The East Carolinian, November 6, 1997






THURDAY
NOVEMBER 6.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Officer cleared after
incident at stadium
1. Officer presence
2. Verbal commands-
communication
OC (pepper) spray
Physical contact
Expandable baton
Deadly force
Arrested fan goes to
court Nov. 17
Jacqueline D. Kellum
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Officer William C. Peebles of the ECU
Police Department, who was the subject of
an internal investigation following an arrest
he made at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, has
been cleared of any wrongdoing.
"There has been an investigation and it
has been the
University's
determination that the
officer acted in
accordance with the
Department of Safety's
use of force policy
said Benjamin G Irons
III, university attorney
and spokesman for the
university on the
investigation.
Allen Thomas Sr
attorney for the
arrested fan, disagrees
with the university's
findings on Officer
Peebles.
"I am at a loss about how they arrived at
that decision because they interviewed
many of the same witnesses I did Thomas
said.
The incident in question occurred on
Oct. 11 during the ECUSouthern
Mississippi game.
ECU alumnus and president-elect of the
Wilson County Pirate Club Michael Radford
was watching the game with a child later
identified as his son.
Radford's son was waving a Pirate flag
Stadium rules do not allow flags during
games as they obstruct the view for other
fans and are potentially dangerous.
"Officer Peebles approached Mr. Radford
and asked him to allow him (Peebles) to
take and keep the flag during the game and
he Radford) refused Irons said.
When Radford refused to cooperate,
Peebles used Oleorcsin Capsicum (OC)
spray, commonly known as pepper spray.
Peebles then escorted Radford out of the
stadium. �
"As they were apparently exiting the
stadium, Mr. Radford unfortunately slipped
and fell Irons said.
Radford was removed from the stadium
Source: ECU Police
FOR MORE INFORMATION
the east Carolinian
ONLINE
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
in an ambulance and treated at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
"Mr. Radford was treated and released,
and to my knowledge there were no serious
injuries Irons said.
Several of the witnesses to whom
Thomas referred expressed their opinion
that the officer's methods were excessive.
One fan wrote a letter to
Chancellor Eakin in
support of Radford.
However, Irons points
out that Peebles was
enforcing stadium policy
and that his initial
request to Radford was
refused.
"The officer was faced
with the choice of
ignoring the rules or
enforcing the rules
Irons said.
The Police Department's
use of force policy reads
in part: "Police officers will use only the
amount of force necessary and reasonable
under the circumstances to control a
situation, effect an arrest, or defend
themselves or others from harm. Every
officer is charged with the responsibility of
weighing all other reasonable means of
apprehension and control before resorting
to the use of force
Thomas commented that he has not read
the University Police Iepartmertt's use of
force policy, but questions whether Peebles'
actions truly fall within the accepted limits.
"I would be shocked if that were the
policy. If that is the policy, it needs to be
changed Thomas said.
The case against Radford, in which
he is charged with second degree
trespassing, resisting arrest and obstruction
and delav, will go to court in Greenville on
Nov. 17.
Thomas says that he and Radford will be
prepared for the trial, in which the judge
will act as jury.
"We're confident that Mr. Radford has
done nothing wrong Thomas said.
Although Thomas believes the charges
against his client are unjustified, no
SEE OFFICER. PAGE 2
One Card replaces multi-card format
Students like these eating lunch in Mendenhail Dining Hall will soon have to switch to the One Card.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Dining card, activity card,
library card, ID combine
ANGELA KOENK,
STAFF WRITER
The wallets of ECU staff and students are
going to be a little lighter next semester.
The ECU 1 Card will officially replace
the multi-card system currently used on
campus.
The card will be a combination library,
dining, and activity card and will include a
debit account. (
According to Jennifer Sutton, director of
ECU One Card Systems, the university
decided to switch to this system to make
things easier for people while on campus.
"It's more convenient to just put money
on account rather than having to carry cash
around Sutton said.
The debit account, called the Golden
Key Account, can be set up allowing
SEE ONE CARD PAGE 2
Sonic plaza plans
underway
Students get to aid in
project that will bring
blast of technology
AMBER TATUM
STAFF WRITER
Construction on Joyner Library goes to
a higher plane as plans for the sonic
plaza are set underway.
"This will make for a public space
that is lively and interesting and ever-
changing. There won't be another
place like it anywhere in the world
said Christopher Janney, the project
artist from PhenomenArts, Inc.
Also working on this project along
with Janney are art students like Drew
Saraizl.
"It helps make it more personalized
than having someone come in who has
no real attachments to the school
said Saraizl, a senior graduate student
in the School of Art.
The sonic plaza will consist of four
elements that are the primary artwork
for the the library expansion. These
include the Ground Cloud, the Sonic
Gates, the Percussive Wall and the
Media Glockenspiel.
According to a release sent out by
the news bureau, the Ground Cloud is
a 12-foot circle of water mist over a
grate. It will be designed to "dance
according to the whim of the wind, at
times static, at times furious
At the north side of the plaza will
be the Sonic Gates, actually the
columns that have been a part of the
library since the original structure was
built. They will be outfitted with
photo-electric cells that will chime
whenever movement is sensed.
As Janney said, "The tones will be
scored to be in consonant harmony,
but change in pitch and timbre
throughout the day. The more people,
the more active the sound. You'll
never hear the same sound twice
The 15-foot x 40-foot Percussive
Wall has 64 water jets that are arranged
to play a series of ever-changing
patterns of water mist. A sound score
will also coincide with this feature.
"When no one is there, the fountain
will be quiet, asleep. As people pass by.
it will wake up and start to dance
Janney said.
Last, but certainly not least, is the
Media Glockenspiel. This is the big
clock tower that has recently been
completed.
Within the face of the clock tower is
a circular ring of a dozen, 20-inch video
monitors centered around a set of
three-foot doors from which various
elements will emerge four times a day
at twelve feet above the ground.
"There is a whistle, a rooster, a
moon and a joker Saraizl said. "The
exact times are sunrise, noon, sunset
and midnight
This she, part of the Joyner Library expansion, will soon resonate with soothing sounds.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
The rooster is
supposedly going to come
out of the clock tower at
sunset and act like a big
"cuckoo clock
"Actually, the concept
was developed about seven
years ago before funding
Saraizl said.
The design won an
award for design in 1991.
Funds from this project
come from half of one
percent of the total $30
million of the library
expansion money.
Student workers in this
plan receive credits for
their time.
"It will help me down
the road and with
references and my resume
Saraizl said.
ChristopherJanney,
WorldClassArchitect
� Spanish enous in teps
� Ml : 'InterriMtioial Airport
tn.ipa ;� i to he Mviys in es thi 1998n and P,ir ipletion q1 ti � nc
Med school dean
Hallock named to
liaison committee
Prestigious group reviews
medical schools
Amanda Briggs
S'MFF WRITF.R
Dr. James A. Hallock, ECU vice chancellor for health and
sciences and dean of the School of Medicine, has been
appointed to a Liaison Committee on Medical Education
(LCME).
The LCME is a group that represents the Association
of .American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and American
Medical Association.
SEE DEAN. PAGE 2
Pitt County
lection Results
rfc3
: Friday S96
ve McUrwhorn 420
WrfeHm 2
tct4
Browa 249
� Forties 883
Ramey 669
l-rict 5
Mary Aisentzer 848
ArieHe Morris 6.SS
Mayor
Nancy Jenkins 4,980
Write-ins 9
At Large
Chuck Autry 3,222
Jack Waif 2,tG2
District 1
Mildred Council 509
"Mite Ruff 54
District 2
RurTus Huggins 475
Write-ins 8
Total msaadber of people who Voted 5,609
Total siM' of people registered to vote
33MM2
Saws Wt Cavity Board of d�tiur.�
THURSDAY
TODAY
sunny
High 64
Low 49
TOMORROW
rainy
High 60
Low 49
m M
Did you know that
early registration
begins Monday
November 10th.
opinion5
Too Much for food?
lifestyle.
Percolator serving up the
caffeine fix
sports.
10
Fall tennis wraps up
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG.
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.siudentmedia.ecu.edu
� . m






2 Thursday, November 6, 1997
W"
The East Carolinian
I w- &��" m 33P
jj across
he state
DOT to add stoplight
on dangerous bypass
ELIZABETHTOWN (AP)
Following complaints about safety
on the new N.C. 87 bypass, the
state DOT says it will install a
traffic signal at one dangerous
intersection.
Since it opened in September,
there have been at least eight
accidentsir.v-olving injuries on the
bypass.
Last week, 13-year-old
Stephanie Richardson of Clarkton
died of injuries she received in an
Oct. 9 accident on the bypass.
Along with the traffic light at
Airport Road, state officials will
also addflags to warning signs
along roads intersecting the
bypass as well as newpavement
markings they say will help
drivers negotiate through
thecrossings.
Elizabethtown Police Chief
Michael Royston said the light
should help.
Billionaire's gift
helps community
SALISBURY (AP) Billionaire
Julian Robertson and his sisters
have given the Salisbury
community, not the government,
a gift of $15 million to improve
social problems in their
hometown.
The gift was announced last
month by the 65-year-old
financier, who founded the $10
billion Tiger Fund, and his sisters,
Wyndham Robertson and Blanche
Bacon. Robertson is listed on the
Forbes annual ranking of richest
Americans at No. 148 with a net
personal worth of $1 billion.
The town's mayor and eight
others were named to a board of
directors for the Robertson
Foundation, which will oversee
the gift.
across
11 h e nation
Government awards
$19.6 million in
AIDS grants
WASHINGTON (AP) Federal
grants totaling $19.6 million have
been issued to provide support to
low-income people in Minnesota
and 19 other states who are
infected with the AIDS virus.
Housing Secretary Andrew
Cuomo said Monday the grants
will help 11,000 people who have
tested positive for HIY including
those with full-blown AIDS,
remain in their homes or be
provided with housing if they are
homeless.
The grants, which were
awarded to community
organizations on a competitive
basis, represent 10 percent of a
$196 million program. The larger
share of the money earlier was
awarded to states and cities
according to a formula based on
the number of AIDS cases
reported.
The $19.6 million in grant aid
is being made available to
communities in Alabama, Alaska,
Arizona, California, Connecticut,
Hawaii, Florida, Kentucky, Maine,
Maryland, Massachusetts,
Minnesota, New Jersey, New
York, New Mexico, North
Carolina, Rhode Island, Texas,
Washington and Wyoming.
DEA watches for
intoxicating drug
MILWAUKEE (AP) The U.S.
Drug Enforcement
Administration has initiated at
least four investigations in
Wisconsin to determine if an
intoxicant known as the "club
drug" was used on rape victims.
GHB (gamma
hydroxvbutyrate) is a colorless
drug which, if used to spike
someone's drink, can leave the
person unconscious and
vulnerable to crimes like rape or
robbery.
John Riley, a Milwaukee DEA
agent, said two investigations are
underway in southern Wisconsin
and two are underway upstate.
He declined to provide details
about assaults that may be under
investigation.
The drug was once used to
treat narcolepsy. Health stores
sold it as a sleeping aid.
About six years ago, the
government forbade
nonprescription sales.
No manufacturing of GHB is
known in Wisconsin, but gallons
of GHB have been confiscated in
Chicago. Rilcy said.
One Card
continued from page 1
students to deposit money, and
then use the funds when
purchasing athletic and event
tickets, paying library fines and
making other transactions on
campus.
Small monetary increments
can also be added to use copiers
and vending machines. These
deposits can be made in the One
Card office which is located in
Dowdy Student Stores.
Within approximately the next
year, the cards will also be used in
place of outer door keys to
residence halls, according to
Sutton. Freshmen and transfer
students obtained their cards
during orientation sessions last
summer, but have only used them
as meal cards when dining on
campus and to set up accounts
with financial aid money that can
be used in the student store.
These students were also given
the currently used ID cards which
were used as activity cards.
Under the one-card system,
this will ail be done electronically.
"Basically it (the computer
system) gives you an activity and
as you use that activity it blocks
that space Sutton said.
Students and faculty who have
not had cards made will be
required to have them made
between Nov. 8-21 in the student
store.
Nov. 13 and Nov. 19 are
designated faculty and staff days.
Student cards will not be made on
these days, but faculty can have
their cards made on any day.
Anyone who cannot have their
card made during these dates will
have to have it done in the One
Card office before the end of the
semester.
There is no cost for the first
card but replacement cards will
cost $15. Students need to bring
their current identification card or
driver's license and social security
card when getting their
replacement done.
The cards will not be given
during the re-carding event and
according to Sutton it has not
been decided yet when they will
be distributed.
Dean
continued from page
"This is a great honor for me
personally and for the university.
It is a great responsibility to serve
on the board of the LCME since
the organization is charged with
accrediting all medical schools in
America Hallock said.
Dr. Jordan Cohen, president of
the Association of American
Medical Colleges appointed
Hallock on this 17-member board
for a three year term. Hallock was
chosen from the deans of 125 U.S.
and 16 Canadian medical schools.
"This is a tremendous
achievement; this has positive
effect on Dean Hallock and for
the university. Dean Hallock was
chosen above deans from 141
medical schools said Jeannine
M. Hutson, with Medical Center
News and Information.
The LCME surveys medical
schools and accredits these
schools for M.D. programs. This
is a select 17-member board
consisting of public members,
administrators, medical educators,
practicing physicians and medical
students.
The LCME conducts site
visits to 20 to 30 institutions
annually. The LCME also reviews
written reports and survey data
from the nation's medical schools
and their parent universities.
Appointment to the Liaison
Committee is gaining extensive
recognition for Dean Hallock and
the School of Medicine.
Officer
continued from page 1
countersuits against ECU have
been filed.
"He cares very deeply for
ECU. He is not looking to get
anything from ECU Thomas
said.
However, the investigation of
Peebles' actions has been
concluded, and the university
considers the matter closed.
"There was no action taken
against Officer Peebles. He
remains an officer in good
standing Irons said.
The parking lot located
east of the Hawl Building
and west of the Austin
Building will be closed
beginning Monday,
Nov. 10, 1997.
UNDERWATER
Jamaican Restaurant & Bar
511 S. Cotanche St.
Greenville, NC
(919) 754-2207
Lunch Special
Beef, Chicken, or Veggie
Patty with tossed salad
and Free Tea.
$3.50 plus tax.
Dinner Special
Any Chicken
entree' and free
tea.
-���
l &
Uk
� Doors Open: 7:30 p.m.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
11.25 plus tax
expires 11897
'A Touch Of Class'
756-6278
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
7
le Dincm "2.



10 OR MORE GIRL y
DANCERSEVERV jjg
Located 5 Milet W�st of Cre�oviU� on 264 AlL (Behind Aladdin Limo Service)

BmiffiH
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Be sure to redeem your orange Thirsty Thursday coupon at
The Spot for a free 16 oz. drink when you make a purchase.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8
For more information, call the Student
Union Hotline at 328-6004. All films start
at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted and
are FREE to students, faculty, and staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No backpacks allowed in the theatre.
"A WILDLY
ORIGINAL,
FIERCELY
FUNNY TREAT
jgnn vdii
"THEBEST
MOVIE OF THE
SUMMER SO
FAR,BYFAR
MR. JONES
MR. SMITH
MEN IN BLACK
COLUMBIA
PICTURES .
Important
Information
ALL
ECU Students,
Staff, and Faculty!
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
AS?
CA
oiA
3TSV
VESI"
&�&&�-
GusWtson
D00RPRI2E
EACH DAY!
Get your name in early
f for a chance to win
each day!
Visit the ECU I Card web page,
linked from "Business Services'
on the ECU home page:
www.ecu.edu
MANDATORY
REGARDING EVENT FOR ALL
STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
TO NAVE NEW PHOTO I.D.
CARDS MADE
Students, staff and faculty who have already been through
the ECU One Card recording process need not participate.
The ECU One Card will be required as of January I,
1998 for all Campus Libraries, Recreation Center access,
Campus Dining, Student Activities, Financial Aid Defer-
ment accounts, and everything you needed an ECU I.D.
card for in the past!
To produce your new identification
Current ECU ID card OR Driver's
November 8- 21, 1997
Location: One Card Office
ECU Student Stores, Wright Building
Monday -Thursday
9:00 am - 12 noon & 1:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Friday
9.00 am - I 2 noon & 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saturday, November 8, 1997 ONLY
10.00 am -3:00 pm
NOTE: Thursday, Nov. 13 &
Wednesday, Nov. 19
STAFFFACULTY ONLY
9:00 am - 12 noon & I 00 pm - 7:00 pm
Stafffaculty also welcome any other
date & time listed above.
card you must bring with you:
license and social security card
Questions should be directed to the ECU One Card System Office,328-20IS,located inside Dowdy Student Stores,Wright Building.
mmm�.
jy r





The East Carolinian
w
Thursday. November 6. 1997 3
UL
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8jm
Bring S3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy al 758-1901
Campus dining prices fair as possible
Prices competitive
compared to
restaurants
Natasha Phillips
s 1 1 1 �l!l�
Many ECU students complain
about on-campus food expenses,
but not every ECU student is
aware of the various steps involved
in determining food prices.
Fred Bissinger is the resident
districr manager of Aramark.
ECU's food distributor, and
explained how prices arc-
determined.
"A lot of work noes into setting
food prices. We do a market
survey, which evaluates and
compares local food prices.
ftcrward. we compare prices and
products of equal or lesser value.
Then we submit those prices to
the university. They can either
approve r deny acceptance
Bissinger said.
"In order to figure out how-
much to charge, wc have to figure-
out what the cost of doing
business is and place retail prices
appropriately. This allows vou to
remain competitive said Frank
Salamon, director of ECU Dining
Services.
Salamon said Aramark tries to
keep prices low enough to satisfy
the customer and make a decent
profit.
"We get into difficulty when
people take us out of market. The
food places on-campus are
restaurants, not grocers' stores.
When people see the wide variety
of food we offer. they
automatically think of a grocery
store. It's not fair and we suffer for
that Salamon said.
"We know that if the students
aren't satisfied, we won't be here-
next ear Bissinger said.
While prices in ECl 's dining
facilities may seem high when
compared to grocery stores.
bothBissinger and Salamon believe
they are competitive when
compared to off campus
restaurants.
"It's difficult to determine if
our prices are too high. It's
subjective. I think when you
compare us to a grocery store.
we're high; however, when you
compare us to a restaurant, we're
low. It's hard to say. We try to
offer the most to students and still
make a profit Bissinger said.
"Places like McDonald's and
Wendy's don't have the variety and
flexibility of our services. lor
example, the average cost of a
meal on the 14 meal plan is $3.40.
With that plan, you're guaranteed
14 meals a week. Most
importantly, you can eat all you
want Salamon said.
The flexibility and reliability of
ECU's Dining Services are the
qualities that both representatives
believe make a meal plan worth
while, although the comparisons to
other establishments' prices are
inevitable.
"No one can beat the
competition's prices every time. If
you were to compare our prices to
someone else's. I would be totally
comfortable Salamon said.
"We're here for the students.
That's Aramark's main goal
Bissinjier said.
rZ
Thursday, November 6,1997
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room, 8 -10:45 pm
ssa
,op.Eiy
Miriam Tyson
��,
Balance
tptttf
m . Jkum i k i
LISTEN TO WZMB FOR BAND INTERVIEWS BEFORE THE SHOW
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE UVE MUSIC, PEZA & REFRESHMENTS
Cubbie's
Monday-Thursday
"Food 101 nightly special at Cubbies"
5-9pm
�2 dogs $1!
�Free fries with any Cubbies size
sandwich!
Only at downtown location with college ID
Wednesday
�$1 long neck beer
limit 3
x Only available at downtown location with
student ID
501 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 752-6497 or
a1 600 E. Arlington
fl Greenville, NC 27858
(919)321-8091

758-459752-47 I 5 For more info visit our website at, WWW.netmar.comuserselbo
The Elbo is available for private parties Call 758-4591 or 752-4715
for available dateiifcries plus price packages
TUESDAY NIGHT LIVE
Cooyrtght 1997 Kroger Mid-Attanttc. items & Prices good In CreenvWe. We reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to dealers
ltems& Prices Good Thru Nov. 8,1997 wgj. 5 Thur 6 I 7 Sat 81
Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi,
Mountain Dew
$1.25
PPP
ecial guest
le Area
Night Long
WEDNESDAY CLASSICS NIGHT
FOOD & DRUG
Always Good.
Always Fresh.
Always Kroger.
Your Total
Value Leader.
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
1Specials.
The Best in Classiei
all the current hits
Beer &
jlnd Dan(
lent si
ecials
70's, 80's and
ttle beers and
Thirsty Thurs. LADIES NIGHT
$1.
.50 cents Draft ar
Plus the
m
WA Nite Long
25 M?!
8 Varieties
Kroger
Cereal
13.75-20-oz.
Four 2-Ltr. Btls. Per Customer At This Price Please
3$
4-Compartment Assorted Varieties; ?Ai-
Swanson
Dinners
9.5-11.75-oz.
l$5
�;
RUSH HOUR FRIDAYS
Best in ClaSfcTRock & Hot New Rock
from 8:30 Til 11:30 Every Friday
1 cent Draft and $1.00 Shot Specials All Nite
Don't miss our new brarjds on tap efery Friday
Frozen
ice Cream
Bars
12-CL
Buy One Get One
FREE!
Frozen
Patio
Burritos
:

In Store Baked
Traditional or "New"
Cream Cheese
Iced Cinnamon
Rolls &
$"n
6-Ct.
3
Corn, Peas or
Stokelys
Creen Beans
14.25-15.25-oz. Can
3
$!
SATURDAY DANCE FACTORY H VourKrogerDeli Proudlv lnlroduces "Delicious New
Our New Format Non-Stop Top JO Party Music
Plus All Nite $3.00 Double Hibplls at�l .00 Bottle Beer
Specials Plus AfrPUxhersT5rily $3.00"
Bring your E.C.U. Ticket Stub after every h&pe (JameKJ :iet $1.00 oft Admission
Buffalo Style Chicken Wings!
25
only
f Choose From 4 Mouth Watering Varieties:
MILD WILD FIRE
HOT CARLIC BBQ SWEET HONEY BBQ
Available Only in Stores With DelLPastry Shoppes
Snack Time, Dinner Time.
Game Time, Party Time,
Any Time
Each






r
iCTiWi
4 Thursday. November 6. 1997
v J A1A A y 3
The East Carolinian
Lake Imp USA
TftE lOtlici ivrvHtCirrr
,1MB: BR6W&R v �ccs
I uisH i uses. AUooowiac.
Oft, 4 MMbAtU). THE1 MM
SUCH BEAUTiFUUPUitM&E
UBAUiC LH VfGdS 0aI
vkz wai, THr �
ACROSS
1 Big � theory
5 Golf stroke
9 File markers
13 Baseball family
name
14 Concerning
15 Under
16 Religious fel
owship
18 Certain Arabian
19 Pays attention to
20 Seizing authority
22 Post-game
summary, briefly
25 Born as
26 Chase away
29 Mountain nymph
31 Boutique
35 Food fish
37 Invigorate
39 Had a meal
40 Doctrine
41 �Magnon
42 Inlet
43 Boat race
45 Apart
47 Thick slice
48 Stage whisper
50 Elusive
51 Jilfian or Blyth
53 Gave out cards
55 Russian �
59 Essential ol
63 Sanction
64 31A employee
67 Angle
68 At the summit
69 Indian
70 Window part
71 First name In
country
72 Polka �
DOWN
1 Johann
Sebastian �
2 Medicinal plant
3 City on Norton
Sound
4 Candy store
offering
5 Brooch
6 One: pref.
7 Theatrical
company
8 Certain biBs
9 Uproar
10 Jai �
11 German city
12 Gulp
15 Drill
17 Put to work
21 Ukeasub
23 Unchanging
24 Bakery
byproducts
26 Prepares for the
match
27 Convention
locale
28 End of the
alphabet
30 Race for games
32 Multitude
33 Bay window
34 North Pole
explorer
36 River Island
38 Old French coin
44 Gastropod
46 Vexed
49 Conceive
Skim.1, or 1296
Harris Teeter
LowfatMilk
Jk With
Washington State 's
Larcre Sweet g�3 it)
Gala Apples�Zj
24 et Caplets or Tablets
Exceorin
Pain Relief I
12 gallon Harris Teeter
Ice Cream
orYc
12 oz. Frozen
Harris Teeter
Orange Juice
25 ct
Robttussin
Cough Props
Erink Feature
In THe Bakery
2 liter
Diet Coke
or Coca. Cola
O IN? Tribune Media Services
All right Nteived.
52 Salamander
54�Vegas
55 Coarse file
56 Stew pot
57 � Bator
58 Ruler
60 Poi source
61 Mine entrance
62 Bread and
whiskey
65 Toss
66 Ecol. org.
s h a dHb assI Is e l lj
E A V eIa GAT 7Be L 1 E
EVEpIv OjDJ E lIn A M E
MERIT SHE L E A N O R
� VAT SB PASTl
D E TjE GAT E ISji T 0 T A L
A V AiiS T A S IeRODE
TAP SlE N T E RS T O A
E 0 S E Jj lEGO splE R N
R E E V eHmIe A L -TiTm E S
� E T T AD Y E OB
d eT'a r s i rHp r e aIc'h
R 1 D EllN 1 t'r 0A R E A
ARE sis N A 1 lIl 1 N T
G E N t EMM YS ATE
Fresh Baked
Crusty Round
With
VIC Card
Price Effective Through Nov. 11, 1997
$tore�'
r
'

��
V
1





f
5 Tuesday, November 4, 1997
opinion
The East
eastcarolinian
AMY IROYSI KB Editor
CELKSTK WILSON Managing Editor
Matt Hkor MMnsiiijOutcw
AMANDA SUN NaarsEdiior
jACyt'Kl.INK D. KELLilM Asi Ne� EdMOt
ANDY Tl'RNKR Li(�a�taEditor
JOHN Davis Assistant Liftstvte Editor
AMANDA ROSS Sports Editor
TRACY LftttlACH Assistant Sports Edrwr
CAROI.K MKHi.R Head Cop, Editor
JOHN MURPHY Soft Illustrator
Heather Burgess wire Edna
SarteajitECU wmamsm �25. the Eea Carota m n.ttaats 12.000copmim kesdayandThuntar.Thefeedastwuf�iladiesttnonit d
retro dttetaionatBoarTt Tea taCargtmaRiNlaiiro The East
Cen�an rcsenes rte ngtit re edn orrein tatans tor pubacataai Al tews roust be sejned tellers should be addressed tt. epnon eraror. the East
Caretman. Puokalions BuMmn. ECU. Greeiw. 2785M353 ntonwoi. cat 319 328.6366
oumcw
Aramark, the company that provides on-campus dining services, claims its main goal is to satisfy
students. But more than a few students are not satisfied with the Aramark's food prices � and
rightly so. The prices at the company's on-campus "fast-food" style restaurants are much higher
than other local fast-food restaurants and convenience stores.
The company maintains that the two dining halls offer fair prices and a wider selection of
food than places such as McDonald's and Wendy's. This is true. When compared to these two
places (and similar fast-food restaurants), the dining halls do offer the better deal. The prices
at the dining halls probably compare with or are even slightly less than most local restaurants
who offer "all-you-can-eat buffets
Aramark admits its prices are high compared to grocery stores. This is understandable, and
students realize it; food bought in bulk quantities is always cheaper than individual dishes
purchased at restaurants.
But if you compare McDonald's, Wendy's, Burger King, etc. to the places on campus such as
The Wright Place and The Spot, Aramark's prices are certainly much higher. Better deals on
hamburgers, cheeseburgers, chicken sandwiches, etc. will be found at the outside
establishments.
The Wright Place and The Spot offer more of a variety than most fast-food restaurants. This
is also true. The on-campus places serve more as convenience stores, providing students with a
wider food choice. However, even when compared to convenience stores, Aramark's prices on
many food and drink products still come up considerably higher. Aramark cannot deny this. It
can't be expected to always have lower prices, but it can be expected to have reasonable and
comparable prices.
Students with declining balances may not notice the differences as much. But persons who
pay with cash certainly notice the difference.
Perhaps if Aramark had direct on-campus competition, its prices would come down. That
often does the trick.
Maybe we're paying for convenience, but, regardless, we're paying too much.
EDITOR!
. Amy L
ROYSTER
n Chief
All officers need adequate training
Do you want to go to jail?
Do I want to go to jail? Who
wants to go to jail? How
would you respond to this
intelligent question?
My roommate and I were headed to
the concession stand for peanuts
after the first quarter of the
Homecoming game when we saw a
youngwoman in front of us collapse
onto Dowdy Ficklen's cement floor.
My roommate checked to make sure
the woman was breathing and ran
for help while I crouched down next
to the woman, unsure of what to do.
Help came in the form of a
uniformed police officer who
immediately looked at my
roommate and myself and said, "Do
either of you know CPR? Can
anyone check her pulse?"
My roommate pushed the
incompetent officer's hand out of
the way and took the young
woman's pulse herself. Hovering
helplessly over the stranger, the only
thing I could do was move her long
red curls off of her face and tell her
she would be OK. Help arrived
several minutes later when
emergency medical technicians
took the young woman to the
hospital.
Back in the stands my roommate
and I discussed our amazement over
the responding officer's lack of
training, wondering what would
have happened if the young woman
had not been breathing and neither
of us were certified in CPR.
With the subject of patrol officers
on our minds, we noticed five
officers on the student side, busy
ejecting three students and two
middle-aged fans for alcohol
violations. Before ejecting one
student, an officer asked him what
was in his cup and, before he had a
chance to repond, yelled, "Do you
want to go to jail?"
This question seems to be a
popular phrase among officers
patroling the games. Maybe they
practice it in the mirror or in group
chants; the week before at the
Southern Mississippi game, Officer
William Peebles used the same
phrase when he ejected Mike
Radford, the president of the Wilson
County Pirate Club. Radford was
ejected from the game because, as
reported in the Oct. 30 edition of
TEC, his son was obstructing the
view of other fans by waving a flag.
The ECU Police Department
says they have investigated what
v itnesses have called brutality on
the part of Officer Peebles and have
found no misconduct on the
officer's part. Still, fans who
witnessed the event say Peebles
incited Radford by yelling at him
and asking him if he wanted to be
taken to jail, despite Radford's
promise to control his child's flag
waving. Ultimately, Peebles
engaged Radford in what one fan
described as a head lock and
removed him, leaving his child
crying in the stands.
Certainly, 20, 000 to 30,000
screaming, often intoxicated, fans
need policing; so who are these
officers patrolling the football
games? Are they qualified to provide
emergency medical attention to a
young woman who has passed out
cold? Should they have the
authority to threaten citizens with
taunts such as, "Do you want to go
to jail?"
Do you want to go to jail? Do I
want to go to jail? Who wants to go
to jail? How would you respond to
this intelligent question? How
would you respond when help
arrived to the scene of the
unconsious fan and the officer said
to you, "Do you know CPR? Can
you take a pulse?"
The officer who responded to
the young woman looked like a
golice officer. He had on a uniform,
ut. Assistant Chief Tom Younce
explained that he may or may not
actually have been a sworn officer.
According to Younce, the ECU
Police Department employs sworn
reserve officers who assist with
patrol on game days. These officers
have completed basic training,
which includes CPR certification.
However, there are also a number of
students who wear a version of a
uniform and carry radios who are not
sworn officers, do not carry weapons
and are not certified in any
emergency medical training.
The ECU Police Department
needs these students and reserve
officers to help handle the
numerous fans, but the citizens and
fans deserve officers who are well-
prepared for the job. All officers on
patrol during game days should be
prepared to deal with intoxicated
fans who may be sarcastic and
disrespectful. They should be
trained in CPR and basic emergency
medical assistance to help both a
drunk freshman who may pass out
from too many beers and an 80-year-
old Pirate Club member who may
suffer a heart attack. All officers
should be prepared and trained to
manage people without loosing
control.
It is my humble suggestion that
the training for all sworn officers,
reserve officers and student patrols
be reviewed. The people working to
keep game day safe should have
updated training in basic crowd
management and emergency
medical techniques.
The press, by nature, is rarely beloved
nor should that be its aim
William Henry, writer and critic 1983
OPINION
Keith
COOPER
Columnist
Presidents who try to help get hurt
Too many people with economic
and political clout have
impeded the ambitions and
progress of blacks in America.
Seemingly, . when American
presidents made appreciable,
meaningful efforts to appeal to
blacks, they were assassinated,
denied a second term or
aggressively pressured and pestered
by the establishment. Too many
people with economic and political
clout have impeded the ambitions
and progress of blacks in America.
After slavery officially ended with
the Thirteenth Amendment in
1865, blacks still had hard times.
Whites consistently fought hard to
stifle progress made by blacks.
During Reconstruction (1865-
1877?), black politicians were
intimidated and harassed
throughout the South. Whites
formed "white man's parties" and
clubs to challenge the successes of
blacks. By the way, since George
White (last black vestige of the
Reconstruction period) was chased
from office in 1902,1 maintain that
Reconstruction ended that year,
despite the fact that most historians
prefer 1877 (when federal troops
left the South as part of a deal
invilvong the controversial 1876
Presidential race between
Rutherford Hayes and Samuel
Tilden).
Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)
was willing to free the slaves to
preserve the Union . Privately,
Lincoln wanted to send blacks to
Nicaragua. In any event, it took
20,000 black recruits to turn the
tide for the Union forces. Prior to
the Civil War, southern states
threatened to secede from the
Union if Lincoln didn't change his
views on the slavery question. To
Southerners, slavery was an
economic necessity. Therefore,
abolitionists like Frederick
Douglass, Henry David Thorcau
and others were detested by those
who wanted to preserve the status
quo. About five days after the end of
the Civil War (also called the War of
Secession, War Between the States,
etc.), Lincoln was assassinated.
John Kennedy (1961-1963)
accentuated themes of honesty and
integrity in government. Among the
innumerable changes, he
challenged Americans to eradicate
disease, conquer the deserts and
cherish ethnic, racial diversity as our
greatest strength. Although
Kennedy was initially wishy-washy
on civil rights, he later became a
major proponent of rights for
Negroes. He vociferously
condemned racial bigotry and
prejudices in America. In Dallas,
Texas in 1963, Kennedy's life was
snuffed out. Shortly before the
assassination, Kennedy had planned
to sign what became the Civil
Rights Act of 1964.
Jimmy Carter (1977- 1981)
appointed more African-Americans
to federal positions than any of his
predecessors. Carter, a Southern
Baptist, condemned racism. A man
of peace, Carter promoted racial
harmony and reconciliation, . He
urged tolerance and mutual
understanding. Carter, sometimes,
is regarded as weak on foreign policy
despite his successful Camp David
Accords and a host of other global,
humanitarian accomplishments.
Carter's defeat was more
complicated than the failed
American hostage rescue attempt,
often used as the main explanation
for Carter's loss. Most reelccted
American presidents were not
foreign policy heroes.
Bill Clinton has been grappling
with Whitewater, charges of
presidential improprieties, sexual
harassment allegation, etc.
Nevertheless, during the Million
Man March in 1995, Clinton in
Austin, Texas, said, "Racism is a
black man's burden and a white
man's problem Clinton abhors
racial tensions exacerbated during
the Rodney King and O.J Simpson
aftermath, Clinton, a brilliant
politician, became a political
centrist in the 19 Presidential
race. This allowed him to attract
moderate and conservative voters
key to Clinton's reelection.
He didn't appear to be too liberal
or too African-Amcrican-oriented.
Yet, his remarkable record speaks for
itself. For example, he has the
record for having appointed the
most African-Americans to federal
positions. The combined records
(of African-American
appointments) of Clinton's and
Carter's, far exceed those of their
combined predecessors.
The aforementioned presidents
are only a few of the many American
presidents who were ridiculed and
criticized for the propensities
toward African-Americans. The
status quo had a shrewd way of
pressuring those presidents and
making it difficult for those leaders
to govern. This is why Clinton is
being "accused of practically every
sin in the book. There is even talk
about possible impeachment of
Clinton. In terms of scandals,
Republican presidents (i.e. Grant,
Harding, Nixon, Ford, Reagan,
Bush) should be inducted in the
"hall of shame Through
perserverance and a deep-rooted
concern for humanity, Clinton will
triumph in the end.
UETTER
to the Editor
Student questions clubs admittance policy
On Oct. 25, some friends of mine
were enjoying a night downtown.
They had frequented the clubs
before and decided the Cellar was
the best one for the night. They had
stood in line for a while and finally
made their way through to pay. "Joe"
paid his money and entered the
club. Then "James" was getting
ready to pay when someone stopped
him and told him they had reached
their quota and he could not get in
unless he had a membership. He
said he did not have one and
requested to buy one. Once again,
they said no, so my friends left.
However, Joe stuck around for a
couple of minutes. The people
behind James and me were allowed
to enter the club without a
membership.
Why did this happen? It
happened because James is black.
He was denied access to a club
because of the color of his skin. Joe
and the people behind him were all
white and could get in.
Why did such a popular club
revert to a 1960's concept? What
this club did broke almost every civil
rights law. I have heard many stories
similar to this from my roommate.
Ravers, African-Americans and other
minorities were denied access to
clubs downtown because of who
they are. These types of behavior
and actions are sending out negative
connotations about North Carolina
and the south. They say the south is
still stuck in the pre-Civii Rights
movement era. Do not support
these rumors and sayings, but
instead tear them down. Do not see
each other as blacks, whites, ravers,
headbangers, but instead as human.
Jeremiah Johnson
Freshman
Math Ed.
LETTER
to the Editor
Moral deterioration means pay first
My first treat of the day is to drive to
a local doughnut shop on my way to
school (and the infamous ECU
parking space hunt) to retrieve one
chocolate iced cream filled
doughnut that costs 48 cents,
including tax. I often have the exact
change or close to it, which requires
change (two cents).
Recently, the smiling attendant
started to hand me my precious bag
of doughnut when suddenly a look
of duty crossed her face and out
thrust her hand for my MONEY
FIRST. I began to wonder if she
thought I was planning to play the
"gotcha game whereby I grab the
bag and take off in a whirlwind of
doughnut dust, screaming down the
boulevard, laughing hysterically as I
disappeared into the traffic �
without paying.
Then I began to realize and recall
that most fast food drive-up
windows take the money first �
and then give you your food. I
suppose the "crash the diner"
syndrome has hit the fast food drive-
through scene, making us all suspect
in the eyes of the fast food boards of
directors who apparently have
implemented this policy of pay first.
Is this a sign of a morally
deteriorating society or merely a
"chicken-egg" argument (as in
which comes first)? I mean, come
on, girl; it's only a doughnut � or is
it?
Cynthia Willis
Senior
ASIP








r
I �MHt
What's your
favorite?

We're looking for your favorites in
our first Reader's Choice survey.
Just complete the survey form printed
here and drop it by our office or put
it in campus mail to us.
Or point your browser to our website
at www.studmtmedkeou.edu and fill
out the survey on-line.
Either way you choose, enter only
once Jut do it before 5 pm, Nov. 7.
Once you enter, well throw your name
in with everyone else who responds
and draw out a WINNER at random.
That person will take home a Casio
hand-held color TV. Could winning be
any easier?
Then, look for the Readers Choice
favorites featured in a tabloid special
edition on Tuesday Nov. 18.
I the l � �
eastcarolinian
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. WHEN COMPLETED. CLIP AND SJJBJJOJTHEAST CAROLINIAN
I
What's the best place to get breakfast after a late night?
Readerscw

What's the best place for lunch between classes?
What's the best place to take a date for dinner?
What's the best place to get a good pizza?
What's the best place to live off-campus?
Who has the best game-day picnic to qo?
Whose fries stay the hottest all the way home?
What's the best place to buy a keg?
What's the best place to dance all night?
What's the best place to buy CDs?
What's the best place to get a haircut?
- - �� �

What's the best place to park illegally on campus and get
away with it?
What's the best reason to skip class?
What grocery store best fits student's budget?
What's the best place to have your car repaired?
What cab company has the friendliest drivers?
What laundry won't eat your socks?
Name
Phone.
L.
J

MWM
�i &e& �
M
� r





i
7 Thursday. November 4. 1997
CD
review
The Replacements
All For Nothing,
Nothing For All
9 12 OUT OF lO
ANDY TURNER
UHsmF.EDmm
I
The nickname said it ail � The
'Mats, short for placemats. There
were sides. You were cither with
The Replacements or you were the
ones who stepped on them, who
ignored them, who they enjoyed
pissing off at an costs. At times, it
seemed as if they stepped on
themselves, preventing the band
from achieving further "success" in
the music industry.
But all of that is documented by
writers, friends and fans (it's hard
to tell them apart) of the band in
the liner notes to Reprise Records'
Replacements retrospective, All
For Nothing, Nothing For All. Most
importantly, the two-CD
retrospective shows that, beyond
their reputation as pure-hearted-
drunken-poetic-bastard losers, The
Replacements at their peak were
one of the best dum rock and roll
hinds ccr.
The first CD consists of songs
from the band's tour albums on
Sire Records. B-sides, alternate
takes and other material previously
only available only on bootlegs
grace the second CD. Both CDs
make it painfully apparent that
The Replacements should have
landed both feet in the music
industry door, not as "I Don't
' Know" proclaims, "one foot in the
door, the other one in the gutter
I But such is the price (or reward) of
unflinching, bullheaded integrity.
"Shouida been" hits dominate
the first CD. You couW call hit "I'll
Be You" hit (Top 40 and MTV
briefly humored them) Paul
Westerberg's tremendous ability as
a songwriter is proven song after
song. The abrasive, anthemic
"Bastards of Young" offers, "The
ones who love us best are the ones
we lay to rest and visit their graves
on holidays at bestThe one's who
love us the least arc the ones we'll
die to please If it's any
consolation. I don't begin to
understand He may be a bastard,
Westerberg sings convincingly, "it
beats pickin' cotton and waitin' to
be forgotten
Bob Stinson's wild-ass ghost (he
died in 1995) haunts "Bastards of
Young Sure, he played most gigs
in a dress and was almost always
drunk or drugged, but the guitar
was his red-headed stepchild, one
that he liked, but still treated like a
red-headed stepchild.
The Replacements were able to
do the rough and rowdy songs and
tender, reflective songs just as well.
Westerberg wears his liver on his
sleeve on the tear (in your beer)
jerker, "Hear Comes a Regular
Opportunity knocks once and
then the door slams shutAll 1
know is I'm sick of everything that
my money can buy A fool who
wastes his life, God rests his guts
The rhythm section of Chris
Mars and Tommy Stinson show off
their stuff on Alex Chilton" and
"Can't Hardly Wait "Alex
Chilton especially, shows how
SEE REPLACEMENTS WE I
"What a life a mess
can be
Uncle Tupelo
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Coffee has been with us humans for
quite a while now. The first
recorded encounter with coffee is
from the middle ages. An Arabian
goat herder noticed that when his
goats ate the beans from a certain
plant, they got a little jittery. Back
in those days, they didn't have all
the wonderful pepper-uppers that
we have. They pretty much had
beer and wine, and people of
Muslim faith abstain from alcoholic
beverages. So coffee was probably
an exciting prospect. Or maybe that
guy always ate the stuff his goats
ate.
At any rate, he eventually tried to
make a drink out of it, and before
you- could say "iced double mocha
skinny lattc coffee had caught on
in lands Middle Eastern. The
Muslims were more advanced than
us Europeans back then (this was
before OPEC) and they invented
coffee houses rather quickly.
Nowadays we know that, because
caffeine is a diuretic, it's probably
not a great thing to drink in a
desert, but they didn't know that,
A brief history of coffee:
Coffee purveyors in Greenville
The Percolator- open since 1994, this is the only remaining
coffeehouse in Purpletown. See main article.
Starbucks- corporate coffee. Yuck. Located inside Barnes and Noble
The Bean Bag- ooen from 1994-1997 this was a popular hangout for
deadheads and smokers, which spelled trouble for the business
when they imposed a "no smoking" rule.
Cuppacino's- open for spring semester 1996, this was possibly the
best coffeehouse to grace Greenville. Great variety, social
atmosphere and killer house coffee.
The Java Shop- a ritzy, yuppie kinda place, open from 1993-1994. The
latte's were the best this town has ever seen.
Matt Dull- a former art student, he was known for carrying two coffee
makers (an espresso machine and a Mr. Coffee) to drawing class
with him.
Krispy Kreme, Denny's, Perkins- these are not really coffeehouses, but
they do serve something that looks and tastes like coffee and they
are open 24 hours, which is an advantage after 11 p.m.
Butterfield's- a handy (but pricey) place in the Plaza mall to buy your
very own espresso machine and other coffee paraphernalia.
The Wright Place- a campus fast food joint Under no circumstances
should you trust their coffee. If rfs realty coffee, that is
and besides, would you want to face
and angry nomad if he'd not had his
coffee that morning?
We still have coffee houses today,
even here in the quaint little town
of Greenville. Of course, it's taken
many coffeehouses for the idea to
stick, but in the face of many
obstacles (mostly a lack of
consumer interest) one coffeehouse
has tenuously taken hold: The
Percolator.
Located downtown, next to the
buck-fifty theater, The Percolator is
testament that even cool things can
happen in Greenville. Yeah, sure,
the Arabs didn't drink, and we have
our bars and pubs, but there's
something to be said for the
aesthetic of a coffeehouse. I like
places I can go where everybody
knows my name and is always glad I
came. I'm not fond of bars though,
which smell like stale beer and
locker room, and are filled with a
bunch of drunk people that aren't
really glad I came anyway.
The Percolator, rather than being
filled with drunk people, is filled
with stories. The old wooden
floorboards tell stories of a time
when the Percolator used to be a
bat (It's since joined AA and is
celebrating untold years of
sobriety.) The yellow walls tell tales
of the countless cigarettes smoked
by countless nervous medical
students studying away.
Watch the people. The
employees tell a story as they make
coffee, chat with regulars, take
smoke breaks and bus tables. Watch
the regulars. You know who they are
because they put napkins under
their coffee mugs, they know the
tables are wobbly and the coffee will
spill; they bus their own tables.
The theatre majors rehearse
lines. The english majors read books
and scribble on spiral notebooks.
The cops relax and hobnob with the
locals. The high school students
pretend to be college students.
Employees of other downtown
businesses drift in on their breaks.
Scores of pretty ladies get their
coffee to go. They know and fear
the desperation of single men in
coffeehouses.
Some art major has hung his blue
pastel drawings on the wall,
drawings of people with squished
heads and pensive looks on their
faces. They watch the people going
about their days, congregating,
enjoying solitude, laughing with
friends, reading the paper. Someone
is reading this article while sitting in
the Percolator, sipping a coffee
beverage. (If you're reading this in
the Percolator, tip the employees.
Minimum wage is no fun.)
The moral of this story is, well,
there's not really a moral. But
Danial Rowe serves urn up in The Percolator (top), while The Percolator crowd
relaxes and gets their caffeine fix (below).
PHOTOS BY JOHN DAVIS
Renovations promise
bolder, better Mendenhall
MICCAH SMITH
STAFF WRITER
If you haven't been to Mendenhall
Student Center lately, or if you just
haven't ventured downstairs, you
may not
know about
the changes
that are
gradually
taking place
there.
The 23-
year-old
building
was never
quite the
hub of
student life
the
Student
Union
wished it to
be, what
with strict
policies
about food,
drinks and
not
stretching
out on the
furniture to
take naps,
b u t
University
Unions Marketing Director Carol
Woodruff said that these old policies
were just recently done away with in
an effort to make Mendenhall more
homelike.
"I wanted to get more students
using the building explained Bill
Clutter, Director of University
Unions for the past one and a half
years, about the various ways in
which Mendenhall is being
Check out the new stuff in Mendenhall
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
improved.
Some of you may be familiar
with the grossly inadequate
computer lab downstairs. Clutter is
implementing a plan to improve the
situation.
"I identified (the TV lounge
behind the lab) as space where we
could exoand
the lab he
said. The new,
widened area
will become a
"computer
lounge with
areas for
studies, music,
relaxing,
hanging out
According to
Mcndenhall's
resident
technical
genius Josh
Hoover, this
will include a
separate TV
lounge, a
meeting room
with furniture,
art posters,
jazz and mood
music and a
central
computer lab
with a 44-unit
capacity. He
called it, "a 30's
cafe with a 90's swing
The rest of Mendenhall could
use some sprucing up as well, so
plans are being made to move the
first-floor rug and furniture
underneath the stairs by the
gameroom on the basement level
and to add a big-screen TV to create
a kind of living-room.
"We are talking about doing
SEE MENOENHALL. PAGE �
there'll come a time when you're
weary of staggering home, puking
your guts out. You'll get bored with
not remembering if the girl you
flirted with was pretty or not. You'll
begin to thirst for multisyllabic
conversations. Hangovers get less
enjoyable as time progresses. Coffee
is so much more pleasant to spill on
yourself than beer.
When the early sunlight pours
through the storefront windows at
Some films never make it
lo ike Emerald City.
Some an too
ronlroversutl. Some are
too small. Whatever ike
reason, sejnst never pi
to see some mifkty good
movies
on ikeUgsrreen.
When ikej kit video,
koaever, tkey're imrs for
Ike taking. Tkis series uiJI
look at some of Ike films
Mat d'idn' make Ike
Greenville ail.
seven in the morning, hitting the
floorboards, lighting up the dust,
casting a halo around the steam
rising from your latte and through it
you glimpse the face of that
intriguing person you met yesterday
morning, you'll understand what a
coffeehouse is for. Maybe there's
more to life than getting plastered
in between homework assignments
Maybe there's a good reason why
Muslims stay sober.
Traveller makes its way to Greenville
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Hunky and dory don't always hook
up in the old Emerald City. Take, for
example,7f�i�!irr, a movie about
rural con men starring Bill Paxton,
recently released on video. The
movie was filmed in Wilmington
and is set in rural North
Carolina. Throughout
Traveller, Greenville is
mentioned. Despite all
these connections, the
movie never made it to the
theaters in town. They
missed a great movie.
Sometimes Paxton can be
the best thing about the
movies he appears in
(Trespass, Tbister). However,
there are so many good
things about Traveller that
it's hard to nail down the
best thing.
The story centers around
a group of Irish-American
con men who, through
various scams, dupe country folk out
of their money. If you're not one of
them, you're ripe for the pickin
The son of a former clan member,
Pat O'Hara (Mark Wahlberg),
returns to town with his father's
body for burial. Pat wants to join up
with the gang, but the group's
leader. Boss Jack (Luke Askew)
doesn't want him. Boss Jack is still
sore that Pat's father married
outside of the clan. However, Bokky
(Paxton) decides he'll risk taking
Pat under his wing. And, off Bokky
and Pat go to the back roads of
Carolina, looking for fools to cheat.
When one of their victims, a juicy
Luke Askew and Bill Paxton drink up in Traveller.
PHOTO COURTESY OF OCTOBER FILMS
bar maid named Jean, played by
E.?s Julianna Marguiles, falls for
their devious dupe, Bokky takes
pity and returns her money. She
rewards him with an all-night shag
session. But, alas, there are more
fools to be had, so Bokky and Pat go
back on the road. They meet up
with Double D (James Gammon)
and plan a scam involving
counterfeit money with some big
time hustlers in Kentucky. The
boss. Bimbo (Vincent Chase), is no
hick fool. Money makes his dirty
heart beat.
Excellent performances are to be
found all around. Chase, a veteran ot
only a handful of films, is
simply excellent. He has
evil down pat. He'd make
Ahnold wet his britches
Paxton, as usual, does a
strong job. He's a cheating
criminal, but, goddurn,
he's still a nice guy deep
down. Marky Mark shows
he has a lot more talent
than those ads with him
dancing around in his
draws would have led us
to believe. With the good
reviews coming from his
performance in Hoodie
Nights, he's white hot in
Hollywood.
The'film is the directorial
debut of Jack Green. The Oscar-
winning Green has served as
cinematographer of numerous ('linr
Eastwood flicks. He does a superb
job with Traveller, as does writer Jin.
SEE TRAVELLER PAGE 9
r y
�� I ii Kiwi '�
�m
5P
i
T
��" T.





8 Thursday. November 6, 1997
llostyle
The East Carolinian
November
6 THURSDAY
Men in Black at 8
p.m. in Hendrix
Theater (runs
through Nov.8.)
Pirate
Underground from
8-10:45 p.m. in
Mendenhall
Percussion
ensemble, Mark
Ford, director at 8
p.m. in Fletcher Recital Hall
Mike Mesmer "Eyes" at The
Attic
The Excentrics at Firehouse
Tavern
Paul Tardiff (live jazz) at Stacatto
Robert Earl Keen and Robbie
Fulks at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
Robert Earl Keen
PHOTO COURTESY OF ARISTA
7 FRIDAY
Jazz Ensemble Carrol Dasheill,
director, at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
Too Skinnie J's at The Attic
Kernal Goat at
Firehouse Tavern
8 SATURDAY
Balance B at The Attic
Kelly Bell Band at
Firehouse Tavern
Gran Torino at Cat's
Cradle in Chapel Hill
11 TUESDAY
Travel-Adventure Film:
Jerusalem- Sacred and Prof one at 4 and
7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theater
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
Ben Folds Five at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
12 WEDNESDAY
ECU Steel Orchestra,
Mark
Ford, director, 8 p.m Fletcher
Recital Hall.
The Jesus Lizard at Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill
ONGOING
"Cajun Music and Zydeco"
exhibition at Mendenhall Gallery
through Nov. 10
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our It's
Showtime column? If so, please
send relevant information (a
schedule would be nice) to:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
Safe sex can be erotic, author says
JENNIFER TAFE
STAFF WRITF.H
Safe sex. In a time of HIV, AIDS and
other sexually transmitted diseases,
safe sex is no longer an option. It is
a necessity.
Aside from the usual pro-condom
Trojan commercials on MTV and
the occasional safe sex public
service announcement, people are
pretty much left on their own to
determine what exactly safe sex
means. And let's face it, health class
lectures are pretty dry as far as
tails go.
Often safe sex information is
dispensed wirh much technical
information and little imagination.
Eroticizing Safe Sex, the Student
Union Lectures Committee's latest
sentation, aims to change this.
ic lecture will discuss and
demonstrate various ways to engage
mutually satisfying safe sex
tices.
On Monday Nov.10, at 8:30 p.m.
River Huston, author of HIV, AIDS,
and The Single Person, will be talking
about the more interesting, erotic
aspects of safe sex in the 90s.
Huston's presentation will focus
on the wide range of erotic
possibilities one has while still
maintaining a safe sex life.
Huston, herself diagnosed with
HIV in 1990, explains that she has
enjoyed an erotic, satisfying
relationship with her partner for
years without infecting him with
the virus.
Lecture Committee members
are excited about this presentation.
The most popular lectures usually
focus on sex. Past shows by Dr. Ruth
and Susan Landolphi have been
among the best attended lectures.
"Sex always seems to be a
popular topic said Assistant
Director of Student Activities J.
Marshall. This lecture offers a
different perspective than the
speakers of earlier presentations.
"She's a woman that's living with
AIDS Marshall said. "She's been
involved with the same partner for
six or seven years without infecting
him. She must know something that
we don't
According to Huston, the only
sex acts that can be defined as
"safe" are those in which there is no
exchange of body fluids. Eroticizing
Safe Sex will explore and discuss all
of the possibilities that fall under
this definition.
The topics covered in Ervtuizmg
Safe Sex definitely stray from the
usual dull, informational formats of
health classes and commercials.
Huston will discuss sex toys,
fantasy, simulated oral sex and many
other things in addition to more
traditional topics like condoms and
dental dams. Eroticizing Safe Sex is a
presentation based on useful,
practical information.
Students and ECU staff can get
their free tickets in advance at
Mendenhall Student Center with a
valid ID. Admission for the general
public is S3 in advance and $5 at the
door.
�� � �
Bringing Back the Fun
Monday, November 10,1997, 8:30 pm
Hendrix Theater
Admission1
ECU Students, Faculty, and Staff
FREE advance tickets available upon presentation of valid
ECU ID at Mendenhall Student Center Central Ticket Office
Public
$3.00 in advance, $5.00 at the door
LL BODY SVIASSAG
HUGQIN
ATION
s�t�r
PRESENTED BY THE STUDENT UNION LECTURE COMMITTEE. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL OUR
HOTLINE AT 328-6004, OR VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT www.ecu.eduStudentUniotvTHEHOMEPAGE.html.
Wmduati with dsabdrtas who requira accommodation m order to paroopata at any want ECU an ancouaged to contact the Oaoartmtni tor Dtubaty Support Sarvtcet
pt 91-328 4802 fVorcaTOD) torTv�9� hourt prior to iht start o( tt program Mo data funds wart ueed m tht punting of this material Prtntad on racydad paper
EXPLORE
OTHER CULTURES,
OTHER PLACES
D&partmont
Anthropology
Brewster
A-214
ANTH 2016
SPRING SEMESTER 1998
ANTH 1000 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 2000 Archaeology Around the World
ANTH 2010 Societies Around the World
ANTH 2015 Introduction to Biological
Anthropology
Biological Anthropology
Laboratory
Cultures of East Asia
Cultures of South Pacific
Ethnographic Field Methods
Archaeological Methods
Archaeological Laboratory
Women's Role in Cross-Cultural
Perspective
ANTH 4050 Pschological Anthropology
ANTH 4260 Cultural Ecology
ANTH 5010 Advanced Archaeological Methods 6
Theory
ANTH 5015 Advanced Ethnographic Methods 6
Theory
ANTH 6101 Core Course: Archeology
ANTH3002
ANTH3004
ANTH3050
ANTH3075
ANTH3076
ANTH3200
Relationships in the 90s.
Mission Impossible?
Wednesday, November 19,1997,8:00pm
Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall Student Center
Host Dwayne Featuring: Fabian
Why dont women Bee nloe guys?
Do you tank aM men are dogs?
East Carolina's 1 Live Talk Show! FREE!
.the
dwajgK
Or are you Just a superfreak?
Why do black men data white woman?
Where have all the good men gone?
For further info, about becoming a panelist, contact: ctvvayrieslxyw@hotrnail.corn.
�$2fe
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Cultural Awarenecs ConwTfclttBe. For more information,
ce!32a4715,orch�xoutourwebpaqe
-
,






i � c
The East Carolinian
style
Thursday. November 6. 1997 9
Replacements
continued from page 7
tight the duo were. The
tightness often gave way to
inebriated, yet spirited,
sloppiness during the The
Replacements' live shows.
"Achin" To Be "Talent Show"
and "Nobody from the band's
final two albums, are also very
good songs. They may lack the
energy and togetherness of the
early songs, but they are still
interesting, well-written and
performed songs.
The second CD offers up
some semi-rare Replacements'
jewels. Particularly interesting is
the early version of "Can't Hardly
Wait The earlier version is a lot
wilder and looser, but not
necessarily better. "Beer for
Breakfast "Till We're Nude
"We Know the Night" and
"Portland" are standouts.
"Like a Rolling Pin a parody
of Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone
is hilarious, especially because
Mr. Bob happened to be in the
studio while the song was being
recorded, unbeknownst to
Westerberg.
Sadly, the retrospective only
tells part of The Replacements'
story. The sometimes wonderful,
sometimes sloppyawful
(different from plain awful)
albums the group made for
Minneapolis based label Twin
Tone are not represented at all. A
complete and fair representation
of the band has to include songs
from those albums.
The retrospective also
includes bonus multi-media
material. As part of the bonus
material, the video for "Bastards
of Young" is included. This was
the band's first foray into the
world of music video. It was a
medium they did not particularly
care for, as indicated by the video.
It is shot in black and white, and
it largelly consists of a closeup of
a stereo speaker, with the song
blaring gloriously out. The lone
shot of the speaker gives way to
the speaker and a partial shot of a
guy smoking. At the end of the
song, he gets up and kicks over
the speaker. That pretty much
sums up The Replacements.
They did it their way, and when
they had to do it someone else's
way, they still did it their way.
atalog
Connection
Everything in the Store
Sb'J
Tattooing &
Body Piercing
10 off all
Body Piercing
with Student ID
Expires: 113097
(919)756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
4685 Suite A US Hwy 13 Greenville NC
Mendenhall
continued from page 7
some upgrading in the billiards
area as well Woodruff claimed.
Glow Bowling made its dchut
this past weekend at Midnight
Madness. This was the first time
the blacklights, with the help of
special phosphorescent ball and
murals, were used to take bowling
as we know it into a realm beyond
tackiness that can only be called
"cool
Now might be a good time to
give Mendenhall a chance. You'll
be surprised by how much better
things are looking.
Traveller
continued from page7
McGlynn. Hints of Eastwoodian
themes are evident through this
small, rwisting film. The eternal
Eastwood questions plays heavy:
What is the truth? And whose
truth is it?
Rent Traveller and be prepared
for a wonderful little film with a
familiar local background. Let the
Greenville theaters wait for
Monkey Trouble i. or some movie
with Steven Segal and phony
kung-fu. I'll take this one.
I Know What tops the
box office for third week
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Richard
Gere's murder mystery "Red
Corner" got nipped by the low-
budget thriller "I Know What You
Did Last Summer which topped
the box office charts for the third
straight weekend.
Three movies � including two
new films � opened in national
release. Gere's "Red Corner
which is so critical of the Chinese
that it could not be shot in the
actual locations, made its debut in
second place. The adult film story
"Boogie Nights moving into
wide distribution after two
weekends in selected cities, was
fourth. Danny Glover's serial killer
drama "Switchback" opened
poorly in eighth.
"Devil's Advocate" ranked No.
3. Playing in Canada only, "Bean"
performed well.
A Life Less Ordinary" plunged
51 percent in its second weekend.
1. "I Know What You Did Last
Summer Sony-Columbia, $9.4
million, 2,524 locations, $3,727
average, $45.3 million, three
weeks.
2. "Red Corner MGM, $7,403
million. 2.244 locations, $3,299
average, $7,403 million, one week.
3. "Devil's Advocate Warner
Bros $7.37 million, 2,404
locations, $3,065 average, $37.3
million, three weeks.
4. "Boogie Nights New Line,
$4.7 million, 907 locations. $5,162
average, $8.8 million, four weeks.
5. "Kiss the Girls Paramount,
$3.5 million, 2,354 locations,
$1,492 average, $51.4 million, five
weeks.
6. "Seven Years in Tibet Sony,
$3.3 million, 2,103 locations,
$1,559 average, $31 million, four
weeks.
7. "Fairytale: A True Story
Paramount, $2.9 million, 1,278
locations, $2,271 average, $7.1
million, two weeks.
8. "Switchback Paramount,
$2.7 million, 1,128 locations,
$2,398 average, $2.7 million, one
week.
9. "Gattaca Sony, $2.6
million, 1,279 locations, $2,022
average, $8.2 million, two weeks.
10. "In & Out Paramount,
$1.7 million, 1,659 locations,
$1,042 average, $59.2 million,
seven weeks.
ECU Ring Event
DOWNTOWN ONLY
3 DAYS ONLY
Friday, Nov. 7th 10-6
Saturday, Nov. 8th 10-6
Sunday, Nov. 9th 1-5
Now Open at Arlington
Village - And soon to
be back downtown
with a bigger and
better store!
ARTQ1RV E D
CQLLetSP JEWELRY
Nov. 10th
Nov. 11th
Nov. 12th
Nov. 13 th
Nov. 14th
10am-4pm
10am-4pm
10am-4pm
10am-7pm
10am-4pm
Special Hours: 10am-7pm on the 13th
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
1RTQ1RVED
V COLL�G� JEWELRY
BE
EAST
CAROLINA
UNTVEHsmr
iE& HH jjjjfi
'Special Payment Plans Available
EAST
CAROLINA
INIVERSITY
NCs Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 1 of ECU and
fop f 00 College Bars hi the
Nation by Playboy magazine
October 1997
;
Tonight
Mike Mesmer "Eyes
'The World's Most Powerful Hypnotist" "
if
ADVANCE TiX AVAIL-
ABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SgUrS
EAST COAST MUSIC
& VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
Two Big Nights, Two Big Shows!
i
Friday Nov. 7'
Tod Skinnee JS
Capricorn Recording Artist
special guest:
Almighty Senators
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKULLY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC

Saturday Nov. 8
free admission
with Too Skinee J's
ticket stub
Coming Next Week

Cravin Melon
Sat. Nov. 15
Special Guest:
The Ultraviolets
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKULLY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
H
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Jusr show your F.CLi student ID at the
DarryTs across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
Famous Saucy Barbecued Fork
Ribs. Award Winning Fajitas
Grande, New Wood lire Grilled
Steaks. Fresh Vteeetable Pasta,
RESTAURANT & BAR
V I I I f I I I � lllll
800 East 10th Street � Z52-1907
Roadside Chicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese
Sandwich, Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts It's .til specially priced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favonte
place for food and lun'
' i � � .
w� I





10 Thursday. November 6, 1997
sports
Tennis teams await final tourneys
JEREMY ANDERSON
STAFF WRITER
For the ECU Men's and
Women's Tennis Teams, it has
been a long fall season of
individual tournaments.
Although the Pirates have not
competed as a team, Coach Bill
Moore has seen some good
tennis that he hopes will carry
over into the spring season.
"Both teams will do well in
the spring. Exactly where we
will finish in the conference,
I'm unable to say Moore said.
The ECU Women have
competed in several
tournaments this fall which
included the Lady Pirate
Invitational here in Greenville.
The Lady Pirates are led by
their only senior, Mona Eek.
The Pirate netters gained
much needed experience this
fall. Seven different players
competed in singles
competition, while six different
doubles jg combinations
competed. Freshman Maggie
Maginp.es was the most
in singles play
9-1 record and
successful
posting i
winning
singles championship at the
UNCW Invitational. Maginr.es
teamed with sophomore Asa
Ellbring to compile a 4-3
doubles record. The team of
junior Catherine Morgan and
sophomore Michelle Martin
also posted a doubles record of
4-3.
The Pirates will be an
extremely young team this year
and Moore will have his work
cut out for him.
"It has been fun breaking in
the new girls. They have done
very well Moore said.
The ECU men's squad
boasts all upperclassmen in the
lineup this season. However,
the Pirate men have been
hampered by injuries this fall.
Two Pirates who have played
strong this fall arc Seniors
Roope Kalajo and Nils Alomar.
As the only two seniors on the
team, the duo has traveled to
tournaments in North Carolina,
South Carolina, and Georgia.
Kalajo and Alomar have
already qualified for the main
draw in singles play at this
week's Rolex Championships in
Chapel Hill. This tournament
will be the toughest
competition the Pirates have
faced this fall.
the Flight Three
Remaining Schedule
Woman
Nov. 7-9 Southern Collegiate Championships Columbia. S.C.
Fall Season Complete
Junior Kenny Kirby polishes his game up during a recent practice. The women's and men's fall season will
conclude this weekend.
Nov. 5-8 Rolex Championships
Fall Season Complete
Chapel Hill. N.C.
PHOTO BY CUT SUCH
Men'sRoster
Name Nils AlomarYear Sr.Hometown Mallorca, Spain
Roope KalajoSr.Kokkola, Finiand
Wes KinterJr.Lancaster, Pa.
Kennv KirbvJr.Wilminaton. N.C.
Brett RowleyJr.Lighthouse Point Fla.
Stephen SiebenbrunnerJr.Gunskirchen, Austria
Derek SlateJr.Mt. Airy, N.C
Women'sRoster
Name Mona EekYear Sr.Hometown Nesbru, Norway
Catherine MorganJr.Washington, N.C.
Anne-Birgitte SvaeJr.Oslo, Norway
Asa EllbringSo.Norrahammar, Sweden
Maggie MeginnisFr.Clemmons, N.C.
Michelle MartinSo.Lynchburg, Va.
Kersten SchachingerSo.Defray Beach, Fla.
Jennie WardFr.Richmond, Va.
Women's soccer knocks off ranked team
Overtime goal ensures
home playoff game
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
Win. Upset. Victory. Whatever you want to call
it, that's what the women's soccer team
achieved Friday afternoon.
It was the biggest win of their brief four year
history, knocking off conference foe George
Mason, who was also the number 22 ranked
team in the country.
With the victory, ECU gains the number
four seed in the CAA Women's Soccer
Championship tournament. But more
importantly, they host their first round match
with Old Dominion on Wednesday, Nov. 5 at 2
p.m.
The Lady Pirates have won a record 10
games this year (10-9), and are currently 4-4 in
the conference, which marks the most
conference wins they have ever had. ECU is
currently on a three game winning streak and
has won nine of its last four games.
Freshman forward Jennifer Bush booted in
the goal in the sudden death overtime, which
marked the first time ECU has beaten a top 25
team.
Head Coach Neil Roberts feels this victory
is a stepping stone for his team.
"To beat George Mason was really great for
our team; it was a great team effort Roberts
said. They did exactly what I asked them do
that night and it worked out for us
The Lady Pirates have never made it past
the first round of play and actually tied ODU
for fourth place in the tournament but ECU
owns the tie-breaker since they defeated
ODU in head-to-head competition, 1-0, back
on September 24 in Greenville.
Roberts knows tournament play essentially
means a whole new season.
"Now it's a new season Roberts said. To
host a home playoff game is something we are
really excited about.
According to Roberts the credit goes to the
players who have stuck together and played
their hearts out in the remaining weeks.
"I have to credit the players in the last two
weeks of the season they really stuck together
and established some solidarity, and really just
made it a point to have agood time playing the
game Roberts said. "That's half the battle
right now
The Lady Pirates match is tomorrow (Wed.
Nov. 5) at 2 p.m. at Bunting Track. Tickets are
$1 with a student ID.
Swimmers
lap up "pool"
of wins
Team picks up another
impressive victory
The Lady Pirate soccer team suffered a disappointing 3-0 loss to the Lady
Monarchs in round one of the CAA tournament. ECU finished the season 10-10 .4
in the CAA, the best finish the team has seen in history.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
Pirates look for third straight conference victory
Football team hoping
to keep streak alive
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
Right now ECU is on a winning streak
and they hope to keep it going when
they plav at Houston this Saturday.
ECU (3-5, 2-2) is coming off their
first two conference wins, while the
Cougars (3-5,2-1) have won two of their
last three conference games.
Last Saturday's win marked the
second time this season, the Pirates had
to come from behind to seal a win. The
defense played a major part in that win
when Dwight Henry ignited a second
half rally that led to 31 unanswered
ECU points. Henry's 98-yard
interception return for a touchdown and
Forrest Foster's 13-yard touchdown
marked the second week in a row the
defense scored two touchdowns.
"We're real confident atxut the way
we were able to come back
Quarterback Dan Gonzalez said. "I
think we were more confident in the
area that our defense was able to score
two touchdowns. It was a welcomed
surprised and hopefully we're able to
get it going offensively to help them out
a little bit
ECU career leader in touchdowns
Larry Shannon, who caught his first
touchdown of the season last week to
give him 21, said the offense has to pay
back the defense.
"We need to pay them back
Shannon said. "We need top go out
there and score early and get ahead and
not make it hard on everybody. If we can
play with the lead we can play with a lot
more confidence
Offensively the Cougars get it done
through the air, with 1,748 total passing
yards, and 1,050 on the ground. In
comparison, ECU has 1,670 passing
yards and 511 rushing yards.
Defensive tackle Brian Johnson said
they have to be ready for every kind of
offensive plays. Johnson said last week
the defense almost got burned because
they thought the Cards would pass the
ball more, instead of running the ball.
"They're pretty even on the run and
pass, so we have to be ready for
anything Johnson said. "Last week we
thought they (Louisville) were going to
pass a lot and they gut us with the run
early so we have to be ready for
everything
Coach Steve Logan said Houston is a
team that is searching for some self-
identification.
They're finding themselves in
several different positions trying to find
out who and what they are right now
Logan said. "The quarterback situation
seems to have settled on one guy. They
started with three quarterbacks believe
it or not. They're trying to find out a lot
of things and they haven't found a way
to put it all together in a package just
yet
The quarterback they have settled
on is red-shirt freshman Jason
McKinley. After eight games, McKinley
has completed 105 of 1 passes with
seven interceptions and seven
touchdowns, for 1,384 yards. He is
averaging 173.0 yards per game.
The Pirates kick off the game at 2:30
p.m. (central time). The game will be
televised locally on WNCT-TV
STEVE LOSEY
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU swimming team had an explosive meet
on Saturday. The Pirates soundly defeated the
American University Eagles in swimming
matches on Saturday and continued what is
shaping up to be a great season.
Both the men's and women's swimming teams
are now 3-0. The men's team beat the Eagles
120-85 and the women's team won 135-89.
"Wc won both meets convincingly said Head
Coach Rick Kobe. "Wc dominated both teams
On the women's team, several freshman
turned in impressive performances. Samantha
Perry won the 200 breaststrokc in 2:24.59. Perry's
time is the fourth fastest in Pirate history. It was
the second time in two weeks Perry broke 2:25.
In ECU history, only three other Pirates have
broken 2:25 in such a short rime span. So far.
Perry is undefeated in the breaststrokc.
Freshman Brooke Wise won the 200 butterfly
in 2:10.50 and is undefeated in the 200 butterfly.
Casey Sloan, ECU's top freestyle swimmer, won
the distance freestyle in 5:06.69. Holiie Butler
won the 100 and 200 freestyle. Butler is also
undefeated in each of her categories. Senior
Amanda Atkinson won the backstroke.
There are probably 12 more that I could
name that are just as impressive Kobe said.
"We've got a lot of talent on this team
Senior Brandon Tilley, co-captain for the
men's team, chalked up another victory for his
undefeated record in the 200 IM with a time of
1:57.89. Tilley went on to win the 200
breaststroke in 2:08.18. Tilley is the highest
ranked breaststroker in the conference and holds
the school record for the 200 breaststroke.
Senior Lee Hutchens, the other captain of the
men's team, won the distance freestyle.
Sophomore Matt Jabs got two victories under his
belt Saturday. He first won the 50 freestyle with
a time of 21.56 and then won the 100 freestyle in
48.11. Paul Pinther won the 200 backstroke with
a time of 1:55.95.
"As with the women's team, 1 could name 12
SEE SWIM. PAGE tt
Ankle injury
doesn't mean
end of career
Men's tennis player
continues to impress
on the court
STEVE LOSEY
SENIOR WRITER
Roope Kalajo
Junior Roope Kalajo has traveled
all the way across the Atlantic to
play tennis for ECU, and we
should be glad that he did. Since
he has started playing in America,
he has become one of the best
players on the team.
While at a youth tennis
academy, he won numerous
championships, including the
Scandinavian Championship. ATP, the worldwide
ranker of tennis players, recently ranked Kalajo
886th out of all the tennis players in the world.
In high school, Kalajo played ice hockey. He
gave up that sport, however, when he was 15 to
concentrate on his talents in tennis.
Kalajo's tennis career suffered what could have
been a drastic setback in the spring season. He
twisted his ankle during a match and was
recovering for a long time. Over the summer, he
returned to Finland for surgery and therapy He
was unable to practice all summer.
"I'm getting bettei Kalajo said. "But I'm still
not 100 percent yet
He is going to have therapy all year in order to
make a full recovery
Despite his injury, Kalajo has been an integral
part of the tennis team this season. Most recently,
he was one of four players chosen to compete at
the University of South Carolina Region II Fall
Invitational last weekend. After the other three
were knocked out of the tournament, Kalajo was
still alive in the consolation bracket.
Unfortunately, the USC tournament was plagued
by intermittent rain that weekend and the
consolation bracket was eliminated due to time
constraints.
"Our team has had a lot of injuries this
semester Kalajo said. "We're just getting ready for
spring I really think that the spring semester will
be our big chance
Kalajo is a business major and is still undecided
about what he wants to do after graduation, but is
thinking about staying in America to play tennis.
He has high aspirations for his performance this
year.
"I think that this season will be one of my best
yet said Kalajo. "Last year was my first in the
VS and if I stay healthy, I'll have another good
season
&��� .
-





3E
The East Carolinian
S
pori
s
Thursday. November6, 1997 11
Volleyball team
continues to struggle
Don't let an unpaid parking ticket stop you from
registering! Be sure you have paid all university
debts, including parking fines, prior to waiting in
line for Spring registration.
DID YOU KNOW you can find the
latest parking lot changes on the WEB?
From the ECU Home Page (www.ecu.edu) link to "Parking Lot
Adjustment Notices" listed under the Intranet Or if you are off-
campus, look for it on the Parking & Transportation Services web site,
or Business Services web site.
You'll find more than you want to know about PARKING at ECU! If
you have any questions, you may send an "electronic postcard" from
this web site.
RawllAustin Parking
Lot Closing I III0197
Lady Pirates
drop eighth
conference loss
Pall Kaplan
STAFF WRITER
The ECU women's volleyball team
fought hard through another loss
against a more powerful American
University team. The Pirates were
defeated by the Eagles in three
games, 15-8, 15-5 and 15-10. ECU
has fallen to a record of 12 wins and
17 losses overall, and two wins and
eight losses in the conference.
American improved their record to
23-3 and 7-2 in the conference.
LaKeya Mason, a junior transfer,
helped the Pirates in the first game
with three block assists in a row.
She finished the match with five
block assists, seven kills and three
digs. Cinta Claro had nine kills and
seven digs, Claro is now nearly fifth
place on the all-time top 10 list
with 361 kills so far this season.
Kristin Warner, who had 29 assists
and four digs, now has 912 assists
to rank fourth.
"We had problems hitting the
ball and we had problems passing
the ball
Coach Kim Walker said about
the defeat on Sunday.
.Almost as soon as senior captain
Kari Koenning came back into the
lineup from an early season broken
arm, freshman Liz Hall went on
the disabled list with
mononucleosis. Hall is expected to
return next weekend to the lineup.
Hopefully with the return of
Koenning, the Pirates will be able
to get some numbers up in the "W
column. With Koenning on the
court, ECU is 8-4 and only 4-13
with out her.
"We're working to just win the
matches, they're all tough matches.
If you don't play on a given day,
they'll beat you Koenning said
when asked about her outlook on
the remaining games left in the
season.
The women's volleyball team
will be back on the court at home
Friday Nov. 7 against Elon College
and Saturday Nov. 8 versus James
Madison University.
Parking Meters
PARKING METERS are located in several areas of campus for the
convenience of temporary parking. Metered parking is .25 for 30
minutes. Meters near the Rec Center may be fed for up to two hours
of parking, while on other areas of campus, the maximum time to be
paid for at once is 30 minutes. In an effort to assist students and
visitors, some of the 30 minute meters will be changed in the near
future to allow for a greater amount of time before needing to add
quarters.
The parking lot located east of the Rawl Building and
west of the Austin Building will be closed beginning
Monday, November 10,1997. Facilities Services and
contractors require this lot for equipment and materials
storage related to elevator installations in the Rawl
Building and the Austin Building. Following these
projects, the parking lot will be closed permanently in
keeping with the University's Master Plan.
209-B S.Evans S
Pittroan Building
neat courthouse
Greenville. NC
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
The Comk Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)758-6909
Indoor Climbing Wall Vertical Tour
All tours begin at 7pm at the
Adventure Program Center.
November 6
Outdoor living Skill Seminars
Dressing for the Outdoors ��
November 12
Climbing
Pilot Mountain Trip 2
November 15
Reg. by Nov. 7
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Climbing Seminars
Climbing Safety Rescue
November 10
Beginner Climbing
and Belaying Workshops
Learn the techniques that will
make you a confident climber.
November 17
For more information call 328-6387

�i"li �





12 Thursday. November 6. 1997
01
The East Carolinian
Pirate ChaseTurkey
Trot 1997
5K1.5 M Road Race and Walk
Saturday, November 8, 1997 � 10 a.m.
Schedule of Events� 10 a.mECl Rec
Services 1.5 mile run
10:30 a.mPulse Athletic Club 5K Run
11:15 a.mTBA Invitational 5K Run
11:45 a.mTBA Post Race Parry and Awards Presentation
Location� Registration and
rewards located at ECU Rec Center
StartFinish lines located on Main ECU campus
Race Director� Charlie "Choo"
Justice-Head Coach ECU Women's cross country and track
and field-(919) 328-4611 or 328-4622 .Assistance Race
Director-Cliff Ogburn 328-1567
reregister� Preregister in person
at ECU Rec. Services
Race Day Registration� Begins at 8:30 a.m. at
ECU Rec. Services
Entree Fees�
Prcregistered SI 2.00, on race day $14.00
ECU students S5.00 before, S7.00 on race day (must present
valid ECU student ID)
All registered participants will receive a race packet, and will
be eligible for door prizes.
T-shirts guaranteed to the first 200 tegistered, available on a
limited basis afterwards
Participants may pick up their packets beginning at 8:30 a.m.
on race day
Awards�
5K: Awards will be given in the following categories
(No duplication of awards)
Top 3 overall males and females
Top 3 ECU students (m & 0
Top 2 ECU facultystaff (m & 0
Top 2 ECU alumni (m & f)
Top 2 males and females in the following age groups:
12 & under, 13-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70 &
over
Turkey Trot: 1.5 mile: Top 2 ECU students (m & 0
Top 2 ECU facultystaff (m & f)
1.51
mile
Studm Rscrtiion Ctumr
smst.
Swim
continued from page 10
and led the Pirates to a


��?.
��
EL TORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Est 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
Say Pirates &
Get Hair Cut
for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
PIRATE SPECIAL
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Fri. 9-6
k33iS8Anytime Full Line Professional Hair Care Products
$7.00
Haircut
OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET
Catalog :3�JJS5$�:
Connection
Division Of E3�iS
355-1644 642 E. Arlington Blvd. MS 10-6 Sun. 1-5
SELECT
LADIES PANTS
FLANNEL
SHIRTS
Ladies and Metis
WINTER
COATS
m
Regular Price
Great Selection!
FLANNEL
BOXERS
Famous Maker
JEAN
IOVERALLS
$
OFF
20
Catalog
SHOES
Up To

PRICE
JERUSALEM
SACRED AND PROFANE
Check out
the holiest
city on earth.
All-you-can-eat dinner menu: fresh squash
soup with orzo and red peppers, vindaloo
(pork and potato stew), grilled lime and
curry chicken, eggplant caponata, Shanghai
noodles with mung beans and zucchini,
flatbread, cinnamon rice pudding. Tea, coffee,
and water included.
Tuesday, November 11, 1997 Hendrix Theatre, 4 pm & 7:30 pm
IT DOESN'T
MATTER HOW
YOU GET THERE
Films are free to student ith a current, valid ECU ID. Dinner tickets at 112 each
To esrve your ctinnet ticket, come to the C10 n KendennaH Student Center
by Thursday. November 7. 1997 and pay itn cash, a meal card, or your declining
balance. Dinner will be served at 6:00 pm in the Great Room
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
919 328 478S or 1 .800.ECU.ARTS;
TOD access foi deafhearing impaired call 919.JZ8.4716
ETSU
East Tennessee State University
JOIN OVER 2,200 GRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLED AT ETSU!
WE OFFER OVER 35 PH.D ED.D ED.S.
AND MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS, PLUS
CERTIFICATES IN BUSINESS AND NURSING. TUITION
WAIVERS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS, INCLUDING
ASSISTANTSHIPS FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS. ARE
AVAILABLE.
For more informuion, contact us at:
School of graduate Studies
East Tennesse State University
Johnson City, Tennesse
(423) 439-6149
(423) 439-5624 fax
E-Mail: gradschfaetsu-tn.edu
When repsonding, please refer to 002
Visit ETSV Online at
http:ictviv.etsu-tn edit
more great swimmers Kobe said.
ECU's divers also easily beat the
Eagles diving team. Casey Dodge
and Ryan Baldwin had impressive
scores
victory.
"We obviously were a better
team Kobe said. "We just had a lot
more talent
The swimming team competes
Saturday and Sunday. Saturday they
swim against Old Dominion
University at 2 p.m. and on Sunday
at 1 p.m. they swim against William
and Marv.
"Old Dominion is one of our
toughest meets Kobe said. "It
could go either way. We may be
slightly favored against William and
Mary
Kobe has high hopes for the team
this season. His goal is to go
undefeated, and after the first three
matches, it seems to be a very
realistic goal.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9795
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.9
www.goarmy.com
The Fireheuse Tavern
Thursday
Treading Evans
Friday
KemalGoat
Saturday
Laughing
Coiois
Sunday
Sunny Wheat
tyMMJftff
Pizza
Free
all day
4pm Panther Came
Live Remote with
99X.1st drawing for
Superbowl Tix
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to Dj Mad
Mike upstairs
Greenville's
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri 8 Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
32 ox. Domestic Draft
S1.S0
14 oz. Domestic Draft
7SC
FREE FOOD
NFL
Ticket
on DSS
Monday
Night
Football
75 c Southpaw
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
TastingDisplay
VJ
L Sports Bar
Get the Credit You Deserve
with the East Carolina
University Credit Card!
as?
Apply for
the East Carolina
University� Visa� or
MasterCard� and show your
support for ECU�! It's the credit card
with a low competitive annual rate, and
there's no annual fee ever, as long as
you use your card at least once per
year. PLUS, every time you use your
ECU credit card 3&&J will pay a royalty
to the university.
You'll be proud to display your ECU
Visa or MasterCard while enjoying
the full benefits of a credit card.
Use it for school supplies, traveling
and emergency cashand
it's a
great
way to
establish
good credit!
� Low Annual Percentage Rate
� No Annual Fee
C 3
uu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
To apply for your ECU Visa or
MasterCard, call toll-free �
1-600-476-4223, Monday
through Friday, 7:00 a.m.
to 11:00 p.m Saturday
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Show your school
spirit - call today!
'Must use Hit- card a! least once annually or $20.00 fee is assessed.
Come by Todd Dining Hall Nov. 10th and
11th from 10 AM to 1 PM to complete your
application and receive a free T-Shirt
�-
-�i





r
The East Carolinian
classifieds
Thursday, November 6, 199713
FOR RENT
i
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8
Effldencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
ROOMMATEf NEEDED AT 107-A
- Stancil Drive, two rooms available for
' $120per month. Five blocks from cam-
J pus off Meade Street Call 758-4124,
� ask for Tom, please leave phone
�number.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP: TWO
; blocks from campus, one block from
downtown. New apartment, only $173.
�Must be fun, outgoing, ECU student
: preferred. Call 758-3684
4 BEDROOM AVAILABLE AT Play-
� !ers Club Apts. 6-month lease begin-
i ;ning Jan. Call Melissa at 321-7613.
FEMALE NEEDED ASAP TO sub-
� Mease 2 bedroom apt $212.507mo. plus
I 12 utilities. Call Amy, 353-4153.
j
� WALK TO ECU. 3 Bedroom, 1 12
bath, central heatair, carpet stove,
1 rel, dishwasher. S630mo. Call 321
!4712.
ASAP ROOMMATE NEEDED, LUX-
URY apartment $205 a month. Fire-
; place and ceiling fans. Plantation
j Apartments. Call 531-5978.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New
"Rec Center! One 2 bedroom apt. above
Catalog Connection - $475 a month!
One 2 bedroom apt. above Percolator
Coffeehouse $500.a month! Both avail-
able December 1st-one month deposit
required! Call Yvonne at 758-2616
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
NON-smoker, studious, to share 3
bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse on
ECU Bus route. Fully furnished, 13
utilities. No pets. Call Lesley, 754-2942.
FEMALEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED - Players Club Apts. 14 of
rent and expenses. Call Melissa at 321-
7613.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER
MATE needed for apt 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utili-
ties. Call 752-1652.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR 4 bedroom house 5 min. walk
from campus. $182.50mo 14 utili-
ties. Call Elizabeth @ 752-7325.
1 Si 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment 756-6209.
CANNON COURT. 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
FOR SALE
FREE MOTOROLA PAGER, AVAIL-
ABLE options include voice mail, e-
mail services. Call 1-800-784-6452 Id
1675167 or write to Free Pagers, PO
Box 4112, Greenville, NC 27836-2112.
RALEIGH COMMUTER BIKE, SHI-
MANO grip shift, 21 speed, lock, 1
year old, top condition, sell for $150.
Call Burkhard 551-9069.
GUITARS-WILL SELL OR Trade my
collection starting $150 to $2,000. Call
919-637-6550.
1997 JEEP WRANGLER-SE. White
with black softtop. Immaculate condi-
tion, only 6K miles. 18 months left on
factory warranty. Many options.
$15,000. Call Rick 816-4423(w) 355-
0888(h).
CHOCOLATE BROWN SECTIONAL
SOFA, great condition. Getting new
furniture, must sell immediately. $95
or best offer. Call 975-7372 days or
355-3118 evenings.
STUN GUNSI SAFE AND easy to
use. 919-946-6830.
FREESTYLE BIKES BY HARO,
Mongoose, Hoffman, and
Diamond Back. Check out our
freestyle accessories. Call 355-
8080. Ask for Derrick or Benny.
HELP WANTED
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Cain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7,223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
�WWHleJBS! ffaH-ffaT
(99) 930028
EDWARDS PHARMACY IN AY-
DEN, location 7 minutes from cam-
pus, needs hard working, honest per-
son to work 20-30 hours par week run-
ning registers, cooking at grill, putting
up stock, helping fill prescriptions.
Phone 746-3126.
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-$ 1,500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
WANTED: INDIVIDUALS TO
SHARE thair story at an information
booth on how tobacco has impacted
their life. Suggested topics might in-
clude heart disease and lung disease.
Please contact Nicole at Health Promo-
tions & Weil-Being at 328-6793 by Nov.
13,1997.
CRUISE SHIP S LAND-TOUR Em-
ployment- Learn about nationalinfl
Cruise Lines and Land-Tour compa-
nies. World Travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
Caribbean). Excellent benefits bo-
nuses! We can help you make the con-
nection. 517-336-0574 Ext. C53621.
��BASKETBALL OFFICIALS NEED-
ED THE Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is still looking for in-
dividuals interested in officiating in the
printer adult basketball league, posi-
tion pays $12-515 a game. Clinics will
be held to train new and experienced
officials. However, a basic knowledge
and understanding of the game is nec-
essary. The next meetings will be held
Monday, November 3 & 9,1997 at 7:30
p.m. at Elm Street Gym. Experience re-
quirements, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more infor-
mation, please call the Athletic Office
at 830-4550 between the hours of 2:00
p.m7:00 p.m Monday thru Friday.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
COURIER TO WORK PART-time for
busy medical practice. Make deliver-
ies, run errands, do filing. Applicants
must be able to work 9.00 a.m1:00
p.m. Monday through Friday and have
a good driving record along with reli-
able transportation. Interested applic-
ants should send their resume or ap-
plication to Pitt Surgical, P.A. 905
Johns Hopkins Drive, Greenville, NC
27834.
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wanted Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.icpt.com
PART St FULL TIME positions avail-
able am or pm. Cooks, dishwashers,
servers. Applications accepted 9:00-
5:00, Ramada Plaza Hotel. Above aver-
age wage with experience.
EARN $7B0-$1 SOOWEEK RAISE
ALL the money your group needs by
sponsoring a VISA fundraiser on your
campus. No investment and very little
time needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for information today. Call
1-800-323-8454x95.
WANTED: NURSING STUDENTS:
INDIVIDUALS interested in helping
the Dept. of Health Promotion & Weil-
Being to join us at an information table
for the ECU campus on Nov. 20, 1997
for Great American Smokeout Day. For
more information call Nicole at 328-
6793. Please respond by Nov. 13,1997.
Also in need of Visual Demonstrations
such as model of smokers heart or
lung.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVIC-
ES. MA-English. Fast turnaround, rea-
sonable rates. Most1.50pp. Reports,
term papers, thesis, etc. Windows 95.
Call Jamie at 758-1161 day or 758-4567
eve.
GREEK PERSONALS
SISTER OF THE WEEK: Alpha Delta
Pi-Shannon Schmidt, Megan Packard.
Alpha Phi-Karyn Newill, Kim Lewis. Al-
pha Xi Delta-Alayne McNeil, Jen Boyd.
Chi Omega-Meri Hines, Jamie Hand.
Delta Zeta-Lisa Waterfield, Brandy
Nichol. Sigma-Jennifer Miller, Maya
VanDyken. Zeta Tau Alpha-Amy Bergn-
er, Christy Lee. Pi Delta-Leslie Garris,
Ashley Dix.
CONGRATS TO ZETA TAU Alpha's
new Executive Council. PresSara Lea-
hy; VPI-Kate Clay; VPII-Alison Gurga-
nus; TresCarrie Rogers; Sec-Wendy
Melton; Mem Megan Guthrie; Ritual-
Kristin Mayer; Historian-Erin Riley;
PanhTricia Shepardson
TO THE BROTHERS OF Pi Kappa Phi,
thanks for showing our Big Sisters a
great time at our Big Sis Party. We al-
ways have a good tie with you guys.
Love, the little sisters of Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS TO JILL ALT-
FEDER ON your lavalier from Brent
We love you. Your Alpha Xi Delta
sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ZETA
TAU Alpha's volleyball players. Every-
one did a great jobi Good luck to our
soccer players. Blair, next time wear
tennis shoes!
ALPHA PHI STRANGER MIXER on
Halloween was quite a sight! The
Spartans cheers rang through the
night From gangsters and flappers to
Jack and Jill, we all had quiet a thrill.
The night was packed with fun by-
the-way, who was that pregnant nun?
ZETA BABIES, ARE YOU prepared
for Friday? your future sisters area. We
love you! Have a great week! Love,
Zeta Tau Alpha!
GAMMA SIGMA MU PLEDGES
You're doing a great job- Keep up the
hard work. Hang in there- inductions
are just around the corner! Love, your
Pledge Mom'
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALPHA
XI Delta for winning the volleyball
championship. You girls are awe-
some. Love, all your sisters
THANKS TO ALL THE guys who
come to our Halloween Stranger Mix-
er on Friday. As always, it was the best
time. All your costumes were great
Love always. Alpha Xi Delta
THANKS. SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
for the pre-downtown last Thursday at
Harry's. We all had a blast. Can't wait
to get together again soon. Love, Al-
pha Xi Delta
THANK YOU, TAU KAPPA Epsilon
for the social on Saturday. Lefs do it
again soon. Love, Alpha Xi Delta
DELTA ZETA BIG SISTERS would
like to thank our little sisters for giving
us the best Big Sis Party. We love our
Little Sisters. Love, your Big Sisters
ALPHA DELTA PI, WE may not have
won but we had a blast working on the
float with all. let's hang out some
more! Love always, Sigma Pi
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALPHA
XI Delta for winning the volleyball
championship. You girls are awesome.
Love, all your sisters
LOST& FOUND
COAT FOUND, DESCRIBE
ACCURATELY and I'll return it Call
328-7799 and leave a message.
SERVICES
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need Timberland boots
and thoett Good Jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, l'OLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door It ring buzzer.
I I) 1 I S W A 1' S II () I'
TRAVEL
7 Nights Air&Hotel - Save $150 on Food & Drinb
Florida $119
South Rsoch, Panama City, Daytona, Cocoa Beoch
Spring Break Travel � Our 11th Year!
1-800-678-6386
"AAAAiSPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cancun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, & Florida. Group dis-
counts & daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, & go free! 1-800-234-
7007. http:www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
ik
C9riCUn ton aw
NOW HIRING REPS!
http:www.andiesasummartours.com
Book Today
VisaMCAmexDisc
1-800-234-7007
"�ACT NOW! CALL LEISURE Tours
for Spring Break packages to South
Padre, Cancun, Jamaica and Florida.
Reps neededTravel free and earn
commissions. Group discounts for 6 or
more people. 800-838-8203 or
www.leisuretours.com
OTHER
GET PAID TO SHOP, eat out and
morel Free details. Send self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope to Busi-
ness Basics, PO Box 97-SP, trVest Ber-
lin, NJ 08091-0097.
810008 POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218
9000 ext T-3726 for listings.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext H3726 for current
listings.
SEIZED CARS FROM 8175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-3726.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NOTE-TAKING WORKSHOPS:
MONDAY from 11:00 a.m12:00 noon
and Tuesday from 3:30-4:30 p.m. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering these pro-
grams the week of November 10th. If
you are interested in any of these
workshops, contact the Center at 328-
6661.
-HOW TO APPLY FOR and Fund
Graduate School � Dr Lorraine Ara-
gon will present instruction on appli-
cation procedures, testing, and identi-
fying funding sources for students in-
terested in attending graduate school.
The seminar will be held on Nov. 13,
3:30 p.m. at Career Services, Room
103.
ARISEADAPTED RECREATION:
LEARN racquetball! Clinic offered at
the SRC. Class begins Nov. 9. Call 328-
6387.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet Tues-
day, Nov. 11 at 5:00 p.m. in Menden-
hall Student Center Room 244
JOB SEARCHING ON THE Internet
Career Services and Joyner Library
staff will provide instruction to stud-
ents on how to use the Internet for job
searching and career information on
Thur. Nov. 13 and Wed Nov. 19 at 3:00
in Joyner 104. Since seating is limited,
please sign up at Career Services or
call 328-6050.
THIS SATURDAY AT 10:00 A.M.
plan on competing at the Fall Tourna-
ment of Games: Spades, Chess, Sega
Football, and Two-Man Volleyball are
being hosted at the Baptist Student
Union located on 10th Street next to
Wendy's. Mission trip fundraiser. Call
752-4646.
THE RCLS SOCIETY WILL be hav-
ing a Bake Sale on Wed Nov. 5th from
9:00-2:00 and will have a Car Wash on
Nov. 8th from 10:00-2:00 at Trade Mart
(Greenville BlvdHth St). Hope to see
you at BW-3's for our social at 9:30 on
Nov. 6th.
TUE. NOV. 4-SENIOR RECITAL, So-
nia Aicaia, soprano, A.J. Fletcher Reci-
tal hall, 7:00 p.m. Wed Nov. 5-Sym-
phonic Wind Ensemble And Concert
Band, Scott Carter and Christopher
Knighten, Conductors, Wright Auditor-
ium, 8:00 p.m. Thurs. Nov. 6-Percus-
sion Ensemble, Mark Ford, Director,
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m. Fri.
Nov. 7-Jazz Ensemble A, Carroll V.
Dashiell Jr Director, Wright Auditori-
um, 8:00 p.m. Sat. Nov. 8-Senior Reci-
tal, Abigail Cockrell, flute, A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 4:00 p.m. Sat, Nov. 8-Sen-
ior Recital, John E. Chapney, trumpet
and Jason Barclift, horn, A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00 p.m.
PILOT MOUNTAIN: ONE DAY climb
at the State Park. Register by Nov. 7 for
Nov. 15 trip. Call 328-6387 for details.
ADVENTURE WORKSHOP: OUT-
DOOR LIVING: Dressing for the Out-
doors. Seminar on Nov. 12. Call 328-
6387 for information.
220,000 Titles!
www. lstmusic.com7ecu
Great Discounts!
ECU'S ADULT EDUCATION PRO-
GRAM is offering Putting your Course
Online: A How-to For Faculty Novem-
ber 13th, 2:30 p.m in Mendenhall
Student Center. Co-sponsoring the
PBS Adult Learning Satellite course
are the School of Education Office of
School Services, and Division of Con-
tinuing Studies. The one-hour broad-
cast will take a hands-on approach to
putting your course online, and be fol-
lowed by a question and answer ses-
sion with a panel of experts. The pro-
gram will benefit faculty, deans, divi-
sion chairs, and public school person-
nel who are interested in online in-
struction. Cost is $5.00. for further in-
formation or registration, please con-
tact Dr. Vivian W. Mott at 328-6177 or
edmott@eastnet.ecu.edu.
BADMINTONSQUASH CLINIC:
DEADLINE FOR registration Nov. 11.
Dept. of Rec. Services 328-6387
TURKEY TROT: TEAMS UP with the
Pirate Chase on Nov. 8. Last Day to
register: Nov. 6. Contact Dept of Rec.
Services 328-6387 for more info.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP Thursday from 3:30-5:00 p.m.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program the week of November 10th.
If you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ABSOLUTELY UNBELIEVABLE
FREE TUTORING sessions available
for all ECU students offered by ECU
Professors every Monday, Tuesday,
and Thursday starting at 4:00 p.m. at
the Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center. Math tutoring on Mon-
day and Tuesday, Math and Science
tutoring on Thursday.
TEST-TAKING WORKSHOP: WED-
NESDAY from 3:30-4:30 p.m. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment will be offering this pro-
gram the week of November 10th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
A SPECIAL THANKS GOES to
Smith's Red & White, Speech Therapy
East, CRF Speech Services, Mrs. Shel-
ton's 4th grade class at Wahl-Coates
School, Pitt County Preschool Speech
Services, Furniture Fair, Mary Kay Cos-
metics, Emerald City Grill, and Bostic
Suggs for all the donations and sup-
port during Homecoming.
CLIMBING WALL CONTEST: HOW
well do you conquer the wall? Regis-
tration deadline Nov. 13. Contact the
Dept. of Rec. Services 328-6387 for de-
tails.
CLIMBING SEMINAR: SAFETY
RESCUE Nov. 10. Know what to do in
times of danger. Contact Dept. of Rec.
Services 328-6387 for further informa-
tion.
ECHO MEETING NOV.
lobby of Fleming Hall
6, 5:30 p.m.
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY.
h
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCHjjl
RED OAK CHRISTIANj�?
CHURCHml �� IaRbIb
1827 Greenville Blvd. SWM Ski 111
756-3526 Services: Worship 11 e.mTOW
Sunday School 9:45 a.m Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP & SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED &ECU CAMPUS
FRIENDS ARE MADEST. JAMES UNITED
GREENVILLE CHURCHMETHODIST CHURCH
OF CHRIST2000 E. 6th Street
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE752-6154
752-6376Services: Worship-Sunday
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m 68:30 a.m 11 a.m Sunday
p.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednes-School 9:45 a.m.
day
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
WE WELCOME YOU! LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAYA VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FROM HOMEFOR INSPIRATION
UNIVERSITY CHURCHUNITARIAN UNIVER-
OF CHRISTSALIST CONGREGA-
Corner of Crestline Blvd. &TION OF GREENVILLE
Greenville Blvd.131 Oakmont Drive
756-6545355-6658
Services: Bible School 10 a.mServices: 10:30 a.m. each
morning worship 11 a.mSunday
evening worship 6 p.m.
A CHURCH GROWING IN CHRIST. CARING FOR PEOPLE.
REACHING OUT TO
GREENVILLE WITH THEPROCLAIMING THE WORD
CLAIMS OF CHRISTGREENVILLE CHRIS-
FIRST FREE WILLTIAN FELLOWSHIP
BAPTIST CHURCH1411 S. Evans Street
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)752-2100
756-6600Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
Services: Sunday School 9:45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
SINGLE VSONPBCS
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY;
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAYECU STUDENTS 8 SINGLES
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 AMWELCOME
EACH SUNDAYPEOPLE'S BAPTIST
THE MEMORIALCHURCH
BAPTIST CHURCH1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE756-2822
756-5314Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
Services: Sunday 11 a.m10:45 a.m 6:30 p.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinnerWednesday 7:30 p.m.
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHERCOME AND JOIN US IN
STUDENTS FOR AWESOMEPRAISING THE LORD!
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANTSYCAMORE HILL
WORDMISSIONARY BAPTIST
KOINONIA CHRISTIANCHURCH
CENTER CHURCH226 W. 8th Street
408 Hudson Street758-2281
752-1898Services: Every Sunday
For information about vsing includedin our Church Directory call 328-6366.


�y�mii ii
; �' :� v.
��





r
�sa
Do it for ECU
Or for a portable CD player, whichever floats your boat.
The administration has said they1 re
looking fpr a new university sym-
bol, something other than VeeVee Pirate,
We at The Bast Carolinian would like to
help them in their deliberations.
Send us your idea for a new ECU logo
before our Nov. 28 deadline.
We'll pick our favorite and give that per-
son a portable CD player. Then well run
all of serious logos we receive in the Dec.
4155ue of the paper and on our website at
www.studentmedU.ecu.edu.
Here s your big chance to help the ECU
administration and show your school
spirit (or how badly you really want a
portable CD player).
Bring your entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
-1 � lK
r
Put onyour
thinking cap
send us
logo ide.

�.
zmrm
jM jl Vf" X ��


Title
The East Carolinian, November 6, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 06, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1238
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy