next few
y back to
earn played
�n University
C. Although
ingles players
:s over the
lents, they
ate Kalajo's
:d a close 4-3
men's tennis
I American
�h before the
to Greenville
host James
at 2 p.m.
ime Polonius
play the hero
'irates. This
un of the day.
with the bat
CU an easy
Fairfield.
here are no
: only team to
said,
ss improved
II after the
ill play in the
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Finally
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being carded.

VISA
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Now winjOK lAj-eyow Misheard,
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,
I
I
i
I
Registration
Terminal Locations
School or Dept.
School of Allied Health
Total - 7
School of Education
Total -10
School of Health
Human Performance
Total� 4
School of HESC
Total - 4
School of Ind. & Tech.
Total-5
School of Musk
Total - 5
School of Social Work
Total �3
School of Nursing
Total - 5
Anthropology
Total - 2
Biology
Total - 4
Chemistry
Total � 1
Communications
Total -1
t -
Economics
fatal � 1
English
Total-3
Foreign Language
Total - 2
Geography
;Total -2
Geology
Total - 1
History
iTotal - 3
Mathematics
Total� 4
Philosophy
ITotal- 1
Physics
Total � 1
Political Science
Total-2
Psychology
Total -3
Sociology
Total � 2
Theatre Arts
Total rl
Undergraduate Studies
(ATP only)
Total -10
Registrar's Office
Total -13
Location
Anx 1CSDI Office
Anx 6PA Office
310 EHLBIOS
306 OCCT Office
Anx 3PTHE Office
308 CLSCHIMA
Speight 102A
Speight 109
Speight 134
Speight 137
Speight 203
Speight 230
GCB 2318
Flanagan 357
Joyner 103
MC 171
MC177
MC174
Christen bury 203
HESC 130
Flanagan 105
Rawl 343
Rawl 327
Rawl Ann. 139
Wright Ann. 307
Fletcher 102, 134
Fletcher 119
Ragsdale 102
Ragsdale 104 A&B
Rivers 108
Rivers 119
Rivers 157 (Crad. only)
Brewster A214
BN-108
BN-108A
BN-108E
Flanagan 204
Erwin 113
Brewster A429
GCB 2201
FL Reception Area
GCB 3324
Brewster A227
Brewster A229
Graham 101
Brewster A311
Brewster A314
Brewster A316
Austin 129
Brewster A327
Howell 209
Brewster A124
Brewster A126
Rawl 104
Brewster A411
Brewster A414
�312 REHB Office
School of ArtJenkins Fine Arts Center
Total � 2BW Senior Gallery
School of BusinessGCB 3209,
Total - 6GCB 3411
GCB 3414
GCB 3420
GCB 3105
GCB 3203
Hours Open
8:00-12:00
8:00-12:00
8:00-10:002:004:00
8:00-12:00
8:00-12:002:00-4:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-10:002:004:00
8:002:001:00-3:00
8:00-11:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-11:001:004:30
8:00-12:003:00-5:00
Spec. PermissionProblems
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:301:004:00
8:00-11:002:004:00 1
8:00-12:003:004:00 1
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-2:00
8:00-12:002:00-5:00
8:00-11:001:304:30
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:664:00
8:00-12:002:304:30
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:30
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-5:00
8:004:00
I
Honors Program
Total-2
Messick 106
Brewster B101
Brewster A102
Brewster B103
Whlchard 100
Whichard 101
Whlchard 102
Whichard 104
Whichard 105
GCB 2026
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:30
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
s (' s
luloilKlll'll
')cc Hcsp
RS
328 2149
- Sisic
(I ICCCs
11 N numbers
liv!�isl r.il ionmv
4
2
4
4
2
2
2
3
All students are encouraged to check the web for course
schedules and availability, tags, and registration terminal
locations on the Office of the Registrar's home page at East
Carolina University. You can go there directly by typing:
http:www.ecu.edureglstrarregistrar.html






-A volunteer who helps kids
-Real Crisis Center volunteers
-A volunteer who helps the homeless
-ECU majors that require volunteer service
�Matching students to the many needs in the
, �i.
AT" .
-��r �

� �
�Jtic�?s
se
al
iast
VOLUNTEERISM





2 Tw��y. Mttch 26, 1998
focugsrction
The East Ciroliniin
I
Student Volunteer
Program
7000 strong
"There is a
light in all of
us. We only
need to share
it. Do
something
good. Feel
something
real
ECU student volunteer program poster.
Judy Baker provides for
68 agencies
Kerrv S. Watson
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Outside Christenbury 201, a
poster on the bulletin board
reads: "There is a light in all of
us. We only need to share it. Do
something good. Feel something
real Welcome to the office of
the ECU student volunteer
program.
From the size of this small
office, one would think nothing
goes on here, but the opposite is
true. Judy Baker, director of the
ECU student volunteer program,
has more than 7,000 forms, filled
out from ECU students who are
volunteering. "And that's not
counting the students that just
went out ton their own and the
sororities and fraternities that I
talk to about volunteering
Baker said.
The ECU student volunteer
program started
out small. But,
with the help of
Baker, and the
students of ECU,
the program has
68 agencies
ranging from
Adventures in
health to
PICASO (the Pitt
County Aids
Service
Organization.) A
list, provided by
the student
volunteer
program,
contains all 69.
This list contains
contacts for the agencies, what
type of activities they do there,
and what special events they
plan. For example, the Little
Willie Center is a program for
latch-key, home-alone at risk
kids. Volunteers are needed to
drive vans, assist with computers,
be coaches and be Girl Scout and
Boy Scout leaders. The list also
gives addresses on each agency
and contact persons.
Baker said that ECU students
are really making a difference
with their volunteering. Sharon
Schlichting, with the Literacy
Volunteers of America-Pitt
County, says that ECU students
are wonderful. Students have
installed computer programs,
helped with the spelling bee and
have been hostesses.
"We rely heavily on ECU
students says Suzy Walker, from
the Ronald McDonald House.
Dean Foy, with the Special
Olympics, says that throughout
the year his organization receives
700-
8 0 0
students
volunteers.
"ECU students
do an excellent job
Foy said. "If it was not for ECU
students our program would not
be what it is today The program
is one of the
largest
Special
Olympics
programs in
the state.
What can
volunteerism
do for you? It
can help you
gain
experience
that may
help you get
a job and it
can help you
decide on a
major by
actually getting out and working
in your field of choice. Ircan also
help you make a difference in
someone's life.
The purpose of the program is
to keep people volunteering. It
doesn't matter why you go the
first time, what matters is that
you keep going back.
Volunteering is ongoing it
never stop's "It becomes very-
personal Bakers says " You
learn something everyday, and
that is important to me . . . if you
don't learn anything, then why
do you live?"
A student volunteers at Wahl-Coats Elementary School in an after-school program.
PHOTO BY CUT BUCK
Students are helping out at the Plaza's Easter Bunny program.
PHOTO BT JASON FEATHER
To get involved in the ECU student
volunteer program:
�Go to Christenbury 201
�Ask Judy Baker for a list of agencies, and
look it over
�Fill out a risk-management insurance sheet
(it's free)
�Go volunteer!
Source: unknown
REAL Crisis Center
provides many programs
Volunteers trained for
variety of crises
Ellen Fletcher
FOCUS SECTION WHITER
It's 3 a.m. and the phone rings
again. A girl is crying because her
boyfriend has broken up with her.
She needs someone to talk to and
right now she knows the person
on the other end will listen.
How does she know this? She
knows because she is talking to a
volunteer from the REAL Crisis
Center. The center is a private
non-profit organization for anyone
who needs help. It is open 24
hours a day, seven days a week
and counseling is free and
confidential. Although it is
known for its phone lines, the
REAL Crisis Center also does
walk-in, group and off-site
counseling.
"We are a vary busy
organization said Tracy Scott,
program coordinator. "We receive
anywhere from 400-450 phone
calls a month. And that's just our
crisis line
ECU students started the
REAL Crisis Center 27 years ago.
It began as a campus organization
set up for drug counseling and a
place for peers to talk to someone.
Today it is much more.
In addition to telephone
counseling, the REAL Crisis
Center also houses the Rape
Crisis Program for Pitt County.
"When they call us, we will
meet them at the hospital, go
through police interviews with
them and even sit with them
through the court process if they
want us to said Scott, who is also
a Pitt County rape victim
advocate. The center is also
trying to start a support support
group for rape victims in the court
system. It would provide
explanations of all the legal terms
and processes victims sometimes
would never know.
The REAL Crisis Center
provides community outreach
programs in which volunteers visit
high schools or local sororities and
fraternities and speak on subjects
such as rape or sexual assault.
The center also provides
information through its Child
Care Options program, a non-
profit child care resource and
referral service that serves
parents, providers of child care
and employees in Pitt County and
the surrounding areas.
"We give out information on
anything from in-home care to
nutritional food guidelines Scott
said. ,
The REAL Crisis Center has
46 volunteers and will be adding
another 20 from the next training
class. The volunteers go through
a 56-hour training
program. There are
32 hours of class
time, twice a week
for eight weeks.
The volunteers
have homework
and are tested on
the material. They
then enter the
center and do a 24-
hour internship in
three-hour
increments.
"We are very proud of our
training program Scott said.
The volunteers, all of whom are
ECU students, are trained in
every area of crisis. They begin
the classes with crisis intervention
and learn the dynamics of
domestic violence, sexual assault
and suicidology
"Everyone is trained for
everything Scott said. "And we
make sure the volunteejfc are able
'We are a
vary busy
organization.
We receive
anywhere from
400-450 phone
calls a month.
And thafs just
our crisis line
Tracy Scott
program coordinator
to handle any type of situation
The REAL Crisis Center has
come a long way in 27 years.
From drug counseling to helping
rape victims, the volunteers have
done it all.
"It's definitely not a depressing
environment Scott said.
"Sometimes our clients don't
realize how far they have come.
But we do, and that's a rewarding
feeling





3 Thundiy, March 26. 1998
f0CUSscdion
Till East Carolinian
Mentor program
TARGETS
at risk teens
Students serve as role
models
Bobbie Perry
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Sometimes it takes more than a
village to raise a child. It takes a
university, too, as some ECU
student volunteers are finding in
their work with the Governor's
One-on-One Mentoring Program.
Kim Morris, a junior business
major, manages to spend four
hours a week mentoring a 16-
year-old girl who needs a positive
role model in her life. Since
November, when she began
working with the troubled teen,
Morris has rewarded her with the
use of a VCR for regular school
attendance; she has arranged for
her to mother a computerized
baby doll that randomly cries
when hungry, wet or neglected;
and she recently set up an
audition that may eventually lead
to a singing career for the
talented girl.
Ken Dunham, an ECU
graduate student and pre-med
candidate, juggles a job, his
studies and at least four hours a
week working with an at-risk boy.
Since July, Dunham and the pre-
teen have enjoyed going to
movies, reading, roller blading
and just hanging out together.
"It makes me feel good to
think that I have a positive
impact on his life Dunham said.
"But I've learned a lot from him,
too
The One-on-One Mentoring
Program is succeeding, thanks to
such dedicated volunteers and to
the promises made to America's
young people at nationwide
summits heralding 1998 as 'The
Year of the Volunteer
Judy Baker, director of ECUs
student volunteer program,
recently participated in the
governor's Summit on America's
Promise and Volunteerism in
Greensboro. One of the state's
1,000 delegates, Baker said the
highlight of the meeting was
Maya Angelou, who sang a
booming rendition of "The Sun
Don't Shine No More
"She was comparing rainbows
to volunteers who come shining
through just when people are are
their worst Baker said. "She
inspired the audience to renew
their personal commitments to
their communities. I thought,
'Wow! This is what it's all about
I wanted to rush. back to my
office and get to work
The summit pledged to
support America's Promise,
presented last year by General
Colin Powell at the President's
Summit for America's Future in
Philadelphia. Its goal is to
provide the fundamentals
needed to improve the lives of
two million additional American
youths by the year 2000. This
commitment is paying off, said
ECU One-on-One Mentoring
AMERICA'S PROMISE
TO YOUTH MADE AT
THE NATIONWIDE
VOLUNTEER SUMMITS:
�Mentor- Provide an on-going
relationship with a caring adult
�Protect-Offer safe places in which to
learn, play, grow and develop
�Nurture-Ensure a healthy start and a
healthy lifestyle
�Teach-Teach a marketable skill
through effective education
�Serve-Find opportunities to give
back through community service
sourceiunknown
Program Coordinator Natalie
Edwards. Last year, only 12 of
the 12,685 children in the state's
program ended up in a juvenile
training school. "Think of the.
savings to North Carolina
Edwards said. "Every child in
training school costs taxpayers
$48,500 a year
In addition to the 16 currently
trained ECU mentors, the
program needs more volunteers.
Any mature student wishing to
make a positive impact on a child
should call Edwards at 328-1554.
A six-hour training session and an
annual commitment of four hours
a week are required.
Service organizations are also
encouraged to help with group
activities or by financial
contributions to the program.
Volunteers at
COMMUNITY SHELTER
help homeless
Homeless come from
strange places and
circumstances, student
volunteer says; if students
want to volunteer they will
find the time, said
volunteerstudentmom
Meredith Collier
FOCUS SECTION WRITER
Barbara Lee is a volunteer who
spends about 10 hours a week at
the Greenville Community
Shelter on Manhattan Avenue,
cooking food, doing laundry amd
answering phones.
"It feels really good to give
something back to the
community she said.
The junior, majoring in special
education, said she looks forward
to cooking for the residents. Lee
explained that it can be
depressing and stressful to live in
the shelter. She makes time to
encourage and talk to residents
after she cooks.
Lee, a South Hill, Va. native, is
at the Greenville Community
Shelter every Sunday cooking
lunch. She also cooks some
Saturday mornings. Lee said that
cooking is her responsibility
because she made a promise to
cook. It is as important to her as if
it were a paying job. She feels
that if people are going to
complain about problems in the
community, they should get
involved in the community and
volunteer. Lee is the one person
"It feels really good
to give something
back to the community
Barbara Lee
volunteer
who practices what she preaches.
The Greenville Community
Center opens at 6 p.m. and is
open until 8 a.m. Residents must
check in during this time. The
shelter has 50 beds for the men
and 28 for the women and
children. Lee says that they never
turn people away. If all the beds
are full, the shelter has sleeping
bags to put on the floor. The
number of people in the shelter is
always in flux. The shelter stays
full in the winter but usually
empty in the summer.
The number of volunteers also
varies. Lee is encouraged by the
number of couples and families
who volunteer through the winter
holidays. She said that whole
families will come in on
Thanksgiving and Christmas to
spend the day helping those less
fortunate than
themselves.
Diana B.
Magoon is the
operations
director at the
Greenville
Community
Shelter. She
admits that it is
very difficult to
put an exact
number on the amount of
homeless people in Greenville.
One reason is that many people
who lose their homes go to live
with family or friends. According
to Magoon, there are more than
1,000 residents at the shelter in a
year.
The shelter offers programs to
help residents. Parenting classes,
GED classes and Narcotics
Anonymous and Alcoholics
Anonymous meetings all prepare
the residents for when they no
longer need the shelter. The
shelter also helps residents with
finding jobs and housing.
Lee is concerned that people in
the community may not
understand what kind of people
live in a shelter. She is afraid that
they are stereotyped. There are
people with college educations
and former middle-class
backgrounds. Lee said that most
people in America live paycheck
to paycheck. A person could have
a college degree and a well-
paying job, but downsizing could
cause a displaced worker to be on
the street in a matter of months.
Judy Baker heads the
volunteer program at ECU
through which Lee volunteers.
Baker said that if people want to
volunteer, they will
make time to volunteer.
Lee, a student and
mother, makes time to
help others. Lee said the
shelter needs people to
volunteer, including
volunteer to babysit
while parents take
classes. Volunteers are
also needed to answer
phones, do clerical work
and help with
maintenance.
Lee is also on the
Board of Directors at the
Shelter Clinic. The clinic
is a volunteer program
through the ECU School
of Medicine that helps
the homeless population.
A free general clinic is offered
Monday nights, a pediatric clinic
every other Wednesday and a
women's clinic every other
Thursday.
Lee is concerned that people
associate volunteerism as a
punishment because the court
sentences offenders to
community service.
"It is not punishment; it is a
reward she said.
Barbara Lee is
concerned that
people associate
volunteerism as
a punishment
because the court
sentences offenders
to community
service.
"It is not
punishment; it is
a reward'�





IIP
4 Thund.y, March 26. 1998
focilS strl ion
Tkt Em Carolinian
Senior's
(commitment to)
service garners experience
"I've been blessed with
such an awarding
experience. These families
need and appreciate me.
I am overwhelmed by
Faico works with
Family Support
Networks
STAGES DIENER
FOCUS SECTION WHITEK
Melissa Faico, an ECU
senior, spends 15 hours in
class, but then she spends
another 20 hours working
outside of class and doesn't
even get paid.
Faico, a family and
community service major,
wanted to gain experience in
her field, so she chose to do a
360 hour internship with the
Family Support Network.
Faico works form 11:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Family Support
Network's goal is to meet
the needs of families with
premature infants or
children who are at risk for
developmental disabilities,
behavioral disorders, suicide
attempts or chronic illness.
Family Support Network
enhances the lives of
children with special needs
by working with their
families and the
professionals who serve
them.
Faico works with the
hospital program in the neo-
natal and pcdiatric ward at
Pitt Memorial Hospital.
Here, she makes routine
visits and talks with parents
whose child is in the hospital
or has died. Faico is there to
provide emotional support, a
listening ear, and
information on the child's
condition. She also
recommends programs, such
as Parent to Parent
Programs, which put parents
in touch with other parents
who have a child with needs
similar to those of their own
child.
Along with routine visits,
Faico sits in on -rounds with
doctors. "At first I had no
idea what the doctors were
talking about, but I am
slowly catching on to their
terminology Faico said.
She currently is researching
different types of
bereavement, she will then
write, organize and design a
bereavement packet. She'll
also attend an Early
Intervention Conference in
Winston-Salcm on April
17th, and she will visit other
agencies that work in
conjunction with Family
Support Network. "I am
re ally '
getting .a
feel of
different
agencies
and
different
types of work out there
Faico said.
Faico has taken the skills
she learned in the classroom
and has been able to apply
and use them in her
internship and her future
pursuits. Faico plans to
attend graduate school here
at ECU and hopes to get her
masters in Marriage and
Family Therapy. Her career
the impact I have on
their lives
Melissa Faico
plan is to continue working
with families, just as she is
doing with Family Support
Network. "I've been blessed
with such an awarding
experience. These families
need and appreciate me. I
am overwhelmed by the
impact I have on their lives
Faico said.
iM
TUESDAY
MARCH 31.
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do anything t
ECU polic
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Offic
Jones E
sitefi
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EMPRESS 0
In a recent be
officials oven
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the east


Title
The East Carolinian, March 26, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 26, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1263
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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