The East Carolinian, November 25, 1997






TUESDAY
NOVEMBER 25, 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
VGUJME 73, ISSUE 27
Two arrested for hacking into computer system
SBI involved in
investigation of
student, friend
J(HI-I. INK D. K HI. I.I l
s v I s I NEWS I- 1)1 I OR
Agents from the State Bureau of
Investigation (SBI) recently
assisted ECU Police in a case that
ended in the arrest of rwo suspects,
for tampering with ECU's
computer system.
There has been an incident
that involved computer hacking.
The incident involved interference
with a system used for academic
purposes said University Attorney
Ben G. Irons III.
The system in question is the
one on which faculty post on-line
syllabi and other announcements to
their students. Students can also
communicate back to their
professors and sometimes submit
assignments over the system.
According to information on a
warrant obtained from the Pitt
County Courthouse criminal
department, the suspects are non-
student Jason Cooper Hines, 23,
and student Nolan Waithe Grant,
also 23.
Hines is charged with two
misdemeanor counts of accessing
computers without proper
authorization.
Grant is charged with one
misdemeanor count of accessing
computers without proper
authorization and one
misdemeanor count of denying
access of computer services to an
authorized user.
The problem was discovered in
Spring 1997 by Ernest Marshburn,
associate director of academic
computing of Computer
Information Services (CIS). He
alerted the office of the University
Attorney and ECU Police.
"We got the information from
the CIS people, took a look at it
and realized it was going to cross
jurisdiction lines said .Assistant
Director of ECU Police Thomas C.
Younce.
Younce turned the case over to
the SBI, which assigned three
agents from their Financial Crimes
Division (FCD), to investigate the
case.
"They (FCD) have the agents
who do investigations into
computer crimes Younce said.
The SBI received the request
for help from ECU on July 8.
"That investigation culminated
in the arrest of two suspects said
Curtis L. Ellis, special agent in
charge of FCD.
According to Ellis, his team was
able to trace the computer
problems back to the suspects by
following an electronic trail.
"There's an audit trailwhen
there's an entry made in any
computer system, there's a record
of that Ellis said.
The two suspects have their trial
date set for Dec. 18. In the
aftermath of their actions, CIS has
initiated additional security
measures to further protect the
liter
has
done,
were
r i t v
Ben G Irons
University Attorney
c o m p
svstem.
"That
been
There
s e c u
measures in
place before,
and additional
measures have
been taken
Marshburn
said.
However, CIS
also wants to
keep the system
the university
whose use it is
make sure to
accessible to
community for
intended.
"In an University environment,
you want people to be able to get in
and use it, but if vou make it too
easy, unauthorized users can get
in said Blake Price, Director of
CIS.
According to Younce, computer
crimes of this kind are not
common, but have happened
before.
"This is the second one this
year. I made an arrest earlier this
year, involving a non-student who
entered the system from a
computer in Research Triangle
Park. But this, to me, is the more
serious of the crimes Younce said.
None of the systems containing
sensitive information, like
students' personal information or
grades, were affected in any way by
the tampering.
"None of our administrative
systems were compromised Irons
said.
Athletic department
awaits new training,
banquet facility
Fundraising begins for
city's largest complex
Hoi.i.v Harris
NEWS WRITER
The initiation of fund
raising and planning
for a athletic training
and banquet facility
has just begun, and the complex is
hoped to be a large step forward in
the quality of athletic training.
The building, which will be located
somewhere on the Minges Coliseum
property, is slated to be a 10 million dollar
project. It will include not only a 22,0X)
square foot weight and workout area, (the one
in the recreation center is 8.000 square feet),
but also a large indoor track, a 500-person
banquet facility, and a private dining area for
recruits and their families on game days.
However, it has not yet been decided if
non-athletes will be allowed to take
advantage of this forthcoming project.
"My inclination is that it probably (will be
an athletic building said Bruce Five,
director of facilities construction. "The
funding will be handled that way. The
students paid for the recreation center, (so
they are allowed to use it). I have an idea that
if athletics goes out and raises the money it
will be just for athletes
The main idea of the complex is to give-
athletes a place to train that will match or
exceed the finest facilities in the nation. A
probable model for the future ECU weight
room is the weight room at West Virginia,
which has an excess of 20,000 square feet of
space.
Comparably, (Venison has 15,000 square
feet and Chapel hill has 8,000 square feet.
Right now the Pirate weight room comes in at
the bottom of the list, with a 5,000 ft. span of
usable space.
Currently, the university planners only
have lists of floor dimensions and expected
costs. It has not vet been determined where
the money is going to come from, or if the
complex will be a Minges annex or a free-
SEE ATHLETIC. PAGE 2
FLOOR BY fLOOR PRICE
TAG INCLUDES:
First floor will include:
Entrance lobby
Strength and Conditioning
Coach's office
Grad assistants office
coaches conference room
Staff showerlockers
Mens restroom
Women's restroom
taping room
Equipment room
First aid room
Storage room
Elevator
mechanical room
plaza
Total price of first floor- $3,294,325
Second floor will include:
entry hall
elevator
Men's restroom
Women's restroom
Coat room
Reception
Pre-functionPrivate diningRecruit dining
Banquet Hall
Catering Kitchen
Men employee restroom
Women employee restroom
Hall of Fame
Balcony
Total price of second floor- $7,031,270
Total project cost- $10,464,462
SGA appropriations to Transit sorely needed
Many students, like these in front of Christenbury Gym. use the transit system daily and will be affected by an increase in routes and buses Increases were
made available by SGA's recent appropriation of an additional $10 for the Transit System.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
Usage of buses increased
19,000 to 30,000
C R I (. D . R a .vm
STAFF � K 1 I I K
Source: ECU News Bureau
Show me the Money!
How campus building costs stack up
Wright udent Jarvis
, a Health
Place Center HaM
New
Atheletic
Facility
Science8
Tech
expamon Rec Center Expansion Buying
StarJum Student Joyner
ECLJ Transit was appropriated an extra
$10 to their budget so they could maintain
their routes and buy new buses.
According to last year's budget, ECU
Transit was going into a deficit just at
regular operating costs, making it difficult
to update their system with new buses.
"$5 dollars of the increase was to catch
the budget back up with inflation says
Joey Weathington, ECl 's Transit Advisor.
Transit usually has a cushion of 25
percent in their budget to be able to bus-
new buses. Last year those funds were
being used just to keep them up to pace.
"We had to correct the problem so we
could have our 25 percent cushion back
says Weathington.
"We haven't asked for money since
1993 says Lisa Smith, Chair of the
Transit Board.
Over the last few vears, student Transit
use has increased from 19.000 to 30,000.
This jump prompted Transit's need for
additional funds.
"T continue the shuttle service at all
we needed more money says Smith. "It is
a privilege for us (students) to run Transit.
Only one in four in the nation is student
run. We also hoped to retire some buses
but we couldn't because it keeps growing.
With new parking lots at Minges we
SEE TRANSIT. PAGE 2
Athletic officials: N.C. State game tickets distributed fairly
Allocation based on
student turnout
fi X X VI (: k K R S
Officials say recent concerns about the
distribution of ECl" football game tickets
is merely a comment on ECl' students'
participation in away games.
ECU was allocated 5,000 tickets from
N.C. State to be made available for
purchase. A total of 3,500 tickets were
given to the Pirate Club. 1000 to students,
and 500 complimentary tickets to the
parents and friends of the football players.
"It's a philosophical question about
why more tickets were given to the Pirate-
Club, if students didn't pick those tickets
up then there is no real controversy said
Henrv VanSant, associate athletic director
of ECU.
"The students don't realize the
decision made by the Athletic Advisee
One thousand tickets were available for
students and they weren't picked up.
Tickets are to be picked up Tuesday.
Wednesday and Thursday. We even
extend this for the student to Friday and
even on Saturday. We want the students
at the game. We look at the student pick
up rate, which has been poor VanSant
said.
"The tickets were put on sale on Oct.
14 for the Pirate Club, and on Oct. 15 for
the students. The students normally only
get 10 percent of the tickets available. We
have to distribute the rest to the team, to
the legislators and to the Pirate Club said
Brenda Edwards, the ticket manager for
ECU Athletics Department.
"We extended the opportunity to buy
because they weren't picked up on the
designated days. It was advertised in
bulletins: we sent notices to The Kast
Carolinian and to The Daily Reflector
S TICKETS. JAEF 2
Source wwwecu edulacilityservfs 1 prog2.htm
TODAY
sunny
High 53
Low 26
TOMORROW
sunny
High 63
Low 32
r?
Did you know that the
first 'thanksgiving" feast
included fish, berries,
watercress, lobster, dried
fruit, clams, vension, and
plums?
opinion5
Learn the gift of giving
this holiday season
lifestyle6
Got the holiday credit
card blues?
sports9
Wolfpack take the
Pirates with 37-24
�j victory
the east Carolinian
STuDlA N SLOG.
NC 27858
SS from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.siuriemmedia.ecu.edu
�i' � m






rTi �'
2 Tu��d�v, Novgmtw 25, 1997
lews
The East Carolinian
Student Health gets check-up
NC Unemployment rate fell
in October
Renovations
planned for first of
new year

RALEIGH (AP) North Carolina's
seasonally adjusted unemployment
rate dropped slightly in October
compared to the month earlier, the
state, Employment Security
Commission said.
North Carolina's October rate
was 3.4 percent, compared to 3.7
percent in September, ESC
chairman Parker Chesson said
Friday. The unemployment rate in
October 19 was 4.2 percent.
Surf City radio station sate
finalized
SURF Cm; N.C. (AP) Thc sale
of a Surf City radio station was
finalized Thursday, but the new
owner is still waiting for Federal
; Communications Commission
� approval of his license.
Jacksonville-Topsail Radio LLC,
i a new Holly Ridge company,
I announced its plans to buy WZXb-
FM earlier this week and closed a
� deal on the station for $650,000.
Broome said he bought the
station after recognizing the
profitability of radio in a growing
Qnslow County.
JOM SlRETTE
STAFF WRITER
ECU's Student Health Center has
made plans for renovation to begin
by the first of the new year.
"We are trying to turn that
building into a physically nice
facility, said Kay Wilkerson, the
director of the ECU Health
Center.
The Student Health building
was built in 1930 and was
originally used as an infirmary.
The nurses lived there and the
students stayed over night for
anything from an upset stomach to
the flu. However, as the university
continuously grows in population,
the building becomes less
efficient.
"ECU used to be much smaller,
but with the ever-growing
attendance rate here we feel the
need to expand as well said
Wilkerson.
Some pertinent points that will
be considered in the building's
renovation will be: providing more
confidentiality for students,
accommodating the staff with
more working space to increase
efficiency, providing classrooms
within the building for health
education purposes, as well as
expanding the parking lot by
providing a circle drive in front of
the center for easy patient drop
off.
The entrance for the newly-
renovated building will also be
moved. The new entrance will be
facing Flanagan, the classroom
building currently to the right of
the Health Center. The proposed
time allotment for all the
renovations to be finished is two
years.
Student Health requested
funds from the SGA to help
support their new plans for
renovation. The Health Services
is not the only department to
receive monetary support from
SGA's recent allocations but will
demonstrate the largest effects.
"I am just thankful to have the
opportunity to make our students
and staff more at home
Wilkerson said.
Brown & Brown
VITOHMS AT I AW
TYufaEquaiityJustjce
123 W.3rfSt.
Greenville
i -Speeding Tickets
Driving While Impaired
Drug Charges
-All Criminal Matters
II -Free Consultation
752-0952
Athletic
continued from page i
standing building.
The over three million dollars it
will take to complete the first floor
provides for a number of rooms,
including a taping room, a strength
and conditioning room, an
equipment room, and a first aid
room. An entrance plaza with an
awards display of past Pirate
football accomplishments will lead
the way into the heart of the
complex.
The second floor will include
the banquet hall, and according to
Five, this is one aspect of the new
building that non-athletic
students will most likely get to
enjoy. .
"That's a University facihty-
the biggest facility we have
presently is Mcndcnhall, which
we are quickly outgrowing. This is
looked at as a campus-wide
facility Flye said.
Not only will it be an asset to
the university, which at the
present time has difficulty hosting
large events, but it will be the
biggest facility in Greenville, and
therefore the possibility exists
that it could be rented for
community use.
For now, this complex is in the
earliest stages of planning.
However, the university and the
athletics department has high
hopes for its future.
"We really want to build a
quality facility Fhc said.
Tickets
continued from peje
Grand Island and Hall
: County to decide whether
to seek prison
�1 GRAND ISLAND, Neb. (AP)
Hall County supervisors and the
" Grand Island City Council willwte
I Monday on whether either wants to
J submit an application for a 960-bed
� state prison.
" County officials will discuss the
5 topic at a 9:15 a.m. CST meeting
J and the city council will meet at 7
p.m. CST.
Approximately 24 communities
have requested information about
trie prison, which was approved by
� the Legislature this year, said Doug
t Hanson, engineering manager for
I the Nebraska Department of
Corrections.
School officials evaluating
whether box punishment
was proper
MILFORD, Mich. (AP) Huron
ley School District officials arc
investigating a teacher's decision to
put a second-grader in a makeshift
cardboard cubicle to keep his
attention focused.
Assistant Superintendent Nancy
; Coratti said Friday that it will take
' at least seven days to complete the
assessment of the teacher and
! determine whether there should be
any consequences for requiring
'� BradleyWatkinstodohisdcskwork
" in the cubicle.
The teacher had taped a 3-foot-
high cardboard cubicle around
Bradley desk in the back of his
second-grade classroom in Milford,
30 miles northwest of Detroit.
Transit
continued from page 1
fcnSant said.
Even after the extension, all
1,000 of the tickets were not
picked up by the students. The
3,500 allocated for the Pirate
Club wasn't enough Edwards
said. ECU has 6,000 Pirate Club
members. The Pirate Club
members weren't able to pick up
the amount of tickets they
needed, while the 1,000 tickets
available to students were not
picked up.
108 River Bluff Rd.
Across from Trade MartABC
Store on E. 10th ST.
757 - 2471
expect the services will need to
increase even more
This ongoing need for buses is
complicated even more by the
amount of time it takes a bus to
arrive after it has been ordered.
Currently ECU has 18 buses at an
average age of nine years. Some �f
che buses are as old as 1980.
"The five buses delivered in 96
should replace a couple but
increased rider ship has made that
difficult,1 says Wcathington. "The
old buses have been good buses
but maintenance can become
more expensive than buying a new
one. It would be more of a cost
advantage to retire the old ones
and apt some new ones
Transit has a budget of
$600,000 and the average bus
costs $140,000 to $170,000.
Smith has other plans in mind
for helping Transit with their
budget problems.
"We are going to try advertising
on some of the buses says Smith.
"fc are alsoping to trim some of
the routes to make them run more
efficiently. Routes with few
passengers will be trimmed. On
some routes we don't have any
passengers after 6:00. Those will
be the first to get trimmed
�w whM yea lite to M M)
Discount Rates
IjfOL.
. HwgraMtf ffeopof what fed u
it tolas lit AiMrfetf
5x10-
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SPORTSCARD SHACK
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SUPPLYING YOUR SPORTS CARDS NEEDS
PHONE: 1-19-931-9449
FAX: 1-888-531-9331
206 W. 14TH St
GR1ENVHXE, NC 27834
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Services and Peer Counseling
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757-0003
Italian mob boss slain on
way to hospital
PALERMO, Sicily (AP) Gunmen
shot and killed an ailing mob boss as
he drove to a Palermo hospital for
treatment Sunday.
Two attackers pulled up
alongside of the car carrying
Antonino Geraci, shooting him five
times in the head at close range,
RAI state television and the ANSA
news agency said.
A female passenger was
unharmed. The attackers it was
not clear whether they were in a car
or on a motorcycle escaped.
Ten killed in tribal clashes
in Southwestern Kenya
KISUMU, Kenya (AP) Maasai
attackers have killed 10 people with
machetes and knives in a tribal
clash over land in southwestern
Kenya, a witness said.
After the attack, the Maasai
searched houses and beat anyone
who wasn't from their tribe in the
farming town of Kilgoris, 400 miles
west of Nairobi, a local reporter who
wunessed the attack said Friday.
Present coupon when ordering
Two Dozen
Original Glazed
Doughnuts
For '
Thanksgiving Pay
Open 24 Hours
Not valid with any other offer.
Expires 12397
DOUGHNUTS
presents
Student
Appreciatio
Day
Tuesday December 2nd
�:20-12:00 & 1:00-4:00
Student Health Center
Jree giveaways
Hot Chocolate
Jree pharmacy
Supplies
come by and join the fun!
30C E. 1.0th Street Greenville 830-1525

"W
T-
!��





s
pi
I;
i
Do it for ECU
Or for a portable CD player, whichever floats your boat.
The administration has said they're Send us your idea for a new ECU logo
looking for a new university sym- before our Nov. 28 deadline,
bol, something other than VeeVee Pirate. We Qur hyorte dglye that per-
We at The Bast Carolinian would like to son a portable CD player. Then well run
help them in their deliberations. all of serious logos we receive in the Dec.
4 bsue of the paper and on our website at
www.studentmedU.ecu.edu.
Here s your big chance to help the ECU
administration and show your school
spirit (or how badly you really want a
portable CD player).
Bringyour entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
Put on your
thinking cap
send us
logo idea.



1

�!�





mam
4 Tuesday, November 25. 1997
VvlllAvyO
The East Carolinian
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
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For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
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� December 8,1997 (Monday)-4:00 p.m.
� January 20,1998 (Tuesday)-4:00p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 23,1998 at 5:00 p.m.
ACROSS
1 Basketball star,
5 Mild expletive
9 Small spar
14 Where Lima is
15 Inconsequential
16 Expunge
17 Seaweed
18 Type of ticket?
19 Brads
20 Flashy
22 Advantageous
aspects
24 Former Soviet
news agency
26 Roe or red
27 Impede
30 Fabricated
32 Lupino and
Tarbell
36 Elbow grease
38 Disinclined
40 OSS follower
41 Rabbit ears
43 Lawyer: abbr.
44 Pale tan color
46 Modernize
48"� we forget"
49 Mote
51 Preliminaries,
briefly
52 By comparison
with
54 � bien
56 Savings �
59 Escorts
63 Southern trees
64 Curtain or horse
start
67 Leave off the list
68 � preview
69 Beverage
70 No longer green
71 Collars
72 Terminates
73 Formerly,
formerly
01997 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
Ait rights reserved
Answers from Thursday
sk e dp l a t er o l e
kiwi Mr a v e nBe D I T
I D E sH I N E R tJHs 0 R A
PERFUME N A T U Rr A 1
F L TV Ojjji. 0GE TH
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A V E RlT LA T iEIIs A 1 L
p E NWL AS "�" E n L E'
SEOIIMENT S blR" T TIT1 ���m U gJbbHC E D eJbbPbb
S T 0 P G A P � A V EN G E D
L O V EI NOOSEliARIA
a u b ulc o v e rId 1 R T
MAR EJE RASeePEE
DOWN
1 Health resorts
2 Beatles' hit
3 Jason's ship
4 Type of horse
5 Awards for
Seinfeld
6 Turn right
7 Parseghian
8 Deceive
9 Correct
judgment
10 Grassland
11 Foray
12 Man, for one
13 Hardy heroine
21 Highlanders'
cloth
23 Ostentatious
scholar
25 Opening
27 Window a
dornment
28 Napoleon's fate
29 Padres and Bills
31 Motionless
33 Air current
34 On the move
35 Brief argument
37 Man from
Madras
39 Mixes it up
42 Without ice
45 � Empire
47 Moving toward
. land
50 Prompt
53 Outer shells
55 Little ones
56 Church recess
57 Incline
58 Asp victim, for
short
60 Mideast bigwig
61 Tears
62 Let it stand
65 Competed-
fi tnnl
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Thi Eatt Carolinian
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opinion
Tutidat, Nflve.Tibcf 25. 1937 5
easferolinian
AAiV L.ROYSTKREdtei
CEI.KSTE WILSON ManageEtttor
MATT HEGE Mtreitisng Krettor
AMANDA AUSTIN News Editor
JACQUELINE D. KELLUM A�-News Editor
ANDV TURNER LifutylaEditor
JOHN DAVIS Assistant Ltfesiyle Ednoi
AMANDA ROSS Spons Editor
TRACY LAUBAiMI AjsumtSportsEdttor
CAROLE MEIII.E tod Copy Editor
John murphy Sniillustrator
Heather burgess wmEtirn
S�smt lt� EOJ c�tmi sk� 826i i E�t rrtroo rjuaslw EOM
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Cattwitao taser m the rm to edit of reied lenars tor putication All letters must ba storwt Leners shcuk) be addressed to; opmen adatr. tha East
Carolman. ftrttaima Butong. ECU. Greenrite. 2)8584353. Fa atamamen. can 9S 328 6366

The McCaughees consider the quirky
timing of having seven babies so
close to Thanksgiving Day.
�-

oumew
It is the season p be jolly and bring joy and happineis. Thanksgiving is two days away and
Christmas exactly �ine month to the day. It is also thejseason to bring joy and love to another
life, maybe someone you have never met.
Many of us think of Christmas as a time to receive jjfts and surprises from loved ones. Vfe
anticipate Santa Claus's arrival while we are tucked away, snug and warm in our beds. What
many of us fail to think about is all the adults and children who are scattered across the world
and in our own town of Greenville who have no home to live in, no warm bed to sleep in and
no toys or gifts to look forward to when Christmas morning rolls around.
This problem can be solved with the help of each and every one of us out there. The options
are endless and the rewarding feeling is irreplaceable when you know you have helped
someone who is less fortunate if a person would just take the time and a small amount of
money to make a donation to those who do not have � Christmas to look forward to. There
are so many things thse families can use, such as, canned food, warm clothing, toys, books
and most importantly I warm smile that could brighten someones day.
Remember that it il the season to be thankful for what you have, what you may have had
at one time, what youteill one day have and what you qduld be responsible for someone else
having. You have hearjl it all you have seen it a hundred times but have you ever acted
on it? Have you ever pad the opportunity to look into someone's eyes and see the joy and
happiness, and know tlat you were a major part of that-mppiness? Take the opportunity now
and during the next fiw days when there are no classes to make that special and lasting
impression in another Hie.
A few places you cart bring a gift or donation to are ECU's own holiday drive for toys, the
Salvation Army Toys fat Tots or the gift of time and hel�i can be given at any of the areas soup
kitchens. And, of coursl there's always that ringing bell outside the stores. Take time to stick
your spare change in thfc can.
Don't be a scrooge thjis year
OPINION
Keith
COOPER
LETTER
to the Editor
Bakin, Logan mate great contributions
In an earlier September edition
of The East Carolinian, I misttkenry
downplayed Chancellor Eakin's
involvement in the growth ofECU.
Since that time, 1 have spent a part
of my life in the special collections
room of Joyner Library, hoping to
rectify my unintentional use of
words. This is where I came across
scores of information about the
Shared Visions campaign that has
given me all the confidence to say
that we now have the best
chancellor in the school's history.
The Shared Visions campaign
had an original goal of $50 million.
The money was raised to "support a
variety of programs benefiting
students, faculty, staff and the
entire University community" In
December of 1994, the $5femillion
became a reality Surprisingly, the
goal was exceeded by owr $15
million (or over 30 percfnt). It
actually was the most successful
fundraising campaign in i school
history. Scholarships, fellowships,
faculty enrichment and the
expansion of Minges Caiseum,
Dowdy-Rcklen Stadium anf Joyner
Library all came from thisbigger-
than-life campaign.
I would also like to say hire that
Steve Logan has also brought the
university a huge amount of
exposure, as I stated in an earlier
edition. No matter who yo$ would
like to give credit to, East Carolina
University has the most competent
circle of decision makers in the
country. The best news of ail si that
these guys want to continue in their
roles at the university, that in itself
says we hnvc arrived at a wcll-
descrved state of stabUicy. .After-
being accepted to every school to
which I applied, I chose to come to
ECU based on the excitement that
was being generated. As graduation
approaches, I clearly feel 'made the
right choice. Thank you, Chancellor
Eakin and Steve Logan, for your
service to the university, and most of
all, thanks for instilling in us the
firide we need to take on the world.
t is much appreciated! Go Pirates!
Jonathan Huggins
Senior
Nutrition
Improving race relations must
be a top priority of ECU and
other college campuses that
undermine the importance of
making race a central part of
the local, state, and national
debate. Too many students
don't realize the struggles
made by persevering,
audacious blacks
East Carolina University has
curricula of many meaningful
courses. Quite a few courses are
mandatory for students serious
about graduating and advancing
their academic goals. What
specifically determines whether
"Courses should be mandatory? In
America, everyone needs to know
how to communicate in English, the
dominant language in this nation.
Therefore, a satisfactory grade in
English should be a prerequisite for
graduation. Well, what is the recipe
for ameliorating race relations on
college campuses and other arenas
throughout this country? A key
ingredient of that recipe is making a
course in race relations mandatory
for all students. Additionally, the
administration of ECU should
examine the feasibility of organizing
an African-American Studies
department. If other historically
white universities like the
University of North Carolina can
establish one, surely East Carolina
University can do the same.
Improving race relations must be
a top priority of ECU and other
college campuses that undermine
the importance of making race a
central part of the local, state, and
national debate. Too many students
don't realize the struggles made by
persevering, audacious blacks from
the beginning of slavery in this
country through Reconstruction,
the lynching decades from the
1860s through the 1950s, the civil
rights challenges and Southern
white opposition to civil rights gains
for blacks, the gloom and doom
years of Rcaganomics , to present
attempts to send America back to
years of racial intolerance and
enmity. This country, a house
divided, cannot endure too much
longer without fruitful discussions
and practical solutions to race
problems nagging the public
conscience and corroding the very
foundation of our democracy.
No rational-thinking American
wants a race war. The lynching of
Emmett Tecl, Rodney King, and the
psychological whipping of O.J.
Simpson in the name of racism,
bespeak that America must get its
house in order or suffer a
foreseeable catastrophe which may
cause the "empire" to crumble.
A mandatory course on race
relations will encourage students of
various racialethnic persuasions to
taik about divisive issues, help
debunk racial stereotypes and
myths about blacks being
biologically inferior to whites, and
send white supremacy to its grave.
If we are to move forward into the
new millennium with grace,
sophistication, and more tolerance,
we must learn to dialogue about our
commonalities of interests and I
the festering sores of racisr
reminiscent of Apartheid in the
South Africa. Films, seminars, guest
speakers, debates, and other
creative strategies will shed light i
the overlooked and distorted
exploits of African-Arriericans from
the times they accompanied
Christopher Columbus (who didn'tv
discover America) to the New
World from 1492 to 1513 to slavery
when black inventors, largely
responsible for the technological
innovations enjoyed by Americans
today, were not allowed to secure
patents until 1863. Frederick
Douglass, Harriett Tubman, Lewis
Larimer, Rosa Parks, and other black
pioneers will be highlighted and
commemorated in any serious
course on race relations and African-
American history. Indeed, there's
no excuse for ignorance of the
struggle of blacks for over three
hundred years. As a matter of fact,
the honorable President Clinton
will, around December 2, 1997,
make a speech on improving race
relations arguably the most
important speech of his presidency.
While a student at the University
of North Carolina in the mid-1980s,
I was impressed with the African-
American Studies "department
there. Though not a panacea for
race problems on campus, it was a
positive step towards educating
students about a people whose
courage saved George Washington's
life at the Battle of Cowpens during
the Revolutionary War, turned the
tide for the Union Army during the
Civil War, won the Spanish-
American War, and helped win
World War I and World War II.
ECU, let's get serious about
addressing race problems and
improving the quality of life for all
races and ethnicities at ECU and
beyond this campus.
to tie. Editor
LETTER
to the Editor
Candidate says thanks for support
Day should educate himself on Greeks
Being an alumni of ECU, it real ly
means a lot to me that so many ECU
students exercised their right to
vote and supported me in my
campaing for City Council. I know
what a commitment it is t�j take
time out of a hectic class- schedule
and make an effort te get to the
polls.
Furthermore, a very special thank
you is extended to the ECU College
Republicans, who helped me not
only get out the vote throughout the
campaign, but who also stood with
me, signs in hands, in the cold, at
the polls and on street corners
during election day. That is truly
turning your words into action. I
could not have had such a good
showing without you! On to the
next campaign.
Arielle Sturz Morris
Former City Council candidate
clAS5ROOMS
?t�
BEN9 PHASED our
As a Greek woman, I am outraged
at the grossly inaccurate and unfair
accusations made by Jeff Day in his
column "Greeks have much to
learn Fraternities and sororities
nationwide donate thousands of
dollars and countless community
service hours to "help our fellow
man The fraternity system is
comprised of self-sustaining
friendship organizations which
require their members to seek a
high level of scholarship, participate
in campus activities, provide service
to others and exemplify high moral
ideals. To achieve these high
standards, programs are offered
throughout the year to Greek
members concerning issues faced by
college students ranging from the
dangers of drinking to time
management.
Greeks are not perfect and, at
times, we may have poor judgment,
but we are only human. We are
students, like Mr. Day, in the
process of learning about life. I am
proud to be Greek. I am proud to be
a delta Zeta. Mr. Day wrote that
Greeks need to learn to be thankful.
Well, I am thankful to all of the
sisters who came before me who
built a system that has allowed me
to grow and improve myself in every
way. I am thankful for my sisters
who are there for encouragement
and comfort. Most of all I am
thankful for the opportunity to help
guide those who follow in my
footsteps into aft everlasting oond of
sisterhood. I would be VERY
thankful if pcopfe like Mr. Day
would quit judging Greeks. I
suggest Mr. Day educate himself on
the reality of Greek life before he
condemns it.
Heather L. Brown
Delta Zeta President
Senior
Psychology
1 express many absurd opinions. But I am not the first man
to do it; American freedom consists largely in talking
nonsense
' E.W. Howe, newspaper publisher, 1926
"There is not and should not be a correct African-American
way of thinking. We are entitled to diversity of thought,
opinion and perspective
Gwendolyn King, federal official, 1991
r






�MH . .
Tit East Cirolinian
lifestyle
Senior Art
u Shows '97
a feve received quite a bit of
?� jBositive feedback on our recent
h feature on Andy Rukas's senior
, w exhibition. This is a list of the
iflfc remaining senior shows for 1997.
i.Bnjoyi
Hi All shows at Burroughs Wellcome
1 Senior Gallery unless otherwise
,afrotcd. For more information, call
Thursday. November 20. 1997 6
THE
metals) & Brian F-1
Ever wonder
what happens
when you don't
pay your credit
card bills?
Follow Uncle Moneybags and find out
For Bad Credit
��.
SHANNON MEEK
SENIOR WRITER
�jfti&ian Hunskker (metals) & Brad
;�i$jephens (painting) at Arlington
$i Hali Gallery.
sTtuart Williams, (communication
arts), Eric Terry (communication
arts)
& Jeffrey Schuller (communication
arts)
Happy Pants
flue.
Uncle Moneybags
goes holiday
shopping. He finds
many perfect gifts
for everyone
tiendn Pkkup (printmaking) &
Jiaries Jason Smith (printmaking)
ifrflin Jenkins Foyer
; snpr4Z
B
Shopping during the holiday season
becomes natural, like breathing. It is a
bizarre ritual that Americans adhere to: the
day after Thanksgiving, they clamor to the
malls frantic for the perfect gift to express
their love, all the while not allowing their
credit cards a moment's rest.
The use of credit cards skyrockets during
the holidays. If Saint Nick himself owned a
credit card, it would have surely surpassed
its limit. After all, there is no time of year
harder on the average consumer's budget
and personal debt than the Christmas
season.
It has recently become easier for college
students to obtain crejdit cards. The
companies that demanded! a person to have
established credit before issuing plastic have
now lowered their standards so that anyone
can have one. According to Behavioral
Analysis Inc a marketi consulting and
research firm in Tarryiftwn, New York,
nearly three in four VS. aouseholds receive
at least one credit card offer a month. Some
receive even more.
ECU student Randi Fisbane once
received three phone calls concerning credit
cards in one morning's time. "It was so damn
annoying she said. "I was trying to talk to
someone and I had to click over three times
just to talk to those stupid credit card
people
College students have certainly jumped
on the offers for easy money In 1995, Claris
Inc a market firm in Arlington, VA reports
that the average outstanding balance for
households headed by someone under 25
grew from $885 to $1,121.
Ed Hicks, director of Claris Inc
expressed concern.
"We're talking about almost doubling
average balances outstanding in six years,
he said.
"I think the main effect is generation
specific said Ian Davidson, a financial
advisor with the Equion group in Toronto,
and editor of Cmogozines personal financial
planning department. "Older people never
had these kinds of problems. But Boomers,
Gen-Xers and The pcho generation do.
"And I don't sec any of the groups
building up any wealth, which is a very
serious issue for society In that case, the
benefits you're paying for now, you'll never
get
?fq�'�ivid Soutbcriand
-M fciwnmunication arts) &
�fsfilison Cherry (metals) in the
"SFtJpper Crust Bakery
Uncle Moneybags
thinks he's really
smart and uses his
credit cards to buy
all the wonderfull
gifts
Big Stinky St.
Uncle Moheybags
gets his credit card
bill; he owes a lot of
money. "Uh oh
loneybags says'
Penniless In
Uncle Moneybags
has nothing but lint
and old gum in his
pocket. He can't
pay the credit
Up the Creek
Hiiry.
Credit company
sends many mean
letters and, finally, a
big guy nicknamed
"The Neck
tie End of the
Uncle Moneybags
wishes he hadn't
spent all that money
he didn't have while
he sits in the pen
with "Bubba
m-
jCrackle of vinyl still rings true
L as tumables keep spinning
CAi.KB ROSK
STU'E WHITER
3SH� � tke
-�$nt� wtm i
"fom m tie mlf m
'an mi dr sag m
mmed. Urw&txamarttetook,
oUxmi, mean, trlnam stmm and
�jtn eOtr good saff Am m fitt
jtkrros Jwttrr fxfibntk ks Or
mffwthfkitmnln-
9
dp
M
C
Turntables through the
ages.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF 6MR0
ROYAt MASAZME
1 can still remember the old days
watching the label spinning on my
turn table. There s no call
waiting on my
headphones. That
was the scene in
my house when
I was young,
ignorant and
had the
pleasure of
wasting my
day, listening
to all oi my
parents' vinyl
records. Not
much has
changed, though. I
am still young and I
still yearn for vinyl.
We never had a real good
quality stereo at my houscbut we did have
a record player We soem countless hours
mesmerized by the spinning
music disc. Time passed and
all of the vinyl and record
players found their place in
our attic where they lay for
some time. That all
changed this past summer
when I made my own little
investment in a brand new
turntable as well as a trip to
our attic. This $100
investment gave new life to
an old tradition for me and my family and it
also presented me with a new hobby.
One might inquire why someone would
waste their time and effort on such a
musical format when the world has such
technologies as CDs and Digital Audio
Recording.
One thing I have found is that if you
listen to a record that has little or no flaws
(scratches etc.), the quality is equal to, if
not better than, a digital recording. A vinyl
LP is an analog recording, meaning that the
sounds you arc hearing were not digitized
in any way.
The sounds coming from a record are as
true as a live concert because that is what it
is, in a sense. 1 get chills just thinking about
the fact that something most people would
consider primitive sounds so good
compared to the overiy polished sounds
you often hear.
Sometimes 1 even enjoy the crackle of
an old, abused
record. I feel it
acts as a seal of
authenticity for
khe sound.
Granted, I
enjoy the
�quality of a CD
because of the
clarity and
?such, but there
are certain
things about
good ol' records
that vou can't
beat with a stick.
For instance,
the price of a
normal used
record is variably
cheap. CD Alley has a
barrage of used vinyl as tow as
98 cents. The most expensive used
records I have seen there are around $3.98.
Certain titles that I have bought there
would have some collectors drooling: The
Beatles' lt It Be was $1.98, Crecdence
Clearwater Revival's Cosmos Factor was 98
cents. The Byrds' Untitled (which is a
double record set) was only $1.98.
All of these records are in great
condition, and even if they were not, I
would find it hard to pass up such a deal.
Sometimes these albums are worth having
just for the cover, for that is where some of
the value resides.
Anothet plus for having a turntable and
being a vinyl collector is the fact that many
newer bands have learned about the value
and quality of wax. A lot of punk rock, ska
and hardcore bands use the vinyl format
when distributing singles from their full
length albums.
These seven-inches are
nothing more than an old
45 RPM record that has the
hit song on side A and
usually another album cut
on side B. Sometimes the
added bonus is when the
song on Side B is previously
unreleased, hence the term
B-Side. The seven-inch is
the equivalent of a modern
CD single or CD Maxi-
single as they are sometimes termed.
You may ask, "why bothet buying a
scratch-susceptible record when vou can
buy a CD?" Well, why buy a new BMW
when you can get a Mazda Miatta? Same
thing,
d if fe rent
price. Such as
it is with
vinyl, it is the
exact same
music as what
you buy in a
tape or CD
format;
however, it is
cheaper and
somewhat
more precious
to some. If you ate not one to take care of
your possessions, then you are not one to
partake in vinyl collecting for you need to
be quite careful with these records; they
are fragile.
Nowadays, music just doesn't seem to
mean as much as when it did back then.
Maybe it is the cold, hard truth that the
music industry is not selling the right
bands to people, or perhaps there really is a
bit of magic in those old wax circles we all
use to dance to as kids. Something about
that era of time seems to have us hanging
on to the customs of that time: classic rock
music, the '60s-70s style of dress, and last
but not least, vinvl. Will it continue? Time
will tell.
THEATREreyleyj
Mother Hicks demands
audience's attention
STfiNIAXIK Rl.SSKI
STUT WRITER
Mother Hicks, directed by Don Biehn,
is definitely an interesting play.
Everything that a great play needs
seems to be there. Great acting, sets,
costumes � the works. And yet, I
didn't get the impression that too
many of the audience members
really loved it.
The East Carolina Playhouse did
a spectacular job in presenting this
play. But, a lot of people left the
theatre with an empty feeling. Many
did not recognize a lot of the
symbolism that, in order for the play-
to be understood, is necessary.
Therefore, this was a really hard play
to understand.
But, maybe that's the way it's
supposed to be. The more you talk
about the play, the mote you'll
understand, and the more you'll like
it. After all, that's the theme of the
play�prejudice, fear bred of
misunderstanding, misperception
and miscommunication.
Most of the problems have less to
do with how the East Carolina
Playhouse presented Mother Hicks,
the actors or the direction of the
play, and more to do with Susan
Zeder's script itself.
Don Biehn did an outstanding job
directing Mother Hicks. He drew out
the characters from each actor. The
entire east performed exceptionally
under his direction. Movement and
stagingadded a dance-like quality to
the play. But, because of the script,
you don't care about any of the
characters until the second act.
Some �f the action from scene to
scene was choppy.
Sandra Jones is absolutely
fabulous as Mother Hicks. Though
silent through the first act, her
movements intrigue. When she
speaks her lines, Jones brings
Mother Hicks, the character and the
play, to life. Even the people who
didn't enjoy the play as a whole,
were riveted by Jones' impassioned
performance. People who left at
intermission because they didn't
relate to the play lost their chance to
be drawn in to it's heart. Sandra
Jones is the highlight oi Mother Hicks.
Ariahnc Ritchie does a great job
acting like thirteen year old Girl,
searching for a home. The childish
mannerisms that many of us have
forgotten were not lost by Ritchie.
Howeve, some audience members
had a hard time hearing some of her
lines.
Paul May brings the poetry of
American Sign Language to life. He
signs with passion and beauty May's
movements and facial expressions
realrf add to the overall grace of Tuc,
a deaf outcast.
fiA the actors "from the town"
shoild be commended for their
performances. Pattie Wootcn is
superb as Alma Ward, the local
mortician's wife. She gives a stand
out performance and captures the
essaice of a woman in search of a
child to love. Alison Lawrence as
Izzy Sue Ricks, an outspoken and
ovaprotective mother, is fabulous.
Lawrence's voice is a treat. John
Dairow perfectly portrays every man
in the Great Depression trying to
save his family, and in the end losing
it all -even himself.
Robert Alpers set design is in
harmony with the play's themes and
historical setting. The Spartan set
briigs to life the despair of the
1930s, matching the desolation felt
by characters and transporting
audience members to those hard
luck times.
The costumes are simple but
enormously effective. All the
townspeople wear a male or female
version of the same outfit,
illustrating their common beliefs,
way of life, and mindset. The three
principal characters break this
pattern of dress, as they break the
SEE MOTHER HICKS. PAGE 7
Madrigal dinners bring in the
holiday season
Ron Ciikribim Jr.
SENIOR WRITER
With the holiday season fast
approaching, many people are
preparing festivities rich in
tradition. From Thanksgiving
through Christmas to the New Year,
families and friends will come
together to celebrate togetherness,
goodwill and cheer.
At ECU, there is a tradition that
has been ongoing since the 70s and
aims at ushering in the holiday
season. The ECU Madrigal Dinners
aim to promote community and
celebrate the holidays with an array
of performances and a feast. But
these are not just any performances
jnd not just any feast.
The Madrigal Dinners are
modeled after a traditional
Elizabethan feast complete with a
full, four-course meal and
entertainment ranging from a
professional story teller to dancers,
singers and a magician. The
performers are costumed in
Elizabethan-era clothing and the
peformances are based on the types
usually held during the era. The
feast is held on fout consecutive
nights, Dec. 4-7, in the Great Room
at Mendenhall Student Center on
the ECU campus.
From the moment the doors
open, dinner-goers are taken back in
time. Diners will be greeted by the
Lorde and Ladye of the manor,
James and Franceine Rees, both of
whom have been serving as the
hosts since the earliest days of the
Madrigals.
"Year after year, people return for
this event Franceine Rees said.
"(The Madrigals) arc a combination
of fellowship, good music, good
performances and good cheer
The celebration encompasses
the entire performing arts spectrum
at ECU. The Madrigals began in the
'70s when then choral director. Dr.
Charles Moore, first introduced the
idea.
"Charlie called us and asked if
we'd be the Lorde and Ladye of the
manor. We said 'sure' and have been
doing ever since she said. "Similar
dinners have been popping up all
over since then. I remember after
we had the first Madrigals, people
from North Carolina State
SEE MADRIGALS PAGE 1
T"

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7 Twsdey. November 25. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolina
-rug- MOLSON
SUN
Madrigals
cominued irom page 6
�2
S
if

if
�&lfM CANADA
DAY SKI & " . �
SNOWBOARD MM TICKET
NIGHT LODGING LUXURY
CONDO FULLY EQUIP.
DAYS & NIGHT OF COLLEGIATE
. CONTESTS ETC
hCawtoteH,
www.skitravei.com
l-800-999-SKh9
Madrigal Dinners
You axe cordially
invited to celebrate
the holiday season
at the Madrigal
Dinners, December
4 through 7,1997,
in the Great Room.
at Mendenhall
Student Center.
dates
Thursday, December 4 at 7:Q0pm
Friday, December 5 at 7;0Qpm
Saturday, December 6 at 7:0Gpm
Sunday, December 7 at 5:00rkn
p &menu
�Pecan crunch baked salmon
�Htrbed prim rib au jus with horseradisn
�GrBted �m�bl Wellinpon with prikky pesto sauce
�Chevre rice stuffed chicken breast
with red pepper sauce
Waldorf salad 'Wassail- Garden vefetable medley
Twice-baked potatoes � Assorted rods and beverages
Seasonal dessert
University came around and took
notes and asked us about the
dinners. Then, they started their
own. We've inspired a number of
Elizabethan celebrations
Rees said that most of all, it's the
entertainment and the fellowship
that have kept the dinners an
annual sellout.
"The performers are so
talented she said of the ECU
students that participate in the
shows. "After ail of these years,
we're hot tired of seeing them
perform. Each year, they put on
such wonderful shows and then
when they graduate another group
of performers comes in. Seeing the
people respond to the performers is
the highlight for us
Brett Watson, Director of the
Madrigal Dinners, agrees.
"Every year, I get some calls from
people who ask me, Where was this
performer? He was so good last
year Watson said. "I naive to tell
them that the performer has
graduated. The performers in the
choir are all ECU students and they
do a great job. Almost all of them
will return each year while they are
in school
Watson said that the
entertainment for this year's
Madrigal Dinners will, once again,
be top-notch. There will be a
magician, a court jester, a story
teller and much more.
"We try to change things up a
little each year Watson said.
"Some people want to hear what
they heard last year and others want
something new. Everyone who
performs wants to keep coming
back
While diners are treated to a
feast, they will be entertained by
the various performers, many of
whom will make their way amongst
the diners while they perform,
making the event more interactive.
Not all of the performers are
students. The main attraction is a
popular story teller on the national
scene and has been seen at the last
few presidential inaugurations as
Uncle Sam on stilts. Steve Myott, a
master story teller, will spin a tale
he has created just for the ECU
Madrigal Dinners.
"I'm very excited to share this
story he said. "It will be based
upon the Renaissance period, a
time when story telling was very
popular
Myott, a former North Carolina
Visiting Artist who has been
involved with the public school
system for more than 12 years
teaching theatre and directing
original theatre productions, has
been telling stories professionally
for years.
"I've been doing it quite some
time he said. "The stories are
always original pieces that I have
created on my own. I tell them at
libraries, schools, with adult groups.
I'm very interactive with the
audience, so there will be some of
that going on at (the Madrigal
Dinners). I'm very excited about
this. It will be my first time at the
ECU dinners
Myott also does mime and is a
master mask-maker, but story-
celling b hb love.
"fw thb story he said. "I've
looked at as much literature as I
could about the era and will
concentrate on the connections I've
found. Obviously, when you've done
a lot of story telling, you draw on
what you know has worked in the
past. But, with thb story there are
numerous ways to go. It will
certainly be appropriate, colorful
and humorous, because you can get
away with a Jot more around the
castle than you can other places
Myott's attitude reflects the
general festiveness of all the
participants in the dinners.
"It's always fun Ranceine Rees
said. "We look forward to the last
(dinner) as much as we do to the
first each year. It wouldn't be the
holiday season without it
Students dine for $15 and
tickets can be purchased with ECU
meal card, declining balance, check,
cash or credit card. . For more
information, call 328-4766.
Mother Hicks
cominued from page 8
accepted way of life. Mother Hicks'
costumes beautifully illustrate her
zest for life and acceptance of
everyone under the sun. Cheek out
her rainbow wrap!
Everyone brings ha or her own
personal history to the. pity and
therefore takes from it varying
insights into themselves and the
characters. Thb isn't a play that will
appeal to everyone, but everyone
should see it. If you are willing to go
sec it with an open mind and to
think and talk about it, then Mother
Hides is a play you will remember for
years.
If you have a sophisticated
appreciation for theatre, m enjoy
thought provoking drama, 'don't
miss Mother Hicks. Tonight b your
last chance to catch the show.
Tickets are on sale in the Mc�2nnis
Theatre lobby box office or you can
order by phone at 328-6829 or 328-
1726.
ECU STUDENTS: Ibu me purchase Maorfcai Dinner tickets widi your ECU nwl card. Simpljr brinj your mul
card and ECU ID to rte Central Ticket OSca to purchase oouas usinj gOTmealpbrLOemreservations numbs
made no later than three business days prior to die event Contact d� Central T�ket Once at �I J�.47�m.
I JOOECU.AKTS.or doaffteeedv4rcired accest �l�JJfc47Jt Mc�diy rc Ftidw 30am to 610m.
ECU STUDENT TICKETS AM $11
��
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
vtllv
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring S3 to cover cost of dinner
future event,? planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
Taaootas &
BcxtyPfjsrcing
10. off all
Body Piercing
with Studfet ID
Expires: M8SO97
(919)75&rJ600
Autoclave Sterilitfrrion
4685 Suite A US Hwy 13 GreenviHe NC
ESS
�panes"
GREENVILLE AUTO REPAIR INC.
ALL TYPES OF AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Major & Minor Repairs
�Manual Transmissions
-Brakes, Tires & Batteries
-Free Towing With
Major Repair
ZT� 830-6131
-Clutches
-Tune-Uos
-10offftilrr
coiegejfc
I
Go ahead and make reservations lor Graduation
emember
esday
. �
H
.�
mum wmum mi mum wmum mi mm s. 5�
fyuHGt
us
m
iS
Dine JLikeihe Limes
The ECU Madrigal Dinners. Song, dance, story telling, magic and
a full-course Elizabethan feast Usher in the holidays with a slice of
time-tested tradition. ECU students dine for just $15.
Meal card and declining balance
honored. DEC. 4-6 AT 7 P.M. AND DEC. 7 AT 5 P.M. IN THE GREAT ROOM
���
m

1
Bust Out with BINGO
By popular demand, Bingo is here. Come play the numbers and win big.
Admission is free. FRIDAY, DEC. 5 AT 8 P.M. IN ROOM 221
CauSaijft
If you have trouble getting where you need to go for weekends or
holidays, check out the RideRider Board at the foot of the stairs in the
basement at Mendenhall Student Center.
Watch the Big Screen
Chasing Amy (R) screens in Hendrix Theatre on Dec 4-6 at 8 p.m.
Your student ID gets you and a guest in for free.
Lend Ronald a Hand
The Ronald McDonald House needs non-perishable goods to help
needy families through the holiday season. For every two items you
donate, Mendenhall Recreation Area will reward you with a coupon
good for a free game of bowling or a half-hour of billiards.
Collection runs through Dec. 10 in the Mendenhall Recreation Area
.��
� c
Lane Gomes
gtonblvd 355-1111
ALL-U-CAN BOWL�Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday
of each month from 8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just $5 (includes
shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS� Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m.
with 50-cent bowling (shoe rental included).
ONE-BUCK BOWLING�Make Wednesday and Friday discount days
by rolling 10 frames for just $1 (shoe rental included).
$1 games between 1-6 p.m.
��
��
-35 SERVICES: Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games � Student Locator Service
�� � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board � Art Gallery
k t� HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.mll p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
wi mm & wmum mi mum w? mum sat
��
�fata
�.





r
'iliTiHil
8 Tmtdty. Hovsmber 25. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT

RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now taking leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP,
LARGE 3 bedroom condo. Facilities
include weight room, hot-tub, free tan-
ning beds and more. Neatness a must.
$190month plus $210 deposit. Call
353-6570.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
to share 4 bedroom house
ASAP 12 block from campus. Call 931-
0448.
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
TWO BEDROOM. TWO BATH Ou-
-plex-New! Wd hookups, gas logs, pa-
tio, roomy. Quiet, safe neighborhood.
'Graduating. Must rent. $550 per
jnonth plus deposit (neg). Neil or Jon
3K31-1051. leave message.
TWO BEDROOM. TWO BATH apart-
inent located in Oockside. If interested,
please call 758-6009.
' i,
WANTED: 3 BED-
apt off 1st Street. $130mo�
13 utilities. Available Dec. 1. Call Jim-
my, 752-8376.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 2
BDR. apartment, $190 per month,
cable and water included, on ECU bus
line, pool and laundry on site. Call 754-
2719.
ROOM FOR RENT AT Players Club.
Private room. Share bathroom. Rent
$220 per month plus 14 utilities. Call
321-7561, ask for Steve.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE
JANUARY 1, walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(16'x15'). Private phone linecable in
room. Washerdryer included. $175
par month plus utilities. Call Mike at
752-2879.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS ft New
Rec Center! Two 2 bedroom apts.
above Catalog Connection -$475.00 a
month! Both available December 1st -
one month deposit required! Call
Yvonne at 758-2616.
NEEDED JAN. 1ST ROOMMATE to
share 2 bedroom duplex in Summer-
haven. Professional or grad student
preferred. Call Kim, 758-2800 or after
6:00 p.m. 321-8872.
GEORGETOWNE APTS. FEMALE
FOR 12 rent$275) plus 12 utilities.
Available anytime after Dec. 1. Call
752-2209 for more info. Leave mes-
sage if no answer.
FEMALEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED - Players Club Apts. 14 of
rent and expenses. Call Melissa at 321-
7613.
eastcarolinian
RE A r'HU R C H D i R E C T 0 R Y
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1827 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-3526
Services: Worship 11 a.m
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED,
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
Of CHRIST
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE
752-6376
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m 6
p.m. Sunday: 7 p.m. Wednes-
day
WE WELCOME YOU! LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAY
FROM HOME
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Comer of Crestline Blvd. &
Greenville Blvd.
756-6545
Services: Bible School 10 a.m
morning worship 11 a.m
evening worship 6 p.m.
REACHING OUT JO
GREENVILLE WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)
756-6600
Services: Sunday School 9:45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAY
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 AM
EACH SUNDAY
THE MEMORIAL
BAPTIST CHURCH
-1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
756-5314
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinner
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHER
STUDENTS FOR AWESOME
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANT
WORD
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
752-1898
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP S SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
ECU CAMPUS
ST, JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
752-6154
Services: Worship-Sunday
8:30 a.m 11 a.m Sunday
School 9:45 a.m.
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS
ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
A VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FOR INSPIRATION
UNITARIAN UNIVER-
SALIST CONGREGA-
TION OF GREENVILLE
131 Oakmont Drive
355-6658
Services: 10:30 a.m. each
Sunday
A CHURCH GROWING IN
CHRIST. CARING FOR PEOPLE.
PROCLAIMING THE WORD
GREENVILLE CHRIS-
TIAN FELLOWSHIP
1411 S. Evans Street
752-2100
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
SINGLE VISION-PBCS
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY
ECU STUDENTS & SINGLES
WELCOME
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST
CHURCH
1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-2822
Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
10:45 a.m 6:30 p.m
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
COME AND JOIN US IN
PRAISING THE LORD!
SYCAMORE HILL
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
226 W. 8th Street
758-2281
Services: Every Sunday
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
14 utNHias. $220 par month. Play-
ers Club Apts. Call ASAP 321-
0889, ask for Lara.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP or January, rent $179. Large
room with three closets, utilities and
phone, across from ECU. Contact Tara,
758-1152.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
JAN. 1, really cute house one block
from campus. Rent $195.00. Great
deal 11 Social drinker OK but serious
students please call Jennie, Liz or Er-
icka, 830-5419.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED BY
Jan. 1, can move in Dec. 15, to share
duplex on E. 3rd St. Call 561-7981,
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED BE-
FORE January 1st to sublease two
bedroom apartment at Kingston
Rental. For information call 561-7824
and leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share two bedroom apart-
ment in Wilson Acres. $257 a month
plus 12 utilities. Call Stacey, 561-7267
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apt. 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utilities.
Call 752-1652.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
CLEAN ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY Two blocks from Plaza.
$205 plus 12 utilities and phone. Col-
lege undergraduate preferred. Call Phil
today for info: 321-2813.
CANNON COURT. 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
tight Property Management, 756-6209.
BIG THREE BEDROOM HOUSE in
ECU area. 1 12 baths, central heat,
ceiling fans, washer hookup, fenced in
backyard, pets OK. $550 month. Call
830-9502
4 BEDROOM AVAILABLE AT Play-
ers Club Apts. 6-month lease begin-
ning Jan. Call Melissa at 321-7613.
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
ASAP, Players Club Apts. 14 rent and
expanses (per person). Call Tracy at
353-6933.
2 BEDROOM DUPLEX, 2 blocks
from ECU. Central heat & AC, large
backyard, appliances included. $400
per month. Call 551-5025.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn graat monay. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7688.
MEDIA ASSISTANTS WANTED:
THE ECU School of Medicine Center
for Health Sciences Communications
is hiring media assistants. The assis-
tant will direct multi-camera teleclass-
room productions and assist with AV
requests. Hours are flexible. Must be
an ECU enrolled student. For applica-
tion, contact Marc Krein at 816-2472
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworlcs is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Gain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7.223.
Minimum GPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
CASHIERS WANTED: FLEXIBLE
Hours, part-time or full-time. Contact
Kathy at Trade Mart, 321-9263.
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA PHI: WE DANCED the night
away under the palm trees. The Ha-
waiian Social was great. Let's do it
again soon. Love, the Brothers of Sig-
ma Nu
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate our new executive officers.
President, Jen Mock; vice President of
Member Recruitment, Laura Ruge;
Vice President of Program Develop-
ment, Lisa Woodlief, Vice President of
Chapter Operations, Ellen Burrleson;
Vice President of Marketing, Kim Le-
wis; Director of Formal Rush, Jennifer
Cooper; Director of COB, Kaka Win-
stead; Director of MAP, Melanie War-
ren; Panhellenic Delegate, Jelly Orta;
Director of Member Development, Ko-
ryn Newtll; Director of Member Educa-
tion, Lisa Landis; Director of Finance,
Andrea Gillispie. Congratulations
girls! Love, your sisters
A BIG THANKS TO Phi Kappa Tau,
Kappa Sigma, and Delta Sigma Phi for
helping us out on our Sisters Party!
We really appreciate it Love, the new
sisters of Alpha Phi
FOR SALE
SEGA SATURN WITH NBA Live 97,
Madden 97, Daytona USA, PGA Tour
97. $150. Call 413-0797.
MONGOOSE IBOC 17" XTR-LX
Syncos, $550.00. Manttcu SX-Ti shock,
$225.00 Call 830-3952.
1991 HONDA NIGHTHAWK 750 for
sale. Great condition. Must sell. Blue-
book value $2600; asking $2100 firm.
Call Rick at 830-6666, serious inquiries
only.
1990 GEO STORM-GSI Sport, great
condition, AMFM cassette, air condi-
tioning, fog lights, recent tune-up.
$4,000. Call 321-3860.
HELP WANTED
You Name The Hours
Part Time, Full Time
you tell Us.
The Holiday Inn Express of
Washington, NC is now hiring,
enthusiastic, friendly people
with excellent customer ser-
vice atitudes for it's front desk
positions. $6.00hr
Apply in person at the Holiday Inn
Express or Hwy 17N in Washington
(20 min away)
Send Qualifications to PO Box 576
Washington NC 27889
THE BIG SISTERS OF Alpha Phi
would like to thank our little sisters for
an awesome sisters party. We had a
great time, you all did a great job plan-
ning and thanks for all your hard work!
Love your big sisters in Alpha Phil
THANKS TO SIGMA ALPHA Epsi-
lon. Phi Tau and Alpha Zi Delta for the
quad Thursday night We had a great
time! Love, Sigma Sigma Sigma
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA HOPES eve-
ryone at ECU has a fun and safe
Thanksgiving Break!
SIGMA NU, THANK YOU so much
for our wonderful Hawaiian Social. We
all had a great time. Love, Alpha Phi
SIGMA NU WELCOMES THE new-
est brothers: Will Mclntosh, Chad
Suggs, Adam Harris, Jay Miller and
Rob Williams. Congratulations guys!
Your brothers
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD
like to thank all our dates who came to
our Strangers Mixer fast Friday night
We hope that you had a great time.
Thanks, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
PI LAMBDA PHI. PHI Kappa Tau,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Nu, Theta
Chi, Pi Kappa Phi, Kappa Sigma, Sig-
ma Alpha Epsilon-Zeta Tau Alpha
thanks you for being our Adopt-A-Fra-
ternities this semester. We love you 11
PI KAPPA PHI, WE hope that you
had just as much fun at the pre-down-
town Thursday night! Thanks for a
great time I Love, Alpha Delta Pi
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to thank
Alexi Hasapis for putting together our
terrific retreat this past weekend.
Thank you for all your hard work. We
love You I
PI DELTA PLEDGES: OUR retreat
into Camelot, wasn't it great! It re-
minded us all of Christmas since we all
got gifts. Hope you all had a great
time. We love you guys! Remember,
unity is the key. Love, the sisters
LAMBDA CHI, THANKS FOR the
great time last Thursday. Love, the sis-
ters of Alpha Xi Delta
GOOD JOB TO THE members of Pi
Delta's Sports Teams. You kept your
heads high and played your hearts out
and that's all that ever mattered. You
all are the greatest! Love, the sisters
and new members
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA WEL-
COMES the new sisters! We're so
proud of all your hard work. Congratu-
lations! Love, your Gamma Sigma Sig-
ma sisters
EPSILON CHI NU: TO be the hew
guys in town, you really knew how to
show us a good time! The social was
great and we can't wait to see you
guys again I Love, the sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SIG-
MA Kick-Ball team on all of your victo-
ries. Love, your sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta: Katie Adams,
Betsy Bickers, Blair Briggs, Lauren Car-
rier, Lyndsay Cranston, Sarah Evans,
Amy Flanagan, Amy Frye, Meredith
Galloway, Stephanie Hernden, Kim
Noucus, Denise Papa, Denise Reaves,
Kelly Reynolds, Tracy Seme, Jamie Si-
gler, Katie Sweet, Becky Thomas, and
Ellen Watkins
TRAVEL
Includes Taxes
24 Ha Free Drinks
$419
Hot-Ida
oulti Baoch, Panama City, D
Spring Break Travel - Our 1 lid Year
1-800-678-6386
7 Nights Air&Hotcl - Sav $150 on Food & Drinks
HorMa
South Baoch, Ponoma City, Daytona, Cocoa Beoch
Yearl
FREE SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Put
posters on campus, earn free trips! No
selling required I Bahamas, Cancun,
Florida, Jamaica) Best prices and
trustworthy company! springbreak-
travo4.com 1-800-678-6386.
SPRING BREAK
��AAAA1SPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cancun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, & Florida. Group dis-
counts & daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, & go free! 1-800-234-
7007. http:www.endlesssummer-
todrs.com
���14 SPRING BREAK SHOPPING
days left! Now is the time to guarantee
the lowest rates and best hotels.Prices
will increase Dec. 15th! Leisure Tours
has packages to South Padre, Cancun,
Jamaica and Florida. Group discounts
for 6 or more!800-838-8203 or
www. leisuretours.com
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM SI78. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's. Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4wd's. Your area.
Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext A-3728 for
current listings.
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free
800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for current
listings.
GET PAID TO SHOP, eat out and
morel Free details. Send self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope to Busi-
ness Basics, PO Box 97-SP, West Ber-
lin, NJ 08091-0097.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID - Student
Financial Services profiles over
200,000 individual scholarships,
grants, loans, and fellowships - from
private and government funding
sources. A must for anyone seeking
Money for college! 1-800-472-9135 ext.
F53621. L
BlOWS POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings
ANNOUNCEMENTS
TEST PREPARATION WORK-
SHOPS: MONDAY from 11:00a.m
12:00 noon and Tuesday from 3:30-
4:30 p.m. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development will be of-
fering these programs the week of No-
vember 24th. If you are interested in
these workshops, contact the Center at
328-6661
MOW HIRING REPS!
http-Jwww.endle�umroertours.com
Book Today
VisaMC AmexDisc
1-800-234-7007
COUNTY CHAPTER OF The
American Diabetes Association meet-
ing Monday, December 1, at 7:00 p.m.
at the Gaskins-Leslie Building at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital. This
months topic is � "Healthy Holiday
Food and will feature regional dieti-
cians and diabetes educators, discuss-
ing ways of preparing diabetes-friend-
ly foods for the holidays. Also drawing
the winner of our fund-raising raffle.
Tickets for the TVVCR combination
will be sold until the drawing. Refresh-
ments and door prizes will also be
available.
MON. DEC. 1� Trombone Ensemble,
George Broussard, Director, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
SIiom llorsi' Farm
A Full Service Facility is seeking fart-Time Riding Instructors.
If you have Show Ring experience in hunt seat, or saddle seat.
This may be perfect for you. Wages starting at 10.00 per hour.
Contact Kevin at: 753 7248
For information about being included in our Church Directory call 328-6366.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES MAR-
KETING DEPARTMENT is looking
for a qualified graphic artist to fill 20
hoursweek part-time for Spring Se-
mester. $5.15hour. If interested con-
tact Todd King, Coordinator of Market-
ing at 328-1570.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT; PART
TIME Production Assistant needed to
work nights and weekend news. Tele-
vision Production background helpful,
duties include operating studio cam-
eras, teleprompter, audio board and
character generator. Send resume to
Human Resource Dept, WNCT-TV, PO
Box 898, Greenville, NC 27835. Pre-
employment drug test required. We
are an equal opportunity employer
MF.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE AL-
PHA XI Delta Soccer team for winning
the first playoff game. Good luck next
week
CONGRATULATIONS SHELLY FOR
WINNING first place in karaoke. You
did a great job. Lo- e, the sisters of Al-
pha Xi Delta
ALPHA XI DELTA, SIGMA Sigma
Sigma, and Phi Kappa Tau. thanks for
our social Thursday night. We all had
a great time and look forward to doing
it again. Thanks, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
ALPHA XI DELTA THANKS Phi Tau,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and Sigma for a
great time last Thursday.
Letters to
the Editor
un
CP
I
��
flW II III. , I





m
.
9 Thursday. November 20. 1897
sports
The East Carolinian
saV"
'Pack
attacks
Pirates
Tm realty happy with my
career Vve had here. My senior
year has been very frustrating
and very hard on me and it's
only going to make me a better
person in the future. I'm just
glad I got a chance to be apart
of ECU football
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS EDITOR
Larry Shannon
senior splii end
"M never forget it as long as I
Hue; M never forget this game.
Jeff Ken
sophomore linebacker
"We bum we had to stop the
running and when we didn 't
you saw what happened. We
lost focus on that and they
caught us"
Rod Coleman
junior linehnrter
"I'll defensively remember being
on the bad end of seeing the
goal posts go down
Tabari "Snoop" Wallace
senior cornerback
It had been 10 years since the
Pirates played in Carter-Fmley
Stadium, and it was 10 years ago
when the ECU fans stormed the
field and tore down the goal posts.
This time it was the Wolfpack fans
who took over the field after a 37-
24 win, that came down to the last
minute of play.
The game was a defensive
battle in the first half, with neither
team scoring in the first quartet
The Rrates got on the board first
when Andrew Bayes coasted a 24-
yard field goal through the
uprights; it would be the only
score on the board for eit"hcr team
in the first half.
Head Coach Steve Logan gave
credit to his defensive front, who
held State to just 92 yards at the
half.
"Our defensive front was
winning, it's just that simple
Logan said, "We weren't moving
Wolfpack fans storm the field after beating ECU 37-24. The game came down to the wire with the game tied at 24 apiece until the last minute of the game i
touchdowns to seal the win. ECU' season ends at 5-6.
State scomd twpr
PHOTOS er ADAM DJU.MRTQ
the kids or blitzing or anything �
our defensive front was winning
But it was the second half that
was a roller coaster ride for both
SK FOOTBALL PAGE It
SCORING SUMMARY
ECU 61Net yards rushingNCSU 224

lLTotal offensive plays68
K5
Possession Time35:05

23Fourth down conversions01

Quarter Tin toft
2nd 14:51 ECU-Andrew Bayes 24 yd field goal
3rd 13:58 NCSU-Torry Holt 68 yd pass from Jamie Barnette Chris Hensler kick)
03:36 NCSU-Hoit 10 yd pass from Barnette Hensler kick)
0t:13 ECLUason Nichols 3 yd pass from Dan Gonzalez Brantley Rivers kick, failed)
4th 12:49 NCSU-Tremayne Stephens 2 yd run Hensler kick)
08:59 ECU-Troy Smith 10 yd pass from Gonzalez Buck Coilins pass)
04:37 NCSU-Hensler 44 yard field goal
03:50 ECU-Marcellus Harris 40 yd pass from Gonzalez (Bayes kick)
. 00:31 NCSU-Bamette 1 yd run Hensler kick)
00:02 NCSU-Clayton White 34 yd interception return (Barnette rush failed)
ECtHMCSU
341
3-7
3-14
9-14
9-21
17-21
17-24
24-24
24-31
24-37

Young swimmer laps up success
Women's swim team
member making waves
STKPIIEN SCIIRAMM
STAFF III I KPt
This year's ECU women's swim team is
undefeated and appears to be well on their
way to retaining it's conference crown. The
Rrates' 5-0 start can be attributed to their
many swimmers returning from last season's
CM Championship team and a group of
talented newcomers. One of the most
impressive newcomers is freshman Samantha
Perry.
Ferry began swimming at an early age in her
hometown of McLean, Virginia.
"I started swimming when 1 was six or
seven Perry said. "I started with my summer
team and then in fifth grade I started
swimming with a club team. All my friends did
it and I was like 'Hey, I want to do that too I
loved it and 1 did pretty well
Perry continued to swim competitively.
However high school offered other
opportunities.
"When I got to high school I did a lot more
Samantha Perry
activities Perry said, "I did
every activity known to
man � field hockey,
studenc government, you
name it, I did it
These pursuits diverted
attention away from her
first love, swimming.
"1 had a really bad summer
swim season going into my
junior year Perry said, "I
said to myself'Hey if I want to swim in college,
I've got to get my butt in gear and start
working
With the aid of her swimming club coach,
she swam five days a week and worked on
improving her racing. The hard work paid off in
her strong showing in the prestigious junior
nationals last year.
Entering her first season at ECU, Head
Coach Richard Kobe decided to have Perry
train with a group of the other talented breast
strokers on the ECU squad.
"They're like a family Kobe said.
"I've never really trained this hard before,
so my times have been really fast Perry said.
Kobe also set goals for Perry to chase this
season.
"My main goal was to go under 2:20 in the
200, and go 1:04 in the 100 meter
breaststroke Perry said, "Hopefully, I'll do it
Perry's two events, the 100 meter and 200
meter breaststroke, cause her to employ two
different strategies.
"The hundred is more of a sprint. I just go
at it and let everything go Perry said.
"Since the 200 is a longer race, you have to
stretch it out more. My stroke is made for the
200 so I can do it easier than I can do the 100
Perry said. "You've got to stretch out the first
fifty, kick it up a little on the second, do your
hardest on the third and give it all you got on
the fourth
The combination of training, effective
strategy and a drive to perform have led to an
exceptional start to Perry's freshman season. In
the first five meets, she has not lost a race and
has been a major factor in the team's 5-0 start.
Her fast times have impressed her coach.
"She could be our top breast strokcr Kobe
said, "She has a lot of potential
In less than a season of collegiate
swimming, Perry has a chance to put herself
among the top swimmers in ECU history.
"She has a good shot at our hardest varsity
records for girls, the 100 and 200 meter
breaststroke. Kobe said.
Perry's success is not surprising, though the
time it took her to attain it is. Her perfect
record shows that she is valuable addition to an
Runners end season
at regional meet
Men place 20th;
women finish 22nd
Jeremy Anderson
SKNIOK WRITER
The ECU men's and women's cross
country teams brought their season
to a close Nov. 15 at the NCAA
District III Regional Meet, hosted by
Furman University in Greenville, S.C.
The men placed 20th overall, while
the women placed 22nd.
The men had no finish below
seventh during the regular season.
Junior Jamie Mance led the Pirates all
season, including the regionals,
where he placed 27th, with a time of
31:35, on the 10,000 meter course.
Sophomore Justin England also ran
well this season, being the top Pirate
finisher in four meets.
The Lady Pirate runners also had a
'successful season. The Pirates
matched the school's best finish at
the CAA Championships, placing
third.
"Our main goal was our conference
finish Head Coach "Choo" Justice
said. "It was very hard to beat the top
two teams, but we really wanted to
place higher than UNCW"
At the regionals, the Lady Pirates
were paced by sophomore Robin
Bates. Bates ran a time of 19:27 on
the 5,000 meter course to finish 91st.
"Last year she (Bates) didn't run
well. Thisyearshewasoneofourtop
runners Justice said.
The Lady Pirates were led by their
four seniors, Karen Reinhard, Emily
Linncmeier, Kerry Vmsel, and
Barbara Wood.
"They (seniors) did a very good
job this year. They worked hard,
provided leadership, and were a very
good influence on the younger
runners Justice said.
According to Justice, the Lady
Pirates were in a "rebuilding" season.
"We made a lot of progress this!
year and we will need to continue to
make progress next season Justice
said.
lb ensure that the progress will
continue, the coaches are looking
toward recruiting in the off season.
"We are definitely looking at some
top recruits Justice said.
i
I
Three-game sweep ends season
Volleyball team loses
in first round of CAA
tournament
Pmi. Kaplan
SI.Mus WKI IKK
The ECU women's volleyball team
finished their season last Friday
afternoon at George Mason
University in the quarter final round
of the Colonial Athletic Association
�layoffs. The Lady Pirates lost to
ln,es Madison University � one of
this season's rival schools � in only
three games, making for a long bus
ride back to Greenville.
The Pirates were leading for the
majority of the first game and at one
time were up 8-5, before James
Madison went on an 8-2 burst to take
the lead 13-10. The Pirates fought
back to force a tie at 13-13. The
Dukes were able to score again and
with ECU only down one, senior Beth
Tyson of JMU served it over to win
the game.
James Madison jumped out to a
quick 11-0 lead in the second game
and handily won. But ECU would not
give up easily, they battled hard in the
deciding third game until the Dukes
scored six of the games last nine
points to sweep the Pirates back to
Greenville.
The Dukes won 15-13, 15-3, and
15-11. They were led by sophomore
Lindsay Collingwood and freshman
Sara Kidd. Collingwood finished the
match with 12 kills and 10 digs, while
Kidd finished with 11 kills and 17
digs. Beth Tyson also contributed
with eight kills and eight digs. James
Madison improved their record to 17-
13 and continued on to the next
round to be defeated by George
Mason University in four games.
On the other side of the net, the
Pirate game leaders were freshmen
Sarah Kary, Kristin Warner and Cinta
Claro. Kary led the pirates with 14
kills; Warner and Claro each finished
with 10 digs. ECU finished out their
season with a final record of 16 wins
and 19 losses.
The CAA tournament crown was
taken by American University, who
beat George Mason University in five
games.
Women
Lost to Virginia Tech Friday, 39-68. Host N.C. State tonight at 7 p.m.
November 29 they host UNC Charlotte at 5:45 p.m then December 2, the Lady Pirates
host Wake Forest at 7 p.m.
Men
The men's four game road schedule has been to kind for the first three games. On November 15.
lost to West Virginia 66-87: November 18, lost to Saint Louis, 58-70: this past Saturday
lost to UNC Asheville. 61-69. Tonight they play at St. Joseph's.
The men return home November 29 to host Ferrum at 8 p.m.

?:A
m
��
.






10 Tuesday. November 25, 1997
0
The East Carolinian
Football
inimued from page 9
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teams. State came out on the
opening drive and on their second
play quarterback Jamie Barnette
found Tony Holt and 68 yards
later, he was in the endzone, 7-3
State.
The Wolfpack would score
another touchdown towards the
end of the third quarter on
another Barnette to Holt
connection. ECU answered with
1:13 left when Dan Gonzalez hit
Jason Nichols for the 3-yard score
which put ECU within five
points. 14-9 NCSU.
Then came the fourth quarter
where fans definitely got their
monev's worth.
Again the Wolfpack came out
strong and five plays into the
fourth quarter Tremayne
Stephens rushed for a touchdown.
ECU was down, 21-9.
But the Pirates weren't going
to watch their ship sink. Gonzalez
found Troy Smith for the 10-yard
score and ECU was down just 21-
17.
Logan called for the onside
kick, which was recovered by
ECU'S Tabari Wallace, but a late
flag nullified the kick as ECU was
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called for offsides. Logan said the
penalty was caused by a freshman.
"Some freshman, I'm not going
to tell you who Logan said.
"Look in the obituaries, you'll find
out tomorrow (Sunday.)"
The Wolfpack got the ball back
and scored a field goal, 24-17
NCSU.
With 3:50 left in the game,
Gonzalez connected with
Marcellus Harris for the 40 yard
score and the 24-24 tie.
It was up to the defense, to try
to hold off the Wolfpack scoring
drive. But Stephens turned up the
heat. Four plavs later, he rushed 48
vards down to the ECU 19-yard
line. That set up an eventual
Barnette touchdown and once
again the Pirates were down, 31-
24. But with :31 left, ECU still
had a chance to get down the field
for another touchdown. But three
incomplete passes in a row, and
then an interception by Clayton
White, who took it into the
endzone to ice the win, sent the
Pirates home with a heartbreaking
37-24 defeat.
'They made plays when they
had to Gonzalez said. "Came
down to the end there and they
put the ball in the endzone. You
just can't say enough about the
wav they came out
Stephens finished the day with
170 vards and one touchdown, and
Holt caught two touchdown
passes.
INoseguard Travis Darden
personally knows Holt and knew
he would be the go-to guy for the
Wolfpack.
'We knew Torry Holt was a play
maker like that and he brought
the team back Darden said. "He
came out and proved that was a
play maker
Dan Gonzalez ended the day
with 26 completions, 259 yards
and three touchdowns. On the
ground, Jamie Wilson and Scott
Harlev were the leading rushers
with 27 vards each. The leading
receivers' for the Pirates were
Jason Nichols with 54 yards,
Marcellus Harris with 53 yards.
Buck Collins had 51 yards and
Larry Shannon finished with 50
yards.
After the game, the fans
stormed the field, tore down both
goalposts and carted them off.
Instead of an ECU riot as they
called it 10 years ago, this year it
was a State celebration. It's a
scene the ECU players will never
forget
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"I'll definitely remember being
on the bad end of seeing the goal
posts go down Wallace said.
ECU was hoping to end the
season with a win for their fourth
straight winning season, but came
up a game short, ending the year
at 5-6.
"I'm disappointed that we
came out with a losing season
Darden said. "1 would have never
dreamed of this happening to us
like it did today (Saturday), but it
happened and we're going to learn
from it and we're going to start
winning again
And winning is what the Pirates
will look to do next year,
something that is already on their
minds.
"It was a tough season; it was a
rebuilding season, so we're looking
forward to next year linebacker
Rod Coleman said.
Fellow linebacker Jeff Ken-
feels the same way.
"We have an excellent defense
returning; the offense looks good
returning Kerr said. "I'm looking
forward to next year
Playing his last game in an
ECU uniform, Gonzalez said since
his team didn't get down and give
up, that should help them out
next year.
"We lost today, but I don t think
that puts a damper on the effort
the guvs gave this season and
that's reallv going to help them
out next season Gonzalez said.
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�kM
2 Tuesday. November 25. 1997
focu
w1
LU11
The East Carolinian
- y�'
"College students
should strive to put
a percent of monthly
Students
have options for
saving money
money into equity,

Bill Collier
stock broker at Pitkin Partners
Help prevent future
problems
HOLLY TllRAILKILL
FETl RE WRITER
"I'm broke" is a phrase often used by-
college students with financial worries.
However, there are ways students
can save money now which will
help them avoid future financial
woes.
"College students should strive to
put a percent of monthly money
into equity said Bill Collier, a
stock broker at Pitkin Partners in
Greenville. Collier said that with
today's stock market, students
can expect to see a 10 percent increase in
investments at the end of the year.
But many students cannot wait that
long to see results. "I wish that I did have
an extra amount of money to save for my
future said Jennifer Ward, an ECU
student. "Most money that I have is spent
on food, bills and spending money
Other options are available to save
money.
"The best way that 1 recommend
saving money is through an automatic
transfer says Tracey Sawyer, a personal
banker at Wachovia.
Sawyer said that this is an automatic
draft system that would withdraw a given
amount each month. This money goes
directly into your savings account. She
added that whether it be $10 or $25 a
month, students are usually happy with
the results.
According to Sawyer saving this way is
effortless. The only complaint is that few
withdrawals are allowed out of this
account.
"This is to ensure that the person is
actually saving Sawyer said.
Sortie people disagree with these
methods of" saving.
"If I knew that I could have money
drafted each month without bouncing
checks, I would be interested said Susan
Mclin, an ECU student. Mclin said that
keeping a personal budget on things such
as groceries, helps her to save.
"I never go over the amount that I set
for myself; 1 don't want to get myself in
trouble Mclin said.
One student has come up with an
unusual way to save money and still keep
it accessible to her.
"I find that sending money to my
parents is helpful said Julie Tanner,
another ECU student. She admits that it
is better that her parents can't tell her no
when she asks them for money. They just
send some of her own money.
Whether you save through a bank, the
stock market or by yourself, most financial
advisers find that it is important to
prepare for the times to come.
"You definitely wouldn't regret it
Collier said.
Financ
At least 50 million, or
about one-fourth of US
households, have an
average unpaid credit
card balance of at least
$5000.
-If one never added to the
debt and made the
minimum payments
required, it would take
472 payments, or 40
years, to pay off $5000.
Nearly 45 percent of all
undergraduates, more
than 50 percent of
graduate and 75 percent
of professional students
finance all or part of their
educations with student
loans.
sorces: Consumer Federation of America and Nolo's
Legal Encyclopedia
In-State
tuition
not easy to set
Students pay more due
to residency laws
DF.ANNA SPAETTI
FEATUBS WRITER
"On the application
they asked why I was
in NC. I wrote down
I was engaged to
someone who was
a resident and I
wanted to go to one
of the best teaching
schools, which was
ECU. I thought I
had all of the
requirements, but
they told me I didn V.
Colleen Thompson
The problem is not unique, but the stories
are.
To Colleen Thompson in-state tuition
meant that she could stay in NC and
support herself. Thompson had everything
in her name, including her house and her
car. When she applied for in-state
residency, she thought she had all the
requirements. She was wrong.
Residency officials told her she didn t
make enough monev on her own to pay
out-of-state tuition. Therefore, she
couldn't receive in-state tuition.
To many students, residency
classification doesn't mean anything. But
to others, it means that they are paying
more than four times the amount of tuition
as in-state residents. Yes, students made
the choice to go to school out of their
home state, but what about students who
are trying to make it on their own?
Sc-JECU"
Ik2u�gh?S�st year at ECU. After her parents moved out-of-state last August,
tharhe SdSed becausegshe did not claim independent on her taxes last year. She
couldn't undeand why she was denied. She works full time as assistant manager of a
clothtg store ZThas'everything from her car registration to her msurance, and an
aPrCotntehrmann,unior social work major from Virginia, thought about applying for
in-state SKR, after seeing what many of her friends went through, she deeded
"ThSdfonn other people that it was really hard. People told me it was almost
'TarknowrhrmVnfpeople are upset when she denies in-state tuition to them
But she alSsuesses that it �not only her decision; she has to follow the guidelines set
up b"lawThe Taws are here to protect the people of the state who are paying taxes,
Harris said.
"Taxpayers and supporters of North Carolina
supplement each student, in-state and out-of-state,
Harris said. ,
Thev don't support out-of-state students as mucn,
and that is where the different rates of tuition come
'They (the
taxpayers) are
supporting
the state and
their dollars
are bein"
invested back
into the state
economy
Jackie Harris
university's classification officer
"They (the taxpayers) are supporting the state and
their dollars are being invested back into the state
economy Harris said.
Students who apply for in-state tuition should tninK
about their claim. If your parents are still supporting
you, then there is a good possibility that your claim
will be denied.
Rick Zellman. a sophomore, who is an independent
student, received in-state tuition. For Zellman, the
process was pretty easy. (
"1 got in-state tuition. 1 paid the taxes that 1 nadn t
paid for the previous year. I sent the state a check. I
just got it that way. 1 didn't meet any of the other
standards. I had lived in the state in the military, but
that didn't really count Zellman said.
"There has to be a preponderance for evidence to
reflect that a student is here to make North Carolina
their home Harris said, "not just to go to school. If
their parents reside in another state, they must be
an independent, self-supporting student in NC.
Housing, food
biggest expenses
THAODEUS JENKINS
KEATI RK WRITE!
college education is expensive. By the time you've paidfor
tuition fees, and books, there isn't a lot left over for rent, food
clothing and recreation. How do students manage? What do
they spend their money on? .
For most students, no matter what their income, housing
and food are the two biggest expenses. For example; 21-year-
old Julissa Lopez, who lives off-campus, spends about$243, on
rent and utilities, $250 for clothing, and $100 for food each
month. Lopez, a senior form Fayetteville, has an annual
income of about $15,000, which comes from jobs, grants, and
"1 think that my spending habits are like other students;
we get money and want to go shopping and eat out, Lopez
531 Andrew Coleman, a junior accounting and managemem,
who lives off-campus, said he has an annual income ot $7,WU
from scholarships and a part-time job as a supply clerkat Rtt
Memorial Hospital. He estimates that he spends $600 for
bills, $50 for food, $60 for gas, $50 for clothes and $125 tor
beer and going out to clubs each month.
"When vou stay off campus you have more bills to pay, but
as long as you manage your money right, the cost will equal
out" Coleman said. .
On campus students spend most of their money on
clothing, food, and the telephone bill. Keisha Shepperson a
freshman from Richmond, VA, lives on campus She
estates that she spends $100 per month on the telephone
bill and $50 a month on food.
"My problem is the telephone bill. My bill last month was
$80 1 make calls to home a lot and at the end of the month
when I get my bill, 1 wish that 1 didn't even pick up the
And you
thought your
credit card bills
were bad. . .
As of Nov. 13,1997, the
Public Debt for the US is
$5,430,247,270,129.23
source: Bureau of the Public Debt
phone Shepperson said. .�!�. a
Another student living on campus said she receives a
monthly income from her parents and a pan-time job as a disc
jSy. She estimates spending $140 a month on clothes and
"If you figure, clothes can run you anywhere from $25 to
$125 a month, depending on what you want and where you
buy it fmm; food colts about $5 to $10 each time that you eat
our CD's cost about $15 to $20; to get my hair done costs me
$25 a week and if I go out to a club or the movies, it costs me
arTs each time that I go. I would actually be spending
nSre if I SS&Z ay mphone bill like. I did 1-year but
my mother pays it for me this year, so that is more money that
I have now the student said.
I Did
you
know?
Did you know that
63 of students
spend between
$1-20 per week on
bars and clubs
while 70 of
students spend
between $1-30 on
groceries per
week?
astcarolinian's
foctl
ASH I.ROVSTKK Editor
CELESTE Wll-SON Managing Editor
ANGELA KOENIG Special Feature Ednoi
OWID SOliTHERLAND Special Feaiure Designer
ThP nuroose is to take an in-depth look at issoes of importance to students and
facB at ECU This issue is the sixth of six which will appear this semester.
Focus is a class project for Shearlean Duke's Bas.c News Writing class.
-
"�� Jr
� r m �MLiyi� �1






r
SSB
3 TtiMdtv. November 25. 1997
foe
section
The East Carolinian
A
Emergency loans
available through
Up to $50 can be
borrowed by students
Michael waggett
FEATUtE WtfTE
In Oct. 1967, a student at ECU wanted to
buy a new pair of eyeglasses but had no
money. The student was able to buy the
glasses that he needed, and he didn't have
to wait on a paycheck, phone home for
money, or make a trip to the bank. Instead
he applied for and received a Student
Government Emergency Loan.
Far more than 30 years ECU students
have been taking advantage of this little
known program, according to Penny
Doughtie, manager of the Student Rind
Accounting Office.
The office, located in Mendenhall
Student Center, disperses funds from the
SGA to campus programs including the
Student Union, Minority Student Affairs,
Media Board and University Unions.
"It was put in place to speed up the
process for students, and to better
accommodate student organizations with
smaller orders Doughtie said.
The emergency loan account
available through this office was originally so
that students could borrow up to $25.
"As more students have borrowed and
paid the loans back over the years, the fund
has been able to keep regenerating itself
Doughtie said.
As a result any ECU student may still
apply for this financial assistance. The only
difference between now and 30 years ago is
that students do not have to list any reason
for needing a loan and the amount a student
can borrow has increased to $50.
The loan comes as a totally new piece of
information to some students.
"I've never heard of it Sophomore Andy
Vincent said.
"Students can find all the information
that they need to know about the Student
Government Emergency Loans on the
ECU web page Doughtie said.
The loans can be for as little as $5. A
surcharge of $2 is also added to each loan,
which must be repaid within 30 days.
Students must not have defaulted on a loan
during the previous semester. Receiving the
loan is as simple as going to the office with
no tags recorded and filling out the
application.
Doughtie said that the numbers of
students who are applying for and receiving
the loans varies from month to month. She
reports that there were 20 loans issued in
August, 13 in September and 17 in October.
In the beginning of the semester, it
seems like we give out more loans
Doughtie said. "One girl came in the other
day and her electricity was about to be cut
off. She took the money and hurried
downtown to pay the utility bill
It b too late to get loans for this semester,
The cut-off date was Nov. 3, but students
may once again take advantage of these
loans next semester.
Steps for
Open checking and savings accounts
Always pay bills on time
time
Close all unused credit accounts
Use cash if the item will be used up by the
time the credit card bill arrives
can cause
debt problems
"Living is expensive with food,
gas, drinking downtown. My
friends and I go to a nice
restaurants once a week. Ifs a
ritual, but I guess I'll have to
Students need to keep
gpod credit rating
LEXAN BLANCHARD
FEATURE W�I 1 Eit
A 21-year-old ECU junior has credit card
debts of more than $3000. Even after
working and saving more than $1,300 over
the summer, she has less than $100 in her
bank account now. So, when she needs to
buy something she whips out her credit
cards, creating more debt.
"Living is expensive with food,
drinking downtown the student said,
friends and I go to a nice restaurants once a
week. It's a ritual, but I guess I'll have to
stopjt
The student has discovered one of the
many major pitfalls of credit cards: paying
them back.
"I need a job the student said. "I don't
have a job and that's the sad part
The. college years are among the most
formidable years of a person's life and an
important part of these years is the need to
establish credit. But in this cashless society,
students must watch for the pitfalls of easy
credit, and remember that the key to
survival is to establish good credit.
To get a credit card, students don't even
have to have a job. College students are
considered a group of people with
potentially high future earnings. For this
reason, credit card companies often forgo
their minimum income requirements,
usually $15,000 to $25,000 a year, when
students apply.
Credit card companies also figure that
students without jobs are connected to
their parents' wallets. If a student cannot
pay, the companies believe that the parents
will help them out, not wanting their
children's credit to be tarnished at such an
early age.
The main reason for credit card
companies targeting college students is to
instill brand loyalty, according to Money
magazine. Numerous studies have proven
that people keep their first credit card for
10 or more years. The earlier a credit card
company attracts a student, the better
chance it has of establishing a lucrative
relationship with that customer.
What most students do not understand
is the credit card companies' process of
billing. The average minimum monthly
payment is only two percent of the card's
balance. If paid at that rate, paying of a
$1,900 credit card balance would take more
than 23 years. In the end, not only would
you have to pay the original money but also
an additional $4,790 in interest at the
average annual interest rate of about 18
percent.
Credit cards are not the only pitfalls in
establishing credit. Buying a car is one of
the first big purchases a person makes but
keeping up with the payments can be
difficult if you do not budget correctly
Most college students do not qualify for
car financing, according to Donald Mann,
Business Manager at Merritt-Williams Ford-
Jeep-Eagle in Morehcad City.
"Even if they arc working, the majority of
college students have no established credit
record Mann said. "Most need their mom
and dad to co-sign for them
In order to qualify for a car loan, a person
must be employed and have the means to
make the monthly payment.
"With a car payment it is easy to overstep
your bounds Mann said.
Mann also noted the frequency with
which he sees unpaid student loans as a
barrier to car loan qualification.
So what does the average college student
need to do to establish good credit?
According to Helen Huntley, a financial
writer for St. Petersburg Times, opening
checking and savings accounts is the first
step. Keeping your accounts in balance is
good practice, and it may help you when
applying for a loan with the bank down the
road.
stop It.
ECU student
A second step is to apply for a credit card.
There arc many different types, but a good
one to start with is a secured card. With a
secured card, you can deposit money and
charge against this balance. This is a good
way to practice before applying for a major
credit card.
Third, always pay your bills on time. If
the telephone company or your landlord has
trouble collecting from you, they can file a
report with a credit bureau. This is also true
for doctors, lawyers and other professionals.
Finally, apply for only one credit card or
loan at a time. Lots of inquiries on your
credit report is considered negative.
What if you already have credit cards and
a car or student loan and may be headed for
trouble? Changing your habits now can help
keep your credit record in good standing.
First, when trying to decide between paying
cash and charging something use cash if the
item will be used by the time you get your
credit card bill, according to Gerri
Detweilcr, author of The
Ultimate Credit Handbook.
One ECU junior said, "I
bought some gin and tonic with
my credit card the other night
because I was out of cash
Following the above guideline
would rule this out, along with
the purchasing of groceries and
gas with credit. Detweiler advises
that if you can eat or drink it, buy
it with cash.
Another good idea is to close
all unused accounts, according to
Helen Huntley. Available credit
can be counted against you when
applying for a loan, or even trying
to rent an apartment or house.
Huntley also advises
consumers to clear up any
errors on your credit report.
Each credit reporting
agency has its own
guidelines for doing this. Or
you can add an explanation
to any negative credit item
giving circumstances for it.
The Consumer Credit Counseling
Service (CCCS) can help you. Offices can
normally be found in every county The
CCCS office in Greenville is a member of
the National Foundation for Consumer
Credit. According to Kathy Taylor, an
employee at CCCS, the organization's
services arc always free. They offer a debt
repayment program, in which CCCS acts as
a mediator between the debtor and the
debtee.
"But CCCS cannot help you with
secured credit items, like houses or cars
Taylor said. "Our goal is to help people be
debt free
Through their debt repayment program,
CCCS works to reduce the monthly
payment and interest rate. The majority of
debtors are willing to work with debtees,
Taylor said.
"Even if they are working, the
majority of college students have
no established credit record
Mann said. "Most need their
mom and dad to co-sign for
them.n
Donald Mann
Business Manager at Merritt-Williams Ford-Jeep-
Eagle in Morehead City
Are you in Debt Trouble?
1. You use credit cards where you used to pay cash, such as at the grocery store and restaurants.
2. You have depleted your savings or worse, used cash advances from credit cards to pay past due bills.
3. You have lost track of how much you owe.
4. You put off paying your telephone or utility bills in order to pay high credit card bills and other debts.
5. You regularly receive letters from collection agencies.
In you answered yes to most of these questions, you have a debt problem.
Here are the
steps to take
to receive a
Student
Government
Emergency
m Go to the SGA
with a valid and
current ECU ID.
3� Be sure your
school record is
not tagged for
unpaid bills and
that you did not
default on a loan
during the previous
semester.
For More
Information
Concerning Your
Credit
Contact Greenville
Consumer Credit
Counseling Service
205 SW Greenville
Blvd. (919)355-1156
The three national
credit bureaus can be
reached at the phone
numbers below. Fees
for individual credit
reports can range
from free to $8.
111
(510) 689-1912
Check you credit report
on-line at
www.consumerinfo.com
Contact credit card
companies on-line at
Check with your local
bank
source: Bank Rate Monitor
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, f

TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and information about campus issues and activities.
STUDENT RADIO STATION
WZMB 91.3 FM
Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of music including alternative, jazz, metal, rap and more, j
MINORITY MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up four times during the Fall and Spring terms for discuss.on of the problems and issues facing ECU's minorities.
LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
Rebel
Pick us up annually in the late Spring to view a showcase of campus literary and artistic creations.


L
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
ECU STUDENT MEDIA
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 25, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 25, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1255
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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