The East Carolinian, January 27, 1998






r
TUESDAY
JANUARY 27.1998
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Officials say nearly half of computers
with "Year 2000 glitch corrected
t
Legislators to
consider financial
aid next session
Students work on computers in the Austin Building, these computers may
incorrectly recognize the last two digits in the year 2000 as being the year
1900.
PHOTO BY JOCEIYN FRIEDMAN
CRAIG D. RAMEY
SENIOR WRITER
Expected computer glitches
from the year 2000 have ECU's
computer staff already working
on a problem that may not
come into effect for two more
years.
"We started working on the
problem about five years ago
with IBM said Blake Price,
CIS (Computing &
Information Systems) director;
"Right now wc have about 40
percent of the problem fixed
This technological setback
involves the computer's
understanding of the year
2000. When most computer
programs were written, they
were taught to read the last
two digits as the year 1900
instead of 2000.
"Potentially, this could
affect paychecks or retirement
checks Price said. "Some
employees have their
paychecks directly deposited
into banks and financial aid
may come from outside
sources. If the bank or loan
company has not upgraded,
they may not get their money.
This affects any computer that
uses date calculation in its
programming
This glitch has caused
complications before. Nearly a
year ago, officials had problems
with a financial calculation that
projected beyond the year 2000.
"We have most of the student
systems fixed Price said. "Right
now we are working on financial
systems
Software venders have
upgrades that will convert the old
technology. Integral, a computer
software company, has
volunteered to upgrade systems
in human resources. ECU
technicians are also putting
changes in programs they have
written. To prepare for the glitch,
the alumni system has been given
a totally new package.
So far, ECU has had to support
this solution on its own, without
help from state legislature. Next
session, there will be a proposal to
give ECU money to help.
"It hasn't cost us any money
Price said. "We have to pay for it
with people power and
postponement of other projects
Personal computers could also
be affected by the year 2000.
"The newer ones should be
okay, but the older ones will have
a problem Price said. "They
have it in their hard wiring to
SEE COMPUTER 6LITCH PACE 3
Book buying alternatives
not likely to become
option to students
Students, like the one pictured here, often sacrifice large sums of money to purchase books for a semester,
a problem not likely to change in the near future.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN BREEN
Rentine would not allow
professors to change
textbooks often
AMBER TATUM
STAFF tt'RITKR
Every semester, students of all classes dread
the hassle of having to buy their books.
Alternative means have been sought out by
our student stores.
Western Carolina University has a policy
where students pay a $68 book fee which is
included as part of their tuition. This allots
one book; the rest of the books must be
purchased through their student store.
"We ECU have looked into it book
rental said Director of Student Stores
Wanda Scarborough.
At Western Carolina, a two year adoption
policy is in effect which says that a book that
is rented must be used in class for two
consecutive years.
"Our professors wouldn't like it because
they would not be able to change books
when the newer ones come out
Scarborough said.
It would be very expensive and time
consuming to get a policy like this on the
move. Millions of dollars would have to be
allocated and professors would have to agree
ro a three vear adoption policy
Professors at Western Carolina are
starting to try to make changes to get away
from their two year adoption policy.
"The book fee will go up to $72.50 next
fall as a cause of requests coming in for
exceptions to our (two yeat) policy said
Pam Degraffenreid of the Western Carolina
University Bookstore.
When asked if ECU would ever consider
using this mean of getting books, some
answers were skeptical.
"I wouldn't recommend it because the
fee wouldn't cover course packs or
recommended course readings
Scarborough said.
Students gave their opinions as to if they
would prefer a policy like this.
"Yeah, I would like to rent my books
especially when my rent and scholarship
money goes to buying my books said junior
Stephanie Adkinson.
Other students have totally different
opinions.
"I would rather buy them because the
money I get back from selling them at the
end of the semester helps me a lot said
sophomore Meredith Snyder.
Medical Foundation elects
Bennett as new chairman
he front entrance of Joyner Library can now be viewed through the re-erected columns from the original library. The new library addition �� a state-
� of-the-art sonic plaza for students to enjoy. The plaza will be equipped with flowing water and the sounds of nature as students pass through.
PHOTO BY JOCEIYN FRIEDMAN
Board looks to put past
scandals behind them
HOLLY HARRIS
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU Medical Foundation, the fund
raising organization for the Schools of
Health Sciences, Medicine and Nursing is
still licking its wounds and making
provisions to insure last year's financial
calamity will never happen again.
Last September former foundation
President Robert K. Adams II was indicted
on 16 charges in relation to financial
mishandling and embezzlement othe
foundation's monies.
Vice president, and executive director of
the Medical Foundation, Terry Carter, says
the organization is undaunted by recent
setbacks and will continue it's charitable
missions in the future, including beefing up
the Medical Foundation board, putting
more controls in place, and keeping up a
good rapport with it's publics.
"I think its a difficult time that we are
engaged in, we arc more proactive in
educating our donors and friends in the
kinds of pivotal roles they can play in joining
with us to support the three schools-it's
vital for any charity organization to engage in
a continuous educational effort Carter
said.
According to Carter there has not been
any complaints from donors or any funding
offers removed.
"I really haven't received an inquiry
about anything thats happened-What I have
tried to do is say it's a new time and a ne�
era, and we are totally committed to ouj
mission Carter said.
Due to the fact that an audit report
revealed that the Foundation's board oT
directors did not have enough control over
former president Adams, the board has been
increased in size and divided into four
committees that each have a responsibility
to keep track of a certain area and report
back to the board as a whole. Since one of
the main areas in which organization lost
monev was Adams's mishandling of
foundation land purchases, one key.
committee has been formed to oversee real
estate issues. This group will insure fair and
SEE MEDICAL FOUNDATION PAGE 3
TODAY
Rainy
high 48
Low 36
TOMORROW
Rainy
high 46
low 40
The School of Social Work
is the only one in North
Carolina with both
undergraduate and
graduate programs
accredited by the National
Council of Social Work
opinion.
Got the high priced text
book blues?
lifestyle6
Student Union rolls in
many exciting events
sports.
Men's team posts two
strong wins
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
acioss from Joyner lihraty
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.iec.ecu.edu
S.
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2 Tuesday. January 27, 1998
ri�
The East Carolinian
news
flriefs
Student Health Ceiiter available to assist
women with abortion counseling, follow-ups
a cross
e s t.a t e;
8-year-old boy stopped
driving stolen car
RALEIGH (AP)�An 8-year-old
boy was taken into custody for
driving a car stolen from the home
of a Wake County sheriffs deputy,
police said.
The boy, whose identity was
not disclosed, was reported
missing Thursday from an after-
school day-care center, said police
Capt. DA Inman.
Movie starring Robin
Williams seeks locals
ASHEVILLE AP) �Hollywood
is calling locals to be extras in a
movie starring Robin Williams.
The Universal Pictures film
Patch Adams will be shot this spring
in Asheville and also in Chapel
Hill, the movie's casting office
announced Thursday.
School officials looking
for offensive oversight in
textbooks
MIAMI (AP) �The Miami-Dade
school district� with 20,000
students of Haitian descent � is
trying to find and pull from its
schools textbooks that have a
reference to an outdated link
between Haitians and AIDS.
The' first edition of the book,
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich's
Biology, published in 1989,
includes the reference, AIDS is
most common in certain groups:
homosexuals with many sexual
partners, intravenous drug users,
Haitians, and hemophiliacs.
New book tackles
diversity issues at college
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) �
College survival guides usually
offer study tips, ways to deal with
sloppy roommates and how to
cram for your first midterm. But
what about the facts on racism?
And what should minorities do
when they find themselves alone
in a lecture hall with 800 whites?
A new book by three diversity
officials at Penn State University
tackles the issues minority
students face when they attend
predominately white institutions.
www.tec.edu
25th anniversary of
landmark Roe vs.
Wade passes
HOLLY HARRIS
SENIOR WRITER
This year marks the 25th
anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the
landmark Supreme Court decision
that recognizes the right of every
woman to decide for herself if she
wishes to carry her pregnancy to
term. There are nearly 26 aborti
owns for every 1000 women of
reproductive age in the United
Stares. To assist women at ECU
who have to make this difficult
decision, the university offers
several paths of counseling and
physical care.
Health providers at Student
Health Services are available to
administer urine or serum (blood)
pregnancy tests, and then to
counsel the woman on a variety of
options if the test proves to be
positiveIf a pregnancy test comes
up positive we counsel on all the
options and refer where
appropriate If they opt for an
abortion we give them a list of the
different places with numbers and
maps said Heather Zophy Health
Education Coordinator for the
Student Health Service.
Another important information
service Health Services can
provide is a brochure or
information sheet from the
individual clinic that states its
policies, costs, and anesthesia
practices. Abortions are generally
available from about seven weeks
to 20 weeks of gestation. Prices
are related to the length of the
pregnancy, but student rates start
at about $225 to terminate a
pregnancy during the first
trimester, not including
anesthesia. Certain locations also
offer "The morning after"
treatment which can be used only
within 72 hours of conception to
insure that a pregnancy will not
result. The Health Center has
information on clinics in North
Carolina as well as a few in Virginia.
If the patient is concerned about
the procedure itself someone at
the university center is available to
discuss and explain the
operation.as well as what the
woman can expect in the weeks
after her abortion.
Zophy says that services at the
ECU clinic are completely
confidential, and the woman is
assured of privacy.
"It's up to the students and
their partner or support to decide
what's best for them, We're here to
educate them on their options and
to help them out the best we can
while answering their questions
Zophy said.
Post-abortion checkups
including a pelvic exam are part of
the university's student care
services. Not only is the woman
given a physical checkup, but she
is also counseled about STDs and
contraceptive methods.
Another important resource for
women who have elected to
terminate their pregnancy is the
University Counseling Center.
This free service is available to
anyone who may need help coming
to a decision, or working through
feelings about the decision they
have mad.
"We are a confidential service
because I think one of people's big
concerns is that they don't want
people to know ow. We can assure
them they wont find out from us
said Dr. Nancy Badger, a counselor
at the center.
"We have the ability to see
people on short notice, and we can
also provide referral services for
other mental health services
Badger said.
The counseling Center and the
Health Center will work in
conjunction for the best welfare of
any woman that requests their
services to insure adequate
physical care and individual
counseling. Both centers can also
provide a variety of abortion
alternatives including adoption.
Organizations such as Carolina
Pregnancy Center and the
Department of Social Services will
counsel women who choose to
carry their pregnancy to them and
help them find resources such as
maternity clothing, prenatal care,
and assistance after pregnancy.
Information about adoption
services such as The Children's
Home Society of NC, and Catholic
Social Ministries, is also available
through university providers.
LOCAL OPTIONS AND RESOURCES OTHER THAN
ABORTION
-Department of Social Services
-The Children's Home Society of NCAdoption Services
-Catholic Social MinistriesAdoption Services
-Another Choice for Black ChildrenAdoption Services
-Carolina Pregnancy Center
Addresses and phone numbers available at the Student Health Center 32S-6794
Rugby players arrested
after alleged gang rape
TOKVO (AP) � Eight college
rugby players have been arrested
in the alleged gang rape of a
woman during a party at a karoke
singing room.
Three players, one a student at
Teikyo University, were arrested
Saturday, authorities said. Earlier
this week, police arrested five
members of the university's rugby
club on charges of raping the
woman last November.
Former Nazi's extradition
sought for Rome wartime
massacre
ROME (AP) �An Italian senator
has asked the justice minister to
seek the extradition from Austria
of a former Nazi officer implicated
in one of Italy's worst wartime
massacres, the Italian news agency
ANSA reported Saturday.
The Rome dairy La Repubblica
said it had traced the ex-Nazi,
Wilheim Schubernig, 83, to a
southern Austrian town, Sankt
Veit an der Glan. The newspaper
said he had been named as taking
part in the 1944 retaliatory
massacre of 335 civilians by the
Nazis at the Ardeatine Caves
outside of Rome.
Sex scandal plagues
Clinton, White House
Alleged affair causes
growing concern in
world newspapers
BRUCE STANLEY
t W1ITF.R
From despair in Cairo to
bafflement in Havana, the latest
sex scandal dogging President
Clinton generated growing
concern in newspapers and
capitals around the world Saturday.
News of the president's alleged
affair made the front pages in the
Middle East, Europe and Asia,
where journalists speculated
Clinton's new woes might weaken
the dollar, cripple the peace
process in Israel or even lead to a
military strike against Iraq.
Prosecutors allege that Clinton
had a sexual relationship with
former White House intern
Monica Lewinsky, 24, and later
encouraged her to lie about
it.Clinton has denied any sexual
relationship with Ms. Lewinsky
and has promised to tell the full
story.
During a meeting with U.S.
lawmakers visiting Havana, Cuban
President " Fidel Castro sharply
criticized the U.S. news media for
their treatment of American
officials, VS. Rep. Richard Neal,
D-Mass said Saturday.
"He was absolutely
astounded Neal said.
In Iraq, where President
Saddam Hussein has refused to let
Financial Management Association
Will have the first meeting of the year
on Wednesday, January 28th, General
Classroom 1028, at 4pm. Guest speakers
from Wheat First Butcher Singer will
be discussing the stock brokerage business.
The Trip to:
Wall Street & the New Yprk
Stock Exchange will also be discussed.
Free Pizza & Refreshments: All majors welcome!
President Clinton denies allegations.
PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITE HOUSE WEB PA6E
U.N. weapons inspectors enter
sensitive sites, a newspaper
suggested that the scandal could
give Clinton a reason to attack
Iraq.
' "lb keep the media busy with
something other than his sex
scandal, the American president
SEE WHITE HOUSE. PAGE 3
2d I ;OL
Honoring You
Today
For a Better
Tomorrow
Congratulations! If you have at least a 3.30 Cumualtive Grade
Point Average and between 32 and 96 credits, you are cordially
invited to become a member of Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
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If you have any questions or cannot attend this meeting, but are
interested in finding our more about Phi Sigma Pi, please call
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Date: .Tan 27.1998
Time: 7:00 PM
Place: G.C. Rm 1032
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3 Tuesday. January 27, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Native Americans see college as better life,
presently only 2 percent represented
BROOKINGS, S.D. (AP) � Last
summer, as Clarice Mesteth loaded
her life into a car and headed 300
miles from home, fear churned in
her gut.
The 25-year-old Oglala Sioux
woman began a journey that is rare
among Indian people and too often
ends in failure.
Now, in her second semester at
South Dakota State University,
Mesteth is determined to return
home to the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation clutching a bachelor's
degree.
"When you leave the
reservation, it's like you're naked
she said. "But I can't drop out of
college, because this is my future
Mesteth is among the few
American Indians in South Dakota
likely to earn a college degree.
Many Indians at the state's public
universities drop out; many more
never set foot on a college campus.
That concerns educators and
tribes, who see higher education as
a tool to enrich the state's poorest
people.
Less than 7 percent of Indians
earn a four-year degree, fewer than
any other minority group in the
state, according to the 1990 U.S.
Census.
This trend is mirrored by
Indians' scarce presence at the
state's six public universities.
While Indians make up about 8
percent of the state's population,
they represent just 2 percent of
students at public universities,
according to Board of Regent
statistics.
Preliminary statistics show that
most Indian students at state
universities quit before earning a
degree. In a 1995 sampling of
university students, less than half
of the Indian students enrolled in a
public university re-enrolled the
following year, according to the
Board of Regents.
Computer Glitch
continued ftom page 1
check the current date before they
boot up
Embedded systems will also be
an obstacle for technicians to face.
These include things such as chips
in elevators and medical
equipment.
"Some of those systems can't
handle the date Price said. "An
elevator might think it is time for
its maintenance date, shutting
down because its repair is over 100
years too late
To help test computers, CIS
does offer software that reports if
the computer will be affected or
not. Last Tuesday, CIS held a
seminar in which they answered
questions and made all ECU
departments aware of the
imminent problem. Price predicts
that another one of these seminars
may take place in the future.
Medical Foundation
continued from page
accurate appraisals and report
their findings to the entire board.
These precautions were instated
to make certain that nothing is a
one person operation.
"ifc
Not only is the board larger and
more specialized, there are also
controls that demand an increase
in the number of people
authorized to sign checks,
additional and consistent internal
and external audits, and full
board approval for all land
purchases. The board even has a
new Chairman, Thomas A.
Bennet, the retired vice chairman
of Wachovia Bank.
Finally, the foundation is
taking steps to legally recover
some of funds Adams Embezzled.
"That's being evaluated by the
board and its a very important
issue, as a group and as a
foundation, we feel it is important
that we make every effort possible
to recover the money legally
Carter said.
Carter says the foundation is
taking such careful steps to insure
a bright future for their
organization because of it's high
level of dedication to the students
in the three schools for which they
raise money for scholarships,
endowments and other
educational opportunities.
"We wouldn't be here if it were
not for the student body, that's
what drives us to our commitment
of excellence Carter said
White House
continued ffom page
may start a foolish military action
by attacking Iraq according to an
editorial in Babil, a daily
newspaper owned by Saddam's
sonOdai.
In some Arab cities, the scandal
triggered gloom over its possible
meaning for peace in the Middle
East. Lebanon's leading
newspaper, An-Nahar, said that
Clinton's sex scandals have
- 'paralyzed and handcuffed him
Egypt's Al-Ahram newspaper
hinted pro-Israeli plotters were
scheming to underminethe
president.
An editorial in the Palestinian
newspaper Al-Quds lamented the
potential impact on Clinton's
efforts to coax Israel into
withdrawing its troops from a
substantial portion of the West
Bank. The controversy could give
Israel's hard-line government "a
new escape hatch undercutting
Clinton's effort to pressure Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu, the newspaper said.
Israeli newspapers did not publish
Saturday morning because of the
Jewish Sabbath. In France, some
editorials criticized the prudish
attitude toward sex in America.
S�s�Wiv�-x-
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Greenville, NC 27858
(919) 561-7536
Open 11 to 11
Vrutk Specials
Monday
Margaritas: Small 12 oz $1.95
Medium 24 oz 3.95
Large 48 oz. 6.95
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Tuesday Domestic Beers 99 g
Wednesday Import Beers $1.50
7 Pitcher Margaritas $8.50
Thursday Margaritas: Small 12 oz $1.95
t. rin jpmw Medium 24 oz 3.95
Large 48 oz. 6.95
Sudy corona Beer $1.50
$1 Off Any Lunch $4 Oil Buy Two
� Special or Combination Plate � Combination Dinners with
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East Carolina University's Student Union is now
Accepting Applications for Chairpersons
of the Following Committees and Assistant
to the President for the 19981999 Term:
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ACROSS
1 Small vipers
5 Squabbles
10 Low voice
14 Narrow gap
15 Austin resident
16 Car
17 Small amount
18 Sports venue
19 Study late
20 Ushers, at times
22 Washington city
24 Open roughly
26 Actor Maneo
27 Like Batman
and Robin
30 U.S. uncle
32 Find the answer
36 Dumbfounds
37 Plans of action
39Palmas
40 Crop pests
41 Styron's "The
Confessions of
Turner"
42 Language of
Vilnius
44 Eye covetously
45 Brown ermine
46 Tycoon Turner
47 Span
48 " Not
Unusual"
50 Dinner course
52 Give back a
likeness
56 Used a bike
60 Mayberry kid
61 Use a soapbox
63 Corn-belt state
64 Close by
65 Sound adjuster
66 Chiistmas carol
67 Matched groups
68 Dispatches
6? Chipper
124
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C 1997 Tnbune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Answers from Thursday
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that can help you
prepare for your
career goals?
You Will Gain Experience in:
� Calling on local advertising clients
� Helping to develop creative advertising
� Develop and coordinate advertising campaigns
� Local advertising account servicing
Applications are available at The East
Carolinian, second floor of the Student
Publications Buiiding or call 3282000
for more info.
DOWN
1 Sale-tag
disclaimer
2 Blackthorn
3 Pocketed
bread?
4 Sculpted people
5 Ringo or Bart
6 Enduring
7 Chopping tool
8 Brown shades
9 Ginger cookies
10 Accumulation of
unfinished work
11 Distinctive air
12 Comic Laurel
13 Vague amount
21 Finish
23 Desert springs
25 Bashes and
blowouts
27 Telephones
2B Stand by
29 Garlic-basil
sauce
31 Poorly suited
33 Specialized
vocabulary
34 Calf meats
35 Colorado park
37 Adriatic
38 X on a
sundial
40 City near Helena
43 Taxi seekers
44 Confers holy
orders
47 Womanizer
49 Glasgow lads
51 Gives sidelong
glances
52 Howard and
Silver
53 Edgeless sword
The East
Carolinian
Advertising
Department
Can Help
You Get The
Needed
Experience
Before you
Graduate.
eastcarolinian
2Joiw us on campus for a
UVE REMOTE
this Wednesday between
1 and 3 p.m. in Wright Plaza.
We'll have lots of giveaways
Including CPs and gift certificates.
THIS WEEK
INSIGHTS
LaFranee Davis
Crime Prevention
on Campus
i from 8-8 p.Ri.
FOOD &. DRUG
Always Kroger
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE, SPRITE,
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola Classic
2-Liter Bottle
f
Deli Style
� Turkey Breast
�Cooked Ham
�Sandwich Beef
Pound
Jumbo
New York Style
Bagelse-ct. pkg
(6 Varieties From Which To Choose)
, & Prices Good Through Jan. 31.1993.
Copyright 1996 Kroger Mid Atlantic Items & Prices
Good Jn Greenville. We reserve the right to limit qua
titics None sold to dealers
Sugar Sweet Black or j) � mm
White Seedless Z?Z
Crapes w
All varieties jg � ��
Ballpark Z9E
Hot Dogsw6-oz. Pkg. mar
Cut Green Beans, Corn or Peas m g jB
Kroger & W
Vegetables14.2s-1s.2soz. cans �
K wick Krisp
Sliced Bacon
12-OZ. Pkq
MOST
Kroger, the World's Largest
Florist, can now send flowers
anywhere in the world
Call: 1-800-KROGERS
(Roanoke, Va.) or ask at any
Kroger Customer Service Desk.
"��
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So, how much did you spend on textbooks this semester? $150? If you can quote a number
that low you're lucky. How about $200? $250? $350? If it's above that, you deserve even
more sympathy than the average student.
Textbooks are one of those costs most students grumble about every semester. We don't
like paying for tuition, housing or meals, either, but books seem to particularly gall us.
And why is that? Well, maybe because not all of the books we buy are used in the classes
they are required for, or if the book is used, it's sometimes only certain chapters, not the
whole thing. And after the one semester in which they are bought, we have no further use
for them. So we're going to spend anywhere from $30 to $100 on a single book that we
will use for four months, and then do the same thing for a different book the next
semester?
Of course, we are offered the opportunity to sell our textbooks back, and many of us do,
thereby recouping at least some of the expense. That is, as long as the teacher or the
department hasn't decided to switch to a different text, or the publisher hasn't come out
with a new edition which the academic world figures it simply must have.
And what's the deal with new editions, anyway? Do they really change enough to warrant
the cost of a new book, or the loss of a chance to sell a used book back? Last semester the
Student Store was not buying back Shakespeare anthologies because a new edition was
coming out. Has Shakespeare really changed that much in the past few centuries, never
mind the past few years?
Some schools are attempting to offer their students alternatives to buying their books,
such as Western Carolina University. They offer the chance to rent a book, which can then
be returned at the end of the semester. Their system sounds far from perfect�only one
book can be rented per semester, and the cost is still far .too high.
But at least they arc offering an alternative, something which The East Carolinian would
like to suggest that ECU look into. Surely there must be other, less expensive ways for
us to obtain the temporary use of books that we're going to return at the end of the
semester anyway.
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
OPINION
C0CHRAN
Tobacco battle reminiscent of prohibition
In a court fry where nearly
half the population lights up
daily, big T seems indomitable
in the real war American's
like their right to smoke when
they want toy just as they like
their right to a beer on
Friday night. People will
always smoke.
In boxing there are punches-that
can catch you just right � a solid
left hook, a right cross, a powerful
blow to weakened ribs. Last week
RJR Nabisco took one right on the
ol kisser. Following a California
lawsuit which uncovered
documents showing big tobacco
plans for advertising aimed at 14-to-
18-year-olds, RJR must be reeling
under the shot.
In what seems an endless battle
between the state attorneys general
and big "T it may seem the
attorneys are chopping solid
stomach shots. Last fall they sent
big tobacco to the canvas in a $365
billion settlement, which most
critics of the tobacco industry said
was too easy on RJR, Philip Morris,
and others. Big T agreed to the
settlement rather quickly, true
enough. Many say the California
lawsuit of last week is an example of
the reason why.
Under the last fall's settlement,
tobacco companies would gain
immunity against future lawsuits
U.e. ones like last week) where
attorneys have access to big
tobacco's written records. The
reason why RJR and Philip Morris
agreed to pay $365 billion dollars is
to save money. It is going to cost
them a tot more if lawsuits continue.
However, a Republican-led
congress is slow to pass any deal
involving their major campaign
financiers. And the Clinton camp
seems just as reluctant to make a
staunch move. Meanwhile, big
tobacco seems to be getting waylaid.
The irony is that no matter what
happens, RJR will live to fight
another day. They might have to pay
a lot more money on their next go
around (which means consumers
will have to pay a lot more on tl
next go around) but they will rise
again. How can they not?
In a country where nearly
the population lights up daily,
seems indomitable in the real war.
is all too reminiscent of prohibition
transitory moment in the spotli; '
Americans like their right to s
when they want to, just as they like
their right to a beer on Friday night.
People will always smoke.
So why should we support state
attorneys genera! who arc only going
to hike the prices of a pack of
cigarettes up? Why should we let
them frivolously peck away at our
state's number one export? You tell
me.
It is a bit more subtle battle than
that of prohibition, no doubt. Hit
'em where it hurts�the
checkbook�right? But let me ask
you this; when the smoke clears,
when politicians have congratulated
themselves for squeezing more
money out of big tobacco, who is
really going to be left to foot the
bill?
People smoke.
Sex scandal, dirt overshadowing real news
UETTER
to the Editor
we care more about the
Presidents sex life than the
crises in Iraq or the Pope's
historic visit to Cuba. We have
become such a society so bent
on dirt that we wallow in it
like hogs.
Did you hear the news? The
President allegedly had an affair.
Whoop-de-do! Who cares? Evidently
a lot of the American public does.
Hani Copy, Extra, Jerry Springer
move over because here comes the
cavalry; Rather, Jennings and just
about every other' major news
network anchor. These broadcasters
are going to tell us all about the
President s sex life.
I want this important,
groundbreaking news. I want to
know when Clinton first had sex,
where, and for how long. I want the
names of each and every person he
engaged in sex with. Hey, it is our
business, the man is President of
this country.
The President's entire life
should be open to scrutiny. We do
not want an immoral man in the
White House. Immorality in the
White House? Not in my country.
The United States has an image
to uphold. The legacy of Franklin
Delano Roosevelt, Lyndon Barnes
Johnson and John F. Kennedy must
be continued. For these fine men
inhabited the White House, and
they had a tradition of being moral
in the eyes of the public and a very
cooperative press.
This attack mentality in the
press is not fostered by the press.
We, the public, buy the crap they
print, televise or broadcast. For
some strange reason, we care more
about the President's sex life than
the crises in Iraq or the Pope's
historic visit to Cuba.
We have become such a society
so bent on dirt that we wallow in it
like hogs. We, as a society, love dirt.
Hugi Grant and Divine Brown, hard
hitting important news to me and a
good portion of the country.
Suppose Clinton did have sex
outside of the bounds of marriage.
Shall we brand the President with a
scarlet letter? An even better idea
would be to leave the President's or
anybody's sex life where it belongs;
between the parties involved,
whether it be one or 21.
We arc not the ones who are to
judge Clinton. If his wife can stick
by his side through all this junk that
some like to call journalism, it
should be good enough for the rest
of the country.
Perhaps some consider
themselves a better judge of the
President than his wife. In this case
they are either mentally deranged or
Republican, perhaps one in the
same.
One Card system needs improvement
I write over a frustration that I am
learning is universal the more
students at ECU I speak with. The
topic, you might have guessed
would be the conversion to the ECU
One Card. Let me share why I am
frustrated.
Like a model student, last
semester when we were asked to get
our picture made for the "grand"
ECU One Card, I did. I was told
that I could pick it up in the Spring.
Spring rolls around, and like a good
student, I braved the lines to pick
up my card, only to be told that they
couldn't find it and by the way, "Just
walk around the front of the
bookstore and go in some doors on
the side building to check on it So
I went outside and around the
building, but when I got to the side
of the building, I realized that there
arc a lot of doors, none marked with
information relating to the ECU
One Card.
Fortunately, 1 chose the right
ones to enter and again, I was
confronted with a line. I was
graciously told by a fellow student
that since my card was lost, I could
step to the front, at which some lady
took my name and social security
number. After waiting 20 minutes
without being told anything, I
decided that other things in my day
had to be accomplished and that I
would have to waste time coming
back to campus, finding a place to
park and probably waiting in more
lines, just to get some card the folks
at the ECU One Card office lost.
Can you not understand my
frustration? It stems from the run-
around I have gone through, the
disorganization of the all campus
office, the lines resulting from this
disorganization and the apparent
inadequacy of the personnel in the
ECU One Card office. I wonder
where my picture ID with my social
security number (which 1 have
always been taught is private) is?
How did my card get lost, and if it
were truly misplaced, then why
could my card not be replaced in the
20 minutes I waited since all
pictures arc stored on the
computer? Or what if my card was
given to some other student? In
order to minimize these
frustrations, the ECU One Card
office should check into some
options. Perhaps mail the cards to
the students after their tuition is
paid. Then again, this would require
planning ahead and organization.
Sue McCormack
Graduate Student
Physical Therapy
"Newspapers always excite curiosity. No one ever lays one
down without a feeling of disappointment
Charles Lamb, English essayist, 1822
Got something to say? w t Letter to the Editor
Need somewhere to say �t? r � � �-ww' ��
and let your view be heard
eastcarolinian
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The Student Publications Building
Cl
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MWB

6 Tuesday. January 27, 1998
CPf"
review
DJ Shadow
Preemptive Strike
8 OUT OF io
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Ever since the release of his widely
acclaimed debut album,
Endtroducing, DJ Shadow has been
the poster boy of instrumental hip
hop. The premiere act of the
independent label, MoWax,
Shadow has gained a reputation as
one of the genre's most innovative
and creative artists. His influence
has not only inspired other hip hop
musicians and aficionados, but also
rock groups (such as Radiohead)
and filmmakers (such as the avant-
garde Wim Wcnders.)
Pmmptkx Strike is not a new
album. Rather, it is a collection of
singles previously available only on
vinyl. Some of these songs were
rather hard to come by, and due to
the high demand for Shadow
material, very expensive.
Admittedly, this collection is not
nrarrv as good as Endttvdmnz. but
it's not supposed to be. As Shadow
relates in the liner notes, "I wanted
to make them (the songs) available
to those who enjoyed Endtroducmg
while I still had some control over
their presentation
Shadow's wisdom in this matter
is a refreshing change from the
usual way "previously unreleased"
collections are presented, as
hodgepodge compilations thrown
together by greedy record
companies. Preemptive Striie, while
not the tour de force Endtrodwing
was, is still a tasteful and engaging
SEE SHADOW. PAGE!
Slobberbone
Barrel Chested
9 OUT OF IO
Caleb Rose
STAFF WRITER
Music has been worldwide since
the beginning of time and has
slowly evolved. Through the
changing times, music has become
more and more categorized,
especially these days. People
ponder the question, "What
happened to rock and roll music
and where did all of these other
music genres come from?" If you
arc wondering this as well, then you
can find the answer with
Slobbcrbone's latest Doolittle
Records release, Barrel Chested.
The opening title track, "Barrel
Chested" fuels the album with the
purest 93 octane rock-n-roll
I v a i I a b I e .
Singersongwriterguitarist Brent
Best makes the listener aware of
his current situation as he rocks out
tinging, "I'm broken down and
barrel chested again some people
try for all their lives but never make
a dent
This loneliness-through-failure
theme is quite common in Best's
The East Carolinian
(V
Student Union rolls in changes
Bowling,
Barefoot and
Fiona among
spring
highlights
RON CHERUBIN1
SENIOR WRITER
There is nothing quite like
spring at ECU. It gets tougher
and tougher to go to class when
you wake up and sec everyone
outside laying out, riding bikes,
jogging, walking the dog and,
frankly, living it up.
In an effort to add to the
frustration, Mendenhall Student
Center is gearing up for a number
of fun and exciting events for the
spring semester. Among the "distractions" offered by the
student center are the annual Mardi Gras party, Barefoot on
the Mall, concerts, lectures, movies�a multitude of things
to do. The Department of University Unions, housed in
the student center, is collectively made up of full-time
staffers and students at ECU, who are tasked with coming up
with entertaining programs for the study body as a whole.
Bill Clutter, University Unions director, likes to approach
Mendenhall programming from provider-client point of view.
"We want to tailor Mendenhall to the needs of our
clients Clutter said in reference to the thousands of
students that make use of the student center. "Whether it's
work, relaxation, or play we want to make Mendenhall the
hub of activity
Clutter's short run at ECU has been marked by rapid
changes at Mendenhall. The bowling alley, now the Outer
Limit? has been revamped, and the latest renovation
addresses both recreational and academic needs.
"The SGA expressed a need for a better computer lab
Clurter explained emphasizing the SGA's role in the creation
of the new computer lab. "The new lab is actually moved
now and open at this point. Currently, we have the 12
computers and a big screen television in there
But, there is much more to come in the lab.
"We're in the design phase right now Clutter said. "We
are bringing in 40 new computers (both IBM and
Looking for something to do?
The Student Union has recreation,
music and movies and lots of
other fun stuff planned for the
spring semester.
ABOVE PHOTO COURTESY OF MAMMOTH. BELOW
PHOTO COURTESY OF DIMENSION FILMS AND LEFT
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
Macintosh), and they will all be fully wired. We've expanded
the hours and have the potential to make the lab a 24-hour
one if needed. We're enhancing the lighting for added
security and comfort reasons and are installing a new sound
system. 'Wfe're creating some ambiance
When in full operation, the computer lab will be a state-
of-the-art lab within yards of both recreational fun (billiards,
bowling) and food.
The Mendenhall staff is gearing up for Mardi Gras,
a late night party at Mendenhall Student Center on February
20th, which has been a hit year after year and this year will
be bigger and better than ever. Food, prizes, a casino and
much, much more, make the event one to mark on the
calendar.
The Student Union's Barefoot on the Mall on April 30th
will actually be more like Barefoot on the Bricks as it will be
moved to a location between Mendenhall and the Student
Recreation Center. Though there is no replacing the effect
the mall has on the event, Barefoot should, as always, be a
smash.
"We're not going to hold back a bit this year said Jeffrey
Marshall, assistant director of student activities. "The move
certainly won't affect the experience. Vfe've had Widespread
Panic, Edwin McCain and the Toasters the last three years
and we expect to have another great show in here this year
Speaking of big shows, the Student Union is bringing in
one of the nation's, hottest acts on March I. Fiona Apple is
signed to play at
Minges Coliseum.
Jur timing is
right Marshall said.
"(She is) a three-time
Grammy nominee.
The award show is
February 27th and
we've got her on stage
March 1
On the heels of the
Fiona Apple concert is
a big-time, three day
jazz bash. The three
day event was
dreamed up in the
School of Music and
by the time it was
lined up, the Student
Union, WTEB radio
and the ECU Athletics
Department were all aboard. In conjunction with the 15th
annual Pirate Purple and Gold Pigskin Pigout, the Jazz
Festival will feature the ECU Jazz Ensemble featuring Benny
Green, nationally-known Spyro Gyra and another act to be
SEE STUDENT UNION. PAGE 7
St. Paul Chamber Orchestra performs tonight
Conducter
OrchestratesFbr
Modern
Audience
Jason Jenkins
STAFF WRITER
Reports of the demise of classical
music have been greatly
exaggerated, if you believe Hugh
Wolff.
Wolff, who conducts the St. Paul
Chamber Orchestra that will
perform at Wright Auditorium on
Jan. 27, doesn't buy the theory that
orchestral concerts are going the
way of the Edsel or the platypus.
With a little more attention to the
needs of the audiences of 1998
instead of 1848, Wolff said, classical
music can experience a renaissance.
"What kind of event do we want
a concert to be? If it's only a
celebration of music from 150 years
ago with everybody dressed the way
they were 150 years ago and the
atmosphere stuffier and more
intellectual than it was 150 years
ago, then we've made a serious
mistake Wolff said.
And Wolff, bom in Paris, trained
at Harvard and a professional
conductor since 1979, is doing what
he can to change the perception of
classical music. Not by ignoring the
musical luminaries of the past, but
by framing their work in a more
modem light.
"I've had this kooky idea that,
since we're not an original-
instruments orchestra, we can learn
from the original instruments about
style and about sound, but let's do
that on modem instruments Wolff
said. "We've learned something
from original instruments about
sound, style, articulation, tempo.
And, frankly, modem instruments in
the hands of good players should be
able to do anything
That's precisely the goal of the
St. Paul Chamber Orchestra,
America's only full-time chamber
orchestra. While orchestral music
has steadily declined in popularity
recently due to a multitude of
perceived factors (the rock
orientation of baby boomers, the
demise of the philanthropic rich,
the boredom of attending concerts),
the SPCO has consistently sold out
concerts around the world.
"That's because SPCO seeks out
newer, better ways to present
music said Wolff.
"There's always a place for all-
Beethoven concerts � I'm all in
favor of them and don't mind
wearing tails Wolff said. "But we
have to be more flexible. That's not
the only way to go
Wolff said. "If I'm presenting
music to an audience 20 to 35 years
oid, I'm not shy about speaking from
the stage and explaining why T have
juxtaposed certain works.
"When you study your audience,
you get comments that say people
stay away because they feel
intimidated or they feel like they're
not welcome or they feel it's an
abstract experience. If you address
Hugh Wolff wants you to enjoy classical music.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARKETING DEPT.
those three
fundamen tal
things, you don't
have to change
your program that
much, just the
way you present
it
Wfoiff points out
that concerts are
still
entertainment,
and audiences
exposed to other
forms of
entertainment
demand more.
"Look at the
entertainment
forms we're
competing
against Wolff
said. "They've all
done more than
we have. Go to a
professional
basketball game
and there's a
whole aspect of
entertainment
that didn't exist a
generation ago
if you're
competing for a
younger
audience, you
have to recognize
it.
"We're not going
to dim the lights
and have lots of
dry ice, spotlights
and loud canned
music to
introduce guest
artists. But we do need to be aware
that people expect a certain amount
of excitement in their
entertainment these days
That's one of the reasons for the
selection of the music SPCO will
play. The concert begins with an
acknowledgement of modem
composers, with Aaron Jay Kernis'
Too Hot Toccata. Kernis, a
composer-in-residence for SPCO
from 1993-1996, was commissioned
to compose Too Hot Toccata by the
SPCO and completed the work in
1996. The work is scored for flute
(doubling on piccolo); two each of
oboes, clarinets (2nd clarinet
doubling on bass clarinet), bassoons,
horns and trumpets; timpani and
percussion; piano; and strings.
Too Hot Toccata is an
appropriate concert opener, a five-
minute piece that is upbeat and
highly energized. It also features
almost all the principal players and
sections of the orchestra as soloists,
something Kernis intended as a
tribute and a challenge to the
players.
Next in the program is Piano
Concerto No. 1 in E Minor, Opus 11
by Frederic Chopin, a 39-minute
piece highlighted by the appearance
of acclaimed pianist Emanuel Ax. This
piece opens with a striking march of
Polish character, and slowly descends
into a pathetic tone, only to be lifted by
the striking entrance of the piano solo
by Ax.
While the first movement is
sweeping, the second is more intimate.
Ax launches into extensions of the
music previously heard, and as the
SEE ORCHESTRA. PAGE �
COncertreview
SEE SIOBBERSTONE, PAGE 7
Super Bowl
Cereal bowl
You know, a "bowl"
Andy Turner
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Cynics would have you believe that rock-n-roll was as dead as
the boxer who got the death punch from Ray "Boom Boom"
Mancini back in the '80s. Rubbish � it's alive and punching,
as indicated by the bands who have taken the stage at Peasant s
the past two Thursday nights.
This past Thursday, rag and rollers, the Blue Rags, had the
hippie chicks (or, perhaps more politically correct, "penis-
deficient Birkenstock wearers) doing the "Jerry Garcia two-
s t e p
(head
down,
arms
flailing,
s p a c e y
look) until late in the night.
Despite their youthful appearance, the Blue Rags are
excellent musicians, combining elements of ragtime, gospel,
blues, country and bluegrass. The Blue Rag boys weren't a
talkative lot, but, nevertheless, provided a lively and
entertaining set.
The band rolled through songs like swinging hobos.
"Bootlegger Blues" and "First Time (One More Time
Tonight)" were among their best numbers.
A love for music is apparent among all the band members,
SEE CONCERT REVIEW. PAGE 8
Lined up on a log and ready to rock: Chapel Hill's Wake
PHOTO COURTESY OF WAKE
"
�V
�mf� -





pfc
7 Tuesday, January 27,1997
i testyle
The East Carolinian
STUDENT UNION
continued from page 6
named later. That act, if signed, will
be a familiar name to most music
lovers.
Marshall also pointed to a
number of other Student Union
programs ongoing throughout the
spring semester. Chew on This
continues, including one on the
cigar fad and another on white-
watering the Mississippi. Time
Wise will be giving a lecture on a
white perspective to Affirmative
Action, and a dancestory telling
group, Womyn with Wings, will
perform in March.
Student Leadership has a busy
semester as well.
"This semester Student
Leadership Development
Programs' Interact Series is playing
host to two successful ECU
Alumni said Jim Sturm, director of
student leadership development
programs. "Dr. J. Reid Parrot,
Jrpresident of Nash Community
College, and Ms. Lisa D. Benton,
regional personnel manager for
Wachovia Bank will be sharing their
'Success Stories' as part of the drop
in workshop series
Sturm encourages students to
attend these workshops pointing
out that not only do students get to
hear insightful speakers, but
students also get a free lunch.
So, it appears, that Mendenhall's
lineup isn't just Mardi Gras and
Barefoot on the Mall. Throughout
the semester, you can count on a
bevy of top-notch movies to keep
you entertained. Look for such
popular and recent films such as
Fifth EJement, G.l. Jane, In &Oui, and
Mimic among others. As always,
ECU students get in to the movies
for free and are welcome to bring a
guest.
Also on the recreation tip, the
bowling center is now operating
under its new name, the Outer
Limitz, and is boasting a new look.
The entire center has been given a
neon facelift for glow bowling, the
center's newest program.
Bingo is back in full force this
semester on a regular basis. Last
semester, bingo was such a hit at
Midnite Madness, that now, the
popular late-night activity, has been
added to the regular schedule.
The S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series wraps up
with a strong Spring lineup. In
January, The Saint Raul Chamber
Orchestra will play, featuring pianist
Emanuel Ax. In FebKiary, the
Georgian State Dance" Company
will perform, as will th fterlin
Symphony Orchestra featuring
pianist Derek Han. Highlighting
the spring events is the popular
musical Grease which will be
performed on Monday, February
23rd. The series wraps up with a
performance by the Van Clibum
International Piano Competition
runner-up, Yakov Kasman, in March.
The ECU Travel-Adventure
Film and Theme Dinner Series will
present four more destinations,
complete with gourmet meals. And,
the Family Fare Series concludes
with a trio of performances: Lyle,
Lyle, Crocodile, Jungle Book and
Laura Ingails Wilder: Growing Up
on the Prairie.
If you would like more
information on any oi these events
or would like to find out how to get
involved in student center
activities, call the information
center located on the main floor at
328-4700.
SLOBBERSTONE
continued from page 6
songwriting as the latter tales from
the album narrate. For instance, the
track "Front; Porch" is a precise
measure of this theme. It tells the
story of a felk who seems to have
been dumped, because throughout
his relationship he has only
remembrances of parties and nights
of drinking that leave him "passed
out on the front porch with a head
full of beerconfused and clouded by
thoughts of you, dear
Tn record harbors rwo other
surprises in the field of musical
genres. The two tracks "Lame" and
"Haze of Drink" display punk rock
roots that seem to be under
Slobberbone's feet. Hard guitar
riffing and typical punk rock vocal
harmonies drive these tracks.
N The other surprise is the manner
that the Dcnton, Texas lifestyle
comes out country. Typical of
Eastern North Carolina and a
growing trend all over the country
now is a mesh of raw rock n roll with
traditional country sounds. To
accomplish this feat, the band
started by writing slow, acoustic
(sometimes electric) sorrowful
numbers. Once this had been
consummated, Sloberbone decided
to put the finishing touch on by
recruiting Lloyd Maines (Uncle
Tupelo, Richard Buckner, Wagon) to
accompany them on pedal steel
guitar and dobro. To further aid this
countryrock mesh, they add fiddle
on a few tracks played by Susan
Voelz.
For a fine example of this music
fusion, consider again the track
"Front Porch As stated earlier,
Best begins the song by making the
listener aware of his current
situation: "Driven by silence, I'm
drownin in sin Ripping guitars tear
through the song until it breaks
down into Best's Neil YoungSteve
Earle-style harmonica solo.
"Get Gone Again" offers the
same style however at a much
slower tempo. This track floats on
the somber notes that are
resonating from Lloyd Maines
paradise of pedal steel playing.
Barrel Chested is full of surprises,
but none of these are as great as the
story told in the chilling track "Billy
Prichard From the opening line,
we learn that a boy was found dead
lying in the creek of the town. Then
the story switches to the boy's sister
and her new love Billy Prichard. Her
father does not approve of this and
warns her of this boys past life: "I
dont want him hanging round here
girl'cause his eyes are filled with
evilhe's gonna drag you to the
depths of Hell The father says
that her brother had gone fishing
with Billy and that is who killed
him. He continues to tell her Billy's
father was a drunk and his mother a
whore; they raised him on
witchcraft, debauchery and
everything wild. When her father
took his son fishing with Billy, he
had planned to kill Billy by having
them wait for him by a tree. The
two friends, being friendly-like,
traded hats while the father was
gone and when he snuck up from
behind and shot him in the head. In
the end, the father's secret was out:
"You shot your own son and vou
blamed it all on Billy Chilling.
One of the main building blocks
of today's generation is good oV
rock-n-roll, and if that strikes your
fancy, Slobberbone delivers the
right pitch.
Wed 28 &Thurs 29
cow�cr
hPPIC presents
Mesmer'eye
ADVUNCE WAWkl-
CDAUfY'KUUrS
EAST COAST MUSC
VWSKU-AmC
World's Most Povtrful Hypnotist
Formerly Purple
Schoolbus
$ 2 32oz. draft
Acoustic Bus
Beach Music's
Number 1 Show
Sat 31
Chairmen of
the Board
2"7 U1 May, rS
It's TOURNAMENT TBS
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS
CHESS
RHCQUETBRLL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at the University of Tennessee, Knox-
ville,TN, the weekend of February 20-22,1998, all expenses paid by Mendenhall
Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Eight-Ball
Tue Jan 27, 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Chess
Wed Jan. 28 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room
New
This
Year!
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Jan. 31- Feb. 1
Student Recreation Center
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
EOE Sigma Phi Epsilon
Founded: Richmond, VA, in 1901
Fastest growing of the two largest Fraternities in the world,
one of the largest on campus.
Location: 5.05 E. Fifth Street, two blocks from downtown across the
street from campus. We have two houses and a party room
for band parties. Alumni gave us $250,000 for renovations
to our back house which has been completed.
Academics: Balanced man scholarship.
Athletics: Chancellor s cup. which we are currently holding.

There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information.
RUSH
Jan. 27-29
For more information
call 757-0487
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The house with the heart!

VV
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BjBi
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8 Tutiday, Jimmy 27. 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
CONCERT REVIEW
continued from page 6
particularly stand-up bassist Bill
Reynolds. With eyes rolling back in
his head and smiling like he's the
guest of honor at a Tijuana
whorehouse, Reynolds makes the
stand-up bass look like an orgasm
machine (that's a compliment).
Gram Parsons didn't care for his
music being labeled "country rock"
or "progressive country Instead,
he preferred the more specific (and
more elusive) label "Cosmic
American Music Perhaps,
however, Chapel Hill's A&kc knows
what the hell pi' Gram was jawing
about. Indeed, their Jan. 15 show at
Peasant's suggested a vast array of
influences mined from the
treasures of what we call American
music, including that of Mr.
Parsons.
American music is certainly the
guest of honor at a Wake show.
Thursday's show offered spirited
doses of country, folk, blues, rock
and roll and bluegrass to the
Peasant's crowd.
Wake, made up of former FTyin'
Mice Jon Shain (guitar, vocals) and
Mark Simonsen (drums), along
with Oarreli EMxon (bass), John
Curie (guitar) and Kirsten
Simonsen (vocals, mandolin),
performed incredibly beautiful.
heartfelt music that provided relief
from the rain and mud offered by
the Greenville night.
More than likely, the weather
was also to blame for the only
medium-sized crowd in
attendance. The band, however,
didn't seem to mind the size of the
crowd, as they delivered a fine set.
Wake was scheduled tc perform
that weekend at the Nemo
Showcase in Boston. If they were
holding anything back for that show,
it was not apparent.
Fans of harmonizing will eat up
Shain and Kirsten Simonsen's sweet
vocals like John Goodman chasm
down a double coconut pic. There
is, of course, the Gram
ParsonsEmmylou Harris
comparison that can be made of
their harmony vocals. However,
Shain's voice has more of a Dylan
nasal thing going than Parsons' high
twang. Simonsen has a gorgeous
voice of her own that would make
Shania Twain crv like a hurt cat.
Songs like "Weight of Time" and
"Forty Days" showcased not only
the talent of Shain and Kirsten
Simonsen, but all of Wake. They
played tike a band that has been
together quite sometime, despite
Dixon and Currie not having even
appeared on the group's self-titled
debut album released last year on
Flyin Records.
Hopefully, Wake might make it
back to the Emerald City. Soon.
And, hopefully, the weather is as
good as their musk.
Thay had the hippie chkks swaying and spa-ed- The Blue Rags wowed em at Peasant's Thursday.
PMSTO COURTESY Of THE BlUE BASS
ORCHESTRA
continued from page 6
attention shifts solely onto the piano
solo, the orchestra assumes a
subordinate role. The finale brings
another change of character, this time
an expression of youthful vitality. The
themes of the closing movement
suggest vigorous Polish dances, and the
piano part revels in exploits of dexterity
After the intermission, SPCO plays
Felix Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 3
in A Minor, Opus 56, "Scottish" The
composition follows the classical
symphonic plan of four movements,
though Mendelssohn stipulated that
these should be played without pause.
The piece meanders between serene,
melodic and dark, march-like tones,
giving the piece a deep emotional
complexion.
In all, the performance is geared
toward providing music that will move
and excite the audience, something
Wolff thinks is vital.
"I like the players to know that they
have a real stake in the performance,
that it's their performance and not
just mine Wolff said. "By the time
we get to concert, they can do it
without me, generally speaking. I'm
there to be a spark and to remind
everyone that there's a live
audience. That something I
learned: every performance is a kind
of life and death, a creation of
excitement out of nothing
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
SHADOW
continued from 6
collection.
The album begins with two
singles from the earliest days of
MoWax, "Influx" and "Hindsight
Both of these show Shadow's early
experiments with his unique
sampling methods and his penchant
for jazz and classical music samples.
The jewel on here is the suite
"What Does Your Soul Look Like"
offered in its completion and in the
order Shadow prefers. Presented
over four tracks, this sublime and
masterful movement is testament
to his powerful compositional skills.
The piece possesses an urgent
spiritual quest, very similar in
attitude to John Coltrane's four-part
composition, A Love Supreme.
Shadow may very well be the
Coltrane of hip hop since he seems
to be unwilling to keep hip hop in
the realm of butt grinding
soundtracks and has instead
decided to turn the versatile
medium into a very emotional art
form.
The album closes out with a phat
new composition, "High Noon" and
a sry remix of Etu&rvducmg's "Organ
Donor In "High Noon Shadow
demonstrates that he hasn't lost his
creative spark at all, and his clever
use of hard rock guitar riffs and fast-
paced drum samples to create a
jazz-oriented song is just shy of
genius.
Superior in quality and
musicianship, Preemptive Strike is a
must for Shadow fans. and for
anyone looking into Shadow's early
career.
Support student-run
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To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired,
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept
TEC
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ECU
inian
Subscriptions begin with ttw first f
fororw mv
��� Greenville, NC 27858
1
I
WANTS
TO PICK
YOUR
BRAIN.
OJL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1998
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowl Information
and Registration Packet from the Information
Desk, Mendenhall Student Center.
Sponsored by Mendenhall Student Center
First place team members will receive $25.00 each
IFC Spring 1998 Fraternity
Rush
Jan. 26-29 8-llpm
bids extended at 12 midnight Jan. 29th
1111
OIOF Phi Kappa Psi-909 Forbes St.
OKT Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
11KA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
nKO Pi Kappa Phi- 803 Hooker Rd.
nAO Pi Lambda Phi-410 Elizabeth St.
IAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Alpha Phi House
IOE Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E. 5th St.
OBI Phi Beta Sigma - 800 W. 5th St.
0X Theta Chi - 312 E. 11th St.
AID Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
AX Delta Chi - AAI1 House
AID Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
KA Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
KI Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Elizabeth
IN Sigma Nu - 501 E. 11th St.
in Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E. 10th St.
For more information, contact the Student Activities Office, 210 Mendenhall 328-4711
Friendships are common,
but Brotherhood
lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek
sil iNIi 4'

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�WHfB"�
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�pi
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9 Tuesday. January 27. 1998
Pirates fall to
sports
The East Carolinian
Loss marks fifth conference loss for men's
basketball program
on, 52-63 Runners show
academic excellence
TRACY M, LAUBACH
SPORTS EDITOR
The men's basketball team handed over their fifth conference loss of the
season on Sat. to CAA rival UNC-Wilmington, 52-63. Heading into the
game, the Seahawks ranked third in conference standings while the
Pirates ranked eighth.
ECU was first to put points on the board when at the 19:45 mark,
Tony Parham sent in a three-pointer, immediately followed by a 15 foot
Head ccach Joe Dooley watches closely from the sideline as his team struggles in
the battle against the Seahawks.
PHOTO BY AOAM OALPORTO
jump shot from center Dink Peters and another three-pointer by Alico
Dunk.
It wasn't long before UNCWs Mark Byington got into the game,
sending in a three-pointer of bis own with 15:42 on the clock. By the end
of the first half, Bytngton collected six more points to lead his team into
halftimc with a one point advantage over the Pirates. 29-30.
ECU lost control of the game in the second half, with excellent plays
by Byington and senior forward Keith Spencer, shooting 8 of 9 from the
foul line. The Seahawks maintained the lead for the entire period, to end
the game with a victory to improve their record to 10-8 overall, 5-2 in the
CAA.
The reason you win road games in any conference will be the play of
your seniors Seahawks head coach Jerry Wainright said. "This is our
fifteenth road game out of eighteen games, and our kids have bought into
the idea that you have to be mentally tough on the toad
ECU head coach Joe Dooley said that no matter what the Pirates did
omen post highest
average GPA
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
SENIOR WRITER
Aiphons van ierfand shoots as teammate Tony Parham watches from behind.
PHOTO SY ADAM OALPORTO
on the court, the Seahawks always had a way to answer.
"Byington and Spencer made great plays Dooley said. "It seemed
that when we tried to make a run. the did an excellent job answering at
the defensive end of the court
Parham was the only ECU player to post double digits on the board,
leading the Pirates with 18. Peters and Raphael Edward each put in
eight, while Dunk followed with six.
Edwards, a senior from Brooklyn, N.Y was named CAA player of the
week for the second time this season after turning in four consecutive 20-
point performances with the 88-67 victory over Richmond last week.
Edwards currently ranks third in the conference in scoring (17.8) and
second in rebounding (8.1).
The Pirates, now carrying a 2-5 CAA record will host Old Dominion
University on Wed. evening for a 7 p.m. game.
o one ever said that being a
tudent athlete is easy. For
wmeonc to go through college,
jet their degree in four years and
lay varsity sports
he whole time is
feat in itself,
however it is the
mes who can
slays sports and
:onsistently
r o d u c e
:xcep t ional
ades that
escrve the most
raise. There is
ne team that
ms to be full
f such athletes
ear after year,
e women's
ross country
rogram is always
n the forefront of
iCU's athletic
earns when it
�omes to
c a d e m i c
ixccllence.
Traditionally,
every semester
ve have the best
rrade point
iverage said
-lead Coach
Varies "Choo"
ustice. "Most of
he girls have a 3.0
r better
The tradition
f academic achievement is shown
ry the fact that in the four years
hat the Athletic Department has
landed out the PCS Phosphate
Outstanding Scholar Athlete
Iward , it has gone to a member of
he women's cross country team
hree times.
"Our team takes a lot of pride
n the fact that they have good
grades, Justice said.
The team's scholastic success
comes despite the difficulties
posed by playing college sports.
Any college athlete's commitment
to a team consumes much of their
time.
A lot of the difficulties come
from the time we give to the
sport said senior Emily
Linncmeier, "Especially with
running because it is year round.
We have practice everyday and a
meet every weekend. This takes
Emily linnemeier and Erin Cottes represent the women's
cross country team on the track and in the dassrocm.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION
time away from everything else
both socially and academically
The restraints on their time
complicate most aspects of their
academic life, especially
registering for classes.
"Athletes have to try and work
SEE TRACK, PAGE 11
Ladies continue to struggle

I
ECUandUNCW
tied for last place
with a 2-5 record
JENNIFER ALEXANDER
STAFF WRITER
The Lady Pirates won the tip-o f
in Sunday's game against th:
Seahawks of UNC-Wilmington, bijt
that's all.
"We can't play together rig!
now starting senior Shay Hayc s
said. "We need to come and regrou ?
and we need to start playing as p
team again
The starting lineup for the LaoV
Pirates were freshman Tricra
Peckham, sophomores Misty Home
and Danielle Melvin, and seniors
Jen Cox along with Hayes.
ECU started off strong with a 6-
0 lead, scoring by Cox, Melvin, and
Home.
In the first half the Lady Pirates
hit 10-28 field goals, the Seahawks
were 11-26.
ECU sunk 7-9 free throws as
UNCW hit 7-10.
The Pirates went 0-3 from three
point land and the Seahawks
knocked down 4-6 of their three
point shots.
ECU finished the half with a
total of 12 turnovers as the
Seahawks had only six.
With 2:24 left in the first half the
score was tied at 27. ECU never saw
the lead again.
At the end of the first half the
score was ECU 27, UNCW 33.
As the second half started, the
Seahawks started to build their
never ending lead.
"We stopped boxing out and
gave them, the boards Hayes said.
UNCW out rebounded ECU 21-
15 in the second half.
ECU committed a total of 18
fouls, the Seahawks had 17.
"We fouled entirely to much
Hayes said.
in the second half ECU sank
only 7-26 field goals as UNCW
knocked down 10-25.
The Lady Pirates were 50
percent from the foul line in the
second half, the
Seahawks shot 64
percent.
In the second half
UNCW shot 1-6 from
the three point line
and ECU was 0-7.
"Right now a lot of
people don't have a
whole lot of
confidence Hayes
said. "I know Misty was
our go-to shooter and I
think that a lot of
people need to have a
little more confidence
in her or we need to
find someone we can
go to and count on
Hayes scored her
600th career point in
the second half. She
currently has 607
points.
The final score of
che game was ECU 46,
UNCW 61.
"I think individually
we played hard, but we
don't have that team
play Hayes said.
Both the Lady
Pirates and the
Seahawks are currently
tied for last place with
a 2-5 record in CAA
standings.
ECU makes strong
showing in Blacksburg
Senior Shay Hayes goes in for a layup.
PK0T0 BY CLAY BUCK
Stats from
Jan 25 game
Track competes in
Virginia Tech Invite
Scott Rose
STAFF WRITER
The Virginia Tech Invitational
vas held this past weekend in
lacksburg, VA, home of the
lookies (a hookie is a castrated
urkey, what a mascot!). Both
the men and women ran along
vith about 30 other teams from
iround the country.
Coach Charles Justice said
This was a tremendous meet.
This was the highest caliber
neet I have ever seen
Top teams from all over the
:ountry such as Miami.Georgia,
Tennessee, Kentucky, UNC,
nd N.C. State just to name a
ew.
The men's track team
:ompeted in only their second
ndoor track meet of the season
his past Friday and Saturday,
lashawn Deans, a junior from
pring Hope N.C. tied his best
or the season in the 60-meter
ligh hurdles with a time of 8.58
seconds. This was the same
time that Deans ran last
weekend in Chapel Hill, N.C.
it the Joe Hilton Invitational.
Teammate Tremayne
Slunley of Reidsville, N.C.
Inished the 60-meter high
lurdles just behind Deans with
Melvin
Peckham
Totals
P
Wt�
wWvWf
Koukourouzova
oints
rebounds
3
11
3
1
Totals
42
20
time of 9.75 seconds.
Vaughn Monroe, from
Fayetteville, N.C. led a trio of
pirates in the finals of the 60-
meter dash. Monroe who took
third in the preliminaries with
a time of 6.80 seconds took
fifth in the finals with a time of
6.85 seconds. Titus Haygood,
from Charlotte, N.C. and
Freshman Chris Justice, of
Greensboro N.C. also made it
to the finals with preliminary
times of 6.90 seconds which
was good enough for seventh
for Haygood, and Justice
completed the preliminary
round with a time of 6.95
seconds. Haygood also placed
seventh in the finals with a
time of 6.91 seconds and
Justice took third place with a
time of
6.95 seconds in the
consolation races.
The most bizarre twist of
fate came during the 4x400
relay. Our team was battling
Seton Hall for the top spot in
the race when in the third leg
of the race Seton Hall's runner
collided with our own Mike
Miller and pushed him off the
track and possibly out of a first
place finish for the race.
The lady pirates were led by
Saundra Teel a junior out of
Beaufort, N.C. She set her
seasons best time in the 60-
meter high hurdles in the
preliminary competition. In a
race were only the top 16 times
could qualify for the finals
Teel's time of 9.03 seconds
placed her 17th in the
competition, among some of
the country's most elite
runners. Freshman Marshari
Williams of Durham, N.C. and
Junior Missy Johnson of
Richmond, VA. also ran in the
preliminary round and set
times of 9.30 seconds and 9.32
seconds.
In the 60-meter dash
preliminaries ECU was led by
junior Nicky Goins of
Jacksonville, N.C. who finished
23rd overall with a time of 7.84.
Freshman April Cox, of
Farmville, N.C. placed 51st
with a time of 8.18.
The distance medley
competition team finished
strong with a time of 13:01,
which placed them 15th
overall. Saundra Teel also
placed seventh in the high
jump, and Kiona Kirkpatrick
finished 16th in the 400 to
finish the weekend for the lady
pirates.
Said Coach Justice "There
were about 70-80 kids in each
event and to finish in the top
15-20 is something special,
especially with this kind of
competition
On January 31st the Pirates
will travel to the University of
Kentucky for the Rod McCray
Invitational.
Men'sWomen's
60-meter dash preliminary Vuaghn Monroe 6.80 seconds Titus Haygood 6.90 Chris Justice 6.9560-meter high hurdles Saundra Teel 9.03 seconds Marshari Williams 9.30 Missy Johnson 9.32 high jump Saundra Teel 7th place
�� Jf
"����
1
?T






10 Tuesday, January 27, 1998
snorts
The East Carolinian
Tagliabue would support form of replay
SAN DIEGO (AP) � A modified version of instant replay has the
support of a key National Football League precinct � the
commissioner's office.
In his state of the league address Friday, commissioner Paul Tagliabue
said he would back a reinstatement of instant replay to aid game officials'
calls on critical plays only.
But he said he wanted to limit replays to critical plays, the kind that
can make or break a season. Tagliabue seemed at ease during his one-
hour news conference, and why not? He just oversaw negotiations for
new television deals that brought the NFL nearly dlrs 18 billion over the
next eight years.
Super Bowl goes high tech
SAN DIEGO (AP) �Any way you look at it, the Super Bowl is so wired
this year you could call it the Cyber Bowl. There are stadium seats with
armchair computers that allow fans to view instant replays, call up player
stats and watch the live telecast. For the millions of fans not lucky
enough to have a ticket to the Super Bowl between the Green Bay
Packers and the Denver Broncos, the National Football League offers an
interactive web site, with a live global cybercast, views from six camera
angles (including the blimp), and international audio reports in five
languages.
There is nothing that will substitute for the live game, but this is a
darn good consolation prize, said Ann Kirschner, vice president of NFL
interactive. The fan is totally in control.
Flutie still hoping to measure up with the Bills
ORCHARD PARK, New York (AP) � His hair is longer with a touch of
gray, the creases in his face deeper. Other than that, not much has
changed since Doug Flutie last played in the National Football League.
After signing a two-year contract with the Buffalo Bills, Flutie wound
up answering the same questions Tuesday that have followed him
throughout his career.
Is he tall enough to play in the NFL? He was introduced by the Bills
standing 5-foot-9 (1.73 meters) �and that's wearing one-inch heeled
cowboy boots. All I know is that I played the game at my height all my
life. I know no different, Flutie said. This is a game. It's football. I know
one way to play it. Over the last eight years in the Canadian Football
League, Flutie was named the league's most valuable player six times
and took the Toronto Argonauts to the Grey Cup title the last two years.
In the last two seasons, he completed 64 percent of his passes for
11,225 yards, 76 touchdowns and 41 interceptions as the CFLs marquee
player. He was expected to make about dlrs 1.1 million in Canadian
currency (about dlrs 700,000 U.S.) next year had he signed another
contract with the Argos. I'm taking a risk, no question about it, Flutie
said. Right now, my decision is not about money. It's about playing
football and having fun. The CFL put the fun back in football for me.
I'm not going to let anybody take the fun out of it for me ever again.
Man snares happiness repairing baseball gloves
COLUMBIA, S.C. CAP) �Larry Monts found a business that fits him
like an old glove. A longtime
worker in the sporting goods field,
Monts turned a peripheral part of
his job repairing baseball gloves
into a budding side business
where he does everything from
relacing to reconditioning to
reworking gloves.
Baseball has held a lifelong
interest for Monts, a former third
baseman for
Chapin High School who
played the outfield for two years at
Coastal Carolina in the mid-
1970's. Now 46, he began by fixing
his own glove before he began
repairing others after he went to
work for Todd & Moore in 1982.
Monts decided to take the plunge
for himself after working out the
details with Todd & Moore, where
he's the warehouse manager for
shipping and receiving. The store
is a drop-off point for his Carolina
Gloveworks, born in January 1995
and based out of his Chapin home.
I decided I might as well make
this an interesting thing and create
a
little business, Monts said.
Business has gradually grown to
where he repairs 300 to 500 gloves
a year, working evenings and
weekends. He gets work from
recreation parks, Dixie youth
leagues, high school and college
teams, as well as individuals.
Monts does basic work such as
fixing thumb and finger loops and
replacing webs, as well as more-
complicated operations such as
taking apart an entire glove and
replacing the padding.
Lawyer's pet project may
set precident in animal
law
Fashion models without furs.
Laboratory break-ins. Snappy
slogans. That's rhe animal rights
movement, out front.
Behind the noise is an activist
of a different sort, Boston trial
attorney Steven Wise. While most
attorneys in the movement lobby
for anti-cruelty statutes or go to
court on behalf of outraged pet
owners. Wise stands apart in the
belief that he can reshape the legal
concepts of person and property
through common law. His goal is to
win fundamental rights� or full
personhood for animals, though
other specialists in animal rights
scoff at the idea that common law
can be used that way. Wise is soft-
spoken but firm when he defends
his approach as the most likely way
in which rights for animals will be
achieved.
Munoz, Singletary, Head
1998 Class
SAN DIEGO (AP) �Tackle
Anthony Munoz and linebacker
Mike Singletary, who dominated
their positions during the 1980s,
were elected to the American Pro
Football Hall of Fame in their first
year of eligibility on Saturday. Also
chosen by the 36-man board of
electors were safety Paul Krause,
the U.S. National Football
League's career interception
leader: Dwight Stephenson. who
played 107 straight games at
center for the Miami Dolphins;
and seniors candidate Tommy
McDonald. Munoz was an
indestructable offensive lineman
for the Cincinnati Bengals, elected
to 11 consecutive Pro Bowls and
chosen for the NFLs 75th
anniversary team in 1994. He was
a three-time choice as Offensive
Lineman ofthe Year and was
picked as the NFL's Man of the
Year in 1991.
Wisconsin Weekend
Package
RACINE, Wis. (AP) � Al
Svendsen liked football as a kid.
He wasn't an exceptional player,
but he enjoyed the game and was
versatile. In those days� 1946 �
if you played end you played both
offense and defense.
While his four kids had to guess
about ATs football finesse, they
could at least give the ol' man a
hard time when it came to the
garb. They got a glimpse of him
decked out in his high school
yearbook, where they found a
photo of the young Al. lunging
toward the camera, hands out,
goofy helmet secure, ready for
action.
Raiders hire Jon Gruden
as head coach
OAKLAND, California (AP) �
The Oakland Raiders hired Jon
Gruden, the offensive coordinator
for the Philadelphia Eagles, on
Thursday to be their third coach
since 1995The hiring, expected
for the past few days, was
announced late Thursday-
afternoon by team spokesman
Mike Taylor. Gruden, who will fill
the vacancy created by the firing of
Joe Bugel on Jan. 6, is scheduled to
appear at a news conference in
Oakland on Tuesday.
Brown&Brown
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Truth,Equality,Justice
123 W.3rdSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
(icor�e hit I it -ill (Manager)
(919) 353 2774
Baskets 'n More
Gifts Delivered
for all occasions
684-C Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
Grwnville. NC 27858
Tanning Special Pkgs.
10 Visits $30.00
Unlimitd
Attention JAZZ AT NIGHT Fans
I Due to the increasing popu-
' larity of these events, a ticket-
ing procedure has been imple-
mented, effective with the Fri-
day, January 30 performance in
the Mendenhall Great Room at
8:00 p.m.
Because these events are paid for with stu-
dent activity fees, ECU
students will receive one
ticket free of charge
when they present a valid ECU
One-Card at the Central Ticket Office-
Mendenhall. All other
tickets, including ECU
faculty and staff, will
be $2.50.
Advance ticket pick-up
purchase is strongly en-
couraged.
Thanks to all who have sup-
ported this program and created a
very big success.
Co-Sponsored by the ECU School of Music and the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee
HUNDREDS HAVE
ALREADY
COME FORWARD.
!feV3!
Tickets are also
available for the
only other JAZZ AT
NIGHT scheduled
for Spring '98 - '
Friday, March 6.
wS$EE �p
Don't gamble with
your living arrangements.
Don't risk losing the
benefits of campus living.
� Affordable rent and your choice of economical
and flexible meal plans
� The freedom to choose a roommate and the
flexibility to make room changes
� Easy access to campus resources
� A variety of nutritious and delicious food
� An academic-year lease (August through May),
not a twelve-month lease
� Good times, good food, and great friends
Watch your mailbox for information
about housing and dining sign-up
and how you can be a winner in the
1998 Housing and Dining Sweepstakes.
University Housing and Campus Dining Services
Telephone. ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD






��MMMVMMMHi
sports
s
The East Carolinian
Football fans enjoy
commercial breaks
NEW YORK (AP) �
Celebrities, feuding reptiles and
other critters battled for attention
in high-priced commercials on the
Super Bowl telecast, though the
most daring ad made it look like
someone had committed a huge
blunder.
Federal Express ran a network
test pattern as the backdrop for its
commercial during Sunday's game,
when 30-second ads cost a record
Si.3 million.
A caption ran across the bottom
chat said the unidentified sponsor
had prepared a great ad with
dancing kangaroos and a Garth
Brooks soundtrack but it never got
to the network because the ad
agency used someone other than
Federal Express for the shipment.
"We wanted to highlight the
reliability of our service Federal
Express spokeswoman Shirlee
Clark said late Sunday.
Others poked fun at the stakes
involved in advertising on the
Super Bowl, which has become a
showcase for marketing creativity
as well.
Continental Tire had an actor
who looked more like a professor
than a pitchman hold a drawing of
its tires during its commercial,
Super Bowl victory means Denver fans play hooky
which concluded " We don't make
great tire commercials. We make
great tires
More than 30 advertisers
appeared on the program that was
expected to attract an estimated
130 million viewers.
The outcome of the game
remained in doubt until the final
seconds of play, meaning viewers
stayed tuned for the whole game
and all of the commercials.
Underdog Denver beat
defending National Football
League champion Green Bay 31-
24.
A dozen advertisers used
animals or celebrities for their ads
Three Budweiser commercials
featured'a sore-losing lizard named
Louie who hired a hitman to
eliminate the famed frogs who had
earlier been selected over him for
the beer ads. The frogs survived
after a neon sign fell into their
swamp, and Louie is left moaning
v never hire a ferret to do
weasel's job
Pepsi-Cola took to the air with
its ads. A gnat sipped Pepsi and
belted out the classic vv Brown
Sugar" in one ad. A high-flying
goose imitated, a sky surfer
moves in another.
DENVER (AP) � Elated and
relieved that their team finally
won a championship after 38 years
and four failures, Denver Broncos
fans didn't mind spending another
few hours Monday waiting for the
Super Bowl champs to return
home.
Adults took the day off work
and kids missed school to flock to
Mile High Stadium, where a
buoyant crowd of at least 25,000
roared and threw confetti when
the team finally arrived at a
welcome-home rally just before 7
p.m.
Fans started lining up at noon
outside the stadium, which
opened at 3 p.m.
"I feel like five hours was
nothing compared to the 38 years
we waited said Robert Bluhm,
47, of Denver. � f It was well worth
it
Jared Jones skipped his classes
at Colorado University, arriving at
2:45 p.m. to celebrate the team's
first Super Bowl championship in
five tries.
"I've waited my whole life to
win said Jones, 21, of Littleton.
"I can wait a few more hours to see
them in person
Chanting "El-way "El-way
fans shook orange pompoms and
waved banners as quarterback
John Elway � a veteran of four of
the Broncos' Super Bowl berths �
crossed the field to the stage.
The players and coaches
deserved to win, he said, "but for
38 years you guys have been there
and you deserve it more than
anybody
"I wasn't sure we were ever going
to get to do this, but isn't it fun to
stick that one finger in the air and
say we are the best?"
So hoarse his voice was nearly a
whisper, coach Mike Shanahan
said to wild applause, "We've got
the best fans in the world. Thank
you very much
Other players, including
Shannon Sharpe, Bill Romanowski,
Neil Smith, Mark Schlereth and
Ray Crockett, many with their
wives and children, joined owner
Pat Bowlen on the podium to
thank the cheering and whistling
crowd.
"We've very proud to be home
with the Lombardi trophy said
Bowlen, hoisting the silver prize
over his head.
Bowlen has threatened to sell the
team if voters do not help fund a
new stadium, and some fans said
the Super Bowl victory would
build support for the cause.
"This is definitely going to change
the outcome of the stadium tax
said 17-year-old Jesse Malcomb of
Broomfield. "There's no way we
won't pay for a new stadium
TRACK
continued from page 9
their schedule around so that they
are able to practice in the
afternoons. That limits the classes
that they are able to take Justice
said.
In addition to practices, the
meets also present potential
problems. Since most meets are on
weekend and out of town, the
runners often miss Friday
classes due to travel.
The motivation to succeed
academically often comes from
inside the team itself.
"The kids on the team put a lot
of pressure on each other to do
well in school. I think there's a lot
of competition between each
other for the grades Justice said.
Linnemeier, who holds a
perfect 4.0 grade point average
disagrees, "We support each
other
"We have this thing called
secret pals. At every meet, we give
each other little inspirational
gifts Linnemeier said, "So we're
motivated
Ironically one source of
motivation comes from the causes
of the pressure.
"We are all hard workers
Linnemeier said, "We know we
have practice everyday and meets
every weekend so we work harder
The squad's academic
excellence is due in part to the
motivational and competitive
factors from inside the team.
However another reason comes
from a closer look at the sport of
cross country and the athletes that
commit themselves to it.
"The sport requires you to be
very highly motivated and self-
disciplined. Those characteristics
carry over to the classroom
Justice said. "You're talking about a
sport where you have to go out and
run mile after mile, by yourself
with no one making you. That type
of discipline is going to make you a
better student
RUSH
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
National Co-Ed Service Fraternity
Informational Meetings:
Tuesday January 27,1998 Wednesday, January 28,1998
MenXnhaH, Rm. 221 AAendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
8p.m. 8P-m- �
Leadership, Friendship, and Service
Winner of the 1996 Governor's Award
For more information, please call Angie Nowaski at, 355-3452
FLORIDA ka
SPRING BREAK
FROM $149 PER WEEK
$ANDPtfER BEACCMNMBEACH WESOfCT
PANAMA Cmr BEACH
HOME OF THE WORLDS LONGEST KEG PARTY'
CALL FOR INFO. 1-800-874-8828
5UARV 3,1998 8:00 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
Pablo Francisco
STUDENTS FACUfTY SZ.Qfl
GENERAl PUBLIC $5.00
AT THE DOOR S7.00
I 1 llw8�LIMJn
w
ON SALE AT THE QENTRAI.UICKET OFFICE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. MC VISA ACCEPTED.
:
t!
g
SUNDAY, WWCH 1,1988 8:00PM MMKSStUSEM I ff
&x woTfe nwto
FIONA APPLE
STUDfflTS S150C 8TARTW8 JML 28, 8:801
GENERAL PUBUC $18.00 STARTBUS FEB. 2,8:801
AT THE DQ0R $20.00 DOOM 0PENM8 AT 7:801
0
jS
TBKn OH 8W1 AT TffiCmWtt TICKET OFHCE,MWBrJ ���
FILM: MIMIC THURS- - SAT' JAN 2j : 3r� 8:�� PM HENDRIX THEATRE
wmLmm
CALL FOR ENTRIES �l.
Friday, February 6,1888 8 -11 PM to Room 242 Mendanlnil
njgnutlon packet Avalabto at the Meadennal Werautiae Desk sad Gray Salary
$8.00 Fee Par Entry - Uadt 8 Entries Par Person. Casii Prizes Tetadag1,050 to be Awarded
K
PIRATE UNDERGROUND Featuring. Kecia Simpkin
Sam Fisher
THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 8:00 PM MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
nurui You Can Get There From Here: Nova Scotia on Motorcycle
VilC W Presenter: J. Marshall
OH THIS Tuesday, January 27 12 Noon Mendenhall Underground
m
s
WHKHT
Friday
all GrVit! Room
BINGO satur?ay' january 3i' 8:��m mendenhau great R��M
; Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
" � Student Union Hotline at 32&3004. E-mail: uuunion@ecuvm.cis;ecu.edu
HI
The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Hugh WoHf and featuring pianist
Emanuel Ax, will present a night of classical music entertainment.
Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket Office for15.
All tickets purchased at the door are $30.
TONIGHT, JANUARY 27 AT 8 RM. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
See the Bad, Bad Girl Live
Rock'n'roll bad girl Fiona Apple comes to ECU, and it would be "criminal" to miss it!
Student tickets will be sold exclusively January 26-30 at the Central Ticket Office.
General tickets will go on sale February 2.
SUNDAY, MARCH 1 AT 8 P.M. IN WILLIAMS ARENA
Dn't JvL$t Be � Vavrn
Test your nerves and strategy at the All-Campus Recreation Chess tournament.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28 AT 6 P.M. IN MENDENHALL SOCIAL ROOM
Battle of the Dancers
Check out how much fun folk dancing can be. See the Georgian State Dance
Company describe their culture through dance. Elaborate costumes, high energy,
and breathtaking dance. Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket
Office for $12. All tickets purchased at the door are $25.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Mimic (R) will screen in HENDRIX THEATRE
JAN. 30-FEB. 1 AT 8 P.M. Your One Card gets you and one guest in for free.
CiieW" �H TfrS
"You Can Get There From Here: Nova Scotia on Motorcycle"
Presented by J.Marshall.Gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
Free admission.TODAY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
BaSeeNt Beat
Come hear some cool new music for free at the Pirate Underground every THURS-
DAY AT 8 P.M. IN THE MENDENHALL SOCIAL ROOM.This week: Kecia Simpkins.
Ml
5
IK
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s

&
fej t The New Orleans Sound
Listen to some snazzy tunes at Jazz at Night. Free admission for ECU students
with valid ECU ID. All others pay $2.50.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30 AT 8 P.M. IN THE MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
I STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity"
"tmnri hh �����wHBBBBjBBBBBBBBBBBaaHaBPHWBBBBWBBeWiBBHHBBnHBHBH
� HOURS: Mori-Thurs. 8 a.mn p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12p.m12a.m : Sun. 1 p.mll p.m.
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ciassnieas
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
12 OFF DEPOSIT: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt near ECU only $375 per
month, 900 sq.ft. free basic cable, wa-
tersewer, all appliances, pets O.K. Call
758-1921.
FOR SALE
SUBLET MALE, MASTER BED-
ROOM at Players Club, private bath-
room 14 utilities, $220 per month. Call
321-0598. Open February.
SUBLEASE NEEDED ASAP. EFFI-
CIENCY ROOM AT RINGGOLD
TOWERS, $276 A MONTH, WATER
INCLUDED. FURNISHED, MOVE IN
IMMEDIATELY. CALL 561-7238 OR
LEAVE MESSAGE.
STUDIOUS ROOMMATE WANTED
TO share an apartment beginning
May 1998. One year lease preferable.
Please call Eva at 328-3220 as soon as
possible.
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3
bedroom apt. 2 blocks from campus.
Quiet place, $185 & 13 utilities. For
more info call 754-2487.
its. laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus. ECU bus services
sq.
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3 bedroom
apt. off 1st Street $130month. 13 util-
ities. Available Feb. 1. Call Jimmy 752-
9376.
ROOMMATE SPOT AVAILABLE -
female. Player's Club $220month.
Move in immediately. Call 353-4120 or
353-6480.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom duplex in Summerhaven.
Call 758-2800 or after 6:00 p.m. 321-
8872.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. PAY
13 rent and utilities. Located in Wilson
Acres. Call Marc or Brian at 561-8280.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP-
House located two blocks off campus
on Eastern Street. Male or female. No
pets. Outside smoker allowed. Rent
plus 13 utilities, phone & cable. Call
752-8682.
REEDY BRANCH- ONLY $395 per
month. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Washer Si
dryer hookups. 2 blocks from ECU.
Available immediately. Call 561-8117.
WATERBED. KING SIZE POSTER
bed, cherry wood. Asking $275.00, re-
tail was $1,200.00. 321-3210, leave
message.
TWO HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR-
CYCLES for sale. Both new. Sportster
custom and Heritage softtail classic.
Serious inquiries only please. Contact
Frank at 754-8160 leave message or e-
mail frggville@skantech.net.
SHOEI X-8 TWO Shields, nosepiece
$60. Hein Gericke First Gear jacket with
liner $225.00. Fox Gauntlet gloves
$40.00. Parts and manual for
CBR900RR $40.00. Call 353-0956.
MACINTOSH QUADRA 630 1224
mg mghz monitor, hp printer, 8x cd,
33.6 modem syquest drive freehand
4.0 ray dream, plus extra programs
and utilities. $1150. 753-4225.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. Student financing for less than
$30.00 a month. Includes carrying
case, printer, software, insurance, and
theft alarm. Call Alfred at 355-3565.
GREAT PRICES ON T-Shirts, cups,
glassware for your organization! Call
413-8797 for your catalog and prices
for your next event! Or email: mgai-
ney@sprintmail.com
FREE LINGERIE. SIZE S-3X. For
more info, call 919-823-3514. Fax 919-
823-2812. E-Mail jeandjs@sprint-
mail.com. Or write Lingerie, PO Box
231, Tarboro, NC 27886
COMPUTER AND PRINTER: 486.
50 mhz, 8 mgs Ram, Canon Bubblejet
printer. Windows 3.1, Microsoft Word
6.0, Microsoft Excel 50. Perfect for col-
lege student! 757-2552
ATTENTION FORMER REDUX ft
Phen-Phen users; we now have an all
natural, safe way to lose weight with-
out the side effects. Dr. recommended
& guaranteed. I went from a size 12 to
a size 6 in 7 weeks! Call now & ask me
how. 1-888-648-5831.
18 SPEED AT BIKE $85.00. 3-piece
dinette set $50.00. Computer desk
wchair, printer stand $75.00. Canon
Bubblejet 200ex, $100.00. 9'3" custom
surfboard, $225.00. Unique hardwood
coffee table, 43"x43. $75.00. Call Jer-
ome, 353-0835.
NON-SMOKING CAREGIVER
NEEDED for 5-year-old with mild lung
disease. Must have own transporta-
tion, references, criminal check. Hours
are Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
from 12 to 5 p.m. Leave message after
5 at 830-9082.
LOOKING FOR A fKT Time job?
The ECU Telefund Is hiring students
immediately to contact alumni for the
ECU Annual Fun Orive. $5.50 per
hour. Make your own schedule. If in-
terested, come by Rawl Annex, Room
5, M-Th between the hours of 3-6
p.m.
LOCAL LAW FIRM SEEKS mailroom
supporterrand runner from 1 - 6 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Must have reliable
transportation. EOE. Interested candi-
dates, send resume to Legal
Administration, 1698 E. Arlington
Blvd. Greenville, NC 27858.
HORSEFARM NEEDS HANDYMAN
TO paint, mow, general main-
tenance, 10-24 hours. "No slow
footing Call 768-2664 for inter-
view.
HORSEFARM NEEDS BRIGHT,
NEAT, young lady with initiative,
experience, and a winning atti-
tude. Serious inquiries about this
weekly position please call 758-
2664 for interview.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas
top adult entertainment is once
again searching for beautiful la-
dies. H you have what it takes to
be a Playmate, call 747-7686,
Snow Hill.
EARN S750-61SOOWEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment St
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
BUS DRIVERS WANTED: ECU Tran-
sit is now hiring ECU students for your
student transit system. Contact the
Transit Office at 328-4724 for more
info.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 19S8. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext 1 A.S.A.P.
TRAVEL
rvr-mlettal
JAMAICA FLORIDA�JtII
Mil
Call today! Space is ilmi
1800648-4849
On-Canpwseall
RycM@75S-S624
Tiffany� 328-837
Bahamas
Party
Crelre $279
Cc-ncun
$399
Panama
City $139
forth
Beach $119
HELP WANTED
WORK AT HOME. 5OO-$1200
PTmonth, $2000-$6000 FTmonth. Full
training provided. Call for free infor-
mation booklet. 1-800-486-6907.
SERVICES
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS II
The East Carolinian Advertising De-
partment is currently interviewing
prospective Advertising Sales Reps.
Applications are available at The East
Carolinian, Second Floor, Student Pub-
lications Building.
PERSONALS
Spring Break Travel - Our 1 llh Yearl
1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach. "Summit Luxury condos next
to Spinnaker. Owner discount rates.
(404)355-9637.
Humum
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics is currently hiring
full-time ECU undergrad and graduate
students to tutor student-athletes in all
subject areas. Minimum 3.0 GPA re-
quired. Call 328-4550.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruil'ng on
campus for a limited number ot summer
'9!l management ixjsilior.s. Cain Hands-on
� viericnce and Wld your resume. Last
summers avenge earnings 7,223.
Minimum GPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE
MEDIATELY, walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
15'x15'). Private phone linecable in
room. Washerdryer included. $175
per month plus utilities. Call Mike at
752-2879.
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS.
female roommate to share large 3 bed-
room house. Washerdryer. 13 utili-
ties, $190 rent. Nice! Call 561-7768,
757-1467. Please leave message.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM apt. 3
blocks from ECU. Only $195.00 per
month. Call 758-1921, ask for Ken.
FOR RENT 4 BEDROOM townhouse
in Player's Club. Open ASAP. Total
deposit only $220. 34 paid already.
Call 355-8847 or club office 321-7613.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
Share beautiful new three bedroom
house on ECU bus route. Very reason-
able rent. Call me at 752-2489.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP. Move in 11498 Nice, spacious
two bedroom apt. Only 6 months old.
5-7 minutes from campus. $200month
12 utilities, cable, phone. Leave mes-
sage 353-0854.
ECU AVAILABLE NOW! ONE bed
room apartments. 4 blocks to ECU.
Furnished or unfurnished. $265$285
month. 758-6596.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 1 S 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
F
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND Parks Department will be hold-
ing an organizational meeting for all
those interested in officiating in the
Spring Adult Soccer Leagues. Position
pays $12-$16 a game. Clinics will be
held to train new and experienced offi-
cials. However, a basic knowledge and
understanding of the game is neces-
sary. The meeting will be held
Thursday, January 29-at 6 p.m. at Elm
Street Gym. For information, call the
Athletic Office at 830-4550 between 2-
7 p.m.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION St
Parks Department is recruiting 12-16
part-time soccer coaches for the
spring youth indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of soccer skills and have the abil-
ity and patience to coach young peo-
ple ages 5-18 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours are from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching -
flexible according to class schedules.
This program will run from mid-March
to April. Salary starts at $5.15hour. For
information, call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550 after 2 p.m.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
VERY FUN work. Flexible part- time
hours (mostly evenings and wee-
kends). Must have outgoing personali-
ty and reliable transportation. Own
35mm SLR camera a plus, but not es-
sential. No experience necessary. We
train. $7.00 per hour. Call Sara at 1-
800-722-7033.
PART OR FULL-TIME position avail-
able at Mattress Plus, 606 E. Arlington
Blvd. Apply in person, no phone calls
please.
NOW HIRING PLRVMRTES MRSSR6E
earn great money. Confidential
employment. Call today, 747-
7686.
PHI SIGMA PI REMINDER: Smoker
is tonight in G.C. 1032 at 7:00 p.m. Be
there and be ready for a great semes-
ter.
GREEK PERSONALS
TO THE PI LAM brothers, Hope Rush
is a success. We know it will be. The
Five Society
TO THE BROTHERS OF Tau Kappa
Epsilon: Thanks for the rad social last
Friday night! We appreciate all you
did, and hope to get together soon I
Love, Alpha Xi Delta
TO THE BROTHERS OF Pi Lambda
Phi, We're BackllHI The Five Society
THETA CM. WE HAD a great time at
the social last week. Can't wait to do it
again. Love, the sisters of Zeta Tau Al-
pha
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI would
like to congratulate Becky Gunn for
winning over a guy like Jeff. We love
you both!
THANK YOU, CHRISTINA LACY for
all you hard work and dedication to
Sigma. Love, your Sigma sisters
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA WISHES all
ECU fraternities a great spring rush
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA HOPES eve-
ryone has a great Spring Semester
KAPPA SIGMA, WE HAD a great
time at our pre downtown Saturday.
We hope to do it again soon. Love, the
sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
KAPPA ALPHA THANK YOU FOR
the great time Thursday night. We will
definitely have to do it again some-
time! Love, the sisters of Alpha Phi
ALPHA PHITHE RETREAT TO the
Outer Banks was a blast! Our games,
dancing, and swimming proved to be
a bonding experience! Let's keep up
the enthusiasm for our new offices
Qxm vn
Groin ten
CAMPUS REPS: SELL S Aim GO FREE!
cafituff
BaRa9s
florMa
FREE PUPPIES TO A good home!
12 lab 12 boxer. Six weeks old. Call
758-9662.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
Scholorships. Business. Medical bills.
Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-9000
ext. G-3726.
BIKE RACK WALL MOUNTED. No
holes required. Holds two bikes.
$40.00 obo. 353-0956
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
time. At Home. Toll Free (1) 800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
iijji.niimj,ii.ii5i
THU JAN. 29-SAT Jan. 31-East
Carolina Religious Arts Festival with
featured artists and clinicians, Janette
Fishell, Director. Thu Jan. 29-Guest
Recital. Festival Organ Recital of the
East Carolina Religious Arts Festival,
Colin Andrews, Organist, first Presby-
terian Church, Kinston, 8:00 p.m. Fri
Jan. 30-Guest Recital, "Stations of the
Cross: A Journey To, and Through, the
Cross Via Music Art and Poetry David
Briggs, Organist and Conductor of the
Choristers of Gloucester Cathedral,
Gloucester, England, The Memorial
Baptist Church, 1510 Greenville Boule-
vard Southeast, Greenville, 8:00 p.m.
Fri Jan. 30-Jazz at Night, Carroll V.
Dashiell Jr Director, The Great Room,
Mendenhall Student Center, 8:00 p.m.
Sat Jan. 31-Guest Recital, "Lift High
the Cross hymn and Choral Festival
of the East Carolina Religious Arts Fes-
tival, David Briggs, Organist and Con-
ductor, John Horman, Director of the
Festival Children's Chorus, The Memo-
rial Baptist Church, 1510 Greenville
Boulevard Southeast, Greenville, 2:00
p.m. Sat Jan. 31-Senior Recital, Kevin
Earl, clarinet, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
4:00 p.m. Sun Feb. 1-Senior Recital,
Christina McNeeley, Bassoon, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 2:00 p.m.
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNI-
CATION Sciences and Disorders is
providing the speech, language and
hearing screening for students who
are fulfilling requirements for admis-
sion to Upper Division on February 2
or 3, 1998 for students in the College
of Arts and Sciences, General College,
and the Schools of Art, Health and Hu-
man Performance, Human Environ-
mental Sciences and Music. Screen-
ings for students in the School of Edu-
cation will be February 4 or 5, 1998
from 5:00- 6:00 p.m. These are the only
screeningdates during the Spring Se-
mester and are on a first come, first
serve basis. Conducted in the Belk An-
nex (ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic,
next to the Belk Building (School of Al-
lied Health Sciences). No appointment
needed-Please do not call for appoint-
ment. Waiting is outside the clinic
waiting room. Sign in begins at 4:50
p.m.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP Thursday from 3:30-5:00 p.m.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program January 29nd. if you are in-
terested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
RESUME CRITIQUES - Students who j
have already prepared a resume and :
would like to have it critiqued by a Ca- j
reer Services counselor may come to j
the Career Services Center on Wed.
Jan. 21 at 3:00 p.m. or Wed. Jan. 28 at
2:00.
LEARN HOW TO MANAGE your
time. The Office of Undergraduate
Studies will offer a workshop on
Thursday, Jan. 29th at 4:00 p.m. on
Time Management and ifs Freel Just
come to Brewster B-103.
IMPROVE YOUR READING
SKILLS! The Office of Undergraduate
Studies will offer on Wednesday, Jan.
28th a workshop on reading compre-
hension. Free! Just come to Brewster
B-103 at 4:30 p.m.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet Tues-
day, Feb. 3 at 5:30 p.m. in the General
Classroom Building in Room 1032.
ECU MEN'S SOCCER TEAM will be
conducting open Goalkeeper Only try- �
outs starting February 2, 1998 from 4-
5:30 p.m. All interested participants
need to report to the Scales Field
House with all appropriate equipment.
DONT FORGET OUR BLOOD
DRIVE I Mendenhall Student Center,
Tuesday, January 27, 1998, 12:00
noon-6:00 p.m. Sponsored by Biology
Club. American Red Cross Blood
ServicesMid-Atlantic Region
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A
Career Workshop: Tuesday 3:30 - 5:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program January 27th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661
BODY IMAGE GROUP FOR Women
workshop: Wednesday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram January 29th. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL
STUDENT- Tips for Writing Papers
workshop: Thursday 10:00-11:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram January 29th. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
ACADEMIC STUDY SKILLS WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:00-5:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment will be offering this program
January 29th. if you are interested in
this workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661
VISA MC AMEXDISCOVER
1-800-234-7007
http:www.endlesssummertours.com
BEST HOTELS. LOWEST PRICES.
All Springbreak locations. Cancun, Ja-
maica, from $399, Florida, from $89,
Texas, Mazatlan, Bahamas. Register
your group or be our Campus Rep.
800-327-6013. www.icpt.com
AWESOME SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS Party Cruise! 6 days $279! In-
cludes meals, parties & taxes! Great
beaches & nightlife! Leaves from
South Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
AWESOME FLORIDA SPRING
BREAK! Panama City! Room with
kitchen $139! Florida's New Hotspot-
South Beach $129! Bars open until
5:00 a.m Cocoa Beach-Hilton $179!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800678-6386
AWESOME CANCUN & JAMAICA
Spring Break Specials! 7 nights, air &
hotel $459! Save $150 on food, drinks!
Panama City $139, SouthBeach $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
���SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink
parties! Sell 5 & go free! Book now
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
http:www.endlesssummertours.com
QUALITY SERVICE AT A FAIR
PRICE - OIL CHANGES.
BATTERIES. NC INSPECTIONS
KADS AUTOMOTIVE
3205 E. 10th Street
758-5237
Hours: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. IW-F; 8
a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat.
THIRD GENERATION PIRATES
SUPPORTING ECU THROUGH
SHARED VISIONS-BOTH
ACADEMIC 8 ATHLETIC
BROWN & WOOD
PONTtACCADILLAC
GMCJEEP
329 Greenville Blvd. SW
355-6080
Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
For information about being included in
our Auto Directory call 328-6366.
TOTAL QUALITY SERVICE
STEVE BRILEYS AUTO-
MOTIVE SERVICE CEN-
TER
3142-A Moseley Drive
752-5043
Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
OTHER
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to con
gratulate sister Julie Smith and Erin
Gibbons on their engagement! Best
wishes to you both!
ADVERTISE IN
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. delinquent Tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free (1)
800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for current
listings.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. Credit card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities
8t growps. Any campus organization
can raiskup to $1000 by earning a
whopping,$5.00Visa application. Call
1-800-932-OS28 ext. 65. Qualified call-
ers receive Fee T-shirt.
ti
THIS YEAR A LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's
Loan Repayment
program, you could get
out from under with a
three-year enlistment
Each year you serve
on active duty reduces
your indebtedness by one-
third or $1,500, which-
ever amount is greater,
up to a $65,000 limit
The offer applies to Perkins Loans, Stafford Loans,
and certain other federally insured loans, which are not
in default. �
And debt relief is just one of the many benefits
you'll earn from the Army. Ask your Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE!
www.goarmy.com
1
4
r


Title
The East Carolinian, January 27, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 27, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1244
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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