The East Carolinian, January 22, 1998






��
THURSDAY
JANUARY 22.
easlcaromuan
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CARCLMA
University Printing & Graphics gets new home
� : i-
New facility allows for
installation of new
higji-tech equipment
HOLLY HARRIS .
SEHIOK WRITER
University Printing and Graphics has a new home. The
main campus branch of the publications department has
moved from its former location in the student publications
building to a new facility on Tenth Street. The new
building is not only more spacious, but allows room for a
variety of newer and more technologically impressive
machines.
"Basically what the status was at the old facility was that
we were inundated with work we didn't have the space to
process; we couldn't install additional equipment because
of the space confines said Robert F. Hariow, director of
Crime Wove
Tigs to prevent Crime
ance to autor
ill doors
-Park in wall lit areas
University Printing and Graphics.
Despite the fact that the location of the
Printing and Graphics building was convenient
at its mid-campus spot, there were only 9000
square feet to accommodate the staff, machines �
andpaper supplies.
The new building, which opened to the
public on Jan. 5, has around 20,000 square feet
with space for copy machines, printing faculties,
offices, design areas, a dark room and an array of
other specialized equipment.
Though walk-up service is no longer readily
available from the main location, the
department has compensated for the move by
setting up an office on the second floor of Joyner
Library that
can perform
?uick copy
unctions as
well as binding
and faxing.
Those who use
the facilities
will, however,
find that the
Tenth Street
office has
many
advantages
like a color
copier and a
design
department
that can help
with anything
from
. Don Stocks, a senior, works at the
new PIP print shop. Story on page2.
PHOTO BY JBCEIYN FSiEOMAK
conceptualization to production.
The new facility has many advantages that
work to make ECU's publications department
Christiana
cheeks the motion sensortd
light m her backyard, the light is bested near the door burglars kicked in to gain access
to her apartment over Christmas break
UUUOSHJUNUSf UUOtl SOUft: ECUPD
Holiday crime increases:
An increase in crime over the
holidays creates a need for
awareness in students who left
Greenville during Christmas break.
"Crime increased all over
Greenville said Cheryl Tafoya, crime
analyst with the Greenville Police
Department. "M: did notice a slight
increase in the Tar River area. We think
this slight increase is due to the fact
that a lot of students leave their homes
for two weeks or more without taking
proper precautions
Officials say more crime occurred
during the Christmas break rather thsu
Thanksgiving break because of the difference in time off
from school.
"Get your neighbors to look out for you said Melissa
Bartlett of Greenville PD's public affairs. "Get them to
pick up your newspapers and mail. Make sure they know
what cars should be in the driveway and what cars
shouldn't
The Greenville PD also offers a "Vacation House
Check" program. This consists of a routine patrol by
officers in the traveler's neighborhood. Each patrolling
officer is aware of lights that are supposed to be on and
cars that should be in the driveway. Officers will also
check all of the locks and doors to ensure that nothing
has been tampered with. To take advantage of this
program, people should contact Cpl. William Harris at
830-4366 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. or the Greenville
PD's 24-hour dispatcher at 830-4316.
The Greenville PD stresses preparation for anyone
who plans to leave town for an extended period of time,
"w took all of our valuables out of the house or out
of the field of viewsaid Amy Garner, an ECU student.
"W; were still broken into, but they didn't take
anything. I had a feeling that someone would break in,
so we did all that we could
Garner's home has had property stolen out of the yard
in the past, but when her house was attacked, nothing
was taken
ECU student Elizabeth Blocker's home
Students
must protect
homes when
away
CRA1G D. RAMEY
SENIOR WRITER
burglarized in less than 40 minutes
after she left.
"Vfe left a window cracked open so
we could air out the house said
Biocker. "I've lived in Greenville for
14 years and this is the first time my
home has been broken into
"Downtown cops didn't have any
action over the break and we knew
that they would be patrolling in our
neighborhood said Kelly Vroodell,
also an ECU student. "My landlord
checked on the house and picked up
our mail. Our neighbor has a motion
light. I even called my machine
while I was home so I could monitor any sounds that
might be going on in the house
WoodeH's home was still burglarized, with nearly
$1,000 stolen.
"I think people should get renter's insurancesays
Vifoodell. "Just in case something like this happens
"We increase our amount of patrols during
Christmas Bartlett said. "We assign units to specific
neighborhoods as well as other high crime areas related
to the holiday season
Officers are on constant patrol of mall parking lots in
both patrol cars and as undercover shoppers. Traffic
patrol is also increased to compensate for the large
amount of commuters from surrounding cities who drive
to Greenville to shop.
"Shopping mall parking lots are the center for a lot of
holiday crime Tafoya said. "People leave shopping bags
in their back scats. They carry large amounts of cash
"Criminals look for the least amount of resistance
Bartlett said. "You just need to be aware of the people
around you. Be smart
Officials also suggest the following precautions: keep
purses secure (under a coat), travel in groups, park in
well-lit areas, notify neighbors, keep keys in hand and
lock everything.
Nearly half of the Christmas holiday crimes are still
unsolved.
was
An ECU student works hard at the new central printing
and graphics location on loth Street.
mo n jokoti feitonA
the third largest in the state university system,
rivaled only by Carolina and State (the program
has 221 copiers spread out around university
facilities such as the library and the medical
complex). Not only does the new office boast
digital phone lines with individual extensions
that will make communications much easier, but
in some instances, customers don't even have to
SEEPRH�TtNGME�3
SGA hopes to hear
more students voices
SGA directly responsible for
expansion of Mendenhall
computer lab
AMBER TATUM
STAFF WRITER
"I want to narrow the cleavage between students
who care enough to be involved and those losers
who merely complain and do nothing said Scott
Forbes, SGA president.
"We are searching for students for
committees. The staff needs students'
opinions
The Student Government Association is the
voice of our student body at ECU. If no one is
going to get involved, then improvement for
our university is going to be difficult.
"The administration wants what's best for
the university. They really do. They say, 'Hey
Scott, what do you think? Forbes said, who is
also chairman of the Student Media Board. "It's
amazing
SGA is directly responsible for expansion of
the Mendenhall Student Center computer lab.
S6A President, Scott
Forbes
nunwTQ
A larger lab will open
soon, and there is a
possibility it will be an
extended hour lab.
"We arc going to have
44 computers as opposed
to 12 in Mendenhall
Forbes said.
The money has been
allocated for the project,
but the idea is still fresh
and has a lot of strings to
tie up. Safety procedures,
when to keep the lab open the longest and
similar details need to be thoroughly discussed.
"Hours will be very extended through
midterms and finals. They the hours will vary
during the semester to accommodate students'
needs said William Clutter, director of
university unions.
Instead of an officer being stationed to keep
the lab safe, a doorbell may be a possibility for
entrance into the lab at late times of the night.
"We (University Union and SGA) arc looking
to order Macintosh or IBM computers Clutter
said. "Lab hours will be determined from
speaking with student leaders
SEE SGA PAGE 3
Web site welcomes creative competitors
Cherry Coke to award
winner Sony digital camera
JENNIFER V1CKERS
STAFF WRITER
"Cherry Coke fans will soon be able to turn their
creative ideas into something Useful.
Cherry Coke's new web site is offering an online
competition seeking creativity in music, design,
writing and computer skills.
This is a free contest open to all U.S.
residents. Interested persons can visit the web
site at: www.cherrycofce.com.
"We've never done anything like this before.
We don't know how many arc expected to enter,
but we are hoping for a lot said Kari Bjorhus of
Coca-Cola's media relations department in
Atlanta.
The competition began in December, but
visitors still have three more months to visit.
"There is a competition every month for four
months. Each month 24 finalists will receive
Cherry Coke hats and one winner will receive a
Sony digital camera Bjorhus said.
A panel of judges awards the prizes in each of
the four competitions. The first, composing
music, offers special software tools to create a
tune, Hsten to it and submit it. The second,
designing the world of the future, offers visitors
to use their imagination and computer design
tools to visualize how things could be.
For the third competition, writing a movie
treatment, visitors can choose from a cast of
SEE CHERRY COKE PAGE 3
THURSDAY
TODAY
Partly Cloudy
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TOMORROW
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high 48
low 33
rrnrmr.
In a 1995 U.S. News and
World Report survey, the
School of Medicine ranked
No. 9 among the
primarycare schools in the
United States. It was No.
3 in family medicine.
opinion.
Don't outlaw cloning
Don't outlaw cloning
lifestyle7
Animation.it's not just for
kids anymore
sports.
10
Foreign athletes grace
the sports scene
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOC,
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6386 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.t8C.ecu.edu
-

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2 Thursday, January 22. 1998
news
.

Hh Point man des after
staggering into bar
HIGH POINT (AP) � A High
Point man collapsed and died in a
bar Sunday after he had been
shot in the abdomen.
Preston Lamonc Lyles, 27, was
shot shortly after 2 a,m. and
collapsed in the Comfort Club
zone.
NAACP quickly finds
new exeutive director
CHARLOTTE (AP) � The
North Carolina NAACP took only
17 days to find a new executive
director after spending a year
before hiring the departing Keith
Sutton.
The civil rights organization's
executive board on Saturday
hired Hurley Derrickson of
Greensboro, who works for the
VS. Census Bureau
Woman mauled by four
dogs on rural road
CROSSVILLE, Tcnn. (AP) �A
77-year-old woman was
hospitalized in intensive care
after being attacked by four dogs
on a rural road in Cumberland
County. Sheriff's deputies said
Mabel D. Bilbrey of Crossvillc
suffered numerous cuts,
punctures and lacerations. �
Swine waste topic for
hearing
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) �
The state's proposed regulations
on swine waste will be put to
public hearings Thursday night
in Paducah and Bowling Green,
the Natural Resources Cabinet
announced today.
Jewish Law does not
rule out human cloning,
rabbi says
JERUSALEM (AP) � Jewish
law does not rule out human
cloning, a rabbi told legislators
Tuesday as Israel began tackling
an issue that has triggered a
moral debate in the western
world. U.S. President Clinton
and Christian leaders are seeking
a ban on the procedure.
Turkish Police arrest 120
Iraqi Kurds on Greek
border
EDIRNE, Turkey (AP) �
Continuing a crackdown on
illegal immigration, police
apprehended 129 Iraqi Kurds
near the Greek border, the
Anatolia news agency said
Tuesday.
The East Carolinian
briefs
Candlelight march
candlelight march and
vigil was held in honor of Dr.
vlartin Luther King, Jr. on
Monday. The march formed
on College Hill Drive and
Erocceded to Mendenhall
tudent Center. A
celebration then took place
at the student center and
was concluded with an
address by Dorothy Spruill
Hedferd, manager of the
Somerset Place historic site,
ledford is the author of
Somerset Homecoming:
Recovering a Lost Heritage,
ier books document the
experience of individuals,
ncluding members of her
amily, who were slaves at
he Somerset Plantation in
Washington County. The
18th and 19th century
plantation was one of the
argest in the region.
Civil rights activist
speaks
Charles E McDew, a
teacher-activist and the co-
founder and former head of
the Student Non-violent
Coordinating Committee
(SNCC), discussed his early
involvement in the civil
rights movement in America
when he spoke at
Mendenhall Student Center
jreat Room on Wednesday,
Ian. 21. McDew helped form
SNCC in 1960 and became
the organization's chairman
n 1961. Although McDew is
not as well known as some of
he later SNCC leaders�
Jtokely Carmichael and H.
tap Brown� he played a
icy role in the early civil
rights movement. He has
been involved in numerous
contemporary, social and
political change
jrganizations. Bob Moses, a
"cllow activist, described
im as "black by birth, a Jew
:y choice and a
revolutionary by necessity
Art Lecture
On Jan. 22 an art lecture
rogram, part of the
nternational Enameling
ymposium and exhibit, will
e held in the auditorium at
the Jenkins Fine art Center
i 7 p.m. A reception will be
teld afterward. Contact Gil
Leebrick or ECU Gray
Gallery for further
nformation.
Art Workshops
Workshops and
presentations about
enameling will be held at
he School of Art on Jan. 23.
The International
Enameling Symposium will
continue through Sunday.
An exhibit of enamels is on
display at the Gray Gallery.
Mountain life shown
in pictures
An exhibit of photographs
taken by a photographer who
traveled in the South from
1930 to 1955 is on display in
the Mendenhall Student
Center gallery through Jan.
30. William "Picturcman"
Mullins spent most of his
life capturing the scenery
and people in the
Appalachian mountains. The
exhibit is part of the
Southern Arts Federation's
Folk Arts and Southern
Culture Traveling Exhibits
Program.
Universities have
ambitious wish
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) �
Lawmakers are not making any
promises on state universities'
annual wish list of construction
projects.
The state College Board last
week endorsed a $76.7 million
building plan for the Legislature
to consider.
We've done so much for the
universities over the last five or six
years that (state building officials)
have really not been able to keep
up with it. We've just snowed
them under said House Ways
and Means chairman Charlie
Williams, R-Senatobia.
Senate Finance Committee
chairman Hob Bryan, D-Amory,
said any proposal will include "a
rational amount, but not that
much
The Legislature in the past 10
years has provided more than $1.2
billion for new construction and
renovation projects throughout
state government, according to
the state Bureau of Building,
Grounds and Real Property
Management.
More than half of that � $665
million � has gone to the eight
state universities and 15
community colleges.
The Legislature last year
allocated $87 million for
universities and $25 million for
community colleges.
Williams and Bryan said they
envision a total of about $50
million being allocated this year
for universities and colleges.
While colleges have been
enjoying a building boom in recent
years with more money from the
Legislature, their construction
needs continue to outstrip
available funds, said Mississippi
State University President Mack
Portcra.
I hope we don't level off any
time soon. If you've been on our
campus, you can see that there are
some serious infrastructure needs
at Mississippi State Portera said.
About $8.8 million of MSU's
$19.2 million worth of needs is
marked for streets and parking
lots.
Alumnus opens print shop
High tech digital
color printing now
available
Sarah valliere
STAW WRITER
Donald Stocks, ECU alumni and
former president of the Pirate
Club, is now the new owner and
manager of the PIP Printing
Center, located at 612 E. Arlington
Blvd.
"I love being around ECU and
was looking for a business were I
could remain located in the
Greenville area Stocks said.
Stocks was most recently working
as a chief financial officer for the
L.L. Murphrey Co. hog farming
operation. He said he switched
his line of business because he
really likes working with the
people around Greenville.
The PIP Printing Center has
been open for seven years and is
one of 600 in the franchise. Stocks
purchased the Center the 1st of
November.
The PIP Printing Center
CRYSTAL CONNECTION f! UNIQUE GIFTS " FOR UNIQUE PEOPLE
CRYSTAL CONNECTION 422 Arlington Blvd. i Behind the Animal House 3558250
creates brochures, bulletins, press
releases, business forms, fryers,
reports, catalogs, stationery,
menus and many other printed
pieces. It offers graphic design,
color printing, typesetting, high-
volume copying, color copying and
custom binding.
Stocks has now begun adding
high-tech features such as the
high-tech digital color printing
system, one of the first in the
Greenville area. This system will
allow the Center to produce full
color digital prints using a UFO
color Flare Raster Image Processor
and a digital printer. "What this
means for our customers is that
each color document we produce
is an original, far superior to what a
color copier can produce said
Stocks.
"This equipment is probably
the most exciting technological
breakthrough to impact our
industry recently and allows our
customers to print on demand
exactly when and what they
need notes Stocks.
To contact Donald Stocks for
more information concerning the
Center and what it offers, he can
be reached at 355-1636.
Body Jewelry
Beads & Beading Supplies
Hemp jewelry & Dog collars
Hemp Products
Candle Making Supplies
Unique Sterling Jewelry
Grateful Dead puzzles
New Stuff Arriving Daily
C Alternative cards & Journals
L Stickers & Patches New Incense S
Burners Indian tapestries 8 Perfume
oils Blacklight Fixtures a Posters
Wind Chimes a Door Beads Locally
handmade clothing ,
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Doors Open: 7:30 p.ra. 'Si Touch Of Class

Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
756-6278
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
10 OR MORE GIRL
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NIGHT!
Located 5 Milei Wst of Greenville on 264 Alt. (Behind Aladdin Linto Service)
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3 Thursday. January 22, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
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Cherry Coke
continued from page 1
characters and create film. For the
final one, designing web screens,
one can create new wallpaper for
computer screens.
"At the end of the four
competitions, the web community
will vote for one grand prize
winner from the four finalists
Bjorhus said. "The grand prize
will be the winner's own theme
page within the Cherry Coke Web
site
"We feel that Cherry
Coke drinkers are creative
people Bjorhus said. "I think
that this will be good for the brand
and appeal to the sort of person
who likes Cherry Coke. We want
people to enter and show the
creativity of their ideas. We
believe this will build a stronger
brand identity
SGA
Continued from page 1
Secondly, the SGA legislative
branch has decided where student
fees should go.
"Fees went to Mendenhall
Student Center improvements,
Student Union for concerts and
films, a more efficient transit
system and a new computer lab
Rrbes said.
In the future, SGA plans to do
some research into professor
surveys. Publishing the results of
these may happen. Lighting on
central campus is also a problem
area the SGA wants to rectify.
"Our organization has donated
two bicycles to the ECU police so
that more patrols will be made to
ensure better safety on campus,
especially the mall area Forbes
said.
Presently, this project still
needs to be finalized. Special
thanks from the ECU police
department go to Scott Forbes for
his input in making ECU campus
a safer place.
"The police department
appreciates Scott Forbes' effort
and the bikes that were donated
as they make it possible for more
officers to patrol campus said
Captain Johnnie Umphlet of the
ECU police.
Patrol bicycles have made
things easier for the police as they
may sometimes aid an officer in
getting to a call faster or enable a
student to stop them to make a
quick inquiry. It is obviously more
difficult to stop an officer who is
riding down the road in his patrol
car with all the windows rolled up.
"The bike patrol (officers) can
get between buildings to better
ensure safety of students
Umphlet said. "It's a better tool to
get to a smaller area. There are
about 38 officers that are designed
to patrol campus daily. They are
divided into five squads. One
squad is stationed at the School of
Medicine and four cover campus.
Two officers per squad are on
bikes
In accordance with modifying
organization and making things
run more smoothly, the election's
chair will be appointed three
months earlier.
Library Vandalism is a
Serious Crime
Offenses:
�Writing on Desks Tables
Books Magazines
� Removing Pages from
Books Magazines
� Misusing Computers
� Consuming Food Drinks
COIlSeCJUenCeS: Fines, purchase damaged property,
Campus Community Service, or Probation! Vandalism in
the Library occurs daily, Do your part to STOP IT
X&he Cellar
Friday
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Imports & Micro Brews on tap for a
PENNY all night & we will not run out.
You'll recieve a FREE draft cup at the
door when you enter!
Thurs. Ladies Ni
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� $1.00 Bar Specials
� 1$ Drafts
Other universities have
similar problems with crime
CHRISTINE TATUM
CPS
As best as Boulder police can tell
so far, the last time anyone saw
23-year-old Susannah Chase alive
and well, she was walking home
by herself around 1:30 a.m. on
Dec. 21.
Police say the junior American
studies major at the University of
Colorado had had a couple of
beers, gotten into an argument
with her boyfriend and decided
to leave him and another man
sitting in a pizza parlor not far
away from her off-campus
apartment.
By the time they found her
two hours later, police said Chase
had been beaten so badly they
couldn't tell if she was a man or a
woman. She died two days later.
No arrests have been made.
The circumstances leading up
to Chase's murder sound familiar
to many campus police officers
around the country. They're
careful not to blame the
victims� "No one has the right
to harm someone else said
Brett Brough, an officer at the
University of Colorado � but
they quickly add that many
students fail to protect
themselves as well as they could
or should.
Too often, students are easy
targets for assault and robbery,
police say. They fail to pay
attention to their surroundings,
walk alone at night and drink
more than they should with no
trusted friends around to help
should they encounter trouble.
Though she wasn't legally
impaired, Chase's blood alcohol
content was .037.
"That's not much, but I'm
sure it had some effect on her
said Jennifer Bray, a
spokeswoman for the city of
Boulder. "She was a small girl
The key to self-protection is
self-awareness, experts, say.
"You can't let your defenses
down said Sgt. Chris Keary, an
officer on the University of
Kansas' campus.
"We tell people all the time to
find a designated walker or
driver. A lot of times, there are
people who don't like to drink
but who do like to go out. Ask
them to pay attention to
surroundings for you
Campus police have
developed lists of safety tips they
,dole out every year during
freshman orientation.Usually
topping them are "Never walk at
night alone and "Stick, to well-
lit and well-traveled pathways
Many attacks could have been
avoided if students hadn't been
walking by themselves, police
say.
"We say it all the time, but
people still don't pay attention
said Sgt. Gilbert Bussey, an
officer at Georgetown University.
"And then when something does,
happen, we hear the same thing
all the time: 'I never thought it
would happen to me
Printing
continued from page 1
leave the comfort of their own
computer.
A new machine will allow
those with software connecting
them to the Graphics network to
create documents on their
computers, and send them
directly to the publications
department without having to
physically transport a hard copy to
the building.
In the future Harlow expects
the Printing and Graphics program
at ECU to continue to grow and
improve.
"We've more than quadrupled
since 1992 most universities do
not have a printing and copy
operation as large as ours Harlow
said.
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4 Thursday, January 22, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Albright alleges Iraqis
using biological, chemical
weapon on prisoners
BARRf SCHWE1D
DIPLOMATIC WRITER
WASHINGTON (AP) � It
is near the end of a "zoocy
day" for Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright, and a
team of Middle East experts
is waiting outside her office.
Ahead is a period of both
crisis and opportunity, and
for the moment Albright's
attention is fixed on the
dangerous stalemate between
Iraq and U.N. weapons
inspectors.
s"They must have been
close to something on
whether biological or
chemical weapons were used
on prisoners Albright told
The Associated Press in a
wide-ranging interview
marking the end of her first
year on the job.
Iraqi President Saddam
Hussein is "tightening the
noose around himself, she
saiU, personalizing the
conflict. ' By not letting this
inspection team go forward,
in almost a strange way it's
almost as if he has come close
to saying, 'O.K you caught
me
At ease in het outer office,
warmed late Friday by a
burning log in a nearby
fireplace, Albright registered
confidence the Russian
government intervened to
halt sales to Iran of Russian
technology before Iran could
develop dangerous new
missiles.
She seemed dubious that a
stalemate in Israeli-
Palestinian negotiations
would be overcome by
President Bill Clinton's
separate meetings this week
with Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu and
Palestinian leader Yasser
Arafat.
"Iaman eternal optimist,
and I will continue to be
one she said. But getting
Israel to pull back more on
the West Bank and the
Palestinians to rout terrorists
are very serious issues to
their leaders
Albright fretted that
everything in the Middle
East gets tangled, "cvcn
things that seem simple"
such as setting up a
Palestinian airport or an
industrial zone.
Sighing at the end of what
she called "a zooey day
Albright said she does not
expect Netanyahu and Arafat
to reach agreement while
they're in Washington. But,
she said, "It will be useful
for them to hear the
President's words" and take
them home.
Albright considers 1997 to
have been a poor year for
Mideast peacemaking and did
not predict 1998 would be
better. But in the interview,
her thoughts on the Arab-
Israeli conflict, Iran's race to
develop awesome weapons
and the weary struggle with
Iraq reflected the resolve and
directness that marked her
first year as secretary of
state.
With Netanyahu due to
arrive on Monday, and no
easing of the inspection crisis
with Iraq, the weekend was
unlikely to be serene cither.
But Albright found cause
for cheer.
Saddam, she said, "is
tightening the noose around
himself" by continuing
U.N. weapons
"the eyes and
the international
to defy
inspectors
cars of
system
The inspection regime is
not foolproof, she said. But it
has uncovered more illegal
weapons than were destroyed
in the 1991 Gulf war.
By defying the U.N.
Security Council, Saddam is
causing Russia and other
nations to be "fed up with
his demands she said.
In a speech Saturday
marking the seventh
anniversary of the war,
Saddam threatened to
suspend cooperation with
U.N. weapons inspectors
unless U.N. economic
sanctions against Iraq are
lifted.
Albright has taken the heat
in some of Washington's
foreign policy think tanks for
working in tandem with
Russian Foreign Minister
Yevgeny Primakov.
Ariel Cohen, a Russia
expert at the Heritage
Foundation, says the foreign
minister is pursuing an anti-
American agenda, trying to
line up Iraq, Iran and Libya
in coalition with Russia.
Albright said while
Primakov looks out for
Russia's interests, he has
never tried to undercut the
U.N. inspection operation
and has been "quite useful"
in helping the United States
maintain a tough diplomatic
stand in the Security
Council.
"You work with a number
of countries to achieve a goal,
which means that everybody
gives some Albright said.
There clearly is give-and-
take in the way she runs U.S.
foreign policy.
Want to be a big part of Pirate
Football in 1998. Become a
football equipment manager!
Benefits:
- Scholarship to pay towards school
- Travel with the team
- Daily interaction with the players
coaches.
Now accepting applicants for Spring
Football. Call Dan Glinski at 328-4602
eastcarolinian
Advertising Department
Looking
for a fast
paced job
that can help you
prepare for your
career goals?
You Will Gain Experience in:
� Calling on local advertising clients
� Helping to develop creative advertising
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Applications are available at The East
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for more info. .
The East
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Choose one of Wachovia's industry acclaimed training
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Wachovia is accepting resumes.
Consult with your Career Services Office for details. We are
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website at www.wachovia.com.
for .employment
An Equal Opportunity
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WACHOMA
Le�tfhed.
The ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee Presents
ILLUMINAM
o
JUETAL
QCERAMICS
UHDATItmS
ymmumm
(yJSCWJPfmE
O
:
o
-CALL FOR ENTRIES
Friday, February 6,1998
8:89 -11:89 PM to Room 242 MendenhaN
Registration Packets Available at the MendenhaH
Information Desk and Gray Gaaery
$3.00 Fee Pen Entry - Limit 8 Entries Per
Cash Prizes Totatog $1,858 to be Awarded
o
JLLUMINA'98 EXHIBITION
Monday, February 8 - Friday, March 6,1888
MendenhaH Gallery
o
CLOSING RECEPTION &
AWARDS PRESENTATION
Wednesday, March 4,1888
7:66 - 8:00 PM in MendenhaH Gaiery
1






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Yada yada yada. After this season's finale, the popular phrase will be a faint cry in the wind
heard only by Seinfeld devotees.
After a relatively long run, Sdnfeuis tuning off; not because the show has reached the
point of contrived plots and lame characters, rather because it is king of sitcom comedies and
wants to remain that way. Jerry Seinfeld told Tme magazine he intended to quit while ahead and
would not sign a contract for another season.
In the realm of network TX Seinfeld's move is noble a least, and perhaps even
revolutionary Yet, to call Seinfeld's move revolutionary would imply that otters intended to follow
u
it.
rat chance. Nobody but nobody with a top ranked show stops at the height of popularity
Thinkifoa.As the lives ota
to the hilt and, after sucking every creative juice out of its writers, continued to run the show to
death.
Most shows sacrifice quality for big bucks and royalty checks after creative inspiration runs
dry Not Seinfeld. An offer by network execs reported at $5 million an episode could not convince
Seinfeld to stick it out, nor could the disappointed faces of his costars. Recently given a raise, it's
a safe assumption that they would prefer to hang around another season. Seinfeld has said that he
felt it was becoming increasingly difficult to turn out funny material and he didn't want the quality
to decrease.
Time reported that the show brought NBC approximately $200 million and that execs were
prepared to offer Seinfeld even more money to stay
Seinfeld has made a sacrifice more often associated with real artists than with prime rime
media stars. Still, many people have pointed out it was easier for an already wealthy man, with
more than 60 automobiles, many of which are rbrsches, to turn down the $5 million per episode
offer. This may be true but TECbas a feeling that millionaires are people just like us, who, given
a penny want a dollar, which is why Seinfeld's move is rare.
A comedian wanting to end a show in a roar of laughter shouldn't be such a rare occurrence.
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
Cloning happens; don't outlaw it
We must face forts; nothing
we can do as a country,
organization or person can
stop cloning from happening.
Eventually somebody will
clone a human. All the
regulations, sanctions and
laws will not stop cloning.
Ban it; stop it; make it illegal.
Cloning is bad, horribly bad.
Cloning goes against God. We must
do our best to ensure this process
never happens.
I heard it; you have probably
heard it. Politicians, religious
leaders, friends and anybody with an
opinion have basically agreed
cloning is a science that should not
be touched.
Before we ban this process
altogether, we must think. Think
about a cost-benefit analysis of
cloning. When looking at the pros
and cons of a situation, I like to look
at the worst case scenario fust.
I will include one ground rule in
this article: no God. Since I do not
want to get into an argument about
the existence of any higher power,
the supernatural possibilities, ix.
end of the world, Armageddon, etc
will be excluded.
One of the worst case scenarios is
that we become a society that tries
to clone the perfect human.
Something like this has happened
before. Canada and Germany both
have tried to breed, not clone,
"better" human beings. History will
repeat itself.
We must face facts; nothing we
can do as a country, organization or
person can stop cloning from
happening. Eventually somebody
will clone a human. All the
regulations, sanctions and laws will
not stop cloning. Given this
outcome all we can do is hope some
deranged person or country will not
try to clone a "superior" race.
Another possibility is that the
first cloning attempts will result in
horrible disfigurements. We know
about Dolly, the cloned sheep, but
do we know how many times the
scientist failed? Was Dolly the first,
or were there other sheep with
three legs, six testes, no head or just
a pile of flesh and bones? The
possibility that cloning will result in
problems is the very reason why we
need not outlaw the procedure.
For if we outlaw clones, only
outlaws will clone. Cloning will be
forced underground. Maybe Richard
Seed, the scientist who announced
he will try to done a human, will
have to go someplace where cloning
is allowed. Perhaps Seed or anybody
else who wants to clone a human
will have to go countries with less-
than-good intentions.
Let us look now at what good
might come of this procedure. A
heart transplant might not come
from another person, but from your
own DNA. People debate whether
cloning is human, but is it human to
wait and hope that someone will die
so you can have life?
With cloning technology a new
kidney, heart, liver or any other vital
organ may be produced for you. As
technology progress maybe nerves
can be fixed through cloning
technology. Many medical
breakthroughs await us.
Cloning humans should not be
made illegal, but should be heavily
regulated. If the technology is
watched closely, we can possibly
stop a abomination from being
"bom
Cloning will be debated even
after the first humans are cloned.
Cloning will happen; all we can do is
try and nudge cloning technology
along in direction that is good for
society as a whole. Now, what is
good for society is another debate
altogether.
OPINION
Columnist
Carole
MEHLE
Can I exchange my Exchange:
?
Why should I pay now for an
e-mail system that might work
when I'm long gone? Why
should I pay for technology
that I can't use? What's the
problem? When will all this
wonderfully wired technology
work?
Since this campus is one of the top
100 wired college campuses in trie
nation, according to Yahoo I tend
to expect some things
technologically. I must say I have
been left wanting this semester. Yes,
Academic Computing Services, I
have Technology Withdrawal Blues.
Like the rest of the qnlucky
users of the Exchange e-mail
system, I worked myself up to the
screaming point as I tried for days to
log onto my e-mail account. I
believed the old VM system was
down � I had heard a rumor that
VM would be gone at the end of last
semester. I switched away from VM,
willing to go full steam ahead; out
with the old, in with the new. Until
the new got out of my reach, until
my persistence became futile.
I will happily admit I'm still
using VM � not only because I can
get to it, but also because I can
actually read the mailing list whose
text Exchange doesn't support.
I've heard that "only 250 can get
on Exchange at once" rumor;
perhaps it's true, but how long does
it take to use e-mail? Why is the
system constantly and continuously
maxed out? Why are the maximum
number of users connected when
the system responds? I've tried at all
hours to get through � Sunday
night even.
What's worse is that my internet
access at home won't let me at
Exchange; you must have Netscape
Navigator 3.0 or above to access the
system � a trick to get financially
stropped college students to blow
$100 on software just so we can get
to the e-mail. I understand there's a
way to get Exchange to work
without the Web, but why go to all
that trouble? Is it really worth it? E-
maii is available through most
internet access providers and from
internet sources, like Yahoo! and
HotMail.
The main reason I use the "free"
on-campus e-mail and the rest of
the technology is that I pay for it; I
might as well use what I pay for. But
now, I'm not so sure that what I'm
paying for is worth it. Why should I
pay now for an e-mail system that
might work when I'm long gone?
Why should I pay for technology
that I can't use?
Why should I pay for technology
that may get installed after I'm
gone? Why should I pay. for
. technology that will go whecei don't
use it? My on-campus base is the
English Department, which is badly
in need of technology � ask any
student or teacher in a computer
classroom; ask any student who's
needed to surf the internet and
gone to the Writing Center to do it.
There arc professors whose
computers can't get to Exchange
I
which is
base of
because they don't have the
memory necessary to make
Netscape and Exchange work. I'd
happily pay a load of money to see
that my department has the
technology available to me as
struggle to graduate.
The Writing Center,
right in my central
operations, is where I accessed the
internet. Now that my access is
gone from there, I have to venture
to other places � I go to the library,
which seemed to have the
technology I needed until the
Reference section moved, like the
rest of the mobile library wc seem to
have. I'm scared to touch Proquest,
but I will have to if I want to get my
research completed and graduate
soon. I'm not sure that's working;
I'll ask an English 1200 student
who's knee-deep in issue paper
research. I do know some of the
CD-ROM databases on wh;oh I
have become dependent aren't
working. The librarians seem to
it's an Academic Computing hi
that needs to be taken care of.
So, Academic Computing, I ask;
What's the problem? When will all
this wonderfully wired technology
work?
And please, don't promise us the
moon and give us lemons. Get the
technology we have to work before
adding to it. The funny thin about
kinks in systems is if they re not
fixed, people get mad unless you
teJlcthem'tHe.kinks art these .arid
honestly work on them.
I can't be the only one on campus
who's a little let down by the
technological back slide. In the age
of the internet and computers, of
being wired, wc need a system that
works, a system we can depend on.
Maybe some of us will be lucky
enough to see it.

to the Editor
Seniors, take interest in your class gft
my ettorts to Drtng the Seniors of
1998 a truly perfect senior class gift,
I received some rather divine
inspiration that maybe I should ask
the seniors to give some input into
the project.
Have you ever had the feeling
that no one ever seeks the students'
input or that your issues are not
being heard? Hopefully this will
change by becoming involved in the
planning of this year's senior class
gift. A senior class gift should be
something we can all enjoy and
admire years after leaving the
university. It could be used as a tool
to inform all the students after us
about our involvement with the
university.
There are an infinite number of
reasons this project should be
important to all seniors. The lighted
clock in front of the geology building
is just one example of gifts left by
previous classes. It could be that
your idea becomes the basis for the
next senior class gift. All you have to
do is make the effort to write down
your ideas and send them to the
address below.
I would also like to take this
opportunity to ask the seniors to
inform me of any concerns you may
have as a student here at ECU. It is
my responsibility, as one of your
class representatives, to voice your
opinions and ideas whenever a
legitimate concern arises. No, I am
not running for office. I can no
longer run for any other office seeing
that I am graduating in May.
However, I want to make thei,
graduating class of 1998 the best it t
can be. I need your help in doing so. '�
If you arc a senior and have;
concerns or ideas for the senior class,
please feel free to write me at the
following address: Jonathan
Huggins, 1514S. Charles Blvd. 84,
Greenville, N.C. 27858. Be sure and
leave a return address so that I may
get back in touch. Everyone �,
remember to vote on April 8 so that -
ECU can continue to rise to the top.
Go Pirates!
Jonathan Huggins
Senior
Nutrition
J
w&&�?
Write A Letters to the Editor
All letters to the editor must be typed, 250 words or
less and include name, major, year,
and phone number.
Send your Letter to the East Carolinian 2nd Floor
Student Pub. Building, Greenville, NC 27858
)
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Tutsdiy. January 22. 1998
comics
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The East Carolinian
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Buffalo 1�
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7 Thursday. January 22. 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
ew
Rodeo Boy
How is it where you
are?
8 OUT OF 10
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The thing people forget about
Nirvana is that Kurt Cobain's
excellent pop song craftsmanship
is what sent them soaring to the
top of the charts, not their
iconoclastic "popularity is bad"
attitude.
The attitude is what made
Kurt Cobain pull out the shotgun.
Unfortunately, with the rise of
Nirvana and all things Seattle,
there emerged this new, strange
genre of nek and roil known as
"indie-rock
Like most self-important
revolutionaries, most indie-rock
bands are so cool and so artistic
that their music is inaccessible to
all but the tiny few who, ironically,
share these same elitist attitudes.
With few exceptions (noted
here as Yo La Tengo, Guided By
Voices and every other Pavement
record) the indie rock genre is
filled with pedantic, spoiled white
kids from the suburbs who can't
quite play their instruments and
can't really sing either.
Thank God though. Rodeo Boy
remembered that the key to
winning friends and influencing
people in the music biz is, in fact,
one's ability to craft a catchy tune
and not the cheapness of one's
thrift-store Naugahyde jacket.
It's kind of nice to see that
somebody out there remembered
that the whole indie-rock scene is
just a Bizarro pop radio scene, and
that, when it comes down to it,
making good pop music ain't all
that awful. Hey, it got the Beatles
and the Stones somewhere.
From the beginning of
"Ordinarily Yours" (a song about a
cross dressing boyfriend who's
been discovered in his girl's
clothes) to the guitar solo in the
finale of "Found Out How is it
where you are? is smart, fun, slick
pop music.
Most of the songs take a few
measures to build up before they
catch their groove, but once they
get going, they ring with James
Reardon's effects-laden guitar riffs
that inspire whatever sort of
thrashing about indie-rockers
consider good dancing to be.
Reardon's vocals are decent -
for the most part he knows he
ability and doesn't try to overexert
himself but he does get that
boy squeal-scream
skinny white
sometimes.
Stand-out
Rodeo Bov's
songs that reveal
true greatness are
"Big Bills Count Once in which
they sound particularly
garagebandlike, complete with old
school punk rawk time signature
changes and rapid-fire vocals, the
epic ballad "Demon Song and
the very Lou Barlow-esqe "Soul
Proprietor
There are a few tracks on the
album that don't send my
pacemaker into overload, like "To
Slash From" and "Country of the
Coward but overall the album is
solid and enjoyable, a good
stepping stone for a band that, if
they keep this up, will write some
really smashing songs in the
future.
Apple to play:
Will she take
Student Union's
blues away?
Committee hopes
Apple's appearance will
return enthusiasm to
disinterested students
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The Student Union announced Friday that
Grammy-nominated pop singer Fiona Apple
will be performing here at ECU on March
1st. The popular diva, whose hit single, "Criminal"
has been a mainstay on top forty radio, will be the
first big name musical act to play ECU since
Widespread Panic. While this is exciting news,
there is a little apprehension at the Student Union,
who are the promoters of the concert.
In the recent past, there has been less than
pleasing attendance to concerts and events brought
to ECU by the Student Union. The last three
major musical acts to be booked here, Widespread
Panic, A Tribe Called Quest and Little Texas all fell
victim to lackluster ticket sales and less than
enthusiastic student interest.
Most, if not all of the various programs
implemented by the Student Union that were
designed to spark student interest in the shows the
Union has to offer, have failed miserably. In recent
years the Union has tried such programs as "An
Evening With" which featured prominent
comedians Chris Rock and Carrot Top, "The Fan
Club which featured rising local bands
performing at parties before home games, and
"Pirate Underground which is a current program,
free to students, that features
musical acts comprised of
ECU students.
With most of these, there
has been little or no reaction
from the student population.
The Student Union, quite
aware of these problems, has
been reviewing their programs
in an effort to figure out just
what isn't connecting. In the
university's past, such big
name acts as James Taylor,
Linda Rhondstat, Heart,
Jimmy Buffett and Charlie
Daniels all played to sold-out
audiences. More recently, the
only show to sell out here has
been the Allman Brothers.
With each act, problems
have plagued the promoters.
In the case of Little Texas, efforts to advertise on
local country music stations fell through, while
with A Tribe Called Quest, the band simply
cancelled.
"I think the biggest problem with that was that
you couldn't buy tickets anywhere but on campus
C.W Jameson of the Student Union said.
"They saw that tickets sales were poor, and by
their contract, they were allowed to bail said
Jeffrey Marshall, assistant director of university
unions.
When asked why he thought students seemed
uninterested in shows put on by the Student
Union, Marshall felt that there was a large social
aspect to students' choices.
"People want to go where the crowds are. The
last time Hootie played at the Attic I was there
and there were people lined up down the street
to get in the door. But inside, only about 100
people were actually watching the show.
Everyone else was looking around to see who else
was there Marshall added that he understands
the desire to party and experience shows with
friends. All too often though, the acts that people
want to be seen at are too expensive.
What I need
is a good
defense
Fiona is the
Student
Union's great
white hope.
PHOTO COURTESY
OF
MARKETING OEPT.
"People want to go where the
crowds are. The last time Hootie
played at the Attic I was there
and there were people lined up
down the street to get in the door.
But inside, only about 100 people
were actually watching the show.
Everyone else was looking around
to see who else was there
J. Marshal
assistant director of university unions
"The dynamics
of the music
business has
changed, I think. It's
quicker-paced and
the money they're
(the artists) asking
for is considerably
more
These days,
touring is seen as a
marketing tool by
many record labels.
Since most of the
bands that college
students listen to
have already
successfully broken
into the college
market, many artists
feel no need to tour colleges.
Some of the problems that the current Student
Union has already discovered are basic things
which can be altered. Under previous
administrations, large amounts of complimentary
tickets were handed out; for some shows, more
than half the tickets were
comp tickets.
The problem of tickets only
being available on campus is
under scrutiny at the moment.
The Student Union is talking
to Ticketmaster about the
possibility of Ticketmaster
making tickets available to
non-students. Of course,
Ticketmaster will add their
service charge. "We certainly
want to retain the right to sell
tickets to students here said
Marshall. "We don't want to
shortchange the students in
this deal
For the moment, the people at
The Student Union are
crossing their fingers, hoping
that the Grammy-nominated
Apple will draw in profitable crowds and perhaps
renew ECU's past reputation of bringing in class
acts.
Apple will be performing at Minges Coliseum.
Tickets arc $15 for students and go on sale January
26. Any students who purchase tickets in the first
week will be eligible for closer seating. For more
information, contact the Central Ticket Office at
328-4736 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Do Something.
To suggest acts for the Student
Union to book, contact them!
Call: C.W. Jameson at 328-4715
Visit the web site:
www.ecu.edustudentmedia
Attend a meeting: 5pm, every
Wednesday in Mendehall 212
Performers who have recently appeared at Minges include, from top: Wide Spread Panic.
Little Texas and Tribe Called Quest.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARKETING OEPT.
How did they do?
Ticket sales to past events
Widespread Panic (1997)- 2600 tickets
-700 comp tickets
A Tribe Called Quest (i996)- 900 tickets
-300 comp tickets
Little Texas (1996)-1000 tickets
Allman Brothers (1995)- sold out.
Minges holds 5400 people
tttfc3
You walch TV? Of course- you do - you're an
American. You walrh TV. spoak TV. lire TV. become
TV Everyone knows that. What you don't know is that
TV t, watching you
Mark Brett
STAFF WRITER
All across America television screens burn their images onto
the retinas of our bored, entertainment-starved populace.
On one channel, we thrill to the adventures of a dangerously
stupid nuclear technician and his family. On another, we
delight in the bizarre antics of a foul-mouthed group of grade
schoolers. And on yet another, a crazed super hero berates
celebrities for our amusement. It's getting weird out there.
And if they keep making animated TV series like the ones
described above, it's only going to get weirder. The number
of cartoons in primetime is growing by leaps and bounds, and
their popularity is at an all-time high. Currently, we're in a
golden age for TV animation, and the inevitable wave of crap
that follows any fad hasn't hit yet. So before it does, we
thought we'd give you this: the TEC Guide to TV Animation.
Enjoy.
The Simpsons: Currently in its ninth (!) season, The
Simpsons is the grandaddy of them all. Quick, intelligent and
with arguably the best animation on the air, this show is still
a gem. That said, I must also admit that it's faltered this
season. It's not that the show's rapid-fire humor and social satire have grown
stale. It's just that they've slowed down a bit. The jokes don't come at the
same pace, and they're not as viciously funny as thev once were. .After nine
MMMMManimation
PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX
produce some of the most realistic
dialogue on television, though it
manages to work in stand-up comedy
material without seeming forced,
years, I can understand losing a step, but it's still
a shame. The Simpsons is one of the best series in
television history, and we may never see its like
again. But luckily, it has more than one heir
apparent Final Grade (current season): 8 out of
10.
King of the Hill: The first time anyone raised in a
small southern town sees this show, their
response is the same: "Hey, I know that guy
And therein lies its appeal. King of the is real.
Painfully, uproariously real. Despite occasional
detours into the bizarre (such as the time Bobby
was under the mental control of ants), this show
doesn't have to exaggerate its characters' actions
or personalities to be funny. Though it has an
unfortunate habit of resorting to sitcom-style
plots, it handles those plots well. The recent
"Manger Babies" episode (featuring God's arch-
enemy Joe Sixpack) was a high point, telling
me that the best for King of the Hill is yet to
come. Final Grade: 9 out of 10.
Dr. Katz: Though the writers for this show
SEE TUBE B00B PAGE 9

� '
�.






.8 Thursday. January 22,1998
iitstyle
The East Carolinian
Wells, Perkins leave powerful
blues legacy behind
To receive TEC,
Support student-run media SST
and send in a check or money !�
order to: circulation dept.
�I First class mail$40 ' -�
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unian
Subscriptions begin wrtft the first paper tent and r
for one (1) yeer
Greenville, NC27858J
CHICAGO (AP) Junior
"Wills, one of the last of the
great bluesmen who shaped
the Chicago sound and
influenced the Rolling Stones
and other rockers, died of
cancer at 63.
� Wells, who died Thursday,
was a sharp-dressing showman
with a powerful harmonica
ttyie and strong singing voice.
"Junior just had this
unbelievable ability to
internalize everything about
the blues that is erotic and
scary said Bonnie Raitt, who
recorded and toured with
Wells. "He was real sultry. It
Vas the fact that he was kind of
held in that made him so
powerful and so sexy
i Wells' influence can be seen
in bands such as the Rolling
Stones, with whom he toured,
as well as in harmonica players
such as Kim Wilson of the
Fabulous Thunderbirds and
Magic Dick of the J. Geils Band.
He became the harmonica
player in Muddy Waters' band in
1952 at a time when the blues
Junior Wells
1935-1998
PHOTO BY MARK HA
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(AP) � One of the roots
of rock 'n' roll can be
traced to the day 7-year-
old Carl Perkins picked
up a makeshift Perkins
guitar made by his father
from a cigar box,
broomstick and baling
wire.
Sixteen years later, the
poor, unassuming boy
had become one of the
genre's founding fathers
as part of the Sun
Records stable of artists
in the 1950s that
included Elvis Presley
and Jerry Lee Lewis.
Perkins, best known for
writing "Blue Suede
Shoes died at a Jackson
hospital Monday at age
65 of complications
related to a recent series
of strokes.
"We have lost absolutely
one of the people I say is
as responsible as
anybody for rock 'n' roll
said Sam Phillips, owner
was changing to an urban, electric sound, Chicago was its of the Memphis record label
citalVnd Waters was its king Perkins' guitar licks and songwnt.ng melded
Wells had a "less is more" style of playing, said his country and rhythm-and-blues, influencing Presley,
longtime manager, Marty Salzman.
1 Each note had to have the right feel,
the right tone he said.
Wells' "Hoodoo Man Blues
considered by many one of the greatest all-
time blues albums, came out on Delmark
Records in the 1960s.
Wells recorded and toured with guitarist
Buddy Guy, both as headliners and as
opening acts for the Rolling Stones. In
recent years, Wells toured with his own
band and made guest appearances with
rockers Van Morrison and Carlos Santana.
Wells' parents worked a farm in Marion,
Alfc and as a youngster he took an early
interest in music and the Memphis, Tenn
blues scene. He moved to Chicago at 12.
Wells soaked in the music and the
Chicago scene in the late 1940s, playing his
first professional gig at 14 He joined
Waters' band as a teen-ager, replacing
harmonica superstar Little Walter.
According to Salzman, legend has it that
Wells, as a youngster, worked all week on a soda
truck to earn enough money to buy a
harmonica he had seen at a pawn shop. When
told it cost $2, he put down his week's earnings of $1.50,
grabbed the instrument and ran.
Wells was brought before judge and told him he v just
had to have itwhereupon the judge demanded Wells play
the harmonica. After listening, the judge gave the store
owner 50 cents and dismissed the case.
Last year, Wells' "Come on in This House" won the
WC. Handy Blues ward for best traditional blues album.
He also recently completed scenes for the movie " Blues
Brothers 2000" and recorded a song for a Rolling Stones
tribute album called v Paint It Blue: Songs of the Rolling
Stones
Wells is survived by two sisters and 'v many children,
Salzman said.
Lewis, the Beatles, the Stray Cats and dozens of
other rockers over several decades.
He was inducted into the Rock
and RollHall of Fame in 1987.
"Carl was a very close
friend for over 40 years, and his
musical legacy is certain to prevail
forever said Johnny Cash, who
also worked with Perkins at Sun.
Perkins was born April 9, 1932,
outside Tiptonville, near the
Missouri border in rural West
Tennessee. He grew up picking
cotton and soaking in the music
sung by black field hands.
In his spare time, he would retreat
behind his family's chicken house
in west Tennessee and imagine
himself singing on Nashville's
(intni (� Ovry raui')sN�
Just as he was making it big with
his version of "Blue Suede Shoes" in
early 1956, Perkins suffered one of
his greatest disappointments. On
his way to perform on "The Perry
Como Show he broke his neck and
fractured his skull in a traffic accident in Delaware.
Perkins was sidelined for a year, unable to capitalize
on the popularity of "Blue Suede Shoes
Meanwhile, Presley recorded the song and went
on to become one of the most successful stars in
music history. .
"I've never been an envious person, Perkins told
The Associated Press in 1992. "I was raised poor. I
felt fortunate to even be on Sun Records, to be a
small part of what was happening there
Cash took a Perkins song, "Daddy Sang Bass to
the top of the country charts in 1968. Dolly Parton,
The Judds, George Strait and other country stars
&
"AND IT'S
GOOOOP
Catch TheSuperbowl
on our 5 T.Vs
Sunday, Jan. 25th
BeefFajitas for ONE. $6.95
12 price Wings
MasiccmBBrtcrqittnt
(Dine in only)
Downtown
Greenville
757-1666
Cart Perkins
1932-1998
PHOTO C0URTEST MEMPHIS MUSIC
HOME PAGE
recorded his songs.
January
22 THURSDAY
International Enameling
Symposium presentation and
workshops at 7 p.m. in Jenkins Arts
Center (through Jan. 25)
G.I. Jane at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre (through Jan. 24)
Treading Evans at Firehouse
Tavern
Blue Rags at Peasant's
Russell Henderson at Wrong Way
Corrigans
Mike Corrado Band at Staccato
Tank Top,
The Flinch at
Lizard and Snake Cafe in
Chapel Hill
Marlee McCloud, Glory Fountain
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Keller Williams at the Cave in
Chapel Hill
23 FRIDAY
Everything with Smo at the Attic
Babba Seth at Peasant's
Gibb Droll Band at Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Morris, Major Nelson at Lizard
and Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill
Shake Appeal, The Cherry Bomb
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
The Kydells at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
24 SATURDAY
The Jumpstarts at the Attic
Acoustic Bus at Peasant's
Everything at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
The Bouncing Souls. Blanks 77,
Jon Cougar Concentration Camp at
Lizard and Snake Cafe in Chapel
Hill
Blue Dogs, Red Star Belgrade at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Bill Newton and the Big Blues
Quartet at The Cave in Chapel Hill
25 SUNDAY
Open mic at Peasant's
Rex, Those Bastard Souls, Cole
at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill.
27 TUESDAY
Performing Arts Series: St. Paul
Chamber Orchestra, Hugh Wolf,
conductor, and Emanuel Ax, piano,
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
ECU Poetry Forum: Al Maginnes,
Michael Chitwood (regional poets)
at 8 pm in 3008 GCB
Big Stoner Creek at Peasant's
Cafe
The Cypher (open mic poetry) at
Underwater Pirate's Cove
Flicker-local film night at Cat's
Cradle in Chapel Hill
Rover, Todd Dengler and the
Trenches at Ixxral 506 in Chapel
Hill
EACH YEAR
STUDENTS
GAMBLE WITH
THEIR LIVING
ARRANGEMENTS
BY MOVING
OFF CAMPUS.
"I moved off campus last year. I thought
it would be great to live in an apartment.
What a mistake! No one told me what a
drag it is to eat my own cooking, clean
the bathroom, and pay rent and utilities
every month
�Linda the Loser
Sale!
tern's Diitcil "96 or
Ohlci
12 Price
1
ELTORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Est. 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
Say Pirates &
Get Hair Cut
for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
PIRATE SPECIAL
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon- Fri. 9-6
k3�f8Anyt'me Full Line Professional Hair Care Products
$7.00
Haircut
Don't make the same mistake as Linda.
Don't be taken in by stories of
off-campus glamour. It never pays off.
GO WITH A SURE
THING-
CAMPUS LIVING!
Watch this space in the coming weeks
for important information about
return housing and dining sign-up.
Be a winner with campus living,
University Housing and Campus Dining Services
Telephone: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
� � � "�
"���'
,�,rm, ��. -





9 The East Carolinian
lifestyle
Thursday. January 22. 1998
M.mSl&Mz.i �� �:�� '1
: 7 91.3 FM
Needs a
kpm D j
TUBE BOOB
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7
Apply in WZMB's Studio in the bottom
of Mendenhall Student Center
H�IDBiX�lillllMS1
THURSDAY, JANUARY 22
Be sure to redeem your orange Thirsty Thursday
coupon at The Spot for a FREE 16 oz. drink when
you make a purchase.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 23
SATURDAY, JANUARY 24
'The most powerful motion
picture of tbe summer
aMimuiUH
DEMI PIOORE
mm
G.I.JANE
uiMrtnuanii.yuuiniuiHi
,fflBwian�iiiKmisW!an.iiiiffl'i!j�-
ntn&i.uiuianusigui vmm cumniue
�i nu an obuk mmui huh wm in
, wnmrnamfm .
Afc For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted and
i �' are FREE to students, faculty, and staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID. No backpacjp allowed in the theatre.
"T. T "F R
though it is a generally entertaining
half-hour show, I can't stand to
watch it. That damn squiggle-vision
effect (the animation technique
that makes all the lines wiggle) gives
me vertigo. Cheap-ass Comedy
Channel animation crap Final
Grade: 5 out of
10.
Beavis
Butthead: At
best, Beavis
Butthead is
sharply-written
and quite funny.
At its worst, it's
all about fart
jokes. I've
always had
mixed feelings
about this show.
The video
segments are
ultimately
annoying, and
where most o:
the dum
gags set in. The
cartoons are
uneven, their
quality
apparently
depending on
how much time
B&B creator
Mike Judge
spent in the
studio that
week. Frankly,
I'm glad they
finally killed it so I can stop trying to
decide if it's any good or not. Final
Grade: Who knows?
Daria: Another Mike Judge
creation, Daria is a nice little send-
up of American youth culture. The
popular kids are appropriately vapid,
and title character Daria is
appropriately unimpressed with
them. But even though our heroine
reminds me of a good friend of mine,
Daria's knee-jerk irony gets old
pretty quickly. There's just no
venom behind it; the show has a
determined lack of energy that saps
it of entertainment value. Sigh. Final
Grade: Who cares?
Spare Ghost Coast to Coast. Marked
by painful, prolonged silences and
jokes that are funny because they
just don't make any sense. Coast to
Coast is the closest American
television has ever gotten to Dadaist
surrealism. I love it. I love the theme
song by noise guitar pioneer Sonny
Sharrock. I love the cheaply recycled
animation from 30-year-old
cartoons. I love the way half the
guests don't seem to understand
that they're being made fun of. I
love the evil, that is, Zorak. I love .
the episode that features pro
wrestler Randy Savage as Space
Ghost's grandfather. There's very
little about this
show that I don't
love, except maybe
that there aren'r
enough episodes.
If you want funny,
this is it. Final
Grade: 10 out of
10.
South Park: The'
flavor of the week.
Unlike most such'
pop culture
phenoms. South.
Part is actually
good. The feeding
frenzy surrounding
this show reminds
me of the one that
surrounded The"
Simpsons in its early'
days. Also like The
Simpsons, South
Park is sharp, funny
and generally a lot'
smarter than most,
people give it
credit for being. '
Sure, the appeal of
the show for
What's Dadaism, Zorak?
PHOTO COURTESY OF CARTOON NETWORK
Ki3X
m
ja Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
: �
ae
�Je
-cO
,6

Mendenhall Student Center
2nd Floor
@9pm
vstttic:
"The Undefeated Besl
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
752-7303
mm
� � �
Thurs 22r
$4 Adm,
members
$1.50
Hiballs
&
Bottled Beer
O
10:30 PM
Fri 23
z
3
Gi-
ro
en
CO
members
BLACKBIRD
REWRPIM ARTIST
15
32oz. Draft
tf
many is the foul
language and '
offensive humor,
but there's more
going on here than that. South Park is
social satire, and if it offends"
somebody, all the better. We could
use more shows as boldly honest as '
this one. Even though the
animation's not exactly stellar, any
show that can make me laugh at an '
anthropomorphic piece of feces gets
my vote. The Simpsons legacy is in
good hands. Final Grade: 10 out of
10.
And there you have it. The best
of the best. The cream of the crop.
The bee's knees of TV cartoons.
Most are saddled with limited
animation at best (television
budgets not allowing full process
animation). But they all look better
than Underdog , with the exception
of Dr. Katz, and we can't expect
much more than that.
Janua
Schedule
22 Thur Nameless
Balance
23 Fri Everything w
guest S.M.O.
24 Sat The Jumpstarts
25 Sun SUPERBOWL
PARTY w99.x
27 Tues Ladies Nile
Dance Party
28th & 29
MIKE
MESMER"EYES'
30 Fri Acoustic Bus
EVERYTHING
Sat 24
15.
, Adm.
members J
2
32oz. Draft
SPECIAL GUEST
POSSIBLE
WORLD
The Jumpstarts
Sun 25
99
bar specials
99x Superbowl party
Door prizes
Free subs from Jersey Mikes
GIANT 15ft TV Screen 6 smaller screens
Wed 28 &
Thurs 29th
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKUUY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
Mike
MesmerDeyesD
WorldOs Most Powerful Hypnotist
???m
Chairmen of the
Board
February
Schedule
4 Wed Comedy Zone
Q. Vaughn
Bryant
Garry Owens
5 Thur TBA
� �n� '





r
10 Tuesday. January 20. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
How far would you go:
?
"Playing at ECU has given me the
chance to learn more about
basketball. Working with the excellent
facilities and staff is a dream come
true
Cecilia Shinn
basketball player
Nils Alomar of the Pirate tennis team comes to ECU all the way from Spain.
PHOTO COURTESY Of SPORTS INFORMATION
Pirate athletes
come from
across the
globe
STEVE LOSEY
SENIOR WRITER
How far did you come to
get to ECU?
Wilmington? Raleigh?
Asheville? Maybe you aren't from
North Carolina. Maybe you came
from Florida, Virginia, or even as
far as New Jersey.
But if you think that you came
a long way, talk for a minute with
one of the athletes who left his or
her home country to play sports at
ECU. Whether they came from
the north, the south
or crossed the
Atlantic to get here,
they left friends and
family behind to be
educated and play
sports here.
The foreign
athletes who attend
ECU come mainly
from other North
American countries or
European nations.
Many members of the
tennis teams come
from Scandinavian nations. Other athletes
represent European nations such as Spain,
Portugal or Austria.
Trying to decide on a college is never easy
for anybody, but trying to do it with.an ocean
between you and the school is nearly
impossible.
"I first heard of ECU on the
Internet said Cecilia Shinn, a
sophomore on the women's
basketball team. Shinn came to
ECU from Portugal.
"Coach D Anne Donovan,
head coach of women's
basketball called me up
Shinn said. "It was very
difficult because it was all over
the phone, with no visits to the
school
Coach Donovan must have
told Shinn everything right
about ECU, because it was the
KeHy NiUemson
women nun w fird
only college she
seriously considered.
"I vaguely looked at
other schools, but ECU
was the only one I was
interested in. I came to
ECU because I got the
chance to play
basketball here Shinn
said. The basketball
scene is very different in
Portugal. Soccer is the
main sport in Portugal,
but basketball is
growing
"I've been playing for five years now. I used
to play basketball in high school. A friend knew
of a women's team starting up, and I joined it.
Not many of my friends played basketball, and
it was like I went into a different world
Freshman Kelly Niklason's story is very
different from Shinn's. Niklason
was bom in America, but spent
much of her life overseas. Her
father works for the government
as a teacher for military kids
whose parents are stationed
abroad. Her family has long had a
connection to ECU, so her first
semester here was a kind of
familial homecoming.
"My dad played football at ECU
and my mom was a cheerleader
here too, so there's kind of a
tradition in my family Niklason
said. "A lot of my other relatives
Cecilia Shinn
WOMEN'S SASKETMU.
played here and at other schools
Niklason
lived in
England for a
year and a half
before moving
to the
Netherlands a
semester
before
graduating
from high
school.
Unfortunately,
in the midst of
her various
moves, a high
school
counselor made serious errors in her transcript
and, as a result, Niklason has been forbidden
from competing on the women's track team.
The NCAA and other organizations have so far
been unwilling to correct the mistakes and
restore Niklason's eligibility Keep reading the
East Carolinian for an article focusing on
Niklason's story
Fresh talent lies all over the world, and it is
to the athletic department's benefit to
encourage foreign athletes to attend ECU.
They bring with them new perspectives and
ways of looking at their sport, and they also find
new methods here. Shinn, for example, has
found the opportunity to learn more about her
favorite sport since coming to ECU.
"Playing at ECU has given me the chance to
learn more about basketball Shinn said.
"Working with the excellent facilities and staff
is a dream come true
Pirates around
the world
These Pirates came
from miles away to
play sports at ECU.
And the award
goes to
The closest country The farthest country
Rykker Thome & Eva Eiroma
Dom Lausic Finland
tis 5,850 miles
925 miles
Largest country
Rykker Thome &
Dom Lausic
Canada
3,800,000 sq. miles
i
l
Smallest country
Kelly Niklason,
bonette Poionius
&Aiphonsvan
Werland
Most populus country Least populta country
NrsAtomar MonaEek
Spam Anite-Birgrfie Svae
38644)00 people Norway
4,361,000 people
164B3 sq. miles
Consistency is
the key for spring
golf season
Returning players expected to lead team
to good conference standing
James Camp
STAFF WRITER
The beginning of the new year for many means that it's time for
another semester of learning. For some students it is a time for learning
and a time to hit the links. That's right it's time for the ECU golf team
to get ready for the spring season.
The Pirate golfers, coming off a 44-37-1 fall record, start official
practices on Feb. 2. They tough it out practicing in the cold North
Carolina weather to get ready for tournament play in the warmer
weather of March.
Although the Pirates are returning from the fall with a winning record,
according to Head Coach Kevin Williams, the season was disappointing.
"I wasn't pleased with the way we played and expected a lot more
out of the team Williams said. "We had some good individual play, but
as a team, we need to play better. We need some consistency to win this
spring Williams said.
Williams is hoping sophomore Mark Miller will bring that consistency.
Miller played well in the fall and even tied for first place in the Palmetto
Intercollegiate Tournament. Another player Williams wants to turn to for
his leadership skills is senior Kevin Miller.
Williams also wants to see sophomore Mark Riggs really step it up.
"Mark is a really good tournament plaver but he reallv needs to
compete better in practice Williams said. "But it's not just Mark; all
the guys need to play to their potential. Someone has to step it up in the
4th or 5th spot for us
Even though Williams was disappointed with the fall, he did say there
were some good points to the season.
"We ended the season on a positive note with some wins and we did
finish with a winning record Williams said. "Our spring schedule looks
pretty good and I think if we play with some consistency, we can really
turn the corner in the spring and finish well in the conference
The golf team hopes to pull together this season and deliver that level
of play that Williams would like to see. If they do bring that level of
consistency they might be able to improve on their 3rd place finish in
the CAA Tournament.
Damon Stafford
STAFF WRITER
On Jan. 17, the Richmond Spiders hosted the
ECU swim team for a conference meet that sent the
Lady Pirates home with their first loss of the season.
After putting up a tough battle, the Lady Pirates
were downed 145-97.
"With a small pool and no warm up or warm down
areas, Richmond is a tough place to swim Head
Coach Rick Kobe said. "We took a good old-fashioned
spanking but we plan to get revenge at the conference
tournament
The men's team had better luck against
Richmond, winning eight of 13 events and closing the
meet with a final score of 159-84.
"We completely dominated Kobe said. "We
swam against a lot of kids in a lot of events and still
won almost all of them
The conference championship will be held Feb. 18-21 on neutral
ground in Chatham, Va.
"This week will be more intense and practice is going to be hard all
the way up until we swim against Wilmington this weekend Tri-
Captain Kim Fields said.
Patrick Kesler
MEN'S SWIMMING
The meet against the Seahawks will be tough a battle
near the end of the season. With such a strong rivalry
and a powerful Wilmington team, the Pirates are up
for a true test.
"Both our guys and our girls are looking to give the
Seahawks a needed spanking Kobe said. "This
should prove to be a very heated and close swim
meet
The team recently joined hundreds of athletes from
colleges and universities nationwide for a winter
workout in West Palm Beach, Fla. This nine day
journey was seen by Kobe as one of the most
important times of the season.
"The purpose of our trip was to get everyone in great
shape Kobe said. "We had to go down there and work
hard
The team trained in an Olympic sized facility; two and
a half times the size of the pool at Minges Coliseum.
The Pirates conditioned for five hours a day,
swimming over 100,000 yards in a little over a week.
"Florida is probably the most essential part of the
season Kobe said. "Hopefully, we'll see to reap the
rewards from it toward the later part of our season
The regular season finale will conclude with a road trip to Virginia
Tech on Jan. 31. As the toughest matchup of the year, the Pirates hope
to end this season with yet another win.
Pitchers prepare to strike out opponents
Team carries four
starting pitchers
Ian robson
STAFF WRITER
The Pirate softball team
hopes to build on last season's
success with the addition of
another high-caliber pitcher.
Freshman Lisa Paganini will
Lisa Paganini
SOFTBALL
Last year the Lady Pirates posted an
unprecedented 49-24 overall record,
the best known in the history of the
program. The overall pitching staff
for the team was also the best in the
Big South Conference, leading in
ERA, innings pitched and the least
walks allowed.
"We did so much with only three
pitchers last season so hopefully we
can build on that record and make it
even better this year Head Coach
Tracey Kee said.
The Lady Pirates senior ace,
Bendle, will have to play nearly
perfect to top her 1997 season. She is
bolster an already strong pitching rotation, led the second all-time leader in most win
by seniors Jami Bendle, Christi Valevich and strikeouts, and shutouts, returning with a 1.85
sophomore Denise Reagan. ERA and a 27-11 record.
Valevich is the staff's other senior, boasting
a 2.16 returning ERA and an overall record of 8-
Reagan, the fire-balling sophomore, returns
carrying the team's best individual ERA of 1.69
and a record of 12-8.
Paganini, of Long Island, N.Y. is another
hard thrower and is expected to be the icing on
the cake for the squad this season.
"They will definitely set the tone for the
season Kee said. "We have always had a strong
pitching staff here at ECU, and this year it will
be strengthened with the ambition of another
pitcher
As the team opens the season on Feb. 14 at
SEE SOFTBALL. PAGE 11
Swimmers compete in season-ending meets






11 Tuesday, January 20, 1998
s
The East Carolinian
Have your next Campus
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, AUDITORIUM 244
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, GREAT ROOM
8:00 - 9:30 PM
WIN CASH PRIZES AND GIFTS OF ALL
SIZES, INCLUDING A WEEKLY JACKPOT!
THIS WEEK: $50.00 JACKPOT
Sponsored! by the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee.
For more information call 328-6004.
UK looks to forfeit scheduled game
Sports
ixuih I )t
ECU officials said Tuesday
they have never agreed to release
the University of Kentucky from
a contract to play the Pirates in
Greenville in 1998 and expect
them to honor their contractual
commitment to play in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
Mike Hamrick, ECU Athletics
Director, and university attorney
Ben Irons met with three
members of the staff of the state
attorney general's office Tuesday
in Raleigh "to explore options
concerning the actions taken by
Kentucky in its desire to cancel
the 1998 football game in
Greenville according to
Hamrick. "The state attorney
general's office has indicated to
us that they will immediately
begin the process of trying to
obtain as much information as
possible on the issue
"The attorney general will
request from the University of
Kentucky all documents relating
to its decision not to honor their
commitment through our
contractual agreement
The contract as amended
between the schools calls for two
games to be played in Lexington
and one in Greenville. The
Pirates played at Kentucky in
1993 and are slated to travel to
Lexington again in 1999.
The 1998 game in Greenville
had originally been scheduled for
Nov. 12 before UK officials last
August initiated and were
granted a request to have the
date changed to Sept. 12. An
addendum to change the date
was signed by Kentucky Athletics
Director CM. Newton and was
agreed upon by ECU. This
change was agreeable to ECU
since the expansion project to
Dowdy-Ftcklen Stadium had
delayed until fall of 1998.
"We believe that having
Kentucky as our first opponent in
the new stadium would be
attractive to our fans Hamrick
said. "Kentucky certainly was
aware from our discussion of the
importance of this game to our
program.
"Football games must be '
scheduled years in advance k
Hamrick said. "This change of:
event is extremely disturbing at
such a late date (ECU was
notified in writing on Jan. 7 of;
KU's intention not to fulfill its
contractual agreement),
especially in light of Kentucky
having made and been granted a !
request last August to change the
date of the game. To not have '
Kentucky on our 1998 home �
schedule would cause ECU to t
suffer damages far in excess of"
the $175,000 that the University
of Kentucky stated it would pay ��
Hamrick also said, "at no time
did we agree to release the
University of Kentucky form its
contractual obligation. We have
indicated to them that we expect
them to honor their commitment
and we will continue to do ;
everything we can to hold
Kentucky accountable for
actions
its
Softball
continued from page 10
NFL Tackles Stereotype
and Looks to Women to
Boost Fan Base
SAN DIEGO (AP)�Back away
from the television, boys, and
hand over those pork rinds. Come
Sunday, the National Football
League expects some 50 million
women to elbow their way into an
easy chair and watch the Super
Bowl.
Professional football is the
favorite sport of women, ahead of
Major League
Baseball, the National
Baskeball Association and the
National Hockey League,
according to a 19 ESPNChilton
poll. And, the National Football
League reports 43 percent of its
fan base is female.
Never losing site of the bottom
line, the NFL decided to
capitalize on the female-
nomenonby bringing more into
SEE FAST BREAKS. PAGE 12
Chapel Hill, they will already havej
their sights set on dominating the:
regular season and the Big Soutrr
Conference tournament. The.
Pirates went 4-1 against thei
Tarheels last season.
Kee has not decided yet oiv
which pitcher will start at the
season opener, but she feels that!
she has the option to start any one;
of the four.
Paganini is already impressed
with the team effort she has seen in!
her first season here at ECU.
"Everyone on the team really;
has the drive to win Paganini said.�
The Pirates will showcase them
talent for the first time in
Greenville on Feb. 27 - March 1 irt
the Pirate Classic Tournament.
(T
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS CHESS
TABLE TENNIS RRCQUETBRLL
Touraament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to pe held at the University of Tennessee, Knox-
ville, TN, the weekend of February 20-22,1998, all expenses paid by Mendenhall
Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Eight-Ball
Tue Jan 27, 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Chess
Wed Jan. 28 6:00 p.m. f
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room
o
Table Tennis
Mon Jan. 26 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
New
This
Year!
Racquetball
SatSun Jan. 31-Feb. 1
Student Recreation Center
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
I
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information. JJ






r
12 Tuesday. January 21. 1997
s
The East Carolinian
Fast Breaks
Continued from page 11
the fold. It's called Football 101:
NFL Wrkshop for Women, a
crash course in the fundamentals
of football offered this season by
22 NFL teams.
It's not an elementary, bimbo
kind of thing, said Nanci
Donnellan, a sports commentator
better known to fans of the cable
sports ESPN network as the
Fabulous Sports Babe. Women
want to be involved most come
here because they want to know
more.
Falcons could have had
both Favre and Holmgren
ATLANTA (AP) �Here's one
for the what if department.
Green Bay quarterback Brett
Favre and coach Mike Holmgren
could have teamed for the Atlanta
Falcons instead, but it didn't
happen. If it had, Favre thinks
Atlanta would have a Super Bowl
title to show for it.
There's an old saying down
home in Kiln (Miss.): Wire if a
fifth we'd all be drunk by now,
Favre told The Atlanta Journal-
Constitution from San Diego
where he was preparing for the
Super Bowl. But I know this
much: Where I played, I was
gonna win. And I'm sure Mike
would have been successful
where he landed.
Favre was drafted by the
Falcons but traded to Green Bay
in 1992. Two years earlier, as the
Falcons sought a coach,
Holmgren was frequently
mentioned and was strongly
recommended to then vice
president Ken Herock by former
San Francisco coach Bill Walsh.
But Holmgren, then the 49ers'
offensive coach, couldn't discuss
the job until the season ended for
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San Franciso, which was involved
in the playoffs.
There was a fear on some
people's part, that if we waited for
him, it would be late in the going
and he might have problems in
putting together a staff, Herock
recalled Monday.
So the Falcons hired Jerry
Glanville and Holmgren stayed in
San Francisco or two more seasons
before becoming coach of the
Packers.
I had heard some things, but I
don't deal now withwhat if kinds
of things, Holmgren said.
Konstantinov Walking,
Laughing
DETROIT (AP) � Detroit Red
Wings dcfenseman Vladimir
Konstantinov, recovering from
serious head injuries sustained in a
limousine wreck seven months
ago, is making impressive
progress.
I thought he was doing very
well, said coach Scotty Bowman,
who visited Konstantinov on
Thursday at a rehabilitation
center in Florida. He ate well, and
he fed himself. He was laughing a
lot Red Wings trainer John
Wharton, forward Doug Brown,
and associate coach Dave Lewis
visited Konstantinov the following
day.
He was extremely excited to
see his teammates, and obviously
the feeling was mutual, Wharton
said. It was so emotional for us,
especially since (doctors) didn't
think he'd get to this point.
We were told he never walked
more than 25 to 30 steps, but he
walked 75 feet with us. And he
kept smiling and looking back
while he was doing it to make sure
we were all watching. He was so
proud.
Konstantinov was injured June
13, less than a week after helping
the Red Wings win their first
Stanley Cup since 1955. He has
been undergoing rehabilitation in
Florida since Nov. 15.
He's at his playing weight, 195
pounds, said Wharton, who last
saw Konstantinov six weeks
earlier. He's working at rehab six
hours a day in ccupational,
physical and speech therapy.
Black Coaches Consider
Suit
NEW YORK (AP)� Angry about
coaching hiring patterns in the
NFL, a small group of black
assistant coaches has privately
talked about the possibility of
filing a class-action discrimination
lawsuit, The New York Times
reported today. The assistants
have gone so far as to speak to civil
rights lawyers about their chances
and options, the Times said. Some
of the assistants said the chance of
filing such a lawsuit was extremely
small. Right now, one of them
said, it's just talk.
According to another assistant,
that is because such a suit could
prove to be more detrimental than
helpful. There is the fear that any
assistant coach who became part
of it would end up like Curt Flood,
who was treated as an outcast after
challenging major league
baseball's reserve system in court.
The Times did not identify any
of the assistants it quoted.
Mike Tyson Accepts
Wrestling Challenge
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) �Mike
Tyson is vowing to get back into
the ring �this time as a wrestler.
Just as Tyson was to announce
during Monday's World Wrestling
Federation's Raw is War program
that he would serve as guest
referee at Wrcstlemania IV, pro
wrestler Steve Austin challenged
the boxer to a fight. The two
briefly scuffled in the ring.
Afterward, WWF owner Vince
McMahon announced that Tyson
accepted the challenge.
Howard Griffith had
Visions of a Bright Future
as an NFL Runner
SAN DIEGO (AP)� Howard
Griffith had visions of a bright
future as an NFL runner back in
1990.
That was the year he had an
eight-touchdown game for Illinois
against Southern Illinois.
That's right, EIGHT
touchdowns in one game. That's
one less touchdown than Griffith's
total carries for the entire 1997
regular season with the Denver
Broncos. Broncos coach Mike
Shanahan praises Griffith's
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sfa n& EKJf Week

CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Qr Every Thursday 7:00pm
ffi GCB Room 1028
Fun, Friendship, and Bible Study I
� �
:1
.
i �
l. .
IFC Spring 1998 Fraternity
Rush
Jan. 26-29 8-llpm
bids extended at 12 midnight Jan. 29th
OKT Phi Kappa Psi- 909 Forhes St.
OKT Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
FIKA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
nKO Pi Kappa Phi- 803 Hooker Rd.
nAO Pi Lambda Phi- 410 Elizabeth St.
IAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Alpha Phi House
IOE Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E. 5th St.
OBI Phi Beta Sigma - 800 W. 5th St.
0X Theta Chi - 312 E. 11th St.
AIO Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
AX Delta Chi - AAn House
AIO Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
KA Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
KI Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha-500 Elizabeth
IN Sigma Nu-501 E. 11th St.
in Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E. 10th St.
Friendships are common,
but Brotherhood
lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek
WANTS
TO PICK
YOUR
BRAIN.
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Tuesday, February 3, 1998
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowl Information and
Registration Packet from the Information
Desk, Mendenhall Student Center.
Sponsored by Mendenhall Student Center
First place team members will receive $25.00 each.
For more information, contact the Student Activities Office, 210 Mendenhall, 328-4711.
-





WASHINGTON (AP) �The
Supreme Court today turned away
a taxpayer challenge to the
publicly financed construction of
the Seattle Mariners' new baseball
stadium.
The justices, without
comment, let stand a Washington
Supreme Court ruling that upheld
the use of King County's $336
million bond issue to finance the
stadium.
In the appeal acted on today, a
group known as Taxpayers of King
County contended that it was not
treated fairly in the state courts.
The ruling last June by
Washington's highest court
allowed construction to continue
on the ballpark, located south of
the Mariners' current home
Seattle's Kingdornc. Club
officials have said they hope to
SpOTTS
The East Carolinian
Vssociatcd Press
have the stadium completed by
mid-1999. A spokesman for the
Mariners referred inquiries to the
Public Facilities District, the
agency established to build the
stadium.
NOur organization has been
very confident in our legal basis all
through the court action said
Ken Johnsen, executive director of
the stadium authority.
" Hopefully, this marks the end of
our court cases
Chris Van Dyk, who has led
opposition to the project, did not
immediately return a telephone
call for comment.
The state court, by a 7-2 vote,
said opponents had offered "no
compelling arguments" to suppon
their claim that the financing
scheme for the $414 million
ballpark is unlawful.
French to deploy 6,000
Police for World Cup
PARIS (AP) �France will
deploy about 6,000 police and
several hundred
soldiers to ensure security and
prevent terrorist attacks during
this year's World Cup, the Interior
Minister said Tuesday.
vWe are managing a crowd
phenomenon. These are
phenomena which arc difficult to
control, and excesses are
Kible said Interior Minister
-Pierre Chevencment.
"As a result, we will take the
necessary measures he told a
news conference at the shining
new Stade de France stadium built
for the event.
More than 2 million people,
1 � � I � r
I - �
I
r !
I
MCAT Review Course
Sponsored by:
East Carolina University
School Of Medicine
Academic Support & Counseling Center
Beginning
Saturday, February 14,1998
9:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.
For registration information, contact the
Academic Support & Counseling Center
at 2N45 Brody Medical Sciences Building,
or callus at (919) 816-2500
Registration Deadline: January 26,1998
Registration Fee: $75S)Q
? �
1 - -
including hundreds of thousands
of fans from nearby European
countries, are expected to attend
the 64 matches of this year's
World Cup in June and July at 10
different stadiums across France.
French authorities are being
especially vigilant about potential
disturbances by so-called soccer
hooligans and terrorist attacks.
French police already are
exchanging photos of potential
soccer hooligans in order to
minimize the possibility of
altercations between rival fans.
Between 5,000 and 6,000
police will be on hand to ensure
security during the 33 days of
competition between June 10-
Juh 12. And at least 300 soldiers
will help ensure safety as part of
anti-terrorist measures already in
effect.
Big Three back together
for a day
BOSTON (AP) � It was a
flashback to a different, more
stable era: Larry Bird, Kevin
McHale and Robert Parish
together again on the parquet
court.
The Big Three stood side-by-
side as a symbol of what the NBA
and the Boston Celtics once were
a league that gave fans more time
to develop loyalties, a team that
used dominate.
They were teammates for 12
seasons, champions together for
three. Now rookies can become
free agents after only three years.
And the Celtics, rebuilding under
Rick Rtino, haven't won a title
since 1986.
Last Sunday, the Big Three,
perhaps the greatest frontline in
NBA history, were reunited. But
Bird and Parish weren't working
their precision pick-and-roll, and
McHale wasn't making his
unstoppable inside moves.
They were there for the
retirement of Parish's No. 00,
Everbody goes their
separate ways Bird said after a
103- win in his first game in
Boston with another team.
Bird is 41 now and coach of
the Indiana Pacers. McHale is 40
and vice president of basketball
operations of the Minnesota
Timberworves.
Free
It's a "Souper"
Super Bowl Party
Sunday, January 25
5:30 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Main Floor TV Lounge
and Billiards Center
Nachos
Soft Drinks
Hotdogs p izza served during half-
Popcorn : ,
time in the recreation area.
Catch the spirit! The main-
floor TV lounge will be
divided by a 50-yard
line marker. Wear
your team's colors,
bring stadium blankets,
and join in Super Bowl
xxxn.
Attention JAZZ AT NIGHT Fans
Due to the increasing popu-
larity of these events, a ticket-
ing procedure has been imple-
mented, effective with the Fri-
day, January 30 performance in
the Mendenhall Great Room at
8:00 p.m.
Because these events are paid for with stu-
dent activity fees, ECU
students will receive one
ticket free of charge
when they present a valid ECU
One-Card at the Central Ticket Office-
Mendenhall. All other
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Events
Committee and the
Mendenhall Student Center Recreation Area
"Your Center of Activity"
Bring non-perishable food items (maximum 5
person) that will be donated to the local needy
and you will receive a chance(s) to
win authentic NFL
merchandise and other prizes.
Tickets are also
available for the
only other JAZZ AT
NIGHT scheduled
for Spring 498 -
Friday, March 6.
Must be present to win
tickets, including ECU
faculty and staff, will
be $2.50.
Advance ticket pick-up
purchase is strongly en-
couraged.
Thanks to all who have sup-
ported this program and createda
very big success.
Co-Sponsored by the ECU School of Music and the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee
tw
fcji
!�' � I I





s .
THE ECU STUDENT UNION PRESENTS, IN CONCERT
ii
i
SUNDAY, MARCH 1,1998 8:00 PM
MINGES COLISEUM, EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
FIONA
WITH SPECIAL GUEST: TO BE ANNOUNCED
STUDENTS $15.00
GENERAL PUBLIC $18.00
AT THE DOOR $20.00
STARTING JAN. 20,8:
STARTING FEB. 02,8:
AT 7:
As a spatial sfeaM ncenfre,
for $!&!� eat (feat 2 per vaK ECU D).ftB,a
r
hi Monday, January 26 at 830 AM and vul renm
an sale only to ECU
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT
THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE,
STUDBVT GENTBt
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY.
MASTERCARDVISA ACCEPTED.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL
828-8004 OR 1-800-ECU-ARTS
OR VISIT OUR HOMEPAGE AT:
student

��
�� i'1'j






15 Thursday, January 22, 1998
FOR RENT
RINGCOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SUBLEASE NEEDED ASAP. EFFI-
CIENCY ROOM AT RINGGOLD TOW-
ERS, $275 A MONTH, WATER INCLUD-
ED, FURNISHED. MOVE IN IMME-
DIATELY. CALL 561-7238 OR LEAVE
MESSAGE.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3
bedroom apt. 2 blocks from campus.
Quiet place, $185 8t 13 utilities. For
more info call 754-2487.
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3 bedroom
apt. off 1st Street $130month. 13 util-
ities. Available Feb. 1. Call Jimmy 752-
9376.
ROOMMATE SPOT AVAILABLE -
female. Player's Club $220month.
Move in immediately. Call 353-4120 or
353-6480.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
three bedroom apartment, $150 and
13 utilities. Super close to campus!
Room available now. Male or female.
Stephanie or Kelley, 830-3885.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom duplex in Summerhaven.
Professional or grad student preferred.
Call Kim, 758-2800 or after 6:00 p.m.
321-8872.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP-
House located two blocks off carious
on Eastern Street. Male or female. No
pets. Outside smoker allowed. Rent
plus 13 utilities, phone & cable. Call
752-8682.
REEDY BRANCH- ONLY $395 per
month. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Washer &
dryer hookups. 2 blocks from ECU.
Available immediately. Call 561-8117.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE IM-
MEDIATELY, walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
15'x15"). Private phone linecable in
room. Washerdryer included. $175
per month plus utilities. Call Mike at
752-2879.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New
Rec Center! 2 bedroom apt. available
above Percolator Coffeehouse -
$450.00 a month. 1 bedroom apt. avail-
able above 8W3's - $500 a month, one
month deposit required! Call Yvonne
at 758-2616.
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS,
female roommate to share large 3 bed-
room house. Washerdryer. 13 utili-
ties, $190 rent. Nice! Call 561-7768,
757-1467. Please leave message.
GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING 2
male housemates. $220mo. Located 2
blocks from campus. Call Kevin @ 561-
7218 or 919-467-5804, leave a mes-
sage.
FOR RENT 4 BEDROOM townhouse
in Player's Club. Open ASAP. Total
deposit only $220. 34 paid already.
Call 355-8847 or club office 321-7613.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
Share beautiful new three bedroom
house on ECU bus route. Very reason-
able rent. Call me at 752-2489.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 2 bedroom duplex near campus
with female musician. $200 monthly
12 utilities. 931-9014
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP. Move in 11498 Nice, spacious
two bedroom apt. Only 6 months old.
5-7 minutes from campus. $200month
12 utilities, cable, phone. Leave mes-
sage 353-0854.
ECU AVAILABLE NOW! ONE bed
room apartments. 4 blocks to ECU.
Furnished or unfurnished. $265$285
month. 758-6596.
Security Deposit
with prMWntaSon of this coupon, off at mt pi ra
ilawt not vaM with soy ottwi coupon
-WESUY COMMON SOUTH: 16f 2 OedrooroS.
1 batn, range, refrigerator, Irae watatfsewet,
wasfwaWiyer hcoKups, free basic cable in
some units laund.y facilities. 5 blocks from
campus. ECU bus services.
LAHG.rroN parh: 2 bedrooms, 1 bath
range, refrigerator, dishwasher, free
wateffsewir and basic cable, approx. 900
sq. HR washerdryer hookups, central
healair, 6 blocks froricampus. �?
COMPLETELY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE,
�AH Properties have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
rcopaiR) I ,
onogemant
'duimjIi 4 MM Viumi
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$5007MONTH. 758-5393
classifieds
The East Carolinian
CYPRESS GARDENS. 1 & 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT. 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
AWESOME APARTMENT FOR
RENT above 3W-3I Great location 2
bdrm, 1 12 bath. Call John 561-7230
or Yvonne 756-2616.
FOR SALE
'74 MG MIDGET FOR sale with
chrome bumper. Has top and tonneau
cover with about 42,000 miles. Mus-
tard tan color with black interior. Excel-
lent condition. $3,200! Call Peyton,
757-0310.
WATERBED. KING SIZE POSTER
bed, cherry wood. Asking $275.00, re-
tail was $1,200.00. 321-3210, leave
message.
TWO HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR-
CYCLES for sale. Both new. Sportster
custom and Heritage softtail classic.
Serious inquiries only please. Contact
Frank at 754-8160 leave message or e-
mail frggvilie@skantech.net.
TWIN MATTRESS. LUXURY FIRM
posturepedic $75. Dorm size carpet,
beige, used one semester $30. Both in
excellent condition. Call 758-7826.
SPECIALIZED ROCK HOPPER FOR
sale. U-lock included. All Shimano
Alivia equipment. Asking $250. Call
353-7162, leave a message. Only been
ridden 5 times.
MOVING - MUST sell - TV,
microwave, chairs, stool, coffee-
maker, vaccum, bike and more. All in
good quality. Negotiable. Call Shin
752-7621 for details.
KING SIZE WATER BED $200 obo.
Call 931-0925.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. Student financing for less than
$30.00 a month. Includes carrying
case, printer, software, insurance, and
theft alarm. Call Alfred at 355-3565.
GOLF CLUBS PING EYE black dots.
2-9 irons plus pitching, sand wedges
$325.00 Callaway Big Bertha Warbird
driver. 2 months old. $185.00.
Callaway Bag $110.00. Call Dave 353-
2911.
BUY MY FURNITURE! NICE bed-
room set. Two dressers: one wfrirror,
nightstand and headboard. Originally
$600, asking $250. Full size bed $150.
Must sell by 12298. Call 353-0854.
ATTENTION FORMER REDUX ft
Phen-Phen users; we now have an all
natural, safe way to lose weight with-
out the side effects. Dr. recommended
& guaranteed. I went from a size 12 to
a size 6 in 7 weeks! Call now & ask me
how. 1-888-648-5831.
94 HYUNDAI ELENTRA
S3SOO(obo) - displayed at Jolly
Rogers on Charles - Samsung color
TV, $120; Emerson VCR, $50; small
refrigerator. $50. Call 756-8887, 328-
8201.
386; LOTS OF SOFTWARE, modem,
mouse, cheap! Call Chris at 752-9806.
18 SPEED AT BIKE $85.00. 3-piece
dinette set $50.00. Computer desk
wchair, printer stand $75.00. Canon
Bubblejet 200ex, $100.00. 9'3" custom
surfboard, $225.00. Unique hardwood
coffee taDie, 43"x43 $75.00. Call Jer-
ome, 353-0835.
HELP WANTED
WORK AT HOME. 85OO-S1200
PTmonth, $2000-$6000 FTmonth. Full
training provided. Call for free infor-
mation booklet. 1-800-486-6907.
WANTED PART-TIME MAINTE-
NANCE man. Call 756-1050.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics is currently hiring
full-time ECU undergrad and graduate
students to tutor student-athletes in all
subject areas. Minimum 3.0 GPA re-
quired. Call 328-4550.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT"
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currenlly recruil'nq on
campus for a limiied number o: summer
'9!l management positior.s. Cain Hands-on
� 'ierience and build your resume. Lasl
summers average earnings 7,223.
Minimum GPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND Parks Department will be hold-
ing an organizational meeting for all
those interested in officiating in the
Spring Adult Soccer Leagues. Position
pays $12-$16 a game. Clinics will be
held to train new and experienced offi-
cials. However, a basic knowledge and
understanding of the game is neces-
sary. The meeting will be held
Thursday, January 29 at 6 p.m. at Elm
Street Gym. For information, call the
Athletic Office at 830-4550 between 2-
7 p.m.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting 12-16
part-time soccer coaches for the
spring youth indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of soccer skills and have the abil-
ity and patience to coach young peo-
ple ages 5-18 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours are from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching -
flexible according to class schedules.
This program will run from mid-March
to April. Salary starts at $5.15hour. For
information, call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550 after 2 p.m.
SYLVAN LEARNING CENTER IS
looking for a Study Buddy for a college
student taking the following classes:
FINA 2244 and PSYC 1000. We are
looking for a reliable person who is
available immediately on MWF 10:30-
12:30 and TTH 11:15-1:15 . Apply at
2428 S. Charles Boulevard.
SYLVAN LEARNING CENTER HAS
an immediate need for an instructor to
teach basic reading and English skills.
Apply at 2428 S. Charles Boulevard
(beside First Free Will Baptist Church).
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
VERY FUN work. Flexible part- time
hours (mostly evenings and wee-
kends). Must have outgoing personali-
ty and reliable transportation. Own
35mm SLR camera a plus, but not es-
sential. No experience necessary. We
train. $7.00 per hour. Call Sara at 1-
800-722-7033.
PART-TIME CASHIER NEEDED at
Szechuan Express in the Food Court,
Plaza Mall. About 20-25 hours a week.
Experience preferred. Apply in person.
No phone calls please.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confidential
employment. Call today, 747-7686.
NON-SMOKING CAREGIVER
NEEDED for 5-year-old with mild lung
disease. Must have own transporta-
tion, references, criminal check. Hours
are Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
from 12 to 5 p.m. Leave message after
5 at 830-9082.
LOCAL LAW FIRM SEEKS mailroom
supporterrand runner from 1 - 6 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Must have reliable
transportation. EOE. Interested candi-
dates, send resume to Legal
Administration, 1698 E. Arlington
Blvd. Greenville, NC 27858.
HORSEFARM NEEDS HANDYMAN
TO paint, mow, general maintenance,
10-24 hours. "No slow footing Call
758-2664 for interview.
HORSEFARM NEEDS BRIGHT.
NEAT, young lady with initiative, ex-
perience, and a winning attitude. Seri-
ous inquiries about this weekly posi-
tion please call 758-2664 for interview.
GET ON BOARD NOW the areas top
adult entertainment is once again
searching for beautiful ladies. If you
have what it takes to be a Playmate,
call 747-7686, Snow Hill.
EARN $750-$1SOOWEEK. RAISE
All the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment &
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
BUS DRIVERS WANTED: ECU Tran-
sit is now hiring ECU students for your
student transit system. Contact the
Transit Office at 328-4724 for more
info.
BABYSITTER NEEDED. FLEXIBLE
HOURS and occasionally nights. Non-
smoker with own transportation. Child
life or early childhood majors have
been great! Call 752-9243 between 8
a.m. between 10 p.m.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Call 800-393-
4521 ext. 1 A.S.A.P.
AM & PM banquet servers needed.
Applications accepted 9 to 5 p.m.
Monday thru Friday. Ramada Plaza
Hotel, 203 W. Greenville Blvd. 27834.
No phone calls accepted.
LOST & FOUND
TWO ADORABLE PUPPIES FOUND
playing in ditch on Hwy. 43. Both
males, approximately 3 months old.
Healthy, friendly, lots of energy.
Wormed and 1st shots given. Cannot
keep. If interested call 638-6617. Must
be serious and willing to give lots of
love and proper care.
LOST: GREEN WOOL SWEATER;
hand-knitted Christmas present. High
sentimental value. Reward. 328-1850.
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach. 'Summit Luxury condos next
to Spinnaker. Owner discount rates.
(404)355-9637.
BEST HOTELS. LOWEST PRICES.
All Springbreak locations. Cancun, Ja-
maica, from $399, Florida, from $89,
Texas, Mazatlan, Bahamas. Register
your group or be our Campus Rep.
800-327-6013. www.icpt.com
AWESOME SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS Party Cruise! 6 days $279! In-
cludes meals, parties & taxes! Great
beaches & nightlife! Leaves from
South Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
� Most Meals - free Parties
Cqacua
$399
PQftQflflQ
City $139
7 Nights Near The Best Bars
South
fteoch$ii9
Daytona1 49 Cocoa Beach1 79
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Year!
1-800-678-6386
UMiimmn
canow e r?Hi $597
ddty&Cd Qnm tew
CAMPUS REPS: SELL S AND GO FREE!
VISA I MCI AMEX DISCOVER
1-800-234-7007
http:www.endlesssummertours.com
CANCUN
JAMAICA
FLORIDA
Call today! Space is limited
1800648-4849
31
I
AWESOME FLORIDA SPRING
BREAK! Panama Cityl Room with
kitchen $139! Florida's New Hotspot-
South Beach $129! Bars open until
5:00 a.m Cocoa Beach-Hilton $179!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800678-6386
AWESOME CANCUN ft JAMAICA
Spring Break Specials! 7 nights, air &
hotel $459! Save $150 on food, drinks!
Panama City $139, SouthBeach $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
���SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink
parties! Sell 5 & go free! Book now! 11
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
http:www.endlesssummertours.com
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM $178. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
MOTORCYCLE WANTED. STREET
BIKE 500cc up. Call 919-637-6550. Call
before 8:30 p.m.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free (1)
800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for current
listings.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. Credit card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities
8t groups. Any campus organization
can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00v'isa application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65. Qualified call-
ers receive Free T-shirt.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
Scholorships. Business. Medical bills.
Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-9000
ext. G-3726.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toil free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WORLD WAR II AND the Children of
Europe is the theme os the spring
European Film Series shown on select-
ed Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in Speight
Auditorium in the Jenkins Fine Arts
Building. The series includes: Au
Revoir les Enfants (France, 1987) on
Jan. 21; euro pa, Euro pa
(PolandGermany, 1990) on Feb. 4; The
Bicycle Thief (Italy, 1948) on Feb. 18;
The Tin Drum (Germany, 1979) on
March 25; and Seven Beauties (Italy,
1976) on April 15. Attendance at these
films meets the course requirements
for History 1031, World Civilizations,
sec. 005-008.
WOMENS TENNIS PLAYERS
NEEDED. Walk-on positions available
now for the ECU Womens Tennis
Team. If interested, call Coach Brian
Jackson at 328-1980.
THE STUDENT UNION IS now
accepting applications for Assistant to
the President and chairpersons of the
following committee for the 1998-99
term: Barefoot, Cultural Awareness,
Films, Lecture, Marketing, Popular
Entertainment, Special Events and
Visual Arts. Applications can be picked
up at the Student Union office in MSC
236. The deadline to apply is
Wednesday, Feb. 4. For more informa-
tion, contact the Student Union at 328-
4715.
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUD-
ENT Center invites all students to wor-
ship with us. Sunday Masses: 11:30
a.m. and 3:30 p.m. at the Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th Street, two houses
from the Fletcher Music Bldg. For fur-
ther information, call Fr. Paul Vaeth,
757-1991.
STUDY SKILLS OVERVIEW WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:00-5:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment will be offering this program
January 29th. If you are interested in
this workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661.
On-Campus call
Ryan� 788-8624
Tiffany� 328-8378
�K. �? lit I
SIIVICIS
new YEAR, new ADDRESS, new LOOK.
STRESS MANAGEMENT
WORKSHOP: THURSDAY from 330
- 5 p.m. on Jan. 22. If you are interest-
ed, contact the Center for Counseling
and Student Development at 328-6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram January 29th. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661
PREPARING FOR GRADUATE
SCHOOL - Information on applying
for and getting funding for graduate
school will be presented by Dr. Lor-
raine Aragon and Dr. Jim Westmore-
land at Career Services on Jan. 27 at
3:30 p.m. All students planning to go
to graduate school are invited. The
program will also include test-taking
and completing applications forms.
HOME TECHNOLOGY
HEALTHCARE HOSPICE Division
will be holding a training session for
new volunteers starting Saturday, Feb.
28 at Spilman Memorial Baptist
Church in Kinston, NC. Volunteers are
needed to help terminally ill patients
and their families with friendly visits,
relief for family members, support,
and light household tasks. For more
information or to register to attend,
call Michelle Evans at 758-4622.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION (ECHO) meeting -
Thursday, Jan. 22 at 5:30 p.m. in the
lobby of Fleming Hall.
DONT FORGET OUR BLOOD
DRIVE I Mendenhall Student Center,
Tuesday, January 27, 1998, 12:00
noon-6:00 p.m. Sponsored by Biology
Club. American Red Cross Blood
ServicesMid-Atlantic Region
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND a Ca-
reer workshop: Tuesday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram February 3rd. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A
Career Worlcshop: Tuesday 3:30 - 5:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program January 27th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661 ,
BODY IMAGE GROUP FOR Women
workshop: Wednesday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram January 28th. If you are interest-
ed in this worlcshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL
STUDENT workshop: Monday 3:30-
4:30. The Center for Counseling anid
Student Development will be offering
this program Ji�ry 26th. If you are
interested in this workshop, contact
the Center at 328-6661.
"��, "�'���- �i��in .ii i i �.JL.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL STU-
DENT Note-taking workshop:
Monday 3:30-4:30. The Center for
Counseling and Student Development
will be offering this program February
2. If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the Center at 328-6661.

AN AMERICAN CAFE. AN original
play based on the personal stories and
experiences of Pitt County residences
will be performed in the MSC Hendrik
Theater on Wednesday, Jan. 28 at 7:3f
p.m. It is free to the public and is sponf
sored by the MLK Committee and the
Student Union Cultural Awareness,
Committee. ' 1

ADULT STUDENT DISCUSSION
GROUP: Monday 5:15-6:15. The Ceni
ter for Counseling and Student Devef;
opment will be offering this program'
January 26th. If you are interested in�
this workshop, contact the Center at1
328-6661.
The East Carolinian is
looking for dependable,
responsible people to be
advertising sales reps, j
Come by our office or �
call 328-6366 for more
information.

DO YOU NEED MONEY?
"3
We Need Timberland booh
and �ho�! Good Jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JFANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Cold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable .
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door it ring buzzer.
I l 1. 1 S H V S II ()
www. tec.ecu.edu
-r
��-





EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
services Awsome -
Where were YOU
Winner of the VCR
Sponsored by University Housins
Todd florin
Fish Bowl Winner!
Chris Roche
Jumpers

� � miiff ��� i ��
� i ��. �


Title
The East Carolinian, January 22, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 22, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1243
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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