The East Carolinian, October 28, 1997






TUESDAY
OCTOBER 28, 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
�OUJ�� 73. ISSUE t7
Officials say stadium completion expected soon
Stadium needed for
graduation, as
well as sports
Hol.l-i H rki.n
�, I I I W K I i I K
Many days and home games have drifted
past and still it seems the stadium
construction drags on. 1 low ever, there is an
end in sight.
Bruce Five, director of facilities planning,
design, and construction, said the stadium is
75 percent complete and should be finished
by this December. For now. the major delay
is ;he delivers of part of the handrail system.
"We want it (the stadium) completed
and as it should be Five said. "We need for
the contractor to finish it. and (then) we
inspect it and accept it
Five adds that the university is also
concerned about the length of time for
construction because the
building is not only needed
for sports. but for
graduation as well. Over SI
million dollars worth of
maintenance work is being
planned or is already being
carried out by existing
construction efforts.
In addition to the
improvement of seating
capacity, steps are also
being taken to make the
stadium more accessible CO
handicapped fans and their guests. The
grounds will be given a make over as well,
adding landscaping and an enclosed brick
wall. '
"The idea is as you are upgrading the
"The idea is as you are
upgrading the quality of
the facility, you need to
upgrade what is existing
Bruce Flye
Director ot Facilities. Planning. Design, and
Construction
quality of the faeilitv. you need to upgrade
what is existing said Flye, adding that the
university has plans to build a new track,
softball field. 500-seat banquet hall and a
22.000 square-foot combination strength
and conditioning building
for athletes.
For now. however, the new
addition to the stadium will
remain closed until it is
perfect. The university
polices the stands before
every game and requires
the contractors to keep on-
site staff to ensure that
people wander into the
work area. Hopefully, the
stadium will be completed
by the new deadline to
alleviate the annovanee of both students
and staff.
"We're not worried about what we will
get. the biggest aggravation is how long
we've taken to net it Five said.
University officials claim the upper deck, which still stands as an empty shell, will be ready for
graduation in December.
PHOTO BY AOAM DALPQRTO
Medical
School one
of six sites to
perform new
surgeries
Dr. Randolf Chitwood performs a minimally
invasive surgery
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECO MEOIAL SCHOOL
YKfrJh
Expert surgeons may be
best in the country
Am win Bk iis
s I I I tt K I I I �
The School of Medicine is on the
cutting edge.
The medical school has been granted a
national protocol allowing them to be one of
six sites to perform new minimally invasive
surgeries. A team of six surgeons,
nicknamed the "dream team have come
together to research and perfect these
surgeries.
The "dream team" consists of six
doctors: Randolph Chitwood, William
Chapman, Lorraine Tarfa, Jospeh F.lbcrry
Ken McDonald and David Deaton.
Chapman, an assistant professor of
surgery, is excited about the performance
and rhe vast areas of expertise collected tor
this team. Working at Fast (Carolina School
of Medicine for two years and specifically
working on perfecting this surgery with his
colleagues allows Chapman to see a vast
future beginning for minimally invasive
surgery.
"It has been a hard two years to get to
this point of development. I lead ofSurgery
Dr. Chitwood has lead the way for E( to
become a center of excellence. Our team
has specialist in fields of heart, vascular,
morbid obesity and cancer treatment
Chapman said.
In the past two years, the medical school
has proven to be a prime candidate for
research on these new techniques because
of the expertise in different fields and a
tremendous success rare with the
minimally invasive surgeries.
"The school was issued two protocols
allowing us to be the only school preform
minimally invasive surgeries on obesity and
colon cancer. We were one out of sis sites
selected for vascular minimally invasive
surgery. These protocols are research
oriented, and companies are in a hurrv to
SEE SURGERIES 3
TODAY
sunny
High 60
WEDNESDA'
High 68
Mark Harritan and Sharlynda Fleming smile for the cameras and the crowd after this past Saturday at Homecoming after being named 1997-98
Homecoming King and Queen.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
L'iVil I J
moment
of glory
ECU crowns
third black
queen
M Ki, I KRITK
B I X I M 1 X
SI OR U K I I 1 K
Former Homecoming Queen crowns Sharlynda Fleming
as the new Queen.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Homecoming King
Mark Harritan
(Kappa Alpha Order)
Homecoming Queen
Sharlynda Fleming
(Ladies Elite Service
Organization)
Shortly after the half-time festivities of
Saturday's game. newly crowned
Homecoming Queen Sharlynda Fleming
said her crown was a symbol of victory
despite the odds. Only the third African
American to receive the title at ECU,
Fleming said she was told repeatedly that
she could not win.
"All I would say when people tried to
discourage me was. "Through Christ, all
things are possible Fleming said, adding
that the weekend's outcome was a great
boost to her faith.
The junior chemistry major (Prc-Med)
said even her choice to come to ECU was
scrutinized. Many people from her
hometown of Roanoke Rapids told her she-
had made a had decision.
"I was told that because I did not
choose a historically black university that it
would be hard for me to have a social life
and that I would never get proper
recognition for my achievements
Fleming said. "So one thing I've learned
from all of this i not let the opinions and
words of others shape your future. It's all
up to what's m your heart and how hard
you're willing to work to get what you want
in life
In addition to being the 1997
I lomecoming Queen, Fleming is active in
a number of campus organizations. She is
the Chaplain for Ladies Flite, the service
organization she represented; a resident
adviser for I'mstead Hall; a member of
Revelation Steppers; a member of
Koinonia Campus Ministries and a
member of the American Chemical
Society. She also volunteers to have lunch
with Alzheimers patients and is involved
with an after-school tutorial program.
Ladies Elite President Taiisha Coins
said Fleming's election as queen sends a
message of how ECU students want to be
perceived and represented.
"Sharlynda) has an essence that
follows her said Coins. "1 believe it is that
essence that compelled the student body
to choose her. She is a remarkable
representative for Ladies Flite. Being a
new organization to ECU, we needed this
boost of exposure to let people know the
kind of women we are
According to Fleming, the service
organization is important because the
members do more than talk about
problems. They take an active role in the
community to provide solutions and relief.
Fleming added that she takes the greatest
pride in being a member of Revelation
Steppers and Koinonia campus ministries
is it allows her to share the source of her
strength with others.
Fleming said one of the highlights of
winning was her chance to meet
Chancellor Richard Fakin, about whom
she had always heard a lot, but never knew
personally.
"Meeting the Chancellor was really
special Fleming said. "I le is very kind and
caring, and he seemed genuinely happy for
me. My encounter with him broke a lot of
stereotypes about people in high places.
About Fakin. Fleming added. "Being
there at 1 lomecoming was more than just
an appearance for him. I le is really
involved with student life, and all this
proves that he does more than just sit in
SEE VICTORY AGE 3
TUESDAY
1
DidlaJKnow
Did you know that the
campus is 385 acres and
that the School of
Medicine campus is 46
acres? The two campuses
have more than 110
buidings combined.
opinion7
Students should be in
touch with their SGA
executives
lifestyle8
Students gear up to
spend Halloween in
Mendenhall, instead of
downtown
sports.
Residents,
officials
discuss
parking
situation at
forum
Students fight
back after recent
lot closings
AMBER TATI vi
s I l-l tt KITER
After the recent closing of the
parking lot near Umstead Hall,
students are in an uproar.
Students began to fight back
by calling a meeting on Oct. 15 in
VVhite Hall with officials from
Parkin and Traffic Services.
I lere. these students were able to
express their concerns.
Many students are upset and
feel they have been treated
unjustly by the failure of Parking
and Traffic Services and Facilities
Planning to communicate with
them in a more efficient way
about the closing lots.
Notification was given to
student decal holders on Sept. 12;
only three days later, the lots
closed.
Students were notified that
the lot was closing through fliers
that were placed on the
windshields of the cars that were
in the parking lot. � .�
"Basically, 1 was told 'you have
two days to get (your car) out or it
would be towed said Brian
Mosely, a junior and resident of
I'mstead Hall.
Alternate spaces were
indicated on the fliers which also
stated there would be parking at
Minges Coliseum and at the Fifth
and Reade Street lot.
Decal holders feel these
parking lots are unsafe due to the
fact that there is poor lighting.
"They're adequate, but 1 do
not think the lighting is adequate
enough said Raymond McCill, a
freshman and resident of
Umstead Hall.
Students who did not receive
a flier heard of the closing by word
of mouth or a telephone call from
from Parking and Traffic Services
as they threatened to tow the
residents' cars.
Facility Services could not give
a definite reason as to what kind
of construction was to take place,
when the lots would reopen or if
they would reopen at all.
"I called Facilities Planning
twice and was hung up on said
Moselv.
11
Pirate football moves
the only direction
possible, up
the east Carolinian
� I
.858
icross 'rora Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328 6558 fax
on line
www.siurJentmedia.ecu.edu"





p
2 Tutsday, Octobtr 28. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
i
Couple gives school $1 million gift
BOONE (AP) A Miami couple has given Si million to Appalachian
Stare University. .
Robert and Lillian Turchin presented the gift to the school during an
Oct. 24 meeting of the Appalachian University Foundation Board of
Directors. . ,
Robert Turchin is a member of the board. He is also former cruet
executive officer of Turchin Brothers Construction Co. in Miami and
president of RLT Investment Corporation.
The couple became involved in the school after buying a second
home in Hound Ears in Watagua County in the late 1970s. Since then,
both have served on various school advisory committees.
Feminist guru promotes rights for men, women
CHAPEL HILL (AP) Gloria Steinem, the activist who helped launch
the feminist movement, says equality benefits men and women.
In a speech Thursday night at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Steinem said women have made advances but humanity
still has a long road to travel.
Steinem, 63, the founder of Ms. magazine, visited the campus on the
100th anniversary of the admittance of female students to the university
Steinem pointed out the nation's increasing prison population and
said the United States is the only industrialized democracy without
some form of national child care and health care.
Steinem also said men should leam to do what women do, such as
changing diapers, raising children and supporting spouses in their
careers. .
Lesbians and gays also are fighting sexual repression in much the
fcsamc way that women fought the idea that their sexual role was only
producing children, Steinem said.

'

I
Fish oil washes ashore, killing and threatening birds
WATSONVILLE, Calif. (AP) A white, glue-like substance that washed
ashore at Sunset State Beach, along with more than 15 dead shore birds,
�is a non-toxic fish oil, officials said Saturday.
The oil, found in large slicks in several parts of Monterey Bay, poses
no threat to humans. But once birds dive into it, many are not able to fly
and often die of hypothermia, officials said.
An additional hundred birds most of them grebes and loons were
alive but stuck on shore Saturday and needed to be rescued, said
Stephanie Price, the supervising ranger at Sunset State Beach.
Price said the squrce of the fish oil is not known.
Federal prison site search on in Virginia counties
BRISTOL, Va. (AP) Searches for a suitable site for a federal prison are
under way in TazewcTl, Dickcnson and Buchanan counties, officials said.
L UJS. Rep. Rick Boucher said Friday the three counties have
expressed a desire for site visits by the Federal Bureau of Prisons
In September, Boucher sent letters to county administrators in five
"southwest Virginia counties inquiring whether they were interested in
providing a site for a new federal prison.
A federal prison would create 400 new jobs in the area.
Boucher said a new federal prison is needed in Virginia to take the
place of the troubled Lorton prison in Fairfax County, which is scheduled
for closure.
exercises slated for next week
n
Founder of America Online
speaks to students
HONG KONG (AP) Chinese soldiers in Hong Kong will hold their
first live-fire exercises next week in areas previously used by British
forces.
A government statement Saturday night warned the public, for its
safety, to stay away from the San Wai and Tai ling firing ranges in the
New Territories. It said the routine" exercises start next Saturday and
last through December.
China deployed more than 4,000 troops in Hong Kong when it
recovered the territory from Britain on Jury 1.
Their arrival was a sensitive issue because of the hostility many Hong
Kong people feel toward an army they see as an enforcer of the
Communist system in China.
But there have been no major incidents involving the garrison and the
troops are rarely seen in public.
Variety of shows for
youth scheduled
Five shows staged for audiences of
all ages, with special appeal to
children, make up the 1997-98
Family Rare Series at ECU.
The scries will open Nov. 1
with a performance by dramatic
storyteller Michael Cooper, who
used mime, huge masks and
puppetry in his creative
presentations of children's tales.
Each Family Fare event is
scheduled for 2 p.m. on a Saturday
afternoon in Wright Building and
runs about one hour. The series of
touring acts is sponsored by the
ECU Department of University
Unions.
Later performances in the
series are Hans Brinker and the
Silver Skates on Nov. 22, Lyle,
Lylc Crocodile on Feb 14, Jungle
Book on Mac 7 and Growing Up
on the Prairie on April 4.
Lecture on art realism
scheduled for Oct. 30
"Realism: HighLow�InOut" is
the topic of an illustrated lecture
by artist Harold Brudcr to be
given at ECU Thursday, Oct. 30 in
the Francis Speight Auditorium,
Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
Bruder, who will discuss the
latest trends in realism as well as
major realists of the last 30 years,
is one of the original "22 Realists"
who exhibited works in a 1970
Whitney Museum show of
realistic art.
He has worked in several
realistic modes, including
painterly and photo realism. His
painting arc in such major
collections as the Smithsonian's
Hirshhorh Museum, and his
honors include a National
Endowment for the Arts painting
grant and the American Academy
of Arts and Letters' Childe
Hassam Award.
In addition to his painting,
Bruder has taught at New York
City's Queens College, at Pratt
Institute and the Kansas City Art
Institute.
The lecture is free and open to
the public.
African development
topic of ECU lecture
And ECU professor who recently
completed an 18-month World
Bank assignment in Africa will
lecture on "Capacity Building in
Africa" at ECU Wednesday, Nov.
5.
Dr. Mulatu Webneh of the
Department of Planning in the
ECU School of Industry and
Technology will speak in Room
221, Mendenhall Student Center
beginning at 3:30 p.m.
Wubneh was a member of a
World Bank-sponsored African
Capacity Building Foundation
team based in Zimbabwe. The
team assisted 20 African nations in
developing plans to improve their
citizens' technical skills. His own
area covered Nigeria, Ghana,
Kenya, and Uganda.
His presentation, sponsored by
the ECU African Studies
Committee and other campus
units, is free and open to the
public.
Libraries must keep
up with new,
changing technology
JOM StRETTF.
STAFF WRITER
The renovation of Joyncr Library is
bringing more to ECU's campus
than orange construction cones and
forklifts. Computer guru James V
Kimsey, original founder and CEO
of America Online, visited
Mendenhall on Tuesday, Oct. 21.
Following a reception hosted lay
Chancellor Richard Eakin and wife
at their residence, was the
Twentieth Annual Dinner Meeting
The banquet at which Kimsey
was guest speaker, was held by the
Friends of ECU Library.
Kimsey's speech was focused on
the importance of technology in
libraries today.
"Libraries are
the essence of
technology said
Kimsey.
He continuously
reiterated his
infatuation with
the impact that
technology has on
today's society. He
emphasized the
need for libraries to
evolve with the
ever changing
times;
"Libraries are
the cradle to civilizationthey need
to seize this wonderful opportunity
in a world that is continuously
changing" said Kimsey.
One universal issue that surfaced
"Libraries are the cradle
to civilizationthey need
to seize this wonderful
opportunity in a world
that is continuously
changing"
James Kimsey
Founder. CEO America Online
in the duration of Kimsey's speech
was the concern of censorship and
the negative impact it has directly
on America Online.
"Obviously
censorship is on
people's minds
said Kimsey.
He made sure to
address AOL's
attempts to
regulate the
output of
information. AOL
does indeed
provide software to
assist in the
blocking of any
inappropriate
material.
"We try our best to detect
problems and eliminate them but
society must place the blame where
it really belongs said Kimsey.
SGA leaders work hard for students
Forbes, McManus
encourage student
involvement in SGA
CRAIC D. RAMRY
STAFF WRITFR
SGA
officials
bring hard
working
ethics and
experience
as student
leaders.
Scott
Forbes, SGA
President
and Sean
McManus,
Vice President both display an
eagerness to improve student life
using the experiences they have
gained.
Forbes, a 32 year old senior, first
came to ECU in 1983. After
studving for two years he began
working for "The Varsity
Scott Forbes
S6A President
Internship
Program,
where he
sold books
for Tom
Nelson: one
of the
country's
largest Bible
fiublishers.
t was soon
after
understanding of the university and
its inter workings, by giving me
exposure to the political system
Forbes says.
Other goals Forbes tries to achieve
involve the creation a balanced
student Government. The number pf
minority students in student
SEE SGA PAGE 3
Sean McManus
SSAVicfrPres.
working as a
salesman that Forbes opened his
own Pawn Shop in Wadesboro, at
the age of 22. Forbes's Pawn Shop,
ScottV Pawn-Gum-Jewelry was a
success but it was an interest in
law that convinced him to sell his
business and return to ECU.
Forbes worked as an ECU
Public Defender and Attorney
General in preparation for his
position as president, after
returning from his extended
break. Currently, Forbes serves as
as member of The Board of
Trustees. According to Forbes,
serving on the board has been one
of his most fruitful experiences at
ECU.
"It has helped me gain a clear
Pizza
Tuition
Dentist
Guess which one can't
Movies
Concerts
Cabs
:55�f�
go on your MasterCard?
October 23
Assist Rescue�A student from
Clement Hall suffered a seizure
and was transported to PCMH.
ProvisionalJJWIDWIOne Vay
Street Violation�a student, of
Greene Hall, was arrested for
Provisional DWI after being
stopped for driving the wrong way
on a one-way street with no
headlights on.
October 24
Assist Rescue�A student was
transported to PCMH from the
Rivers Building by Greenville
Rescue after suffering from a
seizure.
Suspicious Person�A faculty
member in the Rivers Building
reported being approached by a
male asking if she had any
textbooks to sell. The subject was
found in the Rawl Building where
he was escorted to the Dean of
Students office. When he was
informed that he would need to
apply for a permit to continue
solicitation, he stated he would
leave and not return.
October 25
Damage to Property�A staff
member in Joyner Library
discovered the walls and mirrors
had been written on in green and
black permanent ink in the second
floor men's restroom.
Trespass�A non-student was
issued a trespass warning after
being found drinking alcohol in
Hendrix Theatre.
Assist Rescue�A non-student
was transported to PCMH from
backstage of Wright Auditorium by
Greenville Rescue after she
fainted.
Fire Alarm�The fire alarm was
activated in Garrett Hall after
someone discharged a fire
extinguisher in the hallway. The
investigation is continuing.
October 26
Disorderly Conduct�An ECU
transit driver reported three
students were disruptive on the
Pirate Ride. The three students
accused the Transit driver of using
racial slurs. The Transit was
notified of the incident.
Trespass�A non-student was
issued a trespass warning and
escorted off campus after being
found sleeping in a hallway in
Greene Hall.
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Shopping
Postage
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r
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 28, 1997 3
Surgeries
continued from page 1
have them proven. Patients are
actively asking for them, they are
very eager" said Chapman.
The protocols will add a
tremendous advancement for
patients. Allowing them minimal
time spent in the hospital and
lower costs. The success of the
protocols may offer different
solution for treatment of cancer
and obese.
"The weight lose pill that were
given to patients that were
morbidly obese, such as Redux,
can no longer be used because it
was found to have connections
with heart disease. I feel like
minimally invasive surgery will be
a positive treatment said
Chapman.
Along with testing the
protocols teaching these
technique is a prime focus for all of
the doctors. Currently Chitwood
is teaching in Brussels and Tarfa is
teaching in China. The team is
obtaining national exposure by-
teaching through televised
surgeries to other campuses.
"Our job is to educate the
public. East Carolina is far better
at these procedures than any other
centers on the map. The level of
expertise allows us to have a
higher level of excellence. One of
our goals in forming a center of
excellence is to train new surgeons
in a fellowship program that would
last one to two years. It would be
a lot of work Chapman said.
"With our grouping of
expertise, we may be best in the
country, at least with the new
program for minimally invasive
surgery we are one of the top
medical schools practicing said
Hariey Dartt, director of news and
information at the School of
Medicine.
For more information, visit our
website at www.studentmedia.
ecu.edu.
Victory
continued Irom page
his office
The daughter of Gilbert and
Joyce Fleming, the new queen
attributes the development of her
character to her family. Even
though she grew up in a large
family, there was no shortage of
love for everyone. She said she
believes she acquired her desire to
give to others from her parents
whose happiness always came
from seeing others happy
"1 have five sisters and a
brother Fleming said. "After God,
my family is the most important
thing in life to me, and 1 can't say-
enough about my parents. My
father works very hard to see that
we all have what we need, and I
am especially proud of my mother.
She sacrificed her career to stay
home and care for all of us, but she
plans to continue her education
when the youngest starts
kindergarten
Fleming's sister Christa, an
ECU freshman, is an intended
biology major, and is also working
toward a degree in medicine.
"I'm very proud of my sister
said Christa. "She truly is a
positive role model, and I am eager
to follow in her footsteps
Recognizing all the many roles
her sister plays as a student,
Christa said it has taken a great
deal of adjustment to get used to
the idea of Sharlynda's
achievements meaning so much to
so many people.
"It's a lot different from home
Christa said. "Now so many people
are looking up to her and
depending on her. I kind of miss
her being there for me personally.
It seems like now she's
everybody's sister and not just
mine
Fleming said she has been too
busy so far for the reality of being
chosen to sink in. She said last
week was as exciting as it was
demanding, and she is glad the
hard work paid off.
"I feel honored to represent
ECU in this way said Fleming. "I
want to thank everyone for
selecting me. It definitely makes
me realize that my decision in
coming to ECU was well-made
SGA
bring
to
worldly
student
continued from page 2
legislature has risen to an
estimated 14 out of about 40
members.
"Creating a culturally diverse
legislature is my main objective
right now Forbes says.
Forbes is involved in other
sectors of the campus community
as well. He is a member of the
TKE fraternity and a Political
Science major, who plans to go on
to study law after he graduates in
May.
Sean McManus, SGA vice
president, steps in to fill Forbes's
shoes whenever necessary. Serving
as a right hand man to Forbes,
McManus must be ready to fill in
at all times.
McManus is a senior who
transferred to ECU two years ago
from MIT's sister school in
Australia. While he lived in
Australia, he was in the "bush"
where his nearest neighbors were
over an hour away. Differences in
McManus's geographical
background
perspective
government.
Student Welfare, City Council
and Athletic Committee are some
of the organizations McManus
adds to his presence as an ECU
official. NCAA Division One
renewal is one of the issues
McManus is currently working on.
This committee is made up of
students, faculty and athletes,
giving McManus exposure to
several aspects of the student
body.
"We have almost completed
the final draft of our annual
recertification to keep ECU up to
NCAA Division One standards
says McManus.
In addition to his work
in
various community organizations,
McManus is a triple major at ECU.
His degrees will be in Education,
Personnel and Curriculum
Management.
Both Forbes and McManus stay
busy working for ECU, but they
urge students to get more involved
with student government.
Students wich questions or
comments for the SGA should
contact their hot line at 328-4718.
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757-0003
WALLACE
Towing and Recovery
24hr service
752-1798
Prompt Service, Jumpstart, and Lock out
Special rates 7:30 AM till 5:30 PM Monday
through Friday
ECU Special-$2D.OO up to 3 miles
within city limits
OCTOBER 31,1997
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER 9nminti?nm
ECU ID GETS YOU IN FREE VPm unt" am
A GUEST PASS LETS YOU BRING A FRIEND IN FOR
BINGO
COSTUME
CONTEST
HORROR FILMS
CARRIE and SCREAM
VIDEO KARAOKE
DANCE
FREE FOOD
DRINK & MUSIC
LASER STORM
WIZARD ON CALL
FORTUNE TELLERS
MIDNIGHT
BUFFET
PSYCHIC
HOTLINE
GHOUL'S CAFE
mlISS EiSS! ! r"t 7 hKT 9U6SI 9U6St poss 6uest posses ore ovoi,oble be9innin9on Mondo October 27 ,f0m � -mm Service Desks from 8om until Midnight ond the Centrol Ticket Off:
WrVnl tTi S7nfrCenfer from jZOm until � ?Holloween' 9uesf P�ss� �y be Pked up ot the Community Service Desks until 9pm, the Centrol Ticket Office until 6pm, ond the Student Recreotion Centei
service Desk from 6pm to 9pm. Guests must hove o guest poss for enfronce to the movies. All events ore free.
ice on the
Center Customer
rv!i
,
& T'i
! ' .





Pat0m
4 Tuesday, October 28, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
France
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Rafael Santos
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WATWEONIAII
DON'T EVEN
TRY YOUR
MAGIC ON ME,
WITCH
I'M MORE POWERFUL
NOW THAN YOU COULD
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The Japan Exchange and Teaching Program 1998
Teach English in junior and senior high schools in Japan
Learn about Japanese culture and people
Gain international experience
Requirements
� Have an excellent command of the English language
� Obtain a bachelor's degree by June 30,1998
� Be a U.S. citizen
� Be willing to relocate to Japan for one year
Contact the Consulate General ol Japan at 100 Colony Square Building. Suite 2000
1175 Peachtree. N.E Atlanta. GA 30361.
Call (404) 892-5067 or 1-800-INFO-JET
fRTIIISHT. GOTCHA
YOU TAUGHT 1
OUR PEOPLE fflffl
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Speakers, include:
Miehele Berison-
HIVSTI) educator and
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Sponsored by: Student Union Lecture
Committee and Health Promotion & Well- Being.
Cyber Bunny and all related characters coryrioht 1 997 Thommy Gardner. All riohtr reserved.
Princess Starbriqht
Chris Walker
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10 Riches
14 Jetty bean
shape
15 Range of hills
16 Type style: abbr.
17 Concern
18 Less than
19 Behold: Lat
20 Massages
22 Grabbed
suddenly
24 Actors and
actresses
26 Row
27 Contenders in a
ring
31 Extols
34 Have being
35 Otherwise called
37 Garment part
39 Beret's place
41 Rods (or
roasting
43 Poi source
44 Tight
45 Lean
47 �Aviv
48 Geologic period
51 Sat lazily
53 State of mind
55 Eagle
56 The lost
continent
60 Topeka native
64 Complain
65 Extent
67 Mexican food
68 Role in "La
Boheme"
69 Ryan or Tatum
70 SL �'s fire
71 Russian saint
72 Judges
73 Smell strongly
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Answers from Thursday
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4 Washday need
5 �sprouts
6 "The Adventures
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7 Bettor's concern
8 Emissary
9 Jump the tracks
10 Dessert part
11 Engrave
12 Material for a
doily
13 Went running
21 information
23 Brewed
beverage
25 Journeys
27 Lard, suet, etc.
28 Peace goddess
29 Rise
30 Goes by boat
32"�of a
Salesman"
33 Indian garment
36 Musty
38 Shape
40 Great conceit
42 Swims
underwater
46 Fish In cans
49 Against
50 Souped-up car
52 Middle
54 Actress Keaton
56 Bullets
57 Labor
58 French or
Greek: abbr.
59 Dagger, old
style
61 Auction
62 High point
63 Recess
66 Leg
Design
Competition
Open to All ECU Faculty, Staff, and Currently Enrolled Students
The Division of Continuing Studies is
initiating a new annual award which will
honor an outstanding faculty member
who has taught and mentored off-campus
adult students. Nominations for the
award will be made by extension stu-
dents. Each year's winner will be selected
from among the nominees by a commit-
tee composed of representatives from
the Faculty Senate Committee on
Continuing Education and Summer School
and the staff of Continuing Studies.The
award is to be named The Max Ray oyner
Award For Faculty Service TTirough Continuing
Education. Financial support for this award
is made possible by the Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs.
As part of instituting this prestigious
ECU award, the Division of Continuing
Studies is pleased to announce a design
competition open to all ECU faculty and
currently enrolled students. The competi-
tion seeks a design for a permanent sym-
bol of the award which can be replicated
into the small individual awards to be
given each year.The symbol should have
an area for the name of the award -The
Max Ray Joyner Award for Faculty Service
Through Continuing Education� and an area
where the name of each year's award
winner can be listed.The replica design
should have an area for the name of the
award, the year, and the awardee's name.
The permanent symbol of the award will
be placed in a visible location on campus.
The creator of the winning design will
receive a1,000 honorarium. An award
to construct the winning design and a
limited number of replicas will be given
separately. While there are no restric-
tions on the materials for the symbol and
replicas, designers should keep in mind
the permanent nature of both and the
importance of the awards. Size of both
should be appropriate for the intended
use, and designs may be two-dimensional
or three-dimensional All design submis-
sions should contain complete working
drawings with proper dimensions and
pertinent details indicated along with a
materials list.The deadline for submis-
sions is Friday, December i 2,5 p.m
to the Division of Continuing Studies
located in the Erwin Building. Envelopes
should be clearly labeled "design competi-
tion Designers should also clearly indi-
cate their names, addresses, and daytime
phone numbers. A committee will select
the winning design.
The Division of
Continuing Studies
LTfl
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
TE3
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The East Carolinian
east Carolinian
AMY IROYS I KH Editor
CELESTE WILSON Managing Ednor
Mil I HSOS Advertising Director
AMANDA AUSTIN News EoitOf
JACQI'KUNK 1). KELLUM Assl. NamEditor
ANDY TlRNER Utestyta Editor
JOHN DAVIS Assistant Ulastyle Editor
AMANDA ROSS SponsEditor
TRACY l.AI'BACII Assistant Scons Editor
CAROLE MKIII.K Hud Copy Editor
JOHN MI'RIMIY Staff Illustrator
HEATHER Hl'RCKSS Wira Editor
Scrwng rha ECU comruiMy s�ki S2& tha fat Cardwan puttstias 12.000 copies �tiy luasdar ind Thursday The taad ecuoriit in nch tditmn n rha
rawwon at rhe Erfctonai Board The East Carotimcn iBtLUmaj lertars to rhe editor, loured id 250 woros. whidi may be edited for decency oi Brevity The ess:
Carotnan inarm dte njti to eat or rqect hmers lor publication U letters must he sqned. Lerrers should be addressed ic opinion editor, the East
Cstolnan. Pubhotais Buidino. ECU. Gnemlle. ?7B5B-43!i3 For inloraimon. 019193286386
opinion
Tuesday, October 28. 1997 5
oumew
Generation X is an apathetic bunch of sedated youths who could tell you all about the latest
Sony Playstation and absolutely nothing about Janet Reno. ECU's branch of Generation Xers
are the epitome of the stereotype; less than 1,000 of them bothered to vote for their own
political leaders in the mast recent Student Government Association election. Well, after all,
they are a bunch of Generation X losers right?
Bologna. TEC does not believe for one second the easy-to-sell stereotype of our generation.
TEC believes instead that the reason students are so disinterested in SGA is because most of
them couldn't name one thing SGA does for them. We all know what the President,
congressmen, even the mayor do. But what does SGA do and why should anyone care?
More to the point, whose job is it to ensure that every student of this campus knows the
leadership opportunities available to them and the responsibilities of those positions? Assuming
students would vote if they knew how SGA affects them, whose job is it to inform them of SGA's
role?
Obviously, SGA bears a large part of the burden, but what would SGA gain from massive
efforts to inform the campus of their responsibilities? Would the voting population of the
university increase? If the voting population increased, then would the new voters outnumber
traditional voters? Would the new voters belong to the same organizations as traditional voters
and would they believe in the same things? What we are suggesting is that SGA gains little from
massive efforts to inform students. If anything, they would only shake up the status quo by
doing so.
TEC has not, in recent years, been shy of chastising the SGA but we would like to shoulder
some of the burden of informing students ourselves. While we feel that a few measly sheets
hanging from trees on the mall is a sorry excuse for campaigning, we understand the problem.
Who would spend money advertising if they win without it?
In light of our conclusion that there is no easy answer, we will be focusing our attention on
various leadership positions on our news pages. Today, the first in a series highlights the role of
the SGA president and vice president. We hope the articles will be informative for students and
give them a reason to vote in upcoming elections. We also hope the effort will spark similar
efforts by the SGA to increase voter awareness on campus.
OPINION
Columnist
Flag sacred.symbol, reminder of glory
the flag has always been the
last and best expression of
gratitude to a warrior whose
love of country transcended
the love of self . This tragedy
of ritual and heroism above
all else makes the flag sacred
and inviolate.
Alone amongst the nations of the
Earth and thrice in a single century,
the United States has saved the
world from the dark hand of tyranny.
In 1917 she resolved to lead the
battered remnants of a dying France
and England to a victory that
American intervention alone made
possible. A quarter of a century iatcr
she saved the world from fascist
tyranny and led a bleeding and
exhausted Earth in triumph of
democracy over the ambitions of
communism. In a single lifetime
was it possible to behold each of
these events; to reflect on any of
them was to contemplate an epic in
military and human achievement.
Through the night of that long
travail, America proved she was a
nation of heroes. She had pride and
passion; she fought evil and won.
And when the wars were over and
many of her heroes lay dead,
America recounted the gallantry of
her fallen: she did so funerary and
anthem; she cradled the cerements
of the lost with prayers and living
tears.
In her anguish America groped
for a symbol as beautiful and sacred
as the memory of those she gently
laid to rest. She found that symbol
in a banner not dissimilar to the one
a poet named Key once watched,
battered but unbroken, flutter over
a fort named McKenry. For a wife
unable to hold back the tears as her
husband is buried, the flag has
always been the last and best
expression of gratitude to a warrior
whose love of country transcended
the love of self. This tragedy of
ritual and heroism above ail else
makes the flag sacred and inviolate.
And while there are those who
would insist that the very freedom
which the flag represents demands
that we permit the possibility of its
desecration, how little compass do
they give to the devotion which is
the heart of a hero, or reflection that
devotion has kept us free. It is only
fitting that the flag honors the
graves of heroes; they died for flag
and country, surely it befits this
ultimate of sacrifices to consecrate
with the colors their tombs. There
is nothing in war for which men will
fight more steadfastly than the
symbol of their nation. Inspired by
the flag which symbolized America
and all that America stood for,
America alone amongst the nations
of the Earth saved civilization.
Through two world wars and a cold
one, we acknowledged the
inviolability of our flag. There is
tragic irony that in the year 1989,
just as the Supreme Court ruled
unconstitutional any state
prohibition against flag-burning, we
saw the end of our long struggle
against the Soviet Union. I pray that
our resolve and courage as a people
did not go down that year, as did the
symbol of our courage and resolve.
LMaJattaaa)aiMMaaanaj� ana snstaw
hi IhR
to the Editor
Repeated attacks on Fridley unjustified
The repeated attacks on Inez
Fridley, council member for the
third district, remind me of my own
experience registering voters some
years ago. The criteria for being a
voter included a residence
requirement that had recently been
dropped from one year to about a
month, but there was wording about
what constituted a residence,
something about intending to make
the present location one's
permanent home. It was, and still is,
as far as I know, somewhat slippery.
There was wording about local taxes
and car registration, too. In an effort
to clarify the requirements, I
translated it to "a dormitory address
doesn't qualify, but other addresses
do and added that information to
the voter service notice on my office
door. I received a sharp letter from
the Board of Elections. That
clarified things.
Another time when I was
registering voters on campus, I
forgot to take off a campaign button
I had been wearing. I was clearly in
error. This time I got a notice from a
campus official requiring me to
remove the buttonThe person who
complained to the official needed
only to have called my attention to
the button, but setting things
straight didn't seem to be her total
agenda.
Similarly, any error or confusion
there may have been in what Ms.
Fridley said could have been
corrected quickly, but getting the
facts straight was apparently a minor
part of Mr. McLawhorn's agenda.
The major purpose seems to be to
paint Ms. Fridley as anti-student.
I am grateful to have Ms.
Fridley's intelligence, public-
spiritedness and savvy working for
our community on the city council. I
believe that she is a valuable asset to
all the citizens in her district and
city.
Edith Webber
English Dept retired
CIPT3lv grDZSCWeTBODrs
J&&HTFUUN lAClUDMG Cmz.K1WAlTY
A A F4CT0K OF TUB DIVSTy"
of that public uvivee-siry
CfttttAtttfflT
?g0lumnjsts
Should police enter rooms without a warrant?
OPINION
Columnist
Wiiiiam Stacfey
C0CHRAN
YES
If I had been living in an
apartment, I most likely
would have gotten further
into drugs. I may have even
been arrested for worse things been
than simple possession had I
not had my run-in.
I was arrested for
possession of
marijuana my
freshman year
while living in Slay
Hall. At the time, I
considered the
ECU police who
entered my room
without a warrant
completely unjust.
I felt my privacy
had been invaded
and my freedom
denied.
My only thought
was that if I had
living off
campus, my rights
as a citizen would
have kept the
police off of my
property. After all,
the rules for search
and seizure for
students living on campus give much more power to
the police than living in a house or apartment.
However, I have come a long way from the less-
than-responsible age of 18 to turning 24 Friday. I
suppose I see things differently than I did then.
Essentially, when a student agrees to live on-
campus at ECU they give up many of their basic
rights of privacy. An RA can enter a dorm room just
about any time they want, whether the occupant is
home or not. Fblice can get around carrying a warrant
to search a room myriad ways.
Furthermore, most judicial cases like mine stay on
campus; thus, a student who has his or her room
searched cannot hire a private attorney to represent
themselves (not that it would help with the stone
wall that is the Dean of Students office anyway).
So with all this in mind, why would I stand for the
rights of university police to enter a student's room
with such little probable cause? It is simple: at 18
years of age too many students do not have the
responsibility to handle the awesome freedom that is
living away from mom and dad.
In my case, the run-in was a wake-up call that
made me rethink my freedom, responsibility and
reasons for attending ECU. Although I know I hated
it at the time, my brush with ECU authorities put me
in check.
Fortunately, I went on to make the national
freshman honor society and later to graduation with
an athletic letter to boot.
In retrospect, the experience got me in line and
made me realize that, hey, as harmless as it seems,
using pot is illegal. If I had been living in an
apartment, I most likely would have gotten further
into drugs. I may have even been arrested for worse
things than simple possession had I not had my run-
in.
The procedure with which RAs and campus police
enter an occupant's room may very well impinge on
the normal rights of adults. However, college
freshmen are not normal adults; we, as 18-year-olds,
are not fully aware of the maturity and responsibility
that makes us more productive citizens.
At the time, I was figuring out my life. I was 18. I
had the most freedom coupled with the least amount
of responsibility that I had ever had in my life. Many
students buckle under this enormous pressure; the
pressure that is widespread alcohol and drug use.
If stronger laws can aid campus police and RAs,
then perhaps, they can help guide students up paths
to more positive and productive lives. If I was to run
into the person I was at 18, now, I am sure my 18-
year-old self would probably consider my 24-year-old
self square as hell.
However, it is the passing into maturity, away from
alcohol binges and drug use, that is so satisfying. And
it is here that true contentment lies.
OPINIONColumnist
Jeff BERGMANNO
I applaud the University
for much of the entry
policies for the ECU
police and resident
advisers. The
coordinator's ability to
enter a room is a
different matter.
A manwoman's
home is hisher
castle. If you live in
the dorms, the
castle is more like a
10 x 10 home. The
home can be
searched by the
police if they have a
search warrant,
consent, an
emergency search or
arrest search.
The search warrant
is the same as the
one needed to
search your home.
An emergency
search is just as it
says: an emergency
search. If a bomb
threat is called in,
the police have a
right to search your
room, but only for
the bomb. Illegal
items found in the room cannot be used against you.
A police officer can search your person or any
surrounding areas for weapons if they have an arrest
warrant or are placing you under arrest. The search is done
to protect the police officer.
The consent search is the one I have a problem with. If
the police obtain consent from your roommate they can
search the room. The onfy place they cannot search is a.
locked box, drawer or other such item that you � not your
roommate�own. The key here is that the item is locked.
I will state that trying to divide up a 10x10 room would
be near impossible. However when it comes to the Bill of
Rights, I always believe the police should err on the side of
caution. Or basically get a warrant or obtain the persons
permission for whom you want to search.
The police should obtain the person's permission or get
a warrant for three reasons: one, civil liberties, enough
said; two, roommates can be bastards. It is unlikely but
your roommate could plant god knows what on your half of
the room and get you in trouble. Last but not least your
roommate could blame his illegal possessions on you if you
are not in the room.
The University does a good job with the RAs and their
ability to search a room. They cannot search a room. Only
a coordinator can enter a room for probable violations of
University Housing Code: loud noise, smell of drugs
(marijuana), or curfew violations. A coordinator can enter a
room if they have strong evidence a violation has occurred.
The coordinator can only enter the room if it is
occupied. Unoccupied rooms can only be entered in
unusual cases i.e. loud music that is disturbing other
residents and the room is unoccupied, flooding, broken
windows or severe maintenance problems.
Coordinators can enter a room, but they are only
allowed to look Opening of drawers, trunks or closets is
prohibited. A first for me, I applaud the University for
much of the entry policies for the ECU police and resident
advisers. The coordinator's ability to enter a room is a
different matter.
Sure, in some cases, the coordinator should have the
ability to enter a room. Fights, fires or other such
emergencies are situations in which the coordinator should
enter a room.
Two consenting adults in a room past curfew is not a
reasonable reason to enter a room. Nor is having a beer
with your roommate. es, both examples are in violation of
University policy and drinking under age a violation of
state. But are they worth trampling over the Fourth
Amendment?
In these cases, the police should be called. The police
arc trained to handle these matters. I hope coordinators
entering rooms is rare and with just cause.
The University needs to rewrite the Room Entry for
Fblicy Violations to not allow coordinators in rooms, unless
it is an emergency The ECU Fblice are here for the other
violations. If the police have time to write tickets, they
have time to answer calls for housing violations in the
dorms.
MM
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i'
-





r
Winners
Spirit Cup Winner
National Student Speech, Language, Hearing Association
All DECKED OUT
FOR THE 90
King
Mark Harritan
(Kappa Alpha Order)
Queen
Sharlynda Fleming
(Ladies Elite Service Organization)
Banner Winner
Phi Sigma Pi Honorary Society
Pirat eohest Winner
Ha'zell Y. Parks (Tyler Hall)
Autograph Night Winner
Matthew Tripp, 8 years old
Floats
1. American Chemistry Society
2. Aquatic Sciences Club
3. Chi Omega Sorority Sigma Alpha EpsSion Fraternity
Hall
1. Ay cock Hail
2. Jones Hall
3. Belk Hall
High School Bands
Large
1. D.H. Conley Marching Vikings
2. Northeastern Eagles
3. Perquimans County High School
House
1. Ambassadors
2. Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority
3. Criminal JusticeSocial Work Alliance
Small
1. Charles B. Aycock Marching Falcons
2. Rosewood Marching Eagles
3. Mattamuskeet Lakers
Ml
J&
�j ' 11 If I








r
1

ALL DECKED OUT
FOR THE 90BU
Thank You!
�Ail our judges
�ECU Athletic Department
�Joan Warden (Marketing Manager)
�Carolina East Mall and Merchants
�WITN Channel 7
�WCZI fm 98.3
�The East Carolinian
The Daily Reflector
�ECU Student Stores
�ECU Homecoming Steering Committee
�Angela McWayne (Student Activities)
�Kay Boyd (Secretary, Student Union)
�Millie Murphey (Student Government Association)
�Panhellenic
�IFC
�Ambassadors
�The City of Greenville
�Greenville Parks and Recreation and Ben James
�ECU Police
�ECU Parking and Traffic
�Jerry Baltes (Richmond, Virginia)
�Les Garner (Microage Computers)
�Chick Fila1
�The Great American Cookie Company
�Lynn's Hallmark
Shear Image
Opto metric Eye Care
�Charade's
�Claire's
�Heel Sew Quik
�Katie's Soft Pretzel
Electronics Boutique
�Johnson Jewelry
Eppes Middle School
You helped to make our
90th a great success!
J0
'i

�F J- V
MtnMflwiiiWH' Mpmmn
$Li its
��






8 Tuesday. October 28. 1997
The Eest Carolinian
review
The End of Violence
�t
Motion picture
soundtrack
NINE OUT OF TEN
joi in Davis
ASdST.VVT LIFESTYLE El UK
After filmmaker Wim Wenders
released his movie Until the End of
the World, he commented that, due
to television and Hollywood,
images had lost their power. He
preferred to create a more abstract
collection of images and use
dialogue and music to create the
focal point in his movies. The
soundtrack to Until the End of the
World got more attention than the
movie and got Wenders an
interview on Au Things Considered (a
leftist news magazine on National
Public Radio.)
Always a pioneer, Wenders is not
known for making movies that
appeal to the masses, nor is he
known for making movies that
actually get shown in theaters,
except for maybe at some exclusive
film festival. You may have to wait
to see the End of Violence until it
comes out on video or it gets a spot
on the Sundance Channel, but
soundtracks to Wenders' sell like
milk before a hurricane, so the
soundtrack is getting the sweet
end of the marketing.
There are actually two
soundtracks; one album is a
collection of instrumentals by
guitarist Ry Cooder. The other
soundtrack features a song by
Cooder and songs by the other 15
or so artists that contributed to the
film. Cooder's moody, echo-filled
song is the opener, followed by an
avant-garde soundbite from the
script. Though the soundbites,
which pop up a few more times,
aren't necessary, they're not
disruptive as they were on the
Natural Born Killers soundtrack.
Wenders has a lot of friends in
the music industry and has once
again assembled a stellar group of
performers. Both U2 and Michael
Stipe were on the Until the End of the
World soundtrack and they're here
as well, joined by such big shots as
Tom Waits, Los Lobos, and Sinead
O'Connor.
Each of these artists is superb
here. 12 and Sinead duet in the
sizzling "I'm not your baby which
has a strong Achtung Baby feel to it.
Michael Stipe teams up with Vic
Chesnutt in the stark, burning
"Injured Bird Michael's long
been a country music fan, and this
tune definitely has a tear in its
beer.
There are other "alterna-twang"
songs on this disc, contributed by
Spain and by North Carolina's own
Whiskeytown, whose "Theme for a
Trucker" is one of the nicest
surprises on the album.
Tom Waits is, well, Tom Waits,
growling his way through another
bluesy, shoulda-been-in-a-Bogey-
movie ballad, while Los Lobos fill a
SEE REVIEW. PAGEIO
"Patience, good negotiating skills
and a calm demeanor are
completely useless qualities in
Hollywood. Gandhi never
produced a movie
Jane Hamsher
Co-producer of National Bom Killers
See von in
Midnight Madness at
Mendenhall offers
alternative to
downtown
BYROXCllKRlBIMjR.
senior wurrat
Perhaps the greatest nightmare
or biggest fear on Halloween
night is that you might end up
all dressed up with nowhere to
go. It's a scary proposition,
deciding what your going to do
for Halloween in a town that
goes all out on the day of the
dead.
Downtown beckons for sure.
But for many, the thought of
being out in the cold night air
while getting jostled around by
overzealous revelers and
dodging overindulging drinkers,
is nightmarish enough to seek
an alternative.
For the past several years, the
ECU Division of Student Life
has been throwing a Halloween
bash that, while short on
alcohol, is long on things to do,
food to eat, and prizes to win.
Midnight Madness was
developed in order to
students an option,
alcohol-free � as in, no alcohol
� event is always free to ECU
students and
their guests
and provides
both
traditional and
non-traditional
Halloween
events.
"(Midnight
Madness)
started out as a
way of
providing an
downtown
re
Hey there, handsome.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARKETING DEPT.
alternative to
Mendenhall
Student Center Director Bill
Clutter said. "It is a unique
event in that the Student Life
staff works in a combined effort
to present the students with
some good, clean fun on
Halloween night
Clutter said that the event
has had a fairly steady draw over
the past few years. Attendance
has been high at Midnight
Madness the past few years,
ranging from 2,000-3,000
students annually. This is due,
largely, to the variety and.
amount in the things-to-do
department. The party runs
from 9 p.m2 a.m. and has no
shortage of events to occupy the
time. From the Ghoul Cafe to
Laser Storm to the Midnight
Buffet, the Division of Student
Life has spared no expense to
make Halloween a fun-filled
event.
"We've tried
to change
some of the
activities each
year to keep it
fresh and
we've retained
the events
that people
like. The
events tend to
attract different groupsWe
have horror movies for the
movie buffs, a dance, recreation
for people who want to do some
bowling or billiards and we have
things like Laser tag, which is
the big craze in a lot of the
cities around the county
Laser Storm is a game where
teams gear up with sensor packs
and battle it out with laser guns.
Clutter also pointed out that
Midnight Madness will feature
the unveiling of the newest
trend in the bowling industry�
Glow Bowling. The bowling
center has been redesigned
with glowing pins, glowing balls,
and a new decor, all under
black-light.
Mendenhall Marketing
Director Carol Woodruff agreed
with Clutter on the uniqueness
of Midnight Madness and the
joint effort of the entire
Division of Student Life. All
SEE MIDHI6HT PACEIO
Glow bowling makes its debut
Halloween night at Mendenhall
By Ron ciikrubim Jr.
SENIOR WRITE
On Halloween night, Mendenhall
Student Center will debut Glow
Bowling in the bowling center in
the basement. Glow bowling, also
known as Moonlight Bowling in the
industry, is the first in a number of
planned changes for the basement
at Mendenhall Student Center.
The decision to re-make the
bottom floor of the
student center is
the brainchild of
MSC Director Bill
Clutter who is
determined to
make the building
more like home for
the students at
ECU. With plans to
open a cyber-caf6 in
the near future and
numerous other
upgrades to the
facility in the
planning stages,
Mendenhall is
slowly taking on a new presence.
Glow-bowling is the first step.
The idea is not unique Clutter
said of Glow Bowling. "Bowling
centers across the nation have been
looking for ways to spice up the old
bowling alley. Today's society is
moving away from the commitment
to league playpeople just find it
harder and harder to commit to a set
schedule. Glow Bowling is the
industry's answer to the impulsive
nature of society
Clutter knows a few things about
how to run a
student center
after working at
Florida State
University prior
to his arrival at
ECU one and
one half years
ago. "When I got
here, the traffic
in the bowling
center was very
poor. The
equipment was
in disrepair and
SEE G10W. PAGE 10
Ghoul Cafe �This place
serves up an insane menu
complete with ghostly fog,
horrific music, slime, and a
staff of ghoulish good friends
to make your visit a fiendishly
fun one.
�Laser Storm � This
game pits you and your
teammates against another
team in battle to the death, or
at least until you deactivate
your opponent's sensor, in an
eerie wax zone.
�Star Struck Videos �
Video Karaoke allows students
to step into a rock video,
complete with a variety of
background visions. Students
get to leave with their video.
'Costume Contest � A
Halloween bash wouldn't be
complete without a costume
contest. At Midnight
Madness, prizes will be given
in three categories: Male,
female, and group.
�Bingo � The ever-
popular game adds another
opportunity for Midnight
Madness goers to win a prize.
Bingo will run all night long.
�Halloween Dance � A
costume ball is on tap in the
Great Room. A DJ will spin the
tunes as ghosts, devils,
vampires, and freaks of all
types gather to waltz or
Monster Mosh for the evening.
'Fonyne TeJIejE � Found
in the foothills, a band of
gypsies will be on hand
throughout the building to
offer insight into the future.
Call � If you prefer a bonafide
psychic or a Wizard to do your
fate prognostication, there will
be phones on the main floor
that you can use to connect
with those who know your
fate. And, not just the first ten
minutes are free.
�Midnight Buffet�At 11
Si.rn the dining hall will open
or an all-you-can-eat buffet.
�Horror Flicks � Back-to-
back horror movies will be
shown in Hendrix Theatre.
The first movie is Carrie (R),
filmmaker Brian DePalma's
adaptation of the Steven
King's runaway best-seller.
The second feature is Scream
(R), written by ECU alum
Kevin Williamson and brought
to screen by veteran horror
filmmaker Wes Craven.
Dullard
ANDYTllRNKR
UFESTY1.E EDITOR
Immature. That's probably what
you would call it. But when my
friends and I go bowling, we leave
our brains with the guy at the shoe
exchange. You don't need to think
to bowl. It's all instinct and cheap
swill.
The alley where we go at home
has electronic bowling. You type in
your name and it's posted up on
the TV screen on the ceiling so
everybody gets to sec your name
and score. Of course, we don't ever
use our real names. You have to
assume a bowling name in order to
i'ht information htgneay
is the road this uitumn
travels. Rut simitar to
circus ilimns, tie're
driving the funny car. We
Ifotdly search the net in
search of all thing vein
and flat out strange.
Come Join us on this trip
into the vorid of silly
sites and Baity irei pages
intimidate other bowlers. One
glorious, High Life-enhanced
night we all took the names of
various venereal diseases. Now, I
know what you're thinking, "How
are you gonna meet any little fillies
with a name like chlamydia?" But I
don't want to meet any fillies at
the bowling alley. It's a time for
bowling, not courting.
I had bowling on the brain this
past weekend (which can be
treated with the proper ointment
tutelage). So, I decided to see how
bowling was making it on the web.
1 began my search blindly by
typing in "bowling" on Yahoo. A
whole lot of junk came up.
There were dozens of bowling
association sites and sites that
Bowling without smelly shoes
provided information about and "Do you have the proper
professional bowling tours. The equipment?" I really didn't find
Jean Claude Van Damme of
sites (generic Daily Show
ripoff, thank you very
much), if you will, was
"Across the Lanes"
(www.acrossthelanes.com).
This site had it all. There
was more bowling
information than you could
shake Charles Nelson Riley
at.
The site provided an
article by some bowling
smart guy named Tom
Kouros called, "Do You Make
These 8 Mistakes?" Among the
eight questions were "Do you
warm up before a league session?"
the article very helpful. I
was looking for "Do you
eat too much of that
Einsenhower-era pizza
they sell at the alley and
drink too much of the
$15-a-cup beer-water and
then vomit on the lane,
causing you to slip and
send your ball sailing
across the next lane over?
I mean it was called
"Across the Lanes
I decided I was getting
nowhere by just typing in
"bowling So, I narrowed my
search a bit by typing in "bowling"
plus things I associated with this
rigorous sporting competition like
"drunk fat guys" and "big-haired
women That did it. It took me to
the sites where people didn't
having bowling pins stuck up their
buttocks.
My first stop was into the world
of the "Otaku Bowler Zone"
(http:idfx.comotakubowler).
These guys had the right idea.
The site provided a profile of the
various Otaku bowlers. Akira
described his bowling style as
"drunk" and said his inspiration at
the alley was "killer butt Mr.
Stryker defined his bowling style
as "dash to the foul line and throw
the ball 150 m.p.h He said he
was inspired by "breasts" and his
SEE OUUARD. PAGE t
N i
j3Nk
T
&$
pi
-





The East Carolinian
(.style
Tuesday, October 28, 1997
Professor chews on horror, sci-fi
I �
Ml
O

Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring $3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
ADVENTURE
Get some
northern
exposure as
you tackle
the majestic
Rockies.
Monday, November 3, 1997 Hendrix Theatre, 4 pm & 7:30 pm
All-you-can-eat dinner menu: mixed greens salad with balsamic vinaigrette,
baked salmon, cornish hens with raspberry sauce, winter blend vegetables,
roasted shallots and new potatoes, Pullman Bay bread, and baked Alaska.
T DOESN'T
MATTER HOW
YOU GET THERE
films are free to students with i current, vilid ECU ID. Dinner tickets ire S12 each.
Jo reserve your dinner ticket, come to the CTO in Mendenhatl Student Center
by Wednesday. October 29. 1997 end pay with cash, a meal card, or your declining
balance. Dinner will be served at 6:00 pm in the Great Room
CENTRAL TICKET OFflCE HOURS Montey - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
919.128 �;M or 1.IO0.ECU.ARTS:
TOD access for deafspeech-impaired call 919.328.A7s6
J K N N I V� K K L . T A f E
STIFF WRITKK
Dr. Sherry Ginn, of the ECU
Psychology Department, has an
unusual interest. In fact, it's an
interest that fics right in with the
Halloween spirit in the air.
Sherry Ginn, respected
professor and upstanding citizen,
is a science fiction and horror film
addict.
"I guess you could say it was a
hobby she said. Ginn recently
shared her interest in these films
in a Chew On This lecture in the
Mendenhall Underground.
Close to 50 students and staff
gathered to enjoy free desserts and
drinks and listen to Ginn's lecture
entitled "Depictions of the Brain
and Mind in Classic Horror and
Science Fiction
The lecture focused on the
evolving portrayal of the brain and
included footage from both classic
and modern sci-fi and horror films.
Ginn covered the depiction of the
brain and mind in contexts ranging
from the classic Jekyll and Hyde
scenario to the more current
fascination with aliens invading
earth by gaining control over
Review
continued from page B
Latin sandwich (between Raul
Malo's salsa and the Latin
Playboys' abstract spanishism)
quite nicely with their "Me Estas
Matando
As if there weren't enough
cultural diversity on the album,
Wenders shows his affection for
electronic music as well. Tracks by
triphopster Howie B,
groovemasters Mediski, Martin
and Wood grace the soundtrack, as
does "Untitled Heavy Beat a
collaboration between Q-Tip and
humans' brains.
"Science doesn't have to be
dull Ginn said. There are a lot of
topics that one might never guess
could be attached to real science.
Ginn says she has found her
interest in science fiction and
horror films is often relevant to
topics discussed in the classroom.
Unfortunately, due to limited
time, Ginn is only able to touch on
it briefly in the classroom. The
Chew On This lecture series
provided the chance to address
these topics more fully. In fact,
many present in the audience
were Ginn's students.
Movies and television shape
the way many people perceive the
world around them. Ginn's lecture
and film presentation illustrated
how terrible it would be if people
took their ideas about the brain
and mind from popular media
portrayal.
As far as movies are concerned
though, Ginn has definite feelings
about the age-old classic black and
white vs. modern films debate.
She prefers classic horror and sci-fi
films.
"The old ones left it to your
imagination she said, "but 1 still
watch them all
spinster D.J. Shadow.
A previously unreleased Roy
Orbison song, tuned up and
tweaked by Brian Eno, "You may-
Feel Me Crying is alone worth
the price of the CD. The album
closes out with one of those
aforementioned trendy
soundbites.
Despite the wide range of style
and culture, there is a strong unity
and flow of emotion from the
beginning to the end of the
soundtrack. Wenders may have
become too practiced at using
music to focus his cinematic
visions; the idea of possibly
ruining the music by watching the
movie is frightening. Still, if the
music is this good, then perhaps
the movie is as well.
English professor takes a
bite out of Dracula
D A 1. E W I 1.1.1 AS O N
SENIOl WRITER
Traditionally, horror has been cited
as a genre for the mindless masses,
definitely not something to be
taken seriously. But that attitude
has shifted slightly within the last
10 or 20 years. Not only has the
horror genre been taken seriously
by the literary and film industries,
but the academic world has
also illustrated its deep
interest in everything from
the walking dead to blood-
sucking vampires.
Dr. James Holte is just
one of the many scholars
who have placed an
intellectual, historical and
cultural spin on the horror genre
and, as a result, opened up entirely
new ways of viewing the terrifying
worlds lurking within.
Dr. Holte's fascination with
vampires dates back long before
he ever imagined being a scholar.
"I first became interested in
vampires watching old Bela Lugosi
movies as a kid recalls Dr. Holte.
'They were both frightening and
funny at the same time. When I
was in graduate school and was
getting a traditional degree in
literature, Bram Stoker's novel
Dracula was on the reading list.
Upon reading it, I discovered chat
it was in fact quite an effective
horror novel
Dr. Holte is an ECU English
professor who has taught
everything from Victorian and
Beat literatures to film history.
However, his true passion focuses
on the horror genre as represented
in literature and film, particularly
those dealing with vampires. Dr.
Holte's latest work is a book
entitled Dracula in the Dark: The
Dracula Film Adaptations, which
examines the various
representations of Dracula in film
over the decades. And, with
Halloween rapidly approaching,
the timing couldn't be better.
To celebrate the publication of
his book and the joyous Halloween
season. Dr. Holte will be giving a
talk about Dracula and his history
at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 29 at
Barnes & Noble bookstore,
located at the University
Commons shopping center on
South Evans Street. A few copies
of Dr. Holte's book will be
available for browsing and
purchasing.
Since Dr. Holte not only has a
love for literature but also film, he
saw vampires as being an ideal way
to connect the two. "Since I was
teaching film, looking at film
adaptations of literature, Dracula
seemed to be the perfect example
to use, especially since
there are literally almost a
hundred interpretations
based on Stoker's
conception
Dr. Holte's book reveals in
great detail the richness of
Dracula as a historical
figure, a myth and an icon
popular entertainment. "It
opens with the myth behind
Dracula, talks about the novel and
critical readings of the novel, and
then deals with the major film
adaptations says Dr. Holte. "It
also deals with vampire films in
general and has a filmography and
bibliography in the end for people
who haven't had enough blood and
teeth. There's a lot more out
there
The films highlighted in Dr.
Holte's book include such treats as
Tod Browning's 1931 Dracula, The
Horror of Dracula, Francis Ford
Coppola's adaptation of Bram
Stoker's Dracula, and Interview With
a Vampire.
Interview With a Vampire is
particularly significant, notes Dr.
Holte, because it is one of the
most popular novels (which was
later translated to a Tom Cruise
Brad Pitt film) thac emphasizes
the eroticism of vampirism. 'The
eroticism was always with the
vampire Dr. Holte stresses. "It's
part of ics basic make-up. The
vampire is a sexual being. What
recent adaptations have done is
make the vampire a much more
attractive figure They've
downplayed some of the violence,
made the vampire a more
sympathetic character. It's a
suffering vampire, rather than a
monster, the Other. One of the
trends in modern society is
sympathy for the marginalized, so
you can see why this
interpretation of the vampire
SEE DRACULA, PAGE10
752-7303
"The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
xejmgtmtat&
N�f$ Legemhry Nightdub,
Voted 1 at ECU ami
tap 160 Cafhge Bars in the
Nation by PUsyboy magazine
Qztobw 1997
i
7m
Wednesday Oct.29th
Mike m
Brennan �
im
Thursday Oct. 30th
Atlantic Recording Artist
Edwin McCain Band
Special Guest: Fighting Gravity
ADVANCE TIX AVAIL-
ABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKULLY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC
4 VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
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Friday Oct. 31th
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Halloween
Unsound
Kutphatt
Halloween
Handout
with
Co&tumes
for Cash
V
Original
Saturday Nov 1 st
Nan tucket

WSFL Listener
Appreciation Concert
Door Prize
Ml 'mmis�' trip to
aiihirk'l Islam!
(airfarr inrlmlrtl)
Coming Next Week
Too Skinnee f's
Nov. 7
Mesmar EyCS"Nov 5,6
Cravin Melon
Nov. 15
H
K
,n HAPPFA
all Student Cente
HlVm�
All dressed up and nowhere to go on Halloween? Don't miss the Midnight
Madness Halloween bash at Mendenhall Student Center.
Free prizes, video karaoke, Laser Storm, psychics, bingo, dancing, Ghoul Cafe
open recreation and a midnight buffet. Horror flicks: Carrie and Scream in Hendrix
Theatre. Your ECU ID will get you in free. Guest passes are available.
FRIDAY, OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M2 A.M. at Mendenhall Student Center
Sexy, sutttif Coalmen
Here's a chance to go high class on low cash. Reserve a seat for Bizet's grand-scale
production of Carmen. Witness the tragic consequences of seduction and
rejection. Student tickets are available at the CTO for $15. All tickets are $30
at the door. FRIDAY, NOV. 14 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Spicey Dance
From the burroughs of New York to international acclaim, Ballet Hispanico brings
true Latin dance to the stage. Student tickets are available at the CTO for $10.
All tickets are $20 at the door. Check out page 177 of your ECU Clue Book for a
valuable coupon for a discount ticket.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
On Display
Cajun Music andZydeco � Currently on exhibit in Mendenhall Gallery
Underground Performances
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free in The Pirate Underground
every Thursday at 8 p.m. in the MSC Social Room.
This week: KernalGoat and Deep Fuzz
Sex Education
"Eroticizing Safe Sex: Bringing Back the Fun" A lively lecture by River Huston
Admission is Free for faculty, staff, and students with a valid ECU ID.
One guest permitted per ECU ID.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10 AT 8:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
last Call for New York
Due to the overwhelming response for the Thanksgiving trip to New York, the ECU
Student Union may be adding another bus to the convoy. It's New York for as little
as $155. The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for three nights.
To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip, drop by the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
S3
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55
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Mi
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NDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity
jk HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.ml 1 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p m -12 a m � Sun 1pm-
'Sa-
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10 Tuesday, October 28, 1997
style
The East Carolinian
Dracula
continued Itom page 9
would work
But those who prefer their
vampires to be less sympathetic
and more threatening, need not
worry. Dr. Holte reminds everyone
that there are still plenty of
stories, such as Robert Rodriguez's
From Dusk Till Danrn, where
vampires are simply the monster.
Holte couldn't have asked for
his book to come out at a better
time. The witching season is upon
us, vampires are popular once
again, and it's the 100th
anniversary of, as Holte happily
claims, "a book that has never been
out of print since its first
publication
Anyone interested in
discussing Dracula. vampires and
Halloween in general with Dr.
Holte, be sure to be at Barnes &
Noble on Oct. Z9. All are
encouraged to "dress
appropriately" for the occasion. For
further information, contact
Christie Brewer, Barnes & Noble
Event Organizer, at 321-8119.
Dullard
continued trom page
continued Itom page 8
branches of the division from
Dining to Recreation have
chipped in on Midnight
Madness.
There's great energy here
Woodruff said of the people who
put on the event. "This is a staff-
driven event. People from across
the division (of Student Life)
come together every year to put
on this massive party for one
purpose only: to serve the
students of ECU
Along with the lineup of
events, there will be food and
music throughout the night.
"Midnight Madness is
definitely the best brew in town
Woodruff said in reference to the
slogan that adorns the event's t-
shirts. "This is a great way to
spend time with 2,000 other
students
ECU' students need only
present their student IDs to
enter the bash. Guests must pick
up a free guest pass prior to the
event. Guest passes can be
picked up beginning Oct. 27 at
the Community Service Desks
from 8 a.m. until midnight and
the Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center
from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. On
Halloween, guest passes may be
picked up at the Community
Service Desks until 9 p.m, the
Central Ticket Office until 6
p.m and at the Student
Recreation Center Customer
Service Desk between 6-9 p.m.
Guests must have a guest pass for
entrance to the movies.
other interests included "large
breasts Strykcr seems like a
well-rounded sort.
The "Freak" site
(www. kcds.comcavalcadedefau 11
.htm) was also interesting,
despite it having nothing to do
with bowling. This site was run by
a couple of gab who have had a
few "bad" dates. They provide
anecdotes about their various
dating experiences. "Bowling
Boy" centered around a guy who
was more into bowling than doing
the dog. She concluded the sordid
tale by saying this guy was also a
member of the Swing Out Sister
fan club, a sure sign of unbridled
dementia.
"The Intergalactic Bowling
and Chainsaw Appreciation Page"
sounded like it would be great.
However, when I clicked on it, I
was informed it was "forbidden:
vour client is not allowed to access
the requested object What I
want to know is, what Nazi has
decided that I can't find out about
bowling and chainsaws? If I find
you, Hitler boy, booty thrashing
will ensue.
At www.juggling.iirg. 1 was
blessed to meet "The
Heavyweight Juggler Donnia
Ray Smith, a man who could
juggle fivebowling balls at once.
Mr. Smith said he has a dream "of
having a bowling ball shot from a
cannon where he would catch it
on his neck I have that same
dream, Donnia. Thank you, I'm
not a freak, damn it.
Near the end of my trip down
the information super-bowling-
lane. I came in contact with a
story concerning a man who
exemplified the true spirit of
bowling. The article's title says it
all: "Police Finger Nude Bowler in
Alley Capet" Mr. Scott A. Hughes
of Greenfield, Wisconsin received
a $209.50 fine for stripping down
to his bowling shoes and cowboy
hat and proceeding to bowl. The
Classic Ianes bowling alley where
the incident took place had made
a "bowl naked, bowl free" offer.
They claimed they didn't think
anyone would take them seriously.
Hughes, however, bowled naked
for 30 minutes. Personally, I think
Hughes should have been
rewarded for sticking it out 'hat
long. Bravo, Mr. Hughes.
Bowling on the net was more
fun than a nose full of bowling
shoe sweat. I can't lie. It wasn't.
Almost, but a little short of a
strike.
Student Voters Prepare!
Greenville Municipal Candidate Forum
Tuesday, October 28, 1997
City Council Chambers
7:00 to 9:00 PM
Simultaneous broadcast on
Government Access Cable TV Channel
9 with taped replay at noon and
7:00PM on Wednesday October 29,
Thursday October 30 and Sunday
November 2,1997
Cosponsored by the League of Women Voters of
Pitt County and the Chamber of Commerce,
Greenville-Pitt County
F
Glow
continued trom page 8
the decor was unattractive. Now,
we have all the equipment
working and the place has a new
look. It's really cool
Clutter credits Joshua Hoover,
acting technical director for
Mendenhall Student Center, for
much of the work leading up to
the inaugural Glow-Bowling event
on Halloween.
'We sent Joshua Hoover to the
Brunswick Bowling School to learn
how to maintain these machines
so that we have someone who is
here. He has brought this together
and will be handling the
programming for the bowling
center
At this point, the bowling
center will be using the glowing
pins, glowing balls, and showcase
new wall murals by ECU art
student Drew Fairizl. The center
will also be unveiling new masking
units � the pictures above the
pins that hide the machinery. The
center will be using black-lights
anH haw a fos machine going.
Abo, there will be music and food
will be allowed in the center.
"(Glow Bowling) came about as
we were trying to figure out ways
to update the image of the
bowling center Hoover said. "We
wanted to get more students
involved by making it a more
interesting place to go on the
weekend.
"I talked to students who work
with me and a few others outside.
They all seemed intrigued by the
glow-in-the-dark stuff. The closest
place like this is in Raleigh
The future holds more for the
bowling center's Glow Bowling.
Eventually, electronic scoring will
be added as well as glowing lanes.
Programming, according to
Hoover, will likely include two
Glow Bowling nights a month in
addition to the regular offerings.
The bowling center
revitalization is the first of a
number of planned changes to the
basement in Mendenhall Student
Center The changes include a
cvber cafe and a revamped
billiards hall.
"We're trying to make
Mendenhall more cozy for
students Cluttet said. "We want
it to feel like home
bw-3
Grill &Pub
1 14 East Fifth Street 758 - 9191
llor bw-3 Express Delivery 7:
Coming Soon:
BVV-3 Game Room!
- foozball
- pool tables
- video games
- 100 CD jukebox
CharGrill
Chicken
Taco Salad
$3.99
em 112997
Widespread Panic performed Friday night at Minges as part of ECU's
Homecoming 1997 activities.
gj�& ECl Tailgating 80 in�s lor ,��&,
'�& Special S 19.97 12g
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
mmwmmmawm
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 1
CARP�E
"SIMWNAll
name
tmmmwir
Based on the
runaway bestseller'
If only they knew she had the power.
United Artists
tence
ith us!
person we are
!e need your help this Sail, and
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spring.
We are aCBpting applications for all sections
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� Staff writers for News, Sports,
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� Opinion columnists
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Oct. 30 and Nov. 1, 8 pm
Oct. 30 and Nov. 1, 10 pm
Oct. 31-Midnight Madness: Films will run concurrently starting with Carrie at 9:30 pm
FILMS ARE FREE FOR ALl'sTUDENTS, FACULTY. AND STAFF MEMBERS (ONE GUEST ALLOWED) WITH VALID ECU ID
Sroticizin
Admission
ECU Students, Faculty, and Staff
FREE advance tickets available upon
presentation of valid ECU ID at Mendenhall
Student Center Central Ticket Office
Public
S3.00 in advance, $5.00 at the door
Bringing Back the Fun
Monday, November 10,1997, 8:30 pm
Hendrix Theater
Thursday, October 30, 1997
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
Kernel Goat
Deep Fuzz
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
j44:a14 " f M I
ifetime iH
Apply at our office on the second floor or the'Student
Publications Building (across for )oyner library).
TMcfoVpefC
1997
Tues Nov. 25 - Sun Nov. 30
Cost per person
$155 quad occupancy
$170 triple occupancy
$210 twin occupancy
$315 single occupancy
Call the Central Ticket
Office at 328-4788 to
reserve your seat on a
bus to the big cityllt
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail: uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu





r
The East Carolinian
Rugby team defeats
opponent
Men win 40-5 in
Saturday's game
Jamks Camp
STAFF WRITER
This past Saturday the ECU Men's
Rugby Team had a home game at
ycock Middle school against the
team from Cherry Point. The Pirates
:ame out fired up and took control
f the game from the opening
dckoff.
Eric Kunkel helped set the
:empo for the Pirates scoring the
irst try of the game about four
ninutes into the first period.
The Pirates continued their
jlggressivc play by using their size
kjnd speed to their advantage against
tjieir opponent. The Pirates scored
tjvo more times in the first period on
tries by Matt Washburn and Nate
bnds, giving ECU a 21-0 lead after
e first period.
The Pirates came out in the
ond period and continued their
minance over Cherry Point by
ing a much deeper roster than
CJherrv Point. By using the deeper
rtster, they were able to keep
Mayers from getting tired. It was
aso good because they were able to
vjlork in a lot of the new players on
djic team.
"This was a good game to get in
seme of the new guys, and they
really stepped it up. This was a real
rjpsitive sign for the team said
Matt Oathout,
team captain.
The Pirates
scored twice
in the second
period on tries
by Don Rabun
and Kendall
Jones. At the
end of the
second period
it was 35-0 in
favor of the
Pirates.
The tempo
of the game
slowed some
in the third
"This was a
good game to get
in some of the
new guys, and
they really
stepped it up.
This was a real
positive sign for
the team
Matt Oathout
team captain
period, but by
then the Pirates were assured a well-
earned victory. ECU scored on a try
by Carl Brienzi. The Cherry Point
team also scored but failed on their
extra point attempt. R�r the Pirates,
extra-point kicker Eric Kunkel was
good on five out of six extra point
attempts. The final score of the
game was 40-5.
"This was a really good warm up
game for us going into the state
tournament next weekend. It was a
real good win to get up our
confidence to repeat as state
champs Oathout said.
The state championship
tournament will be held next
weekend at the UNC-Wilmington
campus. The next home game for
the rugby team will be at Aycock
Middle school, Nov. 8 at 1 p.m.
against Towson University
Golfers attempt to
Qualify for invitational
JKRKMY ANDERSON
STAFF WRITER
ith only one tournament left on
r fall schedule, the ECU Golf
and head coach Kevin Williams
rching for a spark to get things
r Pirates (30-32)who have
suffering a sub-par season so
placed 12th in the 15 team
m's Cup of Newport held Oct.
Si 6 in Newport, Rhode Island.
"I was really disappointed
Williams said. "We just arent
competitive
The Pirate linksters have a 300.6
stroke average for the season, a
problem Williams will try to remedy
in practice this week. Rr the first
time this year, all 10 players will have
an opportunity to qualify for the five
spots open for the ODUSeascape
Invitational, which began yesterday
(Monday Oct. 27) in Kkty Hawk,
North Carolina.
" We are going to change up some
SEE 601F PAGE 13
Rain and injuries
Ifamper men's chances
Steve losev
; SENIOR WRITER
Fjur
Ftjur members of
rbje ECU men's
tennis team took a
trip to Columbia
this past weekend.
Tpey competed in
the University of
South Carolina
Region II Fall
Invitational and put
inj an impressive
performance.
;9The tournament
hajf divisions for
singles and doubles
competition. Senior
Roope Kalajo was
seeded "eighth in
thfS A-l category.
Seifior Nils Alomar
wag ranked in the A-
2 Jategory. Junior
Kelny Kirby was
placed in B-l and
junjor Stephen
Sibenbrunner
competed in the C-
1 category.
Three of the four
Pirates received first
round byes on Friday. Kalajo lost to
Charleston Southern's Daniel
Jaworski, 6-4, 6-4, in the second
round. Kirby lost his second round
match to Jordan Goetzman from the
University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga after three hard sets
with scores of 6-2, 3-6, and 7-5.
Siepenbrunner won his second
roujid match against Charleston's
Andreas Kuznik, 6-4, 6-4. Alomar
went on to defeat Paul Thurmond of
Vanflerbilt, 6-4, 6-1. His victories
ensbred him a spot in Saturday's
quarterfinals.
Rain disrupted portions of
Friday's tournament. Several
doubles matches were delayed.
KirqySiebenbrunner got a bye in
Brett Rouley of the men's tennis team sends a ball back over
the net during practice.
PHOTO BY ClAY BUCK
the first round, but their B-l match
against Eton was delayed until
Saturday. KalajoAlomar also had a
first round bye. In the second round,
they lost to South Carolina's
AbebeBergman, 8-2, in an A-2
match.
On Saturday, Kalajo got a place in
the A-l singles consolation bracket,
which he did not let go to waste.
Kalajo beat Francis Marion's Linus
Holmadahl, 8-5, and Sjors Witjes of
Charleston, 8-2, in two pro sets.
Alomar lost his A-2 quarterfinal
match against Charleston's Gil
Cohen in three close sets, 4-6, 6-4,
and 7-6.
SEE TENNIS. PAGE 13
sports
Tuesday. October 28. 1997 11
Blues lessen
with WIN
The Pirates put an end to their four game losing streak with a 32-10 victory over Memphis in Saturday's homecoming game.
PHOTO BY AMAN0A PROCTOR
Amanda Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
When you hit rock bottom,
you can only go up.
After the Pirate's loss to
Tulane, some of the players
commented that things
couldn't get any worse and
emotionally ctie players were
drained. Split end Larry
Shannon said the perfect cure
was a win, and that's what
they got this past Saturday.
ECU broke a four-game
skid and finally recorded their
first conference win defeating
Memphis, 32-10. The Pirates
move to 2-5, 1-2 in the
conference, while Memphis
falls to 2-5 and 0-2 in C-USA.
Head Coach Steve Logan
knew his players were into
the game from the start.
"The kids were excited
before the game Logan said.
"They were into the game
from the start
Saturday's game was a
defensive showcase. The
defense alone
Who's Hot?
Rod Coleman
linebacker
A
�Scored first career
touchdown, running
30 yards after a
fumble recovery
�Recorded seven
tackles
�Recorded one
quarterback sack for
six yard loss.
Jamie Wilson
fullback
A
�Scored two
touchdowns, giving
the red-shirt freshman
a team-leading five on
the season.
�Led ail rushers with
56 yards.
Kelvin Suggs
free safety
�Intercepted pass that
led to touchdown six
plays later in first'
quarter
�Recovers fumble in
second quarter.
�Records three tackles
for the game.
Kendrick Phillips
strong safety
&
�Scored first
touchdown of career
after intercepting pass
and returning it 49
yards in fourth quarter
�Recorded one
quarterback sack for
13-yard loss
"A sad is
like a
touchdown;
they both
equal out.
The
touchdown
felt good
Rod Coleman
linebacker
scored 12
points and
had a key
fumble
recovery in
the first
quarter that
led to a
touchdown to
get things
started.
Safety Kelvin
Suggs picked
off a Bernard
Oden pass in
the first
quarter. Six
plays later, Jamie Wilson ran
ball in for the one-yard score
to put ECU ahead 7-0.
Suggs felt the defense
would have to step up during
the game, and they did from
start to end.
"Our main objective was to
force turnovers and score on
defense Suggs said.
The Tigers drove into
ECU territory down to the
six-yard line and with fourth
and two, the ECU defense
shut down Memphis. The
Tigers couldn't convert,
gaining just one yard, after
Marc Yellock made the stop to
deny the first
down.
ECU
struck again
in the
beginning of
the second
Quarter. Dan
ionzalez
found
Marcellus
Harris in the
end zone,
who made the
great catch
after a
Memphis
d efende r
tipped the
bail Harris'
way. The
point after
attempt by
Brantlcy Rivers
was blocked
which kept the
score at 13-0,
ECU.
A Memphis
field goal put the
Tigers on the
board, 13-3.
During their next
possession, Oden
fumbled the ball
and again Suggs
was there to
ccme up with the
recovery to end
the Memphis
drive.
"We knew we had to play Pirate
defense Suggs said. "Everybody
was fired up and we played what
we know how to piay
ECU ended the half as Andrew
Senior Larry Shannon steps out of bounds
after pulling in the catch.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
"You can't
imagine what
it does to a
team to lose so
manytna
row. This
win is good
for us.n
Dan Gonzalez
quarterback
Bayes faked a 44-
yard field goal
and threw a 24-
yard pass to Buck
Collins that set
up a three-yard
run by Wilson on
the next play.
ECU went into
the locker room
with the haiftime
lead for only the
second time this
year, 20-3.
Logan was
pleased with the
performance of
Wilson, a red-
shirt freshman.
"He's good off
the bench right
now Logan
said. "He's got quick feet and is
good all around
Going into the game, Memphis
ranked first in the conference in
pass defense giving up just 141.5
yards per game. The Tigers gave
up 257 yards in the air in just the
first half.
Gonzalez completed 19 of 26
passes for 233 yards and one
touchdown. Wilson ran for 12 yards
with two scores, while Lamont
Chappell caught four passes for 59
yards.
As the third quarter began, the
fire that lit up ECU in the first half
began to get even hotter.
Memphis had first possession
to begin the second half, but
couldn't get things going. Five
plays into their drive, Oden was
sacked by Kendrick Phillips. The
ball rolled out of Oden hands and
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 13
"We knew we
hadtoplay
Pirate defense.
Everybody was
fired up"
Kelvin Suggs
safety
5-2
1984 1-6
2-5
1986 1-6
4-3 1987
1988 1-6
4-2-1
1990 2-5
6-1 1991
1992 4-3
2-5 1993
1994 4-3
1996 5-2
Marcellus Harris and J.J. McQueen take instruction from their coaches on the bench. Harris caught two balls for 16 yards and
rushed for four more. McQueen cracks a smile while the Pirates roll to victory.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
2-5 1997
4L"
i
i





12
Tuesday. October 28. 1997
0
The Easl Carolinian
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Lady Pirates drop 1-3 loss
to Tribe
The ECU volleyball team
continued its slide as the I'irates
dropped their eighth straight match
Sunday with a 1-3 (5-15, 15-8, 10-
15, 8-15) loss at William and Mary.
With the defeat. ECU slipped to 12-
15 for the season and 2 in Colonial
Athletic Association play.
The Pirates came out slow, but
started to heat up by the third game
as ECU hit .600 for the game with
20 kills and just two errors on 30
attempts. For the match, ECU
outhit the Tribe .2S721S but gave
up 15 service aces. The Pirates also
kept up their blocking average,
collecting 8.5 total team blocks to
William and larys 7.0.
"We were competitive this
weekend. probably more
competitive than any point since
the Memphis tournament (in mid-
September). Now we just have to
get a little more out of it and pick
up a couple wins said head coach
Kim Walker.
Leading the way for the Pirates
on Sunday were middle blockers
Chrissy McPheeters. Sarah Kary and
LaKeya Mason. McPheeters, filling
in for Liz Hall who missed her first
games of the season, finishing w ith a
.533 hitting percentage with nine-
kills and onlv one error in 15
attempts while adding five digs and
five block assists. Kary also turned
up the offense a notch, recording
nine kills and one error in 20
attempts (.400 hitting percentage)
to go along with 13 digs and three-
total blocks, while Mason pitched in
a team-high 12 kills (.409 hitting
percentage), six digs and four total
blockv
Sunday's loss came a day after
the Pirates p ished Virginia
Commonwealth to the limit before-
losing 12-15. 14-16, 10-15. Cinta
Claro collected 10 kills on the night
to move into ECl 's single-season
all-time top 10 for kills. She
currently has 544 kills for the season
to rank seventh all time and needs
Hist two kills to pass current
teammate Shannon Kaess for sixth.
Kristin Warner is also rising on
the top 10 list for assists after
posting 52 against VCU and 30 at
William and Marx. Currently the
iunior has 861 to rank fifth all time.
ECU will be in action on Friday,
Oct. 51. as the Pirates start a home-
stand for the final stretch before the
conference tournament. The
Pirates will play George Mason in
Williams rena at Minges Coliseum
on Friday at 7 p.m. and then follow
up by playing host to American on
Saturday at 1 p.m.
New school record set for
women's soccer wins
ECU used a pair of second-half
goals and a solid defensive effort to
shutout American, 2-0, in CAA
action here Sunday amid rainy
conditions. With the win, the
Pirates improved to 8-9, 3-4 in the
CAA; while the Eagles fell to 7-8-1,
2-5 in the CAA. The eight wins are
an ECU schixil-record for victories
in a season.
In the scoreless first half, both
teams struggled to establish a
rhythm on the damp field. After 45
minutes, the Pirates had outshot
American 12 to 7.
In the second half, ECU was
much more effective in the
attacking third. The Pirates
recorded their first goal in the 62nd
minute on a free kick from 25 yards
by senior midfielder Courtney
Jurcich (Springfield, Va.) into the
far post. For Jurcich, it was her
second goal of the season.
At the 84:09 mark, sophomore
forward Jennifer Reiley (Alexandria,
Va.) played a throw-in from
freshman midfielder Katie Moran
(Oakton, Va.) and fired a shot into
the back of the net from 14 yards.
The goal was Reiley's fifth of the
year and tied her for the team lead
in points with 11.
The ECU defense lead by
sophomores Jill Davis (Pinehurst,
N.C.) and Dana Durbin (Cary.
N.C.) along with sophomore keeper
Amy Horton (Raleigh, N.C.)
withstood the American attack to
preserve the Pirates' fifth shutout
victory of 1997.
Horton finished with four saves,
anchoring the back line for ECU for
the entire 90 minutes. American
sophomore keeper Tara Felton
rallied 12 saves for the Eagles.
Reiley and freshman midfielder
Frin Cann (Bordentown, N.J.) led
ECU with six shot attempts apiece;
sophomore forward Lindsay Wynn
led AU with four shots.
"Certainly, it was great for us to
comeback after four consecutive
losses and get this win said ECU
head coach Neil Roberts. "This win
helps us in the conference
tournament seedings. It's nice to
set a record for wins in a season, but
I was more impressed today with
how we played as a team. Everyone
was focused and gave 100 percent
out there. All the girls stepped up
their play today, and when we do
that, we're a tough team to beat
The Pirates will return to CAA
action on Friday, Oct. 31, when they
host 12th-ranked George Mason.
First touch is scheduled for 3 p.m.
Swimmers kickoff another
winning season
The ECU men's and women's
swimming and diving teams opened
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
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the 1997-98 season in solid fashion
as they finished the weekend
winning two dual meets apiece as
they downed the College of
Charleston and followed up with
another victory against Georgia
Southern. With the wins, the Pirates
have combined for a 52-15 dual meet
record in the past tour seasons.
"It was a great way to get back in
the water and open the season said
head coach Rick Kobe of the
victories. "Both the men's and
women's teams swam well this
weekend and posted some fast
times. We're excited to start the
season 2-0 and hope to keep it
going
Behind several top times, the
Pirates men downed the Georgia
Southern 132.5-108.5 on Sunday
while the women easiK
outdistanced the Eagles 143-95.
()pening the day for the men. 400
medley relax team of Jacob I lartsell,
SID AGI 13
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I woke up�
I hadno
idea where
I was. � �
even vorse
I didn'tknow
who he Ehwas. I was
1liung over,
and totally depressed.
This Isn't
what i w�m .
� wanted
out of
college.
Does alcohol do what you want It to? Or does
It leave you dry? Maybe there'& something
better. To- a i.ec i-c-l or d-rL-r
rr,






The East Carolinian
0
Tuesday. October 28. 1ST 13
Golf
"Yea, Buffy, I totally can't
believe they really printed
my letter to the editor
"Like, I heard they want to
publish yours too
All letters to the Editor must be
typed, 250 words or less. Must
include your name, major, year, and
phone . Send to:
East Carolina University
2nd Floor Student Pub. Building
Greenville, NC 27852
continued fttim page
things in practice. There will probabh be some new
players in the lineup next week Williams said.
Sophomore Robbie 1'crrv. the Pirates top finisher.
shot an excellent 73-74 on the first day ol the
Adam's Cup. onl to shot a final round SJ to finish in
a tie for 43rd. Sophomore Marc Miller had two
tough opening day rounds of 81-77. but salvaged a
final round 73 to finish 52nd overall.
"We put a lot of pressure on Marc Williams said.
"It" he plays bad. we play bad. If he plays well, we
play OK
Williams hopes to get lower scores from his 2,3,
and 4 seeded players. In the Adams Cup. the
"meat" of the Pirate lineup was a combined 59 over
par. The 2-4 seeds all shot opening day rounds in the
70's, but failed to break out of the 80's the final day.
The onlv golfer to have a round under par was
junior Shane Robinson, who shot a 69 on the final
dav. after two opening dav founds of 80 and 88.
Robinson finished in a tie for68th.
"We need to be more productive. ()ur two. three
and four guys have two good rounds and one bad
round in every tournament Williams said.
For more information visit our website
at www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
CONFERENCE
USA

Last Week's Results
Cincinnati 34, Miami (Ohio) 31 (ot)
ECU 32, Memphis 10
Houston 36, Louisville 22
Southern Miss 34, Tulane 13
This Week's Games
Southern Miss at Cincinnati
ECU at Louisville
Houston at Memphis
Tulane at Southwestern Louisiana
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Football
ntinuerj tinm page
into the arms of linebacker Rod
Coleman who scooped the ball up
and ran 30 ards in for his first career
touchdown. The Pirates led 26-5
after a tailed two point conversion.
Suggs joked that Coleman was
looking to pitch the ball off to a
teammate because Coleman knew he-
would have to gei back on defense
and play. He almost got caught from
behind but had enough juice to
complete the run. Coleman said that
felt just as good as a sack.
"A sack feels like a touchdown; it
all equals out Coleman said. 'The
touchdown felt good. I was so
excited. 1 was thinking of something
to do in the end one
Memphis sjot the ball back and did
capitalize on their next drive, 1 5 plays
and 65 yards later with a touchdown.
The third quarter came r an
with ECl' still holding on : i 3 26-KJ
lead.
The Pirates would score one more
time when Phillips intercepted (dcn
and took the ball down lor a the 49-
vard score, scoring his first career
touchdown. That's how the game
would end. with K( II' w inning 32-10
and recording their first ever
(inference I S. win.
Phillips gave tiie credit ;
score to his teammates.
"I just want to thank the players
for the great blocks Phillips said.
ECl" currently stands in fifth
place in the conference, ahead oi
Memphis and Louisville.
The Pirates travel to Louisville
this Saturday for another conference
showdown. Kick off is set for 3 p.m.
Come By the Student Store October 27-30
from 10 AM to 1 PM to Complete your
Application and receive your free T-Shirt
Tennis
continued from page 11
The Pirates suffered setbacks and
bad luck in the two other matches.
Kirby was knocked out of the B-l
consolation bracket by Furman's
Blake Peeper in an 8-6 set.
Siebenbrunner and Matt DeWolff of
Georgia State were engaged in a
close match. They split the first two
sets, 5-7 and 7-5, before
Siebenbrunner was forced to
withdraw when he injured his
shoulder. Kalajo Siebenbrunner were
also forced to withdraw from their
doubles match against Elon as a
result.
Kalajo was the last hope for the
Pirates on Sunday. He had defeated
all of his opponents in the
consolation bracket in the previous
two das. and hopes were high for his
performance Sunday. I'nfortunately,
his spot was eliminated. Rain on
Sunday forced the tournament's
organizers to cancel the consolation
SID
cunlinued from page 12
Brandon Tillcy, Andy Byrnes and
Matt Jabs got the Pirates started on
the right foot with a victory in
5:34.63. ECU went on to win seven
of 13 events with Tillcy leading the
way. Tillev took top honors in both
the 200 breast (2:10.24) and the 200
IM (1:57.92). with his 200 breast
time setting a new Georgia Southern
pool record. Hartsell also added a
victory in the 200 back (1:56.33).
while Byrnes won the 100 free
(48.56) and Jabs cruised to a victory
in the 50 free (10:33.51).
"Both (the men and women)
came out strong and won
convincingly against a good team
Kobe said. "This was an excellent
way for both teams to start the
season
Before heading to Georgia to face
the Eagles, ECU got the season
started on the right foot with a pafrol
victories over the College oi
Charleston on Saturday. The Pirates
jumped out to an early lead and
didn't let up as they recorded a
127.5-85.5 victor, on the women's
side, while the men cruised to an
easy 132-98 win.
Leading the way for the women's
team was Sloan, last vear's (AN
Rookie of the Year. Sloan,
sophomore from Jacksonville, Ida.
took first in two events Saturday
winning to 200 free in 2:14.43 and
the 400 free in 4:37 E( H also had
six other first-place performances
while winning eight of 12 events on
the day.
For the men. ECU won 10 of 11
scored events and two other races
the Pirates swam as exhibitions.
Topping the list for the Pirates was
Tillevwho won the 200 IM in
2:12.85 and the 100 breast in
1:06.88. AJong with Tillev, Ryan
Baldwin was the Pirates' other two-
event winner, taking first in the 1-m
(193.85) and 3-m (238.94) diving
competition.
-JSlISCH
Gardens
WILLIAMSBURG, VA
TALENT
SEARCH
SINGERS
DANCERS
MUSICIANS
ACTORS
VARIETY ARTISTS
TECHNICIANS
STAGE MANAGERS
Jtep intO the SpOtUght! Over 250 positions available.
Busch Gardens Williamsburg features 7 mainstagc shows, strolling
musicians, character actors and variety artists. All cast members
receive FREE CLASSES, special performance opportunities, plus
FREE access to one of the most beautiful theme parks in the world
We have a sports medicine program, housing assistance. one-wa
relocation mileage reimbursement, and mileage per diem tor Spring
commuting performers.
Make plans now to audition:
Saturday, Nov. 1,11am - 4pm
Busch Gardens, Williamsburg, VA
Magic Lantern Theatre
One Busch Gardens Blvd.
Monday, Nov. 3,11am-4pm
Myrtle Beach, SC
Sheraton Myrtle Beach Hotel
Aruba Room, 2701 S. Ocean Blvd.
Wednesday, Nov. 5,10am � 2pm
UNC - Chapel Hill, NC
Frank Porter Graham Student Union
South Road, Rooms 211, 212
Saturday, Nov. 29,11am - 5pm
Busch Gardens, Williamsburg, VA
Magic Lantern Theatre
One Busch Gardens Blvd
For More Informa.ion call: AUDITION H0T11 8 3-330;
or write AUDITIONS co Busch Gardens, One r�i.





14 Tuesday. October 28. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
"�3SB3E
�h praeaotaSoo �jf mis eeispon, effar (Kpirw
r not vatVl wMH any ottjpt a
,er 'hookups, free basic a
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
� MM.2 b�ooms, t bath
uatqr, dishwaaber, free
0 basic cable, anprox. 900'
sq. � wasaardiyer hookup, central1
reatrak. 6 blocks fromcampus.
COMTtem HeNOWKTED UHrre�AltABLE.
�AM Proem h �� mmgancy martananoa-
P� M
riopai I lonogBramt
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
I bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
MALEFEMALE NEEDED ASAP. A
couple blocks from campus. Only $212
month, 12 utilities and split phone bill.
Call 757-2890.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apt. 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utili-
ties. Call 752-1652.
TWO OR THREE FEMALES needed
to take over lease ASAP. $220 per
month, 14 utilities. Please contact
Sheila, Yuka, or Lauren at 353-2471 or
leave a message.
WALK TO ECU, 3 Bedroom, 1 12
bath, central heatair, carpet, stove,
ref dishwasher. $630mo. Call 321-
4712.
OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed for Players Club apartment.
Preferred undergrad. Call 353-0777,
ask for Heather, John or Paul.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED - Play-
ers Club Apts. 14 of rent and expens-
es. Call today, 321-7613.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. MALEFE-
MALE TO share 3 bedroom duplex on
Lewis St. 12 block from campus. Own
room and bath $230 a month plus 13
utilities. 752-8118.
TWO BEDROOM, OCTOBER-JULY,
washerdryer hook-up, ceiling fans,
pets allowed with fee. Very close to
'�tmpus. Only $325 a month. Call 752-
0277 or 413-0978.
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP!
TWO blocks from campus.
$153.33month plus 13 utilities, free
cable. Dogwood Hollow Apartments.
I For more info, contact Rebekah at 758-
5573.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
i share beautiful new 3 bedroom house
, on ECU bus route. Very reasonable
rent. Call me at 752-2489.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease at Players Club. $220
month plus 12 utilities. Call 353-3481.
Please leave message.
1 BEDROOM APT. 1 block from cam-
pus. Nicety furnished. $300 per month.
Available Nov. 1st. Cable. 758-9831
For Sale
SPECIALIZED ATB - Now on sake.
Save lots of St. Cloea out prices
on last year's models. Come in
ami toot ride today. Ask for Benny
or Derrick. 353-8050.
2 YEAR OLD APPLE 386 Performs
with color Stylewriter 2400 printer
$1,000.00. 2 year old Gateway lots of
extras $800.00. Full computer desk
$80.00. Call Joe, 752-8783.
STUN GUNS! SAFE AND easy to
use. 919-948-6830.
1997 JEEP WRANGLER-8E. White
with black softtop. Immaculate condi-
tion, only 6K miles. 18 months left on
factory warranty. Many options.
$15,000. Call Rick 816-4423(w) 355-
0888(h).
FREE MOTOROLA PAGER. AVAR
ABLE options include voice mail, e-
mail services. Call 1-800-784-6452 Id
1675167 or write to Free Pagers, PO
Box 4112, Greenville, NC 27836-2112.
RALEIGH COMMUTER BIKE, SHI-
MANO grip shift, 21 speed, lock, 1
year old, top condition, sell for $150.
Call Burkhard 551-9069.
1996 MNJA S00. EXCELLENT con-
drtion, never been dropped, less than
1500m and under warranty. Great for
commuting. Asking $4500 OBO. In-
cludes helmet and cover. Call 353-
5810.
Help Wanted
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips! I
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available! I Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wanted Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.icpt.com
PART A FULL TIME positions avail-
able am or pm. Cooks, dishwashers,
servers. Applications accepted 9:00-
5:00, Ramada Plaza Hotel. Above aver-
age wage with experience.
PART-TIME POSITION DfSTRWUT-
ING advertising materials. No selling
involved. All materials provided at no
charge. 1-800-YOUR-JOB. www.acm-
net.composteringyourjob.htm.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-51,500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
CANNON COURT, 2
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
i on new one-year contract Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed-
i room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
' ble and water sewer. Half month free
J to ECU students on new one-year cors-
� tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
' ment, 756-6209.
NEW TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX.
�� Minutes from Greenville. $385 a
month. Washer, dryer hookups. Call
day 551-7810; night 321-2329.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE.
WALKING distance from campus and
. downtown. Large room (15'x15'). Pri-
vate phone linecable in room. Wash-
� erdryer included. $175 per month plus
! utilities. Call Mike at 752-2879.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED -
Players Club Apts. 14 of rent and ex-
penses. Call today, 321-7613.
Need help?
"KuHmn � ttimffnt � HtuuueHpt
5��mm Ct4 � Steektmt � Vt�Uttn
mMhttlnfjf'OU
(919) 9P-0022
I summer
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorwofks is currently recruiting
campus for a limited number of sumn
'98 management positions. Cain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7.223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1800-477-1001.
Services
bah Nun Man Ci�isiii
Durtas include arronds, packing & shipping, gan-
aral oflica supports. Transportation a must.
tucnlarl 2 block from Kinko's on 1mm Slraat.
Hoars: 1PM to 5PM Mf Con work around
school schaduW if nacmsory. $6.25 hour. Coll
Kanraet�)B30-l8i7MF 1PM- 5PM.
NEED A JOB? PARTY Success
Rentals is hiring FTPT people. Flexible
schedule - around your classes. Aver-
age pay $6-$20 hour. Call Now: 756-
7903.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES.
THE Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches for
the winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people agea 7-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours range
from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching.
Flexible work schedule around classes
and holidays. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Fe-
bruary. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please call
Ben James, Michael Daly or Quinton
Mantey at 830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO WORK
part-time or full-time 2-3 days per
week 10-30 hours a week, $10 per
hour. Must pass credit check, criminal
and drug test. Send resume to PO Box
493, Tarboro, NC 27886.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVIC-
ES. MA-English. Fast turnaround, rea-
sonable rates. Most $1,50pp. Reports,
term papers, thesis, etc. Windows 95.
Call Jamie at 758-1161 day or 758-4567
eve.
TUTOR: NATIVE SPANISH SPEAK-
ER will tutor students who need help.
For more information, call 758-8119.
Greek Personals
ZETA TAU ALPHA AND Alpha Omi-
cron PI: We're looking forward to fin-
ishing the semester with you all as our
sister sororities! We hope to get to-
gether soon. Love, the sisters and new
members of Pi Delta.
JILL K WHITNEY D Megan G Joy
E and everyone who helped with
homecoming; Great job this weekend!
Love, the sisters and new members of
Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA PHi
ON winning the Flag Football Cham-
pionships! Your passes, punts, and
plays took us all the wayl Love, your
Alpha Phi sisters and new members
CONGRATULATIONS PI DELTA
PLEDGES! We're so excited you got a
"clue" and found us. We love you
guys) Love, your bigs
TO THE LADIES OF Zeta Tau Alpha,
the brothers of Delta Sigma Psi would
like thank you all for coming out and
partying with us in our PJs Hope you
enjoyed the Jell-O.
BIG SIS'S OF DELTA Zeta, thanks for
our lavaliers and everything else. You
guys are the best. We're looking for-
ward to the big sis party. Hope you are
too. Love, your little sisters
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to thank all
the sisters and pledges who helped
with Homecoming. You all are great!
WE WANT EVERYONE TO know
how awesome the Sigma Pi Sweet-
heart is! Thank you Hillary. We love
you!
MEGAN, THANKS FOR THE great
job on our Homecoming Banner. It
looked great. Zlam, the sisters and
new members of Zeta Tau Alpha
PI DELTA SOCCER PLAYERS: keep
your heads high and keep up the hard
work. Don't worry, the season haa only
started.
ALPHA XI DELTA. YOU know we
had a great Luau last week. You guys
rock! Love always, the boys of Sigma
Pi
PI LAMBDA PHI: THANK you for the
great social. You guys really knew how
to show our new members a terrific
time. Looking forward to the next time.
The Pi Delta's
HOMECOMING GRAB-A-DATE Tail
gate: the game was good, the food
was better, and our guys looked the
best. Thanks for all who came. Hope
everyone had as much fun as we did.
The girls of Delta Zeta.
THANK YOU TAU KAPPA Epsilon
for your enthusiasm Wed. night with
our big sis hunt. You guys made the
night a great deal of fun! Love, the Pi
Delta sisters
CONGRATS ON YOUR PROMO-
TtON, Amanda Austin. We're proud of
you! Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Zeta Tau Alpha
SISTER OF THE WEEK: Alpha Delta
Pi- Amber .Reed, Julie Tanner Alpha
Omicron Pi- Heather Otto, Sarah Gar-
riquesAlpha Phi- Brianne Faircloth,
Jenn Cooper Alpha Xi Delta- Cyndi
Bowman, Dana Menture Chi Omega-
Pam Godfrey Delta Zeta- Tina Black,
Lucinda Autry Sigma - Missy Max-
well, Ann Jennings Zeta Tau Alpha-
Alison Gurganus, Jill Kamarak Pi Del-
ta- Meredith Dowty, Ann Elma
DELTA ZETA WOULD LIKE to thank
all the guys who came to our Stranger
Mixer Thursday night, it was a blast
getting to know everyone. Love, the
Delta Zeta sisters and new members
Lost & Found
LOST DOG; CHOCOLATE LABMIX
(possibly injured). Last seen in Tar Riv-
er Estates near the river last Thursday,
if you have seen her, please call 757-
2548 ASAP.
Travel
"AAAAISPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cancun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, & Florida. Group dis-
counts & daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, & go free! 1-800-234-
7007. http:www.endles8summer-
tours.com
Other
SEIZED CARS FROM Si 78. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-3726.
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext H3726 for current
listings.
ABANDONED PUPPY NEEDS LOV-
ING home. Ginger is a sweet- tem-
pered Shepherd mix, approx. 6-8
months old. Since found, she's been
spayed, wormed, and received shots,
if interested, 638-6617. Cannot keep.
Have 6 dogs already. Ginger was
placed once, but was returned due to
landlord Please consider carefully.
Dogs are a responsibility.
SIOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time: At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
LADIES ELITE WOULD LIKE to
thank the 50 ladies who attended our
candlelight social.
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
Announcements
THE SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT of Management will be touring
the DuPont plant Tuesday, Oct. 28. if
you would like to go, call Mr. Childers
at 328-6063. Next Tuesday Denise Hare
will be guest speaker for our general
business meeting.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28 FACULTY
RECITAL, Jay A. Pierson, Baritone,
John B. O'Brien, piano, A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31,
Opera Scenes, Herbert Eckhoff, Direc-
tor, A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Fit Oct. 31-AII Hallow's Eve Benefit Or-
gan Concert, Janette Fished, Director,
featuring the Phantoms of the Organ
Department, St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 4th Street, Greenville, 11:30
p.m.
A HAUNTED FOREST. THE Recrea-
tion and Leisure Studies Department
at ECU in conjunction with Piggly Wig-
gly is sponsoring "A Haunted Forest
on October 28, 29 and 30th from 6:00
to 10:00 p.m. The event is to be held
rain or shine at the Frisbee Golf
Course on East Carolina's campus. Ad-
mission is $2 for adults and $1 for
children under 10. Special guests for
this event will include the Governor's
Program and Power of One.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet Tues-
day, October 28 at 5:00 p.m. in Men-
denhall Greatroom 2 and 3.
AME COLLEGE CAMPUS MINIS-
TRY, Methodist Student Center, 501 E.
5th Street-ECU Campua Thursday
nights, 6:00-8:00 p.m. Please join us
for Christian Fellowship, Rap Ses-
sions, Refreshment, Music, and Bible
Studies. ContactCoordinator - Rev.
Mary Faircloth, 321-1665.
DO YOU NEED MONEY? Learn to
manage your personal & organization-
al finances. Manny Amaro, Director
University Housing Services will pres-
ent "Money Matters" Monday, No-
vember 3rd at 4:00 p.m. in MSC Mutti
Purpose Room. Contact Student Lead-
ership Development Programs at 328-
4796 for details on Interact Programs
CHRISTIAN PRAISE AND WOR-
SHIP Service Sunday at 5:00 p.m. So-
cial Room Mendenhall, sponsored by
Campus Christian Fellowship
THE NEXT MEETING OF The Pitt
County Chapter of the American Dia-
betes Association will take place on
Monday, November 3, 1997 at 7:00
p.m. at the Leslie-Gaskins Building at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital. This
month's topic is "Which New Med is
for Me? and will feature John O'Bri-
en, MD, from the Diabetes Institute in
Norfolk, discussing the new medica-
tions available for treating type 2 dia-
betes. We will also have a "Healthy
Eating Tip of the Month Refresh-
ments and door prizes will be avail-
able.
EXSS MAJORS CLUB WILL meet
Tuesday, October 28 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Pirate Club Social Room. Wear your
Halloween costume and bring an old
T-shirt
A STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP will be held on Thursday, 1030,
from 3:30-5:00 p.m. at The Center for
Counseling and Student Development,
If you are interested in attending this
workshop, stop by The Center located
in Room 316 of the Wright Building or
call 328-8661.
RCLS SOCIETY WILL HAVE s socie
ty meeting on Oct. 29th at 4:30 in
Minges Room 144. We will have a
guest speaker on Therapeutic Horse-
back Riding. The RCLS officers wish
you Happy and Safe Halloween I
THE MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIA
TtON in Pitt County is offering a de-
pression screening that is free and
open to the public on Tuesday. Octob-
er 28,1997. The screening will be done
by mental health professionals and
will be located at Immanuef Baptist
Church in Greenville at 1101 S. Elm
Street from 6:00-8:30 p.m.
ADVISING SESSION FOR PRE-OT
Students will be Wednesday, Novem-
ber 5th in Room 203 of the Belk Build-
ing. 5:00-6:00 will be questions and an-
swers with current OT students and
6:00-7:00 will be advising and signing
of registration forms. If you can not
come to the Wednesday night session
please come to the OT office between
8:00-5:00 from November 3rd and No-
vember 14th.
INTENDED CSDI MAJORS - ALL
General College students who intend
to major in the Department of Commu-
nication Sciences and Disorders and
have Dr. Robert Muzzarelli or Mr.
Meta Downes as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, November 5 at
5:00 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Advising
for early registration will take place gat
that time. Please prepare a tentative
class schedule before the meeting.
Bring Taking Charge, Your Academic
Planner, and use the worksheet to de-
velop your schedule.
TIPS FOR WRITING PAPERS Work-
shop will be held on Wednesday,
1029, from 3:30-4:30 p.m. at The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment. If you are interested in attend-
ing this workshop, stop by The Center
located in Room 316 of the Wright
Building or call 328-6661.
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL
COLLEGE Students - General College
students should contact their advisers
the week of November 3-7 to make ar-
rangements for academic advising for
Spring Semester 1998. Early registra-
tion week is set for November 10-14.
eastcarolinian AD
DEPARTMENT
� Robert Andrews - Senior Account Rep.
� Joey Campbell - Account Rep.
� Misty Edwards - Campus Account Rep.
� Mark Gaunt - Account Rep.
� Todd Jones - Account Rep.
For Advertising Please Call:
328-2000
Fax: 328-6558
.studentmedia.ecu.edu
Check Us Out!
I aSaj
A
nifcji i ' ii
Tv
auJiJtt i- 'eV,





�Wfi
i
me East Carolinian
Distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday, The East Carolinian
serves the campus as the major
source of information about activi-
ties and events as well as a forum
for discussion of issues and ideas.
This student-run paper provides
numerous opportunities, including
communications, business and
management experiences where
students can apply what they learn
in the classroom.
TEC Newsroom328-6366
TEC Advertising 328-2000
wv
WZMB is ECU's student-run
FM radio station that offers a vari-
ety of alternative music including
rock, jazz, rap and heavy metal.
The station also offers news and
sports reports and call-in type par-
ticipatory shows at 91.3 on the dial.
Various opportunities, including
both on- and off-air experiences,
are available in this hands-on envi-
ronment, allowing students to pre-
pare for a future career.
WZMB Studio323-4751
Request Line328-6913
W
enence
lifetime.
Expressions is a magazine that
serves as the voice of the campus
minority population.
Published four times a year, its
pages carry stories, artwork and
poetry that address the concerns
and problems of the various ethnic
and religious groups represented
on this multi-cultural campus.
Various opportunities to write,
design and illustrate are available
between the magazine's covers.
Expressions 3284927
The Rebel is ECU's literary arts
magazine published annually each
Spring. The featured artistic and lit-
erary pieces are selected by a panel
of judges from entries submitted by
the ECU community. An annual art
display showcases those selections.
Staff members can get various
types of experience from adminis-
tering the contest to arranging the
annual art show to producing the
magazine.
The Rebel3284502
ECU Student Media
Join us for (he experience!
Tuesday Oct 28
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Stop by and see the new
Metro and Tracker at the
Mendenhafl Student
Center Brickyard
Pick Up Passes at the
Central Ticket Office
Day of Show
Presented By
The Student Union
Films Committee
Do it for ECU
Or for a portable CD player, whichever floats your boat
The administration has said they're looking for a new
university symbol, other than VeeVee Pirate.
We at The East Carolinian would like to help them in their hunt
A for a new Pirate logo. Send us your idea for a new ECU
logo before our Nov. 28 deadline.
Well pick our favorite logo and give that person a
portable CD player. Then we'll run all of the serious
logos we receive in the Dec. 4 issue of the paper and on
our website at www.studentmedU.ecu.edu.
Here s your big chance to help the administration
and show your school spirit (or how badly you
really want a portable CD player).
Bring your entries to our offices in the Student
Publications Building by the Nov. 28 deadline.
tpCJ
4 j:
. .� .y
SV






What's your
favorite?
We're looking for your favorites in
our first Reader's Choice survey.
Just complete the survey form printed
here and drop it by our office or put
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out the survey on-line.
Either way you choose, enter only
once. M do it before 5 p.m7 Nov. 7.
Once you enter, we'll throw your name
in with everyone else who responds
and draw out a INNER at random.
That person will take home a Casio
hand-held color TV. Could winning be
any easier?
Then, look for the Readers Choice
favorites featured in a tabloid special
edition on Tuesday Nov. 18.
I the 1 � �
eastcarohman
Readersc
PLEASEJRJNJCLEARLYJHJ AND SUBMIT TO THE EAST CAROLINIAN

What's the best place to get breakfast after a late night?
What's the best place for lunch between classes?
What's the best place to take a date for dinner?
What's the best place to get a good pizza?
What's the best place to live off-campus?
Who has the best
to go?
Whose fries stay the hottest all the way home?
What's the best place to buy a keg?
What's the best place to dance all night?
What's the best place to buy CDs?
What's the best place to get a haircut?
What's the best place to park illegally on campus and get
away with it?
What's the best reason to skip class?
What grocery store best fits student's budget?
What's the best place to have your car repaired?
What cab company has the friendliest drivers?
What laundry won't eat your socks?
Name
Phone
L.
J
I
�M&


Title
The East Carolinian, October 28, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 28, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1235
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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