The East Carolinian, October 30, 1997








THURSDAY
OCTOBER 30.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROUNA
VOLUME 73. ISSUE 17
!
Sandra Bullock, a former ECU student
received an Outstanding Alumni
Award during Homecoming weekend.
Unfortunately, Bullock was unable
to attend because of a movie
promotional tour in Italy. She did,
however; fax an acceptance speech
thanking ECU.
"Thank you for this honor ECU,
and thank you for the teachers said
Bullock.
On Friday, a dinner was held to
honor ail four award recipients. During
the honorary reception, John D.
Shearin, chair of the ECU Department
of Theatre Arts, read Bullock's speech
and later accepted her tutor-plated
award during half-time at Saturday's
football game.
Many people were disappointed
that Bullock was unable to attend the
reception, yet even more people
questioned her qualifications to
receive such an award. While she is
extremely successful and highly
respected, she never graduated from
RTU
"Sandra attended ECU from 1982-
1986 and was a theatre arts major. She
left in the summer of 1986, only a few
hours away from graduating said Kay-
Murphy, director of Donor and
Prospect Development.
It is widely believed that an
individual must be a graduate to
receive an Outstanding Alumni Award,
but this is not always true.
According to the ECU Alumni
Association, "This award is presented
to. those who have received a degree
from ECU. However, in cases of
unusual circumstances
suggest an exception,
Committee may vote
someone who attended
significant amount of time, but did not
receive a degree
Some people think that it's sending
the wrong message to honor someone
who never graduated, but the overall
consensus seems to be one of
acceptance and approval.
"She has made outstanding
accomplishments and brought credit
back upon the university said Don
Lcggecc, Associate Vice Chancellor for
Alumni Relations.
ECU takes pride in all of their
alumni; however, ECU is especially
proud of Bullock because she has used
her education to achieve great success
and acclaim. She always speaks well of
ECU and promotes a positive attitude
toward hard work and determination.
"Sandra is an outstanding reflection
of ECU. If someone is out there as an
acceptable role model, that's a
favorable thing. We need more
positive images said Virgil Clark, Sr
chair of Association Committee of
ECU Alumni Organization.
that might
the Awards
to consider
ECU for
Bullock, a theatre arts major, attended ECU from 1982-1986. She left with a few hours shy of a degree.
Bullock had planned to attend the alumni awards ceremony, but had to cancel because of a tour.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SANDRA BUUOCK SUPER STAR PAGE
a
Who is Sandra Bullock? Just in case you're clueless as to what all the fuss is about Her movies include: Love Potion No. 9 The Vanishing Demolition Man Speed While You Were Sleeping The Net A Time to Kill Speed 2 In Love and War � www.studentmedia.ecu.edu for more info.Awards
she has recieved 3 People's Choice awards 4 Blockbuster awards 2 MTV Movie awards 1 Golden Globe nomination

McLawhorn has campaign signs stolen
Candidate said that
other candidates' signs
went untouched
Hoi.i.y Harris
itXff WRITER
When city council candidate Steve
McLawhorn and his wife Nicole awoke on
Sunday morning, rhey found that over 35 of
the campaign signs they had worked all
week to put up were missing.
Signs placed along 5th, 10th, and Elm
streets were conspicuously absent from
both residential areas
and thoroughfares,
with nearly half of
those missing having
been taken from along
public roads.
McLawhorn said he
has no idea who is
responsible for the
theft of his signs. "I
can't imagine, I think
it's more than the
general vandalism because rhey had been
taken down completely said McLawhorn,
noting that signs had only been knocked
down before, never removed.
Oddly enough, other candidates' political
signs such as those for Inez Kridley which
were placed a few feet away from
McLawhorn's signs- were left untouched.
McLawhorn, an ECU student, and
incumbent Fridley, director of facility
management at ECU, are running against
one another for the third district seat on the
city council.
Sources from the North Carolina
Department of Traffic and Highways and
the Department of Maintenance have
confirmed that their organizations did not
remove McLawhorn's signs due ro any
infringement of regulations.
"We were very clear about the distances
from rhe road of rhe areas that they're in
McLawhorn said.
Though it is difficulr to speculate who
might have taken the signs and if thev will
do it again. McLawhorn has plans to replace
them over the weekend anyway.
"I just wish whoever is caking them down
would stop McLaw horn said.
THURSDAY
4 TODAY
Y sunny
High 69
Low 39
WEEKEND
�ar&.ex sunny, clouds
Y increasing
High 70
low 55
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Did you know that ECU
employs 1,181
instructional faculty
members, with 936
holding terminal degrees?
opinion5
Have a fun Halloween;
just stay safe and act
responsibly
TEC, Daily Reflector
newsstands removed from
Fleming front porch
Work order shows Fridley,
hall coordinator requested
stands be sent to dump
Amanda Austin
NEWS EDITOR
Two newsstands were removed recently
from the front porch of Fleming Hall at the
request of housing officials.
Stands owned by The East Carolinian and
The Daily Reflector were ordered removed
from the residence hall by Inez
Fridley, associate director of
housing for facility
management and a candidate
for City Council, and Wayne
Parsons, coordinator for Cotten
& Fleming halls.
Dated Oct. 14, the service
request said to "pick up the two
newspaper boxes on the front
porch of Fleming Hall and
dispose of them. They can be
put on the dump truck to be
raken to the dump
The East Carolinian's
newsstands are state property and The Daily
Reflectors newsstands are property of the
newspaper.
The initial request for the removal of the
stands came from Parsons.
"I am the one who generated the
request, said Parsons, stating the stands
were being used to prop open the entrance
doors, to Fleming Hall and were being used
as trash cans.
"I have been here since January and they
the newsstands have never been filled
with papers said Parsons. "In terms of
safety, that is a big liability for us
Parsons said he did not request that the
stands be taken to the dump and he does
not know who did.
"It may have been a student worker or
somebody else up there in housing
Parsons said.
Fridley admitted that she made the
request to have the stands taken to the
dump.
"Wayne Parsons called and said the boxes
were in poor shape said Fridley. "I called in
the maintenance service request
It's true that we were not currently
placing papers in the rack in
question, but it is not in bad shape
said Amy Royster, editor of The East
Carolinian. "It is actually in better
shape than at least one of the other
racks that we currently use, so we will
continue to use it
Neither Fridley or Parsons have the
authority to remove the newsstands,
according to Ron Speier, dean of
students. The authority to place or
remove the stands can only be
granted by the Dean's office.
"No one asked me for
permission said Speier. "I was not
consulted on this matter
Although Fridley does not have the
authority to remove the stands, she stated
that "there are some things in such poor
shape, we have no choice. It always depends
on the situation
"We got called and we responded said
Fridley.
SEE NEWSSTANDS. PAGE 2
Witnesses confirm allegations
of ECU police misconduct
Chancellor receives letter
of concern from on-looker
Jcyi ki.ink D. Km.1.1 i
VSSISTWI NEWS EDITOR
Pirate Club member Michael Radford
alleges he was mistreated by ECU Police
Officer William C. Peebles during the Oct.
11 game against Southern Mississippi.
"Whar I observed was rhe most egregious
behavior of a law enforcement officer I have
ever personally witnessed witness Jerry
Person wrote in a letter to the chancellor.
ECU Police commented soon after the
incident that their investigation had not
confirmed any misconduct on the part of
the officer.
However, several fans who witnessed the
incident have come forward to contradict
the Police Department's statement.
Mike Jackson, another Pirate Club
member who was seated several rows
behind Radford, told The East Carolinian
what he witnessed.
"What I saw was a police officer walk up
to Mr. Radford's son, or his son's friend, and
jerk a flag out of his hand Jackson said.
According to Jackson, the child's waving
of the flag may have been obscuring other
fans' view of the field.
"I had noticedthere was a kid with a
man down there waving a flag. After a while,
I noticed two officers down there. Then I
didn't see anything else till the officers
dragged him by me to the stairway said
Vemon Morrison, another fan who was able
to see most of the incident.
Jackson said it appeared Radford was
telling Peebles he would stop the child from
waving the flag and it was not necessary to
confiscate it, although he could not hear the
conversation himself.
"The cop became really angry that Mr.
Radford was questioning his authority, I
guess, and got out his mace, and said�and
I did hear this�'Do you want to go to jail?
Jackson said. "All this time, his little boy
was just crying his eyes out
Jackson said also that Peebles did
attempt to spray the mace in Radford's face,
but the mace appeared to malfunction and
sputter. He then said the officer seemed to
handcuff Radford and began to escort him
roughly to the top of the stairwell.
"That was all I physically saw, till I heard
oohs and aahs from the people, and I
SEE POLICE. PAGE 2
Van Brown Runs for City Council
Hoi.i.y Harris
NEWS WRITER
Van Brown wants Greenville voters to give
him the chance to make poor planning and
bureaucracy a thing of the past.
The 50- year-old landscaping contractor
and former senior member of the
Community Appearance Committee is
running against Blanche Forbes and
incumbent Bob Ramey for the district four
seat on Greenville's city council.
"I feel it's time for new blood to be
passed into the castle said Brown. "I think
rhe key ingredient to myself is I'm down
where the rubber meets the road
Good skills of negotiation gained from
acting as a representative for local
neighborhoods during zoning and
commercialization processes and know ledge
of planning from owning his own business
are the two assets that Brown thinks make
him the best candidate.
"i think my main concern right now is
planning. I think Greenville is facing traffic
gridlock real soon; one of the the things I've
found working on a commission is they
spend a fortune studying things and they
never institute anything
Brown graduated from ECU in 1976
with a psychology degree and has since been
affiliated with the university as a fraternity
adviser and a leading participant in the
planning of purple and gold landscaping
along Highway 11 and other parts of the city.
SEE BROWN. PAGE 2
lifestyle.
American Cafe comes to
:ampus in November
sports.
10
Runners' Fall Rise
campaign kicks off
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG.
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
aooss Itom Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.siudenimedia.ecu.edu
?
i '
V





2 Thursday, October 30, 1997
I it.
w-
The East Carolinian
Brown
continued Iroin parje 1
the state
Pantry pays $143 million for Lil' Champ Stores
SANFORD (AP) � Pantry Inc. announced it has purchased Lil' Champ Food Stores Inc. for $143 million,
making it the third largest convenience store chain not owned by a gasoline company.
Pantry paid $133 million for Lil' Champ's stock and assumed $10 million of its debt.
Lil' Champ, based in Jacksonville, Fla was owned by Docks U.SA, a unit
of French retailer Auchan SA.
The buyout will create a chain of 880 stores with annual revenue of about
$970 million.
As part of the purchase, Sanford-based Pantry said it retired $51 million in debt, completed a $200 million
debt offering and arranged $75 million in bank loans.
ABC News will appeal Food Lion verdict
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Even though the jury's punitive damage award in the Food Lion case has been slashed
by more than 90 percent, ABC News is
following through on its promise to appeal the verdict to a higher court.
The company filed the notice of appeal Monday to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in Richmond, VA.
This summer, the trial judge reduced the punitive damages awarded in January to the North Carolina
supermarket chain from $5.5 million to $315,000. However, the smaller penalty was not enough to satisfy the
network.
Food Lion denied the accuracy of the 1992 PrimeTime Live" expose that
accused it of unsanitary practices, but the company did not sue the network for libel or slander. The grocer
instead proved the network lied to get jobs for undercover reporters who then wore spy cameras and hidden
recorders.
Neither side wanted to elaborate further on the appeal.
across the nation
Township takes fight against large hog farms into its own hands
NORFOLK, Neb. (AP) An Antelope County township is trying to take control in the fight against large hog-
confinement units.
About 75 Brunswick residents have unanimously approved a new regulation
forcing anyone who wants to build a unit containing more than 200 sows to seek a permit from the township
board.
Called ' Regulation E the measure adopted at a meeting Saturday also
requires units to be at least one mile away from any residences and at least 2,500 feet away from the
boundary of a neighboring property, said Gordon Masat, the township's treasurer.
Also, the application of liquid manure to farm ground must be at least 1,000 feet away from neighboring
properties, said Masat.
All of these requirements an be waived if neighbors giv written permiWutn to the developer. I Masat.
Township residents also approved a different regulation in September that
banned the disposal of waste from large hog units within the township.
Under both rules, violators can be fined $20 per animal.
Vanderbilt students angered over ad to spend "Daddy's Money"
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) Some Vanderbilt University students have asked a
department store to apologize for running an ad that proclaimed Live Your Life With Daddy's Money
The ad for McClures recently ran in The Vanderbilt Hustler, the campus
newspaper.
Students representing several organizations, including the Student
Government Association and the Panhellcnic Council, said the ad was
unprofessional and insulting.
McClures President Evalina Andrews said the ad does not reflect the views of the store. She said she was
out of town when it was published.
around the world
Chinese Premier to visit to Japan next month
BEIJING (AP) Chinese Premier Li Peng will visit Japan next month for
meetings with the Japanese emperor and prime minister to promote better
relations, China's Foreign Ministry announced Tuesday
This year marks the 25th anniversary of the normalization of ties between
the two countries. China has lingering concern over a new Japanese security treaty with the United States
which Beijing fears could interfere with its claim on Taiwan.
During his Nov. 11-16 visit, Li will meet Japanese Emperor Akihito, talk with Prime Minister Ryutaro
Hashimoto and visit Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka and Nara, said the ministry.
Somali faction leader promises talks
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) The leader of one of Somalia's main warring factions promised Tuesday to talk with rival
leaders to try to achieve stability in the East African nation.
Hussein Aidid arrived Monday for meetings with Egyptian officials. Egypt has tried to reconcile warring
factions to end the civil war that began in 1991 after trie ouster of the late Somali dictator Mohamed Siad
Bane.
He spoke with Moussa about a reconciliation conference organized by the
National Salvation Council, formed in January by 26 Somali faction leaders. .Aidid has yet to agree to attend
the meeting in the northern Somali town of Bosasso.
Aidid and another top faction leader, Mi Mahdi Mohamed, may meet in Cairo on Wednesday.
Police
continued from page
jumped up and ran over there, and
there was Radford lying about
halfway down, with blood on his
face Jackson said.
Morrison was in a better
position to see what happened at
the top of the stairs.
"The officer had him in a head
lock, and then shoved him down
the steps, and he landed 13 steps
down Morrison said.
Newsstand
continued Irom paqe
Royster questioned whether
safety was the main issue in
removing the racks. "This is not a
question of safety or condition. It's
a question of having the proper
authority to remove one of our
racks. And they definitely did not
have the authority to take state or
private property to the dump
Person corroborated Morrison's
and Jackson's comments in his
letter.
"The fan was then rough-
handled and violently pushed and
jerked toward the steps leaving
the small boy alone, crying and
upset Person wrote.
Radford himself, following
advice from his attorney, was
unable to comment beyond
stating his innocence.
"The only thing I am at liberty
to say is that I did absolutely
nothing wrong Radford said.
Jackson pointed out that
Radford is the president of the
"(State property has to be sent
to Surplus; you can't just get rid of
it because it's on inventory said
Brcnda Cherry, a processing
assistant in Materials
Management.
The newsstands were never
taken to the dump, but were
returned to their rightful owners,
according to Fridley.
'The maintenance man did not
consider them the stands) in that
bad a condition said Fridley.
"One was taken to you The East
Carolinian) and the other
organizationJThe Daily Reflector
Wilson County Pirate Club, and
that the area of the stands in
which this happened was filled
exclusively by Pirate Club
members. While he remembers
many incidents of rowdiness and
police intervention on the student
side, he did not expect to see it in
the alumni section.
Person also seemed surprised
and disappointed by the incident.
"This kind of behavior by
someone designated as a police
officer by ECU is a public
embarrassment to the University
and to me as an alumni Person
wrote.
was notified to pick theirs up
said Parsons.
Royster said the paper would
have been mure than huppv to take
action if they had been notified.
"This is a case -pf someone
removing one of our racks
completely on their own with no
authority or notice. That concerns
me
"Does this mean that if
someone on campus doesn't agree
with what the paper covers, they
can just order our newsstand
removed and thrown in the dump?
I hope not Royster said.
He promises to make zoning,
development and improvement of
existing Greenville the Targets of
his platform, along with a
concentrated concern For traffic
and parking dilemmas.
"We've spent all this
money on how to give more tickets
and all we're doing is making the
public mad said Brown, adding
that he endorses the idea of ECO
and Greenville constructing a
parking deck in conjunction.
"They've turned it into a
financial boondock Brown said.
Other issues he plans to
:tddress include the addition and
expansion of road and the
improvement of downtown.
Brown asserted that the city
government has recognized the
need for a "rebirth" of the
downtown area, but is not really
doing anything productive about it.
He also plans to stand
behind the elimination of the three-
person occupancy law
"That was an obvious case
of discrimination; all occupancy
laws are based on the square
footage, not on an arbitrary number
like three obviously if a house has
5000 square feet, it should have a
larger occupancy Brown said.
The final component of
his campaign is what he sees as the
city council's lack of honesty and
non-partiality.
"1 call it government
profit sharing. When city
employees are allowed to benefit in
the spoils of the development of
the citythe general public is
automatically the loser. Apparently
my opponent Mr. Ramey and Mrs.
Fridley don't share this view says
Brown of Inez Ridley's supposed
involvement in contract favoritism
during the building of the
I niversity (ientre shopping center.
To Brown, his youth and
range of experience make him a
better choice than his opponents
for a university town councilman.
"It's sort of a been-there-
done-that type of deal, so 1 have a
greater insight compared to the
man off the streetmy opponents
wouldn't have any experience with
that Brown said.
The Firehouse Tavern
Thursday
Carbon Leaf
Friday
Long Stem
Daisies
Saturday
Denizen
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Tuesday
Possible7
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Sunday
Free
all day
4pm Panther Game
Live Remote with
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Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to D Will
y upstairs
Greenville's
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
32 oz. Domestic
Draft $1.50
14 oz. Domestic
Draft 75c
FREE FOOD
NFL
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75: Southpaw
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
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25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryls
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The East Carolinian
iiew
Thursday, October 30, 1997 3
NGM Campus Ministry
organizes open prayer
ECU's Citation Appeals Board
an option for parking offenders
M K(.l KRITK BKXJ.fMIN
STAFF WRITER
Students passing through Wright
Plaza around noon each day have
witnessed and wondered about a
group of students who appear to be
joined in prayer.
Members of New Generation
Campus Ministries (NGM) and
students supporting their cause
gather in front of the student
stores each day for what they have
termed "Open Prayer
Edith Smith, who heads the
organization's Evangelism
Committee, said Open prayer is an
attempt to unify the campus and is
open to everyone regardless of race
or organizational membership.
"It just dawned on me one day
that even though we (NGM) say
we want to see fellow students
saved and that we want to win this
campus over to Christ, we were not
doing all we could do to make that
happen Smith said.
Smith added that although the
organization has not met any direct
opposition to their actions, some
students were apprehensive at first.
"It's not that they' didn't think it
was a good idea explained Smith.
"I just heard some people saying
they weren't sure if this type of
(expression 1 was for them, and
that's fine. 1 believe God uses
people in different ways, and
participating in Open Prayer is one
way 1 can further the ministry
NGM Chapter President Joy
Williams said Open Prayer is part of
the organization's October theme
Board allows students chance to
plead case for parking offenses
Jenny vickkrs
STVFF WRITER
NGM students gathered at Wright Plaza bow their heads and gather for prayer.
fILE PHOTO
of "Witnessing
"We have an activity theme
every month said Williams.
"November's focus will be 'Praise
and Worship Open Prayer is a very
effective pan of the theme this
month because it is our goal to
better equip and provoke believers
(Christians) to take an active role in
the ministry
About Open Prayer, Williams
added, "People did look at us like
we were crazy at first, but they are
slowly becoming more receptive.
The group has grown since the first
day the prayer was conducted, and
we take that as proof that people
are watching and listening
According to Williams, NGM is a
national organization with active
chapters on more than 50 college
campuses.
"The complete vision of the
organization is New
GenerationYouth United
(NGMYU), having members in
both university and high school
settings said Williams. NGMYU
3tep into die spotU
Busch Gardens Williamsburg features 7 mainscage shows, strolling
musicians, character actors and variety artists. AH cast members
receive FREE CLASSES, special rxrfonaance opportunities, plus
FREE access to one of the most beautiful theme parks in the world.
We have a sports medicine program, housing assistance, one-way
relocation mileage reimbursement, and mileage per diem for Spring
commuting performers.
Make plans now to audition:
Saturday, Nov. 1,11am - 4pm
Busch Gardens, WHBamstourg, VA
Magic Lantern Theatre
One Busch Gardens Blvd.
Monday, Nov. 3,11am - 4pm
Myrtle Beach, SC
Sheraton Myrtle Beach Hotel
Aruba Room, 2701 S. Ocean Blvd.
Wednesday, Nov. S, 10am - 2pm
UNC-OtapHmNC
Frank Porter Graham Student Union
South Road, Rooms 211,212
Saturday, Nov. 29,11am - 5pm
Busch Gardens, Williamsburo, VA
Magic Lantern Theatre
One Busch Gardens Blvd.
For More Information call: AUDITION HOTLINE 1-800-255-3302
a write: AUDITIONS co Butch Gardens, One BWh Garden Blvd WiilumttUg, VA 2J1S74785
�!
cites within its purpose targeting
and restoring Black America to
Christianity; however, it is a
ministry, so we do not discriminate.
We currently have members and
officers of all races, nationally
In addition to individual campus
activities, Williams said NGMYU
has an organized conference for all
chapters annually. This year's
conference will be held April 9-12
in Atlanta, GA.
"Conference is definitely not to
be missed said Williams. "It is a
time of worship and fellowship, and
we get our horizons broadened by
speakers from all over the world
On ECU's campus, NGM meets
several times each week. The
organization has morning prayer
Mon. through Fri. in GCB 1005 at
7:30 a.m. and gathers for fellowship
on Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. in GCB
1032.
For more information on ECU's
NGM chapter or this year's
NGMYU conference, contact Joy
Williams at 328-3215.
Paying a fine is not the final option after receiving a
parking citation at ECU.
ECU's Citation Appeals Board is made up of a
variety of people, consisting of staff members from the
Staff Benefit Committee, Student Government
Association, School of Medicine, Faculty Senate and
students from Residence Hall Association and Student
Life.
Nancy Roberson, citation appeals coordinator, said,
"The board has people from all walks of life on campus.
The SGA members mainly live off campus, so they are
giving the commuter viewpoint. SGA may not have
knowledge of the parking up at the school of medicine;
therefore, we have someone representative of
knowledge of the school's parking and what the person
receiving the ticket has done wrong
Not just anyone can serve on the board; only
department heads can decide who will serve. For
example, the Director of Human Resources chooses for
the Staff Benefits Committee, just as the Presidents of
SGA and Residence Hall choose for their own groups.
Although, they haven't been given representatives
yet this year. The term of the board is from Oct. I until
Sept. 30 of the next year. One can serve multiple years
if they are reappointed by the president or department
head.
Once receiving a ticket, ten business days are given
to appeal the citation or pay it. Once a ticket is in
appeal, it goes into the computer and does not affect a
student's ability to register or dropadd.
"Something new that we're trying this year is to
have three separate appeal boards Roberson said.
"Last year we had two. You can appeal in writing or
appear in person to appeal
Roberson said the in-person appeal process is
simple. "To appeal in person is realty informal. Ybu arc
given ten minutes to present the case, and the board
may ask questions about the way they parked and their
knowledge of parking
The board is then given ample time to make a
decision, which is reported to Roberson. She sends a
letter out to let the appealant know the decision.
"If you appeal in writing, I will read the case to the
board and the name of the appealant is not given
Roberson added.
Roberson sends that decision as well to the student
after the board hears the case.
Roberson coordinates students and staff on board;
she does not decide on ticket appeals. "If they feel
they have really been treated unfairly, the only thing to
fall back on is the Civil Court System of the city of
Greenville said Roberson.
"We try not to let if get this far, Iwfll, talk to the
student and if I feel that they were mistreated by the
board, then I will talk to the board arid the. board may
reduce the fine. I can't just void it" she said. "The
process is not very quick. If students complain about
the length of time, they have to understand that it is a
long-drawn out process and we try to do the best we
can
Student inerests first lof newly-
elected SGA secretary, treasurer
Parking lots, on-line registration
still of interest to officers
Crk; Rwiky
SI VFF dl IB 11
Student interests come first for first-term SGA
officials. Newly- elected Secretary Leslie Pulley and
Treasurer Lisa Smith plan to make ECU a more
convenient and closer knit environment for all
students.
Parking lot problems and on-line registration were
the two main platforms Pulley ran on last Spring.
These goals arc still in Pulley's sights for her upcoming
term. She claims that ECU parking has always' been a
battle, and during her term she promises to make as
much progress as she can.
Pulley's main duties as secretary include keeping
up with the minutes of all SGA meetings and holding
regular office hours. Each week she prints up the
previous meetings minutes to give out to all members
of student legislature.
Pulley's office hours are Mondays from 3:00 to 4:00
and Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:00 to 1:00.
During these office hours Pulley encourages students
to come by and ask questions or make suggestions for
the SGA. For students who wish to be more involved,
she challenges students to come to SGA meetings on
Mondays at 5:00 in Vlendenhail Student Center,
Room 221.
Here students can see first hand what the SGA is
doing for them. By getting involved they make a
difference, and a chance to make a difference was
Pulley's incentive for becoming secretary.
"I wanted to be helpful and get involved says
Pulley "I wanted to fix things and not just sit around.
but get involved
In addition to holding office as secretary, Pulley sits
on the Fine Arts Committee and serves as the co-
chairperson for the Screenings Committee.
Treasurer Lisa Smith tries to bring ECU together
through changes in bus routes and proper balanced
funding to all student organizations. By using her
power as Transit Board chairperson, Smith has added
several new bus stops to the ECU bus schedule.
Smith also serves as chair for the Appropriations
Committee, which is currently reviewing each case
individually to insure that an equal balance of funds
flows into all student organizations. Smith is already
working on achieving these goals, as well as new ones
involving registration.
"Each semester there are countless numbers of
classes such as Health 1000 that don't list the
professors name Smith said. "This can be a problem
for students who might take better essay tests than
multiple choice tests. They don't know which to
choose
Smith's main job as treasurer is to approve personal
loans and emergency loans to students, ranging from
$50 to $150 depending on urgency andiettgibiriry. She
also can question the approval of funds for student
organizations, made by the Appropriations
Committee.
In addition to all of these obligations. Smith is the
Vice President of Chi Omega sorority and 3n
accounting major. Smith's interests in accounting are
what brought her into the position as SGA treasurer
She hopes work to as an auditor: for government
fund accounting. According to Smith, working as an
SGA. treasurer, is, someof�, the best government
accounting experience-shecan get.
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r
4 Thursday. October 30. 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
&�y�ykft
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Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Starts
l nlis Wednesday, Oct. 29tH
GHR �& Premier Selection
Sl-60 ct Farm Raised
White Shrimi
Steamed
Fred
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Rich Cornwell
FLWR
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people like he
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64 oz. Minute Maid
Orange Juice
ACROSS
1 Lager
5 LA. athlete
10 War god
14 Stew-filled pot
15 Oil source
16 Border on
17 Leave out
18 Musical sounds
19 Facilitate
20 Of holy
character
22 Placard
24 Singles
25 Horned animal
26 Packer of food
29 Soldiers on
guard
33 Whitney and
Wallach
34 Joined
36 Theater part
abbr.
37 Excavation
38 Nerve or
laughing end
39 Fourth caliph
40 Hurt
42 Nips
44 Crisp cookie
45 Get back
47 Owns up to
49 Press
50 A Muse
51 Kind of mill
54 Made duller
57 Blue-pencil
58 Brainless one
60 Makes haste
62 Fork part
63 Code name
64 Gaelic
65 Farming need
66 Ceased
67 Check
01997 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All righU ras&rved.
Answers from Tuesday
L1MBBROA�pELF
0VALR1DGBiTAL
CAREuNjDE�ECCE
KNEADSSw!TCHED
CAsTBT1E"�
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MOAN1�ANGETAC0
M1N1�NEALELM0
0LGADE EMSnEEK
DOWN
1 Scary yell
2 Shade trees
3 "Essays of �"
4 Gives sparingly
5 Game of chance
6 Bitter drug
7 Type
8 Holiday time
9 Reply
10 Man at the
podium
11 As blind as �
12 Trick
13 After young or
pun
21 Dir. letters
23 Cereal grass
25 Web-footed
birds
26 Fragrant wood
27 Wonderland girl
28 Dark
29 Glide over ice
30 Tehran native
31 Brilliance
32 Sends
35 Pointed arch
41 Burst forth
42 Make unclean
43 Greeted,
militarily
44 Suffocate
46 Wrath
48 Racket
50 Neck-and-neck
51 Animal friends
52 Miss Adams
53 Yearn
54 Cageling
55 Hibemla
56 Mr. Arnaz
59 Put on
61 Lawmaker: abbr.
With
VIC Card
14-16 oz.
Ballpark Meat
or Efeef Franks
4.2S-S oz.
Tinas
Burritos.
With
VIC
Card
XO oz. Regular or Marshmalkrvv
Harris Teeter
a
Hot Cocoa Mix
In the Bakery
12Count jjj
Donuts
Erink Feature
In THe Bakery
2 liter
Diet Pepsi, Pepsi or
Mountain Efew
Fresh Baked
French Bread
With
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Prices Effective through fov. 4, 1997
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday, October T2 Through October 2fJ, 1997 In ltir (Jreenville Area Stores
Only. We Reserve The Bight To Limited Quantities. Wone Sold To Dealers. We 61adly .ccept Federal Food Stamps
iitf r � � mi n ir
V





The Eist Carolinian
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROYSTER Editor
CELESTE WILSON Mtrajmg Erjiror
MATT HEGF. Mnnrting Dmcnr
AMANDA AUSTIN Sews Ertorjr
JACQUELINE D. KKLLUM Aat. News Edrior
ANDY TURNER Ufeayto Editor
JOHN D.W1S Assrsam Uesryte Editor
AMANDA ROSS Sports Editor
TRACY I.At'RACH Assrsuni Sports Editor
CAROLE MEIILE Hesd Com Editor
JOHN MURPHY StaK Mintmor
HEATHER Bl'RGESS Wire Editor
Snwij tfie ECJ canmwvry strict 8R rtw �bk Carolflan pubrutws !2.00Q copes iwy tjtsrjsy mo Ihwsdw ft ttld tdnontt in tach nfrtion a rh
opfflon of to fatonH tart. The Em CmUmm �a��i lews n to ttkror. wiiiim2S�inS.�tiim�t)tiftatf !tiia�anctarrirwri'tt�fB
Cjrotansri rmms to rrfl to tftr or reiia ttnsrs tor oMKmm. M ItMB nwsr at sywd ijon staid ta tttraM to: wmon edittr. OK Em
Caroimian. Puactlioni Butofcnc, ECU. Green. 2J858-4353 for !omwion. caR 9G.329 6366
opinion
Thursday. October 30, 1997 5
oumew
We don't mean to sound like a broken record and we don't want to sound like your mothec We
simply want everyone to have a safe Halloween. By following a few simple rules, it's possible to
be around next. Halloween.
Whether this is your first Halloween or even if you're a veteran, it's common knowledge that
Halloween is an extremely huge event in Greenville. Downtown is going to be packed with
people anxious to celebrate.
Don't be dumb and go anywhere alone; there are going to people from all over this weekend
and there is no way for the police to be aware of everything that is going on. Many times the
day after Halloween people find themselves waking up in strange places � like jail or on the
floor of a stranger's house � or maybe they nevet find themselves again. Pay attention to your
surroundings because it's easy to get swept away in a crowd � especially in a large crowd like
the one expected this weekend.
If you are going to drink, drink responsibly. We know you have heard that many times before,
but we cannot even begin to tell you how important it is to be careful. If you are drunk, are you
going to have control of your body, are you going to be able to make responsible decisions? More
than likely not.
We're not saying don't have fun; we just want Halloween to be safe and fun for everyone.
Make sure that if you live in a dorm you know the rules for Halloween because they do change
for the event. Don't take candy � or anything else � from strangers.
Also, you should know that just because it is Halloween doesn't mean that the laws have
changed. Remember that the police officers want you and everyone else downtown to have a
safe Halloween. Don't break the law and don't be afraid to seek their help if you need it.
Be careful and responsible and know the laws. We hope that by doing that, you'll be around
for Halloween next year.
OPINION
Keith
COOPER
Columnist
African-American women: Feel self-pride
African-American women
at ECU should feel proud of
themselves as well. They must
challenge any system which
hinders their social progress
and that of their brothers.
academic excellence.
On Saturday, Oct. 25, about two
million women gathered in
Philadelphia, "city of brotherly
love in a somewhat
unprecedented display of unity.
The Million Woman March was a
grass-roots endeavor designed to
shed light on political, economic,
and social woes facing millions of
African-American women around
this country. Organized by Phile
Chionesu, a Philadelphia business
owner, and co-chairwoman Asia
Coney, the march was successful.
Luminaries Winnie Mandela
survivor of Apartheid of South
Africa) and Congresswoman Maxine
Waters (D-California) delivered
"fire and fury" speeches to raise
consciousness and awareness about
the plight of African-American
women in America.
Mandela's statement, "We have a
shared destiny, a shared
responsibility, to save the world
from those who attempt to destroy
it echoed the underlying purpose
of the march. African-American
women have power that, if used
appropriately and wisely, could
move mountains of hopelessness
and despair and build optimism and
sisterly love and hence, a more
prosperous future for African-
American women. Additionally,
Waters' remarks, "After today, we
will never be the same. America,
please be placed on notice: We
know who we arc. We know what
kind of power we have. We will act
on that power helped galvanize
and make the women present feel
proud of themselves and their rich
African heritage.
African-American women at
ECU should feel proud of
themselves as well. They must
challenge any system which hinders
their social progress and that of their
brothers. It's imperative that such
women work conscientiously to
strive towards achieving academic
excellence.
Clee Dozier, a sixth-grade
science teacher, made the following
impressive comments indelibly
etched in many memories: "When 1
get there, I want to see a sea of
black women who are united . .
.because we are fighting the same
issues that are in every city, state,
and hamlet of the world Teen
pregnancies, coping with single-
parent households, building
stronger families, economicsalary
disparities, AIDS, and the "crack
explosion" allegedly master-minded
by the CIA during Ronald Reagan's
presidency were core issues
discussed at the march. African-
American women and others on the
ECU campus and elsewhere should
debate these nagging concerns and
suggest solutions. Everyone in the
community should be the "burden
bearer" of these social problems
that tend to devastate too many
neighborhoods, create gloom and
doom, and threaten our fragile
democracy.
Chionesu was right when she
said, "Black women have taken care
of everyone else since the time
we've been in this country We've
taken care of white women, white
men, white children . . .our own
men, our own children. And now
it's time that we take care of
ourselves In any event, women
from various walks of life attended
the march to quench their thirst for
insight and the hard facts about
their plight in America. They were
encouraged and motivated to take
the message of hope and "can-do"
optimism to their communities and
demand meaningful, appreciable
change.
I L- I LD
to the Editor
Use space for major concerns
Getting The East Carolinian before
my first class starts has become
embedded into my Tuesday
Thursday morning routine for the
last four years now. Once I am in
class, 1 glance over the paper then
pass it to a friend. In the last several
months, while I have read over the
paper, I have wondered if TEC has
run out of fresh ideas to write about.
For instance, the Tuesday, Oct.
21 article entitled "Clockwise the
article answered the question why
all the clocks in the General
Classroom Building are incorrect.
When it was first brought to our
attention in the Letter to the Editor
page a couple of papers ago, it was a
funny thing to think about. But for
TEC to take a majority of the front
page to explain the answer was
ridiculous. A plain and simple
solution is to learn to carry a watch
whenever you arc on campus.
Don't get me wrong; I am not
dogging the author of the article. I
just think that it was not a major
concern to the people at ECU.
There is plenty of other important
newsworthy information that could
be and should be addressed.
Myisha Hutchinson
Senior
"The problem of freedom in America is that of maintaining
a competition of ideas, and you do not achieve that by
silencing one brand ofidea
Max Lerner, author, columnist. 1949
OPINION
John
DAVIS
Columnist
Honor Code needs higher visibility
In a system where obscure
legalese hidden in the back of a
book tliat only some people
have access to determines the
discipline of students and the
discipliners have no
accountability, there s
something shady going on.
When was the last time some
administrator called you and asked
how you liked that professor with
tenure who was hired to fill some
quota and can't teach to save his
life? Or whether or not you find
registration easy. Do you get the
classes you want? Do you feel books
are too pricey?
I hate to propose this idea, but it
has occurred to me that perhaps the
administration just doesn't care
about us students. I mean, they
don't have to care- we hold no
economic power over them in spite
of the fact that we are their
livelihood. We don't vote for them;
it's like we don't exist, because, if
you pay attention, you'll notice that
when they do know what we feel,
they listen nicely and then do
whatever they were planning in the
first place.
Truth is, students are a real
bother to administrators, who are
basically paper-pushers, and paper-
pushers don't like real people, who
don't fit in to their statistics and
rules and programs. Real people are
messy and have these annoying
things called lives which get in the
way of the process. To
administrators, procedure is the
goal of procedure. If administrators
could operate the university
without the bother of students,
they would.
Take this case as an example.
Two home games ago, Meg
Carmichael was happily tailgating,
drinking a punch that her mother
had invented, gets a ticket for
drinking on the tailgating field,
because it is illegal to drink any
form of alcoholic beverage on the
aforementioned field. Carmichael
talks to the assistant dean of
students, and pleads her case by
saying that if she'd known it was
illegal, she wouldn't have done it.
After all, her mom invented the
beverage; it's not going to be the
sort of thing that intoxicates you.
The assistant dean replies that
ignorance of the law is no excuse
and Carmichael should have known-
after all, it's part of the Honor Code
in The Clue Book.
The Clue Book does contain the
Honor Code � I looked. Looking
was not too easy though- copies of
the Clue Book were hard to find and
I resorted to an outdated copy I
discovered in someone else's room.
The Honor Code is the tiny print in
the back, just like a shady contract.
(There isn't, by the way, any clear
way outlined in the Honor Code for
us to discipline their bad behavior.)
So what does the Clue Book say?
Well, nothing, directly. There's a
whole section of Honor Code
(Article V) concerning alcohol and
how not to drink it, but it never says
directly that it's illegal to drink on
the tailgating field. In fact, it
mentions that "only beer and
unfortified wines shall be served"
can be served at "registered student
organizations, departmental or
school or college organizations
That sounds like you can drink on
the tailgating field. But, there's
another bit (Article V, section B)
which restricts alcoholic
consumption to Greenville law and
its illegal according to Greenville
Ordinance No. 358 and 360 to drink
on publicly owned property which
is what this University is.
So Carmichael is in trouble for
violating the Honor Code, which
seems to be more important than
actual honor to the administration.
Webster tells me that honor is
"adherence to principles considered
right, integrity Carmichael says
she would have adhered to those
principles, had she known of them.
Which brings me to "code which I
suppose is meant to mean the same
as Webster's definition 1: "a
systemized body of laws" but which
seems more like definition 4: "a
system of symbols for secret
writing
In a system where obscure
legalese hidden in the back of a
book that only some people have
access to determines the discipline
of students and the discipliners
have no accountability, there's
something shady going on. This
kind of passive communication does
not serve to keep students from
breaking the law or the Honor
Code. Why doesn't the university do
something to let every student
know that all alcoholic beverages on
that field are illegal? How hard
would it be to post a sign at the
field? Too hard I guess, or maybe it
would ruin their fun.
When the spirit of the law (don't
get drunk and harm other people) is
less important than following the
letter of the law (which took me a
good two hours to decipher), there
can be no honor, Honor Code or no.
LETTER
to the Editor
Ridley's served her term; time for change
I am writing in response to the
recent coverage of the city district
three race between Inez Fridley and
Steve McLawhorn.
Steve McLawhorn seems to be a
very good choice for the job because
of his previous service to his
neighborhood as president of
a homeowner association,
neighborhood quality, crime and
parking, are very well-chosen and
reflect the needs and desires of
other members of his district like
me.
As for Ms. Fridley, I don't
understand why someone would
want to stay on the council for so
very long. If there were any changes
wanted to make or any laws she
wanted to write, there has been
more than ample time.
Most of the people I have spoken
with feel that Inez Fridley has a
conflict of interest by serving on the
council and working for the upper
levels of the ECU administration.
Someone like Steve McLawhorn has
no conflict of interest. 1 feel that we
can trust Steve to represent the
interests of the people who live in
and around the university first
foremost.
I believe that it is clearly time for
progressive and positive change in
city district three and I hope that
your readers will join me by
supporting Steve McLawhorn on
Nov. 4.
Eddie Jones
Senior
Chemistry
PIRATES5HH
Do you know the law
concerning alcohol
consumption on the
fieldat tailgating
parties?
No, I don't knm the law. I don't think they are doing a
good'job communicating it to people. I have seen police
officers ticketing under age drinkers at the taunting
fit-Id, but if uo one is allowed to drink regatrlless of age
then they should just ticket anyone they see drinking.
Kristi Ferguson
Pte-nursing
Sophomore
Yes, I think that I do. I believe that the no alcohol
rule during tailgating is not strictly enforced. Even if
people do have alcohol, what are they hurting?
I think the only place it should be banned is
p in the stadium.
Joel Harris
ITEC
f
� , I '
f f
- V





r
.
i
i
far ECU
Or for a, portable CD player, whichever floats your boat
he administration has said they're Send us your idea for a new ECU logo
looking for a new university sym before our Nov. 18 deadline.
bol, something other than VeeVee Pirate. w, ,� r . ,
� We Li pick our favorite and give that per-
We at The Bast Carolinian would like to son a portable CD player. Then we'll run
p them in their deliberations. all of serious logos we receive in the Vec.
4 issue of the paper and on our website at
www.studen tmedia.ecu.edu.
Here s your big chance to help the ECU
administration and show your school
spirit (or how badly you really want a
portable CD player).
Bringyour entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
t � s iN
I,1
Vutonyour
thinking cap
send us
your logo idea.
in mmt
�v
mm
& y$ii. " �yiij.M. n.i-






r
The East Carolinian
Thursday, October 30. 1997 7
Some devilish
suggestions for
Halloween music
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
I will make it through this
Halloween without listening to the
"Monster Mash Promise yourself.
Try something different.
Halloween music has much more
to offer Well, "Monster Mush" is
tradition, you say. In this case (and
in many cases), tradition is just a
way of passing off things that are as
imaginative as Jim Carrey and
Adam Sandier in an all-night
poocing contest.
Halloween songs should be fun,
dark, scary (I'm talking Marian
Carey scary), evil, murderous (I'm
talking Bili ClintonVlnce roster
murderous), devilish, loud, quiet
and, most of all, really weird. There
are a lot of songs that have some or
all of these qualities, but they
never really get their due as
Halloween music. So, I will offer a
few listening suggestions for the.
forthcoming hell night. My
suggestions will be followed with
smart-ass and irrcfevant comments.
Thank you.
"Something's Wrong With You
Screamin' lay Hawkins: The
originator of "i Put A Spell on You"
is tailor-made for Halloween. He
used to open up his shows by
coming out of a coffin. This old R
& B tune is truly bizarre.
Afterwards, you'll wanna order up a
big plate of "baked, barbecue
gorilla ribs
"Chainsaw The Romanes: The
Ramones make it sound like
getting sliced and diced by the
maniacs from The Texas Chainsaw
Massacre is a lot of fun. Lcatherface
and leather jackets make a great
team.
Zf She Weird" Pixies: "Is she
weirdIs she whiteIs she promised
to the night?" Is Frank Black ever
going to be as good as he was with
the Pixies?
"Horn to Maximize Your Kilt
Count The Supersucters: Those
Supersucker boys are always ready
with useful information. They
could also probably tell how to
nLximizc your drug intake from
the looks of 'urn.
"Raving Heh" RUN-DMC: Now
that they ve given up their sinful
ways, RUN-DMC is only raising
heck. But, hell, check it out
anyway.
"Dark Night Blasters: This song
is included on the From Dusk to
Dam soundtrack. It's even scarier
than Quentin Trantino's acting
abilities.
"Choppin' Mall Honeymoon
Killers: Jon Spencer's little honey,
Cristina, plavs the geetar on this
one. The perfect Halloween band
name.
"I Kill Children Dead Kennedy's:
"God told me to skin you alive
growls proto-punk Jello Biafra.
This song is about as twisted as
they come. Biafra would make a
good serial killer, already has his
excuse down pat.
"Curtains For My Baby The
Chrome Cranks: For six minutes
plus, Peter Aaron whispers and
gasps about butchering his baby,
while the Cranks spew out eerie
background music. When he starts
talking about "burning your
brains you'll have to make a
mental note: Don't date
psychopaths or merrlbers of The
Chrome Cranks.
"Flying Saucer Rock-n-RoU Billy
RileyandHis Little Green Men: All the
energy, abandon and goofiness of
early rockabilly is captured in this
song. Billy Riley was the king of the
hillbilly punks. This song was
definitely from a different planet.
7 Was a Teenage Zombie The
Fleshtones: Perfectly silly song from a
perfectly silly movie. That means
its good and stuff.
7 Was a Teenage Werewolf The
Cramps: Like Screamin' Jay, The
Cramps were made for Halloween.
Just about any of their songs would
fit the Halloween spirit (as long as
you arc a bikini girl with a machine
gun).
"I'm Gonna Murder My Baby Pat
Harr. Hare was a label mate of Billy
Rilcy's on Sun Records. He really
did murder his baby and died in
prison for it. If Slayer was from
Memphis, they'd sound like this.
Sin Alley, Vol. 4, various artists:
This compilation from Crypt
Records has a side drunk and a side
SEE HAUOWEEN. PAGE 9
EASTERN
EXPOSURE
Qrafljjt
The cast and crewof An American Cafe.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF PEOPLEACT
An American Cafe, a play about life in
eastern North Carolina comes to the
ECU campus Nov. 7
Miccaii Smith
MAKE WHITER
No matter what your plans are for
the month of November, take time
out on Nov. 7 to see An American
Cafe, an original play written,
produced and directed with
Eastern North Carolina as its
focus.
Yes, the show is free and yes,
you may even find it relevant to
your life, especially if you're a
North Carolina resident. Although
the play is about ways in which
dramatically different people
relate to each other, the characters
all have their experiences in North
Carolina as common ground.
The plot unfolds in a coffee
shop, where a young Black
businesswoman named Lavinia. a
Mexican immigrant named Carlos,
a young Jewish woman and several
other racially diverse characters
meet and discuss their
experiences and individual ideas.
The idea for the play originated
in May of 1996, when a Pitt
County community theatre
organization called People-Act
lxgan a project which would bring
high school students. Pitt County
residents and new U.S.
immigrants together in
conversation groups. "We got
people who didn't know each
other, of different races and
backgrounds, to talk to each
other recalled Janice Periquet,
managing director of PeopleAct.
These groups discussed
literature from American writers of
different races and backgrounds.
They shared personal insights into
life with each other. The
transcripts from these discussions
were used by writers Todd Lovitt,
Deborah Morrison, Janice
Periquet, Carl Campbell and Gay
Wilentz to form the script for An
Ameruan Cafe.
Lovitz used his computer
expertise to design multimedia
aspects for the production,
incorporating hypermedia and
video aspects into the play. The
actors, whom Morrison described
as "a tightknit communitywho
have a lot to say about what
America could be in its ideal
state personalized the script
with improvisation and have tried
to present the many different
attitudes and individuals of Pitt
County with accuracy.
Sponsors of the ongoing
PeopleAct project, which will
hopefully produce something
entirely new next year, include the
North Carolina Humanities
Council, Perkins Trust, ECU and
the Z. Smith Reynolds
Foundation.
ECU's involvement with this
production is another good reason
to see this play.
"PeopleAct and the ECU
multicultural literature program
are partners in this project said
Wilentz, ECU Project Director.
The play can help to give you
SEE EXPOSURE MGE 3
tor An Amorican
Cafe include:
Friday. Nov. 7 at
at 8 p-m.
Saturday, Nov. 8,
Moore Han, UNC-
Saturday, Nov. 15,
The little Theatre,
Buuilteth City
State University
&.
moviereview
Seven Years lacks epic magic
Get ready for a
magic carpet rave
Pitt matures with
Seven Yean in Tibet
Di.k Williamson
SBMOR WRITER
7 OUT OF TO
No matter what you think of Brad
Pitt as a person or actor, you have to
admire his determination to not just
be another Hollywood poster boy.
When audiences first took notice of
him in Thelma & Louise, Pitt was
destined to be a sex symbol,
whether he liked it or not. How
could a man with such godly good
looks, complete with silky blonde
hair and icy blue eyes, not be a sex
symbol. Pitt was young, beautiful
and popular. It didn't matter if he
could act or not: he was everything
Hollywood wanted in an superstar.
Pitt, however, had other plans. In
an effort to mature as an actor and
not an icon of glamour, he sought
roles that weren't tailor-made with
him in mind. Within the last few
years, Pitt has surprised the critics
and his fans by portraying such
eclectic characters as a reckless and
obsessed police detective in rhe
horrifying Seven, a lazy-eyed nut case
in Terry Gilliam's psychologically
thrilling 12 Monkeys, and an IRA
terrorist with a conscious in the
flawed but intriguing The Devils
Own.
Pitt's latest venture clearly
illustrates his desire to be taken
seriously as an actor. Seven Years in
Tibet is not onlv a somewhat riskv
Brad Pitt in Seven Years in Tibet.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES
5th St. on Halloween
21 Jump Street
role for one of Hollywood's biggest
stars to take on, but it is also a risk
for Hollywood in general.
Hollywood, being what it is, likes
formulas that don't require much
thought or soul searching. Making
any film too intelligent can be
financial suicide.
Based on Heinrich Harrer's real-
life memoirs, Seven Years in Tibet
does require some effort on the
audience's part. Not only does the
film revolve around a man's search
for his own personal identity, it is
also set in a religious and political
culture that few Americans truly
understand.
The overriding plot is formulaic
enough, though. Harrer (Pitt) is an
arrogant, self-obsessed Austrian
mountaineer who joins Germany in
its quest to conquer one of the
highest peaks in the Himalayas. As
fate would have it, the conquest is
interrupted by an avalanche and,
worse yet, World War II. Inevitably,
Harrer finds himself a prisoner of
war, along with fellow German
mountaineer Peter Aufschnaiter
(played by the always wonderful
David Thewlis).
Eventually, Harrer and
Aufschnaiter escape and brave the
ruthless wilderness, hoping to find
freedom at the end of their journey.
Along the way, the two men, despite
their differences, become friends.
The two find salvation from
hunger and death when they sneak
into the Tibetan city of Lhasa, a
place forbidden to all foreigners.
Luckily, the city's leaders decide to
welcome their foreign strangers. It
is here that the two men begin to
discover their true selves. While
Aufschnaiter discovers peace
through a woman with whom he
develops a romantic relationship,
Harrer discovers peach through an
unusual yet intimate relationship
with Tibet's young spiritual guru,
the Dull Lama himself.
Through their mutual
interactions, the Dali Lama learns
about the world outside Tibet and
Harrer learns the power and peace
SEE SEVEN. PAGE 9
Firehouse Tavern
hosts
Halloween rave
SHANNON MEHK
Sllh'f WHITER
The youth culture has always found
a sense of freedom in partying.
In the sixties, there was
Woodstock. In modem times, there
are the all night parties known as
raves.
A rave, by definition, is to
declaim wildly; or to utter in
madness or frenzy. By modern
standards a rave is a social event. It
is an all night excursion. In most
cases it is a dance party held in a
warehouse, night club or open field.
It is a marvel of youth culture,
where a sense of awareness and
community comes alive through the
response of music, dance and a
positive mood.
On Halloween night, at 3 a.m a
rave will be brought to the
downtown scene in ECU. The goal
of the promoters behind the rave
was to completely transform the
Fire House Tavern. There will be 70
DJs coming from all over North
Carolina to play their electric dance
music known as techno.
The birth of raves are said to
have been clandestine parties
sprouting around the English
countryside in the late eighties.
Raves have matured since then and
are occurring in every country in the
world.
People that have gone to raves
say that it is much more than just a
party; it is an experience. Ravers
often talk about The PLUR (peace,
love, and unity) and The Vibe, or
the subjective sense and quality of
the rave.
"At a rave, the DJ is a shaman, a
D.J. Bell
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MM MASTER J.
priest, a channel of energy-they
control the psyhic voyages of
dancers A part of their concept of
raves is built on sensory overload
said raver, Brian Behlendorf.
The purpose of the music played
at raves is to heighten the effect.
Techno that is played has the
freedom of lyrics. It is a sound that
takes a person to different levels.
The DJ weaves something unusual;
hypnotic. Many ravers bring glow
sticks and other visual aids to
heighten the effect.
Raves are seen by many ravers as
refuge from society's repugnant
sides.
In fact, there are even some
people so committed to the PLUR
and the rave scene that they believe
raves are the vehicles of social
change. The positive effects of
raving spreads into the peoplewhose
lives are involved and beyond.
Sean Nemeth, one of the
organizers behind the Firehouse
Rave, said, "A diverse crowd comes
together for one night. When you go
to a rave and see people different
from you come together in one
mind, it is a borderline religious
experience
"One foot in the door, the other one in the gutter
"I Don't Know"
The Replacements
� i mil � wummmmmm
mftfllgmm ill iVi'i ill IIIII �.






r
8 Thursday, October 30, 1997
i ft 'style
The East Carolinian
October
30 THURSDAY
Carrie and Scream at 8 p.m. in
lendrix Theater (runs through
;3N'ov.l.)
� Pirate Underground from 8-
SO:45 p.m. in Mendenhali
I Cassat String Quartet at 8 p.m.
Jn Fletcher Recital Hall
Edwin McCain and
lighting Gravity
The Attic
Carbon Leaf
Firehouse Tavern
Junior Brown at
Cat's Cradle in Chapel
Hill
Evil Weiner
spooktacular at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
at
at
Aiica Furton
,31 FRIDAY
� Midnight Madness at
Mendenhali
Opera Scenes, John O'Brian,
' director, at 8 p.m. in Fletcher
Recital Hal1
Unsound, Kuttphat at The Attic
Long Stem Daisies at Firehouse
Tavern
Band Masquerade
Night at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
NOVEMBER
1 Saturday
Family Fare: Michael
Cooper at 2 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium
Opera Scenes, John
O'Brian, director, at 8 p.m. in
Fletcher Recital Hall
Original Nantucket at
The Attic
Mike Corrado Band at
Firehouse Tavern
Low, Ida, Shark Quest
at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
3 MONDAY
Writers Reading Series:
Alice Fulton and
Kathleen Halme in
Mendenhali, Room 244
at 3 p.m. and in Willis Building
Audiotorium at 7 p.m.
Travel-Adventure Film: High
Country Adventure, 4 and 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theater
Faculty Recital, Mary Burroughs.
horn; with Alisa Gilliam, piano, at 8
p.m. in Fletcher Recital Hall
Mike Watt at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
4 TUESDAY
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
5 WEDNESDAY
ECU Poetry Forum
(free poetry
workshop) at 8 p.m.
in Mendenhali 248
Symphonic Wind
Ensemble and
Concert Band, Scott
Carter and
Christopher
K n i g h t e n ,
conductors, at 8 p.m.
in Fletcher Recital
Hall
Comedy Zone
featuring Mike
Mesmer Eves at The Attic
Kathleen Halme
Ongoing
"Cajun Music and Zydeco"
exhibition at Mendenhali Gallery
through Nov. 10
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our It's
Showtime column? If so, please
send us information (a schedule
would be nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
Isycvur
cold weather? ?"
Bring your vehicle to Hastings Ford to have it winterized
Vjour vehicle needs the cooling system flush�iil�d-ith
jsh anitfreeze, and the inspection of alfbelte and hoses
r cracks hfbe-He cold weatfier hits.
licle for $5
�r your appointment
758-0114 or 1-800-654-3429
Service and Parts Mon - Fri
7:30 - 5:30
30HASTINGS
FORD
QuaIitXtQ&&

752-7303
The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
NG's Legendary Nighteki
VoredJ at ECU and
lop TOO Colhge Ban in
Nation by Pteyboy magaxme
October 1997
!
Thursday Oct. 30th
Atlantic Recording Artist
Edwin McCain Band
Special Guest: Fighting Gravity
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKUUY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC &
VIDEO WASH PUB � ATTIC
" Halloween
Unsound Kutphatt
Halloween
Handout
with
Costumes for
Cash
V
Original
Saturday Nov 1st
Nantucket
WSFL Listener
Appreciation Concert
Dooi P
Wed Nov. 5" thru Thurs Nov. 6
Mike Mesmer "Eyes"
"The Worlds AMwnnjiummfc.
No itii i
Most Powerful
Hypnotist4
vff
;i�'(�"ilc(,l. (l,
lukii liult-r� rt
Coming Next Week
Too Skinnee J's Cravin Melon
Nov. 7 Nov. 15
ustomer MjkP.
preciation
D
aps
Heroei Are Here Too!
t
Wednesday, October 29th, through
Saturday, November 1st, Only!
8th
Huge Hk k Issi i Silk! I ANNIVERSARY
iii�T�5ooii Sale!

Many Other Great Deals
Step By & Pick Up A
Flyer Fer Futher Details!

757-0948 � 116 E. 5th Street
:dsAW A
SS MONTH)
tmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmr

AIDS: a personal perspective
miAtio skkmu.rn adhkinsim,
bsiKs iuuni rn AIOS.
Oct. 30 i)7
. .�. w &. � � �
Speakers include
Michele Benson-
HIVSTD educator and
a person living with AIDS
p.m
Sponsored by: Student Union Lecture
Committee and Health Promotion & Well-Being.
�'�
Copyright 1997 Kroger Mid-Atlantic, items Prices good in GreenvfSe. We reserve the right to fcitt quantities. None sold to dealers.
Items Prices Good Thru Nov. 1.1997 WecLM Thur MI fri 511 Sat 1 I
Caffeine Free Diet Coke,
Diet Coke, Sprite or
Coca Cola
2-Liter Bottle
FOOD & DRUG
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Always Fresh.
Always Kroger.
Your Total
Value Loader.
Frozen Poly Bag
Birds Eye
Vegetables
iTviaft a
Buy One Get One 5 �
a arm �Bate
HOT OR MILD
Valfeydafe
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1-Jb.Pfcg.
Buy One Get One
FREE!
2Aqz. Stark Mary Jane, Peanut
Butter Kisses or
BracH's Milk 2
Maid Caramels
14-oz
3
Tamarack Farms
Fresh
Apple Cider
5th Avenue or Nutrageous
Hershey's Snack
Size Candy
12-1 3.8-02. Bag
a j aBw Frozen
25K Tombstone
7 rB Pizzas
Gallon T 189-24.8
2Sg
i-oz AT
1
Hf ��� 'Ji






The East Carolinian
style
Thursday. October 30. 1997
Free Pregnancy Test
Mad WWhile You Wait Free And Confidential
1 1Services and Peer Counseling
�k r��
HIaiwm la i ic7yiictiiy v-i iii
1 'gf. Kfe 1� 1Hours Vary as Needed
209-S S.Evans St Ptttman Building (near courthouse) Greenville, NCAppointment Preferred 757-0003
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)758-6909

csm
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
Thursday, October 30, 199
Kernel Goat
LentoWZMBforbandiiterviews
Deep Fuzz
SUPPORTY
UR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
For more information, see our web page at vww.ecu.edustudehtunionpirateunderground.html
IIHH
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 1
�,VDAl-
If only they 4 knew she had the -rMS'�s
pOWc 1 � flmY
f
.t��rb
VJ United ArtistsPHjKL 1
Oct. 30 and Nov. 1, 8 pm
Oct. 30 and Nov. 1,10 pm
Oct. 31 -Midnight Madness: Films will run concurrently starting with Carrie at 9:30 pm
FILMS ARE FREE FOR ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF MEMBERS. (ONE GUEST ALLOWED) WITH VALID ECU ID.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL THE STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-6004. NO BACKPACKS ALLOWED IN THEATRE.
Be safe
lake care of
yoursell
tomorrow night.
You have to
watch out for
folks who get in
the way of your
safety
downtown and
elsewhere on
t ialloween
night. AKo.
watch out for
yourself. Don't
j;et half-cocked
and think you
can conquer the
world or
chainsaw
hookers. Act
like you have
some sense.
Seven
continued Itoin page 7
that can come with modesty.
humility and youthful fascination.
Both I larrer and the Dali Lami
grow as friends and leaders within
their peaceful community until the
Chinese government decides Tibet
must be ruled under its communist
power, even if it means that Tibet
must be overtaken with military
force.
Director Jean-Jacques Annaud
works hard to make his film an epic.
something layered with substance
and meaning, and he half-way
succeeds. The film feels large,
encompassing a narrative that lasts
nearly a decade and detailing the
development of several key
characters over that time. Abo,
nnaud and scriptwriter Becky
Johnston (who shows much more
talent for story here than she did
with The Prince i Ttdes) provide a
nice cultural and political context
for those who are uneducated in
I ibetan history,
But the don't delve too deeply.
Half the Film is taken up with the
journe to 'libel, the other half
focuses on llarrer's relationship
with the Dali Lama. While the film
deals with the complex cultural and
political issues of Tibet in an
admirable manner, those more
familiar with the situations may
find it too simplistic.
'Therein lies the film's main
problem. Admittedly, it is an
enjoyable, beautifully
photographed and expertly acted
film, but Annaud's vision doesn't
really challenge or overpower its
audience. It does demand
attention, but it doesn't leave one
with the sense of awe and wonder
one would expect. Some essential
ingredient is missing, some
timeless sense of mysticism or
magic that prevents Annaud s vision
from qualifying as a true epic like
Ih Last T.mperor, just like Annaud's
critically acclaimed film. The Lover,
was in reality a soft-core porn film
disguising itself as an art film, Seven
Years m Tiltet is a mainstream studio
film disguising itself as a modern-
day epic.
But that shouldn't bother all
those lusting Pitt fans out there
Pitt not only glistens with physical
beauty once again, but he also
carries his own as a mature actor.
His performance is fueled with
such energy and determination thai
it's clear how much this film meant
to him.
I lothwood as a whole seems to
care about Tibet now. Martin
Scorsese has been working on his
own Dali Lama film, and Richard
Gere (who has been speaking out
for Tibet for vears) will soon release
a film dealing with the political
turmoil in that region. It's the
biggest trend since alien invasions.
If Tibet is the next big trend in
movies, then Seven Years in 'Tibet
isn't a bad wav to start it.
Exposure
continued Iwm page
an idea about what the
multicultural literature program is
all about, and it may help unite
members of our community who
would otherwise be estranged from
each i ther. The audience membci
will even have chances to voict
their own feelings about America
culture and how working together
can make America stronger.
Free tickets for An American (-ife
are available only at the door on thf
night of the show. 'This will be at
Fletcher Auditorium at 8 p.m. on
November 7. i
ffQgggff
SAVp
Don't Miss our Annual
HALLOWEEN SALE!
!fillovccn iAilc runs Ibureoa?,
�ctobcr 30 m$ vriCvav, October 31.1
Discounts apply to resular price apparel. Subject to supply onj
hand No other discounts or prior purchases apply.
$15 OFF I $10 OFF I $5 OFF
Your Choice
STARTER�
Coat
TOPS by
Champion�, Polartec�,
Jones & Mitchell�
Short Sleeve
T-Shirts
rAno ae always, our Clearance Kiel; carries a
selection of apparel at Mscounte of 5(
25 OFF
Select Polos
any CHAMPION
Sweatshirt
$5 OFF
Any
Sweatshirt
$25 & up
Ronald E. Dowdy
Visit our display at the Technology Fair, Thursday, October 30, in Mendenhall Stud
Center Multi-purpose Room!
AND, if the Pirates win in Louisville this weekend, shop the "Take it Away Points Sale"
on Monday and Tuesday. We'll take 1 off select regular price appan
scored by the Pirates, up to 30! See store for details
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright Building328-6731
irr, 7 00 pmSaturday: 9:00 am 3:00 pm
Halloween
linued Imm iaiR
weird. The weird side offers up
a lot of obscure goofy ghoulisb
numbers, including "Graveyard
Rock" from 'Tarantula Ghotrl
and Her Grave-diggers and
Carlos Casal's "Don't Meet Mtf
Frankenstein,1' where, for som$
reason, Frankenstein talks lik$
lin and the Chipmunks
Great stuff.
"Mr. H hirly The Replacements.
()k. so this song has nothing to
do with Halloween. However,
when ou come home from
downtown after drinking 299
Old Milwaukee's. you'll
understand its relevance then.
You don't want to -visit Mr.
Whirlcv. trust me.
" Ain't Superstitions Hoxclin'
ll'ot: That voice is Halloween.
You don't get anv scarier or more
real than that. Also, check out
Jack-O-Fire's Wolf cover,
"Moanin at Midnight It has
the Halloween spirit and the
spirit of I loulin' Wolf. �
There's plenty of other good
Halloween stuff I didn't
mention (any sung Nick (!ave or
Robert Johnson has evet done),
but this list is big enougQ
already. s that's it. Gome tr
rlunk of it. you could probably
lust play Nfariah ('arc all night.
That would scare the boogers
out ol me.
"�-






10 Thursday. October 30, 1997
sports
Run like the wind
The East Carolinian
Mike Ford's thoughts about the men's
competition
Ford is the Men's Cross Country assistant coach.
Runners Fall Rise Campaign in action
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
STAKK WRI'ISK
Last year's ECU Men's and Women's cross
country teams went in opposite directions.
After the season the men s team hoped to
build on their impressive campaign while
the women looked to put their frustrating
season behind them.
This summer, senior Mike Marini sent a
letter to each of his teammates. In the
letter he wrote that this season would be
ECU's "Fall Rise Both the men's and
women's teams hope to complete a "Fall
Rise" Saturday at the GAA Championships
in Willkmsburg, Virginia. The women look
to rise above rivals and the disappointments
of last year, and the men hope to complete
ECU's rise to becoming a contender in
GAA cross country.
Mike Marini, Brian Beil, Justin England, Stuart
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEK
1) Jamie Martce
2JttuartWHi
?3) Brian 8H
14) Jeremy Coleman
5) Justin f rtgtaad
6) Sean Connolly
7) Mike McGehee
8) Rod Reeves
?9 Andrew Worth
10) Matt Schweitzes
11) Larry Lewis
�13) MalfflC��
Ike Marini
24:52 (86)
25:0$ W)
25:261971
25:30 (97)
25:32 (97!
25:39 (93)
26:00 (87)
26:25 (96)
26:26 (96)
26:33 (89)
26:34 (96)
26:3X396),
26:38 (97)
The East Carolina women's cross
country team heads into the CAA
Championships with hopes of defeating the
Seahawks of UNC-Wilmington and the
ghosts of 1996.
At last year's meet the women's team
finished a disappointing seventh place. The
low finish was a fitting end to a frustrating
season.
"Last year we had a really bad season
said Head Coach "Choo" Justice. "Things
just fell apart. It's almost like the football
team this year, the way the wheels have just
come off
The Pirates began the 1997 season bent
on improving and not repeating the
collapse of the year before.
"Early in the season we weren't running
that well but the girls' attitudes were all
really good and they trained really hard,
which was different from last year where
attitudes and training habits were not
well Justice said. "I kept saying we're
going to be OK if we just keep at it
like we've been doing.
"As the season has come along, the
girls' times have started to drop.
They're getting better every week
Justice said. "We're improving, but
we're still a step behind some of the
teams that we want to beat
This season's tough schedule gave
the Pirates a chance to gauge their
improvement against some of the top
teams in the country,
"We took a beating at times as
opposed to going and running against
some really easy teams and winning,
but we felt that running against
tough teams would pay off in the long
run Justice said.
Earlier this month, the team
finished eighth at the North Carolina
State Championship Meet. The
team was beaten by rival UNCW
"We came back from the meet and
the girls said that when we go to
conference we just go for broke and
fay ir on rhe line Justice said. "Our
goal is to finish higher than
Wilmington
"In some ways the fact that they
beat us takes a little bit of pressure
off us, because now they're expected
to beat us. They're the hunted and
we're the hunters Justice said.
With his team focused on
overcoming its opponents and the
disappointments of its recent past,
Justice knows his team is well-suited
�fop the challenge ahead.
"They're a pretty close-knit
group, and' 1 think when they make
up their mind to do something, they
can get it done Justice said. "So,
William and Mary
James Madison
East Carolina
Virginia
Commonwealth
UNCW and
George Mason
Remaining Teams
"I think William and Mary's going
to win it outright. In the five
years I've been coaching, they are
as strong as the've ever been.
Thier depth is unbelievable
"James Madison should finish
second because they're about as
strong as they've ever been
"If James Madison gambles a
little too much, if they go out too
fast, then ECU may sneek up on
them and we could be fighting
for second position
"I believe that Virginia
Commonwealth, UNCW and
George Mason are all better
teams now than at last year's
conference championship
"As a whole our conference is
very legitimate"
"Choo Justice's thoughts about the
women's competition
Justice is the Women's Cross Country head coach
James Madison
and
William and Mary
East Carolina
Remaining Teams
Robin Bates and Karri Hartiing hope to lead the Lady Pirates to a streak
of improvement.
FHOT0 VI JBHATHAK 8REH
Will,
hopefully their determination will carry
them through to it
Last year's men's cross country team
was among the best in school history.
They gained respect for the program by
finishing third at the 1996 CAA
Championships. This year's squad
includes many of the main contributors
from last year and some talented
freshmen. Their goal i� to improve on last
year's performance and take cross country
to the next level.
Hampered by injuries, the Pirates had a
slow stan to their 1997 season.
"Until (the State Championships
there hasn't been a week that we've all
been completely healthy or haven't had a
nagging injury or some crazy fluke injury
said Assistant Coach Mike Ford. "Out of
16 guvs, 14 have had something kooky go
en.
The season began looking promising at
the important William and Mary
Invitational in late September. In addition
to being the first chance CAA rivals get to
race against each other, it is also the same
course on which the CAA Championships
will be held this weekend.
"Of the first five meets we ran, William
and Mary was the only meet that we really
geared up for Ford said. "It was the only
meet that we really performed solidly with
the least amount of injuries
The success continued at the North
Carolina State Championships. Their fifth
place finish was not indicative of their
strong showing.
"We went out and ran with the big
dogs. We got right up there and ran solidly
behind the top ten leaders. At the mile
mark we had four guys in the top twenty
runners. That's very bold Ford said.
In addition to the team finally being
healthy, another reason for the team's
stronger showings has been their strategy
to combat their lack of depth. In cross
country your score is based on your team's
five fastest times.
"Our top four guys' goal is to stay
within 14 or 15 seconds of each other. Our
fifth guy is going to be a team effort of our
next six guys Ford said. "Our strategy is
"The best two teams in the
conference are James Madison
and William and Mary
"We're battling Wilmington and
Mason for the 3rd, 4th and 5th
spots
"I think we're strong enough
that we're strong enough that
we're ahead of the other 4 teams
in the conference
to go out like gangbusters, and whoever is
left standing out of those six, we need one
to pop through and have a good race
"It's not important for everybody to get
out there and run a great race, but it is
more important for everybody to gamble
and try and go out as fast as they've ever
gone out Rrd said.
The team hopes their recent success
continues at this weekend's CAA
championships. Entering the meet, the
Pirates know they are a very dangerous
team.
"Put us in as the dark horse said
Marini. "We've all worked very hard and
this team has jelled at just the right time.
This is what we trained for Marini said.
"We would just like to do better than
last year. I think we're better this year
said junior Jamie Mance. "We won't
accept anything less then third. We'd love
to shoot for the top teams. We'd love to
shoot for William and Mary and JMU
"I think we need to shoot for second
Ford said. "If we race that way, only good
things are going to happen
Pirates go for two in a row
Botfomof-the-
barrel Louisville
hosts ECU in
Conference USA
match-up Saturday
-
AMANDA ROSS
sfoR t s guit.oi
ECU is vying for their second conference
win this Saturday against Louisville. The
Pirates are coming off a 32-10 victory over
Memphis last week.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
When ECU was in the process of
becoming a member of
Conference USA, it was Louisville
who was trying to keep them out.
� Now this Saturday, for rhe first
time since 1967, the two teams
will meet
ECU is coming off their first
conference win, and are looking for
their third win of the season, while
Louisville is coming off a loss to
Houston.
Louisville, (1-7, 0-3) hosts
ECU (2-5,1-2) on Saturday for the
3 p.m. kickoff. The Cardinals are
currently in last place in the
conference, while ECU sits in'fifth
place. ECU leads the overall
series, 2-1.
Coach Steve Logan said he
hasn't and won't address the
players about the off-the-field
conflicts with Louisville earlier in
the year.
"I'm not going to talk to them
about it Logan said. "The way
we've kind of come through these
four or five weeks is keeping our
focus internal
One aspect of ECU's game
they will need to focus on is the
running game. Not one time this
season has ECU netted over 100
yards on the ground in a single
game.
"We've got to have a 150-yard
rushing day Logan said. "If we do
it, I think a lot of things will fall
back into focus for us
The much-anticipated return
of Scott Hariey this year has
been a disappointment, due to
an ankle injury he suffered at
West Virginia and a young,
inexperienced offensive line.
Hariey has 230 yards this year,
compared to 993 yards after
seven games last year.
Red-shirt freshman Jamie
Wilson has stepped in and
produced as rhe team's second
lea'der rusher. Wilson has gained
199 yards on the ground with
three touchdowns and said he is
glad the coaches are confident
in his ability.
"I'm pleased I'm getting a lot
more playing time this year
Wilson said. "It feels good to
know thev have confidence in
me
ECU quarterback Dan
Gonzalez said this team is used to
running the ball in the past and
needs to get the ground game
going to balance themselves out.
"We vc been accustomed to
running the football around here
the last few years Gonzalez said.
"That's something we need to get
going again to make us a balanced
offense
In the air, Gonzalez has 1,415
yards with six touchdowns and six
interceptions.
Defensively, the Pirates will
have to ward off a Louisville team
that loves to throw the bail,
?especially out of the shotgun
' formation. Quarterback Chris
Redman has thrown for 2,349
Young players having
rough time
Men's soccer
struggles to gain
needed wins
Tennis player's act
is all together
P.xi'i. Kaplan
SI UK Wlll'KR
The ECU men's soccer team is
drying off from their 3-1 loss
Sunday against the Panthers from
High Point. ECU's record fell to 5-
10 and 1-4 in the Conference.
The Pirates only goal of the
game came from the head of junior
forward Wyatt Panos as he headed
in a pass from Junior Jon Smiley at
the 59:48 minute mark in the
second half. The Pirates went into
the game expecting an easy
victory, but in rainy conditions like
Sunday anything can happen.
"At this point we really can't
afford to look past anyone or
expect any easy wins Panos said.
In their last few outings the
Pirates have been having trouble
getting themselves into the "W"
column.
"In the beginning of the season
we were playing well and were
very enthusiastic until about a
quarter of the way through the
season Panos said. "With the
losses we've had, moral has really
fallen, we really haven't played
well since our win against
Campbell. Many of the guys seem
like there just trying to get
through this season and arc already
looking forward to next season
Head Coach Will Wiberg
credits the season to young team,
playing more experienced
opponents.
"We're a very young team who
have been losing to teams with
much more experience, our three
remaining conference games are
against teams ranked in the top 25
in the nation Wiberg said.
"Losing to teams with more
experience is part of the growing
process, a team of 22 freshmen and
sophomores takes time
The Pirates already are
foreseeing a successful future with
only one starter graduating from
the team after this season.
"We're only losing one senior
starter this season (Jay Davis) who
has been there for us a lot Panos
said.
Unless the Pirates win one of
their three remaining conference
games, they will enter the
tournament in eighth place, and
most likely will play the nationally-
ranked Eagles of American
University. The Pirates' scoring
leaders this season are Panos, with
nine goals, and Scott Pokorney,
who has scored seven goals.
Michelle Martin
achieves success in
all that she does
SB FC0TIAU WE 12
JF.RKMY ANDKRSON
STAFF WRITF.R
For most student-athletes,
balancing time between practice,
games and schoolwork is a tough
task. Michelle Martin, a
sophomore from Lynchburg, V&
seems to have found the perfect
combination.
Martin, who plays tennis under
the direction of coach Bill Moore,
plans to major in
exercise physiology
here at ECU. She
currently has a 4.0
GPAand hopes to get
into medical school.
"Michelle is an
overachiever Moore
said. "Everything she
does, she docs welt
Martin is no
stranger to success.
She started playing tennis almost a
decade ago.
"I started playing tennis when 1
was about ten. I had a really good
coach and he motivated me
Martin said.
xrtin remains motivated here
at ECU. According to first year
assistant coach Bryan Jackson,
Martin has matured far beyond her
years.
"Michelle wants to get better
Jackson said. "She has the
maturity of a 25-year-old. We wish
we had six or eight more just like
her
Martin s hard work is starting to
pay off. After a promising fall
season, Moore is looking for good
things out of Martin this spring.
"She (Martin) is playing at a
very high level. Her only fault may
be sometimes she tries too hard.
She will definitely be in the top
half of the lineup this spring
Moore said.
Martin still says she has a few
aspects of her game
she needs to improve
on.
"I need to work on my
volleys and ground
strokes in practice
Martin said. "I'm also
working on being
aggressive and coming
to the net
Martin said the one
thing she works
hardest on, however; is the mental
aspect of the game.
"I have a fighting mentality. I
always fight back Martin said.
With that attitude and work
ethic, Martin will be successful on
and off the court.
"Michelle is an
overachiever
Bill Moore
enms Coach
ECU's Jon Smiley battles with UNCA's Kane Lawson for possession of the ball.
PHOTO BY ClAY BUCK
in if �i� n t






H"
The East Carolinian
Thursday. October 30. 1997 11


IullIt Ma
756-6278
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers



Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. "Si Touch Of Class
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
mmmmmmm
I I TUESDAY:
j WEDNESDAY
� Is??
THURSDAY:
j9 FRI. &SAT:
I � 10 OR MORE GIRL
�" DANCERS EVERY
Sty(OT NIGHT!
Located 5 Mile West of Greenville oa 264 Alt (Behind Auddin lino Scnicc)

I Thurs 6 pm - 8 pm
Come Join us in the
New A.M.E. Campus Ministry
ECU University
501 E. 5th Street
Methodist Student Center
m
- -e.
S
1
1
19
P?
Our Purpose
The Purpose of the A.M.E. Campus Ministry is provide a link between ECU campus
students and the Greenville area hoses of worship. The Ministry will seek to achieve
"Koinonia" and foster "community" among students at ECU. Those searching for a meaning-
ful life will find His love and peace through the study of the Word, Christian fellowship, Christ-
ian music, educational forums, and recreational activities.
Our Goal
The goal of the A.M.E. Campus Ministry is to mobilize and equip students for Christ-
ian living and service where our motto, "God our Father, Christ our Redeemer, and
Humankind One Family" will become a living reality. The aim is to aid in the emotional and
spiritual development and growth of students in Bible study groups, counseling, roundtable
discussions and rap sessions.
Our Objectives
to provide a vehicle to learning the keys for Christian living
to mobilize college students for service to the Lord through campus, community
and church based outreach projects
to create a safe environment for relationships based on a strong foundation of
Christian values and beliefs
to establish a Christian support group (In-reach) that will identify and assist in
meeting the diverse needs of the college student
S3
as
g
9
�9
3
it?
tt New AACE Campus Ministry ECU University - 301E 5th Street Methodist Student Center 51
758-4591 -752-4715 For more info visit our website at, WWW.netmar.comuserselbd
The Elbo is available for private parties Call 758-4591 or 752-4715
���ii-ki aggj jyfaiii In in packages
TUESDAY NIGHT LIVE
eciai guest
e Area
Night Long
WEDNESDAY CLASSICS NIGHT
1 t Specials,
The Best in Class!
all the current hits tc

Da?
fecials
70 80's and
ttle beers and
sjs5-
Thirsty Thurs. LADIES NIGHT
.50 cents Draft arjp
Plus the
jKvaift1
Long
RUSH HOUR FRIDAYS
Best in ClaHocf & Hot Nelv Rock
from 8:30mir4o Ery Ffday
1 cent Draft arlrj $i .00 Shels All Nite
Don't miss our nfeyv brails orjPi'SJIry Friday
SATURDAY DANCE FACTORY
Our New Format N
Plus All Nite $3.00 Dou
Specials Plus
Bring your E.C.U. Ticket Stub a
Party Music
1.00 Bottle Beer
$3.00
get $1.00 off Admission
bftfUk
QBs thrive in state
of Washington
PULLMAN, Wash. (AP) � Brock
Huard and Ryan Leaf may not sec
eye to eye about a lot of things, but
at least they see eye to eye.
Both quarterbacks are 6-foot-5
passing machines who have led
Washington and Washington State
into the Top 10.
Huard, of Washington, is the
nation's No. 2-rated passer. Leaf,
of Washington State, is rated No.
4.
They've never met, except on
the football field, where Huard
passed Washington to an overtime
victory in last year's Apple Cup in
Pullman.
This season the two teams arc
on a Nov. 22 collision course that
could decide which goes to the
Rose Bowl. It would be the first
Apple Cup since 1981 that had a
Rose Bowl berth hanging in the
balance.
Leaf, an intense competitor
from Great Rills, Mont wasn't
much interested in discussing his
cross-state rival.
"I don't want to meet him
Leaf said Saturday
He noted that Huard, from
Puyallup, Wash plays for the
higher-profile Huskies, located in
the media-rich Seattle market.
The Cougars lie across the
Cascade Range in tiny Pullman.
Investigations show
Harrick violated
rules at UCLA
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Pacific-
10 Conference and NCAA
investigations show Jim Harrick,
now coaching Rhode Island,
committed multiple NCAA rules
violations during the late stages of
his eight-year tenure as UCLA
basketball coach.
The violations include
Harrick's lying to UCLA
administrators, improper
telephone calls to recruits and
misuse of tickets.
But they were very minor
not even minor Harrick told the
Long Beach Press-Telegram for
Tuesday's editions.
Any penalties against the
UCLA program are not likely to be
severe and will not be determined
until late November or early
December the newspaper said.
Harrick was fired by UCLA on
Nov. 6, 1996, for violating the
NCAA's extra-benefits rule and
lying about it.
Harrick told the newspaper
that he doesn't think he or UCLA
will be penalized by the NCAA's
committee on infractions over the
violations.
UCLA fired Harrick almost
immediately after discovering he
had lied to its administrators.
However, the NCAA could order
sanctions be imposed on Harrick
by Rhode Island, which hired him
in May.
Lying to school investigators
about the circumstances of the
Oct. 11, 19, recruiting dinner is
considered the most senous of the
violations.
Mason still upbeat
as Minnesota
awaits Michigan
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) �
Minnesota's Glen Mason insists
these aren't trying times, despite
the fact that his team has suffered
a pair of gut-wrenching losses over
the past two weeks.
There is no time to sulk really,
not with No. 5 Michigan on the
horizon Saturday in Ann Arbor,
Mich in the 81st battle for' "The
Little Brown Jug
If anything, Mason believes his
Gophers (2-6, 0-4 Big Ten) will
benefit from a 16-15 loss at No. 1
SEE BREAKS PAGE II
THE STUDENT'S CHOICE
JACK WALL
City Council At-Large


Supports ECU Students, Faculty & Staff
Will work to improve parking and traffic
10 years experience serving the citizens of Greenville
VOTE on November 4th
- Graduate, ECU School of Business, 1964
Former Board of Directors, ECU Pirate Club
Call 321-1996 for a ride to the pall!
7 am - 7 pm
I VANT TO GO TO
CHICOOQOOOO st
Fri. Oct. 31st 14th Annual Halloween Fiesta!
COSTUME CONTEST
1st Place $100 Gift Certificate
Downtown Greenville
757-1666
"fMbmH
lln
'$�� ��






��
12 Thursday. October 30. 1997
2li
0!
The East Carolinian
I
M
Breaks
continued from page 11
Tc
Pcnn State on Oct. 18 and a 22-21
loss to rival Wisconsin last
Saturday.
"The players have had a great
attitude; they have worked
incredibly hard
Mason said Tuesday. "They
feel they have been getting
better
Mason agrees, but he can't help
but ponder what those two Big
Ten victories would have meant.
"It's hard to hang your hat on
someone saying you're better or
feeling that you're better Mason
said. "Now, they can hang their hat
on beating Pcnn State and beating
Wisconsin. Then they can say, 'All
that hard work is worth it But the
bottom Kne is, they still didn't get
paid for their effort
It's not going to get any easier
Saturday, as the Gophers are being
set up as homecoming bait in front
of an expected 106,000-plus at
Michigan Stadium.
The Wolverines (7-0, 4-0) are
third in the country in total
defense (216.9 yards per game)
and first nationally in scoring (8.1
points per game).
Michigan's 18 interceptions are
easily tops in the nation.
NBA hires two female
referees
NEW YORK (AP) Two women
were hired today as full-time
National Basketball Association
referees, marking the first time in
major pro sports in the I'nited
States tttat females will officiate
regular-season games in an all-
male league.
The hiring of Dee Kantner and
Violet Palmer was announced by
the NBA, which told them not to
comment about their
appointments until Wednesday
night.
Kantner, 36, was the supervisor
of officials in the WNBA Palmer,
33, was an official in the women's
professional league. Both have
officiated women s college games.
Kantner and Palmer have been
working exhibition games the past
three weeks.
They also officiated preseason
games last season, although they
did not make the final cut for the
regular season.
"They've gotten better each
time out NBA vice president of
operations Rod Thorn saidv Just
like the other referees, they've
come back from the summer, had
training camp and preseason and
gotten used to being out there
Kantner and Palmer will join
three other new members of the
NBA's 58-member officiating
crew.
The hirings were not
unexpected. The league office
sent a memo to all teams over the
summer ordering them to set aside
a spare room as a locker room for
female officials.
!
' v tv
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring $3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
WE'RE MOVING!
In order, to enlarge and redecorate our
downtown store, we will be closed
Wednesday & Thursday. We will reopen
at our new location in Arlington Village
on Friday. Come by to see us!
We will reopen our downtown store in
three to four months.
atalog
onnection
Division Of SES
Arlington Blvd. M-S 1(
M-S 10-6 Sundav 1-5
Football
continued from page 10
yards this season, with 17
touchdowns and 11
interceptions.
"What they've done
offensively is scary because they
have taken the Redman kid and
put him into shotgun every
snap Iogan said. "They're
throwing 50 to 65 passes a game
With Louisville relying heavily
on a passing attack, the Pirate
defensive backs know they have
their job cut out for them.
"I know I'm going to have to
take care of my job in the
backfield, me and my other db's
safety Kelvin Suggs said. "We
know he's (Redman) a good
quarterback and they have good
receivers � they're big and
physical
ETSU
East Tennessee State University
JOIN OVER 2,290 GRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLED AT ETSU!
WE OFFER OVER 35 PH.D ED.D ED.S.
AND MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS, PLUS
CERTIFICATES IN BUSINESS AND NURSING. TUITION
WAIVERS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS, INCLUDING
ASSISTANTSHIPS FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS, ARE
AVAILABLE.
I
For more inform a ion, contact us at:
School of graduate Studies
East Tennesse State University
Johnson City, Tennesse
(423) 439-6149
(423) 439-5624 fax
E-Mail: gradsch@etsu-tn.edu
When repsonding, please refer to 002
Visit ETSU Online at
http:llwvow.etsu-tn.edu
355-1644
bw-3
Grill &Pub

1 14 East Fifth Street 758- 9191
�l
Coming Soon:
BW-3 Game Room!
- foozball
- pool tables
- video games
- 100 CD jukebox
J&W
Best Halloween
Party in
town. Prizes,
Giveaways,
1.50 Icehouse &
Miller Lite
An E.C.U. graduate, who understands student problems,
MIDNIGHT
MADNESS
OCTOBER 31 1997
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER 9nm imtii ?nm
ECU ID GETS YOU IN FREE 9Pm untllGm
A GUEST PASS LETS YOU BRING A FRIEND IN FOR FREE
Council Rep. fotf'Jones, Aycock, Scott, Belk & Tyler dorm areas.
SEND
JSM
DOWNTOWN
City Council District 4
NOV. 4tH
Paid for by the committee to elect Van Brown
BINGO
COSTUME
CONTEST
HORROR FILMS
CARRIE and SCREAM
DANCE
VIDEO KARAOKE
FREE FOOD
DRINK & MUSIC
LASER STORM
WIZARD ON CALL
PSYCHIC
HOTLINE
FORTUNE TELLERS
GHOULS CAFE
MIDNIGHT
BUFFET
ECU students ore admitted wild ID end moy bring dm jiml wilti I guest pass. Guest posies on ovoSoble beginning on Moodoy, Cktobei 27 fiom the Community Service Desls horn 8om unKI
Midnight aid the Control lidet Office on the man Hoot of Mendonhol Student Cent from 8:30om until 4pm On Hofloween. guest posses moy be pkked up ot the Commonify S�f�ke Desks until
9pm, the Cenmi Ikkel Offke until 4pm, end me Student Rwtohon Cent Cuslomei Sonic Desk fiom 4pm to 9pm Guests must hove o guest pass lot entrance to Hie movies. M events oie tree
4-
.1. I.HlllM

km am.
j j m. am.





r
�� m

The East Carolinian
classitieds
Thursday, October 30. 1997
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Effldencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Security Deposit
-
i
i
� wttti peeemeflniik tw� apupon.�pW j
100197 not vulid withany oWetogwon i
i -wesuk common sow 1 or 2 ctedfooms.
H bath, range, refrigerator, free watertee.
'wasftefslrfyer houps. free basic cable in
'some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from,
campus, ECU bus services.
-uawsiow park; 2 bedrooms, 1 bathi
range rerrl&aratqiv dishwaher, free;
iwntSfcewer, afld basic �nole. approx800
"sq f washerdryer lookups.
Jh! it; 6 blocSB frati campus.
. WISIfcNOWeD UNITS AVAILABLE
, 4� Properties Iwve 24 hr. emergency memttnance-
TWO OR THREE FEMALES needed
to take over lease ASAP. $220 per
month, 14 utilities. Please contact
Sheila, Yuka, or Lauren at 353-2471 or
leave a message.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apt. 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utili-
ties. Call 752-1652.
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAPI
TWO blocks from campus.
$153.33month plus 13 utilities, free
cable. Dogwood Hollow Apartments.
For more info, contact Rebekah at 758-
5573.
CANNON COURT. 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
i
u.
ij��2SLLV
inoQement
For Sale
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP; TWO
blocks from campus, one block from
downtown. New apartment, only $173.
Must be fun, outgoing, ECU student
preferred. Call 758-3684
WALK TO ECU, 3 Bedroom, 1 12
bath, central heatair, carpet, stove,
ref dishwasher. $630mo. Call 321-
4712.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share beautiful new 3 bedroom house
on ECU bus route. Very reasonable
rent. Call me at 752-2489.
ROOMMATE NEEDED, MALEFE-
MALE TO share 3 bedroom duplex on
Lewis St. 12 block from campus. Own
room and bath $230 a month plus 13
utilities. 752-8118.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed for Players Club apartment.
Preferred undergrad. Call 353-2885,
ask for Heather, John or Paul.
CYPRESS GARDENS. 1 ft 2 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
4 BEDROOM AVAILABLE AT Play-
ers Club Apts. 6-month lease begin-
ning Jan. Call Melissa at 321-7613.
FEMALEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED - Players Club Apts. 14 of
rent and expenses. Call Melissa at 321-
7613.
1 BEDROOM APT. 1 block from cam-
pus. Nicely furnished. $300 per month.
Available Nov. 1st. Cable. 758-9831
SPECIALIZED ATB - Now on sale.
Save lots of St. Close-out prices
on last year's models. Com in
and tost ride today. Ask for Bonny
or Derrick, 355-8050.
FUJI TAHOE MT. BIKE, all Shimano
components, Onza bar ends, best offer
around $200. Call Fred, 353-6228.
2 YEAR OLD APPLE 380 Performa
with color Stylewriter 2400 printer
$1,000.00. 2 year old Gateway lots of
extras $800.00. Full computer desk
$80.00. Call Joe, 752-8783.
RALEIGH COMMUTER BIKE. SHI-
MANO grip shift, 21 speed, lock, 1
year old, top condition, sell for $150.
Call Burkhard 551-9069.
1996 NINJA 800. EXCELLENT con-
dition, never been dropped, less than
1500m and under warranty. Great for
commuting. Asking $4500 OBO. In-
cludes helmet and cover. Call 353-
5810.
FREESTYLE BIKES BY HARO.
Mongoose, Hoffman, and
Diamond Back. Chock out our
freestyle accessories. Call 355-
8080. Ask for Derrick or Benny.
STUN GUNS! SAFE AND easy to
use. 919-946-6830.
FREE MOTOROLA PAGER. AVAIL-
ABLE options include voice mail, e-
mail services. Call 1-800-784-6452 Id
1675167 or write to Free Pagers, PO
Box 4112, Greenville, NC 27836-2112.
1997 JEEP WRANGLER-SE. White
with black softtop. Immaculate condi-
tion, only 6K miles. 18 months left on
factory warranty. Many options.
$15,000. Call Rick 816-4423(w 355-
0888(h).
Help Wanted
MALEFEMALE NEEDED ASAP. A
couple blocks from campus. Only $212
month, 12 utilities and split phone bill.
Call 757-2890.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS & New
Rec Centerl One 2 bedroom apt. above
Catalog Connection - $475 a month!
One 2 bedroom apt. above Percolator
Coffeehouse $500 a month) Both avail
able December Ist-one month depos
requiredl Call Yvonne at 758-2616
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease at Players Club. $220
month plus 12 utilities. Call 353-3481.
Please leave message.
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PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Gain Hands-on
experience and liuild vour resume. Last
summers average earnings 7,223.
Minimum GPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES.
THE Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches for
the winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 7-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours range
from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching.
Flexible work schedule around classes
and holidays. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Fe-
bruary. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please call
Ben James, Michael Daly or Quinton
Manley at 830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO WORK
part-time or full-time 2-3 days per
week 10-30 hours a week, $10 per
hour. Must pass credit check, criminal
and drug test. Send resume to PO Box
493, Tarboro, NC 27886.
EARN $7BO-$1500WEEK RAISE
ALL the money your group needs by
sponsoring a VISA fundraiser on your
campus. No investment and very little
time needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for information today. Call
1-800-323-8454x95.
PART & FULL TIME positions avail-
able am or pm. Cooks, dishwashers,
servers. Applications accepted 9:00-
5:00, Ramada Plaza Hotel. Above aver-
age wage with experience.
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips)!
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available! I Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wantedl! Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.icpt.com
PART-TIME POSITION DISTRIBUT-
ING advertising materials. No selling
involved. All materials provided at no
charge. 1-800-YOUR-JOB. www.acm-
net.composteringyourjob.htm.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-$1,500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
Greek Personals
NIKI NOREN - YOU MADE us proud
by representing us during Homecom-
ing! We love you! Love, your Alpha
Delta Pi sisters
THANK YOU DELTA ZETA for com-
ing to our house for dinner last Thurs.
We had a great time. Love, Alpha Xi
Delta
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to
thank all of the ladies who enjoyed the
Bring-A-Date at O'Malley's last Tues-
day night.
ALPHA PHI HOMECOMING WAS a
great success. It was very special to
celebrate 125 years with our interna-
tional president, the first group of
women to live in the house, as well as
all of the other alumnae who joined
us. Thanks to all sisters who put hard
work into planning and decorating.
Love, Alpha Phi!
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
SIGMA soccer team on your victory
last Wednesday. Love, your Sigma
sisters) Sigma Rocks!
SIGMA PI THANKS FOR the Ha-
waiian Social. We had a great time.
Let's all get "laid" soon! Love always.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA HOPES eve-
ryone at ECU has a Happy Halloween!
TO THE BROTHERS AND pledges of
Theta Chi, Friday night was a blast, the
bike rides were fast. We tore up the
dance floor, sorry Clay you couldn't
score. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta
ALPHA XI DELTA. THANK you for
having us over for dinner Wednesday
night. We had a great time. Love, the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta
THANKS TO MAYA VANDYKEN for
all of your help with Homecoming.
You did a great job! Love, your Sigma
sisters
LAMBDA CHI, WE ALL had a great
time at Harry's last Thurs. Can't wait to
get together again soon. Love always.
Alpha Xi Delta
THANK YOU GENNELL AND
Chasdity for your hard work on Home-
coming. Love, your Delta Zeta sisters
DELTA ZETA. CONGRATULATIONS
ON 95 years of strong successful con-
tinuing sisterhood. From October 24,
1902-1997.
THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO
SUPPORTED the Sell-A-Date. Sigma
Nu and Pi Kappa Alpha, we had a great
time! Xi Love, Alpha Xi Delta
J
Alpha Xi Delta
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU �� JU
$- � si t T rti We Need UmberUnd boots
C A S H snd.hoe.IGoodJe.ns.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins - Also Sicken G�Id Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THUR5-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking tot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
I I) I 1
local Wholeinte Nutrition Componv
Making port time, neat, outgoing
poiMMtoilly, eomewhut computer ���,
y&k good telephone ��� MMdueL
Duties include errends, pocking & shipping, gen-
eral office supports. Transportation a must,
located 2 blocks from Kinko's on Tenth Street
Hours: 1PM to 5PM Mf. Can work around
school schedule if necessary $6.25 hour. Coll
Ken direct� 830-1817 MF 1PM-5PM.
Travel
��AAAAISPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cancun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, 8t Florida. Group dis-
counts & daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, & go free! 1-800-234-
7007. http:www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
SPRING BREAK
��
GAriCUri
IsrMa
NOW HIRING REPS!
httniffwww.eridleasswwmertours.com
Book Today
VisaMCAmexDisc
1-800-234-7007
Other
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
CONGRATULATIONS TO SHAR-
LYNDA FLEMING on being chosen
for ECU'S 1997 Homecoming Queen.
We are very proud of you. Love, the
sisters of Ladies Elite
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H3726 for current
listings.
$100O'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-3726.
Announcements
INTRODUCTORY MARTIAL ARTS
CLASS: TAI CHI: Learn flexibility and
breathing techniques to increase con-
centration and decrease stress! last
date for registration Oct. 31. $10 stud-
entmember fee. Call 328-6387 for de-
tails.
THE NEXT MEETING OF The Pitt
County Chapter of the American Dia-
betes Association will take place on
Monday, November 3, 1997 at 7:00
p.m. at the Leslie-Gaskins Building at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital. This
month's topic is "Which New Med is
for Me? and will feature John O'Bri-
en, MD, from the Diabetes Institute in
Norfolk, discussing the new medica-
tions available for treating type 2 dia-
betes. We will also have a "Healthy
Eating Tip of the Month Refresh-
ments and door prizes will be avail-
able.
tTme management work-
SHOPS: MONDAY from 11:00
a.mm12:00 noon and Tuesday from
3:30-4:30 p.m. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development will be
offering these programs the week of
November 3rd. If you are interested in
these workshops contact the Center at
328-6661.
CONQUER TO APPALACHIAN
TRAIL: Backpacking trip through She-
nandoah the weekend of Nov. 7-9. Be-
ginnerIntermediate skill level re-
quired. $48 student cost covers trans-
port and gear. Deadline for registration
is Oct. 31. Call 328-6387 for details.
TEST PREPARATION WORKSHOP:
WEDNESDAY from 3:30-4:30 p.m.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program the week of November 3rd. If
you are interested in this workshop
contact the Center at 328-6661.
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL
COLLEGE Students - General College
students should contact their advisers
the week of November 3-7 to make ar-
rangements for academic advising for
Spring Semester 1998. Early registra-
tion week is set for November 10-14.
SATURDAY, NOV. 1, GRADUATE
recital. Ken Kreuzer, Composition, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4:00 p.m. Satur-
day Nov. 1 -Opera Scenes, Herbert
Eckhoff, Director, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 p.m. Sun. Nov. 2-Senior Re-
cital, Joel Henry Tucker, Trumpet, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 2:00 p.m. Sun
Nov. 2�Senior Recital, Leigh Anne Ri-
denour, mezzo-soprano, A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 4:00 p.m. Sun Nov. 2�
Senior Recital, Andrew T. Wright, per-
cussion, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
p.m. Mon Nov. 3�Faculty Recital,
Mary Burroughs, horn with Alisa Gil-
liam, piano, A.J. Fletcher Recital hall,
8:00 p.m.
CHRISTIAN PRAISE AND WOR-
SHIP Service Sunday at 5:00 p.m. So-
cial Room Mendenhali, sponsored by
Campus Christian Fellowship
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY from 3:30-5:00
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of November
3rd. If you are interested in this work-
shop contact the Center at 328-6661.
MIDNIGHT MADNESS! THE DE-
PARTMENT of Recreational Services
in conjunction with Mendenhali Stud-
ent Center is sponsoring a HAUNTED
HOUSE on HALLOWEEN NIGHT from
10:00 p.m1:00 a.m. Check out the ac-
tionif you dare!
A HAUNTED FOREST. THE Recrea-
tion and Leisure Studies Department
at ECU in conjunction with Piggly Wig-
gly is sponsoring "A Haunted Forest"
on October 28, 29 and 30th from 6:00
to 10:00 p.m. The event is to be held
rain or shine at the Frisbee Golf
Course on East Carolina's campus. Ad-
mission is $2 for adults and $1 for
children under 10. Special guests for
this event will include the Governor's
Program and Power of One.
THE RCLS SOCIETY WILL be start-
ing a can foot drive on Nov. 3rd . It will
go through Nov. 24th. The cans donat-
ed will go the the Greenville Commun-
ity Shelter. Also, officer nominations
will be taken during Nov. 3rd thru the
7th, put them in RCLS suggestion en-
velope on RCLS bulletin board.
ARISEADAPTED RECREATION:
SEATED AEROBICS classes de- '
signed to target the specific needs of
ARISE participants. Class begins Nov.
1. Call 328-6387.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION WORK-
SHOP: WEDNESDAY from 3:30-4:30
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of November
3rd. If you are interested in this work-
shop contact the Center at 328-6661.
ADVISING SESSION FOR PRE-OT
Students will be Wednesday Novem-
ber 5th in Room 203 of the Belk Build-
ing. 5:00-6:00 will be questions and an-
swers with current OT students and
6:00-7:00 will be advising and signing
of registration forms. If you can not
come to the Wednesday night session
please come to the OT office between
8:00 -5:00 from November 3rd and No-
vember 14th.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 28 FACULTY
RECITAL, Jay A. Pierson, Baritone,
John B. O'Brien, piano, A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31,
Opera Scenes, Herbert Eckhoff, Direc-
tor, A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Fri. Oct. 31-AII Hallow's Eve Benefit Or-
gan Concert, Janette Fishell, Director,
featuring the Phantoms of the Organ
Department, St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 4th Street, Greenville, 11:30
p.m.
ECU SADD-STUDENTS AGAINST
Destructive Decision- cordially invites
you to take part in the Mendenhali
Midnight Madness Friday, Oct. 31st
for a night of Safe Fun!
KrCKBALL TOURNEY: REGISTRA-
TION MEETING on Tuesday, Nov. 4,
5:00 p.m. at MSC Room 244. 328-6387
for details.
CLIMBING WALL: TOURS AND in
struction scheduled for Nov. 6. Call
328-6387 for details.
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS - ALL
General College students who intend
to major in the Department of Commu-
nication Sciences and Disorders and
have Dr. Robert Muzzareili or Mrs.
Meta Downes as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, November 5 at
5:00 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Advising
for early registration will take place at
that time. Please prepare a tentative
class schedule before the meeting.
Bring Taking Charge, Your Academic
Planner, and use the worksheet to de-
velop your schedule.
E.C.U. LAW SOCIETY WILL holdlts
next meeting on Thurs. , Oct. 30th at
7:00 p.m. in Rawl Room 103. Join us as
we discuss law and what it takes to get
into law school. Open to all majors!
"TIPS FROM A PRO" and FREE DIN-
NERil! Thursday, November 6 at 4:00
p.m. in MSC Great Room 3. Share
leadership experiences and philoso-
phies with Earl Brown, Attorney at
Law. Pre-register by calling Student
Leadership Development Programs,
328-4796 or stop by MSC 109 by
noon on Nov. 5th.
TURKEY TROT: DEADLINE FOR en-
try is Nov. 6. Contact Dept. of Rec.
Services at 328-6387 for more details.
DO YOU NEED MONEY? Learn to
manage your personal & organization-
al finances. Manny Amaro, Director
University Housing Services will pres-
ent "Money Matters" Monday, No-
vember 3rd at 4:00 p.m. in MSC Multi
Purpose Room. Contact Student Lead-
ership Development Programs at 328-
4796 for details on Interact Programs
BEGINNING CUMBtNGBELAYING:
NEXT ADVENTURE Workshop on
Nov. 3. $5 student costs covers all.
Dept. of Rec Services 328-6387
Support student-run media
ast Carolinian
To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept.
? Firc�mail$40 JEC
? Second class mail$110.00 �Qj
fawn and run Greenville, NC 27858
Subscriptions begin with th first s
for on (1) ��'
studentmedia
Check Us Out!

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"
I
I
What's your
favorite?
We're looking for your favorites in
our first Reader's Choice survey.
Just complete the survey form printed
here and drop it by our office or put
it in campus mail to us.
Or point your browser to our website
at www.studentniedkecu.edu and fill
out the survey on-line.
Either way you choose, enter only
once. Put do it before 5 p.m7 Nov. 7.
Once you enter, well throw your name
in with everyone else who responds
and draw out a WINNER at random.
That person will take home a Casio
hand-held color TV. Could winning be
any easier?
Then, look for the Readers Choice
favorites featured in a tabloid special
edition on Tuesday Nov. 18.
I the 1 � �
eastcaroliman
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY WHEN COMPLETED. CLIPAN� SUBJTjjEJEAST CAJRCMJNIAN

What's the best place to get breakfast after a late night? j
i
i
fo2AChoice
What's the best place for lunch between classes?
What's the best place to take a date for dinner?
What's the best place to get a good pizza?
What's the best place to live off-campus?
Who has the best
ic to go?
Whose fries stay the hottest all the way home?
What's the best place to buy a keg?
What's the best place to dance all night?
What's the best place to buy CDs?
What's the best place to get a haircut?
What's the best place to park illegally on campus and get
awav with it?
What's the best reason to skip class?
What grocery store best fits student's budget?
What's the best place to have your car repaired?
What cab company has the friendliest drivers?
What laundry won't eat your socks?
Name
Phone.
L,
?
V


Title
The East Carolinian, October 30, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 30, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1236
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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