The East Carolinian, November 20, 1997






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THURSDAY
4MVEMBB) 20,1997
EASTCAROUNAlfffiVERSJTY
6REBWILLE, NORTH CAROUNA
SGA allocates funds to cam
anizations
Fees cut in several
departments
CRAIG D. RAMEY
StOTVIWTHI
Student life is expected to become more
convenient due to an increasein funds.
Mendcnhall Student Center and
Student Health will show the most changes
from the additional money.
"Mcndenhaii wiU benefit tremendously"
said Sean McManus, SGA vice president. An
increase in technology fees will go toward a
new computer lab in the basement of
Mendenhail, making up the entire East
Wing. There will be 44 new computers in
the kb. There are also plans to buiid a study
cafe in the basement with a television and
desks.
"We're hoping to extend the hours so it
will be open during the more non-
traditional, says McManus. "We're hoping
that will make it a little more user-friendly.
"When the construction on Student
Health is completed, you won't even
recognize the building McManus said.
"Plans to renovate the inside and add on to
the outside will make the building three
times its present size. This change will not
occur overnight but in stages. The small
waiting and examination rooms will expand
to make it a more comfortable experience for
students
These renovations are expected to begin
within the next six months.
Monday, Nov. 17, the SGA voted on the
distribution of the extra $36 each student
will pay in fees. The biggest increase the
State of North Carolina will albw is 5
percent of the previous year's fees. After
different departments campaigned for the
new funds, there was an additional $8 that
needed ro be trimmed to drop the figure to
$36, which is the maximum increase.
Technology, athletics and recreational
services were among those trimmed.
Some of the departments requesting
funds were Student Recreational Services,
Student Life, and Informational Technology.
Also at the meeting was Vice Chancellor
of Financial Affairs Richard Brown. Brown
was present to answer any distribution
questions that students attending the
meeting had. After each speaker explained
his or her plans for new funds, the students
asked specific questions about fund
distribution. Following the students'
questions, a motion was made by a student
legislator to make the final decision.
"This decision has been in the hands of
student government for several years
because it was thought that they would have
a better idea of where students would like
their money to be spent McManus said.
Prerequisite: COMPUTER
Do you feel computers
should become
requirements for students?
"That's what computer labs are for.
What about the people who already
haw computers?"
Angela Grumpier
snohiwnre
" think if a student wants a computer
they should get a job and buy it
Buss Holder
sophomore
" don't think so because most people
have their own access to their own
computers
Jill Suggs
sophomore
"Yes, because everything is going to
computers and it's hard to get through
school if you don't know how to use
them
Brandon Waters
sophomore
Individual ownership of computers, Rke the one John Moses is working on, may become
npnwMnt for all student attending college, raising tuition costs to cover the price.
mSTO SY ADAM DAiTORTO
Additional requirements for students may
include computers
ANGF.LA KOENIG
STAFF WRITER
Students at Western Carolina
University are going to be taking
something to classes next semester.
The school's trustees recently
approved a new rule requiring
computers for students leaving ECU
students
wondering if this
idea may
become a trend
that spreads
east.
Director of
Computing and
Information
Systems Blake
Price said that
the Information
Resources
Coordinating
Council has
discussed the
idea of requiring
computers for
students on campus.
"In the last couple of IKCCJ
meetings it's been discussed, but I
think it s more of a discussion to see if
it could be done Price said. "It's
something we need to look very
carefully at
This would be accomplished
through an increase in tuition but
could be covered through financial aid.
While some ECU students believe
this would be a positive change, few
desire an
increase in
tuition.
"I think the
tuition is high
enough already
said Heather
Smith, a
sophomore
elementary
education major.
According to
Price most
personal
computers range
from $1500 to
$2000, but if
they become
Hpu) much monetj null
you haue to ronjorp
up to buij a ntnu
computer ?
For the monitor
S199S799
For the computer
S799-S2999
mandatory for ail students some
departments may require more specific
programs or systems which could increase
the price more.
Students who already own computers are
not enthusiastic about this possibility either.
SEE COMPUTERS. PAGE 4
Students and faculty representing many organizations on campus attended the S8A meeting on Monday
Nov. 17 that covered budget distribution.
PHOTO W JOCEUfH FRIEDMAN
Stock market drop means
little to campus investments
Short term change does
not affect long term
increases
jENKt.Pie. VlCKKRS
STAFF WtlTF.I
Although the stock market prices fell a few
weeks ago, ECU wasn't affected.
Richard Brown, vice chancellor for
administration and finance, said that short
term increases and decreases in the market
don't change anything at all if one looks at
the long term increases in the market.
"S&P 500 began at 720 and increased to
983; the decrease to 928 a few weeks ago
doesn't compare to the overall increase in
value, which is still a 25 percent increase for
the year. The stock market is up
significantly since Jan. 1. The recent
decline was only giving back some of the
return. The Dow Jones Industrial average is
still up 17.4 percent, which is still a great
rate of return Brown said.
The university has a significant portion of
their investments and endowments in
domestic common stock. ECU also has a
sizable portion of their portfolio in fixed rate
investment bonds, which moderate the
future rate of return. When the stock
market goes down, the investment return
also goes down.
"ECU'S portfolio is extremely diversified
to reduce the risk Brown said.
ECU has gone through considerable
measures to ensure a stable position within
the stock market. Jim Lamer, vice
chancellor for institutional advancement,
explained that the stocks of ECU are long-
term investments. "The return this year has
been significantly better for ECU Loftier
said.
"Our stocks are arranged in a Strategic
Asset Allocation. This is a concept that won
a Nobel Prize. This is the most significant
way to invest in securities to maximize the
potential for gain and minimize the
potential for loss Lanier said.
The stocks are also placed in growi
companies like Gateway and Microsoft
which have good records of growth.
SEE STOCK. PAGE 4
t.
Chemistry majors:
Demand at all time hi
FOR MORE INFORMATION
t h a east Carolinian
ONLINE
www.studentmedis.ecu.edu
Intro class
enrollment jumps
from 400 to 600
CRAIG D. RAMEY
STAFF WRITER
ECU's Chemistry Department �
has plenty to offer, to keep up
with the field's fast growing
pace.
According to the American
Chemical Society (ACS), the
number of students graduating
with BS degrees in Chemistry
is at an 18 year high. This
trend first hit ECU a tew years
ago and is continuing to
progress more than ever.
We have been running at
SEE CHEMISTRY. PAGE 4
Employment situations for future chemists end engineers, like
Jamie Lawley, is unfolding as one of the brightest in a number of
years.
PHOTO 8� ADAM BAIMMITO

TODAY
partly cloudy
High 55
Low 35
TOMORROW
showers
High 85
Low 44
Did you know that there
are approximately 1764
parking places for staff on
campus and 4658 parking
places for all other
permits?
Cnn'f i jusr
60 TO C0tle"6e
uitKoor sewc
PRCfVkWbA?
opinion6
Required computers:
Idea needs careful
consideration
lifestyle.
gobble, gobble:
Thanksgiving turkeys
await final hours
sports.
10
Watch out. Wolfpack;
Pirates ready to paint
Raleigh purple
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
Shone
28-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu






2 Thursday, November 20. 1997
W
The East Carolinian
Students unaware, ignore drinking policy
during football games
the state
Joint Venture Service
Center adds Nash jobs
ROCKY MOUNT (AP)� A
new service center formed Ty
Digital Video Express, or Divx,
will create about 550 jobs in Nash
County, officials announced
Tuesday.
The facility will be in the
63,000-square-foot former Rack-
N-Sack store in Cross Roads Plaza
Shopping Center in Rocky
Mount. The center is scheduled
to open in the spring of 1998.
Divx is a joint venture of
Circuit City Stores Inc, and the
entertainment law firm of Ziffrcn,
Brittcnham, Branca and Fischer of
Los Angeles, and manufactures
the Divx video disc.
UNC technology chief
pursues job in business
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � A top
information technology
administrator at UNC-Chapcl
Hill left for a new job in Florida
this month and took 12 of his
colleagues with him.
William Graves, who joined the
UNC faculty in 1967 and directed
the Institute for Academic
Technology, resigned from his
director's job on Nov.
1. He is the new senior vice
president for COLLEG1S, a
Maitland, Fla consulting
company that teaches computer
skills to college faculty and staff.
He will remain on the
" "University of North Carolina at
, Chapel Hill faculty but is on leave
of absence officially from his
. professorship in mathematics.
ECU to host TransPark
conference
ECU will host the 4th annual
Global TransPark Conference
Friday, Nov. 21 in Mendenhall
Student Center. Governor James
Hunt will attend. The conference
begins at 10 a.m. with an address
by Garland Garrett, secretary of
transportation, on the future of
Global TransPark in North
Carolina. Norris Tolson, secretary
of commerce, will also speak
during the morning session.
Governor Hunt's remarks will
come during the 12:30 p.m.
luncheon. Parking may not be
available near the student center
and ECU will provide a shuttle
service so that conference
participants can park at Minges
Coliseum.
ArtSmart Series offers
ice skating production
ECU's ArtSmart Series will
give selected youngsters from the
public schools a special showing of
"Hans Brinker and the Silver
Skates" at 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
Friday, Nov. 21 in Wright
Auditorium. The stage will be
fitted with synthetic ice to allow
the performers to do their figure
skating and race routines. The
public presentation of the show is
Saturday at 2 p.m. Advance public
tickets are $9 for adults and $5 for
children. All tickets at the door
are $9. Call the ECU Central
Ticket Office for information.
Ecology, art addressed in
lecture Friday
Law clearly stated in
Clue Book
VICKIE BUCHAN
STAFF WRITKR
Buffalo wings, beer and good friends are famous
for making tailgating a memorable event among
Pirate fans, but officials say many people are
unaware of tailgating policy.
ECU officials want fans to have a good time,
but unfortunately most
people still don't know the
rules when it comes to
bringing and consuming
alcoholic beverages.
"It's basically common
sense said Associate Dean
of Students Karen Boyd.
"Anytime you have 30,000
people packed into an area
where a drug is around,
you're asking for trouble.
Alcohol is shown to be found
in high violence crimes, not
to mention it plays a pan in
coordination issues
Despite many attempts
to educate the public on
what is against the law,
officials are still finding just
as many people bteaking the
law without knowing what it
is they are doing wrong.
Most students don't even
know there is an alcoholic
violation law.
Boyd says the law is
clearly stated in the Clue Book
under the Code of Conduct on
what is acceptable and unacceptable with the
alcohol policv. .
The law states that if a student is not of age
to drink (N.C. law states you have to be 21),
then the student can't drink anywhere on
campus. This law holds true for all universities
in North Carolina. Most students are aware of
state law, but there are a few more rules that
students are unclear on.
For anyone 21 or older, drinking can only be
done in university approved areas
Greenville which is concerned with the
consumption of alcohol.
Non-fortified beer and wine js permitted
outside the gates of Minges. Liquor is not
allowed, whether already mixed or straight from
the bottle. Drinking alcohol after passing the
gates is against the law.
Boyd also said that many times it allows those
drinking students to sober up before driving
home.
"All of those people at the games had to get
there somehow and chances are that they all
There is an approved law of where to drink at
football games and what is prohibited, which was don't have designated drivers, Boyd said,
formed by a state law and the municipal part of
Many students, like the ones tailgating above, are unaware of the policies against drinking alcohol while tailgating.
PHOTO BY AMAM0A PROCTOR
, � � .�
Mysterious 'toxic cloud1
leaves school children
coughing, hacking
MAZATLAN, Mexico (AP) �
About 50 children at a Mazatjan
elementary school had coughing
fits after a mysterious "toxic
cloud" was reported near their
school, Mexico's news agency said
Tuesday.
Mazatlan fire chief Vicente
Robles told Notimex that
authorities could not immediately
identify what they believed was a
chemical vapor responsible for the
- incident on Monday.
m
Police defuse two
apparent pipe bombs
near gas line
rVYDALE, WVa. (AP) �
-Explosives technicians defused
3 two pipe bombs found in an
"Abandoned station wagon near a
"tjiatural gas line in Clay County, a
SKSire marshal said today.
lil The property owner where the
-car was parked contacted police
Monday night after he looked into
the vehicle and saw the bombs
while he was trying to get the car
moved, said Deputy Fire Marsha!
' k.
A lecture program for an art
exhibit about ecological concerns
will be held in Speight Auditorium
at the Jenkins Fine Arts Center at
4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 21. The
public is invited. The lecture
coincides with the "Art as Activist:
Ecological Concerns of the 90's"
exhibit at the Gray Art Gallery
through Dec. 3.
ECU alumnus to lecture
on law school success
John Heyl, a 1994 ECU
graduate of philosophy, will give a
lecture entitled "What it Takes to
Succeed in Law School in the
90's Heyl is currently the editor
of the prestigious North Carolina
Law Review. The lecture will be
held Thursday, Nov. 20 at 7 p.m.
in Ragsdale 218A
Pi Sigma Alpha sponsors
awareness project
Pi Sigma Alpha, the political
science honor society, will sponsor
an awareness project for the Great
American Smokeout today. A
booth will be set up in front of the
student stotc. Pamphlets about
how to quit smoking, provided by
the American Cancer Society, and
information about the benefits of
quitting smoking, provided by Pi
Sigma Alpha members, will be
available.
me
Police arrest about 100
people in raid
PARIS (AP) Hundreds of
French financial police detained
about 100 people Tuesday in an
effort to break up a fraud ring in
the ready-to-wear clothing
industry.
Shortly before dawn, more
than 300 police raided about 60
businesses and homes of clothing
executives in Paris.
Using a system of false billings
and delayed-pay transactions via
intermediaries, the ting is
believed to have stolen more than
$175 million, police said.
French Police discover
hidden weapons
BAYONNE, France (AP) A man
hunting mushrooms in the
Pyrenees Mountains stumbled
onto a plastic tank holding
dynamite, plastic explosives,
grenades and Uzis.
French police, who also found
20 false Spanish license plates
there, said Tuesday that the cache
belonged to the Spanish Basque
militant group ETA
� November 13
Assist Rescue�A resident of
Slay Hall was found passed out in
the showers. Greenville Rescue
personnel responded and
checked out the student. The
student was released to his
roommate and was issued a
campus appearance ticket for
underage consumption of
alcohol.
Domestic Disturbance�A
resident of Tyler hall reported
that her roommate had
threatened her when she
complained about a violation of
housing policies. The roommate
was issued a campus appearance
ticket for visitation violation and
threatening her roommate.
Controlled Substance�A
staff membet reported the odor
of marijuana coming from a room
in Gotten Hall. A consent search
was conducted and no controlled
substances were found.
November 14
Driving While Impaired - A
student was arrested for driving
while impaired in 'he Fourth and
Reade Streets parkmg lot.
Domestic Disturbance -
Officers responded to a noise
complaint in White Hall. Upon
SEE CRIME SCENE PAGE 3
I
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NWS
The East Carolinian
lews
Thursday, November 20, 1997 3
.
North Carolina studies minor now available to students
Knowledge of N.C
advantage in work
force
Sarah vallierf.
STAFF WHITER
The North Carolina studies
program is available to all students
as a minor who are interested in
learning more about the state.
Information and many
interesting facts about North
Carolina's natural and cultural
history, and contemporary issues
and goals are available through the
North Carolina Studies Program.
This program has recently
become available as a minor. Karen
Baldwin, the new director of the
North Carolina Studies
Department and an English
professor, describes the program as
a strongly multi-disciplinary
program in which the courses
actively integrate many academic
studies - geology, history, literature,
geography, folklore, biology,
anthropology, archeology, ecology
and political science
This minor, useful for any major,
is directed toward people who plan
on living and working in North
Carolina.
ECU is the only University in
North Carolina to offer this
program. Therefore, the students
who obtain this minor will have a
big advantage in the work field.
The comprehensive knowledge
gained about North Carolina's
politics, education, business, history
and social work will offer a good
competitive edge.
The rnijor requirements consist
of a otal of 24 semester hours.
These hours must be approved by
the director of the N. C. studies
program. The only specific course
requirements are six semester hours
of introductory courses and senior
seminars and nine semester hours
of core courses including North
Carolina English, geology and
history courses. The left over nine
semester hours arc to be selected
from at least two different
disciplines. These electives
provide a lot of variation and can be
tailored to anyone's interests. Many
of the students currently enrolled in
the introduction course, NCST
2000, find the integrating features
very exciting.
Baldwin says the purpose of the
minor is to "provide the state with
the next generation of 'saders in
politics, law, education, science, and
industry
This minor allows people to pull
together a background of subjects to
help their major.
Baldwin, as the new director,
describes the program's goals as
"providing for ncntraditiona!
students as well as the students it
currently provides for
Nonttaditional students are
students from other areas and
people already teaching. Teaching
is an excellent career to use with
this minor. John Byrd, an
anthropologist and teacher for the
NCST 2000 course in the spring,
commented on the advantages of
prospective teachers taking the
course.
The North Carolina Studies
Program fills a need for multi-
disciplinary training courses for
prospective teachers, because
classroom teachers must integrate
many fields of information at once
in their lessons and classroom
activities. In the past, teachers
could take a variety of liberal arts
courses, but no one course tied it all
together. Introduction to North
Carolina Studies meaningfully
integrates humanities, science and
social sciences. The course allows
students to see the connections
between land forms and human
history, between current policies
andpopular culture J
This program is attraefmg
attention from places besides �the
ECU campus. The UNC public TV
show, North Carolina Now, featured
the North Carolina Studies program
on a recent segment.
If taken advantage of, this
program can offer many advantages
and opportunities for extensive
knowledge of North Carolina and
competition in the work force.
Students interested in more
information regarding this program
and its advantages can contact John
Byrd, course coordinator, at 328-
6760, or Karen Baldwin, director of
N.C. Studies, at 328-6726.
Iraq's chemical, biological weapons ready within days
Diplomats won't
consider lifting
sanctions
LONDON (AP) Iraq, which is
racing down the Tjnitcd Nations
over Saddam Hussein's refusal to
admit some U.N. weapons
inspectors, could have chemical and
biological weapons ready for use
within days, British government
sources said in a report Tuesday
And it could build missiles in
just a few months capable of hitting
key targets in Israel and Saudi
Arabia with chemical or biological
warheads, according to a
government risk assessment report,
obtained by the news agency Press
Association.
Britain's Foreign Office said the
report was released to selected
British
media oudets but would disclose
no other details.
"This is informal on that needs
to be in the public domain said
Foreign
Office spokesman Andrew Page.
The report said it could not ruie
out the possibility that Saddam had
successfully hidden "a handful" of
largely complete missiles and
chemical and biological weapons.
"In a crisis these could be
available for use within a matter of
weeks or perhaps even days the
report said. "Provided it still has key
components and that is unclear
Iraq could within a few months
build, with little risk of detection,
missiles capable of hitting Israel
and key targets in Saudi Arabia
But the report added that the
large-scale production of chemical
warfare agents in Iraq would
"almost certainly" be detected
quickly.
The report was more optimistic
about Saddam's well-known nuclear
capability, saying it would take him
at least five years to produce a
crude air-delivered nuclear bomb -
if he could procure the necessary
equipment from overseas.
Production of a long-range
nuclear missile would take a further
four years, the report said it was
believed.
That would give the United
Nations time to detect these
weapons "well before they reached
fruition the report said.
U.S. President Bill Clinton on
Tuesday ordered more U.S.
warplanes to the Persian Gulf as the
standoff continued over Saddam's
decision Thursday to expel six
American weapons experts from the
U.N. inspection team.
The remaining 68 non-American
inspectors also withdrew in protest,
halting a U.N. program to monitor
the disposal of Iraq's weapons of
mass destruction and chemical
weapons.
U.N. monitors have said that on-
site inspections are crucial to
ensuring that Iraq does not try to
revive its banned programs to build
chemical and biological weapons
and long-range missiles.
"If the U.N. Special
Commission were to be removed or
prevented from operating for a
sustained period, Iraq could
produce within a matter of months
a small number of chemical or
biological weapons, including
missile warheads the British
intelligence report said.
The United Nations imposed
sweeping economic sanctions
against Iraq after Baghdad's 1990
invasion of Kuwait. U.N. diplomats
said they will not consider lifting
the sanctions until Iraq fully
cooperates with the arms monitors.
U.N. weapons inspectors have
said they are stunned by Iraq's
success in circumventing the
sanctions to develop a deadly
armory of biological weapons.
Iraq's program is believed to be
extensive, with lethal supplies of
anthrax, bubonic and pneumonic
plague, botulism and aflatoxin.
U.N. officials believe Saddam
also has the ability to produce the
highly toxic VX liquid nerve agent.
TIm�
LAST DAY
to have your
M waf mm I mUF
123 234 678 98456
�xjk Date 112197
Crime Scene
continued from page 2
arrival officers found a female
resident of White Hall in a male
resident's room. The two had
been arguing. Both were issued
campus appearance tickets.
transported the student to
PCMH.
November 17, 1997
Damage to Property - A
resident of Clement Hall reported
the plastic driver-side door on his
Jeep had been cut while his
vehicle was parked in Curry Court.
Larceny - Two faculty members
reported the larceny of text books
from a room in the Carol Beik
Building.
Solicitation � A resident of Belk
Hall reported a person was on the
third floor of Belk Hall selling
cosmetic make-overs. Officers
were unable to locate the subject.
Possession of Marijuana - A staff
member reported the odor of burnt
marijuana coming from a room in
Oarrett Hall. The occupants of
the room consented to a search of
their room. Marijuana and drug
paraphernalia were found in the
room. A student was issued a state
citation for possession of drugs and
paraphernalia. Another student
was issued a campus appearance
ticket for using a controlled
substance.
Driving While License
- A non-student of Colerain,
was stopped for operating a
without using the headlights
non-student was arrested for dri
while license revoked.
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4 Thursday. November 20. 1997
i(
The East Carolinian
Iraq refuses U.S. offer to ease economic, weapon sanctions
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) Iraq is
not a camp of refugees Saddam"
Hussein's government said as it
rejected a U.S. offer to ease
economic sanctions and help end a
crisis over U.N. weapons
inspections.
" - Iraqi officials said Tuesday the 3-
wcek-old crisis will continue until
the United Nations accepts Iraq's
conditions for the resumption of
U.N. weapons inspections in the
country, including a balanced
Composition of the inspection team.
raq says American inspectors
dominate the team.
i We adhere to our requests and
demands, because they are fair, just
and fully justified said Foreign
Minister Mohammed Saeed al-
Sahhaf.
Saddam expelled the six
American weapons experts on the
U.N. inspection team Thursday,
prompting the remaining 68 non-
American inspectors to withdraw in
protest. The moves halted the U.N.
program to monitor the disposal of
Iraq's weapons of mass destruction
and chemical weapons.
' tjntil inspectors certify that Iraq
is free of such weapons, the United
Nations will not lift crippling
economic sanctions imposed after
I rag invaded Kuwait in 1990,
sparking the 1991 Gulf War.
Traq also began rationing cooking
e to the public Tuesday; fearing
.S. air strikes on the oil refineries
ctat produce natural gas. In
addition, thousands of Iraqis
continued to gather at factories,
foflning " human shields" to lessen
the likelihood of American strikes
on those facilities.
�About 2,500 women and children
camped out at a weapons factory
outside Baghdad on Tuesday.
Children wrote ' Down with
America" in chalk on the factory
floor, heeding a call by Iraqi
lawmakers who did the same thing
Monday on the sidewalk outside
parliament.
'We want them (Americans) off
our backs and we want the sanctions
lifted Leila Mohammed, 21, a
college student, told reporters who
government officials took on a tour
of the factories.
U.S. National Security Adviser
Sandy Berger said Tuesday that
Washington favored improving an
existing oil-for-food program that
allows Iraq to
sell some oil
every six
months to buy
food and
medicine.
"We are not
a camp of
refugees that
Sandy Berger
will give us
small food al-
Sahhaf said.
"We will not
accept it
Berger said the U.S. position was
not an inducement for Iraq to allow
l.N. inspectors back, but said
Washington would be in favor of
allowing Iraq to sell more oil once
Saddam comes into compliance
But Iraq's ambassador to the
United Nations said his country
may stop participating in the oil-for-
We are not a camp of
refugees that Sandy Berger
will give us small food
1' We will not accept it"
Minister Mohanned Saeed al-
Sahhaf
food deal next month unless he
receives assurances that sanctions
will soon be lifted.
" 'We cannot deal with this very
temporarv; partial deal while we are
after the full lifting of the embargo
Nizar Hamdoon said in New York.
Al-Sahhaf also hinted that a
separate compromise is being
discussed through Russia, where
Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tariq
Aziz met Tuesday with President
Boris Yeltsin and Foreign Minister
Yevgeny Primakov.
The official Iraqi News Agency
said Saddam called a meeting of the
Revolution Command Council,
Iraq's main decision-making body,
Tuesday night
to discuss with considerable
interest" the Russian
proposals.
Despite Iraqi threats
to shoot down any
American U-2 spy
plane in its airspace,
the Pentagon said a
U.S. pilot flew a high-
altitude mission over
Iraq without incident
Tuesday.
Al-Sahhaf described
the plane as a
frightened rat" that
returned to its base in
Saudi Arabia, and said it had been
out of range of Iraqianti-aircraft
batteries.
President Clinton also ordered
more U.S. warplanes to the Gulf to
prepare for a showdown if Iraq
shoots down a U-2. The planes are
used by the United
Nations to monitor Iraq's
Stocks
continued Irom page 1
"We work with professional
analysis to help reduce our
exposure for risk Lanier said. "We
don't time the market or play the
market. We have a long-term
investment. The stock market over
time will produce long-term value.
Year in, vear out, this is a verv
strategic plan. From the university
standpoint, the money invested has
been given to help with students
scholarships
"The recent stock market
decrease is a modest correction
during a year of extraordinary
growth Brown said.
weapons programs from the air.
Iraq claims the spy planes are
designed to help plan an American
attack, not to gather information for
the United Nations. Iraq says it no
longer possesses biological or
chemical weapons, a�d that U.N.
inspectors are refusing to certify
that because of pressure from the
United States.
The inspectors, meanwhile, are
anxious to return to Baghdad, a team
spokesman said Tuesday at I .X.
regional headquarters in Bahrain.
"The U-2 flights can only
provide so much information Alan
Dacey said.
"Nothing can beat the on-the-
ground monitoring
Inspectors have watched Iraqis
bum documents at suspected sites
and dump the ashes into nearby
rivers, he said.
Iraq also has moved several
pieces of equipment that could be
used to make banned weapons away
from U.N. monitoring cameras, he
said. The equipment was moved
shortly after Baghdad announced
Oct. 29 that it wanted Americans on
the team out of the country,
according to Dacey
Chemistry
continued ttom page 1
capacity for the last five years said
Dr. James Hix, and ECU Chemistry
professor and member of ACS. "We
have all of the faculty and students
they will allow us and our classes are
always full. Around 93' our intro
classes jumped from 400 to 600 and
has pretty much stayed that way
ECU needs to keep pumping out
this many graduates because the
need for them is at an all time high.
Pharmaceuticals are the leading
division of the professional field that
is in need of new chemistry
graduates. It is chemistry and
biochemistry that branch out and
create all of the new drugs and
pharmaceuticals on the market.
Catalytica Pharmaceuticals recently
bought out Glaxo-Welcome which
was the leading employer of
chemists in Eastern North Carolina.
After the buy out, many chemists
were worried about their
employment futures in our region.
But it wasn't long before Catalytica
was in need of even more chemistry
graduates.
"We've never had a difficulty in
placing our students Hix said.
'They get snatched right up
Students who have attained their
PhD. are more likely to get hired
first. ECU's main campus does not
offer PhD's so students are forced to
apply to the medical school where
degrees such as pharmacology and
biochemistry are offered.
"Most of our graduates want to
go on and pursue their PhD Hix
said.
Chemistry students without
their Ph.D's can use co-op as a way
to enhance their experience.
According to ACS, students with co-
op experience are the most sought
after. Catalytica Pharmaceuticals
currently offers several co-op
positions for ECU students. Most
co-op employees want the student
to work full time for the four to six
month span of time they are hired to
work. This creates a big problem for
students who are interested in
taking that route.
"Most upper level chemistry
classes are sequential, so if they miss
a semester to do co-op, they are
actually missing a year Hix said.
The next class the student needs
to take will not be offered for
another year. As an alternative, many
students choose to do analytical
research in laboratories on campus.
Computers
continued Irom page 1
Angela Perry, also a sophomore
elementary education major, said, "I
already have a computer so that
would be unnecessary tuition
However, not all students are
opposed to this proposal.
'There are a lot of people on
campus who don't have computers
at home especially commuters and
we need money from somewhere to
finance them, in this day and age a
lot of professors are requiring work
to be done on computers
sophomore Koneisha Ward, a
business administration major, said.
"Besides the cost) is not that much
really
Price said a possibility that is
more realistic is for individual
departments or programs to require
computers for students.
The decision to require
computers at WCU makes the
school the first public university in
NC to adopt such a requirement.
Wake Forest University, as well as
other private institutions across the
country already require this of
students.
"What we're trying to do is
ensure every graduate of WCl'J
has the basic skills necessary to be
competitive in an economy that
relies increasingly on information
management WCU Chancellor
John Bardo said.
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DEPENDENT CARDS (Fee charged)
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Questions should be directed to the ECU One Card System Office, 328-2015, located inside Dowdy Student Stores.Wright Building.






5 Thursday. November 20. 1997
The East Carolinian
K
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Starts Wednesday,
November 19th
In The Bakery
S" Pumpkin Pie
Seventeen Days in May
RICH'S 10P
TEN EXCUSEb
ft)fk NOT TURNING
IN STRIP
THIS VJEEK:
�W yT� ntxt � Unless Ww5
�� it run.��r � Second
iua n vJhcK cSe I'll preWy
0)Vos fny sci ssCsCiwldt cut avt amy heads
"Ao artist SucK aS myself cant be put on a. Imetoble.
)Rev o,rSS (-�� ft b� � UP for C rnystlf an articV
7) Corirct Holdou
6)rresr, out of stolen ideas.
5) A la of irtfeyty W� we CT 'tr4 vv ce " a1
Stayed Up "oo Ute WaKj ,� Spic cK-nel
3)Il wft, TJisney's fo.ult(Can bf use on Any eAtuse t'Vl
jYTVi1 IU'�n��' Suppressed "i) strip
l")6c CautjV4 UP in (Action Borry, M.W book , "llr. )o; c� Crack.
turn liSuLti
ACROSS
1 Lean-to
5 Cover with metal
10 Acting part
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publication
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29 In unison
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possession
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measure
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60 Ancient
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64 Rub out
65 Fencing sword
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engagement
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12 gallon
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fait Cifolimm
east Carolinian
AMY L.ROVSTKRHiHI
CM.ESTK WILSON �&)&
MATT HKCK Mwrism Snoot
AMANDA AILSTIN Nmit EAiw
JACQUKUNE D. KKIXUM taaHwaWw
ANDY TURNER Uhnyh���
JOHN DAVIS Atasam Uiesiyta EdiiB
AMANDA Boss SperaE�
TRACY LAHBACII Aaaaol Sports Eior
CAROLE MKIII.E tad Copy Eft
JOHN MI'RPHY SuH libamw
HEATHER BURGESS WmEdiK
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opinion
Thursdiv November 20. 1997 6
oumcw
There's no denying that we live in a computer age. Some people fuss about how dependent
we have become on computers and other forms of technology, how we can no longer think for
ourselves, et cetera, and those people may have valid points. But despite all that, computers
are here to stay, and if the trend continues, they will only become more important as the years
8� .
So it seems only logical that colleges across the state and the country are now considering
the option of requiring students to own computers. Some colleges and universities are already
taking that step. Wfestern Carolina University recently became the first state school in North
Carolina to initiate this requirement, making many wonder if other schools, including ECU,
will follow suit.
Wfe at The East Carolinian believe required computers for all students is a great idea in
theory, for all the reasons named above�we live in a computer age, we're all going to have to
use them sooner or later, we need computer skills to be competitive in the job market, and all
that jazz.
But reality is different. From what we've been told, no one has said anything about the
students being given computers�they are going to have to buy them. Saying that computers
are not cheap is an understatement, and we just wonder how this massive move to campus-
wide computer ownership is going to be financed.
At WCU, the answer is the cost will be added in with tuition, and, therefore, is eligible to
be covered by financial aid. Our response to that is, what about those students who already
own computers? They will be paying extra tuition for something they already have. Secondly,
anyone who believes covering the expense with financial aid is as easy as saying it will be so is
living in la-la land. Not everyone is eligible for financial aid, and a lot of the aid students are
available for is in the form of loans which are paid off over year after graduation.
Paying for the computers is only one aspect of this issue. There is also the question of
whether individual departments may require particular types of computers with particular
programs, or whether the entire student body will simply be issued one kind. If the students
are left on their own to choose their computers and buy them, will there be anyone to advise
them on the best kind to get for their major and the kind of work they will be doing on it? Will
tfce school have staff on hand to help students get the most value for their extra tuition? What
about printers, modems, and any other extras? There are countless questions that come with
even an individual's choice to buy a computer for themselves and their own purposes. If a
college, or an entire university system, chooses to require computers for all students, those
questions will multiply exponentially. University administrators need to consider this and plan
very carefully.
And it seems as if they are aware of all these concerns. They have discussed the issue, but
no one has blazed ahead with idealistic views that requiring computers for all students would
be as simple as making the decision and would only benefit students.
We would simply like to remind the administrators in power, the ones who make these
decisions on our behalf, to keep all these concerns in mind before they do anything. A
computer for everyone sounds like a great idea in theory, but unfortunately it's not that simple.
OPINION
Columnist
JontT
DAVIS
Exchange poses problems for user
Microsoftgetting free beta-
testing out ofus, but we have
to put up with a system that
can't even match up to a
system that is over five years
old
A couple of weeks ago, the
computer here in the paper office
experienced some slight operator
error. Someone uneducated
accidentally erased the software
that allowed users to access the
flCUVM system. So, I was forced to
i�c the new and improved
Microsoft Exchange system, this
shouldn't have been a problem,
right? It should have been a great
opportunity for yours truly to learn
ail about the great new system,
become familiar with it, and
eventually switch over to it from the
old dinosaur system. Right?
Wrongo. While it's true that
Microsoft is forcefully advancing,
arid Bill Gates may one day rule the
known universe, the simple fact of
nc matter is this popularity has no
real connection with product
quality. Of course, Microsoft has
never been a bastion of creativity.
Their golden bread winner,
Windows, was nothing more than a
copy of the operating system
Apple's Steve Jobs swiped from
Xerox in the 70's.
lb put it more bluntly, Microsoft
Exchange is an overrated piece of
crap (if intangible things like
software can be so called). Let's
compare the two systems, shall we?
Firstly, there is the simple matter of
understanding how each system
works. Anyone familiar with the VM
system will know that every option
and tool available is operated by
pressing a function key (like Fl, F2,
etc.) ON the screen, each of these
options is given a name correlating
to the function. For example, if one
wants to forward mail, one presses
the F-key that has the words
"forward mail" beside it. In
Exchange, this function is enacted
by a strange little icon that has a
picture of a person's head an an
arrow. No actual words offer any
guidance as to what this icon
represents. To make things worse,
four of these icons arc pictures of
people's heads with arrows pointing
in various directions. One assumes
that the direction of the arrow
distinguishes between "forward
"reply, and others.
As a person unfamiliar with the
existential relationship between the
human mind and the spiritual
essence of internet software has no
clue what these arrows represent, it
doesn't help that this particular
iconography in no way correlates
with the former iconography of
previous Microsoft software.
If one figures out how to use the
dang program, there is then the fact
that it doesn't do much. It's not at
all flexible or easy, and being Web-
based, its prone to the same foibles
as Netscape. In the VM system one
can assign nicknames to specific
addresses. That is to say, if I mail
Angee often, and I don't want to
type in an interminably long address
OPINION
Column
Keith
COOPER
Presidents' lives needlessly wasted
the lack of technological
innovation and advancement
coupled with ignorance
needlessly wiped out lives that
could have been saved easily.
Indeed, the lives of Abraham
Lincoln, James Garfteld, and
William McKinley fell prey to
carelessness and ignorance.
every day, I can assign that address
the name "Angee" and from then on,
I can just type in the name "Angee"
and the system will automatically
mail it to her address. Pretty neat,
huh?
It gets better. I can also assign to
a specific nickname a group of other
nicknames. In other words, I can
make an automatic mailing list. If 1
mail the same information to the
same people often, I don't have to
type in 20 e-mail addresses, I can
just type in one keyword and it will
mail to them all. Does Exchange do
this? Not on your life. If it does, I
couldn't find out how in the five
hours i spent on the system looking
for it.
Exchange docs not offer a "print"
option either. One can use the
"print screen" option in Netscape,
but then one gets printouts of all
the graphics, and one has to print
each screen of a several screen letter
separately. In order to print an
entire letter without this
information, one must copy the
text, paste it to a word-processor
and print from that word processor.
So if Exchange is darned crappy,
why the heck are we being urged to
use it? Is it because Microsoft gave
it to the school for free? If so then
not only is Microsoft getting free
beta-testing out of us, but we have
to put up with a system that can't
even match up to a system that is
over five years old, which in
computer life-spans, is ancient.
Thank God, some angel from
CIS did come over to the paper
office and reinstall ECUVM
software, so I can go about my e-
mailing in peace. Perhaps one day,
Microsoft will wise up and work up
a better system. In the meantime
I'll be an old fogey and use the tried
and true ECUVM.
The nation's history has been
tarnished with the assassinations of
four U.S. presidents and the
attempted assassinations of about
six others. Yet, the lives of three of
the four assassinated presidents
should have been saved. The
bullets alone did not kill those
presidents. Instead, the lack of
technological innovation and
advancement coupled with
ignorance needlessly wiped out
lives that could have been saved
easily. Indeed, the lives of Abraham
Lincoln, James Garfield, and
William McKinley fell prey to
carelessness and ignorance. There
was no hope for President Kennedy,
who lost virtually half of his head in
Dallas in 1963.
On Jury 2,1881, President James
Garfield was shot by a deranged
office seeker, Charles Guiteau. The
president, accompanied by James
G. Blaine, Secretary of State,
suffered until September 19, 1881
when he succumbed to a vicious
death by blood poisoning in
Elberon, New Jersey. Interestingly,
the famous inventor, Alexander
Graham bell of Boston, and Simon
Newcombe (Maryland) worked
painstakingly to save Garfield's life.
Bell used his telephone invention to
fashion together a device to detect
I metal bullets. Mr. Newcombe
assisted the inventor. Meanwhile,
� doctors, medical students, quacks,
and other concerned people around
the world sent herbs, detailed
' papers suggesting how to treat the
' president, and special medicines
, which decorated the White House
basement.
Why did Garfield lose his life on
'September 19; 1881? Alexander
Graham Bell, who tested his special
' metal detector on wounded soldiers
(from Civil War) and other
'volunteers, used it to determine
, where a bullet was within Garfield's
body. The problem was that,
'although the detector was
legitimate, Bell and Newcombe left
the president on the mattress with
coiled springs. The humming
sound which gave the doctors hope
was, actually emitted because of
interference with the coiled springs.
Had the president's body been
placed on 'the floor, his life would
have�been saved. The bullet would
have' 'been located. Instead,
Garfield's' succumbed to sepsis, a
deadly infection. However, Garfield
would have been a paraplegic
becaAse his spine was shattered.
i On April 14, 1865, Abraham
Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes
Booth who was later killed by
Boston Corbctt on Richard
Garrctt's tobacco farm in Virginia on
April 26, 1865. In any event,
Charles Leave, the first surgeon at
Lincoln's side, made a controversial
probe through a blood clot that had
formed on the left side of Lincoln's
skull. Using his left finger on the
left-hand, Leale opened the door for
infection, sepsis. Further, Lulls
probing of the president's skull,
arguably, ruptured additional blood
vessels that were not hit by the ball
sho from Booth's derringer.
Nevertheless, in similar cases where
le were shot with a derringer,
the survival rare was much
than the mortality rate.
Charles F. Taft, the Surgeon
General, used a Nealton's probe to
find the ball shot within Lincoln's
brain, he drove the probe about two
and a half inches within the
president's skull. . The ball,
according to Assistant Surgeon J.
Janvier Wood ward, had traveled in a
path different from that speculated
by Taft. Incidentally, Wood ward
performed the autopsy on Lincoln's
body. The Surgeon General
probably made additional wounds as
was the case with Leave.
On September 4, 1901, William
McKinley was shot while he
attended the fcan American
Exposition in Buffalo, new York, he
lingered in agony Una! September
14, 1901. McKinley died of
gangrene poisoning which could
have been prevented. Shot by Leo
Ckolgosz, McKinley never
recovered because a bullet which
Hit him in the chest was not found;
therefore, this contributed to
McKinlcy's death. McKinley's
hicf physician, Presley Riley, did a!i
he could to save the president.
McKinley died while singing his
favorite song, "Nearer my God to
thee
In an age of antiseptic surgery,
the aforementioned presidents
would have survived their fatal
wounds. Sepsis was responsible for
the deaths of Lincoln, Garfield, and
McKinley. Antiseptics would have
been extremely useful in those
cases. Had Charles Leale and
Charles Taft been more careful and
conscious of germs, Lincoln
probably would have survived.1 At
the very least, his life would have
been prolonged substantially. Also,
Garfield's life should have been
saved had the telephone inventor,
Bell, used more common sense.
The gangrene poisoning that
choked the life from McKinley
could have been prevented had
McKinley's surgeons been more
thorough in their examinations of
the president and germ conscious.
LETTER
to the Editor
Showcase all senior exhibits, not just one
The art school here at East
Carolina is one of the most
reputable of all the departments on
our great campus. The amount of
talent that flows through Jenkins
Halls is astounding. Why then
would you put one student's senior
exhibiiton on such a pedestal (see
Lifestyle article from Nov. 18th)?
Everyone that graduates as an art
major is to put on a senior show,
everyone.
Is Mr. Farkas' idea of doing
medical prints really that admirable?
We say no. People in the past here
and" away from ECU have been
doing medical drawings for literally
centuries. There are plenty of
drawings, prints and illustrations
done at the medical school, some of
which are decades old. Is attention
being brought to this persons work
because it, involves the medical
school? Vyky don't you pay some
attention tp the dozens and dozens
of (,semor shows that go on
throughout every semester?
Is more attention being brought
to Farkas' work because he is good
friends with John Davis, assistant
lifescyle. editor and the article's
writer This is called biased
jourriafism no matter how you view
it. It is absolutely deplorable that
you would cast aside the hundreds
of other art students who have
worked literally day and night for
years just to bring attention to one
studnet who drew something school
related and has the luck to be the
assistant editor's friend.
The majority of senior
exhibitions work with a theme as
their foundation. Art students work
diligently to try something new to
break new ground. This journalism
with a slant mocks the majority.
This kind of "journalism" should
have no place in a large campus
newspaper. Look at he boottom of
the article, what is that � a paid
advertisement for his show?
Quentin Pickup
Printmaking
Senior
"Journalists are our eyes and ears, awakening us to what
happens in both far-Off places and nearer home, where
violence has replaced the law, where anger and chajbs rule
and where hatted is learned in the cradle
Kathleen Eldon, mother of slain journalist, 1996

�4" '
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� In
The East Carolinian

review
Imani Coppola
Chupacabra
8 12 OUT OF 10
NICK WlNSTEAD
STAF WRITER
Imagine yourself craving a nice,
greasy piece of pizza. You know, the
stuff you know isn't good for you
but sometimes you just get a
craving for? Then realize that just
as you are about to get a slice, you
end up getting tofu and bean curd.
That is a good way to sum up
tening to Imani Coppola's debut
CD, Chxpacabra. The album starts
off with a happy-go-lucky sweet
feel, and eventually declines to
something less than delicious. Even
gh we revere Beethoven and
ozart as classic musicians and
iters ac their craft, a little bit of
ffy, sugary music like Imani's
t hurt anyone. It's too bad she
1't realize this halfway through
r alburn.
Imani's vocals have a "stay out of
y way" feel to them. "Legend of a
girl" has a strong Western beat
it, and is a great song about
female independence. Naked
City" has a good mix of rap and
t vocals from Imani, and the
good lyrics are a plus. "It's All
about Me, Me, & Me" has a
definite Jamaican flavor to it. The
instrumentation in this song
reminds the listener of a fun-filled
parade.
The CD makes its turn with the
track "Piece This song is
surprisingly slow and lethargic
compared to the other tracks, and it
doesn't fit well with the rest of the
album. "One of These Days" is a
heavy sounding song. It loses the
twangy, spry vocals that Imani
started with. She sounds dry and
flat on this song due to the low
SKCOmNAfWZi
Sixpence None the
Richer
Sixpence None the
Richer
9 12 OUT OF 10
John Davis
ASSISTANT UHMTVI-E EDITOR
One of the dilemmas that artists
face is the pursuit of the artistic
dream in contrast with the
accessibility and marketability of
art and new ideas. Leonardo
DaVinci used to be so caught up in
hb dreams that he would rarely
finish a work before a new one had
captured his attention. There is, of
course, the issue of "selling out of
leaving one's ideals behind in order
to maintain the privilege of actually
making art that comes in to play as
well.
On their self-titled album, this
issue is the very thing Sixpence
None the Richer attempt to tackle.
Simultaneously, they are also in the
midst of capturing their own dream,
and this album is for them a
breakthrough in that pursuit.
This is a problem that many
see sixpence page i
lifestyle
Thursday. November 20. 1997 7
Last Days
With Thanksgiving gptting nearer, the turkeys await their final
hours with pride and indifference
of the
TURKEY
PAT tUID
SENIOR WRITES
Surprise! In no time at all, the
holidays will be here. In a mere
week families ail over the country
will be sitting down at the table
preparing to gorge themsAes on
turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce,
and anything else that appears
edible and is in reach. Sou quick
grade school quiz: Why?
Of course, we do it to celebrate
the pilgrims' survival in
Massachusetts. After landtnfithere
in the Mayflower, the- pi
(who, despite popular belielwere
not Puritans but Separatists) went
through many hardships such as
the harsh cold. Being from cities in
England, they weren't exactly
skilled hunters, so the Indians,
having pity on them, decided to
help them out. The Indians
brought food for a feast as a way of
sharing and developing peace. Of
course this peace didn't last for
long once the Pilgrims'
descendants and other immigrants
to the New World needed Western
Expansion, but the memory still
remains as people nationwide stuff
their faces annually in
reenactment of the original feast.
Of course, as with any holiday or
event, there's always stories
behind the stories, so tie on a bib,
pour some more gravy on your
plate and dive into the world of fun
Thanksgiving facts.
There are myths that surround
Thanksgiving and the Pilgrims. For
one thing many people think that
the Mayflower was headed to
Virginia and got off course. In
actuality, Virginia was almost the.
entire Eastern seaboard at the
time, so Massachusetts was
considered Northern Virginia. The
Pilgrims had hoped to land on
modern day Long Island and
headed there after landing in Cape
Cod. However, rough waters nearly
shipwrecked them and they
turned back.
Turley Towns
H
Turkey, North Carolina
Pop: 280
Sitting on the east side of Sampson County,
just before entering Warsaw, in Dupiin
County, is the quaint village of Turkey, i he
Turkey Township was named for the large
number of turkeys in the region of the
Colonial times. Turkey was incorporated in
1913. The town hosts Is Annual Turkey Day
Parade in November, always the Saturday
before Thanksgiving. Events include special
entertainment, arts and crafts sale, BBQ
plate sale and of course, the parade. This
town is easy to spot, jast look for the water
tower with the TURKEY painted on it.
Information courtesy of Clinton Chamber of Commerce.
Turkey, Texas
Pop: 516

Turkey was a shipping point for
cattle, grain, and cotton in the
golden days of railroading. Now it's better
known for Bob Wills, a pioneer of country
music known as the King of Western Swing.
Wills was raised on a farm just north of the
small town. Now, every last Saturday in April,
the town hosts the Bob Wills Reunion. Crowds
swell from 10-15,000 for the event.
Other times of the year the man is still
remembered in a museum devoted to him and
the Texas Playboys. The museum display
includes fiddles, boots, hats, recordings, music
and photos from the Playboys and Wills.
Information courtesy of th� Turkey. Texas web page
So you like to eat turkey, but
what about living there? That's
right, many states have towns
or cities named Turkey. Right
here in North Carolina turkey
fanatics can make a pilgrimage
to Turkey, N.C The small
town lies south of Greenville
near Clinton in Sampson
County.
The town hosts an annual
Turkey Day Parade the
Saturday before Thanksgiving.
Naturally, there's not much
else there but what a trade-off
for living in a place with a name
as cool as "Turkey If you plan
to go here's the adivce given by
the town itself: "The town is
easy to spot, just look for the
Tom Turkey awaits to bs gobbled
PHOTO COURTESY OF THMSSJMNG OR THt NCT
water tower with the turkey
painted on it i y;
Of course if eating meat isn't
your thing, you don't have to be
left out of the fun. Many different
food companies make vegetarian
turkey.
Or if turkey has become trio
ordinary for you, ham has always
been a popular substitute. Either
way don t let this Thanksgivings?
by without celebrating somehow.
Watch a football game, volunteer at
a soup kitchen, or participate in
the Day-Aftcr-Thanksgrving sales
extravaganza.
No matter what you do thinU
back and offer thanks to threw
Pilgrims for providing a reason to
take three days off of school. r.n
���
Mother Hicks opens tonight at McGinnis
STEPHANIE kLSSEI.I,
ST UK WRITER
College is a time on our lives when we search
for who we truly are. Wc question our ideas,
beliefs and dreams in pursuit of our place in the
grand scheme of things. Susan Vczeder's award-
winning play, Mother flip's, is the story of a
young girl's search far her identity and
parentage. American Folklore, authentic folk
music and American Sign Language combine to
help tell this deeply touching tale.
Set during the Great Depression in small
town Illinois, everyone if the town of Ware
believes that Mother Hicks is a witch. Times
are hard for Wire residents with people losing
their jobs and money disappearing overnight.
Townspeople blame the mysterious Mother
Hicks, but she isn't the only one the town is
talking about.
Girl is an orphan who has spent her life being
passed from family to family. Also, there's Tuc,
a deaf boy who collects the town's cast-offs in
hb wagon. These two outsiders together with
Mother Hicks, arc unlikely principals in this
dramatic comedy.
The play deals sensitively with issues that
arc common to people of ail ages. It explores
the causes of prejudice and fear bred of
misunderstanding. It illustrates our need to
belong versus social out casting, the destructive
power of misperceptions and
misunderstanding, and the redeeming power of
love and acceptance.
The East Carolina Playhouse production of
Mother Hicks opens tonight and runs through
Nov 25, with nightly performances at 8 p.m.
except on Sunday which has only a 2 p.m.
matinee. Individual tickets are on sale from $8-
9 for the General Public,$7-8 for ECU faculty
and staff, and from $5-6 for ECU students and
children 12 and under, they can be purchased in
person in the lobby of McGuinness or by phone
at 328-6829 or 328-1726. The box office is
open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. until
4p.m. and until 8:15 p.m. on performance dates.
eyes
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Dale Williamson'
SENIOR WRITER

Hollywood's history of translating
literature to film is notorious.
Countless times, film adaptations
of books have not onrybeen totally
bad literary translations but also
bad movies in general. Anyone out
there remember Demi Moore's sad
attempt to be taken seriously in a
very loose adaptation of Nathaniel
Hawthorne's The ScarUt Letter.
Trust me, it wasn't pretty
But, for every 10 teirible film
adaptations there is one shining
exception. Within the last year
alone, such notable pieces of
literature as The Engfuk Patient,
Hamlet and even Contact were
turned into intelligent, enthralling
films which not only did justice to
their sources but also, in many
ways, added to them.
One of last year's most critically
praised films also happened to
Debased on one of the most
respected American plays ever
written, Arthur Millers The
Crucible. The film never made it to
Greenville theaters (what else is
new), but it is now a prime video
choice for ail those who have
already seen the summer
blockbusters like The Lost World
and have no desire whatsoever to
waste one moment of precious life
arbage like Batman and Robin.
For those unfamiliar with the
play, The Crucible bases itself in one
of America's darkest historical
moments, that of the Salem witch
hunts. The time is 1692, a time
when puritanical ideologies ruled
the land. This is a time when God's
power was to be obeyed and, if
necessary, feared. Only the
righteous person, the pure, would
ever be accepted into God's grace.
This is a time when religious law is
so rigid that even dancing is seen
as unfit, something someone
possessed by the Devil would do.
The Devil, although never seen,
plays a big role in this narrative
simply because everything that
goes horribly wrong is blamed on
him. When a group of young
women are discovered dancing
around a fire in the middle of the
night, fear arises in the small,
stable community of Salem. Are
these women witches doing
Satan's evil bidding? The audience
immediately knows that such is
not the case, but that makes the
ensuing turmoil all the more tragic.
When the Puritan leaders
confront the girls and start making
accusations, the girls, stricken with
fear and confusion, begin to make
their own accusations. The first
major stone is cast when an African
slave named Tituba (played
SEE CRUCIBLE. PAGE �
You talkin' to me? Winona gets tough in The Crucible
PHOTO COURTESY OF 20TH CENTURY FOX
SHANNON MEEK
SENIOR WRITER
Art often reflects its environment.
Found inside the contents of "faffs
sacred expression are complex
elements of spirit and pain, alive in
society. The ECU School of Art
blends contemporary art and, the
imperative of environmwKal
awareness in its exhibit Armjfcas
Activist : Ecological Concerns mffthe
�90s. :
This exhibit takes place in the
Wellington Gray Gallery Nov.8-
Dcc. 3. The purpose behind this
exhibit is to bring an awareness to
ecological and enviromental
importance.
"It is a multi-leveled one, to
speak about content: political,
environmental and cultural that is
prevalent through art and. the
'90s said Gil Leebrick, gallery
director.
There will be a symposium
Friday starting at 3 p.m It will
address many of, the questions
generated through this exhibit.
The symposium will include an
eclectic range of artists, professors
and authors who will give lectures
about their dedication to
environmental causes. After their
presentations, the symposium wjll
be followed by a gala reception.f
The artists include a variety'6f
people dedicated to ecologjical
issues. Jim Denny, a painter wHo
deals with forest issues, wilPbe
present; Mary Edna Fraser' -$11
demostrate her image-drawn
wetland and coastal areas; Sycfhijy
Cross will speak about the human
connection with the environrneiit
through printmaking and Martha
Strawn, artist and author, exrfBjfr's
Alligators : Prehistoric in Amcrrtin
Landscapes.
. "The exhibition 6'fl
symposium asks many questrotte
concerning environmental 'and
ecological concerns that we'all
have, Leebrick said. "I think th'aj
many people have a frustration
(because) there arc many thjrig
that society does to damage'trie
environment.
"One of the most impor'rafjt
issues out of our discussion rs .a
dualism between human 'ana
nature, when in fact we are one
J
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j. MM
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8 Thursday. November 20. 1997
c
ft
-style
The East Carolinian
November
20 Thursday
Uhx'sGoldat 8 p.m. and Slingblade
at 10 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
Pirate Underground featuring
Lee Solomon of the Grass Roots
organization from 8-10:45 p.m. in
Mendenhall Social Room
East Carolina Playhouse: Mother
Hicks at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
(through Nov. 25 with a 2 p.m.
showtime on Nov. 23)
Agents of Good Roots at The
Attic
Laughing Colors at Firehouse
Tavern
Paul Tardiff and Co. at Stacatto
Apples in Stereo at Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
Pachenko at Lizard and Snake
Cafe in Chapel Hill
21 Friday
Trainspotting at 8 p.m. and Uke's
Goidax. 10 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
Hans Brinker & The Silver
Skates at 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m in
Wright Auditorium
Jazz at Night at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Social Room
The Veldt and The Root Doctors
at The Attic
Jonathan Byrd at Fi rehouse
Tavern
Elephant Boy at Peasant's Cafe
Hurricane Willie, Hank Williams
III Bama Band at Hard Times II
Whiskeytown and the Volebeats
at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
22 Saturday
Hans Brinker & The Silver
Skates at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
Slingblade at 8 p.m. and
Trainspotting at 10 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre
Kuttphatt and No Saner at The
Attic
Mike Corrado Band at Peasant's
The Skellingtons at Firehouse
Tavern
Helium and Blonde Redhead at
Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
Pansy Division and Skelton Key
at Lizard and Snake Cafe in Chapel
Hill
23 Sunday
Onieda, Mao Tse Helen
Barisol Guns at the Lizard
Snake in Chapel Hill
and
and
24 Monday
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
Donkey and Sharking Teeth at
Lizard and Snake in Chapel Hill
25 Tuesday
Jongleurs at Peasant's
Syrup U.SA at Lizard and Snake
SEE ITS SHOWTIME PAGE t
Crucible
continued from page 7
wondrousry by Charlayne Woodard)
is centered out as using her
"voodoo" sorcery to affect everyone.
Tituba is immediately abused and
tormented, resulting in her telling
another lie and accusing someone
else of witchcraft. Chaos ensues,
with one lie after another, one
accusation after another, flooding
over the community. Before you
know it, Salem's got itself a good of
fashioned witch hunt on its hands.
Admittedly, liberties are taken
with history here, but that does not
take away from the tragic power of
this production. Arthur Miller
wisely took it upon himself to write
the screenplay from his own play,
and the result is a masterful
example of literary adaptation,
fueled with complex character
relationships that build on one
another, unresolvable conflicts that
increasingly get worse, and poetic
dialogue that is rarely witnessed in
modem cinema.
Exhibiting the same
professionalism as Miller is Director
Nicholas Hytner, who illustrated his
keen vision of madness in the
modern-day masterpiece. The
Madness of King George. Hytner and
cinematographer Andrew Dunn
visually capture the claustrophobic
atmosphere of rhe Puritan
community with darkly lit interiors
and murky exteriors, creating a
foggy sensation that seems to not
only accurately recreate the reality
of a 17th-century community but
also represent the blurred truths
running throughout the film.
But Hytner's greatest
achievement comes in the form of
his actors. He casts his production
wonderfully and, as a result, gets
top-notch performances from
everyone, particularly Daniel Day-
Lewis, Winona Ryder and Joan
Allen. As one of the few voices of
reason in the insane community,
Day-Lewis develops the character
of John Proctor from a man who
wants to stay away from Salem's
problems to one who is forced in
the thick of the problem as a result
of his own foolish pride. Along the
way. Proctor transforms into a man
with devoted ideals that he will die
for. Day-Lewis' performance begins
on a rather subdued note, but by
the end, when Proctor spits in the
face of Salem's religious elite, he is a
ball of fire that still burns even after
the end credits are rolling.
As the two women in Proctor's
life, Ryder and Allen perfectly play
polar opposites. Going against type,
Ryder fills her adulterous Abigail
Williams with such a selfish evil that
one almost hopes to see her dead
corpse hanging from a rope. In
direct contract with Ryder's
conniving liar, Allen's depiction of
Proctor's devoted wife, Elizabeth,
captures the idyllic essence of the
good puritan woman, someone who
truly believes in the path of God.
However, lurking beneath this good
woman is a sadness and desperation
that is unmistakable. Allen docs not
get the opportunity to shout out an
animated monologue like Day-
Lewis or Ryder, but her
performance is still every bit as
potent.
The Crucible succeeds on so many
levels that even those die-hard fans
of the play may forgive any
alterations the film makes with
Miller's original masterpiece. It
accomplishes what so many films
seem incapable of. It is
melodramatic without being silly, it
is complicated without being
incomprehensible, and it vividly
paints a violent world without being
gratuitously violent.
More importantly, it respects its
literary source, making it not a film
that you watch mindlessly as you
munch away on some popcorn.
Instead, it is something you focus
on as you absorb what is being
presented. Not many movies do
that for its audience, except for
maybe Sorority Babes in the
Slimebalt Boxel-A-Rama.
Sixpence
continued Horn page 7
other musicians have faced, both in
theme and actuality, but very few,
especially in the recent past, have
addressed it so well. With bands like
Nirvana and Nine Inch Nails, the
socialist idea that money is bad and
marketing a sin has permeated
much of their work. (NIN's Broken
is nothing more than a whiny rant at
TVT records; In Utero is just as
much Cobain's rejection of stardom
as his shotgun shell was.) For
Sixpence, these questions don't
have such easy answers as the
grunge movement's proletariat
moralism.
All of this aside, Sixpence have
made a damn fine record. The
group's principle composer Matt
Slocum, also the band's guitarist
and cellist, has attempted
something of a high order for rock
music, that is, he has tried to push
beyond the confines of individual
songs. Of course, this is not a new
idea, as any fan of David Bowie or
the Beatles will recognize.
But this isn't a concept album
like Sgt. Peppers or Ziggy Stardust.
Where those seem to attempt unity
of theme either in lyrics (Stardust)
or music (Sgt. Pepper's), Sixpeike
None the Richer is a record that
unifies itself with recurring musical
themes, in a way similar to baroque
music or mid-century jazz, and the
overall lyrical theme of human
relationships in the midst of an
artist's dream making. Songs fade in
and out of one another, become one
another, and generally don't stay
inside the lines. Lyrics don't either.
Love songs flow in and out of
questions about integrity and
spirituality in art. Some, like "Sister
Mother combine the two themes.
Slocum is ambitious in his
compositions, mostly to his credit.
Crafty in his Edge-and-Corgan-
esque guitar work, he is a master of
string arrangements that could give
George Martin a run for his money.
There's a solid string quartet
backing the band on nearly every
song.
Not that Slocum is merely the
sum of his influences. While one
can see much U2, Beatles,
Smashing Pumpkins, Radiohead,
Zappa and Bach (that's J.S. Bach,
classical composer for you
Philistines out there) in his
compositions, the synthesis of all
these is obviously much more than
the sum of its pans. There are some
strange uses of jazz phrases, half-
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Temporary paid position with the Office of Orientation. Our web page needs to be
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need someone immediately.
tones and percussion that could
have only come from Slocum's head.
The music stays on the laid-back,
acoustic side, for which vocalist
Leigh Nash's voice is well-suited.
It is in the lyrics area that the
band's ambition gets the better of
them. Not that the lyrics are bad.
They're quite good, almost poetic.
Influences of Wendell Berry ("Kiss
me out of the bearded barley,
nightly beside the green, green
grass) Dylan Thomas ("The
Harvester is near. His blade is on
your skin to plant a new beginning.
Well let the cut begin) and Pablo
Neruda (the entire song "Puedo
Escribir" is a Neruda poem)
sprinkle the album. But at times
Slocum's complaint against the
music biz gets him into cheesy
lands: "They're looking for money
as they clean my artistic womb
But these minor faux-pas aside,
the dream Slocum and company
have built is an altogether brilliant
one, intimate and fresh, striking in
it's strange and beautiful synthesis
of old and new musical forms. Gems
like "The Lines of my Earth "I
Won't Stay Long" and "Love" ring
especially spectacular. It's hard to
see how this album, with so few
flaws and so much ambition, can be
topped, but for that, we'll have to
keep listening.
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.1. I

9 Thursday. November 20. 1997
If style
The East Carolinian
� I A
c
'ISA'
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring $3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
castfeiniy
'w!ra
PS�

It's Showtime
continued tram page 8
in Cat's Cradle.
Flicker (local film festival) at
Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
26 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at the Attic
The Gerraldine Fibbers and
Chrome Cranks at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an
upcoming event that
you'd like listed in our
It's Showtime column?
If so, please send
relevant information
(a schedule would be
nice) to:
It's Showtime �
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
J
Coppola
continued from page 7
range she is singing in. The track
"Pigeon Penelope" has decent
vocals and lyrics. The percussion is
over-emphasized and out of synch
with the song.
The CD picks up a little bit of its
original strong sound with the track
"Soon Imani raps and sings with a
vengeance on this song and keeps
this going with the song "Forget
Myself This song has a good mix of
soft rap and nice, smooth vocals.
The last song, "La Da Da is an out
of place love song. This track is a
disappointing finish to a pretty
strong album.
The songs on this CD clearly
reflect a certain potential in Imani's
work. She starts off strong but just
can't finish the race. What starts out
as an uplifting, promising album
ends up being a unsatisfying
listening experience. This CD
might leave you saying "OK, is that
all?" because of its ending. Instead
of coming full circle to the funky,
uplifting style the album began
with, Imani's effort leaves the
listener feeling let down and
unsettled at the end. Imani should
remember that sometimes junk is
good for you, and that switching the
menu is just not a good idea.
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Tired of the
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BW-3 OPEN at 3PM on
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Madrigal Dinners
BW-3 Came Room;
toobe
viclco ganles
KH) ci) jukebox
You are cordially
invited to celebrate
the holiday season
at the Madrigal
Dinners, December
4 through 7,1997,
in the Great Room
at Mendenhall
Student Center.
dates
Thursday, December 4 at 7:00pm
Friday, December 5 at 7:00pm
Saturday, December 6 at 7:00pm
Sunday, December 7 at 5:00pm
a t&menu
�Pecan crunch baked salmon
�Herbed prime rib au jus with horseradish
�Grilled vegetable Wellington with garlicky pesto sauce
�Chevre rice stuffed chicken breast
with red pepper sauce
Waldorf salad � Wassail � Garden vegetable medley
Twice-baked potatoes � Assorted rolls and beverages
Seasonal dessert
ECU STUDENTS: You may purchase Madrigal Dinner tickets with your ECU meal card. Simply brine your meal
card and ECU ID to the Central Ticket Office to purchase octets using your meal plan. Dinner reservations must be
made no later than three business days prior to the event Contact the Central Ticket Office at 919.328.4788.
I 800.ECUARTS. or deafspeech-impaired access 919328.4736. Monday through Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm.
ECU STUDENT TICKETS ARE 15.
Wit
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Special Guest:
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Saturday Nov. 22
Kurr Phatt
Special Guest;
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Saturday Nov. 29'
Drill 187
Special Guest
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tost Came
"Great Light Show"
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i





rifSmm
10 Thursdiy. November 20. 1997
sports
The East Carolmim
�JLb it
Season finale against Wolfpjack
art.
-a-
Football team looking to
end on a winning note
However, ECU's biggest win over the
Wolfpack was in 1992 when the Pirates made a
dramatic comeback to win the Peach Bowl and
finished the season ranked ninth in the
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS EDITOR
nit's smack the pack time.
With just two days left until the
-final game of the season, the
afeotball team is looking to end on a
winning note, but there is no doubt
will have to get past a tough
l.C. State team,
ate" Quarterback Dan Gonzalez feels
for the Pirates to be effective, they
will have to be able to run the ball
;�nd be well rounded overall in their
v&me plan.
r� "Wc need to be able to run the
�rbotbali and have a balanced attack
more than ever, so if we're going to
'fcompetc we're really going to have
i'to be able to run the football as
i wel Gonzalez said.
no But that will be a difficult task,
since the Pirate running game has
only produced 681 yards, and hasn't
been as effective as once thought at
'the beginning of the season. The
'IiWolfpack have gained more than
fi double what ECU has on the
ground, with 1,743 yards.
,ov This game is important for the
lifans and the players in different
- ways. The players want to preserve
eir fourth straight winning season
'with this win, while the fans see the
owip as bragging rights. The series
i rekindled last year for the first
time since 1987, as ECU beat State
d&V29 in Ericsson Stadium in the
t-1996 season finale.
lii -
3�
�WKM
country. But that was then and this is now.
These players aren't worried about the rivalry;
just notching the win.
"To us players that are here now, it's more of
a fan rivalry because we've
only played them one time
in the last 10 years (regular
season) Senior split end
Larry Shannon said. "
We're new to it. "We're just
looking at it as out last
game.
Shannon does admit, since
this is State, it gives them
a little motivation to try to
beat them.
"Against State it just adds
an extra incentive, a little
extra motivation
Shannon said.
Not looking ahead and just
concentrating on what
goes on the field, has been
Head Coach Steve Logan's
purpose the entire season
and for this game. His
thinking has worked, as
ECU has won their last
four games.
"We have climbed out of
our hole by purposefully
not focusing on anything
external Logan said.
"The only thing we
focused on is blocking,
tackling and the next
opponent, and that's what
we're going to do this
week
Gonzalez would like to see
this program end on a
winning note.
"This program deserves to
have another winning
season Gonzalez said.
m
Welcome
back!
Shay Hayes rejoins women's
basketball team
Tracy M. Laibacii
.XSSISTAN I' SPOUTS KUITOt
Q: When did you injure
your back?
4: I first starting feeling pain in
jny back at the end of my freshman
jtear.
i
Q: What exactly was the
nature of your injury?
A: I had a hernia ted disk, and I
kept getting treatment and going
flack to playing too soon,
jbventually one disk became two,
and that is when I had surgery.
Q: How did you gradually
work back into training?
A: started out witti a lot of half
court play and drifts, and stuff
like that.
i .
'O: How did you keep
yourself positive and
motivated for a healthy
return to the court?
A: I knew that I bad another
year to play, so even though it
was tough to sit out, I knew that I
"would be back out there soon.
The Lady Pirates are
pumped up and ready to go
this season, hoping to pick
up where die team left off
in March of last year when
ECU advanced to the finals
of the conference
tournament. Senior forward
Shay Hayes is back on the
basketball court in uniform
this year after suffering a
back injury that qualified her for a medical red
shirt in 1996.
As one of only two team seniors, Hayes said
one of the most critical parts of the season is
now.
"Our biggest goal is to start the season off on
the right foot from the beginning Hayes said.
"We want fo get back to where we were at the
end of last season as far as they way we were
playing. Last year we waited until the end to
come together, and this time we want to have a
winning season
Perhaps one of the biggest challenges the
team faces is stepping up to replace last year's
leaders, including Tracey Kclley, Justine
Allpress and Laurie Ashenfclder.
"No one will be able to replace the seniors
from last year. It is going to take the whole team
coming together to replace the things they did
Hayes said.
Hayes said that one of the hardest things
about missing last year was the fact that she was
not able to end her college basketball career
with the teammates she came into the program
with.
"Knowing that I had another year to play
really helped me
out a lot and
kept me
motivated, but it
was really tough
to watch the
seniors finish
without me
Hayes said.
"We all
started playing
together and had
always planned
on ending
together, too
Hayes began
having back pain
due to a
hemiated disk at
the end of her
freshman year,
but continued
playing
"Q�r biggest goal is to
start the season off oh the
right foot from the
beginning. We want to get
back to where we were at
the end of last season as
far as they way we were
playing. Last year we
waited until the end to
come together, and this
time we want to have a
winning season
basketball, not realizing the degree of her injury.
As time w-nt on, the pain continued to get
worse, as she injured another disk.
"The doctors told me that if I wanted to
keep playing basketball, I would have to have
surgery, and so I did Hayes said. "I started
practicing drills and half court stuff in January,
and by March, 1 was feeling good again
Hayes said a lot wili be expected of the
freshman players on the team.
"We don't really have a lot of returning
players, so the freshmen really can't be
freshmen Hayes said. "They are going to have
to step in and play more like upperclassmen. We
don't have time for them to go through a gradual
freshman process because we are going to need
them
Hayes said there have been good days and
bad days at practice so far.
"We are really starting to come together, and
that is what it is going to take Hayes said.
"Everyone is working realty hard and has a lot to
offer the program
1996 (mm a Junior)
Started in three games
Averaged 5.4 points a game
Averaged 4.5 rebounds a
game
Averaged 1.2 steals a game
Received ECU'S Outstanding
Defense Award
Season high of 14 points
against Lafayette
Second on team in blocks
with 10
Career Highs
Scoring 19
Rebounds 14
Blocks 3
Free Throws 11
Assists 2
Steals 4
Larrf Shannon warns a flag in celebration of a touchdown catch last year against N.C.
Sufi. The Pirates beat the Wolfpack 50-29 at Ericsson Stadium, and play then this
Saturday in Raleigh.
par photo
"Wei (realty would like to have
another win, but we're really going
:o hate our hands full trying to get a
win this Saturday
Senior defensive back Tabari
Wallace said they will attack the
pack at full force.
fs a very intense gam�
"We're going at this
ckat
�Ifs
Wallace said.
with no holds barred. We're going to
come all out at them
The action begins at 1 p.m. and if
you don't have a ticket, the only way
you can catch the action will be
through the radio on the Pirate
Sports Network with Jeff Charles,
Carlesrer Grumpier and Henry
Hinton calling the action.
Men's Soccer season
closes with loss
Ranked opponent
mo much for Pirates
JbrkmI Anderson
skno traiTKi
s
: season dajjie to a close for the
JU's men's soccer team last
pk "A Washington, D.C with a
(defeat at the hands of sixth
, hedfuBTterican University. The
victory4 insured that American
would host the rest of the CAA
ToumaJhent.
WitJ the loss, the Hratcs fell to
7-13 overall, 2-7 in the CAA,
which included six teams that
were nationally ranked during the
season The seven victories put
this ytar's squad in with only five
other tpams to reach the seven
win jplatcau in the soccer
program's 33-year history.
i win seven games against a
schedule that included 10 ranked
opponents was a credit to the
playca Head Coach Will Wiberg
"To win seven
games against a
schedule that
intituled 10
ratifiedopponents
wasacreditto
' the players"
Head Coach Wit
Wibwa
said.
American,
which
includes four
first-team AH-
GAA payers
on their
roster, scored
two goals in
the first half
to take a 2-0
lead. The
first goal
found the nef
in 13th
minute of the
foot of American's junior forward
Scott Wcbet The second goal
came justnine minutes before the
half, as Eagle sophomore Angd
Lanchas slipped the ball past ate
Pirates senior keeper Jay Davis
after receiving a crossing pass
inside the goal box from
teammate Stephen Franzke.
"That second goal hurt us
because it was so close to
halftimc. We could have went to
SEE SOCCER. PAGE 12
it is your prediction of the N.C. State
versus ECU game?
My scoring prediction is ECU 24 and N.C .State 21.
1 have faith in our Pirates.
Melissa Wood
Psychology
Sophomore
Ifeelthat we have improved over the last few weeks
� ECU32, N.C. State 21.
Jimmie Goodman
Construction Management
Senior
ECUhas been coming together wrlland ifwe can
just be cairn, we am hold out and win� ECU77,
N.C. State 14.
Hilsria flodenhizer
Economics
Freshman
This will be a defensive game on both sides of the ball
� ECU24, N.C. State 21.
Malt Clifton
Physical Education
Junior
)
L
S,

t �





11 Thursday, November 20. 1997
0
The East Carolinian
Catalog
onnection
Division of U.B.E.
East Carolina Playhouse
A Tale of Witches and Outcasts
MOTHER HICKS
Rated: PG
New
Location
We have Moved to
642 K. .Arlington HI VI)
November 20, 21, 22, 24 and 25, 1997 at 8:00 p.m.
November 23, 1997 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: 9.008.00
ECU FacultyStaff: 8.007.00
ECU StudentsChildren: 6.005.00
Call-328-6829
McGinnis Theatre
ECU Main Campus
Corner of Fifth and Eastern Streets
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room
THURS NOV. 20,8K� - 1fc45 pm
iTZS
il&atll
Listen to WZMB
91.3 for band
interviews before
the show.
Q4A44 Kfi44 0CMlt4
j.?�r
o��
PIZZA, &
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee. For more information, call 328 - 4715 or check out our web
page at: www.ecuStudent.Unionpirate underground.html
SifiMiiSMliiMl
INDEPENDENTS WEEK: THURSDAY - SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 - 22
Thurs Nov. 20.8 pm
Fri Nov. 21.8 pm
rvntY Year oni: i nrvi
dares 10 in: iii i ikin r
and i in: cuiiics A.c;Kii:i
ONE OF THE YEAR'S
BEST FILMS
�nffNm YORK TIMES
"ASTONISHING
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Ehctnfying and hilarious. Its spiked with outrageous wit.
THUMBS UP
HOI I INT. STONE
"A TRIUMPH
PETER FONDA
ULEE'S GOLD
'A POP CULTURE
CYCLONE"
Sat, Nov. 22,8 pm
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS
BEST ACTOR � BILLY BOB THORNTON
Besl Screenplay (Adapted) � Billy Bob Thornton
L4 tf .
Trainspotting
I mnv win � IB j -� 11
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ONE OF THE MOST
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Fri Nov. 21,10 pm
Sat, Nov. 22.10 pm
Thurs Nov. 20,10 pm
Minnesota Twins
proceed with sale talks
North Carolina
businessman hopes to
buy baseball team
PHOENIX (AP) � The American
League today gave permission to
Minnesota Twins owner Carl Pohlad
to proceed with sale talks.
The Minnesota Legislature last
week defeated a proposal to finance a
new ballpark, and Pohlad has an
agreement with North Carolina
businessman Don
Beaver to negotiate a sale unless
stadium financing was approved by
Nov. 30. If he buys the Twins, Beaver
would want to move the team to
North Carolina following the 1998
season.
"The American League has no
choice but to direct the Twins to
move forward with the sale of the
club AL president Gene Budig said
todav.
The Twins' situation was
discussed Monday night by baseball's
ruling executive council, but no
action was taken. Under baseball's
regulations, the next step would be
for Pohlad and Beaver to reach a sale
agreement and submit it to the
sport's ownership committee.
Any sale must be approved by 11
of 14 AL owners and 12 of 16 NL
owners. In recent years owners have
taken six to 12 months to approve
sales.
"I believe the people of Minnesota
want the Twins Budig said, an
indication that additional
maneuvering may take place to keep
the team from moving. Without
question, they have proven their
commitment to major league baseball
over the years. 1 do not believe that
the Legislature is reflecting that view
of the fans
However, acting commissioner
Bud Selig and the council have made
clear they would favor a move if a new
stadium isn't built to replace the
Metrodome.
"Major league baseball continues
to believe that the Twins cannot
remain in Minnesota without a new
ballpark Budig said. "One can
cannot expect any owner of a major
league baseball franchise to lose
money indefinitely Pohlad, claiming
the Twins have lost millions, told the
(Minneapolis) Star Tribune he thinks
"it's highly unlikely" that other
owners would not approve the sale
and relocation.
He said he expects Beaver to
submit an application to buy the
team, saying it's "just a formality
now Tim Newman, a spokesman for
Beaver's organization, said today he
expects sale talks to move forward.
"We're going to talk to the Pohlads
this afternoon Newman said, "I
really wouldn't want to speculate on a
timetable, because it depends on
what they lay out to us
No baseball team has moved since
the second Washington Senators
became the Texas Rangers after the
1971 season. However, it's unclear if
North Carolina would finance a
stadium.
Voters in the area of Greensboro,
High Point and Winston-Salem will
decide May 5 whether to approve a 1-
cent restaurant tax to finance a $210
million stadium built. Minnesota's
House voted 84-47 last Thursday to
defeat stadium-financing legislation.
Pohlad offered to donate the Twins to
a charitable foundation if a new
stadium were constructed. The
foundation would sell the team in
several years and repay Pohlad's debt
on the team, estimated at $86
million. Pohlad would cover the losses
in the interim.
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? � � WikP Be sure to redeem your orange Thirsty Thursday coupon at The Spot for a free 16 oz. drink when you make a purchase.
'K� For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328004. All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted and
S? jf are FREE to students, faculty, and staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID. No backpacks allowed in the theatre.
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Three ways to
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Second, if you have�or obtain�a
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you may get it paid off at the rate of
15 per year or $500, whichever is
greater, up to a maximum of $10,000.
Selected military skills can double that
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Third, you can earn part-time
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BE ALL YOU CAN BEP
ARMY RESERVE
r






12 Thursday. Novambar 20. 1997
spoils
The East Carolinian
Swedish player signs with Cowboys
STILLWATER, Okla. (AP) � A member of the
Swedish National Team has signed a national letter-
of-intcnt to play basketball at Oklahoma State
UnFrcdrik Jonzen, a 6-foot-10, 230-pound forward,
signed Monday with the Cowboys. He is from
Pjonzen cho? Oklahoma State over Wake Forest
and Marquettc. . .
He is the third inside player signed by the
Cowboys in the early signing period. Oklahoma State
also has signed 6-9 center Anthony Dent of Dixie
(Utah) College and John Gillmore, a 6-7 forward from
Tyler (Texas) College. Jonzen plays for the club team
in Sallens in Sweden and attends high school in
Katdralskolan. He was a teammate of Oklahoma
State freshman forward
Michael Johnson while he was an exchange
student at Shawnec Mission (Kan.) High School.
Administrators restrained from
firing coach
GOODWELL, Okla. (AP)�A temporary restraining
order has been filed preventing Panhandle State
administrators from "terminating or dismissing
men's basketball coach Rick McCormick.
Texas County District Judge George H. Leacn
issued the order and set a Nov. 26 hearing in
jUMcCormick alleges in a lawsuit that Panhandle
State president John W. Goodwin and athletic
director Danny Stone have made "slanderous false
and malicious" statements about him Charles Unite,
attorney for the Board of Regents of Oklahoma A&M
Colleges, said Monday that school administrators had
been considering a "possible adverse employment
action" against McCormick when he filed his lawsuit
CGoodwTn, Stone and McCormick all declined
comment. Leach's order reinstates McCormick to tull
duties as basketball coach.
Dei Greco trying to kick his way out of
slump
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) � -Automatic" A! Del
Greco isn't so automatic this season.
The Tennessee Oilers' kicker has missed four of
his last seven field goal attempts after making 16 of
20 to start the year.
The 14-year veteran is having particular trouble
when asked to kick from 40 yards or more. He missed
a 41-yarder Sunday in the Oilers 17-9 loss to
Jacksonville. ,
"I can't control the yardage of the attempts 1 get
The only thing you can do is stay positive. I have an
the confidence in the world in me as I think
everybody in this locker room docs, and it 11 turn
around he said. . .
"If it was a matter of concentration or not being
confident or being afraid every time I went out there,
I'd be worried. But for whatever reason when 1 go out
there, I'm excited to have another chance
Coach Jeff Fisher said he will start worrying about
Del Greco when his kicker loses that confidence. He
pointed out that Del Greco has been perfect in
practice the past two weeks.
"He's got to find his way out of it, but he knows
the importance of making these kicks, especially this
part of the season Fisher said. "In games that are
close, we can't afford to miss any more of these.
Del Greco, who set a club record last year with lJl
points, has been kicking up to 20 extra balls a day in
practice. His biggest help may come from new goal
posts on the practice field. They are narrower than
regulation posts.
Mariners exhibition schedule begins
Feb. 27
SEATTLE (AP) � The Seattle Mariners will play a
31-game exhibition schedule, beginning Feb. 27
against the Chicago Cubs in Peoria, Ariz.
Thc Mariners' spring schedule includes five games
each against the Cubs and the Colorado Rockies; four
games each against the Oakland A's, Anaheim Angels
and San Diego Padres; three games against the San
Francisco Giants; and two games each against rhc
Milwaukee Brewers, Chicago White Sox and Anzona
Diamondbacks. .
Seventeen of the games will be played at Peoria
Stadium. The final two games, March 28 and Z9
against the Colorado Rockies, will be played in
Denver.
Falcons linebacker Bennett appears in
court on sexual miscounduct
BUFFALO, N.Y (AP) � A City Court judge today
p,otponed the c.uedng of Atlanta iuns
linebacker Cornelius Bennett, who pleaded guilty in
September to a sexual misconduct charge. Judge
Robert Russell said he wanted to review the victims
medical bills and other expenses. He set a new
sentencing date for Feb. 10.
Soccer
continued from page 10
locker room down only 1-0
Wiberg said.
The Eagle offense notched two
quick scores only 15 minutes into
the second half to push the score
to 4-0, and put the game away for
American.
For the game, the Pirates were
held to only five shots on goal.
Leading the Pirate offense was
Wyatt Panos, a junior, who placed
two shots against a tough Eagle
defense. Jay Davis stayed in net
the full 90 minutes in his last
collegiate contest, piling up four
saves. Davis, from nearby Wilson,
N.C played 1635 minutes in goal
this season and finished with a 2.5
goals against average in his fifth
year of affiliation with the
program.
uDavis had a very solid
season. We will not only be losing
a good player, but a true veteran
with lots of game savvy Wiberg
said.
The Pirates were riding an
emotional high going into the
tournament. After the program's
first win ever against a ranted
opponent, a 2-1 shocker here in
Greenville against William and
Mary, the Pirates lost a
heartbreaker to 21 Virginia
Commonwealth after Wyatt
Panos' shot sailed wide in the final
minute.
"It was a great turnaround for
us. We went in (the CAA
Tournament) with nothing to lose.
We fought hard, but the better
team won Wiberg said.
Wiberg and his assistants will
turn their attention toward
recruiting. Davis will only be the
only lettcrman not returning to
next year's veteran squad.
"We (coaching staff) will be
visiting some tournaments in
Florida over Christmas and
another in Washington.D.C. Our
concentration will be centered
along the east coast with the main
focus in North Carolina Wiberg
said.
Mexican Restaurant
LET'S FIESTA!
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
BLOODY MARYS
SANGRIAS
12 PRICE PITCHERS
DRAFT BEER
LIME MARGARITAS
WEDNESDAY MEXICAN IMPORTS
THURSDAY
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
(ACROSS FROM U.B.
757-1666
HI-BALLS
PINK MARGARITAS
$2.25
$1.75
95
$2.50
$1.75
$1.99
$2.75
OPEN 7 DAYS
For Lunch, Dinner,
and FIESTAS!
ALL ABC PERMITS
tor:
DISC JOC'KHYS
SPORTSCASI IRS
NLV
STERS
.Ippii'ation
Dciullinc Tites.
Nov:25, $991
PIM V VI: WZMBS RADIO STATION
KASKMENT IKDKHALI
STUDENT CENTER
LL MAJORS
WKLCOMK
BE A
SPORTS
WRITER
FOR
rolinian
COME APPLY FOR A
JOB WITH US AT THE
EAST CAROLINIAN ON
THE SECOND FLOOR
OF THE STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS
BUILDING
k, NOWHIRING
r�I�5fe
tf
Orientation A��rantx for 1998-99
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 214 Whichard Bldg. � 32JM173

For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Inf ormatioh Session in 208 Whichard Building:
� November 24,1997 (Monday)-4:00 p.m.
� December 8,1997 (Monday)-4:00 p.m.
� January 20,1998 (Tuesday)-4:00 p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 23,1998 at 5:00 p.m.
Thursday
LAUGHING
COLORS
Friday
Jonathan Byrd
Saturday
Skellingtons
Every
Thursday,
Friday,
Saturday
Dance to DJ
Mad M
upstai
fj
Saturday
Nightly
Prink Specials
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Highballs
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
7
foi
Pizza
Free
all day
LIVE MUSIC MOST
EVERY NIGHT
Drawing for
Superbowl Tix
32 oz. Domestic Draft
$1.50
14 oz. Domestic Draft
FREE FOOD
NFL
Ticket
on DSS
Monday
Night Football
95 4. Domestics
Tuesdays
$1.00 Domestics
$1.00 Highballs
Wednesdays
Bar Buffet
Everything is $1.
EVERYTHING!
Greenville's only Licensed NFL Sports Bar
-r
' �
'���j
4





13 Thursday. November 20. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now taking leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH Du-
plex-New! Wd hookups, gas logs, pa-
tio, roomy. Quiet, safe neighborhood.
Graduating. Must rent. $550 per
month plus deposit (neg). Neil or Jon
931-1051, leave message.
TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH apart-
ment located in Oockside. If interested,
please call 758-6009.
THREE OR FOUR BEDROOM town-
house. 3 12 bath, with washer and
dryer. 1 year or 6 mos. lease wno de-
posit. Campus area. Call 752-8078.
i i
p� M
ripply I lonogamant
IMlWta
108-A Brownies Dr. 758-1921
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM IN
Windham Court from January 1998 to
summer 1998. $350 for one person,
$425 for two. Call Stephanie at 931-
0573.
ROOMMATE NEEDED UNTIL END
of spring semester. Female to share a
two bedroom townhouse, 12 rent-
$170 plus 12 utilities. Call 321-7372.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR TWO
bedroom apartment. One-half of
$415.00 rent, utilities, and phone.
Open December, 1. Please contact
ASAP. Call 830-6992. Cypress Gardens.
Thank you.
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT. FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
S500MONTH. 758-5393
NEEDED -MALEFE-
MALE TO share furnished 2 BR, 1
bath apartment located downtown
above Upper Crust. Must be clean 8t
responsible. Smokers wetcome! Call
Staci at 757-9657 or leave a message.
ROOM FOR RENT AT Players Club.
Private room. Share bathroom. Rent
$220 per month plus 14 utilities. Call
321-7561, ask for Steve.
PROFESSIONAL OR GRADUATE
STUDENT needed, non-smoker, for 2
bedroom duplex across from the ECU
Recreation Center. $92.50mo 12 util-
ities. Avail. ASAPI Call Tammy @ 757-
0374.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS New
Rec Center! Two 2 bedroom apta.
above Catalog Connection - $475.00 a
month! Both available December 1st -
one month deposit required! Call
Yvonne at 758-2616.
NEEDED JAN. 1ST ROOMMATE to
share 2 bedroom duplex in Summer-
haven. Professional or grad student
preferred. Call Kim, 758-2800 or after
6:00 p.m. 321-8872.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
neededl for Players Club apt. Please
call 353-2885, ask for John, Paul or
Heather.
GEORGETOWN APTS. FEMALE
.FOR 12 rent($275) plus 12 utilities.
Available anytime after Dec. 1. Call
.752-2209 for more info. Leave mes-
sage if no answer.
FIREPLACE IN OWN BEDROOM!
'Females: need someone to take over
Mease Jan. 1st. 4 bedroom at Tar River
-only $200 monthly plus 14 utilities.
'Call 830-6882.
FEMALEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED - Players Club Aprs. 14 of
rent and expenses. Call Melissa at 321-
7613.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
NONSMOKER, neat, responsible
roommate wanted to share two bed-
room, two bathroom apartment at
'Forbes Woods starting December 1st.
For more information, call Beth at 931-
C0448.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
14 utilities, $220 per month. Play-
ers Club Ants. Call ASAP 321-
0889, ask for Lara.
-FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
�ASAP or January, rent $179. Large
room with three closets, utilities and
phone, across from ECU. Contact Tara,
758-1152.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
NON-smoker, studious, to share 3
bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse on
�ECU Bus route. Fully furnished, 13
utilities. No pets. Call Lesley, 754-2942.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
JAN. 1. really cute house one block
from campus. Rent $195,001 Great
deal 11 Social drinker OK but serious
students please call Jennie, Liz or Er-
icka, 830-5419.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED BY
January 1, 1998 to sublease 3 bed-
room apartment in Wilson Acres. $230
a month. Call Tracy, 758-9245.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share two bedroom apart-
ment in Wilson Acres. $257 a month
plus 12 utilities. Call Stacey, 561-7267
FEMALE NON-SMOKER Ri
MATE needed for apt. 3 block
campus, $255 a month and 12 util
Call 762-1652.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed to share 2 bedroom
apartment in Durham next semester.
$250mo. and 12 utilities. Call Tern at
757-0867 ASAP.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manager
ment, 756-6209.
CLEAN ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY Two blocks from Plaza.
$205 phis 12 utilities and phone. Col-
lege undergraduate preferred. Call Phil
today for info: 321-2813.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
BIG THREE BEDROOM HOUSE in
ECU area. 1 12 baths, central heat,
ceiling fans, washer hookup, fenced in
backyard, pets OK. $550 month. Call
830-9502

APT. FOR RENT, TWO bedroom, one
bath, close to campusPets allow. $300
rent Call 752-3333.
A DEPENDABLE MALE ROOM-
MATE needed to sublease 2 BR. du-
plex apt near campus, good location.
$200month plus 12 utilities. Call
James @ 754-2958.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Gain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7,223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
STUDENT ORGANIZATION NEEDS
SOMEONE to help organize dances.
Excellent experience in leadership,
communication, publicity, marketing.
Opportunity to work with musicians.
Looks great on resumes. 830-6403.
SEEKING RESPONSIBLE, RELI-
ABLE STUDENT to pick up my child
from his school and keep in my home
from 2:30 to 6:00, Monday thru Friday.
Please call Donna Walker at 758-9240
after 6:00 p.m. to inquire.
PERSON WITH PLUMBING EX-
PERIENCE needed to work with area
electrician. Must be available towork
morning hours. Flexible schedule. Call
Monarch Temporary Services, 321-
6000.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confi-
dential employment. Caff today,
747-768S.
MUSIC INDUSTRY OPPORTUNI-
TY! BREAKING Records (Atlantic) is
seeking college reps, for 1998. Great
entry level position. Unpaid, but great
benefits. Call Mr. Wilkina 803-779-
3803.
CRUISE SHIP St LAND-TOUR Em-
ployment- Learn about nationalint'l
Cruise Lines and Land-Tour compa-
nies. World Travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
Caribbean). Excellent benefits bo-
nuses! We can help you make the con-
nection. 517-336-0674 Ext. C53621.
CASHIERS WANTED: FLEXIBLE
Hours, part-time or full-time. Contact
Kathy at Trade Mart, 321-9263.
GREEK PERSONALS
f-r
A 2 BR. DUPLEX for rent near cam-
pus. Great location! Pets allowed!
$380month. Available Dec. 8th. Call
7587118, leave message.
4 BEDROOM AVAILABLE AT Play-
ers Club Apts. 6-month lease begin-
ning Jan. Call Melissa at 321-7613.
3 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
to sublease ASAP Players Club Apts
Please call Michelle or Jill at 756-4080.
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
ASAP, Players Club Apts. 14 rent and
expenses (per person). Call Tracy at
353-6933.
FOR SALE
WATERBED; FULL-SIZE SOFT-
SIDE, mattress only, excellent condi-
tion. First $45 takes it I! Hurry if you
want it! Call 754-8099.
SUPER NINTENDO WITH TWO con-
trollers and twenty games. One year
old. $160. Call Nate at 328-7166.
SONY XE-700 CAR Stereo Graphic
EQ Cass program to display mas-
sages across LCD screen. $400 OBO.
Ask for Don, 758-3531.
SEGA SATURN WITH NBA Live 97.
Madden 97, Daytona USA, PGA Tour
97. $150. Call 413-0797.
PIONEER KEX-MSOO SUPER Tuner
3, 6 CD changer wremote detachable
face and tape player. $400 OBO. Ask
for Don, 758-3531
MOVING SALE: SELLING BED-
ROOM and living room furniture for a
good price. Call Heather at 321-7366.
MOTOROLA MICRO-TAC 1980 Cell-
ular flip phone, leather case, 2 batter-
ies, wcharger, $100 OBO. Ask for Don,
758-3531.
MONGOOSE IBOC 17" XTR-LX
Syncos, $550.00. Manitou SX-Ti shock,
$225.00 Call 830-3952.
FOR SALE: 1988 TOYOTA Corolla
FX, runs well. 758-7292.
1880 GEO STORM-GSI Sport, great
condition, AMFM cassette, air condi
tioning, fog lights, recent tune-up.
$4,000. Call 321-3860.
11' HEALTHY BURMESE PYTHON
with cage and heat rock. Needs good
home with good owner. $800 negoti-
able. Call 830-6992 for more informa-
tion. '
HELP WANTED
TEACHER AIDES NEEDED. REAP, a
preschool program within ECU'S Spe-
cial Education Department is looking
for a person interested in working with
3-4 year old preschoolers. For more In-
formation please contact Dr. Jim
Taylor or Ms. Kim Braddy at 328-6186
or 328-6195.
n
ZETA TAU ALPHA SISTERS would
like to congratulate Amanda Gamer on
her Pahellenic President win! You rep-
resent Zeta and the Greek system
well
ZETA TAU ALPHA CONGRATU-
LATES Heather Wallman and Joy Ed-
son I The interior design school can
use your talents!
TINA BLACK. THANK YOU for all
your hard work preparing the best for-
mal ever. We love you. Your Delta Zeta
sisters
THE BROTHERS OF DELTA Sigma
Phi would like to cordially invite all the
sisters of Alpha Phi to a swingin' time
at our 40's Big-Band Social Friday
night
THE BROTHERS OF DELTA Sigma
Phi would like to congratulate our new
brothers: Derrick Harmon, Ryan Heath,
Zachary Cramp, Travis Harrelson, Tho-
mas Price, William Bumber, John Byr-
um, Peter Hanna. Congratulations
Beta Omega
THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO
came to Pi Delta's Grab A Date. We
hope our dates had as much fun as we
did!
THANK YOU DELTA ZETA for the
spaghetti dinner Tuesday night We
had a great time I Love, Sigma Sigma
Sigma
SIGMA PHI EPSiLON- We enjoyed
kicking off the Cincinnati game with
you guys. Thanks for a great time
SARA ARNESEN, BETH WOLF-
GANG, and Katharine Pappas-Hog-
gard, congratulations on getting into
Nursing School I Kristin Wheeler, Con-
grats to you on getting into the School
of Social Work! Love, your Zeta Tau
Alpha sisters!
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to congratu-
late their sister sororities Alpha Omi-
cron Pi and Zeta Tau Alpha on their
new Panhellenic positions. Good luck
Amanda, as president and Michelle as
secretary.
PI DELTA PLEDGES: GET ready for
tomorrow night. Camelot is going to
be a lot of fun. Love, the sisters
KNIGHTS: JUDGE NOT, LEST ye be
judged.
DELTA ZETA HOPES EVERYONE
had a great time at Rose Formal. It was
a lot of fun and everyone looked great.
Love, the Delta Zeta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
Program Council of Zeta Tau Alpha.
You will do a great job 11
CONGRATULATIONS TO KATH-
RYN WOODALL for your Vice Presi-
dency in Order of Omega. Love, your
Sigma sisters
CONGRATULATIONS SHANNON
MEEK ON getting promoted to Senior
Writer at The East Carolinian. We love
you. Your Delta Zeta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR
ENGAGEMENT Meredith! We're so
happy for you! Love, your Gamma
Sigma sisters
CONGRATULATIONS KELLY
GOODMAN ON your new Panhelle-
nic position as Assistant Vice Presi-
dent You've made us proud! Love,
your Pi Delta sisters
ALPHA XI DELTA: WE had fun at the
karaoke challenge Wed. night at
Sports Pad. We hope the machine
works the next time. Love, the Pi Del-
ta's
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to thank
all of the guys who came and partied
with us Saturday night at our Crush
Party. We hope you all had as much
fun as we did I Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Phil
TRAVEL
SPRING BREAK
C9nCM $mm
SIsrMa ft hi
WOHr HIRING REPS I
http:www.Tidlesssummortours.com
Book Today
VisaMCAmexDisc
1-800-234-7007
FREE SPRING BREAK TRIPS I Put
posters on campus, earn free trips! No
selling required! Bahamas, Cancun,
Florida, Jamaica! Best prices and
trustworthy company! springbreak-
travei.com 1-800-678-6386.
��AAAAISPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cancun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, 8s Florida. Group dis-
counts St daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, 8t go free! 1-800-234-
7007. http:www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
���ACT NOW! CALL LEISURE Tours
for Spring Break packages to South
Padre, Cancun, Jamaica and Florida.
Reps needed-Travel, free and earn
commissions. Group discounts for 6 or
more people. 800-838-8203 or
www.leisuretour8.com
OTHER
SEIZED CARS FROM 8178. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4wd's. Your area.
Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-3726 for
current listings.
IF ANYONE HAS ANY extra NC
StateECU game tickets, please call
752-9316 or 1-800-927-8249.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free
800-218-9000 Ext H-3726 for current
listings.
GET PAID TO SHOP, eat out and
morel Free details. Send self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope to Busi-
ness Basics, PO Box 97-SP, West Ber-
lin, NJ 08091-0097.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID - Student
Financial Services profiles over
200,000 individual scholarships,
grants, loans, and fellowships - from
private and government funding
sources. A must for anyone seeking
Money for college! 1-800-472-9135 ext.
F53621.
810008 POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext T-3726 for listings.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
TUB NOV. 18�VOCAL CHAMBER
Music with Four Hands, ECU Vocal
Quartet John B. O'Brien, pianist with
Jean Barr, guest pianist A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m. Wed Nov. 19�
Senior Recital, J. Benjamin Harrell,
voice, A.J. Fletcher Recital 7:00 p.m.
Thurs Nov. 20�Guitar Ensemble, El-
liot Frank, Director, A.J. Fletcher Reci-
tal hall 8:00 p.m. Fit, Nov. 21� Senior
Recital, Kristin Bjornsdottir, piano, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 p.m.
THE RCLS SOCIETY WILL be taking
the canned goods to the Greenville
Community Shelter on Nov. 24th. The
next RCLS Society Meeting will be on
Nov. 24th at 4:30 in Minges Room 143,
a guest speaker will be talking about
Scuba Diving! Have a good Thanksgiv-
ing break!
TEST PREPARATION WORK-
SHOPS: MONDAY from 11:00 a.m
12:00 noon and Tuesday from 3:30-
4:30 p.m. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development will be of-
fering this program the week of No-
vember 10th. If you are interested in
this workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON the
earth science honor fraternity) is hold-
ing their annual rock and mineral sale
on Nov. 18-20. It will be located on the
first floor of Graham Building from
10:00 a.m4:00 p.m. Items for sale in-
clude rare and unique minerals, gem-
stones, tumbled stones and geodes
from around the world. Proceeds will
go toward Geology undergraduate
scholarships including the C.Q. Brown
Scholarship Fund. !t also provides
funds for two students to attend the
UNC System-wide Summer Field
Camp which is required for all B.S. Ge-
ology Students.
6 Days - Most Meals - Free Parties - Includes Taxes
7 Nights AirHotel - Free Meat - 24 Hrj Free Drinks
Jamaica $419
7 Nights Air&Hote! - Save $150 on Food & Drinks
florMo
South Beach, Panama City, Daytona, Cocoa Beach
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Year!
1-800-678-6386
REAL CRISIS CENTER WOULD like
to thank all of its wonderful volun-
teers: Paulette Benz, Eric Blackburn,
Mary Boccaccio, Henry Brown, Su-
zanne Brown, Amanda Canady, Nicole
Cox, Katina Faulkner, Becky Finelli,
Greta Graves, Steve Green, Brandy
Harper, Christine Harrington, Randy
Hoggard, Russell Horning, Calandra
Ingram, Karen Jessick, Carmen Land,
Margaret Mayo, Amanda McCreary,
Dallas McPherson, Teresa Mudra, Con-
nie Palmer, Suzy Pfister, Lori Rath,
Fran Sankowski, Jennifer Shields, El-
len Stephenson, Sandy Traynor, Nancy
Thurninger, Jonni Wainwright Sally
Walker, Amy Whitley, Ellen Wrisley,
Queen Barnes, Paige Armstrong, Su-
san Walls, and Jill Zang
PRE-PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT IN-
TEREST Group will be meeting on
1121 at 12:00 in the Belk Bldg. Room
214. For more information, please con-
tact Ms. Ray at 328-4411.
FRI. NOV. 21�Jazz at Night, Carroll
V. Dashiell Jr Director, The Social
Room, Mendenhall Student Center,
8:00 p.m. Sat, Nov. 22�Senior Recital,
Michelle Renee Ullom, flute, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 p.m. Sat,
Nov. 22�Graduate Recital, Michael
Weaver, viola, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 9:00 p.m. Sun Nov. 23�ECU
String Orchestra, Fritz Gearhart Direc-
tor, with soloists Mary Bone, Flautist,
Andrew McAfee, principal hornist, and
Brian Reagin, concertmaster of The
North Carolina Symphony, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital hall, 8:00 p.m. Mon Nov.
24�Senior Recital, Sonia Alcala, so-
prano, AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
p.m.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS OR-
GANIZATION (ECHO) meeting Thurs.
Nov. 20 at 5:30 p.m. in the lobby of
Fleming Hall.
E.C.U. LAW SOCIETY WILL meet
this Thurs Nov. 20th at 7:00 p.m. ion
Rawl Room 103. Join us as we discuss
the different aspects of law and what
being a lawyer is all about! Open to all
majors I
COME SOCIALIZE WITH THE broth-
ers and sisters of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority.
Learn more about the Blue and the
White family. Thursday, Nov. 20, 1997
at 9:00 p.m. Room 244 Mendenhall
ATTENTION ALL GRADUATE
STUDENTS: Did you receive a gradu-
ate student survey? if so, please take a
few minutes to complete and send
back in the on-campus envelope that
was provided with the survey or send i
to Student Development, 211 I
Whichard. We'd like to receive them
by Friday, November 21, 1997. Thank
you for your time!
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSO-
CIATION SOCIAL. Catch the Excite-
ment! Harry's, November 20th, 9-11:00
p.m. Free beverages provided
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need Timberland boots
and shoes! Good Jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, FOLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD At SILVER � Jewelry At Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's. VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI l(M)0-12,O0,2.00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Vfcchovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buner.
classified ad info
OPEN RATE:
$3 for 25 or fewer words
STUDENT RATE:
$2 for 25 or fewer words
(must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify)
Additional Words over 25 are 5 each.
AD EXTRAS:
Bold type is $1 extra
All Caps type is $1 extra
(charges for extras are in addition to the line ad charges shown above)
DEADLINE:
4 p.m. FRIDAY for the Tuesday Issue
4 p.m. MONDAY for the Thursday Issue
ALL CLASSIFIED ADMUST BE PREPAID
.








Congratulations
Mike Schiller
of Garrett Hall
100000th student to
enter the Student Recreation Center!
on
11 AST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES





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ECU frsf to hookup Microsoft Exchange
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2 Thursday. November 20, 1997
focus
The East Carolinian
Microsoft Exchange
replaces
Telnet system
Know the
Language
of the
Internet
Address:
The location of an Internet resource.
An e-mail address may take the form
of joeschmoe@somecompanY.com. A
web address looks something like
http:www.ecu.edu.
Browser:
A program run on a client computer for
viewing World Wide Web pages.
Examples include Netscape and
Microsoft's Internet Explorer.
Domain:
The Internet is divided into smaller
sets known as domains, including
.com (business), .gov (government),
.edu (educational) and others.
FTP:
File Transfer Protocol - a set of rules
for exchanging files between
computers via the Internet.
Home Page:
The first page of a Web Site. Also, the
Web site that automatically loads each
time you launch your browser.
HTML:
HyperText Markup Language - a
collection of tags typically used in the
development of Web pages.
HTTP:
HyperText Transfer Protocol - a set of
instructions for communication
between a server and a World Wide
Web client.
Online Service:
Services, such as America Online,
CompuServe, Prodigy and the
Microsoft Network, which provide
content to subscribers and usually
connections to the Internet, though
sometimes limited.
source: Squae One Technology
"It is exciting that ECU
may serve as a model for
other universities in
capitalizing on cost-effective
Internet and Intranet-based
educational information
technologies
Ernest Marshburn
associate director of Computing and
Information Systems
ECU is first in nation
to use system
Danielle Howell
FEATURE WRITKR
ECU is the first university in the nation
to receive a campus-wide Internet and
Intranet- based electronic
communication available to all faculty;
staff and students.
According to Ernest Marshburn,
associate director of Computing and
Information Systems, ECU was selected
because of a vision of moving up in the
world of electronic communication.
"ECU first began discussing its vision
with Microsoft more than a year ago
said Marshburn. "Now teamed with
Microsoft, ECU can provide a fully-
integrated environment
Microsoft Exchange was customized
for educational use and was developed
for people on the move. Marshburn
refers to them as "nomadic users users
such as students who move freely from
dorm room to home or for professors who
move from classroom to office. With
more than 20,000 student, faculty and
staff users, this exchange can be accessed
anvwhere with Internet access.
Microsoft Exchange can also be used
in the classroom. For example, students
can e-mail class assignments to
professors who can return papers with
corrections, all in a paperless
environment. ECU also uses the
Intranet system for course objectives and
studv guides.
Exchange has passed a level six CIA
security svstem which makes it almost
impossible for mail to be tracked or for
someone to hack into.
But such a program does not come
without restrictions. Faculty, staff and
students are given five megabytes of
space, which is only slightly more than a
million words.
"This should not cause any
immediate restrictions if people use it
responsibly by checking mail on a regular
basis said Marshburn. "Any mail that
needs to be saved can easily be moved to
a personal PC
"This system has been in place since
the beginning of this semester and 90-
plus percent of users have spoken highly
of it said Marshburn.
Although the system has received
rave reviews, Marshburn and his staff
have collected comments for users as to
how the system can be enhanced. These
comments were passed along to
Microsoft to be implemented in the next
version.
Financial support for the program
came from the state at a cost of $100,000
for students and $300,000 for the entire
system, according to Marshburn, who
takes great pride in helping ECU achieve
its vision.
"It is exciting that ECU may serve as
a model for other universities in
capitalizing on cost-effective Internet
and Intranet-based educational
information technologies said
Marshburn.
"A computer
virus is a set of
instructions
designed to do
malicious or
annoying things
to your
computer
Wynn Parkinson
computer technician
at Computer Geeks
Multiple users
helps viruses
spread
through campus
J I. I I- I- R T I I
M M RE WRITE
ECU student Elizabeth Hodgson takes a deep
breath and prepares herself for battle. For the third
time in an hour, she reboots her computer. Her
research paper has disappeared.
Hours of" tinkering with files and calling
software company helplines have not solved this
recurring problem. I lodgson's enemy is a computer
virus.
She is not alone. Students at ECU deal with
this nuisance on a daily basis. Chances are, any
campus computer lab user has at least heard horror
stories about computer viruses.
So what exactly are computer viruses and what
can be done about them?
"A computer virus is a set of instructions
designed to do malicious or annoying things to your
computer said Wynn Parkinson, a computer
technician at Computer Ceeks, a local software
and computer companv.
Computer Geeks manager Bill Doane has an
even simpler definition.
"It's a real nightmare said Doane.
To the average computer user, these viruses are
little more than minor annoyances. At their worst,
however, viruses destroy software and cause major
expenses in time and money.
One of the worst viruses, according to
Parkinson, is Stone Monkey form A, which makes
the computer lose its hard drive.
Mruses of this type are relatively rare. More
common are Word Macro viruses like Wazzu, which
FILE PHOTO
spreads through readable files randomly replacing
text with the word "wazzu
A majority of viruses, Parkinson said, were not
made to cause major damage.
"Most viruses were probably designed as jokes
by people with too much time on their hands
Parkinson said.
Computer labs are a real problem area in the
spread of computer viruses.
"ECU students would be more prone to trouble
with computer viruses because labs have somany
different people using the equipment said
Parkinson.
Another growing problem with computer
viruses is the availability of virus building programs
on the Internet.
"The graphical interface on the Net makes it
easier for just anvone to have a virus made to
order said Richard Beck, a salesperson at
Computer Geeks.
The best way to protect disks and files trom
contamination is to invest in anti-virus software.
ECU computer labs have invested in software
which scans new disks for possible viruses and
repairs those files that are affected.
Did
E
ou
now?
Did you
know that
ECU ranked
on Yahoos
list on Top
100 Wired
Universities?
mm
.
Computer Bit
As of Jan. 16 1997, 102 million people had access
to the World Wide Web, e-mail, ftp, gopher and
telnet services. There were 1.6 million recorded
WWW sites in the Internet.
source Netree s Internet Statistics
fn� y
1
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� �. , . �
3 Thursday, November 20, 1997
j??ys
The East Carolinian
I

1
Wired
through
websites
Some intersting sites to
check out on the web;
tedm,8i.sfcif�0u fall out
1. http:www.nwrmk.comxottbaby.htm
ot your chsif in hyst
2. http:www.dailywav.com
it? ttiii of sound bts from all of vouf fewjrits rnpies ens' snows. W great for
ads.
3. hup: www.careerbuilder.com
-If your looking forth
me mte ysa need foi 'bat dream job.
pe you all
Students show creativity and
skill through websites
4. http:www.mapquest.com
-When you need directions to anywbgie w Uw woitt, map quest can pe debve? them.
15 percent of students
have websites
Elizabeth Hodgson
FEATt'RE WRITER
The World Wide Web offers a creative outlet for students
to express themselves artistically by designing their own
home pages. This art doesn't require a canvas and a paint
brush, but rather a computer, some creativity and a basic
knowledge of the language of the web.
Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) and Java
Script arc the languages used in creating a web page. The
language consists of a series of codes that translate into
commands that are read by the server, which transmits
the message to the Web. Several classes teaching this
language and design are offered at ECU.
For those who are looking for the quick route to
learning HTML, the Austin computer lab provides books
explaining the process of using this program. With some
time and practice, the programs can be easily mastered.
Just ask senior Jenifer Banker, a communications major
who has her own web page.
"I mainly learned how to use it (HTML) through trial
and error Banker said.
A white kitten running across a jelly bean background
to the sound of "Under the Sea can be found at
Banker's site. She talks about her life at ECU and her
search for a job for after graduation. Pictures of herself
and her fiance make the site more personal.
Banker is not alone on the Web; 15 percent of ECU
students have also created their own pages, which can be
found at the ECU web site. These web pages can
contain just about anything from animation and games,
to clips from the creator's favorite movie. One common
method used to obtain the animation bits or graphics is
to download them from other sites on the web.
"The animated cat on my page was borrowed from
another site on the Web said Banker.
Many people offer things that can be used in creating
another page, but copyright laws still need to be followed
and attributions are usually necessary. ECU has a set of
guidelines that need to be followed while creating web
sites. These guidelines are posted on the ECU home
page.
Web pages are a way for people to communicate with
each other and express themselves. It is no longer just a
job for some, but a hobby for many.
"It's a creative outlet for me Banker said. "It's a way
to program with creativity
5. http:www.pythoniine.com
-The oft Classic Monty Ppta
efts! with peopteyoy never IMm
6. http:www.nps.gov
-Uwkmg for s way to mn the
Hwomi Park Service web site is tt
on the web by "Wired" magazine.
MM&$M itmM � a tm$� or
reasufes wrtnout is
7. http: www.wb.com
8. http:www.gamersinn.com
9. http:www.pollstar.com
-When you want to find do
out, and find m ail the concert info vo� was
10. http:www.imdb.com
-This site is the movie data base that has att
jfies tbe iiner
tasita!
fetow about any
Students
frustrated
due to
lack of help
in labs
FILE PHOTO
Carrie Doigntery
FIATI RE WRITER
Students at ECU are having difficult experiences in the campus
computer labs.
Most of the complaints are centered around the computer lab
assistants.
Students claim they are receiving invalid information from assistants
about computer procedures. Others claim that the assistants cannot
answer their questions. The students say that the assistants are not
receiving enough training. Assistants at the computer labs disagree.
"No one person could possibly know everything there is to know
about all the software that we carry said Elizabeth Sawyer, a lab
assistant in the Austin computer lab. "Most people that do have
problems with the lab assistants are people that come in here and expect
us to do their work for them
To become a computer lab assistant in the dorms, students have to fill
out an application and, if hired, attend a one-day, eight-hour training
seminar. Lab assistants at the Austin computer lab have to watch video
Computer lab
assistants claim to
receive proper
training
tapes on the types of software, computers and printers available at the
lab. Some students claim that this is not adequate training.
"They should be given a lot more training than that; you can only
learn the basics in an eight-hour session said Melanie Sicard, a junior
majoring in communications.
Students are also experiencing other problems with the campus
computer labs. There have been problems with their hours of operation.
Students have complained about some computer labs closing too early or
not opening early enough. Also, there are problems with the number of
computers on campus. �
"I have had to wait 30 minutes for a computer at the lab in the
downstairs of Umstead Hall said Jamie Stokes, a freshman majoring m
biology. . .
Some students are opposed to all the negativity toward the computer
labs and claim that they receive proper guidance. Also, they claim to have-
no problems with the hours of operation.
"I have never had a problem with the ECL computer labs. I he
assistants always help me if I need help, and I have no problem with
waiting a little bit for a computer. At least we have them. I don't know
what I would do if we didn't said Holly Jones, a junior majoring in dance
theater education.
eastcSrolinians
Al IRots I KR Erttm
Cel.ESTF WILSON ManagingEtinof
A;EI. KORNIfi Special Feature Ediim
DAVID SOI IIIFRI.XM) Special Feature Designer
The purpose is lo take an m-depih look at issues ol importance to students and laculty at ECU This issue is the
third ol su which will appear this semester Look for the next issue on student finances which will appear in
November 26 Focus is a class protect lor Sheariean Duke's Basic News Writing class.
Ever Wonder about?
�There are 50 computer labs on campus.
� Of these labs, 16 fully networked.
�There are 451 PCs and 386 Macs in the labs.
�The labs are located in Austin, Belk, Brewster, Brody, Eller House,
Flanagan, General Classroom Building, Graham, Howell Science Complex,
Jenkins, Mendenhall Student Center, Minges, Bawl, Bivers and Speight.
��-
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- � ji� i in
�-






I
I
I

j
Do it for ECU
Or for a portable CD player, whichever floats your boat.
The administration has said they re Send us your idea for a new ECU logo
looking for a new university sym- before our Nov. IS deadline.
bolf something other than VeeVee Pirate. We our famte and give that per-
We at The East Carolinian would like to son a portable CD player. Then we'll run
help them in their deliberations. all of serious logos we receive in the Dec.
4 issue of the paper and on our website at
www.studentmedU.ecu.edu.
Here's your big chance to help the ECU
administration and show your school
spirit (or how badly you really want a
portable CD player).
f VMT Bring your entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
A-
Vutonyowr
thinking cap
send us
logo idea
i!
Wt'
�w


Title
The East Carolinian, November 20, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 20, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1254
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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