The East Carolinian, January 20, 1998






TUESDAY
JANUARY 20. 1998
Carolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
VOLUME 73. ISSUE 20
University employees march for justice
MLK Day starts
campaign for later
Jacqueline D. kfi.i.i m
isMM NEWS EDITOR
Some ECU employees and other
citizens of Greenville observed
Martin Luther King, Jrs birthday
with a march and a call for justice.
"We're marching for justice,
respect, a living wage, and no
privatizing and downsizing
Tempie Streeter said. "Because
we're overworked and harassed.
We're treated more like slaves than
anything else
Streeter is an ECU
housekeeper and a member of the
steering committee of I .1.
(United Electrical) local 150.
Streeter cited examples such as
housekeepers required to clean
the dorm bathrooms of the
opposite sex.
"Women are cleaning men's
bathrooms. Well, we can't blame
the students because they have to
go into the room. But there are
enough men to do the men's area.
enough women to do � would you
like for your husband to be in there
cleaning the women's bathroom?"
Streeter said.
The group w comprised of
workers not only from ECU. but
also other organizations in
Greenville.
We're from) the town, the
churches, other workers from
different departments, all over
Greenville Streeter said.
()ne member of the march who
was not a member of the
housekeepers said he had many of
the same reasons for marching.
"As all state employees, we're
facing both downsizing, which is
cutting down on staff, and also
privatization Don Cavellini said.
Cavellini is a member of and
organizer for the N.C. Public
Service Worker's Union. I.E. local
ISO. ECU housekeepers are a part
of this organization because,
according to Cavellini, it is very
difficult to start a union in North
Carolina. I.E. provides the
support the ECU housekeepers
need.
While the marching group
paused in front of Jovner Library a
police car pulled up for a few
moments and spoke to a member
of the group.
According to Johnnie Umphlet.
ECU Police-
captain, the
police car was
there only to
inquire about
when the
group would
get back on
their
scheduled
parade route.
"Before you
can have a
parade or
march. you
have to get a
permit from
Greenville
Umphlet said.
Umphlet
said the
permit
application
p r o c e s s
requires
information
such as where
the march or
parade will be
traveling, so that
the police can have the manpower
on hand to direct traffic and see
that everyone is kept safe.
"They were supposed to march
across campus, and they deviated
from the parade route Umphlet
University employees
marched across campus expressing the discrimination they feel from the university
while the snow fell on Martin Luther King Day.
PHOTO BY AMANOA AUSTIN
said.
The march on Martin Luther
King, Jrs birthday marks the start
of the Martin Luther King Support
for Labor Campaign, which will
come to a close on the anniversary
of King's death in April.
"Dr. King's legacy. his
unfinished business, was economic
justice � not just civil rights. And
that is still unfinished now
Cavellini said.
Two graduate
students nominated
for NICHE awards
Let it sno
O 0 o
ihese smi and pepper shakers were chosen partly because of the wheels added to them
PHOTO COURTESY OF JANNA GREGONIS
Over 200 entries, 63
finalists, 12 winners
recognized in Spring
NICHE issue
s i asim Phillips
Ml I �'� I T I
The 1998 NICHE Student Awards honor
superb artistic talent, and this year, two of our
own students.
There were over 200 entries, but only 63
were chosen as finalists.
Two of the selected nominees arc EC!
graduate students. Janna (iregpnis and Felicia
Szorud are Ixith finalists in the Non-wearable
Metal category
According to a news release. The winner
will lx- announced on k-bruary 15, 1998, at j
ceremony in the Pennsylvania Convention
Center, held in conjunction with the
Philadelphia Buvers Market of American (Iraft
"Generally about 10 or 15 of the student
finalists attend the ceremony said Linda
McComiick. marketing director for l"he Rosen
Group. "We actually weren't expecting much of
a turnout and the first year (and) were surpnsed
bv about six or seven of them filing unto the
stage when their names were announced. As of
this date. 36 finalists are sending their work to
Ix exhibited at the special NICHE display
dunnij the Buvers Market of Amencan Craft in
Philadelphia
Gregonis and Szorad arc both tentatively
planning to attend the hebruary ceremony
Judging criteria are determined by the
following three elements: the visual
effectiveness of the student's submitted slides,
the artwork's abilitv to grab and maintain the
viewer's attention and the potential selling
capacity of the student's artistic depiction.
"I believe that my art. Aorta, was chosen
lxcau.se it's out of the ordinary and has a modem
feel to it Gregonis said. "I made something
unexceptional into something playful and fun
Gregonis added wheels to her salt and
pepper shakers to create a connection of
amusement and urgency; however. Szorad
chose to depict an image of personalization.
"My an. lilt I lip Twist, is a small 3-
dimcnsional figurative piece Szorsad said. "In
m opinion, the subject matter is the strongest
and most significant attnbute. It's a personal
statement about how 1 feel being female
The NI( HE Student Awards will give every
nominee the opportunity to display their work;
however, only 12 winning entries will tie
recognized in the Sjiring issue of NICHE
magazine.
This is Jregonis's second year as a finalist,
vet she remains extremelv excited and honored
I is the nomination.
"if 1 win. I'll be extremely happy; however, if
I lose. I'll still enter again next vear said
A student enjoys the unexpected snow that fell all over campus early monday afternoon after a long, cold
and wet morning students engaging in snowball fights could be seen all across the campus while the
snow could still be enjoyed
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
Gregonis. "I've been given the opportunity to
participate in a national show, which- is an
excellent source of publicity: It helps me get
my name out there
"Whether or not you are a winner, this is a
wonderful opportunity for individuals to gain
exposure for their work both at the Buyers
Market of American Craft and in NICHE
magazine McCormick said.
The NICHE Student Awards is an
inclusive program. Both Amencans and
Canadians from approximately 350 schools are
encouraged to enter the competition.
This competition supports metal work
students: it celebrates young artists Szorad
said.
The 1999 NICHE Student Awards
application is available by contacting Nl( 111
Magazine. MX) Chestnut Ave Suite 304,
Baltimore, MI) 21211, telephone (410)889-
2933, tax (410) 889-1320, or e-mail (student
niche rosengrp.com). The entrv deadline is
Nov. 2, 1998.
jtreT'Efi
TODAY
�N
INr"�f
? Partly Cloudy
high 45
Low 28
TOMORROW
Partly i.
high 53
low 30
y
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Didl
w
ECU has one of the
largest art schools in the
southeast and the only art
program in the state
accredited by the National
Association of Schools of
Art and Design.
opinion5
Staff, students need to
be mutually courteous
lifestyle6
Roll back in the day when
roller skates were cool
Endowment
provides for
prospective
teachers in
School of
Education
Harvey family gives
S500,000 to support
teaching initiatives
Sarah Vali eri
� W RI T F. K
'Hie Harvey family, from Kinston, recently
created an endowment of 5500.DUO to
support research and teaching initiatives in
the School of Education.
"1 )ur family has been very concerned
about the lack of the variety of skills
necessarv among new teachers to teach basic
reading to all students Margaret Blount
Harvey, a family memher who is also a
member of the State l ; of Education
said. "East (arolina's School i if Edueati in has
been a national leader in reforming teacher
training, and we thought it was the right
place for our investment
"Reading is critical to success in che
educational process said Leigh Harvey
McNairy, a member of the Lenoitlounty
Board of Education. "Expanding the training
of teachers in this vital area is one of the most
important elements leading to successful
students and successful schools. Vfe have
been delighted by
to our concepts and look forward Co working
with them as this gift begins to make a real
impact on the teaching of reading
throughout our state and nation.
Chancellor Richard Eakin is very thankful
for the Harvey family and excited atiout
seeing the School of Education prosper
further.
"We are indebted to the I larvey family tor
their confidence and their generosity; said
Eakin. "TTiis gift will enable our award-
winning School
of Education to
continue its
initiatives to
better
understand the
dynamics of
reading and to
make sure-
teachers are
better prepared
to help every
child succeed as a competent reader
"Mrs. Harvey wants to sec an emphasis
on phonics as one resource said Emmet
Floyd, interim dean of the School of
Education and assi.stant to the chancellor tr
constituent relations.
Phonics is a teaching method that makes
students sound out words in order co read
them.
Floyd said a phonics teaching program has
been at Teacher's Mcmonal School in
Kinston. It impressed Mrs. Harvey and now
she w ants to expand the pn gram chn lughoui
the state. Floyd savs she recoj t tact
that current ceac hers canrH t be retaught, but
she wants future teachers .it K l to get
exposure to the program.
The goals for the phonics programs are
"to improve the way it is taught and get more
of it in the public schools Floyd said.
"We did not choose East i Carolina because
of its national reputation, although we value-
its prominence Mrs. Harvey said. "We
chose East Carolina because of its influence
throughout eastern North (larolina. It
touches the lives of our families and the
families of our friends. We atc ci mfideni
investment will be used bv the School ol
Education to improve che quality �� life tor
the children of each nt � �
"Reading is ritiealto
success in the educational
process.
Leigh Harvey McNairy
Lenoir County BoanJ of Edu
sports.
�j � , phone
Men s team posts two H .
strong wins
on line






am
2 Tut�d�y, January 20. 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Dnefs
I
Gybercafe brings
technology to mealtime
Two kilted in massive
accident on 1-95
LUMBERTON (AP) � Jeff Shee
compared the Interstate 95
collision he saw to the horrors he
experienced a generation ago in
wartime.
I served in Vietnam, and it
looked like a bomb went off, he
said. The flames must have been
40 feet high.
It started when a pickup truck
collided head-on with a tractor-
trailer Friday afternoon, killing the
two drivers and injuring four other
people.
Community colleges
expect surge of elderly
students
RALEIGH (AP) � The state's
community colleges should
prepare for a surge in students
aged 65 or older as North
Carolina's elderly population
grows, education officials were told
at a conference here.
If we have an aging
population,hopefulry, we would be
prepared, Lt. Gov. Dennis Wicker
said at the Futures Conference,
organized to examine issues facing
community colleges. Wicker is
president of the N.C. Board of
Community Colleges.
Soup, sandwich,
internet served
together in comfort
CRAIG D. RAMEY
SENIO WHITER
Police arrest net over
arrests after investigation
AIKEN, S.C. (AP) � An
undercover investigation into
illegal cellular telephone use has
caught at least 11 people in the
Aiken area.
The Aiken Public Safety
Department arrested 10 South
Carolina men and a Florida man on
a total of 74 charges ranging from
avoiding payment of
telecommunication services to
cocaine trafficking.
Students killed in
car accident
CARLOCK, 111. (AP) � Two
college roommates from
Cambridge were killed when their
car plunged down an embankment
along Interstate 74 in central
Illinois.
Michael Crapnell and Matthew
Mortality, both 21, were juniors at
Illinois State University in Normal.
The age of technology just got a
little more comfortable with the
opening of CyberZac's Cafe.
This new cafe offers several
pool rabies, computer games, and
an all-day sandwich menu.
CyberZac's also carries the perks
of a computerized office layout for
those who need access to
computer technology.
"I got the idea while surfing the
net said Dianne Barrow, owner of
CyberZac's Cafe. There are a lot
of cybercafes out west, especially
in California. Then I started
thinking that we needed one here
in Greenville
The "cyber" part of CyberZac's
Cafe includes a wide variety of
technological peripherals for
customers to use at an hourly rate
of $5. Each of the three computers
is enclosed in its own room, with
its own printer. In addition to
basic internet and computing
options, customers can use a
scanner, choose from 150
computer games and
�Thrustmaster a steering wheel
and gas pedal for driving games.
"Quake 2, Jedi Knight, and Red
Alert, arc some of our most
popular games Barrow said.
"People can download game
demos or do research in the
Library of Congress
Other office based
(options of CyberZac's
Ode include copying
(black and white and
JL laminating,
binding services and
I computer classes.
"We always have
someone here to help
customers with the
computers Barrow
Barrow is also the
instructor for the two computer
classes that the cafe offers.
The Basic class costs 35 and
meets for eight sessions. In this
class, students should learn how to
handle files, scan and
troubleshoot, by allowing the
student to get acquainted with
their computer through hands-on
experience and not through a
textbook. Barrow's second class is
designed to help people create
their own web page. This class
lasts for four meetings and is only
25.
On the "cafe" side of
CyberZac's, customers can sit
down at a table or the lunch
counter and order from a variety of
burgers, soups and cappuccinos.
All desserts and soups are
homemade and lemonade is
squeezed fresh for each glass
ordered.
"Our soups are our most
popular - menu
;item Barrow said.
'We made some
Cajun Bean soup
and it sold out in
no time
In addition to
their soups and
sandwiches, which
all fall under $5,
Cafe offers three
domestic beers on tap and a
selection of wine by the glass.
For those not ready to embrace
the technological age, CyberZac's
Cafe offers billiard tables, a
jukebox, and a snooker table.
Snooker is a game in the billiard
family, played on a larger table
with smaller balls. "The
game came from England and
used to be popular in Greenville a
few years ago Barrow said. "It
faded out but I wanted to bring it
back. The game brings a little
nostalgia
Barrow urges ECU students to
give the cafe a try. Any student
who enters CyberZac's and asks
for a discount card wiil receive one
that gives them &fb off of
computer time and food.
CyberZac's Cafe is open Monday-
Friday, from 8 a-m. until midnight,
and from 11 a.m. until midnight
on Saturday and Sunday.
CTSEXZtCSCAFE
photo w
JONATHAN 8MEN
CyberZac's
Student leadership programs
offer wide variety of workshops
IR Defense Ministry acts
on Saddam's call to
mobilize Iraqis
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP)- Chief
U.N. inspector Richard Butler
arrived in Baghdad on Monday in a
new attempt to convince the Iraqi
leadership to allow his weapons
teams to do their work. I think it's
going to be very difficult, Butler
said in Bahrain before leaving for
his 3-day visit.
He also rejected the weekend
statement by Iraqi leader Saddam
Hussein saying that the inspectors
would have to complete their work
by May 20, a deadline set by Iraq's
rubber-stamp National Assembly
last November.
You cannot have an arbitrary
deadline, Butler said.
Buses collide head-on; 10
dead, dozens hurt
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) -
Two passcr.gci buses collided
head-on on Sunday killing 10
people and injuring dozens more,
the Associated Press of Pakistan
reported.
The accident occurred near
Gujjar Khan, barely 50 kilometers
(30 miles) from the federal capital.
It's not clear how the accident
occurred but police said they were
investigating. Fatal accidents on
Pakistan's congested rural roads are
numerous. The government has
started a safe-driving campaign
with advertisements in
newspapers asking people to
observe basic safety rules, like
signaling to pass and wearing seat
belts.
New additions include
Chancellor's Leadership
Development ftogram
JENNIFER VlCKERS
STAM WHITEN
Student Leadership Programs
on campus offer a wide variety of
free work shops and information
for students interested in learning
leadership skills necessary to
survive college life and beyond.
"One of the programs that we
are continuing this year is called
The Interact Series, which is a
series of eight drop-in work shops
that are open to anyone said Jim
Sturm, director of the student
leadership development programs
at ECU.
A wide variety of workshops arc
offered. One of the workshops
teaches creative programming.
Sturm teaches a workshop called
"An Idiot's
Guide to
Etiquette
Some of the
other
workshops
are called
Success
Stories, in
which
successful
ECU
Alumni
speak about
their
experiences
at ECU and
how they
got to
where they
are today.
"One of the
programs that we
are continuing this
�year is called The
Interact Series,
which is a series of
eight drop-in
work shops that
are open to
anyone.
Jim Sturm.
Director of the Student
Leadership Development
i tns year a
college
president and regional personnel
manager for Wichovia arc both
coming to speak.
Two more sessions offered this
semester arc one with Dr.
Matthews, vice chancellor of
student life, and with Dean
Spears, dean of students. The
Success Stories and the latter two
start at noon and include a free
lunch.
"We try to make these
meetings as simple as possible for
students to meet successful
alumni so they can do networking,
meet people on campus, and
learn Sturm said. They are short
jKow would you like to be o
the ground floor of what God
Is doing in America?
oudtrs itf.je � �Jo ���
catlcrt Ian Km S. H�ori�l)
�1� 3S3-I071
tatljeorai of teat' I
Coming soon:
'One Jwtah mb's �Wo� of eM�dah
W
�"N
u
L�arc-
�" ?
st�. aersm ie
Fellowship Dinner
it the Methodist
udent Center!
st
6:00pm Wednesday, January 21
We are located at 501 E. 5th St. directly
across from Garrett Dorm. Call 758-2030
to reserve a spot! This dinner is open to
everyone regardless of denomination.
programs that students can get a
lot out of
The Chancellor's Leadership
Program is one of the new
additions this year. This program
is available for only sophomores
and juniors who were nominated
by faculty and staff members.
"This is a professional
preparation program. We talk
about presenting yourself in the
public, image management, ethics
and professionalism. We teach
these students how to do these
things well, so that they'll be ready
to go into a professional setting
Sturm said.
Student Leadership also
provides a variety of other services.
�"We are kind of the clearing
house for student organizations,
Sturm said. "We distribute all of
the mail and information to these
organizations Any student who
wishes to inquire about joining
groups is welcome to come to his
office, located at 109 Mcndenhall.
In addition, a Leadership
Resource Library is available
which has books, video tapes and
audio tapes dealing with
leadership.
"We also do specialized
workshops for specific
organizations. We try to do them
as fun as possible, very rarely arc
you just sitting there getting
lectured Sturm said.
In the fall nationally-known
speakers or companies come to
ECU for a presentation.
"We've had the Covey Institute
do 'The Seven Habits of Highly
Effective People "Sturm said.
"We also have an Emerging
Leaders Program for new incoming
freshman arriving in the fall. This
basically helps them survive while
at ECU
A newsletter is put out each
month, The Kaleidoscope, which
focuses on different aspects of
leadership. This newsletter is
distributed to organizations, and is
also available at the information
desk at MendenhallOur
programs are about whatever we
can do to get students to learn
more about leadership, because
the leadership experience you gain
in college is one of the things that
employers look for when hiring
Sturm said. "It makes people far
more competitive when they come
out of ECU with a list of five
organizations that they had
leadership roles in on their
resume. Being a member of any
organization broadens your
experience as a student
Tlarge screen televisions, FREE FOOD, AND PRIZES!
SUNDAY, JANUARY 25,5:30 PM
CYNTHIA LOUNGERECREATION AREA4IENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
BRN,miHBttHra
CO-SPONSORED BY SPECIAL EVENTS AND MENDENHALL RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS
BINGO NIGHT
SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 8:00 PM
AUDITORIUM 244, MENDENHAU. STUDENT CENTER
8UN0ffl,MARCH 1,1898 fcWPM MW8t8 CBU8EWH
FIONA APPLE
UDWTS $18.00 8TMTB.G JAM. 28,8:80 fiM
SENERAL PUBUC $18.00 8TARTH6 FEB. 02,8:80 AM
AT THE 0008 $20.00 DOORS 0PERBN8 AT 7:08 PM
HENDRIX FILMS
m m m m w t
THURSDAY - SATURDAY, JAN. 22 - 24
AH films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise
noted and are free to students, tacuKy, and
staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
TWO THUMBS UP!
G.I.JANE
BH wnmmmmm
y$&& �� Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
r Y otl,dpnt Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
&&
i
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ICv
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Tuesday, January 20. 1398
news
The East Carolinian
I FLORIDA �T
�SPRINC BREAK
FROM $149 PER WEEK
SANDPIPER BEACON BEACH RESORT
PANAMA CITY BEACH
New budget may increase one
key program, cut another
i
i
Program currently
serves 945,000
students across
country
CHARLES DERVARICS
COLLEGE PRESS
President Clinton this month
proposed an expansion of the
college work study program to
serve more students, although
advocates say the increase may
come at a steep price: offsetting
cuts in a federal ban program.
On Jan. 9, Clinton, outlined his
college work study proposal, which
would provide an extra $70
million, or total funding of $900
million in fiscal year 1999. If
approved by Congress, the plan
would increase the number of
work study positions to a record
HOME OF THE WORLDS LONGEST KEG PARTY
X&Ll FOR INFO: 1-800-874-8828
level of one million, the president
said.
The program currently serves
about 945,000 students, according
to congressional estimates.
The work study plan is "not
just about increasing financial
aid Clinton said. "It's about
increasing the circle of community
service and the winner's circle of
opportunity for the future
white House officials have
focused on the work study
program as a way to help meet
administration goals that all
children read by third grade.
Hundreds of colleges and
universities have signed up to
participate in this literacy effort,
"America Reads with help
provided chiefly by work study
students.
But enthusiasm for the work
study increase was tempered by
indications that the administration
will propose cuts in Perkins Loans,
the nation's oldest student loan
program.
Higher education leaders say
they fear the administration's 1999
budget will contain no new capital
contributions for Perkins, a
modestly funded program that
some colleges rely on to
supplement die larger student aid
programs such as Pell Grants and
Stafford Loans.
Perkins is one of the three
campus-based student aid
programs, along with college work
study and Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grants.
Financial aid administrators use all
three to design flexible aid
packages that supplement the
larger programs, officials said.
"The campus-based programs
really work as a unit said
Jacqueline King, director of federal
policy analysis for the American
Council on Education. Since many
students already work to earn
money for college, work study
often is not a viable option, while
an extra loan through
Perkins may fill a need
"Work study doesn't help
students if they're already working
25 hours a week King said. With
more students working, "financial
aid administrators need flexibility
to provide additional work, grant
or loan assistance
This year, the federal
government provided $135 million
in new capital contributions for
the Perkins program. Perkins
operates as a revolving loan
program, which means financial
aid directors provide loans based
on this new capital as well as
repayments from past borrowers
THE PLACE
FOR ALL YOUR
PET'S NEEDS
3140A Moseley Dr.
fBehind Parker's BBQ on
Greenville Blvd.) O
758-6603�
Won-Sat: lltoT
Sunday: 1 to 5
Aquariums & Supplies
Saltwater and Freshwater fish
Reptiles, Small Animals, and Supplies
Live and Frozen Food
Tank Maintenance and Leasing Available
FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF
W. NOW HIRING
�&�!
W&
r
Orientation Assistants for 1998-99
Orientation&theFirst-YearE3q)erience� 214 WhichardBidg. � 328-4173
For more inf ormarion, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in 208 Whicfoard Building:
� November 24,1997 (Nionday)-4:00 p jxl
� December 8,1997 (Monday) -4:00 p .m.
� January 20,1998 (Tuesday)-4:00p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 23,1998 at 5:00 p.m.
RUSH
nA
Life long Friendship Learn, about
Have Fun! Greek Lifel Make Itew Friends!
T
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in

�t
The sisters of Pi Delta invite you to
Spring Rush
Tuesday, Jan. 20 Mendenhall Great Room I
8:00pm-10:00pm
Wednesday, Jan. 21 Mendenhall Social Room
8:00pm-10:00pm
Thursday, Jan. 22 Mendenhall Great Room
8:00pm
For rides or information call Leslie at
561-7926 or Kelly at 757-3641
BILLIARDS BOWLING CHESS
TABLE TENNIS SPADES RBCQUETBHLL
Tournament wianers will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at the University of Tennessee, Knox-
ville,TN, the weekend of February 20-22,1998, all expenses paidby Mendenhall
Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Bowling
Spades
TuesJan. 20 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room
Eight-Ball
TueJan27 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Wed, Jan. 21 6:00 p.m.
The Outer limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Chess
Wed Jan. 28 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room
lr
New
This
Year!
Table Tennis
Mon Jan. 26 6:00 p.m
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Jan. 31- Feb. 1
Student Recreation Center
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information. JJ
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4 Thundiy. January 20, 1998
comics
The East Carolinian
Tranc�
Tfafa�! Sarrtos
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
Cyber Bunny
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These units contain a self cleaning oven, a large frost-free refrigerator,
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ACROSS
1 Massachusetts
cape
4 Indian guitars
10 Landlocked
African nation
14 Individual
15 Decorative bush
16 Ear part
17 Running around
19 Alternative to a
saber
20 Dutch flower
21 Jumps tracks
23 Hearings
27 Actor Cariou
28 Family car
29 Actress Mimieux
33 Sweet potato
36 Tender spots
38 Destine to
tragedy
39 Actress
Thurman
40 Check grabber
43 Sailor's drink
44 Tillis and Torme
46 Roller blade
47 Time period
48 National song
51 Spiral-horned
antelope
53 One of Frank's
exes
54 Liberated
58 Desert Storm
gear
82MomHtoste
63 Comic Rudner
64 Go to bed
68 Biblical garden
69 Spookier
70 Contend
71 Mountain
passes
72 Laundry
machines
73 Begley and
Wynn
12' 11�5i71'10111213
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202122
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Answers fromThursday
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1 Charges
2 When actors
enter
3 Bargains
4 Most sugar-
coated
5 Verb-forming
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6 Black goo
7 Forty Thieves'
leader
8 Tear
9 With wisdom
10 Tidied
iX Arizona natives
12 First victim
13 Sandra and
Ruby
18 Shoot wide
22 Gun it in neutral
24 Smell
25 Nostrils
26 Sport shoe
30 Ripped
31 Junket
32 Austen novel
33 Arizona city
34 Grace ending
35 Brewer's barley
37 Past prime,
breadwise
41 Latin list-ender
42 Subscription
extenders
45 Tribal healers
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55 Toil hard
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60 Part of a plan
61 Dyeing vat
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Respect your elders? What about the elders respecting their students for a change of
pace?
While some members of ECU's faculty and staff demonstrate the utmost of courtesy and
would bend over backwards to help out a student, the majority seem to care more about why
they are here rather than why we are here.
For instance, a secretary operating a registration terminal on dropadd day slaps an "Out
to Lunch" sign on the door after you wait patiently for 40 minutes in line.You are told to
come back at 1:45, and it doesn't matter that you have to work for the rest of the afternoon.
And then there's the adviser you call twice a day for over a week who never returns your
calls. You stop in to sec when her office hours are and sure enough, there she is at her desk,
sipping her coffee and reading the latest issue of People magazine.
Then there's the teacher who refuses to hear your explanation for why you missed a math
quiz. Little did he know that you were in a car accident and had to be rushed to the hospital
for surgery. Now your A in the class has dropped to a B because of a situation you had
absolutely no control over.
We all realize that ECU staff members are very busy. But it is time for the staff to realize
that the students (in most cases) have just as many � if not more � things to do each day.
Most are trying to juggle the 24 hours that go by each day to fit in class, work, meetings and
studying.
The university faculty needs to realize that without students, there would be no East
Carolina University. It is understandable that it would be impossible to please each and
every person on campus, but asking for a little more respect is not asking too much.
Staff members need to listen to the students. Let students say what they need to say and
then decide if their explanation is valid. Whatever happened to the concept of a
compromise?
Students, in turn, need to be respectful to those to whom they are turning for help.
Overly demanding and impatient students will find themselves getting nowhere, but those
students who show respect should get some in return. s
OPINION
OPINION
Macey
COCHRAN
Wolf issue has two strong sides
150 wohes will have
to fend for themselves,
which is not unusual for a
species who has been
struggling for hundreds of
years to survive in the wake
of mankind.
Recently when District Judge
William Downcs decided for
petitioners whose aim is to rid gray
wolf populations near Yellowstone
National Park, he incited a virtual
maelstrom of appeals and criticism
from the National Wildlife
Federation and animal rights
activists. However, either side of the
issue is questionable because both
have good cases.
Ranchers have livelihoods to
think about. And the Federation has
an endangered species to protect
(less than 150 gray wolves live in the
2.2 million acre national park).
Unfortunately, the law does not
favor the wolves whose
"experimental" status is more like
probation.
In Tone, Thomas France, senior
counsel of the NWF, said of Judge
Downes' verdict, "The decision
defies common sense. It was an
order to take ten steps backwards
And if followed through, the
decision can only be seen as a
reversal of what many consider one
of the most successful
rcintroductions ever of a near-
extinct species.
Gray wolves are not
unaccustomed to controversy. For
hundreds of years they have been
the object of mankind's fear and
hate. Hunted to near-extinction in
the United States, a plan was set
into morion in the carry 1970s to
reintroduce the gray wolf to
Yellowstone's wildlife population.
After 20 years of debate, 31 grey
wolves were transported from
northern Canada to the park.
Since then, the project has been
a total success. The park's flooded
population of moose, elk and coyote
(caused by the wolves' extinction)
was brought into balance. This
success trickled down to scavengers
like ravens, magpies and grizzly
bears, who feast on the wolves'
leftovers. It seemed everything was
returning to normal.
But wolves cannot be confined to
park boundaries. Occasionally, stray
wolves kill surrounding livestock
and pose threats to ranchers.
There's always the stress of not
knowing if wolves are in the area
said Vcrn Keller, a local rancher. "It
keeps us on the edge all the time
And here is where Judge Downes
passed his decision. He has ordered
their "removal" (i.e. given any gun
carrying fool the right to shoot the
animals on sight) and protected
them (i.e. gun carrying fools) from
the Endangered Species Act which
waffles on "experimental" near-
extinct animals. Because the wolves
arc a reintroduction they arc not
protected by law. It sounds
ludicrous, but this is what has
happened.
For the time, the NWF has
appealed the decision, but it will be
a while before any positive action
takes place. In the meantime, the
150 wolves will have to fend for
themselves, which is not unusual for
a species who has been struggling
for hundreds of years to survive in
the wake of mankind.
OPINION
Columnist
Keith
COOPER
Humans need to love each other
John
DAVIS
Remember Dr. King's dream
Mil members of the human
race should love each other,
open up their hearts and
welcome diversity, and not
rest until they wipe away a
tear and simultaneously put a
smile of good cheer on
someone else's face this year.
During the Christmas season people
around the world "shop until they
drop They buy numerous gifts to
be placed under their evergreen tree
beautifully decorated with
ornaments, tinsels, and candy canes.
Yet, while many jump with joy, smile
with glee, and dance in merriment,
millions of Americans go to bed
hungry, feel depressed, experience
tribulations, and do not have
"visions of sugar plums dancing in
their heads However, many who
have visions of sugar plums get sour
grapes instead. All Americans
should unite and make this nation
and the wodd a brighter place for
our neighbors around the globe.
The items on my New Year's list arc
key to spreading joy and cheer and
putting smiles on faces throughout
the world.
My first request is for improved
race relations in America. America,
a house divided, can't endure too
much longer beyond the new
millennium unless she gets her
house in order. I agree with Dr.
Martin Luther King when he
elucidated that people should be
judged by the content of their
character rather than by the color of
their skin. When North Carolina,
for example, continues to re-elect a
narrow-minded person like Jesse
Helms, that doesn't bode well for
cither the South or the nation. In
any event, every predominantly
white university in this nation
should resolve, in 1998, to make a
course in race relations mandatory
for all students, and hence, a
prerequisite for graduation.
My second request is for world
peace. The United States
government must learn to negotiate
with countries regarded as terrorist
organizations for too long. I agree
with a famous quote made by the
honorable President John F.
Kennedy in 1961: "We should never
negotiate out of fear; but let us
never fear to negotiate If Ronald
Reagan had believed that, he
wouldn't have sent bombs into
Libya in 1986 to destroy the lives of
innocent people like Hana, the
adopted daughter of Libyan leader
Muammar Qadafi.
Iraq is another country believed
to harbor terrorists. The U. S.
government should work closely
with Saddam Hussein to ameliorate
relations between the two
countries. George Bush pushed
around the Iraqis during the Persian
Gulf War. Instead of becoming
aggressive or belligerent towards
countries with a military capability a
small fraction of ours, who should
advocate peace. President William
McKnley was right when he stated
the following: "Peace is more
preferable to war in any
contingency Additionally,
establishing close relations with
countries like Iraq is key to opening
new markets globally. Newmarkets
mean more jobs for America.
Cuba has been isolated bv the
West for too long. Stringent
sanctions against Cuba should be
removed. Such sanctions arc
devastating to the impoverished
citizens of the country. Harsh
economic reprisals hurt the hungry,
the elderly, and other disadvantaged
groups in Cuba. Since the Cuban
Missile Crisis of the Kennedy
Administration, Cuba has been
isolated from the West. I might add,
shortly before Kennedy was
assassinated, he had planned to re-
establish diplomatic relations with
Cuba. -
My third gift request is for food
to feed the millions of people who
go to bed hungry in America and die
of starvation internationally.
Countries abundant in natural
resources should share something
with emaciated human beings
hungry for the bread of life. After
all, we should lend a hand of
benevolence to those less fortunate
than we throughout the entire year.
The fourth request is for a cure
for cancer (i.c. breast, prostate) and
other diseases robbing precious lives
by the millions annually. If America
can put a man on the moon, then
finding a cure for deadly diseases is,
as President Kennedy predicted,
within her reach as well. Brilliant
minds from around America and the
world can come together and move
mountains of despair and welcome
an avalanche of hope. Indeed,
thanks to the sophistication and
quality of our technological
innovation, we, with God's help, can
conquer disease.
Lastly, my fifth request is for
more love for humanity. This love is
manifested when someone stops to
help a stranded motorist having car
problems along a lonesome highway.
Such love is woven into the fabric of
a government concerned about
advancing the social welfare of its
people. When people
unconditionally volunteer their time
to help someone in need or
consistently contribute to charitable
organizations, they show love.
In a nutshell, improving race
relations should be a top priority of a
country concerned about building a
brighter future for its family. White
supremacy must be killed and
buried. Promoting world peace and
helping the hungry help themselves
are a moral obligation of ours.
Additionally, working painstakingly
to find a cure for cancer is an
honorable pursuit. Finally, all
members of the human race should
love each other, open up their hearts
and welcome diversity, and not rest
until they wipe away a tear and
simultaneously put a smile of good
cheer on someone else's face this
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. did what so few other
people dohe dared to take
Jesus Christ seriously; he
dared to take Thomas
Jefferson seriously; he dared
to dream.
Normally editorial columns arc
reserved for the cynical observations
and complaints of editorial writers.
With The East Carolinian
specifically, much room is given over
to complaints about campus events
and local politics which are, more
often than not, really not that
important in the grand scheme of
things. Even on a national scale, the
media tends to focus on tragedies,
political failings, wars, rumors of
wars and all those wonderful human
flaws which get ratings and sell
newspapers.
Admittedly, it's much harder to
write about more positive issues.
Complaining makes for easy writing.
(Even at this moment, yours truly is
complaining about complaining.)
America gets a lot of low blows
lately in this round robin of "what's
wrong with the world America was
colonized (bad word!) by Europeans
(bad word!) and that pretty much
gets our great nation off on the
wrong foot. The rest is downhill
form there: slavery, Manifest
Destiny, the nuclear bomb,
abortion, AIDS; our nation has
contributed greatly to the horrors of
world history.
I'm certainly not going to deny
our responsibility for the terrible
things we've done. But our nation
has produced quite a few damned
awe-inspiring things as well. This
week, wc celebrated one such
awesome instance: the life of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
It may sound odd to include Dr.
King in America's contributions to
the world, since he was, after all,
fighting against 400 years of racism
that was instituted by Americans.
But think about it for a second. Dr.
King wasn't born in Africa. He
wasn't even involved in the "back to
Africa" movement, which was
prevalent in his time. Dr. King, an
ordained minister in a Protestant
church, educated in America, a
product of American culture and
history was a great man, perhaps (in
my opinion, greater than any other
man in American history) because
he actually paid attention to his
American history.
He remembered the words of the
God he worshipped: "Love jour
neighbor as you love yourself He
remembered the words of our own
Declaration of Independence: A1I
men are created equal He
remembered and took seriously
what so many of us forget and take
for granted: that this nation was
founded on the idea that people can
be trusted with freedom because
they can choose to love each other,
that the risk of a people misusing
that freedom is worth it if it means
that we have the chance to be fully
human.
Dr. King's dream was a grand
dream, one not just of political
equality or empowerment or
entitlement, but one of love, the
closing remarks of his famous "I
Have A Dream" speech reveals this.
He speaks of a place and time where
all men gather together, white and
black Protestant and Catholic, Jew
and Gentile, to sing together theold
spiritual hymn "Free at Last It
sounds improbable, but think about
it.
Dr. King was all too familiar with
America's shortcomings. He wasn't
in denial and he wasn't about to just
let things be. But he did what so few
other people do when they realize
that American isn't a Utopia and
never can be: he dared to take Jesus
Christ seriously, he dared to take
Thomas Jefferson seriously; he
dared to dream.
-It-
year.
To send a letter to the editor.
?Mail it to : Opinion Editor, the East Carolinian, Student Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, 27858-4353.
?Bring it to: our office on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building across from Joyner Library
?Visit our web site at www.tec.ecu.edu.

�Ma
��
1





MOJ
6 Thttrsdtv. Jenoory IS, 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian

Kenerd Lawrence visited campus last Thursday.
PHOTO COUHTESr Of aUWOTIlHi df.pt
Sreate cams to town Feb. 23.
PtWTO COWTF.ST OF MMXETmS BJPT.
JANUARY
1 5 THURSDAY
Travel Adventure Film: Across
the Bering Sea�Nome to the
Russian Far East at 4 and 7:30
p.m. at Hendrix Theatre and
theme dinner at 6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room
Fifth Element at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre (through Jan.
17)
22 THURSDAY
International Enameling
Symposium presentation and
workshops at 7 p.m. in Jenkins
Arts Center (through Jan. 25)
G.I. Jane at 8 p,m. in Hendrix
Theatre (through Jan. 24)
27 TUESDAY
Performing Arts Series: St.
Paul Chamber Orchestra, Hugh
Wolf, conductor, and Emanuel
Ax, piano, at 8 p�m. in Wright
Auditorium
29 THURSDAY
Mimic at 8 p.m in Hendrix
Theater (through Jan. 31)
30 FRIDAY
Jazz at Night at 8 p.m in
Mendenhall Great Room
20 FRIDAY
Jazz at Night at 8 p.m
Mendenhall Great Room
in
FEBRUARY
Georgian State Dance Company
) COWTESr OF MARKETING DEPT
1 SUNDAY
Performing Arts Series:
Georgian State Dance Company
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
5 THURSDAY
Henry Pearson Retrospective
Exhibition lecture and gallery
reception at 7 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
East Carolina Playhouse:
Dance '98 at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre (through Feb. 10 with 2
p.m. showtime on Feb. 8)
187 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre (through Feb. 7)
1 1 WEDNESDAY
Travel Adventure Film: 77�e
Eastern and Oriental Express at
4 and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre with theme dinner at 6
p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room
12 THURSDAY
Nothing, to Lose at 8 p.m in
Hendrix Theatre (through Feb.
14)
14 SATURDAY
Family Fare: Lyle, Lyle,
Crocodile at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
19 THURSDAY
Peacemaker at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre (through Feb. 21)
21 SATURDAY
Performing Arts Series: Berlin
Symphony Orchestra at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium
23 MONDAY
Performing Arts Series:
Grease at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
26 THURSDAY
Seven Years in Tibet at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre (through Feb.
28) I
28 SATURDAY
Black History Month Concert
at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Room
6 FRIDAY
Jazz at Night at 8 p.m in
Mendenhall Great Room
12 THURSDAY
School of Art Undergraduate
Exhibition awards ceremony
and gallery reception at 7 p.m. in
Speight Auditorium (exhibition
in Gray Gallery through April 15)
27 FRIDAY
Performing Arts Series: Yakov
Kasman, Van Cliburn Silver
Medalist at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
30 MONDAY
Premiere Performance of
Works by ECU Composers at 8
p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall
APRIL
MARCH
4 WEDNESDAY
Travel-Adventure Film:
France�Boulevards and
Byways at 4 and 7:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre and theme
dinner at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall
Great Room
5 THURSDAY
East Carolina Playhouse:
Landscape of the Body at 8 p.m.
in McGinnis Theatre (through
March 10 with 2 p.m. showtime
on March 8)
In & Out at 8 p.m in Hendrix
Theatre (through March 7)
4 SATURDAY
Family Fare: Laura Ingalls
Wilder�Growing Up on the
Prairie at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
13 MONDAY
Travel Adventure Film: Cuba
at the Crossroads at 4 and 7:30
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre and
theme dinner at 6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room
17 FRIDAY
Jazz Festival Gala Concert at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium
23 THURSDAY
East Carolina Playhouse: A
Yakov Kasman performs March 27.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MMKETMS OfPT
View from the Bridge at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre (through April
28 with 2 p.m. showtime on
April 26)
24 FRIDAY
School of Art Thesis
Exhibition opening reception at
5 p.m. in Gray Gallery
(exhibition through May 27)
The Berlin Symphony plays Fa. 21.
PHOTO COORTf ST OF HAMETWI6 MPT
r-
Steve Earie
El Corazon
S OUT OF 10
PAT RE1D
SENIOR WRITF.R
Playing music for a living is a
risky lifestyle. No matter how good
you may have it, things can turn
rotten overnight and leave you on a
street strumming your guitar for
change. This has been the story for
top artists like the New Kids and
will surety be the future for acts like
Hanson and the Spice Girls.
That's why it's so amazing
that in an industry where
quantity means more than
quality an artist like Steve
Earle has persevered.
Earle sent Nashville
reeling with his 1986 debut,
Guitar Town. In the years that
followed, his albums Exit 0,
Copperhead Road and the amazing
The Hard Way were all well-received
by critics, but his fan base stayed
small. Then Earlc's drug addictions
got the best of him. After not
showing up for a court date, Earle
was thrown in jail. It was there that
Earie decided to turn things around.
After his short jail stint, Earle
rereleased his Train A-Conmi and
released I Bel Alright on his new E-
Squared record label. Both were
hailed critically as they contained
some of Earle's best work. Perhaps
the most important aspect of fid
Alright was the openness of the
lyrics. In songs like "CCKMP'
�f
(Cocaine cannot kill my pain) Earle
painted a picture of how his life had
been and where it was now
headed.
After touring behind
AlrjgU, Earle went to work
doing behind the scenes
work with other E-
disappointment at the lack of songs
along the vein of
"Promise You
Anything" or
"More Than I
Can Do But a
closer listen
Squared
artists. This
included offering
giidance to the V-
oys, as well as
producing a record
for Raleigh's own
Six-String Drag.
Finally Earle headed
back into the studio
on the other end of the
microphone and came out with El
Corazon.
On Corazon, Earle wrote and sang
from the heart. The result is a
deeper record that takes some time
to digest. One fast listen brings
exposes the brilliance that is present
on El Corazon.
A look at the liner notes also
reveals the all-star cast of. musicians
who lent a hand to the songs. The
appearance of Emmylou Harris on
the album is no surprise, as she also
lend a hand on Train A-Comin She
has also paid tribute to Earle by
covering his song "Goodbye" on her
recent Wrecking Ball album.
However, the album also contains
guest spots by artists like The Del
McCoury Band, The Fairfield
Four, The
Supersuckers
and Earle's own
son. Such a
diverse pool of
talent yields
an album
that pulls
from every
musical genre.
For example, "Tancytown" (with
Harris singing back-up) provides a
dark story of times past. Telling the
storv of a mentally retarded black
man in a racist society, "Tancytown"
is an example of why Earle is hailed
as an excellent songwriter by his
peers.
This is in contrast to the
bluegrass stylings of "I Still Carry
You Around Backed by The Del
McCoury Band, Earie provides an
upbeat little ditty to lighten the
mood of the album.
The roots of El Corazon extend
deep into the essence of rock and
country. In fact one listen to "NYC"
will have you defending Earle has a
true alternative artist, while
"Christmas in Washington" allows
Earle to show his folkish balladeer
talents. "Washington" also falls in
with songs like "Billy Austin" and
"Devil's Right Hand" as a political
commentary.
EJ Corazon is one of those albums
that cannot be summed up in a few
words. The songs are raw with a
stripped-down sound that gets in
your face and makes you listen.
Despite being a more diverse
record than any of Earle's past
endeavors, it still flows and is
listenable from beginning to end.
Regardless ot whether it sells 10
copies or 10 million copies it will
forever be noted as one of his best
albums ever by those who give it a
listen.
4 �
1.4 tj.





-
7 Tuesday. January 20.1997
iiestyle
Tha East Carolinian
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Hours Vary as Needed
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Come to Ihe only Health Depi. Inspected Siiuiio in the Greenville Area. We
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with oik! stop in our own Public Facility, without Hidden or Confused Agendas!
We are without a doubt the safest, cleanest. Most Profiessional Studion in The
Area!
NO APPOINTMENTS ACCESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTIST
For More Information Call: 756-0600
Located At: 4685 IS HWY 13 Grconvillc
Spring theatre
season begins
Feb. 5 with
Dance '98
STEPHANIE RUSSELL
STAFF WHITE
Fall semester is over, and most of us
have managed to find Mendenhall,
General Classroom, Joyner Library
(hopefully) and downtown. Now
see if you are up to the challenge
and find McGmnis Theatre to
experience The East Carolina
Playhouse. These productions are
known to be thought-provoking,
intelligent, funny and moving. The
'9798 season has lived up to the
Playhouse reputation so far, and the
spring line-up promises to be as
exciting as the fall shows.
Launching the second half of the
season, East Carolina's Dance
Theatre presents their annual
program of jazz, ballet, and
contemporary dance pieces, Dance
'98. Choreographed by faculty and
guest artists and performed by the
creme de la creme in the
Department of Theatre and
Dance's professional dance
programs, Dance W is a must see.
Choreographers include: Joe
Carrow, Dawn Clark, Patricia
Pertalion, Patti Weeks and visiting
artist Jay Norman (who worked
with the Summer Theatre in 1995
as director-choreographer ofWest
Side Story). Dates of the
production are Feb. 5-10.
Landscape of the Body, (PG13 for
adult content) written by John
Guare, delves into the dark side of
modem life and the struggle for
survival. When the body ofM-year-
old Bert is found mutilated in New
York City's Hudson River his
mother becomes the prime suspect.
The audience, witness to the
murder investigation, is transported
to a violent world of muggings,
pornography, con artists and �
transvestite named RauSito.
Directed by John Shearin, Landscape
explores issues that confront us
daily in today's world witfc
"empathy, passion, and hard-nosed
understanding of reality The
show runs March 5-10.
The Playhouse season closes
with A View from tie Bridge (PG for
Mature themes), written by Arthur
Miller. Under the direction of
Cedric Winchell, this modern
tragedy that explores the fury,
obsession, and incestuous jealousy
of Eddie Carbonc. Set in Brooklyn
in a working-class neighborhood,
Eddie is entangled in a series of
tragic events that are the result of
promising to raise his orphaned
niece as his own. When two illegal
immigrants arc harbored in the
house and his niece finds love,
Eddie must deal with emotions he
does not understand, leading to a
powerful and shocking climax. The
season finale shows April 23-28. �
Tickets are available individually
or for the entire season and can be
purchased at the box office in the
lobby of McGinnis Theatre or by
calling 328-1726. Prices for season
passes are $32436 for faculty and
staff and $36-40 for the general
public. Individual ticket prices
(with the exception of tickets, for
admission to the musical) are as
follows: $5-6 for children and
students, $7-8 for faculty and staff,
and $8-9 for the public. All shows
run Thursday through Tuesday It
8:00 pjn. and a Sunday matinee at
200 pan. only. Support the arts at
ECU and make plans to attend the
shows of the 9798 East Carolina
n
'
ATiTIC
752-7303
Wed 28th & Thurs 29
j presents
Mike
Mesmer"eyes
World's Most Powerful Hypnotist
Fri 30'
Formerly Purple
SchooWus
Sat 31
Beach Music's 1 Show
Chairmen
of the Board
Janua
Schedule
20 Toes Ladies Nife
Dance Party
21 Wed Comedy Zone
Greg Ray
22 Thur Nameless
Balance
23 Fri Everything w
guest S.M.O.
24 Sat The Jumpstarts
25 Sun SUPERBOWL
PARTYw99.x
27 Tues Ladies Nite
Dance Party
28,h & 29th
MIKE
MESMErT'EYES'
30 Fri Acoustic Bus
31 Sat Chairmen of
the Board
February
Schedule
3 Tues Ladies NHe
Dance Party
4 Wed Comedy Zone
5 Thur TBA
6 Fri Too Skinnee J's
7 Sat Jupiter Coyote
Voted One Of Top Clubs
In America By
Playboy Magazine
mm Kf ft f t Si Mf fcff Si �! fef f Si Mf MM f Si 5S
KU1PI
:
m
m
E
is
:
1
m w wr
The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Hugh Wolff, will present
a night of top-notch, classical music entertairiment
Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket Office for $15.
All tickets purchased at the door are $30.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
spinning, Whirling, TmUng T)anee$
Folk dancing has never been so much fun. Catch the Georgian State Dance
Company as they tell folk tales through dance. Elaborate costumes, high
energy, and flawless dance. Student tickets are now available at the Central
Ticket Office for $12. All tickets purchased at the door are $25.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
(SMovie tjfj the Qtteek
Demi Moore's CUane (R) will screen in HENDRIX THEATRE
JAN. 22-24 AT 8 P.M. Your student ID gets you and one guest in for free.
CHBWThS
"Low Fat CookingHealthy Lifestyles'
Free admission. TODAY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
jj
"You Can Get There From Here: Nova Scotia on Motorcycle" Free admission.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, AT NOON IN MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
ROLL A FEW
ALL-U-CAN BOWL
Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from
8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just five bucks (includes shoe rental).
Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 pm.
MONDAY MADNESS
Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 pm. with 50-cent bowling
(shoe rental included).
ONE-BUCK BOWLING
Make Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10 frames for just
$1 (shoe rental included). $1 games between 1-6 p.m.
���
:
m
m
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Ml
3
SERVICES: CentralTlcket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games � Student Locator Service j
� ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board � Art Gallery a�
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m. �J
t&aiatWS Mf fciHSi K�L:�5 temIIZ 5aM lS
�n-r-
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a-4t "�





8 Thursday. January 15, 1998
k sivie
The East Carolinian
Roll back to the days of roller skates
M ICI H SM II II
- I 1I I k V. I
This is the
column where
we focus on the
stuff we miss and
the stuff we missed. We
will examine the books,
albums and television
shows that we feel deserve
further exploration. The
stuff we dug back in the
day
It would appear that rollerblading as
sport, hobbv and obsession is the
new wave of the future. I refuse to
spend my time or money on it.
possibly because the skates uuuld
require me to lurch around
ungracefully like Frankenstein,
possibly because they cost too
darn much, what with kneepad
and all, or possibly because on
my undying love affair with roller
skating.
It has been said that the human
memory is best stimulated by a smell, a
wafting of a long-forgotten scent under the
nose that can transport a person years away in time and
miles away in space.
The smell in question? Dust, electricity, adrenaline, a
polished concrete floor, the scent of a room in which I spent
much of my prepubescent life: the skating rink.
It didn't matter to me which rink I was at, as long as I
could wear the pink lycra skate skirt my mom bought me at
a pro shop, tie up my skates and get out on the floor, baby.
I can't be the only one of my generation to remember
fondly the hypnotic swirl of a hundred bodies in one
direction to the synthetic beats of Cyndi Lauper. Sheena
Easton and Madonna, whose plastic voices urucd our tired
legs to go just one more lap, the little c-shaped reflections
of light from the disco-ball that soothed us, bathed us in
ultraviolet rays and liquefied our clumsy motions into
something graceful.
Sometimes I would scrape and grasp the tall carpeted
sides of the DJ's booth like a drowning man. heave myself
from the mass of slowly circling bodies, all of whom were
better skaters than 1, and make a request, usually for
"Freakazoid
I'd try to keep my balance in line at the concessions
stand, where I would go for a Coke, always in a small paper
cup with a wax coating.
Those were the days, if you can remember, when
carbonation was sweet and new and half-forbidden to our
virgin mouths.
For ten minutes I'd do nothing but sit
and let the sweat on my hair
cool, rubbing my wheels on
carpeted
floor above the
rink and feeling
the muscles in my
legs move.
I spoke to no one. I
rarely had friends accompany me but I never missed the
humanity, preferring to be absorbed into the collective,
pursuing the furtive goal of elation through rhythm,
through pulse, through exhaustion.
Who remembers doing the Hokey-Fbkey? And so at
about closing time it was on with the house lights, off with
the sweet seductive melodic penetration, out with the
children, all of whom stood in a self-conscious circle, their
Icl;s protruding at various angles of balance and imbalance.
The silly music would begin, all of us throwing our
skinnv limbs about with as much gusto as tired children
could, doing the Hokey-Pbkey and turning ourselves
around, because that's what it's all about.
I remember winning once and receiving, as a prize,
another Coke.
Who else, besides me, remembers crawling into the
backseat of the car. curling their legs up with their feet
against the door, wearing ordinary shoes and feeling the
funny ache of skatelessness before drifting off to sleep?
I1 11 v ����
High Action j Men's skiwear � 1 in Classic Designs i obermeyerg' Skiwear torn m Hurt gtmihuumf
(919)756-1003
207 E.Arlington
GORDON'S
Golf and Ski
To Welcome in the New Year we, at The East Carolinian, decided to make our
ads more reader friendly
Read Our Paper
Than easicarolinian
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Truth.Equal ity. Justice
123 W.3dSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
91.3FM
Needs a
RPM D J
Apply in WZMB's Studio in the bottom
of mendenhall student center
Stop searching
for a job
and find a career!
Jesus Christ died for
the sins of one race.
Please attend State Farms
Information Session to learn
about career opportunities in
Claims and Underwriting in
Virginia and North Carolina.
All Majors Welcome.
Tonieht Onlv
Information Session: 7:00p.m Tuesday,
January 20 Career Services, Room 103
Resume Drop Deadline: Wednesday January 28
Campus Interview: Wednesday, February 11

me ipfiMan :m"ust. be 'lifted
"that eveiy�MNMMBnMM�BLru.
r i urn limn
ar:God;S01pvedr the world that K2
I gave-his bnejind only Son that who-
ever beUeves�?ih him shall not perish but,
aye eternal life. f.For
fo condemn the
srldsbut"ttosaye;ihe;world through
" ISWrioeverbelieves' in ;hira is not
;butiwhbeyerdoes not
jd'alread
from the Bible
John 3:16
The human one.
If you don't like racism you're in good company. God feels the same way. God created every person and
people on earth. He likes variety. That's why He calls racism "sin And when Jesus Christ was crucified, He
died not only for racism, but for every kind of sin in our lives. Once we accept God's forgiveness through
Christ's death, we can enter into a relationship with God regardless of race, nationality or skin color. This year
in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. s birthday and Black History Month we're offering the article "Give the
Dream New Life For your free copy call 1-800-236-9238.
The Dream Begins With God.
for your free article call
1-800-236-9238
Campus Crusade For Christ





r
4-
9 Tuttday. January 20. 1998
Pirates post two strong wins
Men's basketball
defeats Liberty,
Richmond
TRACY M. LAUBACH
SPORTS EDITOR
The ECU men's basketball team
; has been on a home stretch for
their past three games, two of
which were Pirate wins. The last
away game was played against
CAA opponent James Madison
?$� University on Jan. 7 and sent the
! i team home with a 90-60 victory as
? tithe Pirates shot 63 percent.
;j The first of the home games
'was against the Tribe of William
and Mary on Jan 10. Led by senior
forward Raphael Edwards with 20
points and senior guard Tony
; Parham with 16, the Pirates put 63
points on the board while the
Tribe posted 72 points to pick up
their third conference win.
According to William and
Mary's Head Coach Charlie
Woolum, the Pirates arc one of the
strongest teams in the CAA.
"Don't get down on ECU
because, believe me, they arc
going to be right in the thick of
the race Vbolum said. "That is
why I am so pleased with this
victory I think we beat one of
the best teams in the league
The Tribe ranks number one in
conference standings and are
undefeated at this point.
ECU Head Coach Joe Dooley
said the team expected the game
to be a tough one.
"We knew going in that there is
a reason why William and Mary is
the number one team Dooley
said. "We knew they were good
and they played up to as good as
we thought they would
ECU was at a disadvantage,
with several key players on the
bench with injuries. Alphons van
Icrland broke his left hand at
practice on Dec. 11, while Neil
Punt broke his right foot during
the Dec. 20 UNC Asheville game.
According to Dooley, having
men on the bench is no excuse for
the loss.
"We have played about five
games without a full team, and we
are not going to get them back for
a while, so we may as well get used
to it Dooley said.
Senior center Dink Peters, who
?ut 14 points on the board for the
irates said that the high points of
the game came in spurts, claiming
that the game was a "war on the
board
'We can't hold our heads down.
Every practice we are going to get
better and keep giving it our all
Peters said. "As a team and a unit,
we can't get frustrated and think
that the season is over because'
there are a lot of games left to be
played
The Pirates took a break from
conference play on Jan. 14 to meet
Liberty University for the fourth
time in the scries history.
ECU controlled the game for
half of the first period. At the 6:05
mark, Larry Jackson from Liberty
went to the foul line for two good
shots to give his team a lead that
held through the half. ECU
headed to the locker room at
halftime down by five points, 31-
36.
"It seemed like in the first half,
no matter what we did, they
outmatched us with answering
shots Dooley said.
The second half was like a new
ball game for the Pirates. Parham,
who had been sitting the game out
with an injured shoulder, stepped
in to nail four three-pointers, the
first coming with 15:46 on the
clock. At the 12:27 mark, he sent
another one, immediately
don't have a lot of healthy people Peters stayed on the bench, but
in
followed by a three-pointer by
Garrctt Blackwelder.
Blackweldcr's shot gave the
Pirates a one point lead to be held
for the duration of the game. �
Halfway through the second
half, Peters went down with a
strained calf muscle, thus adding
another name to the roster of
those injured on the team.
Even with Peters out, ECU
won the game 74-63, shooting 49
percent from the floor and 60
percent from the line.
"I am very proud of the kids
Dooley said. "The effort has been
good in practice so we have been
trying to build on that. We have
cut back on practices because we
Steven Branch sends a ball to the net during the Pirate's 77-67 victory over
Richmond, who ranks second in conference standings.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN SREEN
The East Carolinian
One never would have known
it by watching ECU in action
against Richmond on Saturday.
with 7-0 van Ierland back on the
court for the first time in over a
month, ECU was neck and neck
Men's Basket
TeamRecord
William and Maty44
Richmond3-1
UNC Wilmington4-2
George Mason3-2
Old Dominion2-2
East Carolina2-3
American2-3
VA. Ctommrjnwealth1-3
1 James Madison05 I
CAA
with the second ranked
conference Spiders through the
entire first half.
"We had two really good days
of practice and practice carried
over to the game Parham said.
"We really went out there and
competed tonight
The Pirates dominated the
court chrough most of the second
half, taking over the lead at the
13:13 mark after being down at
the half, 30-32. It was at that time
Alico Dunk sent his first three-
pointer to the net, only to send
another one in less than one
minute later. Meanwhile, good
shots from the foul line, two slam
dunks by van Ireland and the
sound of 4,698 cheering fans saw
the Pirates through to a 77-67
victory.
"Better than any other time
this season, we executed and
played hard Parham said.
"Sometimes we execute but we
don't play hard; other times we
play hard, but we don't execute.
Tonight, everything just came
together for us
The Pirates will be on the road
Thursday for their first meeting
of the season with conference
opponent Virginia
Commonwealth, who ranks one
slot below ECU in conference
standings. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m.
Lady Hrates drop three straight conference games
ECU struggles
against CAA foes
TRACY M. LAUBACH
SPORTS EDITOR
The Lady Paate basketball team handed
cwdxff th�corBeairJuEOX)fcKrrc kas
Rkfay in a home game against Virginia
Qi�nonwcaldiTreteamrciwrddsa2-
4 conference record and ranks sewnth
arrcngCMopponenrs.
The first in the series oflosses came on
Jan. 9 in a home game against Rkhmond,
54-57.
The Lady Hrates came out stow in the
first rBttp�raTgonK16painc5anthebaard
by the end of the period Meanwhile, the
Spiders, led by
Jennifer
Meade and
M a n d y
Hester,
exploded to
carrv the lead
attfcrfl!f32-
16
�At tatf time,
we knew we
had to erase
the first half
entirely and
come back out
to cake can of
t h e
basketball
Head Coach Arne Donovan sad
The Beam came out much stronger in
the second half to shorten the spread to a
mere one point Spider lead wah3:191eft of
pfay but fefl three points short to end the
game 54-57.
Timing back the way we dkl gves
Jen MoreU takes a shot
during the VCU game.
f H0T0 BT JONATHAN SREEN
ou momentum Donovan sad. "It's the
other team who is back on their hods,
getong nervous and k'syour team who has
riadrerrfirieThatshcuklhavewikedin
our favor, but we just could not play the
entire game in 20 minutes
On Jan. ll,rheLady Prates traveled to
Norfolk ro take on number two nationally
ranked Old Dxrmion. The Lady
Morarchs, undefeated and ranked
nurnber one in the CA have dominated
the confeience as tournament champions
for six consecutive seasons.
They posted a 72-36 win over
ECU, as they were led by
senior center Nyree Roberts
with 17 points.
The matchup against
Virginia Commonwealth was
perhaps one of the more
disappointing losses for ECU,
as the Lady Pirates, although
SEE BASKETBALL. PAGE 10
Track teams shine at Chapel Hill meet
Schedule kicks off
for Pirates
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
SENIOR WRITER
For ECU's men's and women's
track teams, the indoor meets that
make up the beginning of their
schedule offer a chance to gain
experience and see how far they
have to go to reach their ultimate
goal. The earliest of these, The Joe
Hilton UNC Invitational, was held
last weekend in Chapel Hill.
The women's team came to
Chapel Hill for their second meet
of the season, but their first since
returning from winter break.
"I didn't expect a lot in our first
meet back from the holidays, but
we practiced hard for three or four
days before the meet said
women's Head Coach Charles
"Choo" Justice.
The Pirates, rust and all, still
managed some sparkling individual
performances. Freshman Marshari
Williams posted a time of 9.29
seconds in the 60 meter high
hurdles and wound up sixth.
Meanwhile, Missy Johnson soared
to ninth in the triple jump and
eighth in the long jump. She was
bested in the latter by teammate
Leana Anding, who finished sixth
with a jump of 17 feet 7 inches.
However one of the most
dramatic events of the day featured
two Pirates in the shot put.
Freshman Michelle Clayton
finished fifth edging out the sixth
place Crystal Frye by one
centimeter.
"It was great. Michelle would
throw and Crystal would match.
Crystal would throw and Michelle
would match. It was good-natured
friendly competition Justice said.
Last weekend's meet was the
first meet this year for ECU's
men's track team. If they were also
SEE TRACK. PAGE 10
Pirates at the Top
Women's
60 meter high hurdles
6. MaRhonVfillioms, 9.29 seconds
Long
8.
Jump
:7 jr
Shon
SrWicReiTe Clayton, 11.16m
6. Crystal Frye, 11.15m
Men's L
60 meter high hurdles
. Rashown ueons, 8.58 seconds
8. Tremayne Nunley, 8.73
60 meter dash
'L Voughn Monroe, 6.74 seconds
7. Titus Hoygood. 6.86 seconds
8. Chris Justice, 6.94seconds
WOMEN'S BAS
PLAYER
SHAY HAYES
DANIELLE MELVIN
JEN COX
MISTY HORNE
MELANIE HORNE
CHARLETTE GUT
JEN RICE
BETH JAYNES
JEN MORETZ
.RECREATIONAL
(services mm
STATISTICS
QQU
PPG
VS.
2
12
11
7
3
13
2
club sports
Introducing
corner
The Club Sports Corner
Rugby - men
� Ultimate Frisbee - mw
� Lacrosse - men
� Volleyball -mw
� Water Skiing
� Kayaking
� Disc Golf
� Swimming
� Underwater Hockey
� Goju Shorin
� Isshinryu
� Tae Kwon Do
� Tai Chi Chaun
This bi-weekly section will be dedicated to the Club
Sport organizations at ECU. The corner will help to
inform students of the many activities that are
available in Club Sport recreation. Stay Tuned!
Individuals interested in
joining a club program
or starting their own club
are encouraged to
contact Recreational
Services for more
information! �
w
Club Sports Coordinator
Gray Hodgges
Office �SRC 112
Phone � 328-6387
see you at the corner!

E3
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fa
-A.
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�wa�





P I VMM
10 Tuesday. January 20. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Basketball
continued from page 9
behind, kept up with the
Lady Rams throughout the
entire game to come up just
three points short in the end.
Beth Jaynes was the leader this
time, putting- IA points on the
board for ECU, while Danielle
Melvin and Jen Cox also posted
double digits, with 12 and 11
respectively.
What hurt the Lady Pirates the
most were the shots missed from
the foul line, as they shot only 4-8
in the first half and 4-9 in the
second.
"There is no excuse to miss
free throws Donovan said. "We
lack confidence when it comes to
game time lights are on, people
are there; it's a different focus, and
it shouldn't be. It's the same
routine they do in practice
Melvin said missed shots are
from a lack of focus.
"We are all good free throw
shooters Melvin said. "Moving
on after missing a shot is part of
the game. You can't think about
what you have missed because
you've got to get it back and play
defense
Donovan was extremely
pleased with the effort put in by
the team, especially Jaynes and
Melvin.
"Rebounding was outstanding
and was led by Beth and Danielle
Donovan said. "They both did an
outstanding job on the board on
both ends of the floor. We have
tried a number of techniques to
build up confidence, but have
seen no results yet
The Lady Pirates next home
game is schedules for Sunday, Jan
25. They will host UNC
Wilmington, who stands in last
place in conference standings.
Tipoff is set for 2 p.m.
Track
continued from page 9
rusty from the break, it didn't
show. The Pirates blew into
Chapel Hill refusing to be
intimidated, not even by Olympi
Gold. Rashawn Deans placed
seventh in the 60 meter high
hurdles with a time of 8.58.
Behind Deans fellow Pirate
Tremayne Nunley managed an
eighth place finish. ECU's Vaughn
Monroe had a personal best time
of 6.74 seconds in the 60 meter
dash. In addition to earning
second place, Monroe also beat
Olympic gold medal winning
hurdler and Tarheel legend Allen
Johnson. Fellow Pirates Titus
Haygood and Chris Justice
finished only .2 seconds behind
Monroe and placed seventh and
eighth respectively.
The Pirates did not escape
Chapel Hill unscathed. Ail-
American sprinter James
Alexander injured his leg and may
miss up to four weeks.
Both the men's and women's
teams will have another
opportunity to measure their
progress when they travel to
Blacksburg for this weekend's
Virginia Tech Invitational.
� DWI Assessments, Evaluations And Treatment Programs
�Counseling services include
Individual, Family, and Group Therapy
Your assessment & treatment (if required) will
be done in a professional yet laid back manner in
a private, comfortable setting for less money
than you would spend with some larger agencies.
Appointments Scheduled Around YOUR Work or School
Schedule
All services Are Fully Licensed & Credentialized By The State
of North Carolina
Fees based upon income
Located on Evans Street Mall
Within Walking Distance of Campus
Michael G. Morris, CDWIE, CRT, CSAC
315 S. Evans Street; Suite B; Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: (919)752-1333 Fax: (919)757-3995
fJ7
Q
N
r� cd
Of
JU
1
Topics
provided.
Writers
needed.
Come to the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publi-
cations Building (across from the
library) to get an application or more information.
-�'
STEP
OH
FITNESS APPAREL
A LARGE SELECTION
TO CHOOSE FROM!
R4RRP 756-6670
I LTD.
Tune Into Insights
CN
91.3FM
& comment on ECU's new logo.
How it was originated and why.
Wednesday, January 21
from 8:00 -9:00 pm
Special Guest:
Chris Loney,
ECU Marketing
For more info visit our website at,
WWW.nejMcomuserselbo
The ElboJim Sfer private parties
752-4715
for avaifayf Bolus price packages
The Elbo h
down wit
Dance on t
new lights
ted Come sit
Pub Room,
erience the
Pleasure
EACH YEAR
STUDENTS
GAMBLE WITH
THEIR LIVING
ARRANGEMENTS
BY MOVING
OFF CAMPUS.
THURSDAY: $1.00 NITE
Ladies in
Well driril
Michelob Ligh
Jagermeister
lestics and
id $3.50
lus $2.00
Iger shots!
FLASHBACK FRIDAY
mo
The Best 80'sWTfd 90's Dance Music!
House Doubled only $3.5f) $1.75
Bud yght Boltlep
21 and ovfr�eeftilfl :00pm!
SATURDAY: THE HOUSE PARTY
"I moved off campus last year. I thought
it would be great to live in an apartment.
What a mistake! No one told me what a
drag it is to eat my own cooking, clean
the bathroom, and pay rent and utilities
every month
�Linda the Loser
$1.75HouH!H
Domestic Bottles! .
Icehouse and 2j&&f
tilTruup
and
mugs of
er in free
Don't make the same mistake as Linda.
Don't be taken in by stories of
off-campus glamour. It never pays off.
GO WITH A SURE
THING-
CAMPUS LIVING!
Watch this space in the coming weeks
for important information about
return housing and dining sign-up.
Be a winner with campus living,
University Housing and Campus Dining Services
Telephone: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
.1 rV nil rt
B





r
11 Thursday. January 20. 1998
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8
Efflclencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3 bedroom
apt off 1st Street $130month. 13 util-
ities. Available Feb. 1. Call Jimmy 752-
9376.
ROOMMATE SPOT AVAILABLE -
female. Player's Club $220month.
Move in immediately. Cal 353-4120 or
asa�a
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom duplex in Summerhaven.
Professional or grad student preferred.
Cal Kim, 758-2800 or after 6:00 p.m.
321-8872.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP-
House located two blocks off campus
on Eastern Street. Male or female. No
pets. Outside smoker allowed. Rent
plus 13 utilities, phone & cable. Call
752-8682.
REEDY BRANCH- ONLY $395 per
month. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Washer &
dryer hookups. 2 blocks from ECU.
Available immediately. Cal 561-8117.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New
Rec Center! 2 bedroom apt. available
above Percolator Coffeehouse -
$450.00 a month. 1 bedroom apt. avail-
able above BW3's - $500 a month, one
month deposit required! Call Yvonne
at 758-2616.
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS,
female roommate to share large 3 bed-
room house. Washerdryer. 13 uni-
ties, $190 rent Mce! Cal 561-7768,
757-1467. Please leave message.
GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING 2
male housemates. $220mo. Located 2
blocks from campus. Cad Kevin @ 561-
7218 or 919-467-5804, leave a mes-
FOR RENT 4 BEDROOM townhouse
in Player's Club. Open ASAP. Total
deposit only $220. 34 paid already.
Cal 355-8847 or club office 321-7613.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 2 bedroom duplex near campus
with female musician. $200 monthly
12 utitoes. 931-9014
.FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
j ASAP. Move in 11498 Ntoe, spacious
two bedroom apt Only 6 months old.
� 5-7 minutes from campus. $200mcnth
12 utilities, cable, phone. Leave mes-
. sage 353-0854.
"FEMALE NEEDED TO SHARE five
bedroom house. Two blocks from
It campus $250month includes utilities.
I .Washerdryer. Cal 754-2593 Nichoie or
S'Kristie.
'
jjECU AVAILABLE NOW) ONE bed-
room apartments. 4 blocks to ECU.
Furnished or unfurnished. $265$285
month. 758-6596.
I
CYPRESS GARDENS, 1 & 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
I tract. Cal Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
J on new one-year contract Call Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
AWESOME APARTMENT FOR
RENT above BW-3! Great location 2
bdrm, 1 12 bath. Cal John 561-7230
or Yvonne 756-2616
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
S500MONTH. 758-5393
FOR SALE
'74 MG MIDGET FOR sale with
chrome bumper. Has top and tonneau
cover with about 42,000 miles. Mus-
tard tan color with black interior. Excel-
lent condition. $3,200! CaM Peyton,
757-0310
WATERBED, KING SIZE POSTER
bed, cherry wood. Asking $275.00, ra-
tal was $1,200.00. 321-3210, leave
message.
TWO HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR-
CYCLES for sale. Both new. Sportster
custom and Heritage softtail classic
Serious inquiries only please. Contact
Frank at 754-8160 leave message ore-
mail frggviUe9skantech.net
TWIN MATTRESS, LUXURY FIRM
posturepedk; $75. Dorm size carpet
beige, used one semester $30. Both in
excetent condition. Cal 758-7826.
SPECIALIZED ROCK HOPPER FOR
sale. IMock included. AH Shimano
Alivia equipment. Asking $250. Call
353-7162, leave a message. Only been
ridden 5 times.
RETRO VELVET COUCH PREVI-
OUSLY owned by Elvis $65 obo.
Entertainment center with CD player
and stereo $150. Cal Sunshine at 758-
9327.
MOVING - MUST sell - TV,
microwave, chairs, stool, coffee-
maker, vaccum, bike and more. All in
good quality. Negotiable. Call Shin
752-7621 fbrdetak.
KING SIZE WATER BED $200 obo.
Cal 931-0925.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. Student financing for less than
$30.00 a month. Includes carrying
case, printer, software, insurance, and
theft alarm. Call Alfred at 355-3565.
BUY MY FURNITURE! NICE bed-
room set Two dressers: one wrrarror,
nightstand and headboard. Originally
$600, asking $250. Fil size bed $150.
Must sel by 12298. Cal 353-0854.
94 HYUNDAI ELENTRA
$3500(obo) - displayed at Jolty
Rogers on Charles - Samsung color
TV. $120; Emerson VCR, $50; small
refrigerator, $50 Cal 756-8887, 328-
8201.
60 GALLON HEXAGON FISH tar. 3
power jets and underwater filtration
system $200. '97 Rock Shox Judy SL
(long travel) $250. Air conditioning
window unit, excellent condition $100.
Cal Mark or Doug at 830-3952.
HELP WANTED
classifieds
WANTED: PART-TIME WARE-
HOUSE and delivery position avail-
able for morning hours. License
required. Apply in person at Larry's
Carpet One, 3010 East 10th Street,
Greenville, NC.
WANTED PART-TIME MAINTE-
NANCE man. Cal 756-1050.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics is currently hiring
full-time ECU undergrad and graduate
students to tutor student-athletes in at!
subject areas. Minimum 3.0 GPA re-
quired. Cal 328-4550
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND Parks Department will be hold-
ing an organizational meeting for all
those interested in officiating in the
Spring Adult Soccer Leagues.
Position pays $12-$16 a game. Clinics
will be held to train new and experi-
enced officials. However, a basic
knowledge and understanding of the
game is necessary. The meeting will
be held Thursday, January 29 at 6
p.m. at Elm Street Gym. For informa-
tion, cal the Athletic Office at 830-
4550 between 2-7 p.m.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting 12-16
part-time soccer coaches for the
spring youth indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of soccer skills and have the abil-
ity and patience to coach young peo-
ple ages 5-18 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours are from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching -
flexible according to class schedules.
This program will run from mid-March
to April. Salary starts at $5.15hour. For
information, call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550 after 2 p.m.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
VERY FUN work. Flexible part- time
hours (mostly evenings and wee-
kends). Must have outgoing personali-
ty and reliable transportation. Own
35mm SLR camera a plus, but not es-
sential. No experience necessary. We
train. $7.00 per hour. Cal Sara at 1-
800-722-7033.
PART-TIME CASHIER NEEDED at
Szechuan Express in the Food Court,
Plaza Mall. About 20-25 hours a week.
Experience preferred. Apply in person.
No phone calls please.
PART TIME CHILD CARE needed
12:30 to 6:00 pm Mon Wed. andor
Fri. Need own transportation. Infant
and 3 year old, in my home. 707-3193
or 752-2723.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Can today, 747-7686
NON-SMOKING CAREGIVER
NEEDED for 5-year-old with mild lung
disease. Must have own transporta-
tion, references, criminal check. Hours
are Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
from 12 to 5 p.m. Leave message after
Sat 8309082.
LOCAL LAW FIRM SEEKS mailroom
supporterrand runner from 1-6 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Must have reliable
transportation. EOE. interested candi-
dates, send resume to Legal
Administration, 1698 E. Arlington
Blvd. Greenvle, NC 27858.
HELP WANTED: WASH PUB. 752-
5222, apply 10:00 a.m12:00 noon
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday.
ECU STUDENTS: BEGIN THE spring
semester with a part-time position
with Brady's and Brady's Men's Store.
Work with the hottest and newest
styles for the Spring. Part-time hours
available in Young Men's, Juniors, and
Accessories. Flexible morning, after-
noon, or evening hours. AH positions
include weekends. Applications ac-
cepted Wednesday, 2-5 p.m Brady's,
The Plaza
EARN $750-$1500WEEK. RAISE
AH the money your student group
needs by sponsoring a VISA Fundrais-
er on your campus. No investment &
very little time needed. There's no ob-
ligation, so why not call for informa-
tion today. Cal 1 -800-323-8454 x 95.
BUS DRIVERS WANTED: ECU Tran-
sit is now hiring ECU .students for your
student transit system. Contact the
Transit Office at 328-4724 for more
info.
CHILDCARE WANTED - LOOKING
FOR mature, non-smoking student
with previous childcare experience to
supervise two children, ages 8 and 13,
from 2:30-500, Mondays through Fri-
days. Prefer someone who will also be
available during summer months for
full-time employment. Must have own
transportation and strong references.
Cal evenings: 752-6372
BABYSITTER NEEDED TO KEEP
two children all day on Tuesdays or
Wednesdays. Non-smoker preferred.
Cal 355-7875.
ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDENTS. Now inter-
viewing on campus for managers
across Virginia. North and South Caro-
lina for summer 1998. Average earn-
ings last summer $6,000. Cal 800-393-
4521 ext 1 A�A.P.
ARE YOU SITTING OUT this semes-
ter? Temporary positions available in
office and warehousing. Ideal for stud-
ents sitting out this semester or those
taking night classes. Schedules in-
volve up to 40 hours per week. Office
requires 10-key strokes by touch. War-
ehousing requires some lifting. Appli-
cations accepted Wednesday, 2-5p.m
Brady's, The Plaza.
AM & PM banquet servers needed.
Applications accepted 9 to 5 p.m.
Monday thru Friday. Ramada Plaza
Hotel, 203 W. Greenville Blvd. 27834.
No phone calls accepted.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER NEEDED
Tuesdays and Thursdays only. Pick up
my child at 3:15p.m. Must be energe-
tic, flexible, great with kids. Great ref-
erences, excellent driving record. Call
353-5623 before 3:00 pm anyday.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus few a limited number of summer
9 management positions. Gain Hands-on
' v;erience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7.223.
Minimum GPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
Visit us en the Web anytime.
SERVICES
RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER
AVAILABLE. SENIOR OT student
completed courses in child develop-
ment and years of experience babysit-
ting ages one and up. Call Aleea 752-
4039.
new YEAR, new ADDRESS, new LOOK.
www.tec.ecu.edu
fteedtefi?
wunM
t$t it vfe&rtG T�o4C
(99) 93t-0022
TRAVEL
Bahamas
Party
Cancun
The East Carolinian
$39 SPRING BREAK PACKAGE
Boardwalk Beach Resort- Panama
City's Spring Break Headquarters. Only
$39 per person. Restrictions apply. Call
800-2244853 www.spring-
break98.com
vmMmi
GREEK PERSONALS
ZETA TAU ALPHA WELCOMES
everyone back to school and hopes
everyone had a good break.
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to thank
TKE for a good time Thursday night. It
was a great way to bring in the new
semester.
South
BQCh$119
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Y�ari
1-800-678-6386
CAMPUS REPS: SELL 5 AMD OO FREE I
1976) on Apr! 15. Attendance at these
films meets the course requirements
for History 1031, World Civilizations,
sec 005-008.
WOMENS TENNIS PLAYERS
NEEDED. Walk-on positions available
now for the ECU Womens Tennis
Team. If interested, call Coach Brian
Jackson at 328-1980.
VISA I MCI AMEXI DISCOVER
1-800-234-7007
http:vtfWVvndtesssuiTinier tours, com
AWESOME CANCUN & JAMAICA
Spring Break Specials! 7 nights, air &
hotel $459! Save $150 on food, drinks!
Panama City $139, SouthBeach $129!
springbreakt73vei.com 1-800-678-6386
?"SPRING BREAK '98 GET Go-
ing Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, &
Florida. Group discounts & free drink
parties! Sell 5 & go free! Book now
VisaMCDiscAmex. 1-800-234-7007.
httpywww.endlesssummert ours.com
JAMAICA
FLORIDA
PRICE
Cflll flMaWyl ����� IS HflutfMl
1 800648-4849
mrmmera
THf�sty@33�-a�7a)
IM4AaMCk
OTHER
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach. Summit Luxury condos next
to Spinnaker. Owner discount rates.
(404)35&9637.
BEST HOTELS, LOWEST PRICES.
All Springbreak locations. Cancun, Ja-
maica, from $399, Florida, from $89,
Texas, Mazatlan, Bahamas. Register
your group or be our Campus Rep.
800-327-6013. www.icpt.com
AWESOME SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS Party Cruise! 6 days $279! In-
cludes meals, parties & taxes! Great
beaches & nightlife! Leaves from
South Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-80O6786386
AWESOME FLORIDA SPRING
BREAK! Panama City! Room with
kitchen $139! Florida's New Hotspot-
South Beach $129! Bars open until
5:00 am! Cocoa Beach-Hilton $179!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800678-6386
TWO ADORABLE PUPPIES FOUND
playing in ditch on Hwy. 43. Both
males, approximately 3 months okL
Healthy, friendly, lots of energy.
Wormed and 1st shots given. Cannot
keep. If interested cat 638-6617. Must
be serious and wiling to give lost of
love and proper care.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free 1-800-2189000 Ext A-3726
for current listings.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4wd's. Your area.
Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext A-3726 for
current listings.
MOTORCYCLE WANTED. STREET
BIKE 500cc up. Cal 919-637-6550. Cal
before 8:30pm
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free (1)
800-218-9000 Exl H-3726 for current
listings.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free
800-218-9000 Ext H-3726 for current
listings.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000. Credrt card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities
& groups. Any campus organization
can raise up to S1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00vlsa application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext 65. Quaified cat-
ers receive Free T-shirt
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
Scholorships. Business. Medical bills.
Never Repay. Toll Free 1-80O2185000
ext G-3726.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext G-3726.
$1000'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
time. At Home. Toll Free (1) 800218-
9000 ext T-3726 for listings.
SIMM'S POSSIBLE TVPIN6
PBBT Time. Rt home. Toll free 1-
800-218-9000 eHt. T-3726 for
listings.
THE STUDENT UNION IS now
accepting applications for Assistant to
the President and chairpersons of the
following committee for the 1998-99
term: Barefoot Cultural Awareness,
Films, Lecture, Marketing, Popular
Entertainment, Special Events and
Visual Arts. Applications can be picked
up at the Student Union office in MSC
236. The deadline to apply is
Wednesday, Feb. 4. For more informa-
tion, contact the Student Union at 328-
471S
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUD-
ENT Center invites al students to wor-
ship with us. Sunday Masses: 11:30
am and 3:30 p.m. at the. Newman
Center, 953 E 10th Street two houses
from the Fletcher Music Bldg. For fur-
ther information, call Fr. Paul Vaeth,
757-1991.
THE ECU POETRY FORUM win meet
on Wednesday, January 21 in MSC
room 248 at 8 p.m. The forum is open
to the general public. Those wanting
critical feedback on their work should
bring 8-10 copies of each poem.
Listeners welcome.
STRESS MANAGEMENT
WORKSHOP: THURSDAY from 330
- S p.m. on Jan. 22. If you are interest-
ed, contact the Center for Counseling
and Student Development at 328-6661.
RESUME CRITIQUES - Students who
have already prepared a resume and
would Hce to have it critiqued by a Ca-
reer Services counselor may come to
the Career Services Center on Wed.
Jan. 21 at 3:00 pm or Wed. Jan. 28 at
20OL
RCLS STUDENT SOCIETY WILL
have its first meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 22 at 4:30 in the Old Pirate Club.
Please join us for food and fun.
ORIENTATIONREGISTRATION
SESSIONS - Graduating students are
invited to attend an Orientation to Ca-
reer Services and to register for assis-
tance in the job search on Thur. Jan. 22
at 1030 am. or Mon. Jan. 26 at 300
p.m. Campus interview procedures
and establishing a credentials file wilt
be included in the presentation to be
held at Career Services, Room 103,701
E. Rfth St
ORDER OF OMEGA'S NEXT meet-
ing is today (Jan. 20) at 6 pm in MSC
Multi-purpose Room.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOPS -
Career Services will hold workshops
on professional interviewing tech-
niques on Wed. Jan. 21 and Tue. Jan.
27 at 2:00 pm at Career Services,
Room 103. No registration is required.
HOME TECHNOLOGY
HEALTHCARE HOSPICE Division
will be holding a training session for
new volunteers starting Saturday, Feb.
28 at Spilman Memorial Baptist
Church in Kinston, NC. Volunteers are
needed to help terminally ill patients
and their families with friendly visits,
relief for family members, support,
and light household tasks. For more
information or to register to attend,
cal Mkhele Evans at 758-4622.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION (ECHO) meeting -
Thursday, Jan. 22 at 5:30 pm in the
lobby of Fleming Hall.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A
Career Workshop: Tuesday 3:30 - 5
pm on January 20. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop contact the Center
for Counseling and Student
Development
AN AMERICAN CAFE, AN original
play based on the personal stories and
experiences of Pitt County residences,
wii! be performed in the MSC Hendrix
Theater on Wednesday, Jan. 28 at 7:30
pm It is free to the public and is spon-
sored by the MLK Committee and the
Student Union Cultural Awareness
Committee.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION
WORKSHOP: WEDNESDAY from
3:30 - 4:30 pm on January 21. If inter-
ested, contact the Center for
Counseling and Student Development
at 328-6661.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WORLD WAR II AND the Children of
Europe is the theme os the spring
European Film Series shown on select-
ed Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in Speight
Auditorium in the Jenkins Fine Arts
Building. The series includes: Au
Revoir les Enfants (France, 1987) on
Jan. 21; Europa, Europa
(PolandGermany, 1990) on Feb. 4; The
Bicycle Thief (Italy, 1948) on Feb. 18;
The Tin Drum (Germany, 1979) on
March 25; and Seven Beauties (Italy,
111
IK
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; .
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Intramural Sports
Date Event Time
Basketball Registration MTG 5pm
Captain's Certification Clinic 5pm
Bowling Registration MTG 5pm
120
120
127
128
23
Racquetball Single Entry Deadline 5pm
Where
MSC244
MSC244
MSC244
SRC 128
Basketball Shooting Challenge 4-6pm SRC Forum
Adapted Recreation
Date Event
121 Adapted Recreation Meeting
124 Wheelchair Basketball League
124 Racquetball Workshop
1 25 1 st Meeting of Wheel Power
1 29 Climbing Wall Workshop
1 31 Seated Aerobics Clinic
Time Where
7-9pm SRC
11-12pm SRC
l:30-3:30pm SRC
5-7pm SRC
7-9pm SRC
11-12pm SRC
l&F :VJP
Fitness
Date
120
126-36
126-26
127-35
127-32
127
Event
Basic Training Slide
5Million Club-Rowing
Pace Circuit Program
Try Tai Chi
Yoga (Session I)
Noon Track Attack
lime Reg. by
3-4pm Drop-in
your own 131
6:30am or 12:10pm 123
12:10-12:50pm 126
5:15-6:30pm 123
12:10-1:10pm 26
Adventure Programs
Date
130
129-131
126
26-7
Event
Stone Mountain SP-CHmbing
Facilitator Training Class -Ropes course
Roll Clinics-River Kayaking
Canyon Valley-Skiing & Snow boarding
Reg. by
Jan.23
Jan.23
Jan.23
Jan.23
Adventure Workshops
Workshop
Advanced Climbing Session I
Backpacking Basic
Florida Manatee Hunt
Date
128-125
129
213-215
Reg. by 22
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BASKETBALL
bounces
Jason Thudince
STAFf WHITE
Returning players cany men's
basketball team to the top
The mens basketball team has experience on its side with four
senior starters. Othello Meadows, an Omaha, Neb. native, and
Tony Parham. from Washington, D. C, lead the way as the most
experienced backcourt in the CM. Parham has started in every
game but one in his first three years at ECU. Meadows and
Farham have combined to start a total of 138 games for the
Pirates. Meadows is also one of the most accurate three-point
shooters in the conference. He has ranked either first �r second
from behind the arch for the past two seasons. Raphael Edwards
and Dink Peters provide senior leadership in the front court.
Peters, also from Washington, D. C, averaged 8.7 pointe a game
last year mostly form the bench. Edwards, hailing from Brooklyn,
N I was named second team all conference last year, � a year
in which he lead the Prates with 13.2 points and 6.6 rebounds
Kr game. The final starter is a local from Ayden, Alico Dunk.
mM junior, dished out 56 assists as a sophomore who ranked
second on the team. In addition to the starters, Steven Branch, a
freshman from Newark, N. J has some playing time this jrear. 1
am excited about the contributions he (Branch) has made, Loach
Joe Dooley said. Dooley is also looking forward to getting fresh-
man Alphons van Ierland. a Netherlands native, back from a hand
injury in a couple of weeks.
Starters make for well-rounded
Lady Pirate program
The womens team is also led by some seasoned veterans, co-
captains Stay Hayes from Waldorf, Md. and Jen Cox from
Bedford, Va. The pair is averaging almost points and l.U
rebounds per game. Sophomores Misty Home and Danielle
Melvin, from Statesville and Roseboro respectively, have started
in all of the Lady Pirates' games this year Home is a threat to
score from the outside, having made the team-leading 25 three-
� pointers so far this year Melvin has averaged over 20 minutes a
game while scoring five points and pulling down five rebounds per
game. The sophomore class led by Misty and Danielle have
� played really ell Coach Ann Donovan -slid. Another suolw-
more leader is Melanie Gillem, who has seen time in 12 of the 14
contests this year. Gillem averages over five points a game and
has gone 1031 on three point attempts. Tncia Peckham and
Jennifer Moretz, both freshmen, have seen significant pbying
time in their rookie season. Together they have started in 14
games contribute steady play at the guard position. Beth Jaynes,
ajunior from Pfafftown, N. C, has played in 13 of the 14 contests
and contributes solid play in the post.
The East Carolinian
into
ACTION
or a complete scheauie o:
Men's and Women's basketball
check out page 10.
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Raphael Edwards
(6-7)
Yean Senior
Position: Forward
Hometown:
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Major:
Communication
Thff Starting lineups
TonyParham Othello Meadows Dink Peters
Yean Senior
Position: Guard
Hometown:
Washington, D.C.
Major: Exercise
and Sport Science
Yean Senior
Position: Guard
Hometown:
Omaha, Neb.
Majon
Psychology
Yean Senior
Position:
Forward-Center
Hometown:
Washington,
D.C.
Majon Criminal
Justice
AficoDunk
Yean Junior
Position: Guard
Hometown: Ayden
Majon Exercise
and Sport Science
Danielle MelvinShay HayesJennifer MoretzJen CoxMisty Home
Yean SophomoreYean SeniorYean FreshmanYean SeniorYean Sophomore
Position: ForwardPosition: ForwardPosition: GuardPosition: CenterPosition: Guard
Hometown:Hometown:Hometown: VBas,Hometown:Hometown:
RoseboroWaldorf, Md.NiC,Bedford, Va.Statesvilk
Majon EnglishMajon ExerciseMajonMajonMajon Exercise
and Sport ScienceBusinessDecision science � h i � ' � V V 'hi � ���Psychologyand Sport Science The East Carolinian
all
fm, �







The wait is almost overt
Stadium
nears
completion
S c o i t Rose
STAFF WRITES
Tlie long wait is almost over for Pirates fans as the
expansion of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium nears comple-
tion.
The expansion will hold an additional 8,000
fans. The actual seats that will hold the fans have to
be put in and that should take about two weeks,
according to Henry Van Sant, assistant athletic
director. The concourse is near completion, with
final touches being put on the concession stands,
souvenir shops, and the restrooms.
There is still caulking to be done to the stadium.
Kight now the construction crew are in the remedial
and cosmetic stage, putting the finishing touches on.
Construction on the stadium should be complet-
ed by early spring �just in time for the spring
pig-out. There's nothing like breaking in the
new stadium with a big party and a little pig.
"The main problem with' the delay is basi-
cally too much work loo little timesaid Van
Sant.
Some of the problems with construction have
a lot to do with the timing of different things,
like materials arriving late, which therefore
pushes back the starting time of the phase in
which the materials were needed.
'This is not unusual in construction of this
size Van Sant said. UA lot of problems come
from the subcontracting, materials being late
and phases not being finished on time
As every student here at ECU knows, con-
Fans will finally be able to pack of the stands in the fall as the football team will play for 8.000 more with the completion of the addition to the
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
stadium.
struct ion can be a bothersome and,
at limes, an inconvenience.
The stadium will be absolutely
fabulous: eople will be astounded
and will enjoy it very much" said Van
Sant.
So, Pirate fans, be assured that
the stadium will be finished bv the
upcoming football season. This sta-
dium will definitely bring our uni-
versity up into the ranks of the top
schools in the countrv. and we all
know that we have the fans to keep
us there, where we belong.
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Come to the only Health Dept. Inspected Studio in the
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4 The East Carolinia






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Millie's27
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Claire's Boutique 40
General Nutrition 41
Lynn's Hallmark .42
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TOYS
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There's more for your lifestyle at
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�HMW
Swimmer shares thoughts with TEC
(Editor's note: Each ytar,
the ECU mens and womens
swimming teams spend their
Christmas break in sunny West
Palm Beach, Florida for an
intense week of training and
bonding. As a freshman,
Tracer Ormand went on the
trip for the first time and as a
guest writer, has shared her
diary of the week with TEC.)
December 30,1991
We met behind Scott Hall at
7 ajn. ITie trip to West ralm
Beach was a rang one, so we
played card games. It took
about 12 hours to get there
and we went to eat once we
arrived.
December 31,1997
The first practice was at 9
ajn. We woke up around 8:15
and ate breakfast. First we did
dry land workouts and then
swam for about two hours.
After lunch, we headed to the
beach. It was pretty cold, but it
was nice. We had an afternoon
practice that was very hard.
They had oranges waiting for
us! We ate dinner and then
hung out at the beach for the
big New Year's countdown.
an extremely cold ajn. prac-
tice that was a lot like the one
yesterday. It was cold and
cloudy, so most of us slept all
day until evening workout,
which was also very cold.
Luckily, we finished early.
January 1,1998
We started the day out with
January 2,1998
It was much nicer this
morning, but stilt a little
windy. Practice was canceled
in the evening. We balanced
six kickboards on a girl's head
for ten seconds. In the after-
noon, we spent some time at
the beach, watching the guys
play football and then we went
to the mall.
January 3,1998
Practice was pretty hard,
but I felt pretty good today. It
was much warmer. After room-
ing workout, we went to the
beach for the day. After a hard
evening practice, we had a
Chinese dinner that was very
good.
girls' team practiced an hour
earlier because we went to an
Italian restaurant.
January 4.1998
Today was the best day yet.
After practice, we left West
Palm Beach and moved to
Singer Island and a much
nicer hotel It was extremely
warm and sunny ail day. The
January 5,1998
Today we took pictures after
morning practice and then we
went to the beach, even though
it � was cloudy.
January 6,1998
It was a pretty routine day.
Morning workout was really
hard and then we took team
pictures. It was cloudy again
so we all caught up on sleep.
January 7,1998
We swam together today
and had relays in the baby
pool. It was a rat of fun. We
had a team dinner at Chili's
tonight.
January 8,1998
Finally a day off! We didn't
practice today, so we had a
good time on the beach all day.
January 9,1998
We left Florida and began
our long trip back to
Greenville at about 6 a.m. It
was a very long ride home.
Overall, the trip was a very fun
and exciting experience.
Freshman. Tracey Ormand, went to Florida for an intense week of training and has shared
her diary with TEC
PHOTO IT JONATHAN 6REEN
"We
eastcarolinian And student Media
your window to
the world
around you!
BWDapper Dan'sAil Item's Data! "96 oiOlder 12 Price 417 .SV1 s -S. (ikl'l II11 (919) 752-17So I ut! 1 I
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Rewards: Immeasurable personal satisfaction
For more information: Call Volunteer Services at 816-4491.
Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:00
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University Health Systems includes Pill Country Memorial Hospital. East Carolina University
School of Medicine . private practice physicians and other health affiliates.
The East Carolinian
mm
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9 '





po.
mm
Cheerleaders play both
on and off the court
Squad partfcpates In
community events
Paul Kafian
senior wiitei
The ECU Cheerleaders' W-W Basketball
cheering season has been going strong since
November now in mid-January they are in hill
swing. To the surprise of many Pirate basket-
ball tans though, the responsibility of those
high flying ladies and their muscle bound
counterparts doesn't stop once the game clock
reaches 00.
"People don't realize what a talented group
of kids they are and how much time and dedi-
cation it takes Cheerieading Coach Paula
Corbett said.
Not only do they have practices three days a
week comprised ot running, practicing routines
and a strenuous weight work out, tLU
Cheerleaders also take part in a number of
ECU public relations activities and volunteer
work. The Cheerleaders can be found before
moat borne games around campus l��ndiiig,out
flyers promoting that evenings basketball
game. They help out around the community
volunteering at things like the recent
Christmas parade, many Pirate Club activities,
and last semester they were volunteering at St.
Peters Church cm Halloween.
�Ju�t last month we were at Ayden
Elementary School talking!� thei kids about the
importance of staying in school Cheerieading
Captain Tasha Smith said.
Along with cheering the games, working out
and all of the other volunteering time, 16 of the
30 cheerleaders are wing, to participate this
year in the National Cneerieading Association
Tournament in Daytona, Florida.
"We're gearing up for the National
Tournament expect we will do well and have
a good chance endingup in the top five; we just
need to stay focused?' Smith said.
Along with Captains Tasha Smith and
Jonathan Crim, the Pirate cheering squad is
also comprised of three All-Americans, Will
Cooper, Ian Propst and Ragan Tayloe.
For all of you out there womed about the
future of your purple and gold Pirate friend
PeeDee, worry no more. V.
"PeeDee's not going anywhere; the little
kids all love him too much, Corbett said.
"People don't
realize what a
talented group of
kids they are and
how much time
and dedication it
takes"
Paula Corbett
Cheerieading Coach
������
104 W 5th Street
Uptown Greenville
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The East Carolinian
"��





Pep Band takes pride in helping teams to victory
Band to be named
"The Sixth Man"
Travis Baskle
sports writer
If you're ever been to an KCL home basketball
game, vou have probably seen the ECU Pep Band
in action� ihev're the ones in the purple and
white-striped sh'irts, keeping the crowd pumped
up during timeouts. But few people realize the
hard work and dedication that it takes to be in the
band.
The band plays before the game, as well as
during halftime and timeouts. The band also has
to split time with the cheerleaders and dance
team. There is also a director inside Minges
Coliseum who lets them know when a special
evenl or contest is going on.
According to band member Carmen Stauffer,
the band's main duty is. 'lo keep the fans excit-
ed as well as lo keep up the spirits of the play-
ers on the court.
The band is directed bv graduate student Tim
Odom. "(Being in the pep "band) really takes a lot
of dedication and a lot of time
Odom said the band is totally self-sufficient,
and they practice whenever they can. Finding the
time to practice can sometimes be difficult, con-
sidering the busy schedules of most of the stu-
dents.
We enjoy this and have a lot of fun, Stauffer
added.
Many of the 41 band members are also in the
ECU marching band, although it is not a require-
ment.
Odom said the band lakes a lot of pride in the
job they do. In the near future, the band willjtt
announced inside Minges as. "The Sixth Man
Odom added thai the band came up wilh the
name themselves, to show the pride they have in
helping ECU lo victorv.
While the band plavs at both the men and
women's home games, they do not travel with the
team. However, they will be going to the CAA
Tournament at the end of the year and to the
NCAA Tournament if either team advances that
far.
Despite all of the lime and effort that the band
members put forth, they insist that they have fun
Brad Brady said everyone "likes getting to play
and getting to see all of the games.
Many of the 41
band members are
also in the ECU
marching band,
although it is not
a requirement.
Come out and support the Pirates!
Check out the next page and page 10 for a complete listing of schedules for basketbaU, baseball, softball and tennis.
Don't miss out on all the fan!
OMAR'S
Serving Lunch
and Dinner
Downtown and
Plaza Mall
llie
I the � � �
eastcarolmian
And Student Media
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to the world
around you!
Student Stores
Monday - Friday. 7:30 am - 7:00 pmSaturday: �00 am - 3:00 pm
Wright Building www4itudentstores.ecu.edu328-6731
8 The East Carolinian





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Title
The East Carolinian, January 20, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 20, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1242
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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