The East Carolinian, November 4, 1997







TUESDAY
NOVEMBER 4. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
VOIUME73.ISSUEV7
University seeks move to Doctoral II status
ECU Could be first in
state to hold status
ANGELA K0EN1G
STAFF WRITER
ECU wants to move up in the world.
A request has been submitted to the
N.C. Board of Governors to move the school
from the Master's I to the Doctoral II level.
One large impact this
will have on the school
is an increase in
funding, according to
Bob Thompson,
director of planning
and institutional
research.
"We're not sure what
the difference will be
because no other
institutions have moved up (to this level) in
a few years Thompson said.
Bob Thompson
UNC-Greensboro, which is at a higher
level at Doctoral I, receives funding for 14.8
full-time students to one full-time faculty
member.
"Whether we'll be funded for 15.8 FTE
(full-time equivalency) students to one
FTE faculty member we don't know yet
Thompson said. "This could mean an
increase of approximately 70 more faculty
positions
No other universities in the UNC system
are currently at this level. UNC and NCSU
are at the highest classification level at
Research I.
The number of doctoral degrees given
each year is the basic requirement for the
increased status. In order to be ranked at
Doctoral II, 10 or more doctoral degrees in
three or more fields must be given each year.
ECU currently offers 10 doctoral
programs; an average of 10 to 11 degrees are
given each year.
This will affect students by allowing
greater visibility in terms of recruiting and
for graduate programs. According to
Thompson, the needs of students should be
met more easily at this level because
resources will not have to be stretched as far.
"We're handling a heavier load
(currently) than we would have to if at the
new level Thompson said.
The next step in the reclassification
process is to be granted the
recommendation to do so by the Board of
Governors, which is scheduled to meet in
Jan. 1998. The state kegislature will then
have to approve this and set the funding
level. Thompson said this may not happen
until the legislature's long session in 1999.
N.C. State student attacked
at Substation, police respond
Saima Khan, freshman, and Angie Turner, sophomore, walk through the parking lot in which an
NX. State student was recently attacked.
PHOTO BY SABRWA THOMAS
Three ECU students
charged with simple
assault
CRAIG D. RAMEY
STFF WRITER
Three ECU students were charged with
assault against a non-ECU student in the
old SubStation parking lot.
The incident occurred on Oct. 26 at 1:45
a.m. The suspects, Blaze Thompson of Elm
St George Cogc'ell of N. Holly St. and
Scott Craves of Summit St were arrested
and charged with simple assault against a
N.C. State student who was in town for the
weekend.
The accused students used only their
hands and feet as weapons, and were
charged with hitting and kicking the victim.
Thompson, Cogdell and Graves were all
released that morning for a secured bond of
$300. According to police, all three of the
accused as well as the the victim were under
the influence of controlled substances at
the time of the attack.
Luckily, ECU Officer Stephen Hargrove
was in the area when the attack occurred
early Sunday morning and was able to
respond to the incident before it became
too serious.
All three ECU students involved in the
attack were charged with misdemeanor
simple assault and will go to trial on Dec. 8
in Greenville's District Court Two .
These types of assaults are not
uncommon occurrences to the ECU police
department. Most officers have gained a
considerable amount of experience with the
assaults that frequent downtown
Greenville.
Captain Johnny Umphlet has been on
the ECU police force for five years, and was
a member of the Greenville RD. before.
Umphlet has plenty of advice for students
SEE SUBSTATION PAGE 3
Help available for assault victims
The Center for
Counseling and
Development
one source for students
Jennifer Vickers
STAFF WRITER
Following rumors of a serious rape problem
on campus, another rape was reported
recently.
On Oct. 23 a student reported that she
was raped at an off-campus location. A
police report was filed after the incident.
Officer Jon C. Curry said that this case is
currently under investigation and he cannot
comment.
"I cannot make any statements because 1
do not want to jeopardize the case Curry
said.
The Center for Counseling and Student
Development is one source of help for
students who have been victims of sexual
assaults.
Lynn Roeder, director of the Center of
Counseling and Student Development, sees
students who have had sexual assaults on
campus.
"We work with trying
to cope with this
violation. Victims go
through denial,
self-blame,
embarrassment and
depression; we try to
lessen the emotional
intensity
Lynn Roeder
Director of the Center of Couseling
and Student Developemem
"Sometimes
students will
come on their own
or are referred to
us said Roeder.
"Sometimes we
see people who
are very numb,
almost like it
doesn't bother
them, but they are
in shock. Others
are visibly
emotionally upset.
So, we try to
assess at what
level they are at.
We try to figure
out when it
happened, if they
received medical attention, or if they had to
go to court and tell their story. Sometimes
those things can be very difficult
If depression is severe, the center
suggests they see a psychiatrist at the
Student Health Center.
"We work with trying to cope with this
violation. Victims go through denial, self-
blame, embarrassment and depression; we
try to lessen the emotional intensity
Roeder said.
SEE RAPE. PAGE 3
ilebel
Recognized
One of two
awarded in
state
JONl Sl'RETTE
STAFF WRITER
Last year's issue of East
Carolina's LiteraryArt
magazine, The Rebel,
received the Pacemaker
award. This award is
one of the most
prestigious awards for
general excellence in
college journalism.
"In college
journalism, the
Pacemaker Award is
equivalent to the
Pulitzer Prize said Mr.
Paul D. Wright, the
adviser for ECU student
media.
This award is given
by the Associated
Collegiate Press which
serves as a trade group
for universities across
the U.S. According to
Wright, this award is
given to only 6
publications
nationwide. Focusing
on graphics, design,
layout, writing and
general content, the
judges look for an
outstanding publication
as a whole. Some of the
contents of The Rebel
include poetry, fiction,
ceramics, metals,
paintings, photography
and textiles, which
exhibit student's artistic
and literary talents.
"This award is very
hard to get, it only goes
to the best in the
country said Wright.
The Rebel was
selected as one of six in
the nation and one of
two statewide. A North
Carolina State
University publication
called The Windhover,
was also included as a
Pacemaker recipient.
Other Pacemaker
honorees were Flux at
the University of
Oregon; Scholastic at
the University of Notre
Dame, Indiana; West
17th at Rancho
Santiago College,
California and Cellar
Roots at Eastern
Michigan University.
The plaque was
finallv awarded to The
Rebel last weekend, at
the college media
advisorassociate
collegiate press annual
conference in Chicago.
This national
convention brings
together media
publication from
colleges all around the
U.S.
The Rebel has also
received other national
attention. They were
recently awarded a
Silver Crown award last
spring, during it's
convention in New
York.
Top: Tim Jones illustrated Mark Brett's "Easter Under the
Lens Right: Lynn Winters' "Jewelry Armoire" placed first
in wood design.
, flebel 96
Publisher ECU Students and f
Board
Editor: John D. Bullard
Art Director. Jonathan Peed'm
Managing Editor: Krystal Messer
Literary Editor: Susan Cribb
Staff Photographer: Bryon Huthchens
Assistant ADs: Dana Ezzell Gay
Bryon �Hutchens
Staff Illustrators Eric Terry, Tim Jones,
Todd Robert, Doug Gnndstatt,
Kami Klemmer, Tommy Parsons,
Brandon Askew, Scott Pope,
Jeff Schuller
Interns: Randy Miller & Molly Hayes
Art Advisor Craig Malmtose
Literary Advisor: Bruce McComiskey
Photography Stindt Photographic
J4
TODAY
"V sunny
High 60
Low 43
WEDNESDA'
sunny
High 63
Low 35
Did you know that
there are only 22
days left until
Thanksgiving Break?
opinion6
Get out and vote today!
lifestyle8
Wrestling out of this
world
sports.
11
Pirates post second
come-from-behind
victory
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG,
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across Irom Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.siudentmedia.ecu.edu

J�
"F





�'�- , .
iWjMiWII -W
2 Tuesday. November 4, 1997
M WS
The East Carolinian
across
the state
Man accused of
takjna. cotton
kicKbacks
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) � A
Maryville man is facing federal
charges that he cheated Sara Lee
Corp. out of cotton contracts
worth $285,000.
David Hunter Mauney, 58, was
indicted by a federal grand jury in
Greensboro, N.C. this week.
He was the company's chief
cotton buyer between 1990 and
1994. He allegedly got kickbacks
from cotton merchants wanting to
do business with Sara Lee.
Mauney appeared in federal
court in Knoxville Friday and
agreed to appear at a hearing in
North Carolina Monday.
Authorities say Mauney used
four firms, two in which he was an
officer, to secretly accept
kickbacks from cotton merchants.
Also charged in North Carolina
are his son, Charles C. Mauney,
Denise Whitaker and Edwards
Seymour, Jr. They were officers of
the various companies.
EPA to begin a,
superfund removal at
Wnalehead Beach
COROLLA (AP) � The U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency
will begin a superfund hazardous
substance removal at Whalehead
Beach in Currituck County in
December, the EPA said Friday.
The Atlantic Research Co.
made rocket fuel at the site 20
years ago, and beryllium residue
has been detected, the EPA
reported.
The removal will include
excavation and temporary on-site
storage of 200 cubic yards of
contaminated soil. The project is
expected to be completed in
January, according to the EPA.
The EPA said Atlantic
Research removed some material
from the site in 1984, but
sampling done in July 1996
confirmed elevated levels of
beryllium, a rocket fuel
component.
Trustees approve demolition of greenhouse
Space slated for
new science
technology building
AMBER TATUM
STAFF WRITER
The Board of Trustees is using a
new format for their meetings.
The new format was tried and
proved to be more efficient at the
Oct. 24 meeting.
"The general
consensus was
that everyone
liked it (the new
format) said
Gene Rayfield,
chairman of the
board.
Each
department
usuallv gets one
For more
information on
this story please
go to our web
site at:
www.student
media.ecu.edu
hour to discuss
their needs; this time they were
allotted two hours.
Representatives were present
from several different branches
within the university.
The issues covered included
the approving of new appointees.
Among these were Edward R.
Newton, M.D who was appointed
professor and chairman of the
department of obstetrics and
gynecology
.Also, Dr. Thomas Johnson was
approved to run for office while
working full-time here at ECU.
Plans to demolish the facilities'
greenhouse so that a new science
and technology building could be
constructed were ratified.
Several alumni events also took
place. Among these were the
homecoming golf and tennis
classics; for the first time, trophies
were given.
"I felt that it was successful. We
awarded trophies and door prizes
for the first time said Carol Davis,
alumni relations office assistant.
Alumni Circle was also
renamed. The section between
Student Health and Joyner Library
will now be recognized as .Alumni
Lane. The part of the court in
front of the Student Publications
building will be known as Cupola
Court.
Another key event was the
appointment of Dr. Emmett Floyd
as the interim dean of the School of
Education for the upcoming
semester.
Most of these approvals were
done by a mail ballot. The board
plans to meet again in December.
Dow Jones bolts up after abysmal drops in Asia, Europe
NEW YORK (AP) � A buying
spree a week after the biggest point
drop ever pushed the Dow
industrials up 232 points Monday,
prompting veteran traders to
declare the bull is back.
The Dow Jones industrial
average bolted after the opening
bell, following a rebound in Asian
and European markets, then rose in
spurts to close up 232.31 points at
7,674.39, its third-biggest point
gain ever.
The 3.1 percent gain for the day
brought the blue-chip indicator's
rise to 19 percent for the year,
within 42 points of its level before
the historic 554-point Bloody
Monday selloff deflated stocks last
week. The impressive comeback
from its frightening slump leaves
the Dow 585 points below the
record 8,259.31 of Aug. 6, when it
was up 28 percent for the year.
"The bull did show up again
said Steven Adler, president of the
ASM Fund, a Tampa, Flabased
mutual fund that is indexed to the
Dow industrials, who said traders
re-evaluated last week's selloff.
Advancing issues outnumbered
decliners by about 7 to 2 on the
New York Stock Exchange. Volume
on the floor of the Big Board came
to 564.07 million shares, down from
629.05 million in the previous
session and less than half the record
1.2 billion shares that changed
hands last Tuesday as the market
was piling up its biggest point gain
ever, a leap of 337 following Oct.
27's stunning setback. The second-
biggest gain ever was 257 points on
Sept. 2.
Investors were reassured by the
further recovery of overseas
markets, which drew some of their
strength from Friday's continued
rally in New York stocks.
At Hong Kong, where the latest
turmoil began on Oct. 24, the blue-
chip Hang Seng index gained
nearly 6 percent and continued its
climb back from a steep retreat.
"The rally in Hong Kong as well
as the European markets clearly
gave the opening a big boost and at
least placed the notion with
investors that the worst is behind
us said Ned Riley, chief
investment officer at the Bank of
Boston. "The markets have now
stabilized and are settling down to
another run for the records
Nevertheless, a drop like last
Monday's could occur again if a new
issue instills fear among investors.
Riley said, warning, "last week
didn't actually purge the major
imbalances" in stocks.
Important
information


CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
N
ALL ECU ggggg
Students,
Staff, and Faculty!

v
v
v

s s the
nation
Rhpdes college
president leads in
among four-year
coilr

pay
leges
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) � The
president of Rhodes College was
the highest paid head of any
private, four-year college in
America in 1995-96, according to
one survey.
James H. Daughdrill received
$221,140 in salary and $84,964 in
benefits for a total package of
$306,104, said the Oct. 24 issue of
The Chronicle of Higher
Education.
He was followed by Neal Berte
of Birmingham-Southern College
with $305,052 and Tom Gerety of
Amherst College with $278,804,
the survey said.
Daughdrill, a 63-year-old
Presbyterian minister, has been
credited with leading Rhodes out
of financial crisis during his more
than 20 years at the small liberal
arts school.
The endowment at Rhodes has
increased from less than $10
million in 1973, when Daughdrill
arrived, to $175.6 million as of
June 30.
Daughdrill's contract expires in
1999.
Chief executives among private
universities with graduate
programs pay the highest salaries.
John Curry, of Northeastern
University, ranked first with
$995,358 including a buyout
package.
Joe B. Wyatt, chancellor of
Vanderbilt University, ranked
second with $479,072 in salary and
benefits.
Iowa
room
State
gutted
dorm
by fire
AMES, Iowa (AP) � A fire that
was started by a halogen lamp
caused at least $100,000 in
damages to an Iowa State
University dormitory.
There were no injuries i . r
fire Saturday, but about 60
students from Larch Hall's third
floor are having to stay in other
rooms throughout the ISU dorm
system until smoke damage can be
cleaned up.


v.
HAS
CA
oWh
SIV�
'&!
Gustas
ff8-
kkAdj
DOORPRIZE
EACH DAY!
Get your name in early for
ra chance to win each dayl
MANDATORY
REGARDING EVENT FOR ALL
STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF TO
HAVE NEW PHOTO 1.0. GARBS MADE
Freshman and transfer students who already have the
ECU One Card or have been through the One Card
process, need not participate. Dependent cards may be
made at a later date.
The ECU One Card will be required in January 1998 for all
Campus Libraries, Recreation Center access, Campus Dining,
Student Activities, Financial Aid Deferrment accounts, and
everything you needed an ECU I.D. card for in the past!
November 8 - 21; 1997
Location: One Card Office
ECU Student Stores, Wright Building
Monday -Thursday
9:00 am - 12 noon & 1:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Friday
9:00 am - 12 noon & 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saturday, November 8, 1997 ONLY
10:00 am- 3:00 pm
NOTE: Thursday, Nov. 13 & Wednesday, Nov. 19
are for STAFFFACULTY ONLY
To produce your new identification card you must bring with you:
Current ECU ID card or Driver's license oni social security card
Questions should be directed to the ECU One Card System Office, 328-201 5, located inside Dowdy Student Stores,Wright Building,
or visit our web site linked from "Business Services" on the ECU home page: http:www.ecu.edu.
� "4f ��.





r
i"n�i
The East Carolinian
news
Tuesday, November 4, 1997
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS VI LAW
College enrollment slightly up in Iowa
Truth,Equality,Justice
123 WSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
tobacco Ha$t�T
A f V. "11 Tobacco &
8t Calllp Herbal pipes
Body
Piercing
BYKRtSTEN
(OVER 8 YEARS EXPERIENCE)
Call for Appointment 561-7473
Also:
Blacklight Room,
Herbal Teas,
Detox products and
Sativah Herbal Smoking Blends
PRICE LIST
NAVEL
NOSTKIl
EAWCAXTLEDGE
ertnow
TONCVE
LABKETUP
NIPPLE
SEPTUM 7
SPECIAL V&i'
t3.K
S39.9S
139.9S
139.95
157.95
J5J.95
S469S
S46.9S
175 a UP
ecstacy
' a revolutionary alternative
that is taking the nation by storm"
-CMN nightly Mews
429 S Evans Street Mail
561-PIK(7473)
Hours; Monday-Saturday
1-9PM
Women account for 56
percent of students
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) College enrollment
is up slightly in Iowa, with women now
accounting for 56 percent of the students.
Enrollment at Iowa's three regent
universities plus the community colleges and
the two- and four-year private colleges was
180,569 this fall, according to figures compiled
at the University of Iowa for the Iowa
Coordinating Council on Post-High School
Education. That's up 2,346 from last year, or
about 1.3 percent.
Of the total, 98,314 are women, compared to
78,151 men. In Iowa, all but 10 schools have
more women than men. Graceland College in
Lamoni has 81 percent women, the highest ratio
in the state. Other colleges with women
accounting for at least two-thirds of the
students are Mount Mercy in Cedar Rapids,
Marycrest in Davenport, Briar Cliff in Sioux City
and Clarke in Dubuque.
Westmar University of LeMars has the lowest
percentage of women students, 39 percent.
Other schools with fewer than 47 percent
women are the University of Dubuque
(including divinity students), Maharishi in
Fairfield, William Penn in Oskaloosa and Waldorf
in Forest City.
There are several theories for this growing
gender gap. Some argue that men have more
opportunities without a college degree. Also,
men are more likely to enlist in the military than
women. And women, who have a slight numbers
edge in the general population, tend to be more
qualified for college than men, since they
emerge from high school with better academic
records.
In general enrollment trends, there wasn't
much change in the regent universities, wfijre
66,363 were enrolled this fall. That's an increase
of about one percent. � -
Another 60,620 are enrolled at commurflr
colleges, an increase of about 2 percent.
Kirkwood in Cedar Rapids is now the largest
of the community college group, thanks to a five
percent boost, up to 11,164 students. The
previous enrollment leader, Des Moines .Area,
has 10,720 students, which is no change from
last year.
Among private schools, the biggest
percentage boost came at a tiny bible college.
Vennard, of University Park, was shut down two
years ago and all of its assets were sold. Alumni
bought the place and started it up again last fall.
This fall's enrollment of 82 is more than
double last year's enrollment.
William Penn, of Oskaloosa, had a 33 percent
enrollment boost, thanks to the school's new
College for Working Adults.
Substation
continued from page 1
who go downtown after hours.
"If you are going to drink, drink
responsibly, so you stay in control of
yourself said Umphlet. According
to Umphlet, drinking causes
people tf 'do things they wouldn't
normallv do, like walk home alone
in dark areas. If you go out, let
somebody know where you are
going and when you will be back
Putting faith in the human
body's ability to sense danger is one
of the best ways to prevent
compromising situations.
'Trust your instincts said
Umphlet. "If something doesn't
feel right, react. Go to a blue light
phone and ask an officer to meet
you
Rape
continued from page 1
"We are trying out a support
group for the latter phases of rape
victims; mostly group work, the
victims have to be ready for this
kind of therapy said Roeder.
"The group is screened first, and it
is very therapeutic. We never push
them to change, but we do explore
those options. We have to support
the student
It was unknown whether the
Oct. 23 incident was alcohol or
drug related, but the incident
involved two acquaintances.
"Most of the time it is an
acquaintance; it's not the guy in
the bushes. So you trust them,
making it even more of a
violation said Roeder.
"On any campus there are
unfortunate situations. But here at
ECU I don't think that there is a
problem. In the paper it said there
were rumors of a rapist, but I don't
think it has gotten that severe
Roeder said.
onnection
Division a iSQS
NOW LOCATED IN
ARLINGTON VILLAGE
Quality clothing for men and ivomen
We casvt aAwrtise, tuunM, brajuls.
Com& Uv asulyouLL r&coqnlz�s them
MonSat. 10-6
Sunday 1-5
355-1644
$WVf
Tattooing &
jJr-s Body Piercing
10 off all
Body Piercing
with Student ID
Expires: 113097
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
4685 Suite A US Hwy 13 Greenville NC
GREENVILLE AUTO REPAIR INC.
ALL TYPES OF AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
�Major & Minor Repairs
�Manual Transmissions
�Brakes, Tires & Batteries
�Free Towing With
Major Repair
627 S.Clarke DO A C404
Greenville OOU-O I O 1
-Clutches
Tune-Ups
10 off with
college ID
Go ahead and mate reservations lor Homecomina
Dfi
rooms aval ab e
lues tuesday
UUirt Sj lii
Bare far:
r
658 east arlington blvd 355-1111
Time For SGA
Bi-Annval
Funding A gain
For SubrruttingfRequests for
SGA Bi-Annua Funding for
Spring '98 is
� November 14fh, 5:00 RM.
Please submit your request to
the SGA. office - Room 225
Mendenhall student center.
(any requests after this date will not be considered.)
In orcjer to be eligible to recieve fund-
ing, organizations must have an
ECUSGA recognized constitution
For Further Questions
Concerning Funding, Contact Alan Stancill, SGA Co-
Chairman of the Appropriations Committe at 328-7944

2
'm � m "� �
���
' T
V





�RH
������
4 Tuesday. November 4. 1997
comics
East Carolinian
France
u �AW'
Mil
fael Santos
�'
�lt)�
iwViWWAAl
c?
cj 7
"S&HER.
httsnrac
BYATIDRt QCRMAli
WE'VE FORGOTTEN
ABOUT OUR PASTL
ABOUT OUR MASldV
THIS "MAGIC" WAS
OUR DOWNFALL.
AND I PLAN TO
PREVENT IT
LIGHTNING
MAGIC?
HOW COULD
HE HAVE-
LEMME GO.
YOU FREAld
WHERE RE
YOU TAKIN"
ME?
; TIME FOR
US TO GO,
WYNNE
HOME,
WNNEl
BACK WHERE
YOU BELONG.
'iov8"feopyHght'(e) i99? Andre Germain
htts-Jwww.maion-otaku.net-xellotnlcbw9sJ
Moral of the story
Never turn your back
on the badguy
Cyber bunny: Hare for Hire
-ISSUE O 2 ALPHA BOLD-
RMAU.Y ACQUAINT
Or THE STORY
DREAM GIRL
DOCTOR WOOL
MR BLUE MINOTAUR
GARDNER WYNNS
RA-LL.
CB'
BATTLE
COMPUTER
FHrENO AMD SIDEKICK
OF CYBER BUNNY WHO
IAS AN UNCANNY
K FOR BEING
AT THE WRONG
r V PLACE AT
THE WRONG TIME
OING THE
CYBER BUNNY A
STAR OF THIS COMIC
AND A CYBERNETIC
BOUNTY HUNTER ON A
MISSION TO SAVE GIRL
Cat.QRSODE
.ws-wr
3.14 KABtAT 0KM.0
3,u.vw
fi.�EN�UOU�
10.HOitN sctuan
Princess Starbright
Chris Walker
j OV fr TeUSDAy
ACROSS
1 Food fish
S Male voice
9 Vend.
13 Roof overhang
14 Marble
16 Nobelst�
Wiesei
17 Always
18 Swiss singer's
sound
19 Title
20 Earns
22 A Roosevelt
24 Containers
26 Time gone by
27 Appointees
31 Sum
36 Gardner the
actress
36 Depots: abbr.
37 Wear away
gradually
38 Light touches
40 Come In
43 Greek portico
44 Detroit lemon
46 Serves
48 Sea eagle
49 Christopher �
of films
50 Noon and six,
perhaps
52 Ms. Kett of the
comics
54 Colored
55 Letter opener
58 Lecture
62 Sally of the
space program
63 Part of TNT
66 Telephone code
67 War god
68 Slowpoke
69 Fuzz
70 Fancy dude
71 Television
award
72 Fulfill
O 1997 Tribune Media Service Inc.
Ail nghu mwrvad.
Answers from Thursday
aEEnlLAKERjMARs
0LLA0L1VEA0UT
0MITTONEsEASE
SA1NTEoMp0 ASTER
0N ESGOT
cANNE RsENTR1ES
EL1S V0KED0RCH
D1GGASAL1
ACHEBiTESlSNAP
RETR1EVEADM1TS
URGE� cL10
PEPPEp.m qLUNTED
E01TiD10T1M1Es
T1NEM0RsEERSE
SEEDENDE0�EIN
DOWN
1 Appear
2 Possess
3 Say positively
4 Infer
5 Massachusetts
6 Long, long �
7 Unhappy
8 Brews tea
9 Washington
VIPs
10 Verve
11 Luxury car
12 Villain's look
15 A Fitzgerald
21 Labels
23 Italian noble
family
25 Muslal or Laurel
27 Librarian's tool
28 Escape
29 Oversight
30 � Lauder
32 Tribal emblem
33 Love greatly
34 Tilts
39 Most harsh
41 Mild exclamation
42 Rotundly fat
45 Allows
47 Suffix with ham
or gag
50 Seagoer
51 Perfect goals
53 Containers
55 Tow
56 Ireland
57 Mideast gulf
59 Diva's song
60 Penny
61 Detest
64 Flat cap
65 Edge
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DW1, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
VISA
MY ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIP
PUT ME IN THE HOSPITAL LAST SUMMER.
Army ROTC scholar- Army hospital,
ships pay off twice, with Hundreds of nursing
money toward your edu- students win Army ROTC
cation and five rffADERSHJgi scholarships every
weeks of nursing Pj year. You can, too.
experience in an jr n APPtynow!
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE YOU CAN TAKE
For details, vi jit 346 Rawl Building, or call
Captain Michael Drake at 328-69676974.
HIHB
p
ri
THURS. - SAT NOVEMBER 6 - 8
All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted
and are free to students, faculty, and staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
Sroticlzirm
�"3-1
i 4
� m at
"THIS SUMMER'S NUMBER
ONE JOY RIDE!
A PLAYFULLY HIP AND
HILARIOUS COMEDY
MR JONES MR.SMITH
MEN
BLACK
Admission
ECU Students, Faculty, and Staff
Free advance tickets available upon
presentation of valid ECU ID at Mendenhal
Student Center Central Ticket Office
Public
$3.00 in advance, $5.00 at the door
BRINGING BACK THE FUN
Monday, November 10,1997,8:30 pm
Hendrix Theater
Merxtenhall Student Center
Thursday, November 6,1997
tm 1 PIRATE UNDERGROUND
�' ��� Lw naiIii Pt. . Ji r���. P��l nnr� O m-K nm
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room, 8 -10:45 pm
Miriam Tyson
Balance
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE UVE MUSIC, PEZA, & REFRESHMENTS
Relationships in the 90s.
t Mission Impossible?
I Wednesday, November 19,1997,8:00 pm
Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall Student Center
sJf4f Host: Dwayne Featuring: Fabian
For further info, about becoming a panelist, contact: chwayneshow@hotmail.com.
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
��� 'I II'
4 in) itiii �� t





B��or�
pays to
DISCOVER
bOll 0000 0000 0000
UH
Accepted where you see i
to apply onime. go to www.discovercard.CQm
�1937 Greenwood Trusl Company Member FDIC 'Up to 1 puid yearly based on annual level of purchases.
1

�iiiii i. �i
�'f1!
ILL ' '





6 Tuesday, November 4, 1997
opinion
eastfcarolinian
AMY L.ROVSTER EditOf
CELESTE WILSON Managing Edmx
MATT HEGE Adv�msinj DitKiM
AMANDA AUSTIN Nmk Edno.
Jacqueline D. Kellum Am Km Ediw
ANDY TURNER tihjiffc Ediiw
JOHN DAVIS Asssuni Uhiiyli Edna
AMANDA ROSS Sports EliiHX
TRACY Laubach AsisumSporaEdirai
CAROLE MEHLE Htad Cooy Editor
John murphy Suffiitusttaw
HEATHER BURGESS Wire Editor
Serai it ECU emmm m �& � be tmttw aatWat I10OJ ewes nor mwiTlm&i.VmmStfaiiNluaitlBmritki
'mm f Kit EM Bart. H� Em Cmtmm MklMa Mna �� M ��. tMM lo 2S0 anitfL ���� nw �� ���l �� ����� Of tnMy Tka E�t
tmfrwmm&a&mx1mn tKmiLUmmiimilMmmMimuntlK.wimttoBimlm
CmMM. hUcWW Mfcl. ECU &M. M6M3S f� iiImhiij . at W.3M S36S
oumew
The cooler temperatures and changing leaves don't just signify a change in the weather, but also
a change in local politics.
Today is jhe day to make your voice heard and make changes in the things you may believe
are wrong with the local political policies. It is your time to vote and make a difference.
Local officials say the voter turnout is always low, but doesn't it seem opinions are always
high? Everyone has a voice and we use it to complain about what is wrong, but when we have
the chance to make something right, we don't. Why is that?
We should feel privileged we don't have the government views forced down our throats like
many countries around the world. As a citizen of this county, state and country, we can make a
difference in our futures.
It is so important to exercise the right we each have been given. The local races have been
very heated this year, and wouldn't it be nice to show the candidates that we have been listening
to them and all the time they have spent on campaigning hasn't been wasted?
A better future starts today with your vote. It takes very little time and the only thing you
have to do is to find out where you can vote, then it's all up to you.
And if you don't think local politics affects you, then you are wrong. As a student and living
in Greenville anything that is local is directly related to you. Don't you want to have a say in
what the city of Greenville does for you?
If you say your vote doesn't matter, just imagine if everyone said that. Talk about a low voter
turnout. Whether you believe it or not, you do make a difference. As an adult, it is important
you start to make choices in your life and that means what kind of political stand you choose to
take.
Ask yourself what opinions you believe in? Are you republican or democrat? What do you
stand for and believe in? Does anyone feel the same way about issues as you do? If you look into
the candidates views, there is a great chance there is a candidate out there you can relate with.
So after all this, what can you do to make a difference? That's right; vote. Let everyone know
that you won't be pushed around and you want to make a difference.
OPINION
William Stacey
COCHRAN
Columnist
Do away with required English courses
believe English 1100 and
1200 should be offered just as
Biology 1100 and 1200are
offered for students looking to
fulfill their science
requirements � as electives.
you are an ECU student then you
have or will encounter English 1100
and 1200. In fact, they are two of
only three required courses that all
ECU students must take. The
general idea is that the courses
foster basic college writing skills and
personal growth of the young
college student.
This is all well and fine.
However, when other departments
criticize the English department for
not teaching a biology major how to
write a biology paper or a business
major a business annotated paper,
then guilt is being placed unduly.
The English department goes
above and beyond the normal
expectations of a university
department. The idea of cross-
curriculum writing developed from
dedicated English professors who
saw a need to foster writing in all
departments.
It was readily approved by
department heads campuswide, and
I think rightfully so. These
department administrators saw a
need to teach writing within their
respective departments. Out of this
developed writing intensive courses
and the requirement for every ECU
student to take at least one writing
intensive course within his or her
major.
It is time to go a step farther, it is
time for change.
I think in the highly specialized
world that is 1997 the requirement
of taking a general writing course
should be done away with. The
responsibility of teaching a nursing
major how to write a nursing paper
should be placed on the school of
nursing, a political science paper on
the political science department,
etc.
I believe English 1100 and 1200
should be offered just as Biology
1100 and 1200 are offered for
students looking to fulfill their
science requirements � as
electives. The pressure of requiring
a student to take a specific
composition course restricts the
freedom of such a student and
places an undue responsibility on
the English department
administration.
Instead, students should be
required to take two writing
intensive courses within their
majors early in their college careers.
As it is, the writing intensive courses
that students are required to take
within their respective majors are
usually put off until the end of their
tenure at ECU.
By requiring college freshmen to
take two basic writing courses
within th :ir majors and by
dissolving the requirement to take
the two specific English courses
(1100 and 1200), students would
learn how to write within their
majors earlier. Furthermore, what
has become a bit of a burden on the
English department could become a
more efficient, free, system of
study.
to the Editor
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
Columnist
Decide carefully as ballots are cast
Just ask yourself" What will the
challenger do for me?
What has the incumbent done
to or for me?" Two simple
questions should lead
you to the proper decision.
Today is the day � election day,
that is. Election day for the
Greenville city council. Please cast
your vote for the- candidate who you
think most represents your views.
To help with my decision in
casting my vote, I went to the forum
last Tuesday. The forum, a type of
debate, was held by the League of
Women Voters. Candidates were
asked questions supplied by the
audience or called in by those
watching on the Government
Channel at home.
Candidates were asked about
their top three concerns for
Greenville. Of course, most said
crime and drugs were among their
top three. I have never known a
politician who did not think crime
and drugs were a problem. No
candidate wants to appear soft on
either issue; it is political suicide.
The problem with the crime
issue is most candidates' solutions
for the problem. More police seems
to be the prevalent idea. I have a big
problem with more police; it is a
reactive idea. Proactive ideas, such
as community involvement and
greater neighborhood interactivity,
are proven to work better.
Other concerns brought up by
both incumbents and council
members were city growth, parking
and traffic, taxes and sidewalksbike
paths. City growth is phenomenal
and needs to be addressed.
The traffic problem has not been
addressed by the current city
council. Anybody that has driven in
this town on during a football home
game or rush hour knows how hectic
the traffic can be.
The parking problem �
especially in the downtown area and
ECU's vicinity � was addressed by
both candidates for city council in
District 3, Inez Fridley and Steve
McLawhorn. This is of no surprise,
considering finding a parking space
in District 3 isabout the same as
finding a cab on Halloween. ,
Sidewalks and bike paths' were'
another hot topic. All incumbents
and challengers were in favor of
building new sidewalks and bike
paths. The problem will be where
to find the money to fund these
enterprising ideas. Everyone
participating in the debate
preached government frugality, so it
will be interesting where, when and
how the sidewalks and bike paths
will be built.
Of concern to me, but not
addressed in the forum, was
maintenance of roads, especially
those surrounding ECU between
First and Fifth Street. Work has
been done on some of these roads
and instead of repaying them, gravel
and dirt was placed in the holes.
One of these gravel-laden potholes
has existed for three months. I have
gradually watched the gravel get
tossed by vehicles up and down the
road.
As a reminder, some of you might
find yourselves in new districts this
year. The city council redrew �
gerrymandered, depending on your
view point � campus and
surrounding area, which is now split
among four districts. So if you do
not know which district you are in or
where to vote, call the Pitt County
Board of Elections at 830-4121.
I would like to sell you who 'to
vote for, but that decision is up'to
you. I do encourage you, if you have
any questions, to call you
respective council member and
challenger. Put them on the spot;
ask them any questions.
Just ask yourself "What will the
challenger do for me? What has the
incumbent done to or for me?" Two
simple questions should lead you to
the proper decision. Today is the
day you decide whether we need a
city council with an average age of
60 or a one with a more youthful
appearance and ideas.
to the Editor
Elections full of campaign coincidences
I have worked on several campaigns
and I have never witnessed the
amount of sign theft that has
occurred against several challengers
running for city council. The
removal or destruction of a
challenger's signs from roadways
and yards seems systematic and
thorough.
Isn't it amazing that Steve
McLawhorn, Arriell Morris and Jack
Wall lost hundreds of signs during
the same 48-hour period? Isn't it
another amazing coincidence that
their challengers Inez Fridley, Mary
Alsentzer and Chuck Autry had
minimal sign damage during the
same 48-hour period? Isn't it an
AMAZING coincidence that the
incumbents' signs that were
standing right next to the
challengers' were left untouched?
Isn't it an amazing coincidence that
Inez Fridlcy's supporters report the
loss of only one sign? One last
amazing coincidence is that Fridley
and Alsentzer are strong allies on
the council.
This year's elections are just
chock full of amazing coincidences.
But I'm sure we all should believe
that either one deranged individual
or group of deranged individuals,
without any political affiliations,
decided to take hundreds of signs
for their home decor and yard sign
stake needs.
Of course, there would not be
any machine politics or dirty politics
going on here! Greenville, after all, is
nothing like Chicago or New York or
even Lousiana. We are a big city
with a small town heart. We would
never put up with such behavior
from the supporters of incumbents.
If anything like that were going on,
I'm sure that the good people of
Greenville would vote these
candidates right out of office during
the next election.
Amy Bass
Greenville
Desecration of truth worse than flag burning LETTER
to the Editor
Jeff Day's column on flagburning
in the Oct. 28 edition of The East
Carolinian reads like a Pentagon
propaganda statement.
His one-sided and single-
minded interpretation of American
military involvement in the 20th
century is grossly distorted. The
column states that the United
States has saved the world from
tyranny three times in this century,
referring to the two world wars and
the Cold War. However, any
historian knows that World War I
-was the result of increasing
nationalism and the formation of
large military alliances. I fail to see
how it was the product of what Day
calls "the dark hand of tyranny
In World War II, it is certainly
true that the Nazis were a form of
fascist tyranny, but the atrocities
placed on the German people by the
treaty that ended the first World
War, paved the way for the fascist
dictator. This treaty was drawn up
by the Allied powers, including the
U.S. Also it must be remembered
that the U.S. did not fully enter the
war until it was upon her doorstep.
If America was so concerned with
triumphing over the "evil" empires
that were emerging, then why the
wait? Perhaps because the
conquests of the Germans and the
Japanese shared resemblance to the
early conquests of another
"empire � U.S. "conquests
including the Spanish American War
and the deportation of native
Americans are not buried so far back
in our history.
The column also attributes the
U.S. alone for the collapse of
communism in the former Soviet
Union. Day fails to see that the
failure of communism is the result
of the unrealistic idealism of
communism itself. Human nature is
more to blame for the self-
destruction of communism than any
apocalyptic military build-up.
I warn the citizens of any
political system of the the dangers
of blind faith in the actions of their
government. The column fails to
mention the Vietnam "police
action which despite strong public
outrage, continued for over a
decade. Tyranny comes in many
disguises, therefore critical analysis
of government and history is
imperative to ensure the public
good. I, too, am disgusted by the
desecration of the American flag,
however, I find the desecration of
the American truth a far more
dangerous matter.
Greg Pattison
Sophomore
ECU Mice officers need policing
The actions of our outstanding
ECU Police Department should be
applauded for the removal of a
waving Pirate flag from the hands of
a child. Congratulations to Officer
William C. Peebles for doing his job!
You have represented ECU's Public
Safety with bells and whistles!
Protecting Pirate fans from such
vagrancy deserves high appraisal
from ECU's top officials. In essence,
I'm just thrilled to see that our ECU
policemen can gain such pleasure by
putting fear into a small child and
adding insult by roughing up the
child's father.
Wake up, ECU Public Safety!
Pirate fans are simply trying to enjoy
ourselves by showing school spirit at
an outing in which the student body,
alumni and other faithful Pirate fans
are encouraged to attend. Now let's
relive the moment a few years ago
when the Pirates played Syracuse on
the Thursday night ESPN game.
Yes, that was an ugly situation. Every
camera covering the game focused
on the fight among angry Pirate fans
instead of the game. I now question
Officer Peebles; what if your face
would have been the focus on
national TV while you (the arresting
officer) shoved a handcuffed ECU
alumni down the conciete stairs in
Dowdy Ficklen Stadium in front of
his crying child? Think about that
situation, Officer Peebles; would
you then have remorse for what you
did or would you still believe your
actions were justified? Couldn't you
have just politely asked the child or
the child's father to not wave the
flag, instead of forcefully removing it
from the child's hand? Let's not
forget when you seemingly threaten
a man's innocent child, you're
threatening a part of the man
himself. Unfortunately, this incident
will probably go remotely
unnoticed. Don't forget we are
dealing with the ECU Police, and
most of the time those same police
officers figure out a way to make
their actions justified.
ECU's Public Safety should not
only apologize to the family of
Michael Radford (president of the
Wilson County Pirate Club), but to
all fans who attended the ECU-
Southern Miss Homecoming game.
GAIN OUR RESPECT BY
SHOWING YOURS!
Stephen Moody
Graduate Student
Business Education
" ��
����"����
mppi�a'if'i
Tf

���





I
Do it for ECU
Or for a portable CD player, whichever Routs your boat.
Send us your idea, (or a new ECU logo
before our Nov. 18 deadline.
The administration has said they re
looking for a new university sym-
bol something other than PeeDee Pirate. pkk
We at The East Carolinian would like to son a portable CD player. Then well run
help them in their deliberations. all of serious logos we receive in the Dec-
A issue of the paper and on our website at
www.studentmedU.ecu.edu.
Here s your big chance to help the ECU
administration and show your school
spirit (or how badly you really wmt a
portable CD player).
3ringyour entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
:�
5
Vutonyour
thinking cap
send us
logo idea
, t





- . I ��� II
8 Tuesday, November 4, 1997
ifestvk
John Davis
n assistant lifestyle editor
4
Early this year, philosophy major
Laura Boyd sparked controversy on
campus by writing a letter to the
editor of The East Carolinian. Upset
that the Student Recreation Center
was, from time to time, broadcasting
�ontemporary Christian music, she
called for such activity to stop,
citing, among other things, the
"separation of church and state"
clause in the Bill of Rights.
- The Rec Center subscribes to a
digital satellite system that offers a
variety of commercial free music
channels. One of these channels is
the gospel station Boyd heard while
working out. Boyd confronted the
student in the Rec Center
responsible, asking him to change
die channel.
X, "He did change the music, but
when he didn't seem to understand
that it was unconstitutional, I
decided to write the letter Boyd
said in an interview last week.
Over the next several weeks,
many students wrote letters of
protest and agreement about the
issue. While quite a few letter
waters supported Boyd, many also
disagreed with her, claiming she
supported censorship.
�- Boyd said she had no idea that
this would turn into such a big issue.
I was interested in the
Constitutionality of the Rec Center
playing music. I'm not bashing
Christian music After researching
several court cases for legal
precedent, Boyd noticed that there
were no laws concerning religious
music. Boyd feels that, since the
university is a state institution, no
religious music should be promoted
by the state. "The school shouldn't
even be funding the gospel choir
she said.
University Attorney Ben Irons
said that Boyd "has a point. She
should not be compelled to listen to
music promoting a particular
religious point of view Irons was
careful to point out that the
University is not anti-Chrisitan
though. "The University must be
careful not to allow music which
mocks or ridicules the beliefs of
persons of faith
i Irons contacted the SRC, and
spoke with them. "I believe the staff
is pursuing the goal of neutrality he
SSlu.
TIPS FOR WRESTLING
BEGINNERS:
1. Make a party of it. All the
humor comes from the
announcers' comments and the
comments of you and your friends.
With no one around, there's little
humor.
2. Have at least one long-time
wrestling fan present. Just like
diving into a long-running soap or
TV show for the first time, it's
easy to get lost. You won't know
who hates who, who does what or
who's good and bad. The first time
you see Sting fly down from the
rafters you'll be lost without a
little guidance.
3. Keep an open mind. It takes
time to get a complete
understanding of it all. Don't be
afraid to ask questions. This also
means not being afarid to get
involved. Being a wrestling fan is
not a spectator sport. No one will
make fun of you.Jeast not to your
face.
4. Try to keep up. It's easy to get
confused or lost, especially for a
beginner. If you get lost or if you
want behind the scenes info, try
calling Talking Fingers. It's a free,
automated service provided by the
phone company. Call 758-8900
and punch in 2074 when it asks
for your choice. This is the
wrestling rap It provides info on
upcoming happenings and lets you
in on who's really hurt or mad.
Professional wrestling:
The male soap opera
Pat Reid
SENIOR WRITER
So, you finally got the guts to read the
article on wrestling, eh? Or is it just that
no one's around to see you? Either way,
you should be ashamed no more. Wrestling
has become big business and has gained
never before experienced popularity as
well. Every Monday night, millions of
households tune in to one of the two
premier wrestling shows, WWF Monday
Night Raw or WCW Monday Night Nitro,
and for good reason. Today's professional
wrestling takes soap opera type plots and
wraps them in a package of pyrotechnics,
loud music and wonderful choreography to
make it well worth watching. Of course, it
helps to not watch it as a sport, but rather
as an entertainment medium.
For me, interest in pro wrestling first
started around the time of Wrestlemania
III. That's when I saw Randy "Macho
Man" Savage (the Slim Jim guy) beat the
living daylights out of Ricky "The Dragon"
Steamboat. That was- the first time I
realized this is funny stuff.
Shortly after, though, wrestling became
too hung up on pay-per-view. In order to
see a decent match involving a big name
player (in particular Hulk Hogan) you had
to get the next pay-per-view. Ratings
plummeted and the industry knew it was
in trouble. That's when Vince McMahon,
owner and announcer of the World
Wrestling Ferderation, or WWF for short,
got the idea of a live Monday show with
big name talent in big matches. The show,
called Raw, was a great success, but
McMahon (who by the way is an ECU
Alumi) soon got lazy and started taping
the show with mediocre matches
dominating the bill once again.
This is when Ted Turner, owner of
World Championship Wrestling, or WCW
for short, saw a key idea being wasted and
developed his own Monday night show.
Nitro premiered on Labor Day 1995, and
immediately rocketed to the top of
wrestling shows. In the two years since,
Nitro has caused Raw to go back to a live
You got a purty head. Chief Wahoo McDaniel and Abdullah the Butcher get in touch with their sexuality.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF WWF ANO WCW
broadcast in order to compete. Still, Turner has
forced McMahon against the ropes as the nearly
bankrupt WWF is struggling to keep up with
Turner's millions.
So, what makes one better than the other? The
easy answer is big names. WCW is home to old
favorites like Rowdy "Roddy" Piper, Hulk Hogan,
"Nature Boy" Ric Flair and Arn Anderson before
his recent retirement. Add in the popular new
talent like Kevin Nash (formerly Diesel), Scott
Hall (Formerly Razor Ramon), Lex Luger and the
ever popular Sting, and you have a line-up that
can't lose. The WWF's biggest draws, Shawn
Michaels, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, Bret Hart
and The Undertaker, are all too young to compete
with the old favorties. Plus, the WWF simply
doesn't have the number of stars that the WCW
does.
But more than that, the WCWs success can be
contributed to the New World Order (NWO). Stay
with me here, this gets complicated. In 1996, Scott
Hall showed up for the first time in the WCW after
leaving the WWF, but he didn't wrestle. Instead he
SEE PRO. PAGE 9
Who are these
scary people
anyway?
81S .ad"S. AuiUJir (S SB t!U (t sapoMu Msnq (� ub!�a �uew ajBooAA ai6oog am. Atuiuir (Z rumaseu uoa uojea U :sjomsuv
How did
you do?
score Social
standing
1 Jerry
2 Elaine
3 George
4 Kramer
5 Newman
?v
concertr
Juicebaby, Greenville's new squeeze:
?
7
JENNIFER LEGOETT
STAFF WRITER
Being able to review bands both new and
5 established that come through
Greenville is definitely a
privilege. Seven out of ten
times I may be disappointed
by what I have to listen to, but
when I finally stumble upon
- something worth seeing again,
it's great to be able to let
people know.
Local act Juicebaby is one
such band. Even after a
; scheduling confusion due to
the cancellation of John
' Thursday, who billed
Juicebaby as their opening
band, they took the stage last
Thursday at Peasant's to kick
out a powerful, funky, forty-
five minute set. The lineup
includes Jon Gott with lead
vocals, Jon Lauterer on guitar
and accompanying vocals,
Randy Miller on bass and
Dallas Owenby on drums.
� All four originally hail from
Asheville and met in high school. But, because
half of the band was at ECU and the other half
at Western Carolina, Juicebaby was not
officially together until this past May when
Gott and Owenby relocated to Greenville.
Three weeks later, they made a demo and
started plaving shows around Greenville and in
Chapel Hill.
Pull my finger.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JUICEBABY
What they discovered, however, is that
unless you have a booking agent, it is really
hard to get club dates. But you need money to
have a booking agent. You can't get money
unless you play clubs or parties, and you can't
do either of those things unless you have a
booking agent who can get you into the clubs
where people can see your band and want to
have you at their party.
Whew!
The best thing about
Juicebaby is that their
songs are short. With the
almost non-existent
attention span of twenty-
something age people, the
best thing a band can do is,
cut the jamming to a
minimum. If you put
Johnny Quest (for you old-
timers like me who have
been in college long
enough to remember this
band that broke up four
years ago), Red Hot Chili
Peppers (in their early
years before they became
cheezified), and 311 into a
tornado, you would get
Juicebaby's refreshingly
non-generic sound.
Juicebaby cranked out the
beats with minimal dead
air between songs.
The music was see JUICE, page 9
ratlin
This is not a rant. The goal: to write
complete sentences and hopefully to
make some sort of point. Just
another ass with an opinion
Censorship, 1, freedom, 0
Edwin McCain is new and improved
pat Reid
SENIOR WRITER
Edwin McCain is no stranger to
Greenville. After playing the Attic
to help get his start, he has
returned often, once to headline
Barefoot on the Mall. Still, the
Edwin that played the Attic last
Thursday is not the same Edwin of
shows past.
The first four times I saw
McCain live, I was unimpressed.
He talked too much, his sound was
weak and, try as he might, he
couldn't work a crowd. That was
two years ago. A couple of months
ago I saw him again as part of a
double-bill with fellow South
Carolinians Cravin' Melon, and I
was shocked. Apparently, tours
with the Allman Brothers and
Lynyrd Skynyrd, as well as various
other stints, allowed McCain the
chance the grow and learn. Now,
supporting his new album
Misguided Roses, McCain appeared
older and wiser, with a confidence
that wasn't there before. So, to
make sure this show wasn't a fluke,
I ventured down to the Attic ready
to give McCain a chance at
redemption.
After a brief opening set by
Matthew Ryan (not the scheduled
Fighting Gravity), McCain came
out and kicked it all off with "I've
Got to Stop Thinking About That"
from his new album. The crowd
was into it, and McCain was
displaying the same confidence he
had the last time I saw him.
Somewhere along the way he had
improved as a musician and a
showman. By the end of the song,
the crowd was eating out of his
hand.
The problem with the new
McCain was an inbalance between
old and new songs. Obviously,
McCain is either really proud of
Roses or else he's desperate to sell
SEE EDWIN PAGE 9
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The price of freedom is eternal
vigilance. I had this mental picture of
Laura Boyd as this evil Nazi hag,
cackling over her steamy cauldron of
newt's eyes and frog legs. When I
actually talked to her, I discovered that
she was a normal girl, actually kind of
charming and sweet. She didn't have it
in for people of faith, she's just
defending the law as she sees it. And
that's ok, isn't it?
Or is that what vigilance means? If
danger to freedom were as easy to
identify as the heavy breathing and
dark voice of Darth Vader, there'd be
no need for good old Obi Wan.
Remember, Darth Vader used to be
Anakin Skywalker, savior of the galaxy
before the Emperor got to him. Evil
makes a business out of being hard to
spot. Remember how many people
voted for Nixon? Remember how
popular Hitler was in Germany?
Not that I think Laura is evil. Like I
said, she seemed like a nice girl. But
it's the nice girls we have to watch out
for. The openly bad ones won't get
much done. It's the people who
promote a harmful cause, all the while
believing they're fighting for what's
good, that are trouble. That's why the
mall preacher who calls down fire and
brimstone on us all each year as we
walk to class is so hard to get rid of. He
thinks he's doing God a favor.
To Miss Boyd I say, "Don't do me no
favors, lady Censorship is bad. It's
one of those small steps with which
the road to hell is paved. Every time
we let someone use anything, even our
own laws, to snatch our freedom from
us, we've lost another battle. There's
Every time we
let someone use
anything, even
our own laws, to
snatch our
freedomfrom
us, we've lost
another battle.
no solid line
between music
that deals with
religion in a
manner
acceptable to
the University
and music that
doesn't. All
music has
something
dangerous in it.
Well, except
Musak. That's
pretty safe. The
road to Musak is paved with letters to
the Editor.
The worst part about this whole
sordid story is that yours truly is too big
a player to go ignored. Before my call
to him, University .Attorney Ben Irons
had no clue about the goings on down
at the Rec Center. After my call, he
gave them a good talkin' to, and now
they all know that Christian music is
taboo.
This means that, had I refused to
write the article, the Rec Center
would still be free to play whatever
they chose. Because of my actions,
someone has lost freedom. The
saddest thing of all is that I seriously
considered scrapping the article. But,
my editor (God bless her) wanted the
article. I could have said "no could
have let someone else do it or maybe it
wouldn't have been done at all. Is
doing my job more important that the
freedom of others? Is getting a good
story really worth it?
i don't think so. The fathers of our
great nation risked their very lives to
create the freedom we have today. It's
not too much to ask for me to take a
stand in the offices of the school
newspaper. But, I crumbled, and now
SEE AND ON . . . PAGE 9

I t
�� �i. .1 J1UUE1
��





m,
Tlw East Carolinian
lifestyle
Tuesday, Novambar 4. 1997 9
Pro
Wi
f cold weather?
rn your vehicle to Hastings Ford to have it winterized,
vehicle needs the cooling system nusJiedjQlled-ith,
anitfreeze, and the inspection of alt belte and hoses
le cold weather hits.
HASTINGS
r your appointment
758-0114 or 1-800-654-3429
Service �rf P� Mo� - Fri QuaiHsfiMS.
continued from page 8
FORD
said he was there to show the
WCW up and eventually take over
professional wrestling.
Shortly thereafter, he was
joined by Kevin Nash and,
together, they called for the WCW
to put up their best three guys for
a match. Finally, at a pay-per-view,
there was a match pitting Hall and
Nash against Lex Luger, Sting and
Randy Savage. Luger got hurt early
and had to be carried away from
the ring making the fight two-on-
two.
As Hall and Nash looked to be
gaining the advantage, Hulk
Hogan came running out to the
ring ready to help his WCW
compadres out. But, as he got in
the ring, he turned traitor and
attacked Savage instead. With the
combination of Hogan, Hall and
Nash, the NWO was formed.
In the time since, the NWO
has recruited more men and
frequently causes problems for the
WCW on Nitro. With this one
stroke of brilliance, Turner made
good guybad guy wrestling
obsolete. Now there's good guy,
bad guy and NWO. This has
helped push Nitro over the edge
and made the WCW the premier
wrestling organization.
So, what can your girlfriend do
while you're watching wrestling?
After all, wrestling fans are
predominately male, right? This
used to be true, but with the new
popularity of wrestling fans have
sprung up from both sexes. After
THE STUDENT'S CHOICE
JACK WALL
City Council At-Large
Supports ECU Students, Faculty & Staff
Will work to improve parking and traffic
10 years experience serving the citizens of Greenville
VOTE on November 4th
- Graduate, ECU School of Business, 1964
- Former Board of Directors, ECU Pirate Club
Call 321-1996 for a ride, tn the polls!
7 am - 7 pm
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
Juice
continued from page 8
tight and together and it was
evident in every song that these
guys practice and take their music
seriously. But, maybe one of the
all, there are women wrestlers and
women managers. Debra
McMichael, Kimberry, and MiST"
Elizabeth can be seen every week
on Nitro helping their men out
while the WWF boasts such
beauties as Sable, Marlena and
Sunny to bring in viewers.
The key to enjoying wrestling
is to not look at it as guys bearing
each other up, but rather as to
guys acting mad at each other. In
order to feel vindicated, one must
get the best of the other and apply
his "finishing move a particularly
powerful move that will leave the
opponent down for the three
count.
Taking this approach, find a
favorite wrestler and dive into the
wonderful world of wrestling. If,
nothing else, it will give you a little
stress relief on Monday nights.
most important things is that the
all looked like they were having jus i
as much fun as the large crowd. o!
friends that had come out to
support them. These guys wererj
lot of fun. Maybe at their next show
people won't be too shy to dance.
Edwin
continued from page 8
copies. Before it was all said and
done, he had played new songs for
about an hour without going near
Honor AmongThkva, his debut CD.
Finally, the crowd was getting
restless. Some people were getting
lost in songs they didn't know, but
McCain caught on and brought
them back home. "I've gjot to tell
y'all this story about a blind date I
had once proclaimed McCain.
After telling this story of his terrible
blind date with a business-type he
lead the band in "Guinevere Thi
started the flashback version of &�
show with four or five songs fron
Honor Among Thieves.
Finally, after about two hours'
musk, the band left Edwin alor.
on stage. Playing under a lot.
spotlight, McCain then playeu
quiet, heartfelt versions of "3 A.M
and "Sorry To A Friend" to end the
show. m
In all, McCain thoroughly
entertained the crowd and showed
his growth as a musician and
pcrformet I hereby take back ever
bad thing I ever said about McC4
live. Now if he could only pull V
this energy and sound on record
And on
continued from page 8
we have the blessed doctrine of
"neutrality" to govern us. You can
all look forward to the bland-
ineffectual strains of Musak in you
future. Em
But, don't thank Laura Boyd.
Thank me. Thank the grea
protectors of justice and truth, you
own valiant and wonderful new
media. The bad guys won, and w4
helped 'em.
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE!
www.goarmy.com
fc-f rSi Ml Ei�5 KIEiffSi Wiuia a�ii�5 !j�
f wnoraiB
in
Thv Undefeated Best
Place tp Hear Live Mus�c
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
i
Wed Nov. 5' & Thurs Nov. 6
Mike Mesmer "Eyes
"Thm World's Most Powerful Hypnotist" M
ft
ADVANCE TIXAVAR-
A&IEAT
CDAUEY'SKUUY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC
4VI0EO
WASH PUB �ATTIC
Two Big Nights, Two Big Shows!
Friday Nov. 7
Tod Skinnee Jk
special guest:
"Almighty Senators
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE
CD ALLEY'SKUILY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO,
WASH PUB � ATTIC
'
m
r
Saturday Nov. 8'
free admission
vAm Too Skinee J's
ticket stub
i
9 Coming Next Week
E
Cravin Melon
Sat. Nov. 15
Special Guest:
The Ultraviolets
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKULLY'S
EAST COaST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC

jQatin (Dance
From the burroughs of New York to international acclaim, Ballet Hispanico
brings true Latin dance to the stage. Student tickets are available at the CTO
for $10 until 6 p.m. on Nov. 19. Students can see the show for $5 with Clue
Book coupon � page 177. All tickets are $20 at the door.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19 AT 8 PM. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
THE REAXJL.Y BIG SHOW
Men In Black (PG-13) screens in HENDRIX THEATRE ON NOV. 6-8 AT 8 PM.
Your student ID gets you and a guest in for free.
Bandlam
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free in The Pirate Underground
EVERY THURSDAY AT 8 P.M. IN THE MSC SOCIAL ROOM.
This week: Miriam Tyson and Balance
Safe Sex That's Fun, Too
"Eroticizing Safe Sex: Bringing Back the Fun"
A lively lecture by River Huston. Admission is Free for faculty, staff, and
students with a valid ECU ID. One guest permitted per ECU ID.
MONDAY, NOV. 10 AT 8:30 PM. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
WlM i the QcdLf,
Love Makes a Family: Living in Lesbian and Gay Families
Art exhibit will be on display in the MSC Gallery Nov. 10-26
Lane Geonrios
ALL-U-CAN BOWL
Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from
8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just five bucks (includes shoe rental).
Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Give your Monday a boost from 1-6 p.m. with 50-cent bowling
(shoe rental included).
ONE-BUCK BOWLING
Make Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10 frames for just $1
(shoe rental included). $1 games between 1-6 p.m.
MENDENHAli ST
��T HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m � . r
m
s
���
m
m
5
Mi
m
�Mfc

It
'��-
Wiijii uMlJtiUl- JUjJyUjTjJ1UU�� '
TT 4 ������





f"
What's your
favorite?
We're looking for your favorites in
our first Reader's Choice survey.
Just complete the survey form printed
here and drop it by our office or put
it in campus mail to us.
Or point your browser to our website
at wmv.studentmedkecu.edu and fill
out the survey on-line.
Either way you choose, enter only
once. M do it before 5 p.mv Nov. 7.
Once you enter, well throw your name
in with everyone else who responds
and draw out a WINNER at random.
That person will take home a Casio
hand-held color TV. Could winning be
any easier?
Then, look for the Readers Choice
favorites featured in a tabloid special
edition on Tuesday, Nov. 1?.
I the i � �
eastcarohnian
neatie�sc?oue
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. WHEN COMPLETED. CLIP AND SUBMIT TO THE EAST CAROUNIAN
I1
What's the best place to get breakfast after a late night?
What's the best place for lunch between classes?
What's the best place to take a date for dinner?
What's the best place to get a good pizza?
What's the best place to live off-campus?
Who has the best game-day picnic to go?
Whosejriesjtay the hottest all the way home?
What's the best place to buy a kea?
What's the best place to dance all night?
What's the best place to buy CDs?
What's the best place to get a haircut?
What's the best place to park illegally on campus and get
away with it?
What's the best reason to skip class?
What grocery store best fits student's budget?
What's the best place to have your car repaired?
What cab company has the friendliest drivers?
What laundr
Name
Phone
L
J






r
K-
Till Eut Ciroliniin
sports
Tundiy, Novimbtr 4, 1987
Victory second come-from behind win
Defense steals
show in third quarter
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR ,
Being behind in a game is nothing new to the
Pirates. So when they were down 31-14 at the
half against Louisville, they knew they
shouldn't be counted out of the game.
The first half was an offensive showcase
for the Cardinals who rank last in Conference
USA standings, with just one win in a non-
conference game.
ECU got on the board first when Dan
Gonzalez hit Marcellus Harris for the 9-yard
touchdown pass. Louisville answered with a
field goal and a Frank Moreau touchdown
that put the Cards ahead by three, 10-7. The
sec-saw tipped ECU's way when Buck
Collins caught a pass from Gonzalez that
resulted in a 2-yard score. ECU was ahead 14-
10, but net for long. Louisville had the
answer � more Moreau.
Moreau rushed for three more
touchdowns in the second quarter that tied
an NCAA record for most touchdowns in a
quarter with four. Previous to the game,
Moreau had not scored a touchdown all
season.
Down but not out, she Pirates fought back
in the third quarter with defense. For the
second straight game, the ECU defense scored
two touchdowns. Dwight Henry picked off
Chris Redman's pass and rook the ball 98 yards down the
field for the score, pulling ECU within 10 points, 31-21.
Head Coach Steve Logan felt Henry's interception was
the key turning point in the game. �
"Henry's interception was definitely the turning point of
this game Logan said. "Not just because of the
interception, but because he scored
"Whenever you get a big interception like that you fee!
the momentum change Henry said. "But we were still
borderline. We had to go back out there and make another
play
Fellow defensive player Forest Foster did just that, also
picking off Redman's pass for a 13-yard interception and
score.
A Gonzalez 1-yard touchdown run and an Andrew Bayes
Tin Pirates celebrate arter Jason Nichols (no. 1) throws a touchdown to Larry Shannon (no. 80) to seal the ECU victory.
PHOTO BY AMANDA ROSS
25-yard field goal put ECU ahead, 38-31.
But the Pirates knew they needed one more score to seal
the victory. Senior flanker Jason Nichols found Larry
Shannon in the endzone and when it was all said and done
with, ECU completed the victory with 31 unanswered
points.
Logan felt confident that if his team stayed in the game
after falling behind and played hard, they could still pull it
out.
"The only thing I told the kids that had any credibility
was that I didn't know if Louisville could play with a lead
Ixjgan said. "I thought that if we kept up steady pressure
that we might be able to get back in the game
Nichols also became ECU's all time career receptions
leader with 133, after catching four passes for 17 yards. He
surpassed Mitch Galloway who finished with 131 while with
the Pirates from '93-96.
"Coming into the game, I knew I would have my
opportunities with the tight routes we were going to be
running. We were going to throw the ball and use receivers a
lot, so I knew it was only a matter of time Nichols said.
Offensively, the Pirates finished with 283 total yards.
Gonzalez completed 15 passes for 161 yards, with two
touchdowns and two interceptions. Scott Harley netted 82
rushing yards, while Jamie Wilson rushed for 41 yards.
Shannon caught four passes for 83 yards; Collins had 45 yards
and Troy Smith finished with 23 yards.
The Pirates must put this win behind them and prepare
for Houston who hosts ECU this Saturday at 3:30 p.m.
(eastern time.)

HOOP
Men's and women's
basketball season's
set to begin

AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
With the new season right around the corner, it's time to
talk Pirate basketball.
The CAA held its annual media day last week, allowing
the coaches to talk about their upcoming seasons
including Joe Dooley and Anne Donovan, the ECU men's
and women's head coaches.
Rgphae' Edwards, a senior forward, was the Pirates
most productive player last season, leading the team in
scoring (13.2 ppg) and rebounding (6.6 rpg). Edvards
earned second team all-conference honors last year and is
a preseason First learn All-CAA selection for this year.
Edwards finished the season ranked ninth in the CAA in
scoring and was eighth in rebounding.
Dooley's squad returns a core of experienced backcourt
players, with guards Tony Parham and Othello Meadows.
The two seniors have combined to start for 138 games.
Parham, 6-2 guard, has started every game since his
arrival expect for one, averaging 8.5 points last season and
2.7 assists per game. Meadows, 6-3 guard, has ranked first
or second in the CAA in three point percentage each of
the past two season and average 10.1 points last year.
Dooley believes the seniors will the backbone to this
team.
The seniors will provide a type of leadership with
toughness that we need Dooley said. "We need some
guys that will understand what it's like to play games at
this level. Some of our younger guys don't understand that
yet, They're trying to figure out which end is up right
now
Alico Dunk, a junior guard, will also be a threat in the
Pirate backcourt. Dunk averaged nearly 20 minutes a
game, and dished out 56 assists last season.
Alphons van leriand, 7-0 center, will see playing time
this year after sitting out last year. Despite not playing any
games, leriand was named the team's Most Improved
Player last season.
Other players to look out for
this year will be sophomore
Garrett Blackwelder, who saw
action in 22 games last season
and sophomore forward Neil
Punt, who played in 20 games
and scored his season best
eight points and six rebounds
against Armstrong State.
Two transfers will wear the
Purple and Gold for the 97-
'98 year. Junior center Quincy
Hall comes from Northland
Pioneer JC in Arizona, where
he averaged eight points and
seven rebounds David
Taylor, a -sophomore guard, will sit out this season after
transferring from the University of Georgia.
Three freshmen are new this year: Steven Branch;
Larry Morrisey; and Vlnston Sharpe.
The women's team would like to pick up where, they
left off in March, after upsetting Richmond and Virginia
Commonwealth in the CAA tournament to make it to the
finals. Donovan said this is a new season, but they can
take what they experienced last year and use it to their
advantage this season.
"I think we will rely on that Donovan said. "It doesn't
give us anything this year other than confidence, probably
in the proof that the hard work will pay off if we stay
strong and consistent and keep our nose to the
grindstone
The Lady Pirates will look to fresh new faces this year
to help fill the void left by seniors Justine Allpress, who
led the team in scoring her final two years, and Traccy
Kelley, who led the team in rebounding the last two
seasons.
This year's team has only two seniors in center Jen Cox
and forward Shay Hayes. Cox would have been the only
returning senior this year if Hayes had not received a
medicJ red-shin after back surgery last season.
Cox will pick back up on her 9.6 points per game
average and 61 blocked shots last season, which ranks as
the second highest season total in Pirate history.
Hayes jumps back into action this season after being
out of the action last season. As a junior, Hayes was given
ECUs Outstanding Defense Award and averaged 4.5
rebounds a game.
Donovan knows these two women will provide much
leadership this year.
"In terms of leadership, there's no question that those
two will provide
that for us
Donovan said. "I
think we're a team
that has good
depth in the post.
Beth Jaynes gave
us great minutes
last year, she's
doing a great job in
the preseason and
we've got a
freshman that is
really coming on
strong already
Jaynes, last year's
Most Improved
Player on team,
was the lone
sophomore last
year and saw
action in all 29
games. Jaynes will
no doubt see more
action this year as
the team's second
tallest player at 6-
3, averaging 3.8
points a game and
2.3 rebounds a
game.
Three sophomores
Beginning third season as head
coach
Coached the Pirates to a 17-10
mark last year, and 17-11 in '96
His 34 victories are the most by an
ECU coach in first two years
Coaching � Served as an
assistant coach at University of
South Carolina from '8891;
served ECU assistant for four
years before becoming head
coach
Athletic � Two year starter at
George Washington, team .
captain as senior, three year
starter at St Benedict's Prep
School, named All-Northern
New Jersey Conference '8384,
third team all-state, '84
" We need some guys that will understand what
it's like to play games at this level
Joe Oooiay
men's basketball coach
will hit the floor again this year. Melanie Giilem, Misty
Home and Danielle Metvin all saw action last year.
Giilem appeared in all 29 games, and had a career high
16 points against JMU. Giilem shot 45.5 percent from
three-point range.
Home started 11 games last year. She averaged 22.9
minutes and 5.7 points per game. Home will get it done
from the perimeter this year, after having the second
highest total of three-pointers in a season.
Mclvin appeared in 25 games and averaged 3.0 points
per contest. She scored a team-high 16 points against
UNC-Charlotte and works just as hard off the court, being
named to the Athletic Director's Honor Roll as a
freshman.
Nine new players will wear the Lady Pirate uniforms,
including three transfers. Jcnn Rice, a junior forward, will
be active after
sitting out last
season after
transferring from
Syracuse. While at
Syracuse, Rice
averaged 3.0 points
per game and 1.5
rebounds. She will
be eligible to play
in December.
Sophomore
forward Cecilia
Shinn, comes to
ECU from Estoril,
Portugal where she
was a member of
the Portuguese
National Team
since '94. Shinn
competed in
numerous
tournaments and
played in the 97
World University
Games where
Portugal finished
seventh. Waynette
Veney, a junior
guard from College
of Charleston, will
have to sit out this
season, but will see
action next year.
Six freshmen
are new to the
roster and should
see playing time.
Nikki Brown;
Charette Guthrie;
Opal Johnson;
Jennifer Moretz;
Ann Murden and
Tricia Peckham.
Beginning third season as head
coach
Coached Lady Pirates to the CAA
Championship game, where they
lost to eventual NCAA runner up
Old Dominion
Coaching � Assistant coach with
Old Dominion from '8995 before
being named ECU head coach
Honors � Naismrth Basketball
Hall of Fame, 199S inductee; GTE
Academic Ail-American Hall of
Fame, 1994 inductee; Virginia
Sports Hall of Fame, 1996
inductee; Va. Beach Sports Club
Sports Person of the Year, 1996;
GTE-CoSIDA Academic Ail-
American, 8283; 1983 Naismith
Trophy (Player of the Year); 1983
Champion Trophy (Player of the
Year); Basketball Ali-American
Selection8183
Athletic � Old Dominion
University 7983(7980
National Championship Team);
Olympic Basketball Team, '80,
84, 88 (Co-Captain); U.S.
National Basketball Team, 77-
'81848688; Co-Captain
World Championship and Pan
American Teams, '8687;
Semi-Professional Basketball,
Modena Italy'88-89and
Shizuoka, Japan, '8388.
i
Congratulations
to two
outstanding
Pirate Football
players

Jason Nichols
Congratulations
to senior flanker
Jason Nichols
on becoming
ECU's career
receptions
leader. Nichols
caught four
passes in
Saturday's
win, giving
him 133 for his career. He
surpasses Mitch Galloway who
caught 131 passes during '93-
"96. Nichols is also sixth in all-
time receiving yards with 1,297.
ECU senior
cornerback
Dwight
Henry, whose
9 8 - y a r d
interception
return for a
touchdown
ignited a
second half
rally against Louisville Saturday,
has been name the Conference
USA Defensive Player of the
Week
Henry, a 5-11, 180 pound
pjjfiyp nf Ff I -anHnrrfalff Fla.
stepped in front of a Chris
Redman pass and raced 98 yards
for a touchdown early in third
quarter of ECU's 45-31 victory
over the Cardinals. Louisville led
31-14 and had driven to the ECU
15-yard line before Henry's
defensive heroics.
The 98-yard return tied the
Pirate record for longest
interception return. Reggie
Pinkey had a 98-yard return of an
interception vs. Richmond, Nov.
6, 1976.
Dwight Henry
Lady Pirates
beat ranked
opponent
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITO
Win. Upset. Victory. Whatever
want to call it, mat's what
women's soccer team achic
Friday afternoon.
It was the biggest win of their
brief four year history, knocking
off conference foe George Mason,
ranked 22nd in the country.
The victory, gives ECU the
number four seed in the CAA
tournament, as they host ODU
tomrrow at 2 p.m. at Bunting
Track
The Lady Pirates have won a
record 10 games, including four
conference games. ECU is
currently on a three game winning
streak and has won nine of its last
four games.
Freshman forward Jennifer
Bush kciked the winning goal in
the sudden death overtime.
Head Coach Neil Roberts feels
this victory is a stepping stone for
his team.
"To beat George Mason was
really great for our team; it was a
great team effort Roberts said.
The Lady Pirates have never
made it past the first round of play
and actually tied ODU for fourth
place in the tournament but ECU
owns the tic-breaker since they
defeated ODU in head-to-head
competition, 1-0, back on
September 24 in Greenville.
Roberts knows tournament
play means a whole new season. ,
"Now it's a new season
Roberts said. "To host a home
playoff game is something we are
really excited about
According to Roberts the credit
goes to the players who have stuck
together and played their hearts
out in the remaining weeks.
"I have to credit the players in
the last two weeks of the season
they really stuck together and
established some solidarity, and
really just made it a point to have
a good time playing the game
Roberts said. "That's half the
battle right now
The Lady Pirates match is
tomorrow (Wed. Nov. 5) at 2 p.m.
at Bunting Track. Tickets are Si
with a student ID.
V





r
12 Tuesday, November 4. 1997
Teams compete at GMs
sports
Women finish third,
men place fifth
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
STAFF WRITER
The ECU men's and women's cross
country teams went this season
needing strong showings, but for
different reasons. The men's team
looked to put ECU cross country
among the conference elite, while
the women just hoped to show any
signs of improvement. On Saturday
the teams had the chance to realize
a season's worth of goals at the CAA
Championships.
After a seventh place Finish at
last year's conference meet and a
1997 season that at times saw the
Pirates stumble, the women's team
looked to show improvement and
avenge an earlier loss to rival UNC-
Wilmington. The Pirates did both
Saturday en route to their best
finish in years. Their third place
finish was the Pirates' highest since
1993. Their total of 121 points was
two better than the Seahawks'
tally.
"They went out and ran as hard
as they could Head Coach Choo
Justice said. They laid it on the
line. Thev decided they would not
holdback
Junior Kerri Harding was ECU's
top finisher. Harding finished 22nd
with a time of 18:41. Sophomore
Robin Bates and Senior Karen
Reinhard finished 25th and 31st
respectively while freshmen Becky
Testa and Fran Lattie rounded out
ECU's top five.
"Our freshmen made a big
difference Justice said. "Becky
Testa really stepped up her
performance and Fran Lattie
caught a lot of runners in die final
mile
Last year's men's team capped a
successful season with a third place
finish at the conference meet.
Entering this season, the team
hoped to build on their 1996
campaign and propel ECU to the
top of the conference.
Saturday, the Pirates "Fall Rise"
season fell short its goal with a fifth
place finish. ECU's cross country
program did improve this season,
but the fifth place finish shows
that the rest of the conference has
improved also.
"Vfe are in a strong conference
men's assistant Mike Ford said.
"William & Mary and James
Madison are ranked in the top 20 in
the country. The CAA is a
legitimate conference for cross
country
Sophomore Justin England
finished 14th and led the ECU
team with his season's best time of
25:15. Junior Jamie Mance placed
19th, while freshmen Stuart Will
and Steve Arnold and sophomore
Brian Beil were ECU's top five.
WALLACE
Towing and Recovery
24hr service
752-1798
Prompt Service, Jumpstart, and Lock out
Special rates 7:30 AM till 5:30 PM Monday
through Friday
ECU Special-SZO.OO up to 3 miles
within city limits
SPORTSCARD SHACK
Thor & Marty Berg
SUPPLYING YOUR SPORTS CARDS NEEDS
PHONE: 1-919-931-9449
FAX: 1-888-531-9331
206 W. 14THSI
GREENVIlii, NC 27834

�A
52552 c'

Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
'OS
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring $3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
ETSU
East Tennessee State University
JOIN OVER 2,21 GRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLED AT ETSU!
WE OFFER OVER 35 PH.D ED.D ED.S.
AND MASTER'S DECREE PROGRAMS, PLUS
CERTIFICATES IN BUSINESS AND NURSING. TUITION
WAIVERS AND ASSISTANTSFdPS, INCLUDING
ASSISTANTSHIPS FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS, ARE
AVAILABLE.
For more informaion, contact us at:
School of graduate Studie
East Tennesse State University
Johnson City, Tennesse
(423) 439-6149
(423) 439-5624 fax
E-Mail: gradsch@etsu-tn.edu
When repsonding, please refer to 0002
Visit ETSV Online at
http:www.etsu-tn.edu
� DWI Assessments, Evaluations And Treatment Programs
�Counseling services include
Individual, Family, and Group Therapy
Your assessment & treatment (if required) will
ye done in a professional yet laid back manner in
a private, comfortable setting for less money
than you would spend with some larger agencies.
Appointments Scheduled Around YOUR Work or School
Schedule
All services Are Fully Licensed & Credentiaiized By The State
of North Carolina
Fees based upon income
Located on Evans Straat Mall
Within Walking Distance of Campus
Michael G. Morris, CDWIE, CRT, CSAC
315 S. Evans Street; Suite B; Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: (919) 752-1333 Fax: (919) 757-3995
Check out all the great programs designed
to get you in the best shape you can be in!
Tai Chi wilS be meeting
tues & thurs Nov. 4-20
in the SRC Studio 238.
Here's what's new!
Take advantage of these
special classes by
purchasing a Session II
Aerobics Pass.
Circuit Express Non-Stop Cardio
Cardio Box D.A.N.S.E
Holidays in Motion
The SRC has qualified fitness
trainers to help you with
training and equipment
questions.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
This program offers the
opportunity to Identify your
current fitness level and
get a personal exercise
prescription.
Blood Pressure Cardiovascular
Body Composition Endurance
Muscular Strength Muscular Endurance
Nutrition Analysis Flexibility
For more information call 328-6387
5f
� imi�;w
a i, ii ��





c
HP
The East Carolinian
classifieds
Tuesday. November 4. 199713
FOR RENT
I
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
with prMnuOMi�C this
1 bath, e�ge, refckjeraWr,jn
washeiftfiyer hoSfcjps. tni
somerunits, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
-UWQSTON PAR 2 twdroom. I Oath
ranges' reinjijfatqti dishwasjier free
I oMPiiasliEHoiiiJED unrrs Bailable.
-4 ffrupiirtiM have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
?nogamant
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed for Piayers Club apartment.
Preferred undergrad. Call 353-2885,
ask for Heather, John or Paul.
ROOMMATES NEEDED AT 107-A
Stancil Drive, two rooms available for
$120per month. Five blocks from cam-
pus off Meade Street. Call 758-4124,
ask for Tom, please leave phone
number.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 1 & 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
4 BEDROOM AVAILABLE AT Play-
ers Club Apts. 6-month lease begin-
ning Jan. Call Melissa at 321-7613.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
FEMALE NEEDED ASAP TO sub-
lease 2 bedroom apt. S212.50mo. plus
12 utilities. Call Amy, 353-4153.
TWO OR THREE FEMALES needed
to take over lease ASAP. $220 per
month, 14 utilities. Please contact
Sheila, Yuka, or Lauren at 353-2471 or
leave a message.
FEMALEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED - Players Club Apts. 14 of
rent and expenses. Call Melissa at 321-
7613.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP; TWO
blocks from campus, one block from
downtown. New apartment, only $173.
Must be fun, outgoing, ECU student
preferred. Call 758-3684
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apt. 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utili-
ties. Call 752- .652.
ASAP ROOMMATE NEEDED, LUX-
: URY apartment, $205 a month. Fire-
- place and ceiling fans. Plantation
" Apartments. Call 531-5978.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
NON-smoker, studious, to share 3
bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse on
ECU Bus route. Fully furnished, 13
utilities. No pets. Call Lesley, 754-2942.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New
Rec Center! One 2 bedroom apt above
Catalog Connection - $475 a month!
One 2 bedroc.n apt. above Percolator
Coffeehouse $500 a month! Both avail-
able December 1st-one month deposit
required! Call Yvonne at 758-2616
FOR SALE
FREE MOTOROLA PAGER. AVAIL-
ABLE options include voice mail, e-
mail services. Call 1-800-784-6452 Id
1675167 or write to Free Pagers, PO
Box 4112, Greenville, NC 27836-2112.
STUN GUNSI SAFE AND easy to
use. 919-946-6830.
1997 JEEP WRANGLER-SE. White
with black softtop. Immaculate condi-
tion, only 6K miles. 18 months left on
factory warranty. Many options.
$15,000. Call Rick 816-4423(w) 355-
0888(h).
SPECIALIZED ATB - Now on sale.
Save lots of $. Close-out prices
on last year's models. Coma in
and taat rida today. Ask for Banny
or Derrick, 355-8050.
GUITARS-WILL SELL OR Trade my
collection starting $150 to $2,000. Call
919-637-6550.
TREK 400 RACING BICYCLE, Shi-
mano SIS components, Avocet, 600
pedals, etc. Rarely used, must sell,
$200. Call Chris at 754-8358.
FUJI TAHOE MT. BIKE, all Shimano
components, Onza bar ends, best offer
around $200. Call Fred, 353-6228.
FOR SALE: SKI EQUIPMENT, Ros-
signol MX5 185 Saiomon boots-8 and
binding and Scott poles 46 Call 752-
2378.
BIG, COMFY RECUNER. ONE year
old. Showroom condition. $50. Call
931-0975.
GET IN SHAPE FOR the holidays!
Nordic Track Achiever Skier for sale, in
very good condition. Asking $350.00,
originally paid $850.00. Please call
Rhonda, 328-4307 (day), 321-8117
(evening).
FOR SALE-WEIGHT BENCH $35, art
desk, $35, Black & Decker Broom-Vac
$25. Call Brandon at 754-8094.
HELP WANTED
�art Tim Jobs
Earn Money and Resume
Experience working for
ONLINE
COLLECTIONS
Per
Hour
Mon-Fri 5 to 9 pm
Sat 8 am to noon
Online Collections is looking (or the
10 most aggressive people on ECU's
campus to work as telephone collec-
tors. The perfect part time job.
Excellent pay. Our grads get hired
based on their experience working
for us. We also have full mornings or
afternoons to work. Contact Chris
Murphy at 754-1615
or Pat Hutchins at 757-2130.
� "hem7fttnt � memrnentt
tJtmtt
mtiet��f fyu
(9t9) 93t-0022
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
98 management positions. Gain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7.223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES.
THE Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches for
the winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 7-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours range
from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching.
Flexible work schedule around classes
and holidays. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Fe-
bruary. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please call
Ben James, Michael Daly or Quinton
Manley at 830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
WANTED: NURSING STUDENTS:
INDIVIDUALS interested in helping
the Dept of Health Promotion & Weil-
Being to join us at an information table
for the ECU campus on Nov. 20, 1997
for Great American Smokeout Day. For
more information call Nicole at 328-
6793. Please respond by Nov. 13,1997.
Also in need of Visual Demonstrations
such as model of smokers heart or
lung.
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wanted Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.ir.pt.com
PART ft FULL TIME positions avail-
able am or pm. Cooks, dishwashers,
servers. Applications accepted 9:00-
5:00, Rarr-ada Plaza Hotel. Above aver-
age wage with experience.
��BASKETBALL OFFICIALS NEED-
ED" THE Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is still looking for in-
dividuals interested in officiating in the
winter adult basketball league, posi-
tion pays $12-$15 a game. Clinics will
be held to train new and experienced
officials. However, a basic knowledge
and understanding of the game is nec-
essary. The next meetings will be held
Monday, November 3 & 9,1997 at 7:30
p.m. at Elm Street Gym. Experience re-
quirements, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more infor-
mation, please call the Athletic Office
at 830-4550 between the hours of 2:00
p.m7:00 p.m Monday thru Friday.
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-$1,500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
COURIER TO WORK PART-time for
busy medical practice. Make deliver-
ies, run errands, do filing. Applicants
must be able to work 9:00 a.m1:00
p.m. Monday through Friday and have
a good driving record along with reli-
able transportation. Interested applic-
ants should send their resume or ap-
plication to Pitt Surgical, P.A. 905
Johns Hopkins Drive, Greenville, NC
27834.
EDWARDS PHARMACY IN AY-
DEN, location 7 minutes from cam-
pus, needs hard working, honest per-
son to work 20-30 hours per week run-
ning registers, cooking at grill, putting
up stock, helping fill prescriptions.
Phone 746-3126.
PERSONALS
TO MY FAVORITE UL' Sis' Zai Mc-
Callum and Sheri Smith, you guys are
the greatest! Love, your Big Sis Laurie
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD
like to say thanks to all our dates for
Homecoming Weekend. We hope that
you had a great time. Thanks, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon
THE NEW MEMBERS OF Alpha Phi
would like to thank everyone who par-
ticipated in our sisters auction. It was a
great success!
TO ALPHA PHI ft Zeta: Where were
you Wed. night (29th) for the Sorority
Karaoke Challenge in Splash? Chi
Omega Rules!
CONGRATULATIONS AMBER
JAMES ON a terrific job with Pick- fl -
Pirate! We love you! Your Gamma Sig-
ma Sigma sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALPHA
OMICRON Pi's newest initiated
sisters: Carly Ackerman, Cat Ander-
son, Tracy Auten, Monica Brock, Jen-
nifer Dove, Sam Gardner, Tiffany Ha-
dley, Jessica Livingston, Jensina
Sturz, Aimee Whitfield, Jessica Wil-
liams, and Meredith Holden! We love
you! Love, your sisters!
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD
like to thank all the wonderful guys
who participated in the 7th Annual
Pick-A-Pirate! You guys were great!
��� I. � a
CONGRATULATIONS ASHLEY DIX
AND Leslie Garris for getting into TR
and congratulations Ann Elms for get-
ting into nursing school. We're proud
of youl Love, your Pi Delta sisters.
TO ALL SORORITIES: CHI Omega
wins 1st round of Sorority Karaoke
Challenge in Splash! Show up next
Wed Nov. 5th if you're not scared!
CHI OMEGA. WE WOULD Like to
say thanks for all your help and sup-
port during Homecoming week. We
look forward to doing it again next
year. Sigma Alpha Epsilon
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA-EUSSA
RUBIN AND LAURIE BARON
WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE
VERY FEW PEOPLE WHO TOOK
TIME OUT FROM THEIR BUSY
SCHEDULES TO DEDICATE
COUNTLESS HOURS AND KEEP-
ING THEIR COMMITMENT TO
HELP WITH HOMECOMING: VIC-
TORIA STEIGER, PAIGE CURETON,
LEANNE GRIFFIN, SUZANNE
BRINKLEY. KALAN BAGBY. USA
GANOUG. MANDY GUY, AND A
VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO ANNA
ASBELL AND HER WONDERFULLY
GENEROUS FAMILY FOR HELPING
US KEEP OUR SANITY!
��AAAAISPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cencun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, & Florida. Group dis-
counts & daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, & go free! 800-234-
7007. httpwww.endlesssummer-
tours.com
TRAVEL
WANTED: INDIVIDUALS TO
SHARE their story at an information
booth on how tobacco has impacted
their life. Suggested topics might in-
clude heart disease and lung disease.
Please contact Nicole at Health Promo-
tions & Well-Being at 328-6793 by Nov.
13, 1997.
TO MY BABY, MY love, my best
friend, Happy 51st. Charlie, you are the
greatest and I'll love you siempre.
Hugs and kisses, Elissa Beth. 8-3-93
CJW � YOU'RE MY EVERYTHING
and everything is you. I love you baby!
- Paradise
GREEK PERSONALS
GOOD LUCK ALPHA OMICRON Pi
on your intramural soccer season!
Love, your sisters!
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to extend a
very special thank you to Bill Blecha
for hanging our banner for homecom-
ing! Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Pi Delta
ALPHA XI DELTA, WE had an awe-
some time last Thursday night at our
pre-Halloween social. We can't wait to
do it again. Thanks, Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon
TO ALL SORORITIES: THE Sorority
Karaoke Challenge Week 2 in Splash,
Wed Nov. 5th!
OTHER
SPRING BREAK
Cruise
6 Days � Most MmIs � Fn�� Parties � Includes Taxes
7 Nights AifHotel - fnt Meek - 24Hrs free Drinks
$279
iM - Includes tax�
$399
- 24Hrs Frae Drink
$419
7 Nights Air&Hotel - Save $150 on Food & Drinks
Florida $119
South Beach, Panama City, Daytona, Cocoa Beoch
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Year
1-800-678-6386
CdtfCUn'
Panamas
flsrfcta o�$w
NOW HIRING REPSI
http:www.end1eMJuinfrtertoura.coin
Book Today
VisaMCAmexDisc
1-800-234-7007
SEIZED CARS FROM Si 75. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-3726.
ABANDONED PUPPY NEEDS LOV-
ING home. Ginger is a sweet- tem-
pered Shepherd mix, approx. 6-8
months old. Since found, she's been
spayed, wormed, and received shots.
If interested, 638-6617. Cannot keep.
Have 6 dogs already. Ginger was
placed once, but was returned due to
landlord. Please consider carefully.
Dogs are a responsibility.
WANTED 2 BR. APT. FOR
$390mo. or less; would like to take
over a lease and move in January. Call
Christine or Rachel @ 328-7815.
SIMM'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H3726 for current
listings.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
EEEBHEEBaa
THE RCLS SOCIETY WILL be hav-
ing a Bake Sale on Wed Nov. 5th from
9:00-2:00 and will have a Car Wash on
Nov. 8th from 10:00-2:00 at Trade Mart
(Greenville BlvdUth St.). Hope to see
you at BW-3's for our social at 9:30 on
Nov. 6th.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINIS-
TRY MEETS Tuesday from 6-8 p.m. in
the Fellowship Hall at First Presbyte-
rian Church. The church is on the
corner of 14th and Elm St. Dinner is
$3.00. Rev. Allen Proctor, campus min-
ister at NC State will lead a discussion
on "The Faith Journeys of Generation
X Everyone is welcome. For more in-
formation, please call Nancy Huslage
at 758-1901.
TUE. NOV. 4-5ENIOR RECITAL. So-
nia Alcala, soprano, AJ. Fletcher Reci-
tal hall, 7:00 p.m. Wed Nov. 5-Sym-
phonic Wind Ensemble And Concert
Band, Scott Carter and Christopher
Knighten, Conductors, Wright Auditor-
ium, 8:00 p.m. Thurs. Nov. 6-Percus-
sion Ensemble, Mark Ford, Director,
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m. Fri.
Nov. 7-Jazz Ensemble A, Carroll V.
Oashiell Jr Director, Wright Auditori-
um, 8:00 p.m. Sat. Nov. 8-Senior Reci-
tal, Abigail Cockrell, flute, A. Jv Fletcher
Recital Hall, 4:00 p.m. Sat, Nov. 8-Sen-
ior Recital, John E. Chapney, trumpet
and Jason Barcirft, horn, A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00 p.m.
TIME MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOPS: MONDAY from 11:00 a.m
12:00 noon and Tuesday from 3:30-
4:30 p.m. The Center for Counseling
an Student Development will be offer-
ing this program the week of Novem-
ber 3rd. If you are interested in this
workshop, contact the Center at 328-
6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY from 3:30-5:00
p.m. The Center for Counseling an
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of November
3rd. If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the Center at 328-6661.
KICKBALL TOURNEY: REGISTRA-
TION MEETING Tonight! 5:00 p.m. at
MSC Room 244. Dept. of Rec. Services
328-6387
TURKEY TROT: TEAMS UP with the
Pirate Chase on Nov. 8. Last Day to
register Nov. 6. Contact Dept of Rec.
Services 328-6387 for more info.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION WORK-
SHOP: WEDNESDAY from 3:30-4:30
p.m. The Center for Counseling an
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of November
3rd. If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the Center at 328-6661.
CLIMBING SEMINAR: SAFETY
RESCUE Nov. 10. Know what to do in
times of danger. Contact Dept. of Rec.
Services 328-6387 for further informa-
tion.
ADVISING SESSION FOR PRE-OT
Students will be Wednesday Novem-
ber 5th in Room 203 of the Belk Build-
ing. 5:00-6:00 will be questions and an-
swers with current OT students and
6:00-7:00 will be advising and signing
of registration forms. If you can not
come to the Wednesday night session
please come to the OT office between
8:00 -5:00 from November 3rd and No-
vember 14th.
CLIMBING WALL: TOURS AND in-
struction scheduled for Nov. 6 Call
328-6387 for details.
CLIMBING WALL CONTEST: HOW
well do you conquer the wall? Regis-
tration deadline Nov. 13. Contact the
Dept. of Rec. Services 328-6387 for de-
tails.
TEST PREPARATION WORKSHOP:
WEDNESDAY from 3:30-4:30 p.m.
The Center for Counseling an Student
Development will be offering this pro-
gram the week of November 3rd. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
THE RCLS SOCIETY WILL be start-
ing a can foot drive on Nov. 3rd . It will
go through Nov. 24th. The cans dor
ed will go the the Greenville Commun-
ity Shelter. Also, officer nominations
will be taken during Nov. 3rd thru the
7th, put them in RCLS suggestion en-
velope on RCLS bulletin board.
ECHO MEETING NOV. 6, 5:30 p.m.
lobby of Fleming Hall
"TIPS FROM A PRO" and FREE DIN-
NER Thursday. November 6 at 4:00
p.m. in MSC Great Room 3. Share
leadership experiences and philoso-
phies with Earl Brown, Attorney at
Law. Pre-register by calling Student
Leadership Development Programs,
328-4796 or stop by MSC 109 by
noon on Nov. 5th.
ARISEADAPTED RECREATION:
LEARN racquetballl Clinic offered at
the SRC. Class begins Nov. 9. Call 328-
6387.
BADMINTONSQUASH CLINIC:
DEADLINE FOR registration Nov. 11.
Dept. of Rec. Services 328-6387
PILOT MOUNTAIN: ONE DAY climb
at the State Park. Register by Nov. 7 for
Nov. 15 trip. Call 328-6387 for details.
PPHA MRU. MEET TUESDAY. Nov.
4th at 700 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center Room 14
A SEMINAR ON INTERNSHIPS and
Apprenticeships with the NC Dept of
Public Transportation will be present-
ed in the Career Services Building on
Nov. 4 at 2:00. Students majoring in
Planning, Public Administration, Busi-
ness, Geography and other interested
individuals are invited to attend. These
are paid experiences for graduating
students and those enrolling in gradu-
ate school.
A SPRING REGISTRATION ADVIS-
ING session for all Exercise and Sport
Science General College Students will
be conducted Wednesday, November
5,1997 at 6:30 p.m.m in Minges, Room
142.
ADVENTURE WORKSHOP: OUT-
DOOR LIVING: Dressing for the Out-
doors. Seminar on Nov 12. Call 328-
6387 for information.
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
Check Us Out!
�"rW
1 rl" "T"
- �
1 !M�I '





r
-��
Registration
Terminal Locations
School or Peat
School of Allied Health
Total-7
School of Art
Total-3
Location
Anx 1CSDI Office
Anx 6PA Office
310 EHLBIOS
306 OCa Office
Anx 3PTHE Office
308 CLSCHIMA
312 REHB Office
Hours Open
8:00-12:00
8:00-12:00
8:00-10:002:004:00
8:00-12:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-10:002:004:00
fff
it site
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
BW Senior Gallery
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
3rd floor Media Center
8:00-12.001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
School of Business
Total-6
CCB3209
GCB3411
GCB3413
GCB3422
GCB3105
GCB3203
8:00-3:00
8:00-3:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:004:45
8:00-5:00
School of Education
Total � 10
Speight 102A
Speight 109
Speight 134
Speight 137
Speight 203
Speight 230
GCB 2318
Flanagan 357
Jqyner 215
School of Health
Human Performance
Total-4
School of HESC
Total-4
MC171
MC177
MC 174
Christenbury 204
HESC"130"
8:00-12:00l:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:004:00
8:004:00
8:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-10:002:004:00
8:00-1:002:00-5:00
8:004:00
School of Ind. & Tech.
Total-5
School of Music
Total-5 �
School of Social Work
Total-3
School of Nursing
Total � 5
Flanagan 105
Rawl343
Rawl327
Raw! Ann. 139
Wright Ann. 307
Fletcher102
Retcher 119
Ragsdale 102
Ragsdale 104 A&B
Rivers 108
Rivers 119
Rlversl57
Brewster A214
8:00-11:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-11:001:004:30
8:00-12:003:00-5:00
Spec PermissionProblems
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
800-12:002:004.00
8:00-12:062:004:00
Total!
Biology
Total-4
BN-108
BN-108A
Chemistry
Total -1
Flanagan 204
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:301:004:00
Erwin 113
8:00-11:002:004:00
Total-1
Economics
Total-1
Total -3
TlrewsterA429
GCBT20I
IOO-I2:003r:004:W
location o
l0� 11
r 12
im& 14
Registration Days
Graduate students, students wfffr
physical disabilities, registered
with Department tor Disability
Support Services, and students
with 75 or more semester hours
credit
Students with 46-74 semester
hours credit and those eligible
prior to this period.
Students with 1-45 semester
hours credit and those nrfar
this period.
All students eligible.
All students eligible.
87��210071:0�4:00
Peter to using the on-line registration system, each steel
develop & schedule containing no more than If haws of
��9raes and no more than 15 hours � atte��� courses
moats w&h hisher adviser's approvai as indicated oy She
signature on the registration form. AH soecial e�rmissio�
arara hours mafors only courses, D&mnl&mltpQfion'
0ife8s4 f�p course registration must oa securod in'wrHRg
using the �n-Hite ragistr�
Foreign
Total-2
FL Reception Area
GCB 3324
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
Total-2
Brewster A227
Brewster A229
8:00-2:00
8:00-12:002:00-5:00
Geology
Total!
Graham 101
8:00-11:001:304:30
History
Total-3
Brewster A311
Brewster A314
Brewster A316
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
Mathematics
Total-4
Austin 129
8:00-12:002:004:00
Philosophy
Total -1
Brewster A327
8:00-12:002:304:30
Physics
Total!
Howell209
8:00-12:002:004:00
Political Science
Total-2
Brewster A124
Brewster 126
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:30
Psychology
Total - 3
Rawl 104
8:00-12:001:004:00
Sociology
Total - 2
Brewster A411
Brewster A414
8:00-5:00
8:004:00
Theatre Arts
Total -A
Undergraduate Studies
(ATP only)
Total -16
Registrar's Office
Total -16
Messick 106
Brewster B101
Brewster A102
Brewster A113
Brewster B103
Whichard 100
Whichard 101
Whichard 102
Whichard 104
Whichard 105
8:00-12:001:004:00
Honors Program
Total - 2
GCB 2026
8:00-5:005
8:00-5:302
8:00-5:005
8:00-5:004
8:00-5:005
8:00-5:002
8:00-5:002
8:00-5:002
8:00-5:005
8:00-12:001:00-5:002
l( iini(TMl
7 " N
iiKfcblodnrss ntttsl hi
r
I paid bHbiv nislrriiiii or
making srhodulr chaniM. I
order! to noisier, rach
uMl(Mi2;ra(luat(v liidrpl niih
V hive a iviislration lorni
i adi(M:
All students are encouraged to check the web for course
schedules and availability, tags, and registration terminal
locations on the Office of the Registrar's home page at
East Carolina University. You can go there directly by
typing: http:www.ecu.eduregistrarregistrar.html
��I i - i-


Title
The East Carolinian, November 4, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 04, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1237
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy