The East Carolinian, February 24, 1998






TUESDAY
FEBRUARY 24. 1998
VOtUME 73. ISSUE 25
Eight cars towed from University Exxon
lot after Berlin Symphony performance
Off-rampus
parking for event
patrons a concern
Mi nie Hack won h
Several E 1 Performing
Arts Series patrons co
out from viewing a concert of
the Berlin Symphony
received a .great shock tl is
weekend.
Patrons emerged from the
concert to discover theii
had been towed awav
Thirtv-eight out-of-town
patrons parked in the parking
lot of the I niversit Exxon.
located on Fifth Street.
Saturday night, but only 30
cars remained at the end of
the evening when the concert
let out.
Jackie James, manager of
the University Exxon,
claimed that when he arrived
at the Exxon station on
Saturday night to place a car
he had towed in the garage,
he could not get into the
store.
James claims rhat the cars
were blocking the entrance
he was trying to gain access
to.
"I came to get in mv place
of business University
Exxon and all the doors were
blocked James said.
t the time the incident
took place, the Exxon was
c losed.
The store,
however, offers
a 24-hour
w r e c k e r
service. This is
the reason vvh
James had
arrived at the
station.
All eight
cars were
towed to
another Exxon
Station located
on Greenville
Boulevard, where the owners
were to pick them up.
Posted in the lot of the
Exxon arc sins that read
"Customer Parking Onlv:
Towing Enforced However,
sources sa that patrons of
the Arts Series have parked in
the I
w ith
"I nregistered vehicles
tor a performaru t that
the public will attend do
not need a permit on the
weekend"
Pat Gertz
before
full
know ledge of
James.
Out of the J8
cars. James
only towed
eight.
"I just
r e m o v e d
what I had to
get m he

s iac' sav
the cars were towed at the
owner's expense, which can
cost anew here from S25-S65 a
car.
he
umvcrsirv
alls
I niversitx Exxon for most of
-wing needs.
lames declined to
- en; when asked il
felt guilty about tov
that were patronizing i
university-sponsored event.
I his incident has brought
up questions regardii .
non-registered patron-
park when they come I
events such as this one.
Pat Gertz, administrative
officer of Parking and I i
Services, indicated that on
the weekend, parking is
relatively unrestricted.
"Unregistered vehicles lor
a performance that the public
will attend do not need a
permit on the weekend.
(iertz said.
Patrons may park in any
trietcd places that are
available without penalty.
Restricted places such as
handicapped I tire
ones arc still off limns.
(iertz indicated that ever
on the weekdays, university
ials
;ent.
" � a
performance that v
public will attend, we will not
ticket after 7 p.m (jcrt
stated
Anvone attending a
university performance or
special event, whether il
student or a non-student,
should not. however, park in
tricted off-campus lots
Restricted parking lots
include those owned by
pus.
B-GLAD celebrates
PRIDE week f
"Blue Jeans Day"
slated for Fridaw
Feb. 21
HOLU HvkkW
SSSISTWI MFttSEDtTt
BisexuaK. (ias. Lesbians ai d llies
for DiversitN (B-GLAD) kicked oft
Pride Week londav : celebrate
the tight against discrimination and
their message of accepts
Members and supporters i if
group hope this will be the largest
t in the three year
historv
Jeffrey Ocrsh. the group's
adviser. sas Pride Week has always
been well-supported by members ol
the group, but that attendance from
those not directly involved has not
been as constant.
"Attendance has been varied
from the outside community two
vears ago it was prettv good and last
year it was pretty slim Gersh said.
1'he organization, which has
been chartered in its current form
since 1994, said that this ear. an
attempt has been made to advertise
the even; well and plan programs
rhat will be of interest not only
those in the group, but to those
curious about gav and lesbian issues.
Speakers from the university and
the Pitt County I1)S Service
Organization (PICASO) wiil
present on topics such as lesbian
health issues, the process ol coming
out and safer sex practices.
On Fndav. which has been
named "Blue jeans Day B-GLAD
will feature the culmination of the
week's events with a picnic on the
front lawn of Mendenhall. B-GLAD
members sav everxonc on campus is
encouraged to wear blue jeans (or a
swatch of denim fabric) as a symbol
that they believe discrimination
based on affectional orientation is
wrong. Veronica Olass. the
organizations president, said tl
though the concept of wearing blue
leans (a vcrv commonly worn fabric I
may : , .
is being made.
I he reason we use blue j� .
cla is it's not obvious who is gay or
lesbian, and it represents that�it
could lie the person next to you
dlass said, adding that members of
the group will show their pride in
individual ways.
(ilass said she thinks Pride Week
will be well received by the
university at large, and is not afraid
of hostility toward the event.
"We want to have people know
they are welcome to show up at
these events, as well as anvone who
is gav or lesbian and hasn't been to a
B-GLAD meeting�thev should
know this is a sate place to come.
Glass said.
Schedule of events for
Pride Week
Tnda � Information table m front of Wright
Place 10 a.m 1 p.m. Denim swatches for Friday s
"Blue Jeans I )a " available.
Dr. Martha Wishes to speak on the "Coming hit
Process" at 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall 221.
Wednesday�Barry Elmore from PI ASO (Pitt
lhl- Service Organization) will speal
. ailable for questions regarding I ll ll )s issues
at 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall 14.
Thursday�A member of the health education
department will speak about lesbian health issues at
7: in p.m. in General Classroom 2006.
Friday�"Blue Jeans Day B-GLAD encourages
�ne w ho believes it is not right to discriminate on
the basis of affectional preference to wear blue jeans
or a swatch of denim fabric
A picnic will be held on the front lawn ol
Mendenhall from 1 I a.m. to 1 ;
A celebration of pride
Banners representing B-GLAD s Pride Week hang in the mall area of campus Activities are planned for the entire week, including the
tradition of Blue Jeans Day"
PH01 - ' NATHAN
UNC-System President
Broad receives top honor
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Elections
Chair
named
Smith must conduct
election to fill vacant
I Tpost
Molly Broad
named one of
top 84 higher
level educators
I Svstem President
lollv Broad
recently
honored by
i �
i me as
" t the
K4
� level
luntrv.
i the
I e b
issue ot
the
f f i

1 h e
�� e r i c a n
iatii -ii �
ation, the res
is a great
university that
became great A
adership tin it
has 'cm prot ided to
theunki' it) ' r
over 200 years
Molly Broad
a leadership
poll from
l 7
honored
Molly Broad
as one ot
the senior
lead
within
,ic ade i
The poll
11.1
the
inpoii
as c '
last 20 vears. I ht
is a follow ip
s
educators published !()
1 ;
conference held in
September determined
h of the nominees
id reteive hoi
The awards
broken up into
areas, voung le
or leaders
PRESI0ENT
ot Robert
Hamilton Smith was the topic of
discus Mi mda S( JA
meeting
not attend the
meeting, but. according 'to Scott
Forbes. SGA president. Smith
asserts he will be present ar all
future SGA and executive
mittee meetings.
Smith's tirst duty will be to
i onduc t an election to till the
the v ice presidential
term vacated by Sean VIcManus.
Forbes ind the S JA ire at tually
again having an election, because
the appointment will be tor sucl
short tin t is a vvastt
tve to hold the
change the
constitution. 1'hev can't do this
without a Jo perceni vote by the
student body, which is more than
thev get at presidential elections.
according ti Forbes.
I lolding 'his would be
expensive, and would not change
the an election must be-
held in the next three weeks.
because tl enough time.
es said Smith is well-
. itied for thi- I le is
sports director foi WZMB and has
held sevel ions on
campus. R rb - said tha from his
presence at the interview, he-
appears to lie good at delegating
authority and I others.
He also lives on campus, which the
committee saw as a positive quality.
Smith's duties will be to appoint
mittccs to work the polls and
set up new scanning positions tor
them.
With the new One ard sysi
. lace, the old process of marking
off " ers on the back of the
student activitv card to ens .
re than on.
be re .iced Now the cards will be
scanned fi i this p irpose
Bet a eed I
cle 'ill have
sn is hoping
lent
partic ipation even more Smith will
have to set the date for the new
election within the next week to
give candidates the mandatory two
weeks to i ampaigi Smith said one
of his first tasks will be to research
the ne ard system and find out
w he can get more voter
participation from the student
i ants him to do an
cxp todeten inevvhat
u about
andidacy
"1 feel like I can touch on a
diverse crowd within the student
population and help find out wl
it' m the student
government and who (u wants to
S nith said
lbs leadership background
, : :sident ol his
, I Si and the
k district.
trades for
hoi -� i- well as his
pi isition at WZMB. 1 le
my tim
"I wouldn ;
I didn t
' rill it "
. jition
, said, " I wi Mild like
:� I
I
- I
itics
TODAY
Windy
high 55
low 44
TOMORROW
Sunny
Opinion
All should have
scholarship
opportunities
0 Lifestyle
IE Sports
SAGA introduces
Japanamation
.uMimwwuimiww)i!�iir
'
A
vwv tec ecu edu
Do you feel safe in your
dor
practice Safer Sex9
YES
the east Carolinian
newsroom






2 Tuesday. February 17, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Date rape drugs
not thing of past
across
the state
Ten families evacuated
near Cape Fear
WILLARD (AP)� Ten families
in a mobile home park were
evacuated here Thursday after
flood waters from a tributary of
the Northeast Cape Fear River
inundated their properties.
First black woman
elected student body
president
CHAPEL HILL (AP) �
Students at the nation's oldest
public university have elected for
the first time a black woman to be
student body president. Reyna
Walters is oniy the second woman
to hold the top student office in
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill's 205-year history.
Walters, 20, a junior from
Greensboro, defeated Lacey
Hawthorne by about 300 votes
Wednesday.
across
the nation
Delta College plans to
drop music division
SAGINAW, Mich. (AP) � Delta
College is planning to phase out
its music program over the next
two years.
Paul C. Hill, chairman of the
college's Humanities Division,
said the decision was made
because of low enrollment. .Also,
the number of music credit hours
offered by the school has
decreased over 42 percent in the
last eight years. "I'm a musician. It
breaks my heart Hill told The
Saginaw News recently.
Bus driver charged with
raping two teens
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) � A bus
driver was in jail Friday charged
with sexually abusing two special
education students.
Kevin Anderson, 29, of
Louisville, was fired from his job
driving a shuttle van for Atlantic
Paratrans of Kentucky Inc which
contracts with the Transit
Authority of River City to
transport students.
Two students find
themselves in
unexpected situation
NINA M. DRY
STAFF WHITER
Manv women think they are safe
from' being slipped date rape
drugs, but as two ECU students
discovered, it can happen to
anyone.
"My friend and I were dancing
with these guys and they bought
us some drinks Sugar said.
Soon after, both Sugar and her
friend started feeling so strange
that they left the club. Upon
returning to their residence hall,
Sugar said she began
experiencing dizzy spells and
hvperventilation attacks shortly
after her friend went to sleep.
The next morning Sugar said
her friend awoke in a paralyzed
state, unable to move or recall
any of the events of the previous
night. Both
women
believe the
date rape
drug called
Rohypnol was
slipped in
their drinks.
Rohypnol,
also known as
the "date rape
drug are
white tablets
no larger
than an
that
aspirin
a r e
manufactured in Mexico by
Hoffman-La Roche Inc a large
pharmaceutical company.
Although they are not available
legally in prescription form in the
United States, they are legal in
about 60 countries as a treatment
for insomnia.
Rohypnol originally had no
color, taste or smell, so it was easy
for someone to slip it into
another's drink. But this has
changed.
"On Oct. 16,
announced by
1997,
the
it was
North
Carolina Allegiance Against
Sexual Assault that Rohypnol was
no longer colorless said Tracy
Scott, a Pitt County rape victim's
advocate for the Real Crisis
Center. "If dissolved in a drink,
the drug will give off a blue tint.
Even in dark drinks, it will give
off a murky color
According to Heather Zophy, a
health educator at the Student
Health Center, the effects of the
drug will be felt about 15
minutes after it has been
ingested and will reach their
peak in two hours. Side effects
will persist for an additional six
to eight hours.
"Symptoms caused by this
drug can be intensified in the
presence of alcohol, such as
blackouts and amnesia Zophy
said.
According to the Metro
Toronto Research Group on Drug
Use, other symptoms include
decreased blood pressure,
drowsiness, confusion, dizziness,
difficulty speaking and moving
and simultaneously feeling
extremely hot and extremely
cold. It also can cause aggressive
tendencies even though it is
normally a sedative.
Rohypnol has been gaining
popularity with high school and
college students because of the
fact that it's a "hangover-free"
high and they are relatively
cheap, ranging in price of 50
cents to $3. However, it does
have detrimental effects.
"Since 1987, there have been
2,638 documented cases of
Rohypnol seizures in the United
States due to the consumption of
too many of these pills Scott
said.
Another drug out on the
market similar to Rohypnol is
Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB),
better known as liquid ecstacy.
"GHB can be used in
situations of rape because it
causes a
comatose
effect to
i t s
victims
Zophy
said .
"After
taking
GHB, the
person
usually
cannot
remember
the events
that took
place six
to eight hours after the drug is
ingested
GHB has the same odorless
and colorless characteristics of
Rohypnol, but has a somewhat
salty taste. The symptoms are
also similar.
If, for any reason, someone
thinks that he or she is
developing symptoms from GHB
or Rohypnol, there are places to
seek help. Student Health
Services offers testing for both
drugs. Since traces of Rohypnol
or GHB can be detected in one's
urine up to 72 hours after
consumption, urine drug
screening can be done at Health
Services to find traces of the
drug. Weekend hours of 9 a.m. to
noon are available. Pitt Memorial
Hospital will administer blood
and toxicology tests to screen the
system for the drug.
Zophy said one of the most
important things anyone can do
is make certain to give their
physician all of the information
possible.
"It's important to tell the
health care provider all that has
happened to them so that we can
take the measures needed to get
them the help they need Zophy
said.
Rohpynol "date rape drug" is a white tablet no
larger than an asprin. legal in 60 countries.
FILE PHOTO
Cuba, Russia to forge
ahead with nuclear
power plant
MEXICO CITY (AP) � Russia
and Cuba will try to forge ahead in
completing a nuclear power plant
in the western Cuban province of
Cienfuegos, officials of the two
nations said Saturday.
The two countries scuttled
plans to invite other countries to
join in finishing the Juragua plant,
about 185 miles (300 kilometers)
southeast of Havana, because of
opposition from the United
States, Cuban officials said.
U.S. case against Saddam
built on cumulative
record of violations
WASHINGTON (AP) � -At the
core of President Bill Clinton's
case for bombing Iraq are two
charges: persistent violations of
U.N. resolutions since the Gulf
War ended in 1991 and growing
worries about Saddam Hussein's
ability to harm his neighbors.
Taken together, the United
States is using these charges to
cast the Iraqi president as a
cheater whose defiance is making
a mockery of the United Nations
and as a bully who is a grave threat
to the world.
THE FACTS ON ROHYPNOL.
THE "DATE RAPE" DRUG
? .� ,
taid to be ten dines the snengch oi
�����.����
- fiohvpnol was porced ir '
.V
Irug -�h no medicai purposes life bctom
r same class of drug
mclack
R2, Mexican Vanum, rib ami rope.
The average east ft one c"
The drug, ess be used as i
tmhimxkm with cassias ic moderate the eiBec
not likelv to ovetdose on Hahrt
�iW
President
continued from page
Broad received recognition in
the area of senior leaders within
academia.
Broad began her leadership of
the UNC-system last August
and is already making waves.
She has dedicated herself to
looking at how learning is
changing in order to change the
schools appropriately. Since she
took over, she has made
improvements in the roll of
affirmative action in the
admissions process as well as
n to facilitate sexual c
other areas.
When asked about her
leadership of the system. Broad
said, "This is a great university
that became great because of
leadership that has been
provided to the university for
over 200 years Broad has only-
been president of the UNC-
System for about six months,
but hopes to make many
changes and imptovements,
especially in areas such as
diversity.
In response to receiving the
honor. Broad simply said. "It
came as a surprise to me, a very
pleasing surprise
Wedding Invitations
Our wecBing cotmiltaote will assist you with
selecting the invitation or announcement that fits
yOW wedding theme and social occasion. We offer
you a large selection of wedding stationery at
reasonable prices.
Come in and talk with uswe know weddings and
want to help you take that first step down the isle.
A Proper Setting
ARLINGTON VILLAGE � GREENVILLE
756-3363 t-800-633-J943
MEDIUM 1-TOPPING $2.99
PIZZA PICK UP ONLY
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(GUM-B)
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MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
24-Hour Message Service
VISA
�53 -last 10th Street (at the foot of College HH Drive)
757-0376 7574991
I
AI
Eft. i . k. !� .
" and DISTRIBUTION OF ASHES
Wednesday February 25
AM AT THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
NOON W ROOM 244 OF MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Mm call or visfc H� Gentr4stly Nrtweeact 8:30 m m& 9 f?m
V&eth, Chaplain m4 Campus MaJster
"1Kb Generation
Youth Con
withJmstman Curtis
Command Cxperiei
the power of (5
S.00 preregistration
30.00 day of the a
Februan27-28
�B fluk School,
Green!lie, NC
Contact:
Faith and Victory Church
@ 355-6621
n�
Stop the Killer "B
r,
"
ECU Student Health Senice is offering vaccinations
to protect you against a serious illness called
Hepatitis "B"
Three dose complete series: 0,1, 6 months
How Much? Under age 20 cost per shot is $16.50
20 years and older cost $33.34 per shot
(greatly reduced prices)
How Can You Get It? Hepatitis B virus is easier to "catch" than you may
realize. The virus is found in body fluids and can be transmitted through
intercourse (all types), sharing razors or personal care products and can
enter your body through an opening in the skin or through your eyes or mouth.
Call 328-6317 to make an appointment to get your vax






f"
3 Tuesday, February 17, 1998
new
The East Carolinian
Economic conditions best in 30 years
300 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
mM-m -rr-7 itiA 4�a Come enjoy the music,
Wr; 15 7-1710JW. the food, and learn mor
!� tn It �� ' about the colorful history
A SllCe Of MOrOl GrOS of Mardi Gras and the
e with the doll.
Bob, Ian. & the Staff
would like to invite you
to experience a
Slice of Mardi Gras
February 24th.
We will be serving
authentic New Orleans
foods, including a
King Cake.
Served from 11:00a.m. - 3:00p.m.
Tar River
County Couftbouge fTl
Courtlld Cafe 1
3 MSwa
H
a 4th Street
5th Street
Brown & Brown
YITORMYN AI

)
TruthJjualityJustice
123 W.3rfSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
Macro-picture of
conditions excellent
JENNY VlCKERS
STAFF WHITER
Presently, economic conditions in
the U.S. are the best they have
been in "30 years, yet economists
can not explain why or how long
this will last.
Some economists believe there
arc several possible reasons for the
good economy, low inflation, growing
productivity rate and thus, a natural
rail in the rate of unemployment.
The federal Reserve Board has
done a good job keeping the inflation
level low" said Dr. Philip Rothman,
assistant professor in ECU's
economic department.
Rothman believes a high level of
productivity growth contributes to a
good economy.
"Productivity growth is roughly
how much output we get given a
certain amount of input Rjthman
said. "It is the most important
determinant, over the long run, of
economic standards of living It
seems to be increasing a good deal.
Without a doubt, that unambiguously
would make things better off
Many economists have
investigated productivity rates, and
no one knows for certain why they
have increased.
"I would say it's finally focusing on
prices lowering said Dr.Randall
Parker, associate professor in ECU's
economic department. "Economic
growth stems from having a stable
price level, but I can't demonstrate
that formally It's better to have good
times with no explanations than bad
times with no explanations
Basically, if productivity growth
combines with non-inflationary
growth then the unemployment rate
goes down. The economy, based on
average rates, appears to be good; but
certainly not everyone is enjoying
that fact. Some Americans are losing
their jobs and are blaming it on
downsizing in companies or foreign
competition.
Parker believes downsizing isn't
caused by the economic conditions,
but rather by mechanization and
technology development.
"Machines are now replacing
labor Parker said. "The fact of the
matter is a lot of people are
downsized by the textile industry, not
because 01 foreign competition, but
because of overgrowth in the 70's and
80's. The textile industry in North
Carolina has remained competitive
because of the mechanization that's
going on
Rothman believes this issue has
been over-emphasized.
"It's sad for anyone to lose a job
Rothman said. "The downsizing
occurring isn't historically
precedented or terribly unique.
There are always examples of people
who end up with a dead-end job, and
I don't mean to diminish that
Parker said the North Carolina
state economy is incredibly healthy.
"A very high fraction of the work
force was employed in agriculture at
the turn of the century Parker said.
"Today, it's only about two percent
and failing, and we're still producing a
lot of food. The triangle has an
unemployment rate of less than two
percent
Presently, the economy is in its
84th month of continuous economic
expansion. Despite this current
trend, economists don't know how
long this will last.
At some point in the future it is
safe to say there will be a recession:
why, when, we don't know Rothman
said.
Parker believes the recession will
most likely be mild, unless it is
preceded by a run-up in inflation. He
relates this fact to the post-World War
II recessions that occurred after large
bouts of inflation.
"If we don't have a large bout of
inflation, then, from what we know
since the second World War, it's
unlikely to be a very bad recession
ftrker said.
Two issues important in the
economy today seem to be
distribution of income and the
spending of various entitlement
programs, such as Medicare and
social security.
"From a policy standpoint, a
thorny issue is spending of the
funding of various entitlement
programs Rothman said.
Parker said that the problem of
distribution of income has a good,
simple economic explanation.
"The educated are on an up-
escalator, and the uneducated are on
a down-escalator Parker said. "It's
all about how much you want to
invest in yourself. If you have talent
and skills you can make a lot of
money in today's economy, and if you
don't then you're looking at
minimum wage and competition'
with third world countries for your
job for the rest of your life. Thai's
not much of a future
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I
MUSIC AND
3)
Listen to WZMB 91.3 for band
interviews before the show.
vacon.iiMii
�&
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee. For more information,
cal 328 - 4715 or check out our web page at www.ecuStudentJJnionpirate underground.html
LOOKING FOR A GRADUATE DEGREE?
Prepare yourself for a career in business,
even if you're not a business major
Everywhere you look, there's another degree, another masters
program. Which one is for you?
Master of Science in Accountancy
Cameron School of Business
University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Prepare you for opportunities in:
� public accounting � management consulting
� information systems � general business
It has small classes, can be complete between 10 to 13 months
and is AACSB accredited.
Classes begin:
May 21, 1998for non-accounting undergraduates
August 19, 1998 for accounting undergraduates
For an application or information,
please contact:
Professor Joanne Rockness
(910) 962-3116
(910) 962-3811 (Fax)
rocknessj@uncwil. wil. edu
UNCW
CAMERON
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Brotherhood.
Honor. Respect.
To some these are words.
to live by.
Rush
mrTM
For more information, call 830-5439
Carolina university Housing Services
V
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16 Actor Nielsen
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19 Strike caller
20 Dickens
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4 Neighbor of
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31 Materials for
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33 Starting over
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37 "Pretty Woman-
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38 Snacked
41 Cooperate
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43 Roulette bet
44 Fuji flow
46 Ravers
48 One reindeer
50 Fastened
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54 Cher's ex
57 Urbane
58 Scaredy-cat
60 Scotch shot
61 Huns' leader
65 Domestic worker
67 Fuss
68 Less accurate
69 Peak in Sicily
70 X
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72 Seeffl
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23 Nautical
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27 Tent stake
28 Water pitcher
29 Seldom seen
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35 Lined up
36 Cable station
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38 Yodeler's stage
39 Poibase
40 Writer Hunter
42 Time stretches
45 East Coast cape
47 Desert Storm
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51 Japanese self-
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52 Got around
53 Evil spirits
55 Dubbed
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5 Tuesday, February 24, 1998
The East Carolinian
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So why is it that humanity funds its heroes? Most ECU athletes receive full scholarships
in exchange for their talents. This is not a bad thing. Nobody is upset that sports are
loved far and wide by an incredible majority of humans, and certainly nobody besmirches
the indisputable fact that this university's athletic department brings in a heap of its
budget from atttletic events. There are only questions now as to where the money for the
athletic scholarships comes from. Are they appropriated by student fees? Are they
donated by alumni and enthusiasts, are they earned from the ticket and concession sales
at the events? Could the scholarships be raised from a combination of these sources?
These answers would be nice to have. As for now, we're left to wonder just what it is
about being an athlete that warrants a free ride through school.
Many students at this university work outside of class for the benefit of their
departments and, to some degree, the university. Most of these students, who, like the
athletes, work long and hard at their extracurricular endeavors as well as their regular
assignments, but do not receive any compensation from their departments. There are
scholarship programs and external grant resources that non-athletic students can apply
for, but these usually pay a limited amount of money for a one-time situation, and rarely
involve paying a student's tuition in exchange for his or her pursuit of knowledge.
It would be nice if the university recognized some of the students besides athletes who
invest great amounts of time and energy into projects for the university. But most likely,
such an occurrence is a pipe dream. Nothing is necessarily wrong with the apparent facet
of humanity to celebrate its athletes and celebrities more than its artists and
intellectuals. As long as there have been two humans around capable of beating each
other up, there have been others there who have wanted to watch. We love action,
adventure, danger, pain, violence, shock, drama All those sensual thingies that shake us
into realization like pinpricks in our sides. Athletics arc fun. Everybody loves watching
the 500-pound quarterback plow into some other quarter-ton fellow, busting teeth loose,
jarring vertebrae, cracking ribs, straining muscles causing pain, making us who watch
cringe and bury our faces, peek through our fingers and pick our jaws up from off our
knees.
TEC does"norwant to generalize, but the indefinite size of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium in
comparison with the collective sizes of the Wright Auditorium, the Speight Auditorium,
McGinnis Auditorium, Fletcher Music Center's recital hall, and the Gray Art Gallery
implies that wc humans tend to value sports over other forms of entertainment and
enlightenment. It is no real wonder, understanding society's priorities, why athletes
generally receive a free ride through college in exchange for their talents. The real
wonder lies deeper in why we humans even regard athletes as highly as we do. Why do
we relish physical prowess over intellectual capacity? This is not to assume or imply that
athletics do not involve intelligence and mental involvement, rather to observe that
athletics are much more likely to be regarded as a physical event than a mental one.
So, it still wouldn't hurt for the rest of us who work just as hard as an athlete to get
some recognition for what we do. It wouldn't disservice us or the university at all to
receive some form of compensation for the time and energy we spend researching our
unique endeavors that, in the long run, contribute to humanity's improvement just as do
athletics. No complaints were meant by this statement, really. TEC simply asks the
readers to consider these observations.
OPINION
Keith
COOPER
Columnist
Clayton role model for community
Too often, "movers and
shakers" in the African-
American community do not
get the recognition they
deserve. One African-
American who has
been in the forefront of the
struggle is Congresswoman
Eva M. Clayton
According to the incumbents in
I February, Black History Month,
has been set aside to recognize the
achievements of many giants and
pioneers in the civil rights arena.
Too often, "movers and shakers" in
the African-American community
do not get the recognition they
deserve. One African-American
who has been in the forefront of
the struggle is Congresswoman
Eva IvT Clayton, First
Congressional District
Representative for the State of
North Carolina. Although her
accomplishments for the African-
American community arc
commendable, she is truly a hard-
working, commitment-driven
leader for all members of her
district.
A native of Savannah, Georgia,
Eva Clayton made history in 1992
when she became the first African-
American woman to represent the
State of North Carolina. She was
also the first African-American to
represent North Carolina in the
U.S. House of Representatives in
100 years. Of course, George
White (black) represented North
Carolina in the House until he left
office under intimidation and
pressure in 1901. Incidentally, he
was elected under the Fusionist
Party, an organization of white
Populists and black Republicans.
Additionally, Clayton was elected
President of the Democratic
Freshman Class, the first woman
ever to hold the office. Moreover,
Congressional staff members
named Clayton the "Most
Influential Newcomer" to the
103rd Congress.
Clayton is a strong advocate for
economic development, rural
health, a decent minimum wage
rather than a poverty wage,
vocational training, reducing teen
pregnancy, small farmers and small
businesses, and a host of other
causes. She has been on the right
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
HQNEYCUTT
Respect non-smokers' rights
Have a little respect for the
people around you. Although
it may not seem lite it, there
are people around who do
not smoke.
So, smoking is in style now. I have
a scarce handful of friends who
don't do it, and everywhere I look
someone is firing up. And I don't
care.
I think that smoking cigarettes
is as much a fad as celebrities
smoking cigars, disco and Nfcnilla
Ice. Bell bottoms are in one year
and out the next, and so it goes
with cigarettes. So I, never having
been one to fall victim to a trend,
have never had the urge to develop
a serious smoking habit. Sure, I
tried to be cool in middle school
with all my friends hiding behind
someone's house with a single
stolen cigarette of her mother's.
We'd pass it around and nobody
ever actually inhaled, but we sure
did feel cool. After I teamed to
inhale much later in life and
discovered that tobacco and my
delicate system disagree on several
key issues, suph as whether to
keep down my lunch, 1 decided
that the tobacco industry would
have to find another target for its
underage smoking campaign.
But this is neither here nor
there. The real issue at hand is
problem smokers.
By this I do not mean people
who smoke truckloads of cigarettes
daily and become disgusting, hairy
monsters when denied the
soothing burn for more than 20
minutes. I'm talking about the
realty obnoxious ones. The ones
who insist on exercising their right
to blow their stinky carcinogens
directly into my path of travel in
otherwise healthy places.
Say, for instance, when I'm
walking to class. I'm just strolling
along, enjoying a rare sunny
Greenville day, admiring the butt
of a football player in front of me,
when suddenly, I am confronted by
an ethereal gray cloud. Upon
drawing in a breath (which is
essential to life on this planet), I
realize that I have just been thrust
into the midst of a thundercloud of
second-hand smoke. After the
initial unpleasantness subsides, I
take' a look around and try to
discern the culprit. Then I sec a
small, lighted stick swinging from
the fingers of some thoughtless
stranger. How people can walk and
smoke simultaneously boggles my
mind anyway. I have difficulty
walking and chewing gum.
I personalty do not care who
smokes. I recognize that everyone
has a right to do as he or she
pleases. You can smoke until your
teeth turn black and you
spontaneously combust; I don't
give a flying fig. However, I refuse
to be drug down into the fierypit
of a cancerous hell with you. The
absolute rudest thing a smoker r
do to a nonsmokcr is blow snx
directly into the nonsmoker's &ce.
It is worse than rude. It is a
horrible and nasty thing to do,
hell holds a special place for di
people. It is located directly
beneath the toilets.
Lately smokers have been
forced out of their natural habitat.
In California it is now illegal to
smoke in a bar or restaurant. This
is due largely to the
disproportionate number of
inconsiderate smokers versus
thoughtful ones.
Have a tittle respect for the
people around you. Although it
may not seem like it, there are
people around who do not smoke.
If you're in a car with one of these
ephemeral creatures, roll down a
window. If you're walking on
campus, watch where you blow
your smoke. Greenville smokers
have it much better than most. You
can smoke in the mall here, of all
things. Don't abuse a privilege like
that.
The moral of the story here is
that if smokers will respect
nonsmokers, then they will gain a
tot more ground than by doing the
opposite, we can all be friends! So
wave your little tubes of joy with
care, and watch what a happy
world ours becomes.
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
If you do the crime, do the time
side of issues geared towards
advancing the social welfare of the
poor, indigent, the elderly, and
others at an economic or social
disadvantage in the First
Congressional District and the
nation.
Clayton docs not forget the
gcrscvering citizens of her district,
he holds regular forums where
she discusses issues fundamental
to moving the district forward as
the new millennium approaches.
When she came to Congress in
1992, the budget deficit was $290
billion. With Clayton's assistance
in voting for the balanced budget
bill and numerous Democratic
initiatives, the budget deficit was
reduced to $23 billion.
Remember, this enormous deficit
was fueled by Reaganomics and
"supply-side" economics.
Clayton, former member of the
Warren County Board of
Commissioners where she served
as chairperson from 1982-1990, is a
champion of causes for bettering
the plight of the poor and middle
class. When, in Wilson, N.C
Governor Bill CJinton, in 1992,
asked voters to support Clayton, I
knew that she was an agent of
change and social progress. When
I shook hands with Clinton and
Clayton that year, 1 knew that,
after twelve years of Reagan and
Bush, there is a light at the end of
the tunnel.
It is a sad day when a woman
dams she was violated and
people accuse her of lying for
personal gain. What gain?
She goes to trial and is
treated like a whore.
You arc right; you arc exactly right.
The chances of the two fraternity
boys recently accused of sexual
assault actually being convicted of
rape are slim to none.
First let us assume that the
victim is, as the letter to the editor
implies, lying. I am willing to buy
this argument. She might be one
of the two percent of women who
file false rape charges (those who
either admit the charges are false
or later recant their story).
Some even say the two percent
is inflamed. It is believed that
either the small minority recant
their testimony because of a
second and third assault, or they
are, in fact, lying.
The second assault stems form
the police handling of the case. I
will admit the police have gotten
better at investigating rape claims.
In the past the police had a
tendency to treat the victims of
rape as criminals.
The third assault comes from
the trial. What person would not
want to go through the humiliation
of a trial? Subject yourself to a trial,
take the witness stand and watch
more mudslinging being heaped
upon you than the average
Presidential election. A nice
defense attorney will try their best
to drag out every sexual experience
you have ever had.
Everything from your first
sexual experience, to a one night
stand you might have had three
years ago; every little thing you
might have done will try to be
introduced into the court. Who
among us can say they have a clean
record?
If the accuser is lying what is
she trying to gain? These boys are
not rich football players. In all
likelihood money might not be her
concern for these claims. Perhaps
another reason, aside from justice,
exists.
Revenge; it must be revenge.
Possibly, she was mad at them for
spurning her. So, she decides to
file rape charges and not being able
to remember anything. Some
make the wrong claim that one-
fourth of rape charges are made
falsely, and part of the reasoning is
revenge. The women making the
claims for purposes of revenge are
not very bright.
Subjecting yourself to an often-
lengthy and dirty trial is a high
price to pay for revenge. Other
ways of getting revenge are easier
and less emotionally traumatizing.
I will refer you to any of George
Hayduke's books on revenge.
Now wc assume she is telling
the truth. The chances for
conviction are small. They saidshe
said is what the trial will end up
being. Unless a witness comes
forth and we know how close
friends arc about keeping secrets,
conviction is unlikely.
It is a sad day when a woman
claims she was violated and people
accuse her of lying for personal
gain. What gain? She goes to trial
and is treated like a whore.
Some people would rather
believe this woman instigated sex
with the two boys, than the claim
she was assaulted. It is likely, these
people would rather call a woman a
liar than admit a problem exists
within society.
If she is telling the truth the
boys will see jail time. The guilty
party always goes to jail; right, O.J.?
Never let anyone keep you contained and
never let anyone keep your voice silent
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr politician, 1971
S
jJtSJUL






6 Tuisdsy. February 22. 1998
The East Carolinian

CD
review
New student club watches Japanamation
Claire Holley
Night Air
mm h Smith
�.IMOKttWTKH
When most people think of anime, or
Japanese animation, they envision
some big-breasted girl whose lips
don't quite move along to the
English words coming out of her
mouth, getting it on with guys
dressed in plastic space-suits or
various creatures of the underworld.
Maybe they also think of Sailor
Moon, whose hackneyed plot pits a
schoolgirl against X-number of
criminals per week with no relief in
sight.
But this is a misrepresentation of
what anime is reallv about, and
ECU's SAGA (School of .Any thing-
Goes Anime), is a relatively new club
dedicated to introducing students to
real anime, as both an art form and a
source of high-quality, imaginative
entertainment.
Somebody please help me, I have no nose!
PHOTO COURTStY OF MICCAH SMITH
"There's a lot of Japanese
.Animation out there. It's not all giant
robotsreally busty womendemons
that want to take over the earth.
There's a lot of good stuff out there
that does have a plot says .Andre
Germain, secretarytreasurer of
SAGA
Problem is, most American
viewers aren't used to following a
plotline unless it comes to soap
operas, and those tend to last way too
long. .An anime plot typically lasts for
26 episodes, long enough for one
season on the air.
During that
time, characters
get a chance to
develop arfd the
story stays fresh
and interesting.
Japanese viewers
don't have to
keep watching
the same
characters do the
same things over
and over, the way
we do with
American
animation.
Anime is not
science-fiction or
shows for different age-groups and
even serious dramatic movies have
Run away!
PHOTO COURTESY
limited to just
fantasy. Comedv,
found outlets in anime. "It's not a
genre in itself; it's a medium says
Robbie Procious, committee
chairperson.
According to Andre, "Most of the
stuff on (Japanese) TV has been
published in one form or another
Manga, or
weekly issues of
several comic
books sold
together in one
volume, often
spawns spin-off
anime series
which follow the
plots of the
books.
The club
Run away! watches one or
of miccah smith two episodes of
various series
every week until the end of the
series, usually around the end of the
semester. Its officers are always on
SEE ANIMATION PACE 7
9 OUT OF 10
John Davis
It's a shame that female musicians
like Paula Cole and Celine Dion
keep getting nominated for
Grammys when there are talented,
brilliant women out there like
Claire Holley. Folks talk a lot about
how well Dion can sing, even
though all she really does is warble
out arpeggios and tremolos that
have nothing to do with the
content (what little there is) of her
songs.
If they knew what good singing
was, they'd be listening to Holley,
who has the vocal range and
flexibility of Jewel, the finesse of
Patsy Cline and the smoothness of
jLyle Lovett. Her voice drips
honey; it's better than milk; it's
'Smoother than that so-called "milk
chocolate" advertisers show rivers
of in Hershey's commercials.
m In other words, folks, Claire
Holley can sing. But don't expect
any fancy-schmancy vocal
acrobatics or show-off high notes.
Leonardo Da Vinci once remarked
that the sign of a master artist was
knowing when not to paint, and
Holley never over-sings. When she-
has to, she creeps on up into the
high notes or she slurs notes to
throw in some twang, but only
when she has to. Most of the time
she just lets her voice sparkle like
the shimmery rainwater you see in
earrv 90's romance movies.
Slot that Holleys just a pretty
voice. No sir. The lady is also a darn
good songwriter, much better than
the aforementioned Cole, much
better than Jewel, or any random
contemporary I can think of at the
moment. It's refreshingly free of
politics or feel-good psychology.Her
lyrics are filled with the poetry of
normal human life, the clumsy
romances and golden moments of
tiny triumph that evervdav folks
feel.
. Combine that with soothing,
sometimes spooky guitar pickin
and crisp, smooth and haunting
melodies and you have quite an
impressive package. Sight Air
doesn't sound like the average
home-made record. Recorded in
Chicago and Carborro, the album is
beautiful as a hvmn and honest as a
hild.
"Keeper of the Crows a
Idriving, inspiring tune with a
scratchy, hopeful melody is just one
of the tender snapshots of wishful,
broken people in evervdav life.
Others, like "Gold Instead of
Steel are sassy, swinging love
songs.
"Mary Visits Elizabeth" retells
che Biblical story of Christ's mother
Ikhat would be Mary for all you
Patholically challenged) visiting
Jjohn the Baptist's mother (that
viould have to be Elizabeth then.
Wouldn't it?) in a modern context.
;� "Smoke" puts on the disguise of
burning incense filling the room
with it's heady sweet smell.
Sometimes sacrifce. sometimes
perfume, the "little stick of
incense" burns away slow but true
just like this album, which keeps on
with it's fragrant and spiritual
emotions steadily right up to the
qyiet and cool "Night Air
� Not since Emraylou Harris has
there been a female songwriter
w,ith such ability. Like Harris.
Holley beautifully and honestly
wraps the stumbling victories of
"just folks" in the cocoon of her
music, giving them energy and
reason to spread their w ings and fly.
COncertreyiews
Cravin' Melon debuts
new bassist
Treading Evans
good and loud
Pvr rkii)
MVKlKttWIWt
Greenville's adopted sons, Cravin'
Melon, returned to The Attic-
Saturday night, but something was
different. The music was a non-stop
set of Cravin' classics and new
tunes, the crowd was the usual pit of
swaying, singing people, but some of
the faces had changed, with one in
particular drawing the most
attention. Earlier this month Cravin'
Melon announced a change-up in
their personnel. Road manager
Dixon Lee who, over time, had
become the fifth and unofficial
member of the
band had left to
pursue different
goals. Even more
noticeable to
fans though, was
the absence of
bassist J.J-
Bowers.
It seems that
earlier this
month Bowers
decided his time
in the hand had
drawn to an end.
After months of
discussion, he
and the band
parted ways to
allow him to
spend more time
with his wife and
two-year-old
daughter.
Fortunately, he
had discussed
this with the
band enough that
a replacement
had already been
considered.
Saturday's
show at The Attic marked the
second show for new bassist, Rob
Cray. Cray stepped into a situation
of intense pressure with his first two
shows being at Raleigh's Lake
Boone Country Club and The Attic,
two of the band's most popular
spots. Despite any pressure he may
have felt on. the inside. Cray
stepped up to the challenge and
remained cool as he filled the shoes
left by Bowers without a gliche.
.After playing guitar for Doolittle,
Cray switched to bass in the bands
Evan and Jerrard and Lost Paradise
out of Raleigh. Playing with these
bands, he got to know the guvs in
Cravin' Melon and the chemistrv
just seemed to work enough that
when Bowers left. Cray was the first
choice for a replacement.
This chemistrv was instantly
noticeable as the band seemed at
Chapman started the intro to "Hey
Sister a feeling of ease and
relaxation radiated from the stage.
As the show progressed, Cray
never sank back into the shadows,
but rather walked around,
interacted with the fans and never
seemed to play the nart of new guy.
Early on it was easily seen that this
was not a case of the three original
members and the new guy, but
rather this was a collective unit from
beginning to end.
Still, the songs themselves
remained the main focus as the
band mixed the show up with brand
new songs and songs from deep in
the band's five year past. Included
in this mix were extended versions
Cravin' Melon look for thier new bassist. Rob Cray in a dark alleyway.
PHOTO COURTSEY OF CRAVIN MELON
ease and in their groove at the
opening of the show Saturday. As
the television screen in front of the
stage lifted and guitarist Jimbo
of "Blossom" that included a new
SEE MELON. PAGE�
MKCVHSVIITH
MMORUKITIK
Treading Evans played at Pantana
Bob's Thursday night, but
unforeseeable technical difficulties
put a sudden end to the
performance. Action Figures
opened the show, with their own
special blend of catchy rock tunes
featuring an acoustic lead guitar.
Whitey followed their act with a
groovy cover of The Stones'
"Svmpathy for the Devil as well
as some heavy original songs. Eddie
White churned out some album-
quality lead guitar licks backed by a
very tight band, including the
world's most earnest-looking
drummer.
One song, a rap reminiscent of
Rage Against the Machine's,
worked the crowd into such a
frenzied state that a brawl broke
out. Some guy was sharing his beer
with the sky and some other guy
didn't appreciate getting rained on
bv it, and the rest is history. The
dance floor was summarily coated
with an undetermined fermented
substance which didn't make for
good traction.
None of this, however, could
srop the sorority babes from
grouping together in full force in
anticipation of the headliner.
Treading Evans. I knew from the
moment the band stepped on stage
that something "different" would
occur: just what, I didn't know.
With pulsating red lights, lots of
smoke and scary Gwar-esque guitar
sounds, they introduced
themselves. Derek is the lead
singer and also plays rhythm guitar;
Nick plays lead guitar and does
backup vocals; Marshall is the
drummer and Neil (from Action
Figures) was on bass that night.
Suddenly, and with more smoke,
the band launched into a coma-
inducing angst anthem (or at least
assume it was, since I couldn'g
understand the lyrics). The bea
was tribal and driving, capable of
pounding all thought out of then
mind and, in the case of the
sorority chicks, replacing it with an
urge to dance a sort of Cure shuffle j
with various Dead-head arm j
movements thrown in. i
Marshall was clearly in control of?
the show, issuing encouraging
phrases to the crowd ("G-Town is
in da hooouuuse) and ripping off
his shirt with much gusto.
Most of the original audience
was driven from the floor by the
sheer waves of sound emanating
from the stage, but, as the saying
goes. What doesnVkfll you drily'
makes you stronger and had they
stayed, they might have
appreciated Nick's effortless guitar
solos, which infused Treading
Evans' bombastic style with color
and interest.
Derek broke a string and, after
pleading fruitlessly with the crowd
for another guitar, spent several
minutes restringing his guitar while
the rest of the band struck up a
mostly-instrumental number.
Whereas most of the band's
other songs were influenced by the
likes of Tool and other assorted
metal bands, this song, which kept
perpetuating itself, reminded me
of the two unhappy hours I spent at
a Widespread Panic concert last
summer.
Fortunately, once Derek was
back onstage everything got back
to normal for a few minutes until
problems with the sound system,
forced the show into early!
retirement.
Treading Evans puts on a good
loud show, but the band could be a!
bit tighter The music is not so
melodic and the lyrics aren't really
audible, but the songs are, on the.
whole, appealing to humanity's
darker, animal nature. Hopefully,
the next time Treading Evans
Local bands play to benefit Real Crises Center
CALEB Rusk
stkf hi rr�
The Attic housed a widely diverse
group of musicians Thursday,
February 19 when bands from near
and far gathered together to
perform at the ninth annual Rock
For Real concert hosted by the Real
Crisis Center of Greenville. The
Real Crisis ("enter is a hotline that
can be called for those who need to
talk to someone about suicide, rape
or any other life crisis. All proceeds
from the Rock For Real concert
went to the Real Crisis Center.
The evening began w ith an open
mic session that allowed young
bands to perform and hope to catch
a few ears in the process. The
opening group consisted of three
guys playing three acoustic guitars.
Things were pretty laid back
throughout their set which
consisted of some original and some-
cover songs.
At this point, there was hardly an
audience, rather there were only a
handful of people at the Attic. One
of the guys commented. "We dont
have a name yet but I think we arc-
going to call orrselvcs MCI because
we have a lot of
friends and family
in the audience
The handful-
sized crowd did get
a few surprises from
this group when
MCI did renditions
of Bob Dylan's "All
Along the
W a t c h t o w e r. "
However. their
version was the
same arrangement
that the Dave
Matthews Band
made famous. The
other delight was an
acoustic
performance of the
Kiss hit, "I Wanna
Rock -n Roll All
Night Despite
only being in the
process of starting a
band, these fellas
did a real good job.
Following t he-
opening act was
Matt Holder, a solo
singerguitarist who
played a set of cover
songs because he
Hey look mom. no hands! Melanie Sparks headlined Rock for Real.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MELANIE SPARKS
said it is cool to do. By this
time, the crowd had
grown to a little more than
a few and they were very
receptive of the choice of
songs Matt Holder
played. He played John
Mellancamp's "jack and
Diane which had the
crowd singing along. In
the middle of Holders set.
he invited two friends up
on stage and let them
perform one of their own
compositions.
The next band are a
bunch of low-down dirty
thieves because they
definitely stole the show.
Javier and the Cabana
Boys stepped onto the
stage, all eight of them,
and proceeded to deliver
wild, old school ska
sounds that raised heads
and dropped jaws. They
opened with an
instrumental that allowed
all of the members to
shine in their own way.
Javier and the Cabana
Boys consist of guitar, bass
and drums to supplv the
rhvthm and a brass section with a
trumpet, alto sax. tenor sax, and last!
but not least a rough-voiced singer
who added some mouth percussion;
sounds during the instrumental;
song.
The band apologetically!
mentioned that Javier was not in
attendance this evening and that
they had a fill-in on bass for the
duration of the night. Fill-in or not
this band was tight. They delivered
seven songs including two covers. J
one being Svmrip's Reggae tune;
"Skinhead Girl and "Gangsters
bv the Specials. The stage presence
of this group was very loose and you
could tell that these guys were;
having a lot of fun doing what thev j
do.
Kevin, the guitarist, mentioned,
that hours and hours of practice is ;
what enables them to perform with
such comfort. Speaking of comfort,
it was quite humorous to see the
band in the corner of the .Attic
helping each other prepare their j
outfits, adjust suspenders and add
the final grooming touches to
themselves before they had their
fun. It was apparent that the were
SEE REAL CRISIS PAGE I
fr� ' tK"
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"���f�Uii





r
7 Tuesday. Febuary 22. 1998
i lestyle
The East Carolinian
-
Remembering the last hurrah of the space race
!This is the
,coulmn where
,we focus on the
stuff we miss and
the stuff you missed. W:
"will examine the books,
albums, television shows
. (and spacecraft) we
feel deserve further
exploration. The stuff
we dug back in the day
3,2.1-blast off!
PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA WEB SITE
Watching the space
shuttle in the 80 s
John Davis
VSS1STXN I I.IVtM VI
EDITOR
Ft was sometime
during quiet time,
when we were
supposed to be
reading the latest
adventures of Dick
and Jane. Ms. Longo
turned on the old Zenith
on the media cart. For a
second, I thought we were going to
see the resident on TV again but it
wasn't Mr. Carter, it was Cape
Canaveral, Florida.
There was a funny airplane-
looking thing attached to three big
old rockets. The funny-looking
airplane thing was the Space
Shuttle Columbia. The network
announef was rambling on about
some aspect or another concerning
space flight the whole time we were
waiting for the dang thing to take
off. We'd seen Star Wars. We knew
what spaceships were for.
After what seemed like most of
quiet time and a good bit of math
time too, the countdown began and
the announcer quit blabbering on
about nothing. The rockets started
spewing forth smoke and flame, the
scaffolding fell away and the Space-
Shuttle shot off into the Florida sky
real quick-like.
And we all got Space Shuttle
fever. We drew the space shuttle in
our notebooks with those big old
log-sized pencils. We made space
shuttles of Legos
or Erector sets.
We pretended we
were space
walking to fix the
broken tv satellite
so that Tommy's
dad could get his
pay tv.
F think the
whole country-
had Space Shuttle
�fever for a while. I
remember Space
Shuttle t-shirts,
lunchboxes,
coloring books,
magazines, toys.
The Air and
Space Museum
got the bug and
stocked the
museum cram full
of Space Shuttle
exhibits and
paraphernalia.
Not long after
the flight of the
first shuttle, NASA
instituted the
physical
embodiment of
every kid's dream:
Space Camp. At
Space Camp, you
all but became an
astronaut. You got
to work in exact
replicas of Mission
Control or the
Shuttle, bu got to
go through the
astronaut training. The high point
of the camp was a "mission" in the
mock shuttle.
Of course, yours truly never got
to go to space
camp, but hey, I
know kids who
did. And there
was that Space
Camp movie
called Space
Camp.
The fever didn't
last long though.
In the mid-80's,
N.ASA began
their famous
program to
include a
schoolteacher on
the Shuttle. This
didn't come to
fruition until
January 28. 1986.
when the
Challenger was
due to take off.
By this time,
when the TV'
came on during
class, I was busy
drawing pictures of
the X-Men or Star
Trek. Some kids
and I had contests
to see who could
come up with a
better redesign for
the Starship
Enterprise.
(Paramount ended
up winning that
contest with their
Enterprise in Star
Trek, the Sext
Generation, which
Fall on an upstart
FOX.) I was busv
Astronaut ice-cream'(top) is standard
fare at Space Camp. Models of the
Space Shuttle (bottom) still abound
even today.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF NASA WEB SITE
premiered that
network called
putting the finishing touches on the
saucer section of my Enterprise,
which featured bigger phaser rays
than the wussy ones on the old ship.
So I didn't see the explosion. I
heard the gasps of the nerdy kids
who were watching the broadcast. I
looked up to see the cloud and
shrapnel spiraling to the ocean.
Naturally, the bigger phasers on my
Enterprise were not so important all
of a sudden.
I did get to see the explosion
eventually, over and over again in
replay on every news show for the
next week. I think that was the end
of the final lap of the Space Race.
Russia was pretty much out of the
picture anyway, and in a few years,
the Berlin Wali would fall and Being
Better Than The Communists
wouldn't matter anymore. But the
real end was that explosion. The
awe and thrill of knowing that we
sent people into space was replaced
by that feeling you get when your
favorite team comes down off a
winning streak.
The jokes started up. "Why did
NASA switch ro Sprite?"
"I dunno, why?"
"They couldn't keep seven up
Now we have that bucket of
bolts. Space Station MIR. We have
the Hubble telescope, which can't
see better than Milhouse without
his glasses. We have half-hearted
talk about visiting Mars. These
days, for a while anyway, anything
we do won't seem as wonderful as
the times when we sent men to the
moon, when we designed a
spacecraft we used more than once,
when the Stars and Stripes were
painted on the onliest Space
Shuttles in the whole wide world.
Japanimation
continued from page 6
the lookout for new and interesting
series, often special-ordering from
Japan.
S.A.G.A. also plans to visit
"Katsucon an anime convention in
Virginia, and "Anamazement in
Raleigh this spring. Conventions like
these are great places to find the
best and newest series from Japan, or
just to round out an incomplete
coliectionWe just want to show
stuff that would interest
Boy. I sure could use a comb.
PU.0T0 COURTESY OF MICCAH SMITH
peoplestuff that you can't buy (or)
that's harder for people to get aholcj
of explains Andre.
S.A.G.A which held its first
meeting in fall of '96, has a
membership of 30 or 40 people, both i
students and non-students from the!
Pitt County area. Special shows in;
the past year included a presentation
of "X" in Speight Auditorium,
"Macross Plus" in Hendrix Theater
and last semester's 30-hour Animc
Festival in Speight Auditorium.
The club meets from 7-10 p.rru
on Wednesday night, with location)
to be announced on a weekly basis;
For more information, visit tho
SAGA. website at
ww-w.ecu.eduorgsaga or mail Andre
atamg0416@mail.ecu.edu. ,
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
Ayden Golf &
Country Club
ECU Student Green Fees (weekdays) $10
After 3:00 pm Special (includes cart) $15
)
Call ahead for Tee Time
746-3389
The first 50 golfers to bring in this ad receives a
small bucket of range balls FREE!
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
The Comic lock Stare
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)758-6909
�TU OC Coma o 194
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RUSH SIGMA NU
Monday Feb 23,1998
Tuesday Feb 24,1998
Wednesday Feb 25,1998
7-10 pm
501 E. 11th Street
Located behind Miami Subs
For Rides and Information Call 830-5439
C THETHIRDANNUAL
LADIES UNGERIECONTEST
Thursday February 26, 1998
9mx) PM
PRIZES

1st $125.00 Cash
2nd $75.00 Cash
3rd $50.00 Cash
For jTigre information call 758-4591 or come fcsy the e)o tp sgh up!
FLASHBACK FRIDAY
The Best 90 V Da nee Music and 80's Prices!
House Doubles only $3.50
10 KHiran's, Mich Lite & New Castle
21 and over in free til 11:00pm!
AWRDAY: THE HOUSE PARTYU
.750 House Hiballs and Domestic Light
Bottles! .500 mugs of Icehouse and 21
and over in free til 11:00pm!
V.

.J� LJt I1 � � � - . '("
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IITiTiVi �
8 Thursday, February 19. 1998
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
Real Crisis
continued from page E
all about style, and they definitely
had it.
That marked the end of the
open mic portion of the show. The
opening act of the main event was a
group that hailed all the way from
Wilson, called Pceknuckle. Wow!
These guys literally hopped onto
the stage, picked up their
instruments and exploded. There
was an iota of oddness about the
bassistsinger who was dressed in an
EMT uniform and could easily pass
as a character on ER.
Peeknuckle's first song, "Heavy
Metal Magazine" basically
encompassed the gist of their
sound: heavy! The band consisted
of a singerbassist, two guitars,
drums, and a saxophone?!? Imagine
Helmet and Morphine played on a
stereo simultaneously. That gives
you an idea of Peeknuckle's sound.
They were extremely tight and
highly original. There was a heavy
Morphine influence within the
group. In some songs, they tamed
the guitars and switched from an
, alto to a baritone saxophone and
proceeded to play slow, dark songs
with a melodic groove. They
delivered a set full of original
material and to close it, there were
pyrotechnic flashes and a trashing of
the drum kit. They ended with a
bang.
Following Pceknuckle, as the
crowd stood agape, came Nameless.
Once set up, Nameless brought the
crowd to the front of the stage and
delivered the funk. Nameless
produced the widest variety of
music for the evening including
funk-rock, rock meshed with hip
hop in a 311 style, and straight
forward rock n roll.
Nameless was clearly the crowd
favorite when they won listeners
hearts by covering Pearl Jam's
"Yellow Ledbettcr They
performed a lot of new material
that can be found on their second
album, due out this April.
In between songs, the bassist
decreed that the audience join him
by raising their glasses andor
bottles in a toast to the Real Crisis
Center.
With the crowd in an almost
blissful state, they proceeded to
rock through a few more tunes
allowing the crowd to sing and jump
around to some 311 covers and a
hyped-up version of "Brown Eyed
Girl by Van Morrison. After
delivering almost an hour of music,
Nameless closed with "What I
Got paying homage to Sublime
thus closing their set and making
way for Melanie Sparks.
Usually the headlining artist at a
concert yields the highest fan
turnout. This was not the case for
the Melanie Sparks Band. The
rowdy crowd that supported
Nameless disappointingly
diminished to a weary group of
Thursday night down-townees.
Despite the lack of fan support,
Melanie Sparks walked onto the
stage with high spirits. Before the
band commenced, Steve Bivans of
the Greenville Musicians Guild,
who was doing the duty of MC for
the evening, introduced Melanie
Sparks as being the greatest
songwriter around, which elicited a
blush from the Greenville
songwriter.
With high spirits prevailing,
Melanie Sparks greeted the small
crowd and began.
The three piece, fueled by a
jazzy style chicka-chicka guitar, a
fretless bass and drums opened a
can of jazzfunkrock and continued
throughout the remainder of the
evening.
The highlight was a slow, jazzy
version of TTieme from Pink
Panther" that expressed the
versatility and talent of this band. At
one point, Melanie addressed the
crowd by saying, "If you arc not
dancin you should be, and if we
stick, then you arc not drunk
enough
This was a golden opportunity
for everyone to sec the great variety
of musical talent and styles in the
Greenville area musicians.
Hopefully plans for a tenth annual
Rock For Real will soon be revealed.
Melon
continued from page 6
guitar interlude, "Come Undone"
with an audience sing-a-long part
and "Land of Oz" that now includes
a medley verse of Men at Work's
"Down Under
The band also informed the
crowd that they have been given the
S ahead to record a new album for
ercury Records. In the year since
the release of Bed day Harvest ,the
band has written over 30 songs and
are anxious to get back into the
studio. In the meantime, the band
will record shows starting with
March 10's Myrtle Beach show. The
best of the next five or six shows
will be released as a live album to
tide fans over until the planned
January release of their new studio
album.
To help get fans ready for the
future the band played new songs
like the heartfelt "Southbound" and
the upbeat, true story of "My Ex-
Stepmother is Gay This also gave
the band a chance to judge audience
reaction to the new material. After
the show, the band was open to
feedback about the new songs, in
obvious anticipation of a new
record.
In all, Saturday's show seemed to
be more of a reaffirming show than
just another tour stop. The band
left feeling renewed and happy with
the personnel changes, as well as
pleased with the reception of the
new material. The fans left knowing
that the future of Cravin' Melon was
safe and in good hands. Rob Cray
won over skeptics and the music
won over everybody.
"A Taste
Of Greenville9'
has moved to
Carolina East
MaE!
Saturday, March 7, 1998
ll:30am-2:00pm
Featuring over 30 of
Greenville's finest restaurants
Sponsored by Pepsi, Carolina East Mall and
The American Lung Association of North Carolina.
American
Lung
Association
of North Carolina
Carolina East
AA A L L
Belk, Brody's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria & 50 shops
Open M-Sat. 10-9, Sun. 1-6
Located on Highway 11, just 2 blocks south of Greenville Blvd.
:V M� -
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J� Fiona Comes to Town �?�
'� Sultry diva Fiona Apple will take you on a trip through a world of love, loss, scorn,
Pf and sorrow when she rocks ECU.Tickets are still available at the Central Ticket �
m Office in Mendenhall. SUNDAY, MARCH 1 AT 8 P.M. AT WILLIAMS ARENA Q
5 Tw Your UicM. md Wm a 3vch �!
D Bingo Night is your chance to hit the jackpot. It's open only to ECU students, who ��
4a get in for free. Cash prizes will be given. �f
mt WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25 AT 8 P.M. IN MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM ���
It 5(
Jj neak (�Pvevien J
� Check out Kissing A Fool (R). Present your ECU One Card, and you'll get a free "jjj
K screening pass. TONIGHT AT 8 IN HENDRIXTHEATRE �
�5
pil CKew on Tkis 2
M "Cigars presented by ONYX. Admission is free and gourmet desserts and
2 beverages will be served. TODAY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND L
� 5
y On the zp$iq Screen
J� Brad Pitt stars in Seven Years in Tibet (R).Your ECU One Card gets you and f
a guest in for free. FEB. 26-28 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
m pot
2 SOU NDOPHE UNDERGROUND
lkJ Hear some cool tunes from up-and-coming bands for free at The Pirate lk
11 Underground.This week: Tony Whetstone and Disaster in a Can �
5 THURSDAY, FEB. 26 AT 8 P.M. IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
PJ Feed Your Eyes 5
��� Entries for the lllumina Art Exhibit are on display.Take a look � it's free.
K$ THROUGH MARCH 6 AT MENDENHALL STUDENT GALLERY fcj
� GI.OBALL AIJRA j5
JJj Come to the Outer Limitz bowling center EVERY FRIDAY FROM 7-11 P.M.
for exciting theme nights for just $2 per game. Shoe rental is free.
iii Bring a CD, or dress the partThis week's theme: Bowl'n Grind. a
JJJ ALL-U-CAN BOWL�Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday "
�iU of each month from 8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just five bucks (includes Ikl
IO shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m. �ZH
Wjm MONDAY MADNESS� Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m. with 50-cent
bowling (shoe rental included).
PI ONE-BUCK BOWLING�Make Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10 J?J
iJi frames for just $1 (shoe rental included). $1 games between 1-6 p.m. n
11 HOURS: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m. ���
fe&�!E:ff& Ml EMS SftTE-ff fi Ml :5 �! &i

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9 TuMdey. February 24. 1998

I
i
sports
MW�HiMMwaMMMB�M
The East Carolinian
Men close regular season with loss to UNCW
Seahawk offense takes
game from Pirates,
84-14
Steve Lose
SSIiTST SPOUTS KIXTOR
The men's basketball team lost
their final regular season game to
StiC- Wilmington on Saturday.
Several members of the Pirates
turned in stellar performances,
some with scores in the double
digits; however, these efforts were
nOt enough to hold back the
driving Seahawk offense.
Defensively, we could have
done better Dink Peters said.
Peters finished the game with
10 points and three field goals
Saturday while shooting four out of
eight attempted free throws. Six of
those attempts came in the second
half. Toward the end of the game,
the Seahavvk's defense found
themselves facing repeated drives
from, Peters, and efforts to stop
him resulted in shotsfrom the free
throw lint.
The Pirates started the game
strong Although the Seahawks
won the tipoff and proceeded to
score five points within the first
minutes of the game, ECU quickly
caught up. The score was very
close and the lead jumped back
and forth between the two teams.
The Pirates kept up with the
Seahawks for much of the first
half, but by the time the first half
closed. UNC-W had extended its
lead to eight, leading the Pirates
45-37.
"The first half was evenly
played Head Coach Joe Dooley
said. "We both shot 57 percent
In the second half, the
Seahawks never let the Pirates
regain the lead. Despite excellent
shots from the Pirates on the
offensive side by sophomore
Garrett Blackwelder and senior
Othello Meadows, they could do
little more than keep up with the
Seahawks. At several points in the
second half, the Pirates were able
to tie the game but never took the
lead away.
"There was more
participation Peters said.
"Everybody went through a spurt
for three or four minutes. That was
the difference from the last
UNC-W game
"We played much better than
we did during the last UNC-W
game Dooley said. "It wasn't
even comparable. I'm happy with
some aspects, but not others. We
competed at a very high level, we
got good shots . . . but we turned
the ball over at inopportune
times
At the end of the game with
only seconds left to recover a 10
point Seahawk lead, the Pirates
struggled to get final shots to the
hoop. The Seahawks picked up
their final points of the game at
the free throw line to increase
their win to a 10-point margin, 84-
74.
This week. ECT will close their
season as they compete in the
CAA tournament in Richmond.
The tournament begins
Wednesday and goes until Sunday.
"I feel very excited about the
CAA tournament Peters said.
"Everything's behind us now, and
it's anybody's tournament. We
have been playing better as a team,
which will help us going in
"We've played a lot better in
the last 10 games Dooley said.
"We're playing at a much higher
level than we were a month ago. or
even two weeks ago
The Pirate defense attempts to block a UNCW shooter in Saturday's game, which
was the last to be played in the regular season for both teams
PHOTO BY STEVE 10SEY
Swimmers set new records at CAA tournament
Women capture second
place, men come in
third
Damon stvfkord
Stft W1ITH
On Feb. 17, ECU's swim teams
traveled to Hargrave Military
Acjadetny in Chatham, Va. for the
C JkA championships.
Afre�a rocky start on Thursday,
the fiSGU women grabbed second
place In the CAA, finishing behind
conference rival UNO-
Wilmington. The women nearly
pulled off the impossible by-
coming back from fifth place to
claim second oWr thecoiffsc of the
tournament. UNC-W won with a
score of 589.5 while ECU closely
followed with 563 points.
The women's team was led by
sophomore Hollie Butler in the
200-meter
freestyle. Butler set a new
varsiry record in the preliminaries
with a time nearly one-half second
faster than .the previous best set
back in 1995,
Also stepping up was freshman
Brooke Wiic, who finished fifth in
the 200-mctcr butterfly as she
broke yet another ECU varsity
record.
"The freshmen class swam
big Head Coach Rick Kobe said.
Freshmen Alicia Harris moved
into second on the all-time top 10
list as she broke an ECU freshman
record by finishing fourth overall in
the 100-meter breaststroke, and
second in the 200-meter
breaststroke.
"For Alicia Harris, her freshman
record is really big, because the
person whose time she beat went
on to be ranked seventh in the
country in that event later in her
career Kobe said.
Closely trailing Harris in the
200 was ECU freshman Samantha
Perry, who finished third with
ECU's third-fastest time ever.
Other top finishers for the
women's team were Amanda
Atkinson, who finished seventh in
the 100 backstroke, Sandra
Ossman. who placed fifth in the
100 butterfly and Kim Field, who
took seventh in the 400 individual
medley.
"Both the men and women who
set schcHil records for us had just
awesome swims Kobe said. "To
set a record in a program as
established as ours is incredible
The men's team finished third
in the CAA with 441 points and
many new school records were set.
By the end of the competition the
Pirates had held back William &
Mary and placed third by a slim 13
points. Old Dominion stepped
over five-time defending
champion James Madison to grab
the 1998 title.
"The guys finished a solid third
and swam very well Kobe said.
"We set many ECU records and
are very pleased with their
performances
ECU junior Paul Pinther
qualified for first place in the finals
by setting a new varsity record in
the 100 backstroke. Pinther went
on to place sixth with a time of
52.11. Senior Jim Broughal also
finished third in the 100 butterfly
and set a new school record with a
time of 49.90. Other top
performances from ECU's men
were posted by Patrick Kesler and
Brandon Tilley. who took fifth and
sixth in the 100 breaststroke,
respectively.
On the final day of competition,
the Pirates were led by Jarett
Martin, who swam ECU's third
fastest time ever in the 200 fly and
placed fifth in his competition.
The men's swimming team came in third place at the conference championship this
weekend, while the women took second behind UNCW.
FIIE PHOTO
PIRATE SWIMMERS
MAKING THEIR MARK
IN ECU HISTORY
Name
Record Set Event
B. WISe Varsity
H. Butter Varsity
A. Harris Freshman
P. Pinther Varsity
J. Broughal Varsity
200 fly
200 free
100 breast
100b.stjoke
100 fly
Time
2.07.17
1:53.60
1:05.79
51.89
49.40
Tilley also placed by snagging
seventh in the 200 breaststroke. as
well as Broughal who took seventh
in the 100 freestyle. Broughal's
time was only .07 seconds away
from Hall of Earner John Tudor.
"We've had another great
swimming season and we will
continue to recruit with hopes of
continuing our swimming
tradition Kobe said.
The championship draws the
season to a close as the ECU
swimming program continues to
make its mark in the historv of the
CAA
Pirate baseball drops to 1-4 overall record
Jason thcrinc.er
STUF WRITF.K
On Thursday the ECU baseball
team traveled to Elon College to
make up a game that vvas-eflgmatry
scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 17.
Coming off two consecutive losses
at Clemson, the Pirates were
looking for a win with four games
coming up within the week.
ECU had built a 3-0 lead early
in the game on a solo home run by
Billy Benson in the second inning
and a mo-RBI double by Steve
Salargo in the third. Elon chipped
away at that lead by scoring one
run in the fifth and sixth innings
and two runs in the bottom of the
eighth.
"It was hard for us to lose the
way that we did C)3ch Keith
LeClair said of" the loss that
dropped the Pirates record to 1-4.
The Pirates needed a little
pickup heading into Saturday's
home opener against the Radford
Highlanders, and Ix-Clair provided
one. After his pre-game meeting
with the umpires and opposing
coach concluded, he slid headfirst
into a huddle of his players waiting
to take the field.
"It's not something I'd do
pitched one inning of scoreless
relief to preserve the victory for
Jernigan, whose record is now 2-0.
The second game of the four
everyday, but we needed a lift
LeClair said.
LeClair's momentum booster
worked well, as ECl won the first
game 7-1 and the
second by a score of
8-4. The .lift started
early in the first
game. Freshman
John Williamson
belted his first
collegiate hit, a two-
run home run in the
second inning.
"I've been
struggling and I was
just trying to get a
hit Williamson said.
The offense
continued with ECU
scoring three more
runs in the third
inning and two in the
fifth. Williamson
finished the game-
going 2-4 with four
RBIs. Randy Rigsby
also went 2-4 with
two RBIs. Brooks
Jernigan started the
game for ECU and
spread nine hits over
seven innings. gi ing Jason Howard steps up to bat for the Pirates during the
up one run in the Radford game this game
fourth. Josh Bus and photo by clay buck
Kcvvn Fulcher each
game series started out different
than the first. Radford jumped out
to a lead of 3-0 after the third
inning. The Pirates did not lose
their composure though, and
came storming back in the fourth
and fifth innings. Shortstop Ryan
Massimo led the charge by
belting back-to-back home runs
in those innings. In the fourth it
was a three-run shot and in the
fifth a two-run homer. Massimo
finished this game 3-3 with five
RBIs. Rigsby continued to have a
hot bat and belted his first home
run of the year. Bill Outlaw-
allowed six hits over six innings
pitched and struck out five to
earn the victor Outlaw is 1-1 on
the season. Fulcher came on again
to pitch the last inning. Fulcher
did not allow a hit in either of his
appearances.
"It meant a lot to this team to
w in the way we did. coming back
in the second game, especially
after losing to Flon like we did
LeClair said.
The ttrates completed a four-
game sweep of Radford by
winning 10-6 and 6-2 on Sunday.
In the opener Williamson, a
ECU vs. UNCW Statistics
Othello Meadows
Raphael Edwards
Dink Peters
Alico Dunk
Tony Parham
Neil Punt
Steven Branch
Vinston Sharpe
Garrett Blackwelder
Alphons van lerland
2pt3ptFTTP
13415
50414
30410
1105
11611
0011
0000
0000
23316
1002
Lady Pirates fall to
Old Dominion
Scott Rose
s( I()K whi n K
Old Dominion's women's
basketball team came to
Greenville to play the Lady Pirates
in search of their 16th conference
win of the season. With the 75-36
victory they ended the regular
season with a perfect 16-0
conference record.
ODU, currently ranked as the
nation's number three team, came
out strong in rebounding both
offensively and defensively,
causing 25 turnovers, 17 of which
came in the first half. ODU was
led by All-American candidate
Nyree Roberts and .Aubrey Eblin,
each with 20 points. Trie Lady
Monarch's most valuable player,
Ticha Penicheiro. was outstanding
on the court, leading the team in
rebounding, assists and steals.
She was the only Lady .Monarch to
put in more than 30 minutes of
play time, as she played for 32
minutes.
Penicheiro maintained control
of the offensive and defensive
tempo throughout the entire
game, pushing the ball across the
floor and finishing off plays with
several no-look passes. Roberts
dominated down low, shooting
eight for 10 with six rebounds
The hot hand, however, belonged
to Eblin, who shot seven of 11 and
six of nine from behind the arc.
Although the loss was
disappointing fot the Lady Pirates,
they played strong and with a lot
of heart. The game was the last at
home for seniors Jen Cox and Shay
Hayes.
"GDU is a great team, but the
way I looked at it was just like any
other game that you have to play
Cox said. "We needed to play
smart and we didn't
Looking back at her years at
ECU, Cox said there have been
many ups and downs to remember
as she closes her college career.
"The most disappointing
moment of my career would have
to be the fact that I was hurt for
two years Cox said. "The high
point would have to be advancing
to the conference finals last year.
That was cool
Coach Anne Donovan said the
Lady Pirates played a much better
game than they did in Norfolk
earlier in the season.
"I'm pleased with the way we
played Donovan said. "Wc
played hard, which is something
we did not do in Norfolk. I was
pleased with the execution
Donovan went on to say that
playing against a team ranked
third in the country is always
tough, but their momentum that
helped them come out so strong.
"It wasn't the ranking that beat
us, it was the personnel and the
depth Donovan said. "They
have a lot of loaded guns and they
w ere all firing today. I told my girls
that there was no pressure and to
go out and have fun
With the regular season now
Danielle Melvin goes for a two-point
shot in Sunday's game at home.
PHOTO BY CLAY SUCK
over, tournament time is right
around the corner. ECU's race for
the title will begin on Wednesday
at 3 p.m. in Richmond and will be
played against the Tribe of William
and Mary.
The last time these two teams
played was on Feb. 13 in
Williamsburg. ECU defeated the
Tribe 66-59 and was led by Cox
and Misty Home, each with 17
points.
The winner against William and
Mary in the first round will
advance on to round two of the
tournament to play conference
leader Old Dominion.
BASEBALL
10
Lady Piratesvs.ODU
2pt3ptFTTP
Shay Hayes0033
Danielle Melvin60315
Jen Cox50111
Trteia Pecknam0000
Jennifer Moretz0000
NJkki Brown0011
Melanie Gittem0113
Charette Guthrie1002
Cecilia Shinn0000
Ann Murden0000
Beth Jaynes0000
1 '
SlW
i -





iiMlTltr-iln'riilTiT-
10 Tuesday. February 24. 1998
0
The East Carolinian
Lady Pirates advance to final bracket of Triangle Classic
ECU prepares to host
annual Lady Pirate
Classic
TRAVIS BVKKl.KY
, r ir ��iih
The KCl' softball team
advanced to the championship
bracket of the Triangle Classic this
weekend in Raleigh before being
eliminated on Sunday by Illinois-
Chicago 6-2 in extra innings.
F.Cl' advanced to the
championship round as the
number one seed in its pool by
winning three of four in round
robin play on Friday and Saturday.
The Lady Pirates earned a split
on Friday, defeating Youngstown
State 8-4 in nine innings, before
tailing to Marshall 2-0.
In the first game. ECU came
back from a 3-0 deficit and won it
in the ninth on a grand slam In
sophomore shortstop Mamie
Oursler. Senior right-hander Jami
Bendle got the win to improve to
2-0. Bendle struck out four and
gave up only five hits while
pitching all nine innings.
The second game. F.Cl saw a
strong pitching performance by
freshman Lisa Paganini, who
allowed only three hits while-
striking out 10 in the complete
game loss. The Pirates recorded
only two hits against- Marshall
pitcher Natasha Johnson.
On Saturday the Pirates shut
out Eastern Kentucky 2-0 and
then won a shoot-out with I NC-
Charlotte 17-11.
Sophomore Oenise Regan
pitched a two-hit shutout for the
Pirates in game one. Second
baseman Keisha Shepperson
scored on a RBI single by Isonette
Polonius in the fourth and added
an insurance run in the sixth on
Oursler's solo homer.
Against L'NC-Charlotte. the
Pirates scored four runs in the
first, second and sixth innings to
pull away from the 49crs. Bendle
got her third win in relief of
Paganini.
On Sunday; the Pirates got
another strong pitching
performance from Reagan, who
pitched live innings of shutout
"Rigit mm fse're looking at
Incoming more consistent
defensively. H e are giving the
other teams too many chances
srih our defense"
Head Softball Coach Tracey Kee
bail before giving up an unearned
run in the sixth. The score was
tied at one after the seventh
inning, forcing extra play time.
Illinois-Chicago scored five times
in the eighth on just two hits to
get the win.
Pirate Head Coach Tracy Kee
said overall she was pleased with
how the team played.
"Out of 25 teams, we were the
onlv one from North Carolina to
be playing on the final day Kee
said.
"We came together real well.
especially for it being onh our
second time out Oursler said.
For the tournament Oursler
was 5-13 with two home runs.
"I was more patient at the plate
and I'm starting to wait for my
pitch Oursler said.
Kee said the team still needs to
improve in some areas, most
notabK defense.
"Right now we're looking at
becoming more consistent
defensively Kee said. "We are
giving the other teams too many
chances with our defense
The Pirates' first home game
vviil be this weekend as F.Cl
hosts the annual Bell South
MobilityHampton Inn Pirate
Classic.
"We're excited about playing at
home Oursler said. "We're tired
of sleeping in hotels
Kee said Pirate Classic should
be extremely competitive.
"Anvbodv can w in. and nobody
will walk right through Kee said.
F.Cl' begins round robin play
Friday against Delaware at 1 p.m.
and Towson University atp.m.
From trash to grass: Nagano Olympics
provide low points for special moments
NAGANO, Japan (AP)� Like
an ill-wind disrupting a sunny day,
for every special moment of
Olympic glory in Nagano there
was an incident one would rather
forget.
One painful moment Hermann
Maier would gladly wipe from his
memory � his horrifying crash in
the downhill that ended hopes of
winning four gold medals.
Flying spreadeagled through
the air for 30 meters (yards) before
bobbing on his helmet and
crashing through two fences.
Maier seemed to escape injury
only by a miracle. It didn't stop the
Austrian from coming up with
perhaps the most memorable-
Olympic line - "Not Lufthansa,
but OK He came back and won
super-G and giant slalom. But he's
still too shaken to look at videos of
the crash.
Thirty meters (ards) is about
twice the distance six chairs and a
fire extinguisher were throw n from
the fifth floor to a courtyard in the
Olympic Milage. This incident
blamed on l.S. hockey plavers
provided one of the ugliest
moments of the games.
Following an embarrassing 4-1
loss to the underrated Czech
Republic last Wednesday, some of
the American professionals
trashed apartments in the middle
of the night.
Ten chairs were broken and
three tire extinguishers were
emptied. Some were thrown on a
courtvard below. Fortunately, no
athlete was hurt, but damage was
estimated a dlrs 3.000.
Apologies all round hardly
assuaged rhe organizers.
"I'm not happy. It's a verv sad
incident. It was a very dangerous
incident Ko Vamaguchi. a
spokesman for the Nagano
Olympic organizing committee.
"I feel sad for them. That's how
thev will he remembered Anita
Del-rant an IOC vice president
from the United States, said of the
players' behavior.
It wasn't the onlv Olympic
trashing at the Nagano Games.
Austria's snow boarder Martin
Freinademetz was kicked out of
the Olvmpics after a drunken
partv at a team hotel damaged a
dlrs 4.0(H) switchboard. "We had
fun. something got broken
Freinademetz said.
For a rookie Olvmpic sport,
snow boarding certainly had a
rough baptism.
The biggest uproar of the
Olvmpics came after a drug test
detected small amounts of
marijuana in Canadian
SH OLYMPICS PAit 11
Batting Leaders
Player
Avg. HR BBI B SB
Isonette Polonius .400 2 8 5 1
Jennifer Halpern .364 19 3 0
Amy Hooks ��8 0 4 4 2
Mamie Oursler 2 6 7 0
Keisha Shepperson SB 0 5 7 4
Pitching Leaders
Player
Denise Reagan
Jami Bendle
W-L ERA IP
APP BB
1-2
3-0
1.24
2.49
17.0
19.2
3
3
2
4
Baseball
continued from page 9
switch hitter, continued strong bv
belting his second home run of
the season. His first home run on
Saturday was from the left side of
the plate while his dinger on
Sunday came while batting right-
handed. He finished the game 3-3
with three RBIs.
Throughout the weekend.
Williams racked up seven RBIs.
Ko having a good game at the
plate for ECU was Antaine Jones
and Salargo. Jones went 2-4 and
Salargo was 2-4 with three RRIs.
Chris Shaffer hit his first home
run of the season to help get the
Pirates to their highest run total
so far this season. F.CL pitchers
struggled through the early
innings giving up six runs in the
fourth inning. Freshman Foye
Minton came into the game in the
fourth inning and shut the
Highlanders down. In the 5 13
innings he pitched he allowed
only two hits and no runs to pick
up the w in.
In the nightcap Brian Fields
continued where Minton left off.
Fields scattered six hits and two
runs over seven innings to secure
the win. He also struck out four
hitters while improving his record
to 1-2 for the season. This victory
brought F.CL's record to 5-4 on
the year.
Salargo maintained his hot bat
with a 2-3 performance at the
plate with two RBIs. Salargo leads
the Pirates with nine RBIs for the
season. Additionally. Cliff Godwin
had a two RBI double to help put
the Pirates over the top.
ECU looks to extend their
winning streak in a 2:30 p.m.
game against UNC- Greensboro
today at Harrington Field.
CASH IN
WITH CAMPUS
LIVING!
FIFTH ANNUAL PIRATE UNDERGROUND
�WES
PLAY YOUR
CARDS RIGHT!
Bring your lucky sweepstakes ticket and your sign-up playing card
to Sweethearts in Todd Dining Hall this week to see if you're a winner
in the next phase of the 1998 Housing and Dining Sweepstakes.
It's that easy.
Return housing and dining sign-up,
happening now. Get there!
if you participate in return housing and dining sign-up.
you could also win one of seven fabulous
prizes in the 1998 Housing and Dining Sweepstakes.
University Housing and Campus Dining Services
Telephone: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
BATTLE OF THE BANDS '98
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1998, 7 PM ON THE MENDENHALl BRICKYARD TO AUDITION, SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE CONTAINING
DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS FEBRUARY 27, 1998 BY 4 PM THREE SONGS, A PRESS KIT, PLUS AN OFFICIAL
rnnusntiutnr.n ,00,17, c ENTRY FORM TO ROOM 236 MENDENHALL
FOR MORE INFO CALL 328-4715
CHEW
ON THIS
��
"Cigars: Smoke 'em if You've Got 'em
Presented by Onyx Tobacco Shop
12 Moon Tuesday, February 24, Mendenhall Underground
FREE DESSERTS AMD REFRESHMENTS!
THURSDAY, MARCH 5,1998 8:00PM HENDRIX THEATRE
Elvira Kurt
STUDENTSFACULTY FREE
GENERAL PUBLIC S5.00
AT THE DOOR $7.00
TICKETS ON SALE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. MCUISA ACCEPTED.
FOR TICKETS CALL 828-4788
SUNDAY, MARCH 1,1988 8:00 PM MINCES COLISEUM
PKEIHTED N COOPfMTW WITH
rinni ft jmni �� ecu students sib.oo ���-�w.�.�
FIONA APPLE Hr S� ILsf
TICKETS ON SALE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. MCVISA ACCEPTED
THURSDAY - SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 26 - 28
All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise
noted and are free to students, faculty, and
staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
"SEVEN YEARS IN TIBET"
STARRING BRAD PITT
iwn
ILLUMINA
The Twenty-Second Annual
Student Art Exhibition
'j�l Vs and Award Competition
EXHIBITION Monday, February 8 - Friday, March 8,1888 in Mendenhall Gallery
CLOSING RECEPTION & Wednesday, March 4,1898 7 - 8 pm in Mendenhall Gallery
AWARDS PRESENTATION
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee. For more information, call 328 - 4715
PIRATE UNDERGROUND presents .
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 26,1998 8:00-10:45
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room
FREE MUSIC AND
REFRESHMENTS!
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail: uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu





MBiPSPBH

�I I�HH�PW
11 Tuesday, February 24, 1998
Si
KM
S
The East Carolinian
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Tuesday Feb 24
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Pick Up Passes at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Day of Show
Presented By
The Student Union Films Committee
Olympics
continued from page 10
snow boarder Ross Rebagliati, who
had won the inaugural giant slalom
event.
First, the International
Olympic Committee decided to
strip him of his medal. Canada
appealed and it took an
independent arbitration panel to
make sure he retained his medal.
To cap it off, Japanese police
took Rebagliati in for a long
interrogation on the issue. Medal
around his neck, he was let go.
Rebagliati said he hadn't
smoked marijuana since April 1997
and must have inhaled second-
hand smoke -an explanation that
drew chuckles from some skeptics.
"I may have to wear a gas mask
from now on Rebagliati said
afterwards, and offered to lead an
anti-drug campaign.
Gas masks might have come in
handy to several medal favorites
who fell victim to the flu.
Germany lost figure skater
Tanja Szewczenko, its leading
hope for a medal.
Norway's Adne Sondral. the
1.500-meter speedskating
withdrew before the 1,000. In all
at least some 60 athletes fell
victim to the flu-or said they did.
"I know a few athletes w ho said
after failing to live up to
expectations that it was because of
the flu they got here in Nagano
said Atsushi Sugiyama, deputy
director of the Olympic Village
clinic.
With weather like this, a flu
seemed unavoidable. It had been
said well before the games -
Nagano was no Lillehammer, with
its perfect coat of snow and cold,
crystal-clear days.
No .Alpine skiing schedule has
ever been so tormented as here.
Lightning, fog, snow blizzards,
rain� you name it, nature
provided it, even a minor
earthquake.
"I think to stage the Olympics
here, it's really risky because
everybody knew that Japanese
weather is very unpredictable
Italy's Kristian Ghedina said,
complaining about the barrage of
delays.
"We are getting bored he said.
Swedish hockey player Ulf
Samuelsson would have enjoyed a
chance to be bored with other
athletes.
The defenseman was booted
from the Olympics because he
carried both Swedish and l.S.
passports. "I'm Swedish to the
depth of my soul he said. Not
good enough.
After the ouster, Swedish
captain Calle Johansson said:
"We're dedicating every game,
every goal and every point to him
Sweden lost in the next match to
archrival Finland.
National pride is also
paramount in Japan and it seemed
Tae Satoya was in for nothing but
laurels after winning the freestyle
moguls.
Then she failed to remove a
baseball cap during a flag-raising
ceremony, a serious breach of
etiquette.
She left the cap on because she
"was afraid that her hair was a
mess It turned the next few days
in a mess for her.
Following complaints, Yushiro
Yagi, head of Japan's delegation to
the games said Satoya had been
severely reprimanded. "We, as the
people responsible for the team,
deeply regret this matter and offer
our apologies
Nagano deserves gold medal for
cleanliness, even though garbage remains
NAGANO, Japan (AP) � After
two weeks of Olympic inundation.
Nagano deserves a gold medal for
cleanliness. Cigarette butts keep
somehow finding their way into
the proper receptacles, and
spotting a litterbugcan actually be
a challenge.
But up in the mountains, one
village has been overwhelmed by
garbage �and is giving the
overflow to one of its neighbors.
Environmentalists, meanwhile,
are waiting for the snow to melt
before giving the games their
stamp of approval.
As is the case with virtuallv
every Winter Olympics,
environmental concerns have
been high in Nagano, which is
riivd by some of the most
rugged, pristine mountains in
Japan.
Games officials, who are
claiming environmental
friendliness as a major goal, say
their "Green Nagano" message
has been heard.
Japanese cities tend to be
relatively clean, but visitors to
Nagano have been particularly
impressed the past two weeks.
Not only was the city transformed
by the ubiquitous Olympic
banners and signs, it also stayed
virtuallv free of trash.
"Residents are cleaning up
after themselves, and picking up
litter that they happen to see
said Takeji Kurashima. who is in
charge of f(xd and sanitation for
the organizing committee.
Kurashima said organizers have
had no serious problems handling
the garbage generated by the tens
of thousands of athletes,
journalists, sponsors and tourists
who have flocked to this city of
360,(100 for the games.
He said 726 tons of garbage
have been collected at Olympic-
venues and facilities in Nagano
city; an amount that is easily
recycled, burned or buried in local
landfills.
"You always plan for the worst
so that you won't be
overwhelmed he said. "That
hasn't happened
But Kurashima said the influx
of people to the alpine village of
Hakuba, where several skiing and
ski jumping events were held,
proved too much for the local
garbage facilities to handle.
"They have arranged with a
nearby village to handle the
overflow, which has been several
tons a day he said.
Environmental groups,
meanwhile, say they are
concerned by several more
substantial issues posed bv the
Olympics.
Such issues have had a strong
impact on the games.
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Career Events.
�Congratulations to the School of
Technology & DSCI Dept. for their Second
Annual Career Day!
Services for Freshmen through Alumni
Sign up for "SIGI" which helps you understand career options. Using
"1,2,3 and enter on a keyboard" is all you need to know how to do.
You may also search for careers by major.
The Career Services website:
http:www1.ecu.edustudlifecareerindex.htm
Under Career and Occupational Information Button, check out MACES
if you want to find out more about different majors and careers.
Other Programs:
� Resume Preparation Workshops
�Help for Better interviews Workshops
� Dining Etiquette (Putting your best fork forward)
�Using the Internet for Job Searching Workshops
� General Job Search Strategies Workshops
� Class and Club Presentations Tours of Resource Rooms
Employers interviewing at Career Services
Keane
Hershey Foods
Xerox
Underwriters Labs
The Financial Group
Collins & Airman
Ferguson Enterprises
Microsoft
Hughes Supply
ABC Supply
State Farm Insurance
J.A. Jones
Integon
Bureau of the Census
Sherwin Williams
Olde Discount
Colony Tire Co.
Marriot Corp.
Delta Air Lines
Peebles Dept. Store
Coca Cola
Bottling Consol.
Bright Horizons
Children's Ctrs
BB&T
First Citizens Bank
Target Stores
Lowe's Companies
Carmax
SRA International
Roadway Express
Burlington Industries
E&J Callo
Fred Smith Homes
Triangle Bank
Sears
United Piece Dyeworks
Primerica Financial
Services
Stone Heavy Duty
Perdue farms
Cross Company
NC Cooperative
Extension
Office Depot
Dekalb County
Schools, GA
Enterprise Rent a Car
Russ Berrie
This Ad paid for by gifts from Parents and Alumni
We are grateful for their willingness to help support sharing information in this way.
����. i 'sr
V





i
I
FOR RENT
RINGCOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom a
Effidencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TOWNHOUSE AVAILABLE IMME-
DIATELY - Players Club Apts. Call to-
day. 321-7613.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR rent. Wood
cliff Apts. Washer and dryer hookup, 3
blocks from campus. Assume lease.
Call Michael, 522-4583, leave mes-
sage.
rugr:
la Mupoft, -ffwv Mtpfrwi
laundry 1 aicilities. 5 blocks fromj
ROOMMATE NEEDED, $375 IN-
CLUDES rent, utilities, local phone
and cable. Private bed and bath. 5
mins. from campus. Call 321-8872 af-
ter 6PM.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 3
bedroom apt. 3 blocks from campus.
Lease through July. Rent $150mo. Call
Brian at 757-3394.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 1
12 bath, two bedroom duplex. Three
blocks from ECU. $200 per month plus
half utilities. Call Ryan at 758-5756.
RIVEROAK ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT $295. With Stove, re-
frigerator, central air Ik haat, five
blocks from ECU. Free hot water, basic
cable, water St sewer. 756-6209.
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bus services.
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dishwa
opjaje.
tempos.
UNITS 4WULABLE. j
�AM Pwpmm tmy 2 nr tmwgarcy mmnmaiK-
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IS&slB
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
FOR SALE
'98 JEEP WRANGLER - Red, only
9500 milesl Loaded, CD player, 2 sets
of doors, 3 tops, 1 owner, exec, condi-
tion. Call 355-3756, Mike.
PINO EYE GOLF CLUBS, 2 thru 9
irons ineluding SW & PW, $275. Calla-
way Big Bertha Warbird driver. 3
months old, $165.00. Call 353-2911.
GREAT DEALS! MUST SELL now!
Pioneer Laserdisk $30. Pioneer CD
player $25, Sherwood receiver $50, 3
ft. blacklight $20. Call Mike, 328-3177.
DOUBLE BED AND SOUD wood
desk, desk chair included. Bed $40,
desk $50. Moving Feb. 28th, must sell!
Call 756-0857, ask for Jackie.
PARK VILLAGE ONE BEDROOM
apartments $300. With stove, refrig-
erator, washerdryer connections, on
ECU bus route, free water & sewer.
Wainright Property Management LLC,
756-6209.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS and new
Rec Centerl 2 bedroom apt. available
now above Percolator Coffeehouse,
$450.00 a month! Will lease for May
1st with one month sec. deposit) 3
bedroom apt. available now above
BW3's, $775.00 a month. Will lease for
May 1st with 1 month sec. dep. Call
Yvonne at 758-2616.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Two houses in excellent
condition; fully furnished; washer 8t
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
6 -$1600.00 per month; sleeps 8-S2200
per month. (757) 850-1532.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED, EASY to get along with. $200 a
month plus 12 utilities. Close to cam-
pus. February rent paid. Student pre-
ferred. Call 931-9196.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share large 3 bedroom house
12 block from campus. Great house,
very convenient Looking for someone
mature, responsible, and easy-going.
$238month 13 utilities. 75848677
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom apts, 2 baths, located
2 blocks from campus in a nice quiet
area. Rent $180 13 utilities. For more
info, call 754-2487.
.a
FREE CABLE, NO DEPOSIT! 12
roommajes needed starting Aug. '98.2
story townhouse, WD, 3 bdrms 212
baths. Great location! $225mth. Call
Ashley anytime, 353-1286.
FORREST ACRES ONE ft Two bed
room $300-$345, stove, refrigerator,
free water & sewer, on ECU bus route.
Wainright Property Management LLC
756-6209.
FEMALEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED- Players Club Apts. Avail-
able now! Call today, 321-7613.
FEB. RENT PAID. APT.49 Players
Club roommate spot available, female.
$220 mo. Move in immediately. Call
'321-7613 or 353-6480.
CANNONDALE DELTA V500
MOUNTAIN bike, front end suspen-
sion, barely ridden. Includes Rhode
Gear rack, Kryptonite hard lock, Trek
helmet. Best offer. 757-3475.
HELP WANTED
WATER ANALYSIS POSITION.
PART-TIME water analysis lab posi-
tion available. Job hours are Mondays,
Thursdays, and Fridays from 1-6PM
and Saturdays from 9-2PM. The job
will involve some customer service.
Please call Carol or Andie at 800-362-
7665 or 355-7121 for information or in-
terviews.
WATER ANALYSIS ft RETAIL Clerk
Positoion. Part-time water Lab Analy-
sis position available. Job involves
water lab analysis retail floor main-
tenance, customer service, retail sales
and some clerical duties. Must be
available to work from 8-1 or 12-6PM
weekdays and from 8-2 on rotating
Saturdays. Start date will be mid April.
ff interested, call Carol or Andie at 355-
7121 for more information or inter-
view.
WANTED; ADULT ENTERTAIN-
MENT. GOOD $, full or part-time. 746-
6762.
TRANSCRIPTIONIST. 2 SHIFTS
AVAILABLE 7AM-3:30PM or 3:30PM-
12PM). Must type 60 wpm and have
good proofreading skills. Experience
with law or medical transcription pre-
ferred. Pay range is $8.00-$10.00.
Temp-to-hire. AccuStaff, 353-8001.
TELEPHONE ANSWERING POSI-
TION - Part-time phone position avail-
able weekdays 8-1 or 1-6 and rotating
Saturdays. Applicant should have a
pleasant voice, exceptional phone eti-
quette, and be customer service ori-
ented. Experience preferred. Please
call Carol or Andie at 800-362-7665 or
355-7121 for information or interview.
SUMMER WORK: PAINTERS
WANTED The Color Works Collegiate
Painters, $7.00 per hour, 40
hoursweek. No experience necessary.
Contact Michael Fryer. Phone 1-800-
477-1001.
SUMMER JOB. EARN $7.00 per
hour painting, pressure washing, and
replacing siding. Based on 40 hour
weeks with bonus opportunities. Con-
tact Jason Arthur (919)353-5528.
PART-TIME SUMMER JOBS. Re-
creation & Parks Department. The fol-
lowing positions will be available dur-
ing the Summer of 1998. Applications
will be accepted through April 17. Day
Camp Counselors and Supervisors for
children ages 6-12. Cheerleading In-
structor. Youth Baseball Supervisor
and LeadersCoaches. Tennis Instruc-
torsCoaches. Camp Sunshine Day
Camp CounselorsSpecial Populations.
Eppes Recreation Assistant. River Park
North Day Camp Counselors. Bus Driv-
ers. Aquatics Program Personnel, Pool
Manager, Assistant Pool Manager,
Lifeguards, and Swim Instructors.
Most jobs are 20-30 hours per week for
7-8 weeks, beginning June 15th. City
Pool begins June 5th. Salary: $5.15 to
$7.00 per hour. Apply by Friday, April
17, 1998, to City of Greenville, Person-
nel Department 201 W. 5th Street, PO
Box 7207, Greenville. NC 27835-7207. '
PART-TIME UBRARIAN FOR local
law firm. Flexible hours. Must be self-
motivated and independent worker.
Ideal for Library Science major.
Starting pay $8.00-$10.00. Temp-to-
hire. AccuStaff, 353-8001.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing store, is now filling part-time
positions. Employees are needed for
Saturdays and weekdays between
10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. The positions
are for between 7 and 20 hours per
week, depending on your schedule
and on business needs. The jobs are
within walking distance of the univers-
ity and the hours are flexible. Pay is
commensurate with your experience
and job performance and is supple-
mented by an employee discount. Ap-
ply in person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions, 423 S. Evans Street Green-
ville (on the Downtown Mall).
PART-TIME ft Full-Time customer
service representatives. Working in the
mail order department taking catalog
orders over the phone. Must have ex-
cellent customer service skills. Part-
time hours 11AM-4PM, full time hours
9AM-6PM. Temp-to-hire. AccuStaff,
353-8001.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext 1 A.S.A.P.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing informa-
tion, 800-662-2122.
Spring Brea
TRAVEL
Want
$25,000
for
college?
The Army Reserve can help
you take a big bite out of college
expenses. How?
If you qualify, the Montgom-
ery GI Bill could provide you
with over $7,000 for college
or approved votech training.
We'll also pay you over $107 a
weekend to start. Training is
usually one weekend a month
plus two weeks' Annual Training.
By adding the pay for Basic
Training and skill training, you'll
earn over $18,000 during a stan-
dard enlistment.
So, if you could use a little
financial help getting through
school�the kind tha,t won't
interfere with school�stop by
or call:
756-9695
BE ALL YOU CAM BE.
ARMY RESERVE
www.goarmy.com
Ak
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V�ry
VnrKagcs
ECU AVAILABLE NOW! ONE bed
room apartments, 4 blocks to ECU.
Furnished or unfurnished. S265S285
month. 758-6596
DOCKSIDE FOR RENT: 2 bedroom,
2 bath. If interested, please call 752-
9901.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 1 ft 2 bed
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT ft CEDAR
COURT, two bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washer and
dryer connections. Wainright Property
Management LLC 756-6209
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED ASAP!
Players Club! Master bedroom wpri-
vate bathroom and medium bedroom
available. Rent $220 plus 13 utilities.
Call KellyJennifer: 353-1670 or Ka-
tieJeanna: 353-7934.
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH duplex, 4
blocks from ECUj all appliances, fire-
place, wd hookups, rear patio, central
heatair. Available now, $550month.
Call 758-1921.
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. neer ECU, only $375 per
month, 900 sq.ft. Free basic cable, wa-
tersewer, all appliances, pets O.K. Call
758-1921
PART-TIME TELLER. NO experience
necessary. Hours 8AM-2:30PM. Must
have excellent customer service and
data entry skills. Temp-to-hire. Contact
AccuStaff, 353-8001.
CUSTOMER SERVICECUSTOMER
CARE ORDER ProcessorCollections
Representatives needed: Must have
excellent customer service skills. Will
be working in a call center for local cel-
lular company. Full time hours and
excellent pay. Temp-to-hire positions.
AccuStaff, 353-8001.
CRUISE SHIP ft LAND-TOUR Jobs
Discover how to work in exotic loca-
tions, meet fun people, while earning a
living in these exciting industries) For
more information: 517-324-3092 ext.
C53622.
ON CALL TELLER. NO experience
necessary. Hours will vary. Fill in for
vacation, sick and peak times. Must
have excellent customer service, data
entry skills. Temp-to-Hire. AccuStaff,
353-8001.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7086.
NORTH WESTERN MUTUAL LIFE is
offering internship opportunities.
Students will participate in a training
program, gaining experience in the in-
surance industry and preparing them
to become licensed agents. For infor-
mation contact Jeff Mahoney, 355-
7700 or jeffmahoney@greenvil-
lenc.com
NEEDED! SOMEONE TO DO tele
servicing and selling of office furni-
ture. Must be enthusiastic, positive
and willing to work. Call 931-6904 and
leave a message.
MOTHER'S HELPER NEEDED.
SOMEONE to pick up child after
school and supervise 10 and 13 year
old until 5:00p.m. Own transportation
needed. Call 756-3249 after 5:00 p.m.
HIRING ADULT ENTERTAINERS:
DANCERS and singing telegrams for
Greenville and surrounding area. Must
be at least 18, have own phone and
transportation. Drug free. Make up to
$1500 a week. Please call 758-2737 bet-
ween 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. for an inter-
view.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
FULL TIME INDUSTRIAL WORK-
ERS. Must be willing to work form
7AM-3:30PM M-F. Excellent growth op-
portunity with local boat manufacture.
Temp-to-hire with excellent perma-
nent pay rate. Pre-employment drug
screen required. AccuStaff, 353-8001.
EARN S7SO-S1SOOWEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment 8i
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
cool job
for the summer
Need a job? How about working at
the highest peak East of the
Mississippi? Positions and now
available. Stay cool al Mount
Milchell Stale park!
May l-Ot 1
lunt- l-lalxx Day
May 11-1 jtK Djy $h.7S.tw
$7.2Shr
Pay Rate
Si.(X)r
$(00hr
SKIXIhr
Positions available Duration
Park artcmUinl lunc 1 -I al� r I )ay
I'ark .iltendanl
Refreshments ilirk
General Utility worker
Refreshment stand Mgr. une l-Labor Day
For more info, contact:
Mount Mitchell State park
Rt. 5, Box 700 housing
Burnsviile, NC 28714 available
(704)675-4611 ($.50day)
Applications accepted untH March 1, 1998
SERVICES
"NEVER FORGET AGAIN" Lifetime
Reminder Service: never forget any
important occasion again. Postcard
sent to you one week before each oc-
casion One time fee $39.00 for lifetime
service. Call (919)747-2686, leave mes-
sage. Lifetime Reminder Service also
has a gift pack option. Call today.
TWO EXPERIENCED SITTERS
AVAILABLE Monday through Friday,
afternoons and evenings. Non-smok-
ing, senior OT students with reliable
transportation and references. Contact
Lisa or Angie at 830-9385.
EXPERIENCED COLLEGE SENIOR,
IN Elementary Education, will babysit
on weeknights and weekends. Good
references and experience. Call Chris-
tina at 754-2056. leave a message.
Dapper
Dan's
Safe in Progress
Retro and Vintage t lothing,
tndmadt!Stlvi'r leweJn & li
Jamaica
�)� b�sr M��l FUn
in th b�in���
aIn" Vmatni ' iry
CALL FOR FRf-f: INFO YACK
Sun Splash Tlouvx
1 -800-426-77lO j
GREEK PERSONALS
ZETA GOOD GAME ON Wednes-
day night! We had a great time playing
basketball with such good sports! See
you' in the playoffs! Love, the sisters
of Alpha Phi
TO THE GENTLEMEN OF Kappa Al-
pha, crawling up and down the hall,
it's a wonder we all did not fall, sittin'
in the recliner going upside down, and
then taking the social all the way
downtown. Thanks for showing us
such a good time. Hope to do it again
soon. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta
TO THE BROTHERS OF Sigma Nu,
thank you for a good time Thursday
night! The dates were fun and out
honeymoon was even better! Love
the sisters of Alpha Phi
THANKS TO ALL OUR dates who
attended Grab-A-Date on Saturday.
We had a great time and hope you did
too! Love, the sisters and pledges of Pi
Delta
PI KAPPA ALPHA. THANKS for be-
ing our Adopt-A Fraternity last week.
Wednesday night was a blast. The
mind games were amazing. Can't wait
until Thursday. Love, Zeta
PERFECT HOURS AND GREAT
PayH! What: Dependable and dedicat-
ed individual must possess a custom-
er service attitude, commitment to
quality and be computer literate.
Where: Bowen Cleaners with starting
wages at $6.00 per hour, benefits, and
a chance to work with a great compa-
ny. This is a part-tinrie position, M-F, 3-
7PM and occasionally on weekends.
How: Applications can be obtained at
the Bells Fork location from 2-5PM M-
Th, and an interview will be arranged
at this time.
KEEP UP THE GOOD work Pi Delta
bowlers! You guys are doing great
We love you, your sisters
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD
like to congratulate Beth D. and Juan
H. on their engagement. Much love.
Your Gamma Sigma Sigma sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO SA-
MANTHA D. on her engagement to
Michael B. Best wishes to you both.
Love, your Gamma Sigma Sigma sis-
ters
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR
NEW officers: Vice President of Educa-
tion-Laura Husenita, Panhellenic Dele-
gate-Aimee Whitfield, Public Rela-
tions-Leigh Hancock, corresponding
Secretary-Catherine Anderson, Envi-
ronmental Awareness: Heather Stan-
cil. Love, your sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha Omicron Pi
CONGRATULATIONS HEATHER
NEWMAN ON getting lavaliered by
Aaron! Love, your sisters of Alpha
Omicron Pi
CHI OMEGA, WE ARE so glad you
are our sister sorority this semester.
We can't wait to get together soon.
Love, Zeta Tau Alpha
ALPHA OMICRON PI CONGRATU-
LATES Jennifer Feldhaus, Bonnie For-
syth, Candace Jones. Colleen McCool,
Erin Reddic, and Kristina Vincik on
their pinning! Love, your Alpha Omi-
cron Pi sisters
SPRING BREAKGRAD WEEK '98
Cheap rates! www.we-can.comsand-
trap - N. Myrtle Beach. 800-645-3618.
Student representative needed!
���SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink
parties! Sell 5 & go free! Book now
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
http:www.endlesssummertou rs.com
OTHER
WANTED; BUY USED WASHERS
andor dryers, four years old or newer.
Call 321-4008.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
ALPHA DELTA PI, THANKS for a
great social. Hope you ladies enjoyed
yourselves. Love, Theta Chi
Jamaica sroj$sw
Bananas ftmi
Sterna ftwi �
CAMPUS REPS: SELL S AND OO FREEI
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED TO teach summer camps in
NC & SC. Great pay! Flexible schedul-
ing! Free weekends! College experi-
ence not required. For a great summer
job, call Spirit Traditions, Inc. (former-
ly Esprit! Cheerleading) at 1-800-280-
3223!
CAROLINA POOL MANAGEMENT,
INC. now hiring for summer 1998.
Pool managers, lifeguards, swim in-
structors. Charlotte, Raleigh, Greens-
boro, NC; Greenville, SC; Columbia,
SC. For information, (704)889-4439
SKI SNOWBOARD
ris59
Package
VISA I MCI AMEXI DISCOVER
1-800-234-7007
Panama City's & MTV's Spring
Break Headquarters Only
$39 per person Restrictions
Apply.
http 7kvww
DAY SKI &
I SNOWBOARD LIFT TICKET
NIGHT LODGING, LUXURY
CONDO, FULLY EQUIP.
DAYS & NIGHT OF COLLEGIATE ,
PARTIES, CONTESTS ETC.
Students from over 150 U.S. Colleges
Group L eader & Campus Rep Discounts
$239
mssas
Call or,E-Mail lor a free color brochure
vwvw.skifra ve. com
PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
AVAILABLE for students who want to
travel, earn money, and gain valuable
resume experience. For more informa-
tion, call 1-800-251-4000 ext. 1576.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. CREDIT
CARD FUNDRAISERS FOR FRA-
TERNITIES, SORORITIES
GROUPS. ANY CAMPUS ORGANI-
ZATION CAN RAISE UP TO $1000
BY EARNING A WHOPPING
S5.00VISA APPLICATION. CALL
1-800-932-0528 EXT. 65. QUALI-
FIED CALLERS RECEIVE FREE T-
SHIRT.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bill.s Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext G-3726.
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
time. At Home. Toll Free (1) 800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
EHMmsmm
WED FEB. 25 JUNIOR Recital, Jea-
nette Price, flute, Susan Brown, flute,
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 p.m.
Sat Feb 28-Black History Month Con-
cert, Carroll V. Dashiell Jr Director,
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 PM
Sun March 1-East Carolina University
Symphony Orchestra, Douglas Morri-
son, Conductor, Wright Auditorium,
3:00 PM Sun March 1- Saiior Recital,
Amanda Glass, violin, Ajfvietcher Re-
cital hall, 6:00PM Mon March 2-
Graduate Recital, Lisa M. DeBaker, pia-
no, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 PM
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUD-
ENT Center wishes to announce spe-
cial Ash Wednesday (Feb. 25.) masses
with the distribution of ashes: SAM at
the Newman Center 12:00 noon in
Room 244 of the Mendenhall Student
Center and 5:30 PM at the Newman
Center. The Newman Center is located
at 953 E. 10th St 2 houses from the
Fletcher Music Building.
VISION 2000. PASTOR JAMES D.
Corbett and Community Christian
Church cordially invite you to a special
"Vision 2000" service on Sunday,
March 1st at 8:30 and 11:00AM.
Nursery and child care services are
available. Refreshments will be
served. Come out and be a part of
what God is doing at Community
Christian Church located at 1104 North
Memorial Drive in Greenville. For
more information or transportation
services, please call the church office
at 752-5683
THE CHEMISTRY CLUB WILL be.
having a meeting on Wednesday Feb.
25th at 5PM in the Flanagan Confer-
ence Room. Members and non-mem-
bers are welcome.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP Thursday from 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram February 26th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
SENIORS! HAVING TROUBLE GET-
TING started on your job search? Just
can't Seem to find the tie or motivation
and don't know where to look? A work-
shop on "Networking and Other Job
Search Strategies" will be held in the
Career Services building on Tue. Feb.
24 at 5:15PM. Margie Swartout, Assis-
tant Director of Career Services, will
help you identify the most productive
job sources and learn the skill of net-
working.
A CULTURAL ARTS WORKSHOP
will be held for individuals with physi-
cal disabilities on March 7th from
10AM to 3PM at Minges Coliseum on
the campus of ECU. Check in begins at
9:30AM. A $5.00 donation is requested
to cover the cost of art supplies. Lunch
will be provided for those who pre-
register by Feb. 28, by calling Barbara
at 816-4445. Sessions will include:
Creative Writing, Music, Clay
WorkPottery, ImprovGames,
Mouthbrush painting. Sponsored by
Spinal Cord Injury Assoc. of Eastern
NC, Independent Living Rehab Pro-
gram, NC Assistive Technology Pro-
ject, Adapted Recreation and Intramu-
ral Sports Enrichment Program
i "V





r
i
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
I
Intramural Sports
Date Event Time
B-Bdll 1 -on-1 Entry Deadline 5 pm
NCAA B-Ball Pick-em Available 10 am
Softball Officials Meeting 9 am
SoftballPreview Reg. Meeting 5 pm
34
39
311
324
Where
SRC 128
SRC 128
SRC 202
MSC 244
Adapted Recreation
Date Event
35 Climbing Wall Workshop
37 Cultural Arts Workshop
38 Weight-Lifting Workshop
323 1 st of 5 Swim Lessons
Time
7-9 pm
10am-2pm
1:30-3 pm
6:30-7:30 pm
Where
Climbing Wall
Minges
SRC
SRC
Personal Training Now Available
Call 328-6387 for more information
fitness
Date
32
39
316
320
323
324
324
Event
Lifeguard Training Class II Begins
Intermediate Tennis Registration
Aerobics Session II Begins
Aerobics Instructor Training Reg.
Noon Track Attack
Yoga Session II Begins
Try Tai Chi
Time
6:30-9:30 pm
9am-5pm
8am-6pm
9am-5pm
12:10-12:50pm
5:15-6:30pm
12:10-12:50pm
Reg. by
227
39
39
316
320
39
39
Adventure Programs
Date Event
32 Outdoor Living Skills-Beach Camping Sem.
37 Skiing & Snowboarding-Wintergreen Day Trip 3
37 Environmental Education-NC Zoo
38 Hang Glide-Kitty Hawk Kites
38 Climbing-Pilot Mtn National Park
312 Climbing Seminars-Sport Climbing Clinic
Spring Break Trips-Register Now
314-322 Everglades Canoe Trip
314-322 Smoky Mountain National Park
Reg. by
32
32
32
32
32
312
32
32
I

- . .
'





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DILEMMA
I want an apartment. I am so sick of the residence halls. Since when
did sharing a bathroom with 12 other people seem like fun? Laundry rooms
the size of my closet and mat tost more to use than my car. I want my own
bathroom, my own washer & dryer, my own space. I want a place to cook my
own food�no more mystery meat specials from the Cafe.
So how do I do that? The posters up on campus are advertising places
all the time. Every place I've called, though, is either already taken, too
expensive, or with some nut case I'd want to kill after 15 minutes. The
classifieds are about the same. If it isn't a shack, it's $600 a month. Then
there's all those hook up fees and security deposits�do they think I'm made
of money?
SRC'S SIZZLING NEW PROGRAMS
Melt away that holiday weight gain with the help of Recreational
Services new PERSONAL TRAINING program SRC members are eligible
to receive one-on-one instruction to help establish healthy, obtainable fitness
goals. TRAINERS are qualified to assist at each fitness level from beginner
to advanced using multiple techniques (free weights aerobics, CYBEX, aqua,
etc.). Personal Trainers are also skilled in keeping new participants motivated
and helping advanced members to overcome plateaus. Packages are available
For purchase in multiple sizes and price-ranges to help accommodate
individual needs. Special introductory package is available For the month of
FEBRUARY�4 sessions For $50 (savings of $14 off regular price).
But why learn only how to help yourself look and feel better? Have
you ever been envious of those lifeguards who get paid to lounge in the sun?
Why not learn what the job is really all about? As part of the Spring Lifestyle
Enhancement series, Session II of the American Red Cross Lifeguard
Certification class will be offered March 2-April 3 at the SRC Indoor Pool.
The $100 student cost covers books, material, equipment, and fees, and CPR
is includes as part of the course. The course won't guarantee you a job at the
beach, and ydu're not likely to get a call from the producers of Baywatch,
but it will prepare you to make a difference in someone else's life. THAT is
what Fitness and Lifestyle Enhancement are REALLY all about.
i$ it hip to sip? - :��
Have you all been watching Beverly Hills 90210? Or what about some
of those day time soaps? It's all in the media, it's on college campuses and
yeah- it's here at ECU. All the hype is about those "date rape
drugs"�Rohypnol (roofies, R2, roaches) and gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB,
liquid X, liquid esctasy). The drugs can be secretly slipped into someone's
drink (that drink could even be soda or water). Or in some cases, people
willfully take the drug to increase their alcohol-like effect. Whether it is your
intent to be drugged or not�the consequences can be terrifying.
Along with other effects, these drugs both can cause memory
lapse�you can blackout and wake up (like Valerie did on 90210), slip into a
coma and maybe wake up or you can even die.
So the question is�what can we as students do? Well, we can be
aware! Make sure that we don't leave beverages
unattended at a party, a club, etc don't take drinks
from someone you don't know well and trust,
only accept drinks from the bartender or
server, be alert to the behaviors of your
friends�anyone appearing
disproportionately inebriated in the
relation to the amount of alcohol they
have consumed may be in danger.
Spread the word to your friends and call
Student Health Services (328-6841) or
911 if you believe someone has consumed a
drug like this. So while you may be just
drinking lemonade or cola�watch before you
take a drink�it may not be HIP to SIP. For more
information contact the Office of Health Promotion
& Well-Being @ 6793 or Student Health @ 6794.
Speaking of which, have you been to the grocery store lately? Since when
does a gallon of milk cost two whole bucks? All I can afford to buy are ramen
noodles. What ever happened to reasonable pricing? Fm a coUege student,
for goodness sakes!
You know, maybe this campus thing isn't so bad. I know all my
neighbors, and housekeeping keeps
the toilet paper stocked and the
showers clean. That's more
than I can say for my
buddy Brad's
place�ugh! I don't
have to scratch to
pay rent each
month, and I don't
have to get up early to
beat the a.m. traffic on
10th street
When you think
about it, the. Cafe isn't all that
bad either. It sure beats ramen
noodles for a week straight. At
least I get to choose what I WANT
instead of just what I can AFFORD.
And I never have to eat alone. I've always known at least one person in
there.
When was that Housing deadline again? February 27th? I wonder if
it's too late to see if Jeff's got his room signed up. Maybe he and I get that
corner room over in Scott. I'd better get on the phone and find out. I'd hate
to end up in an apartment.
SPRINC FEVER RISES
IN CAREER SERVICES
The melt down is everywhere. ,
Spring is in the air.
The fever has Career Services
Doing many fairs.
Resumes, interviewing, choosing majors,
And defining career goals
Are just a few items for all students to do.
Melt not only those winter pounds
But work on the winter attitude too.
The message to students is
"Start early and perhaps there will be no panic for you
Spring, particularly February and March, are busy months for Career
Services. Recruiters are on campus. Career days are being held for the
School of Industry and Technology, Decision Sciences, the School of
Education, the English Department, the School of Social Work, and the
Department of Criminal Justice.
Referrals, job listings and Job Guides too,
These three things are not all that we do.
You see the fever has hit us;
the action is hot.
The message is old
and the service non-stop.
Prepare for tlje future,
Work hard through and through
And a career will develop,
Especially for you.
A promise from Career Services
Dearly and true,
We will help in this process
Invented to aid you.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 24, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 24, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1252
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58759
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