The East Carolinian, October 23, 1997






THURSDAY
OCTOBER 23, 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROUNA
VOLUME 73. ISSUE 16
Year 2000 signals potential computer problems
Computers may have trouble
adapting to new century
AMBER TT I M
STF f U KIT ER
The end of the world may not happen in the year
2000, but a huge, worldwide computer
"meltdown" is quite possible.
When the new century starts, computer
systems will have problems changing to the new
year.
Because computer programmers decided to
eliminate true dates in data fields and opted to use
the "year-in-century"
format, many hardware
and sofrware systems use
data which only store the
final two digits of the year.
Many of them will want to
read 1900 rather than
2000. According to the
Daily Tar Heel,
computers will have
trouble distinguishing
between a day in 1905
and 2005.
"We're a lot further now
than anyone else in the state said Blake Price,
director of Computer and Information Services.
Approximately 4000 computers are presently on
campus.
"Not all will have a problem said Price.
Blake Price
Director of CIS
"Changes were made in the manufacturing of the
newer PC's to avoid this situation
Some effects of the possible "meltdown"
include erasing bank accounts. On a more personal
note, student record systems may be lost. Such
things as graduation dates and financial status may
be messed up along the way.
ECU is working out the problems themselves.
State funding was not plentiful for the reason that
state officials do not believe that this is a large
problem.
"Universities won't get a lot of money because
this is not considered critical said Price.
ClearK; this should all be taken care of by-
January 1, 2000.
"We're looking at Dec. 1998 for this problem
to be solved 1 said Price. "A lot of work has to
done between now and then
Computers, like the ones in the Umstead computer lab, may not be able to
distinguish between 1905 and 2005.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
Parents
Weekend
held on
Yom Kippur
Reaction continues to
poor planning
Hoi.n HRRIs
, I l I WHI IKK
This year's Parents Weekend was noc
the first time ECU has been accused
of poor planning, and many students
were not surprised at the university's
most recent faux pas.
Parents Weekend coincided with
Yom Kippur, the most solemn holy day
of the Jewish calender.
"The fact of the matter is why did
thev put parent's weekend three days
after fall break said Debra O'Neal,
faculty advisor for Hillel, the campus
Jewish organization.
Not only had many students seen
their families the weekend before, but
for many, Yom Kippur is a family
holiday that is to be observed at home.
Instead of joining in the festivities
these students and their parents were
spending Saturday in fasting, prayer,
and memorials in honor of the
deceased.
"I really wanted my parents to see
that aspect of my fraternity and meet
everybody Sophomore Paul Kaplan,
said. "I think the university knew we
were a minority and could be
overlooked
According to Laura Sweet,
assistant dean of students, it was not a
lack of knowledge of the holiday on
the university's part, but rather a lack
of available weekends on which to
plan the parent's visitation.
"We looked at the three games
knowing that it was a Jewish holiday;
it was the best date we had before us
Sweet said, explaining that other
important events had already been
planned and the university was
reluctant to have the weekend too
late in the season, in November.
In order to participate in both
activities some students prayed in a
local temple on Friday and
participated in university events on
Saturday.
"Its just a shame they were put in
that position" O'Neal said, "parents
have called me from summer on,
asking "what are you going to do?" and
I could do nothing
O'Neal cited examples of
freshman students whose parents
were already concerned about their
child attending school in the south,
where the Jewish population is
considerably lower.
"The example it set for the parents
is sad. " O'Neal said.
Like many students, O'Neal sees
the University's planning as poor
judgment, not malice. Still, the sting
is there.
"1 would understand if it was any-
other Jewish holiday" says senior Jake
Pern, president of Hillel, "1 guess a lot
of people just felt left out
PARKING VIOLATION
4
" TODAY
'� sunny
High 60
Low 366
Students, like freshman Holly Hall, are frustrated over the price of campus parking citations. Many students feel prices should be lowered.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Do you believe
freshmen should
be allowed on-
"Just because they
are freshmen
should they be
punished?"
Minon Faison
freshmen

w
WEEKEND
mostly cloudy
High 70
DdUyKnow
Did you know that before the
football, basketball and
baseball teams were called
the "Pirates" they were
called the "Teachers?"
Parking tickets: a
lucrative business
Natasha Phillips
s I f V RI I K R
Every ECU student knows about on-
campus parking problems; however, not
everv student knows the statistical data
regarding tickets, appeals, tows, and
unpaid parking tickets.
According to the Parking and Traffic
Services, thousands of parking citations
are issued every month. During the fall,
approximately 2,360 parking citations
are issued per month; however, ticket
disbursement peaks during the Spring
term with approximately 3, 305 parking
citations being dispersed on a monthly-
basis. After the Spring term ends,
summer school begins. Summer
sessions have the lowest ticket
disbursement with an average of 928
parking citations per month.
"If I write an individual a citation, it
takes around
RETURN ADRESS
three to six hours
to electronically
get the ticket into
our system;
however, it usually
Campus parking? takes longer to get
the cicket
information into
the University's
system, said
Johnnie
Eastwood,
external
operations
manager with
Parking and
Traffic Services.
Do you believe
that ticket prices
are too high?
"The prices are too
high for freshman,
$25 is a sufficient
ine.
Erica Jamison
freshman
"It's easier if
the person promptly pays the ticket
because the process can be manually-
done, which only takes a few minutes
and saves a lot of time. If a person
decides to appeal, the process can take
between two to four weeks Eastwood
added.
Approximately 11 percent of the
dispersed citations were paid. An
issued parking citation can be paid in
two ways. First, payment can be
satisfied by traditional means: cash,
check or credit
card. There is,
however, another
alternative. If an
individual has their
citation voided
through the
appeals process,
then their citation
is considered to be
"paid About 35
percent of the
appealed citations
were approved, 52
percent were
denied, and 12
percent were
reduced to a lesser
CAMPUS
MAIL
How do ECU'S tickets compare
to other universities?
NCSU $10-$70
UNC Chapel Hill $10-$200
UNC Greensboro $10-$ 100
DEPT OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC SERVICES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NO 278564353
What do you
think ECU does
with the profit
they make from
parking tickets?
"They sure don V
make extra
parking lots
Shannon Williams
Ireshman
fine.
To appeal a
citation, Eastwood
said, the
ticketholder must
fill out an appeal
form. When the
form is filled out,
the ticketholder
has the choice of
submitting their
argument in
writing or going
before a board.
If a written
argument is
submitted, the
hand-written form
must be turned in
with the citation.
If the verbal
argument is
chosen, a request
form must be
submitted with
the original form.
The boards that
consider the arguments meet once a
week. There are three separate boards:
two boards deal solely with written
SEE TICKET PAGE 3
Do you believe
that Freshmen
should be
allowed to have
on campus
parking?
"No, I believe
that with the
shortage of
parking spaces
that are
available, less
students should
be given passes.
Mckensie Thompson
student
THURSDAY
opinion7
Limited tailgating
causes traffic problems
lifestyle8
Get into the Halloween
mood with scary movies
Parking
reduced on
game days
TaHgating has become an overcrowded event, made worse by
roped-ctt and rarely used alumni parking.
PHOTO BY AMAN0A PROCTOR
Increased need for alumni
parking causes crunch
Angela koesig
STVKK WRI'I'KR
Parking: it's a scarce commodity on campus.
This issue is not only a concern during the week,
but also on the weekends of home football games
when thousands of fans fill Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
to see the Pirates play and many of these fans have
to walk several blocks � past an empty parking lot
� to get into the stadium.
One such empty parking lot is the one
designated for Pirate Club parking � a lot not
intentionally left deserted.
According to Dr. Henry VanSant, associate
director of athletics, half of a lot near Charles and
Creenville Boulevard is roped off for those who
support athletics and this is the only such area roped
off for this purpose.
"People have private parking and this is a benefit
of their donations and these are typically for th
larger donations VanSant said.
Pirate Club members must spend approximately
$500 to receive a parking space.
"They have to give a $300 gift and have"
purchased at least two (season) football tickets
said Mark Hessert. associate director of the Pirate
Club.
This year the number of Pirate Club members
increased significantly, causing a parking problem.
To deal with the increase from a need for
approximately 225 spaces to the current need for
approximately 490 spaces, parking had to be roped
off near Harrington Field.
"These spaces are assigned to those people
regardless of whether they come to the games 01
not VanSant said.
These empty spaces are what make ECl
students angry.
"Obviously we know now that 475 spaces are not
going to be used up Hessert said. "But what would
you do if you were in our position?"
Hessert said that both the money raised through
the Pirate Club and student fees are necessary t
run the athletic department and the department
tries to keep the interests of both parties in mind.
SEE PARR PAGE 2
Don't forget the time changes
this Sunday. Set your clocks
back an hour.
Technical difficulties made our Tuesday edition
late. We're sorry for any inconveniences it caused.
sports12
Stadium construction
lingers into 98
the east Carolinian
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across tiom Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.siudentmedia.ecu.ei1u"





2 Thursdty, October 23, 1997
news
Tht El�t Cirolini�n
�FTQA�fi- campus
Tailgaters prohibited from
parking early on game days
Four nominated to replace retiring
Durham County judge
DURHAM (AP) Four women have been nominated to replace retiring
Durham County District Court Judge Carolyn D. Johnson, who will step
down at the end of November.
The four are Tracey Clinc, Fat Evans, Ann McKown and Windy
Sotolongo.
Cline, Evans and McKbwn arc all lawyers in private practice, although
all three have worked in the Durham District Attorney's office.
Sotolongo has been an assistant county attorney in Dujtham since 1990,
specializing in representing the Department of Social Services.
John Bowman, president of the local bar association, said Monday the
nomination period for the judgeship closed at the end of business Friday.
The new step in the process will be balloting by about 700 members
of the local bar. Then the names of the top three vote-getters will be
sent to Gov. Jim Hunt for an appointment.
Food Bank director Kirkpatrick resigns
RALEIGH (AP) Greg Kirkpatrick, the executive" director of the Food
Bank of North Carolina for 12 years, has resigned to pursue other
interests, the organization said.
The Food Bank's Harvest of Hope Capital Campaign had just
completed a drive that raised more than Z million. Kirkpatrick became
the Food Bank's third executive director in 1985. The budget was about
$82,000 then and the Food Bank annually provided about 400,000
pounds of food to 78 charitable agencies across the state.
The Food Bank now has a budget of $1.2 million which supports food
distribution, nutrition, education and advocacy services to 485 non-
profit, charitable agencies in 34 counties.
Regional Development
wins national award
ECU's Regional Development
Institute has been awarded its
second consecutive Project of the
Year Award from the National
Association of Management and
Technical Assistance Centers.
Mack Simpson, acting director of
the institute, recently attended
the association's conference,
"Winds of Change in Lincoln,
Neb to receive the award for the
soon-to-be released publication
East Book.
The East Book will be released
at a conference for business
leaders throughout the region,
hosted by ECU on Dec. 16 in the
Mendenhall Student Center.
Trustees arrive to
prepare for meeting
Members of ECU Board of
Trustees will arrive on campus
Thursday, Oct. 23 in preparation
for their meeting on Friday.
Several of the committees will
meet in afternoon sessions in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Cabaret-style jazz shows
ottered at ECU
Parking not allowed
until four hours
before game
Natasha Phillips
STAKF WRITE
The new four-hour tailgating
parking rule has caused a lot of
unrest among the student body.
It has caused a lot of public
debate regarding lack of parking and
overcrowding.
"Basically the four-hour tailgating
rule was implemented to cut costs
and make things more efficient
said Henry VanSant, associate
athletic director
The popular belief is that the
new time restrictions cause more
inconvenience and create a more
chaotic situation.
"The new rule consolidates the
time people have to get into the
parking lot. My personal opinion is
that this decision may have
increased parking difficulties said
Mark Hessert, associate director of
the Pirate Club.
The overcrowding seems to be
slowly worsening. This problem is
especially evident on Charles Street.
"The traffic has always been bad
on Charles Street and it still is. The
State Highway Patrol does their best
to control it VanSant said.
They put in walkways and cones to
alleviate problems. It's a problem
because everyone comes at one
time. Because of the overcrowding
and pregame excitement,
pedestrians are one of our biggest
concerns. The Highway Patrol does
the best they can do, but it's
difficult
Parking is currently limited, but
alternative options are becoming
more readily available.
"We ae constantly looking for
solutions. A new parking area is
scheduled to be complete in 1999.
It will be behind the new stadium
and will have an additional 700
parking spaces. Local area schools
are also helping to alleviate parking
problems. Elm Hearst School and
Eppes Middle School allow people
to pay for parking privileges. They
use the money for the school's
benefit VanSant said.
The least known alternative is
the shuttle bus service, which is
offered by ECU.
"The University offers a shuttle
system. People park their cars near
the Hilton, pay $5 per car load, and
are driven to and from the game. It's
a benefit that everyone should know
about and take advantage of during
the games. It helps alleviate parking
problems Hessert said.
Go ahead and male reservations lor Homecoming
Pilot error ruled cause of last year's plane crash
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) Pilot error was to bfame for an airplane crash
into the Connecticut Rivef last July, the National Transportation Safety
Board has ruled. .
Flaps on the plane had not been set before takeoff from Brainard
Field, so the plane could not ascend quickly enough to clear the runway,
the report said.
The single-engine Piper Malibu had just taken off on a tnp to Block
Island, R.L when it plunged into the river Jury 12,19.
Pilot Donald Morrison of East Hampton told investigators he set the
flaps as required in the plane's operating manual. He said he noticed a
sudden drop in engine power as the plane got off the ground, so he raised
the landing gear to clear a dike at the end of the runway.
The plane gave a thrust as it flew over the dike, then plunged into the
water, Morrison said.
UMASS Students rally against proposed
campus drinking ban
AMHERST, Mass. (AP) About 300 University of Massachusetts
students chanting "Savecjur beer gathered on the steps of the
Student Union to protest a proposed ban on campus drinking.
Flanked by posters reading We want beer and s fignt for your
right to party, the protesters urged students to register their disapproval
of the proposed ban in a referendum during Wednesday's student
government elections.
Trie Monday rally was organized by the UMass Republican Club and
a campus group calling itself the Pro-Student Caucus.
The state Board of Higher Education voted last week to urge
university and college trustees to impose the ban. Earlier this month,
UMass-Arnherst Chancellor David Scott forbid drinking at football
tailgate parties.
The moves followed the drinking-related deaths of students at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the UMass-Arnherst campus
this rail.
Mexican Navy finds 2 tons of marijuana
floating in Gulf of California
MEXICO CITY (AP) Mexican sailors seized more than 2 metric tons
(2.2 short tons) of packaged marijuana floating in the Gulf of California
earlier this month, the Mexican Navy announced Tuesday.
The 53 packages of marijuana were found Oct. 18 on a routine cruise
about 45 miles off the Pacific coast state of Sinaloa, the Navy said in a
communique.
The drug was taken to the naval base in Mazatlan and turned over to
civilian authorities, the communique said.
23 die in flash floods on Kenyan Coast
MOMBASA, Kenya (AP) Flash floods along Kenya's Indian Ocean
coast have drowned at least 23 people, officials said Tuesday.
The unusually heavy rain, which began Saturday, also has submerged
some neighborhoods in this port city and delayed flights in and out of the
area- .
The Daily Nation newspaper quoted the Meteorological Department
as saying Mombasa received almost 18 inches of rain Sunday and
Monday. .
In no.mal years, Mombasa averages 6.8 inches of rain from September
through November. The Meteorological Department said flooding
should be expected elsewhere in the East African country.
Area jazz lovers are invited to
enjoy an evening of cabaret-style
performances at ECU's "Jazz at
Night" on Friday, Oct. 24.
The informal show, held in
Mendenhall Student Center's
Social Room from 8 to 10 p.m
features ECU School of Music
faculty member Carroll Dashicll
and student and faculty
instrumentalists and vocalists.
Well-known sound
designer to work on
Joyfter project
Christopher Janney, the
intefnationally-known sound
destrier who created interactive
sound displays for such places as
the Spanish Steps in Rome,
subways in Paris and Boston and
Metropolitan Museum of Art in
New Tfork, will oversee the.
installation of one of his latest
projects, the Sonic Plaza at Joyncr
Library. Janney visits the campus
regularly to check on the work.
This project was commissioned
by the state as part of the
Artworks for State Buildings
program.
AIDS discussion to be
held
A panel discussion about AIDS
will be held at 7 p.m. in Room
1031 of the General Classroom
Building. The program,
sponsored by the Office of Health
Promotion and Wcll-Bcing, is
designed to provide information
about the disease and is part of a
scries of AIDS Awareness
programs planned during
October.
Private rooms available
Remember
gtonblvd 355-1111
HENDRIX FILMS i �� mmcm �f sm m mm
Thursday, October 23
Friday, October 24
Saturday, October 25
Park
continued from page 1
"I feel more sorry for the
general public because the
students tend to get there (the
parking tots) carry and monopolize
the space anyway Hessert said.
To deal with the increasing
parking problem a shuttle service
has been set up between the
parking near the Hilton and the
football stadium. Fans may use the
shuttle for $5 rather than have to
walk from distant lots. Spaces are
also available at Elmhurst
Elementary School for $5 and at
C.M. Eppes Middle School for a
fee. In addition to this, Hessert
said, a new parking lot is on the
agenda.
"We will be building a new
parking lot behind the north
stands and at least half will be
done by "98 Hessert said.
Hessert also pointed out that
the stadium expansion means
more people will be coming to the
games and will need a place to
park.
"This year we sold about 3000
more season tickets and had about
1000 more Pirate Club members
Hessert said.
nformaUon. call the ��
n Hotline at 3286004 .
3, Facultyan:j �
�� with.valid ECU ID.
sMmmmr MtwWM
No Backj.
Heridnx Theatre
� 'f 'jl'






The East Carolinian
ntws
Thursday, October 23, 1997 3
I
Pick-Up
Special
103.77
14" - 5.66
(1 - TOPPING)
CRAZY TUi IDHY
MEDIUM 1-TOPPING $2.99
PIZZA PICK UP ONLY
HHFftfip
Block Buster Square
315 SE. Greenville Blvd.
321 -4862
(GUM-B)
MasterCard
Sunday 11-1:30
M-W 11-2:00
Th-F 11-3:00
Thursday Tailgate Special
2 LARGE STEAK
AND CHEESE
SUBS
$7.99
4 LARGE PIZZAS
1 TOPPING
FREE 2 LITER
DRINK
$19.99
3 LARGE PIZZAS
I TOPPING
AND 15 WINGS
$19.99
Ticket
continued from page I
one board deals with verbal
arguments. After the argument
has been heard, it will either be
denied, approved, or reduced.
The appeals form, issued to the,
complainant, contains the board's
decision. If the argument has
been denied or reduced, the
person has 10 days to pay the bill
before a late fee is added. If the
ruling is unsatisfactory, a second
appeal may be filed.
If the individual is still
unsatisfied after the second ruling,
they have to take the issue to the
civil court system. "At this point,
they're out of our hands and on
their own said Nancy Roberson,
citation appeals coordinator.
Both of the ticket and appeal
processes can be lengthy and time-
consuming; the towing issue,
howevet, tends to be briefer, yet
equally unstable. On average, 45
vehicles are towed a month, but
the actual monthly total fluctuates
dramatically. Over an 11-month
period, 498 vehicles were towed.
"When an individual receives a
citation, I like to help and inform
them especially when they
sincerely do not realize what
they've done wrong. There are a
lot of people who come in and are
sincerely unaware of the parking
policies. I like to make them
aware of the rules and regulations.
Hopefully, my assistance will help
them avoid future problems
Roberson said.
Individuals are ticketed for a
variety of reasons. The three most
popular violations constitute a
rather assimilated range of
offenses. The most popular
violation is the unregistered
vehicle violation, which simply
means that an individual parked on
campus without having a parking
permit. Second, overtime parking
constitutes a large number of on-
campus parking violations. It
consists of parking in a parking
meter space or a loading zone.
Finally, the Wrong Zone also
garnishes many tickets. This is
when a staff member parks in a
designated resident area or when a
resident parks in a commuter area.
"I'm not into being big,
bad, and nasty. I'm not into law
and order. If I was, I would have
been a police officer Eastwood
said.
"I like to talk with people
and inform them of the right
things to do. I like doir
interviews and supplying the
students with accurate
information about parking tickets,
appeals, and tows. I like to help
educate the public. I want to
educate everyone on campus � if
I have to do it one person at a
time
6th Annual Technology Fair
Topics: Distant Learning: Cu See Me,
Medical Interactive Technology, Microsoft
Exchange, Virtual Reality, Music and Web
Technology, Interactive Programs, Teaching
Online, Autocad, Learning through the
Internet, Presentation Studio, Resources
available to Students, CAD l
When: Thursday, October 30, 1997
10:0Oa.m3:0Op.m.
Where: Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
� Ja lynne Oaughtry and Jon Narrti (Academic Computing)
� Ivan Wallace and David Par�n(�VT�)
� Lawtace Auld and Veronica Pantcfidfs (Virtual Reality and
Mutation Laaaieteri)
� MM Bvk aad AsMev Smitt (Spatial Eoacatten)
� Baa Hints (tenanting, School Of lusintsf)
� Mruta Uadsay (AMID)
� (odaay Schmidt Hike M�n. Phillip Hislsay, and Irian Whattey
(Scaaat af Music)
� Donald Saxautr and Catherine �talker (School of Art)
� Janet liapai and Clarissa Singta!ary(Eastni AHECECU-KSL)
� Janet L. Wilson (Canter for heat Services Research and
Baveuwnwnt)
� (abort A. Chin (Industrial Tedmolojy)
� Aaiy Frank (Industrial ledwouxjv)
� George laiiey (fhilaiaahy)
� tan lacier (University Housing Service)
� trent Zlauner (Student Stares)
� Elmer Pae and Chris twtkner (Industrial Tichaeloay)
� Xin-Kua Hu (Physics)
� Staff (Mcmcaatptrtbig Services)
� Hamid Khan (Industrial Tecnnotogy)
� Karen Mutcahy (Geography)
� Nancy Haysany (Foreign Language)
� (iuetiang Shan (planning)
� Canl Himes (facility Planning)
MIDNIGHT
MADNESS
OCTOBER 31 1997
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER 9nm unti ?nm
ECU ID GETS YOU IN FREE V
A GUEST PASS LETS YOU BRING A FRIEND IN FOR FREE
BINGO
COSTUME
CONTEST
HORROR FILMS
CARRIE and SCREAM
DANCE
ftIDEQ KARAOKE
FREE FOOD
DRINK & MUSIC
LASER STORM
I WIZARD ON CALL
PSYCHIC
HOTLINE
.FORTUNE TELLERS
I GHOULS CAFE
MIDNIGHT
BUFFET
WILSON ACRES APARTMENTS
752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, NC 27858-0772
Go PiraeS
B�at
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � lV2 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
I VANT TO GO TO
CHICOOOOOOO s;
Fri. Oct. 31st 14th Annual Halloween Fiesta!
COSTUME CONTEST
1st Place $100 Gift Certificate
" CCU mtmn e (MM en 10 ad may bring om pest with o feast pass. Guest passts art ovgJobk twgmnj on Monday, October 27 horn the Comngnity Service Desks tram torn trnhl
nTJnln�atyiCe�1iariA�
fn � Cental Met Office ejpj 4pm, oad Ihe Student leotonon Cento Customer Service Desk hom torn tc Vpm. Guests must hove o gvest pass lor enhance to the nwvies. M events m hoe
Mexican Restaurant
iDowntown Greenville
757-1666
� W& � I






f� -
The East Carolinian
IK
Thursday. October 23. 1997 4
scene
� -
Oct. 17
Assist Rescue � An ECU bus
driver reported that a non-student
was intoxicated and passed out on
the bus. Greenville Rescue
responded and transported the non-
student to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
Damage to Property � An
officer discovered a window on a
vehicle had been shattered while
parked in a Reade Street parking lot.
Due to conflicting versions of the
incident, it is uncertain whether
there was any criminal intent.
Breaking and Entering an Auto
� A student reported that her
vehicle was broken into while
parked west of Aycock Hall. A
compact disc and a pair of sunglasses
were taken from the vehicle. The
victim's ex-boyfriend later
contacted her and returned the
stolen items. The victim declined to
prosecute.
Assist Rescue � A student
fainted in a room in Brewster. She
refused transport by Greenville
Rescue.
Controlled Substance Violation
�A staff member reported the odor
of marijuana coming from a room in
Scott Hall. Two students admitted
smoking marijuana and were issued
campus appearance tickets for the
violation.
Assault � A resident adviser in
Scott Hall was assaulted by a
resident of Scott Hall while
investigating an alcohol violation.
The resident adviser did not want to
press charges.
Oct. 18
Possible Controlled Substance
Violation and Underage Possession
of Alcohol � A resident of Aycock
Hall was issued a campus
appearance ticket for underage
possession of alcohol and suspected
marijuana use. The incident
occurred in Aycock Hall. Three non-
students were banned from campus
for their involvement in the
incident.
Oct. 19
Driving While Impaired � A
student was issued a campus
appearance ticket for driving while
impaired after officers witnessed
him hit the sidewalk while driving
his vehicle.
Tamper with Fire
EquipmentResist, Obstruct and
Delay � A resident of Belk Hall was
arrested after a resident adviser
witnessed he had pulled a fire alarm
pull station at Belk Hall and set off
the fire alarm. The student was
arrested for resist, obstruct and
delay.
Assist Rescue � A non-student
was transported to PCMH by
Greenville Rescue after being found
lying on the bathroom counter
unconscious in Aycock Hall. This
person and another non-student
were banned from campus. The
student they were visiting was
issued a campus appearance ticket
after he admitted to drinking with
the non-students.
Oct. 20
Housing Policy Violation � A
resident of Belk Hall was issued a
campus appearance ticket for
violating the ECU Housing Health
and Safety regulations. The student
burned a piece of paper in the
hallway of his suite and set off the
fire alarm in the building. No
damage was caused to the facilities.
VandalismTrespassingFelony
Possession of Weapon � A non-
student of Plymouth was charged
with vandalism and felony
possession of a handgun on campus.
A non-student of Greenville was
charged with vandalism and second
degree trespassing, and another
non-student from Greenville was
charged with vandalism.
Experience
Elegance & Fine
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7 Days a Week
Serving Lunch & Dinner
OilNAlO
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Greenville, NC 27858
Phone:830-2238 Fax 830 1735
Join us for dinner
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Reservations Welcome!
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Tired of Typical
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Also Available Chilled Microbrews and
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Monday, Nov. 3,11am - 4pm
Myrtle Beach, SC
Sheraton Myrtle Beach Hotel
Aruba Room, 2701 S. Ocean Blvd.
Wednesday, Nov. 5,10am - 2pm
UNC- Chapel HitLNC
Frank Porter Graham Student Union
South Road, Rooms 211,212
Saturday, Nov. 29,11am � 5pm
Busch Gardens, Williamsburg, VA
Magic Lantern Theatre
One Busch Gardens Blvd.
For More Information call: AUDITION HOTLINE 1-800-253-3302
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The East Carohma
"
Thursday. October 23. 1997 5
Hit
i!�i.y'fl
J&E Harley Davidson
1008 DlCKENSON AVE.
END OF lOTH ST.
757-1345
16 YEARS
in Service
Motorcycle Sales
and Service
Apparel
Leather
Collectibles
g
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
Men's Cut and Style Shop
7Ut &�Kt( Sutce I9Z2
WALK-IN'S
WELCOME.
OR CALL
FOR APPT.
752-0559
Citgo
located m the
warehouse on
the comer
Colleges attempt to
combat grade inflation
�k
Tattooing &
Body Piercing
M off all
Bod Piercing
with Student ID
Expires 113097
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
US Hm 13 GreenvilleNC
Tewte Good
.
Open 7 Days a Week � Mon-Sat II - 10 � Sun 12-9
Good Food at a Good Price
Across from Carolina East
Mall in Pier One Shopping
Center, Hwy II South, Greenville'355-71 68
We steam & use less oil � Lower Fat Cooking
���������������������ft��
i e�sap wt SILVER
ta BULLET
'J3 'Touch OjCkss"
756-6278
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country & Western Night
FRI. & SAT: Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
10 OR MORE GIRL � Dmcm
DANCERS EVERY . � �f �.
icheiorttte Parties r"r "
f"S �
Dr. Hcuse and Dr. Darwick
4 are pleased to announce the relocation of
(PA Animal Hospital
J of Pitt County
(�; Greenville Boulevard to our new clinic lit 107 TRADE ST.
(between Golden Corral c Parkers Restaurant)
�Medicme & Surgery Small Animals � Farm Animals & Horses
� Boarding - Air Conditioned
CPS�Just like a nickel used CO
buy a loaf of bread and a movie cost
a dollar, a C grade used to mean
average.
"You should talk to my dad about
a 'gentleman's (I says Su Avril. a
graduate student at the University
of Chicago, who. like her father, did
her undergraduate work at
Dartmouth Universin in Hanover,
Nil.
"Parents understood Is then
she says. "Pushing for A's uas for
desperate academics
It appears, however, that those
"desperate academics" far
outnumber the gentlefolk at
Dartmouth these davs.
The mean grade-point average
has been creeping up about 1100th
of a point each year, says Thomas
Bickel, registrar at the Iw League
school. In the 99- 1993school
year, the mean GPA was 3.23; now
it's 3.28.
Other schools show similar
ascents in grades. Lehigh I University
in Bethlehem. Pa sports an average
GPA of 2.9, up from 2.6 in D72. At
Stanford, only 8 percent of students
in the 19u2-1993 school year got (Is
or D's: no F's were given out that
The odd thing about grade
inflation is that it's happening when
first, the education system in this
country is in full crisis mode and
second, when ACT and SAT tests
aren't rising along with grades.
"That's the definition of grade
inflation: when grades go up over a
period of time and the achievement
grades represent doesn't go up
accordingly says Perry Zirkcl. a
professor in the education
department at Lehigh.
That's precisely the problem
with grade inflation. A's and B's arc-
turning into the kindergarten
equivalent of gold stats: Everyone
gets one. and therefore they don't
mean much.
The problem is more marked in
the humanities than the hard
sciences, eduators note. "I'm a math
professor, andin math there are right
and wrong answers says
Bickel. "Grading humanities ess;is
is much more subjective: there's
more room for disagreement
Softer grading in humanities
classes sometimes lands English,
history and other such majors in
trouble when they take science-
classes.
756-0148 Nights & Emergencies
355-3825
Located 5 Miles Wot of Crecnvillc on 264 Alt. I Behind AUddin Limo Service)
� ��������
�����
Ladies And Mens
FAMOUS MAKER JEANS
�At Discount Prices�
atalog
Jonnection
Division Of fDUTy,
210 E. 5th St. 758-8612 MS 10-6, Sun. 1
Get the Credit You Deserve
with the East Carolina
ELTORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber & Style
Pirate Special
$756
Haircut
Say Pirates &
Get Hair Cut
for S7 Every time.
Regular $10
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
Apply for
the East Carolina
University Visa' or
MasterCard' and show your
support for ECU It's the credit card
with a low competitive annual rate, and
there's no annual fee ever as long as
you use your card at least once per
year. PLUS, every time you use your
ECU credit card r3E3&T will pay a royalty
to the university.
You'll be proud to display your ECU
Visa or MasterCard wh'le enjoying
the full benefits of a credit card.
Use it for school supplies, traveling
and emergency cashand
it's a
great
way to
establish
good credit!
� Low Annual Percentage Rate
� No Annual Fee
tfa
I- AST
CAROM XA
UNIVERSITY
To apply for your ECU Visa or
MasterCard, call toll-free �
1-300-476-4225, Monday
through Friday, 7:00 a.m.
to 11:00 p.m Saturday
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Show your school
spirit - call today!
"Musi us tiic , .nil ,ii lisi rmii- .iniiii,ill Hi $20.00 liv is asspssed.
Come By the Student Store October 27-30
from 10 AM to 1 PM to Complete your
Application and receive your free T-Shirt
English Graduate
Student Organization
is having their Annual Book Sale
Books include: October 2 7&28
Anthologies Outside Student Store
Cook Books
Multi-Cultural Literature
Reference Books
Cheap
Prices






$ Thursday. October 23. 1997
The East Carolinian
filf'mrTrtM Ltfjt
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m,QoU'T(to
HHveA cmss
MAUJ IJtKR tiCAU. M�, IX
sviLAJor ierm& cur of l�t ?
scmfmvx (Aui 'ViectjnatL
peuca' iCMJfiffoeo n xxs ir.
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Wednesday, Oct. 22nd
Halloween Carving
mi tmrlFiue ik or tfevim
Mote'iLiottr
$o�.e BSBHtmr.
xcmyr)MJr
wowrjiKr
G0TffiU)�l�PfrM&P Of
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lev me
KIT ME AT THE bWltii HALL.
Hop-Scotch
M
Nick Holt and Kate Kohn
forth $tt,ic�
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Seventeen Days in May-
Rich Cornwell i3r-
arvi y�r re�f I, un
Lake Imp USA
iS the San f ���
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iMices ffle ice tee�M ws
A'dSTi, OicTfVI WALIfOSiS,
Ai'HEK. V&tT tlAJM STVi
OM UoTTEVEZ. SHE -RfTCHeS
seiAife liMPATieWT:
ACROSS
1 Nothing more
than
5 Seasoning
9 Taken �
14 Verbal
15 Jai �
16 Waterway
17 Stubborn
adherence
19 Commonplace
20 Natives: suff.
21 Leased
23 He was a
Stooge
24 Rock shelf
26 Latvia's
neighbor
29 Scrap of cloth
31 Sounds the
alarm
33 � Alto
36 Pequod's
captain �
39 Irritates
41 City on Lake
Michigan
44 Places for
valuables
45 Indians
46 Poker stake
47 World �
49 Children's game
51 Methods
54 Within the law
58 Miami's state:
abbr.
60 Slackens
62 Constellation
63 Adores
66 Choral works
68"� for Adano"
69"� Karenina"
70 Otherwise
125 oz. Harris Teeter
Orange Juice
DOWN
She's seon in
"Elle"
Irregularly
notched
3 Stormed
4 Shade giver
5 Overfill
6 Type of skirt
7 Shoe forms
8 Schedule
9 Play part
10 Ingot
11 Certain cartoon
12 Roman
statesman
13 Swiss painter,
Paul
18 Neighborhood
22 Money: abbr.
25 Type of store
27 Italian saint,
Philip
28 Part of our
ancient past
30 Joke
32 Narrow opening
33 Laptops: abbr.
34 Exclamations of
discovery
35 Beach figure
37 Water dwelling
38 River island
40 Wind dir.
42 Sale phrase
43 WWII landing
craft
With VIC
Card
20S-23S3O& HS Al
Tombstone 12" 397
Original Pizza?3sZ
17-260
Five Brothers H OQQ
Pasta SauceU
Erink Feattare
5-69 oa
Rice A Roni
With
9
via
2 liter
Diet Pepsi, Pepsi or
Mountain Pew
01997 Tnbuno Media Services, Inc
All rights reserved.
48 Letter from
Greece
50 Too
52 French river
53 Laurel and
Kenton
55 In a merry way
56 Faced the day
57 Type of beam
58 Tab
59 Timber wolf
61 Coup d'�
64 Member of a
fraternal order
65 Cunning
67 Crimson
SARAHBAR BlHs WAY OLE gIa R I aIsN A N E
LIMEls! LlIeARNS . I C E lIS TEE LjY A R D sj -O DEMOTE S�JgJ 0 L PPM 2HH3 R E DBJL 0 D E SIT A R :7l e a n)Hd � T e1jlWa d � H 0 R NHDE V 1 AjlA BET ; AP EllP REE SiiW R E N S o PE DJD L,E R sWfP E E Rj5H� m S55SR ' A mSm A V A N T S ff UARiDjHOUS Ell A R A BlE F 1 TBA M E SBSC A T
IRON SR OOeBa L 1 E 8 E S S MKD � E SBG E T S
24 os.
Harris Teeter as
Pancake Syrup
In the Bakery
SineLayer H jiSQ
Halloween Cake- -J
In THe Ieli
)1i�af5rt�wt��t
4 Piece
Pried Chicken
With
VIC Card
Prices Effective Through Oct. 28, 1997
Tricot In th.it fl.d tffictiv "Wodnotdav, October 22 Through October 2d, 1997 In Our 6renville Arta Store
Only. W Berve Th Kight to Limited QuantHie. Mnu SeU to Sealer. We 61adly jlccept Federal Food Stamp
4?�'�'� .fc
s
XL





Tha East Carolinian
ec
the
AMY L.ROYSTF.R Editw
CELESTE WILSON Managing Ww
MATT HECE ttwrtismg Dmstttr
AMANOA AUSTIN NmnEittla
Jacqueline D. Kellum AwftanEftns
andv Turner utan Editor
John Davis Annum liharta Mtor
AMANDA ROSS Sports Ed
TRACY LAUBACH AismjraSaomEditor
Carole mehle natZuRUia
JOHN MURPHY SlttT IHuarWot
HEATHER BURGESS W� Editor
Smnj 3� ttu rawuvsy UK! 825 t Ear Cuotman putM� 12.000 o�� �t�nr ��ttr AjnoTtawartiml ����!���
�m�ji ol 9� bwawi Burf. n E� Car�n� �tam� Wan � fte MttK tamwd a 260 �orii �ch ��bated Is tarn wtnKiTfctEic
Cmnan warm � r� to �t� nan torn hi pubtaoon. M Inn mat bt qaati. unan aMd lntttmmtm vmnmxa lm
Cntom. Fubhemra Bu ECU. Gum 27KM3S3. for �nfwwwn.a 3&S2IB38&
opinion
Thursday. Octobar 23, 1997
oumcw
One of ECU's favorite game day pastimes is tailgating, an undying passion to party hard with
friends and prepare to cheer the Pirates on to victory. But, tailgating has become increasingly
impossible due to limited close-to-stadium parking spaces and a time restraint to get into the
tailgating field.
University officials are not allowing cars to enter the tailgating field more than four hours
prior to the start of the game and if you have been in the vicinity of the Charles and Greenville
Blvd. intersection during these chaotic hours, you know what the problem amounts to.
Students and others are cruising the area back and forth, hoping and praying to be one of the
lucky ones who just happen to be at a green light when the field is opened. Traffic jam does not
even suffice in trying to define the situation.
Once the field is opened, student cars begin piling in, determined to find the best spot �
hopefully right under a tree where they will be protected from the blazing sun throughout the
extent of the long afternoon. But, here again another problem develops, lack of space for cars.
No matter how long you cruise waiting to get in, the chance of getting a space is slim to none.
The university has taken it upon themselves to rope off space for the the Pirate Club members
and taken space from the students. If you have been one of the many waiting for a space on
game day, you have certainly felt the frustration of seeing the empty area of grass, where not
one car was parked � knowing, in the meantime, you will not get the opportunity to park there.
This is an area where approximately 200 more cars could pile in.
University officials claim that the members of the Pirate Club donate a lot of money to the
university and are therefore deserving of these spaces. No doubt they are deserving of the space,
but they are not using the space. If there are spaces left over, especially as many as there have
been in past games, students should be able to pile more of their own vehicles in. There is no
use in wasting precious parking space � a problem whose wrath the university can't seem to
escape.
The students of ECU are the most important assets to the the university. Without the
students there Would be no university and no football team to cheer on. We deserve, at the very
least, the left over spaces the Pirate Club does not utilize and a little more time to get in and
get settled. This would alleviate a lot of complaints and traffic jams that continually take place
on garpe days.
OPINION
Co In mi
William Stacey
CO'CHRAN
Chancellor vague on doctoral status
A movement to level two
status would be the kind of
move that no one would
complain about, and it would
have lasting effect. It would
raise ECU above the
academic mediocrity that we
are too often criticized for.
ECU's accreditation to doctoral
level two status would be the kind
of move that would change our
university immensely. It would be
the type of infrastructural change
that would raise ECU to higher
academic standards. With better pay
for professors, more money for
research and an increased number of
doctorate programs, ECU could
take a large step in rising to
proficiency.
For those of you who might not
know what I am talking about, it is
this: there are different levels of
collegiate academic accreditation.
ECU is currently a doctoral level
one status. We offer moderate
funding for research, decent salaries
for professors, and three doctorate
degrees (medicine, physiology and
education). This means we only
offer PhD degrees in these three
programs.
A movement to level two status
would be the kind of move that no
one would complain about, and it
would have lasting effect. It would
raise ECU above the academic
mediocrity that we are too ofren
criticized for. Our standards for
accepting students would
inherently be raised, and the
graduation rate would most likely be
higher.
As the son of two ECU alumni
and myself a graduate of ECU's
liberal arts program (currently a
Master's candidate), I have been
witness throughout my life to the
greatness that is ECU.
My major beef with the
administration is the vagueness
with which they announce these
changes. Chancellor Richard Eakin
was interviewed during halftime of
the ECUTulane football game and
even there he was cheerily political.
He said he hoped the doctoral
status would take effect within the
next two years. Why is it that he will
not state for certain when it will
initiate?
When asked about the
completion of Joyner Library he
answered with just as ambiguous an
answer. He said the library may be
finished by January. Anyone who
saw the deadline of construction on
the student recreation center
moved back semester after
semester knows the frustration the
administration can inflict with their
political ambiguity. I will not even
go into detail at what an eyesore the
football stadium was on national
television.
Having followed Pirate
development all my life, I am
concerned with the political card
game our administration seems to
be playing. This is our future and
when administration makes
promises they should damn well
keep them. Instead of luring
students to ECU with promises that
they well know may not be kept, I
think they should take the more
respectable and honest approach.
As a young child, my parents
used to bring me to Pirate football
games. It was there I first learned
what it meant to be a Pirate. Now as
an adult, witnessing the politics of
our administration, I wonder if I
have learned the real definition of a
pirate.
LETTER
to the Editor
Homeless never focus of Pi Lambda Phi
I am writing in regards to a
previous letter to the editor printed
in the Oct. 21 issue. I am a member
of the Pi Lambda Phi fraternity and
am mildly offended by the remarks
of Joshua Neil. However, I realized
that his comments were made out
of ignorance. I do mean "of
ignorance" in the true meaning of
the word: unawareness. We set out
to camp in cardboard houses to
raise money for the Ronald
McDonald House. The Ron House
serves as a home for mothers of
children who are hospitalized and
need emotional and financial
support.
We in no way set out to make
ECU aware of the homeless
problem. Our cardboard boxes were
built as a venue for promotion of
the charity event. This can be
compared to various walk-a-thons
that raise money for problems such
as worldwide hunger and multiple
sclerosis. These walk-a-thons arc
not meant to benefit those who
cannot walk, but are used to bring
attention, and it usually works.
Over the past three years we
have raised nearly $3,000 for a good
cause and it upsets me that people
can overlook the good intentions of
our chapter and criticize all the
hard work we put into this annual
event.
I would like to challenge you,
Joshua to give me a call at the
chapter house; maybe we could
work together to create some type
of campus awareness of the
homeless problem.
Phil Epps
Sophomore
Business Management
7?
m
8
' i
4

&
OPINION
Keith
COOPER
Cancer: a problem that has soluti
If America can
manipulate technology to
put a man on the moon,
she could certainly
manipulate technology to
cure millions of cancer
patients left in the cold.
As of 1997, there are over 1,382,400
new cases of cancer. Of that
number, 785,800 are males while
596,600 arc females. More
specifically there are over 181,600
new cases of breast cancer in this
country, there are over 334,500 new
cases of prostate cancer; over
178,000 new cases of lung cancer
exist and more than 94,000 cases of
colon cancer have been reported
thus far in 1997. In any event,
advanced cancer robs too many
people of their precious lives each
year. What are some of the coping
mechanisms used by misery
surrounding the cancer. These
questions and others will be
answered in a manner that's both
straightforward and informative.
People with advanced cancer
sometimes feel a sense of loneliness
and isolation. This, for the most
part, is becaused advanced cancer is
very disruptive of normal activities.
Moreover, the family and friends
without cancer are hurt because
they can't share the experience of
the victim.
To combat these problems, the
cancer victim should attempt to live
as normally as possible. Shehe
should surround herselfhimself
with familiar things - art, photos,
etc. The patient may wish to watch
a favorite television show with a
close friend. Moreover, victims of
advanced cancer should not be
afraid to invite visitors for company
purposes. They can engage in
activities that could stimulate a
much-needed mutual familiarity.
Additionally, joining support groups
(especially with others having
similar problems) also proves to be
beneficial to the dying.
Since family and close friends
tend to be primary sources of
emotional comfort for advanced
cancer victims,
communication is vital. The
victims should encourage
discussions about their illnesses and
invited hugs, kisses, or hand?
squeezes from those who recognize
and understand the pain, misery,
and agony victims beat
Indeed, advanced cancer is g
serious problem not to be
underestimated. The prevalence of
cancer in its advanced stages is
frightening, yet real. Coping
mechanisms and support from the
clergy, family and devoted friends
wilt be meaningful in providing a
sense of hope and optimism for the
victim.
Further, genetics (especially
finding genes involved with spccifkjL
cancers), vaccine studies and other"
biological studies offer future hoperj
for the innumerable cancer victims,
who, unfortunately, are withering inr
a cloud of doubt and misfortune?-
The clergy, businesses and hcr
policicai community should
without hesitation, regularly send?
money to cancer research programs?
designed to find cures for .varioi
types of cancers blotting o
precious lives in America ai
abroad. If America can manipul
technology to put a man on
moon, she could certainly
manipulate technology to cure'
millions of cancer patients left
the cold.
LETTER
to the Editor
Racial diversity more than black, white
In response to Keith Cooper's
write-up in The East Carolinian on
Thursday, Oct. 16, "Faculty Needs
More Diversity when he spoke of
racial diversity, how diverse is one
racial group? Why not recruit only
African-American, but American
Indian, more Indonesian, Asian and
Hispanics, just to name a few in the
racial rainbow? A college campus is
far too diverse to restrict the search
to only African-Americans as you
made it seem. We respect his views,
but please do not exclude the other
minorities in the same boat.
Christy Pearson
Sociology
Senior
Shannon Shore
Communications
Senior
i
to the Editor
Separation of church, state not law
Okay, it's about time someone
set the record straight. I have been
reading the editorials and the
responses about the Christian music
being played at the Student
Recreation Center, and I feel
columnist Jeff Bergman addressed
the problem most logically and
intelligently. I would, however, like
to bnng one major point that
everyone has missed and
misquoted. There is not now, nor
has their ever been, a separation of
church and state law.
Now let's understand where the
state and idea originated. Thomas
Jefferson wrote in an essay that
since America was founded by
people fleeing a country that did not
allow religious freedoms; it's a good
idea to keep the church separate
from the government, then we
might end up restricting everyone's
freedom of religion guaranteed in
the Constitution.
Here's what the First
Amendment says about religion,
"Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof In other words,
the government cannot establish a
state religion or restrict people from
worshiping any way they want. That
is why some public schools have a
moment of silence in the morning,
so any student can pray if they want
or not do anything if they want. You
will notice, however, that the
separation of church and state is not
a law, but merely an idea, and a
pretty good one too.
William White
Senior
Middle Grades Education
The Constitution is the law that the
government must obey
James H. Quello,
FCC Commissioner
1995
y li






r
8 Thursdty. October 23. 1997
lifestyle
V
The East Carolinian
Pixies
Death to the Pixies
9 OUT OF lO
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
ert geezer teeth. I remember a
time when "alternative" music was
more than just a marketing tool, a
time when it wasn't as disposable as
an empty tube of jock itch cream.
In my day, alternative meant
something. Not that I remember
what alternative meant, but it
meant something I'm sure.
The Pixies came and saved the
late '80s from a big, pop-ice-cream
headache. The late '80s were a time
ruled by rhe tikes of Rick Astley and
New Kids on the Block. Do you
remember, like I do, late at night,
waking up crying, "No Rick, we
won't be together forever. We won't.
We won't, We won't?" It was a time
before bassist Kim Deal went to the
Breeders, and lead singer and
guitarist Black Francis, stopped not
being Charles Thompson and
became Frank Black.
And now Elektra is playing
tribute to the Pixies with Death to the
Pixies, a two disc "greatest hits"
collection. The collection makes it
highly evident (if you didn't already
know) the influence the Pixies have
had on the current crop of
"alternative" bands. A similar set
SEE nUf I. PAGE I
Jonathan Fire-Eater
Wolf Songs for
Lambs
8 OUT OF lO
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Get your top-hat and cane,
gentlemen. Put on your gloves and
take up your parasols good ladies.
Welcome to the Victonan fantasy-
land of Jonathan Fire-Eater. This
dark, Dickensonian country is filled
with orphans, tragic ladies and
mysterious strangers. All the world
is a stage and as we dirty orphans
and unfortunate chimney sweeps
begin to perform our first theatrical
vignette, gather 'round for your
delight.
Jonathan Fire-Eater, an odd,
jumpy little quintet from NYC is
like no band to cut a record in the
past twenty years. Lead by the
gestural, dark vocals of Stewart
Lupton, the sparse guitar of Paul
Maroon and the watery lead organ
of Walter Martin, these young men
produce a sonic theatre that has
more philosophy than the Doors,
more space than anything U2 has
done in ten years, and most
importantly, it does not sound like
anything that's popular right now.
In fact, though the band does bear
striking resemblance at times to
late '70s, early '80s stadium rock at
SEE JONATHAN. PAGE 9
The cast of Dawn of the Dead is coming for your life
PHOTO COURTESY OF REPUBLIC PICTURES
Blood, Guts and large-breasted women
to feast your eyes upon
Dale Williamson
SENIOR WRITER
Put those jack-o-lantems on your
dark porch, get those skeletons out
of the closet and let the spiritual
power of the moon take over your
sanity Halloween is here, filled
with spookiness and fear.
ECU is famous for its
Halloween celebrations, the one
time of year when ghouls, ghosts
arid monsters of all sorts creep out
from their seclusion and walk
openly among the rest of humanity
While parrying downtown on all
Hallow's Eve is a great joy,
preparing for the witching hour is
just as much fun. A long-standing
Halloween tradition has been
gathering a bunch of friends
together to watch one horror movie
after another. Nothing gets one
revved up for a night of trick-or-
treating like a good of fashion
horror flick.
Horror, like love, is not easily
defined. It has many faces.
Keeping this fact in mind, I offer to
all your eclectic viewers out there
13 types of horror available on
video that will make your blood
freeze and get you in the proper
state of mind for a spine-tingling
Halloween celebration.
Classic horror � No Halloween
is complete without paying
homage to those who help give
birth to cinematic horror. Tod
Browning's Dracula and James
Whale's Bride of Frankenstein both
have endured the years to remain
as two of the most influential
horror flicks of all time. Bela
Lugosi's masterful performance as
the bloodsucking vampire defined
the role of Count Dracula, and
Boris Karloff more than fills the
large shoes of Dr. Frankenstein's
freakish creation.
Psychological horror � Jeremy
Irons may have won his Oscar for
his performance in Reversal of
Fortune, but his acting skills truly
sparkled in David Cronenberg's
twisted Dead Ringers. This brilliant
yet unsettling film features Irons
as twin brothers whose lives
unravel when they share the same
woman. More of an intellectual
SCrGaiTlQueens
Brinke Stevens
Movies: The Slumber
Party Massacre Slavs
Gin's From Beyond
Infinity and Bad Girls
FromMars
Neve Campbell
Movies: Scream 1 &2,
The Craft and The Dark
Linnea Quigiey
Movies: Sorority Babes at the
SUmabaH Bowt-A-Rama. Hollywood
Chainsaw Hookers and Night of the
Demons
Michelle Bauer
Movies: Dinosaur Island,
Vampire Vixens from
Venus and Assault of the
Party Nerds 1 & 2
Jamie Lee
Curtis
Movies: Halloween 1
4 2, Prom Night and
Terror Train
Do you like
horror movies?
Alright, if you're such a big
fan, lets see if you know who
said these infamous lines.
1)" This is my costume. I'm a
homicidal maniac. They look
like everyone else
2) "We're on an express
elevator to Hell
3) "A naked American man stole
my balloons
4) Tve been cursed for-delving
into the mysteries of life
5)"Pimples are the Lord's way of
chastising you
6)"You'd still be a virgin if it
weren't for me
7)"l never drinkwine
8)"Groovy
9)"Answere me! You have a
civil tongue in you head. I
know-1 sewed it there myself.
10)"We need a bigger boat
11)"Wemay not enjoy living
together, but dying together isn't
going to help
12)"OGod! Mother, mother!
Blood, blood
13) can't take no pleasure in
killiri. There's some things you
gotta do. Don't mean you gotta
like it
For answers, grab a
mirror and see p.9
horror than a traditional one, it
leaves the viewer with an utter
sense of disorientation.
Slasher horror � If you prefer
your fright feasts to be less
intelligent and more bloody, then
the slasher genre is your forte. The
king of slasher flicks is without a
doubt John Carpenter's
masterpiece, Halloween. This is the
first film to feature Michael Myers,
the shadow of death that has
become a cinematic icon for feat
Gritty horror � As terrifying as
Halloween is, it's level of gore and
violence is tame compared to such
classics as The Texas Chainsaw
Massacre, Night of the Living Dead'and
Dawn of the Dead. Watching these
films, one can almost feel the
stickiness of blood on their fingers
and smeH the sickening odor of
death in the air. Not for the
squeamish.
Big-budget horror�The above
films all succeed despite having an
almost non-existent budget. While
big-budgets do riot equate
greatness, there are prime
examples of big-budget studio
horror films that are thrilling.
Ridley Scott's blood bath in space,
Alien, forever changed the way
movie fans looked at
extraterrestrial life, and Steven
Spielberg's chaotic The Lost World
clearly illustrates how dinosaurs
were not friendly like Barney.
SEE SCREAMERS. HIS. S
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It's a mad, mad, mad cartoon
Southpark offers
more than poop
JOHN DAVIS
ASSISTANT I.IFESTH.E EDITOR
If you remember back into the
dim past of your childhood, you'll
come upon the memory of the day
that you understood what the "f-
word" meant and why mommy and
daddy weren't too keen on hearing it
spew forth from your sweet little
mouth.
You'll also probably remember
having arguments with the
neighborhood gang as to the exact
uses for that and the other "wirty-
dords If these sound like your
memories of days long past, then
the fact that the four eight-year-olds
on Comedy Central's new cartoon
Southpark are more foul-mouthed
than that bald guy in Top Gun, or
Eddie Muprhy's dad at a family
barbecue.
Stan, Kyle, Cartman and Kenny
are four third-grade cut-out
animated little pissants that spend
the majority of the half hour show
uOOkreview
B-movie bonanza
Cult Flicks and Trash
Pics perfect way to
weird up your
Halloween
it's the Southpark gang. Aren't they a lovely bunch?
PHOTO COURTESY OF COMEDY CENTRAL
cursing. At everything. At mom
(Cartman likes to belt out a "g.d at
his mom every chance he gets,) at
schoolteachers, at Death himself.
The terrible tykes are rude, selfish,
complainative and spoiled rotten.
Kenny has managed to die every
episode this far, each time more
gruesomely than the last. They're so
nastv that they've earned Southpark
a "TV-MA" rating.
Rr some ungodly reason though,
in spite of all that, the show is
actually side-splittingly funny. As
you sit there and gape in horror at
the little monsters, vou find yourself
enthralled by the witty, timely and
even deep humor that manages to
poke through the farts and body-
fluid humor that has been pleasing
the people with no brains for
thousands of years. It's not
Shakespeare or anything, but there
is something for the drooling
groundlings who must have their
simplistic "poop" jokes and there's
also some actual comedy writing
going on.
Armed with such characters as
Chef, the 200 pound school
cafeteria cook who sings (usually on
SEE SOUTHPARK, PAGE 18
9 OUT OF TO
Andy tirnkr
I.IKKSTVI.E EDITOR
If you are looking for something that
will complement the weirdness of
Halloween, perhaps a good place to
start is VuleoHound's Complete Guide to
Cult Flicks and Trash Pics.
Be forewarned, it is mandatory
that you have completely bad taste
(in a good sort of way) to enjoy this
book and all the wonderfully
wretched movies it has to offer. In
the world of Cult Flicks and Trash Pics,
no-dollar quickies such as Hollywood
Chainsaw Hookers and Sorority Babes
at the Slimeball Bowl-A-Rama get four
bones, the VideoHound's top rating.
It is a sick, sick, sick, perfect world.
The guide has everything from
the truly bizarre (It's Dead � Let's
Touch It and The Weasel Dripped Blood)
to lame '80s movies (St. Elmo's Fire
and St. Elmo's Fire it's that lame)).
It not only covers sexploitation,
slasher, science fiction,
blaxploitation and trash, the guide
has its own categories: "Nazi
Zombies "Macho Men "Hell
High School "Ever'body Was Kung
Fu Fighting" and "Dental
Mayhem I mean, these aren't the
sort of movie subcategories that ol'
Leonard Maltin or Gene Seiskel
would cover. Roger Ebert, on the
other hand, might, considering he
was the screenwriter for the B-
movie classic, Beyond the Valley of the
Dolls.
VldeoHound gives cast and
directory indexes, as well as
alternate titles index. Rr example,
it may come in handy to know Eat
Your Skin is also known as Voodoo
Blood Bath.
In addition to movie summaries,
Cidt Flicks and Trash Pics provides.
SEE CUT. PAGE It
u
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-�" "y






-
i'ifi T 1'
The East Carolinian
i iVstyle
Thursday, October 23, 1997
Screamers
continued from page 8
Action horror � If you want big
guns and ejqplosion in your horror,
then look no further than James
Cameron's pulsating Aliens. This
sequel to Alien proved that a woman
can do a man's job when Sigorney
Weaver kicked alien butt all over
the screen.
Supernatural horror � Not
everyone is into the action scene.
Many prefer supernatural elements
mixed in with their terror. If you are
of the latter crowd, then The Exorcist
is a must. William Friedkin's tale of
a young girl (played to perfection by
Linda Blair) who is possessed by
none other than Satan himself
shocked the nation back in 1973. It
is still just as shocking today.
Natural horror � Sometimes
Nature can be as frightening as any
demon. Steven Spielberg's Jams and
Alfred Hitchcock's Tie Binds both
perfectly capture the chaos and
destruction the natural world can
reek on us pitiful humans.
foreign horror� Inspired by the
real-life child murderer known as
"Vampire of Dusseldorf Fritz
Lang's M puts a French twist on
the serial killer genre. Bster Lorre,
in his screen debut, is simply
chilling.
Funny horror � After watching
Lorre stalk innocent children, you
need a good laugh. Horror can be
funny, too. Just take a peek at such
films as Young Frankenstein, Evil Dead
2, An American Werewolf in London,
The Addams Family, and A Nightmare
Before Christmas. These are perfect
Halloween treats for the faint of
heart.
Giant monster horror � This
type of horror is fun to watch but
hard to take seriously. Just watch
any Japanese monster movie, like
Godzilla or Yog, Monster From Space,
and you'll get the idea. Thanks to
the success of Jurassic Park,
Hollywood is interested in this
genre once again. A big-budget
remake of King Kong is in the works,
and an American version of Godzilla
will hit theaters next summer.
Modern horror� Horror films as
a whole are on a resurgence now,
thanks largely to contemporary
blockbusters like Silence of the Lambs,
Seven and Scream. The latest entry
into the slasher genre, Know What
You Did Last Summer, debuted as the
top money-making film in the
nation this past weekend. Soon to
come, many sequels to Scream and a
revamped Halloween sequel.
Teenage horror � 1 finish the
list with this because it
encompasses about half the horror
films in existence, everything from
Was a Teenage Frankenstein to Carrie.
Carrie is worth seeing just for a
scene in which a young John
Travolta dumps a bucket of pig
blood all over a teenage Sissy
Spacek, who in turn uses her witch-
like powers to destroy everyone at
the senior prom. Teenagers are
always fodder in a horror film.
And thus concludes your tour of
the 13 horrors of Halloween. Have a
great and safe holiday, and be sure
to keep your night light on when
you finally go to sleep.
Pixies
continued from page 8
Jonathan
continued from page 8
Answers to the Quote Quiz.
Hold up to a mirror and score yourself.
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:
PIRATE UNDERGROUND �
Thursday, October 23, 1997
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
will be released later this year
from The Replacements, another
band whose influence on current
alternative music can't be denied.
The first disc in the collection
includes tracks from the Pixies
five albums, and the second disc is
a live recording of a Pixies show in
Holland in 1990. Both discs are
excellent representations of the
Pixies output. Of course, there are
songs not included that devoted
fans will whine about, but that's
the case with any sort of
retrospective.
When you enter the world of
the Pixies, you enter the world of
weird, the world of UFOs and the
world of really, really loud music.
It was always interesting that
Pixies were on Elektra's 4AD
subsidiary, a label known for shoe-
gazing, quiet bands.
But while the Pixies could be
downright ugly (check out Black
Francis s Satan scream on "Planet
of Sound"), there were, dare 1 say,
pretty melodies mixed in with the
feedback of songs such as "Wave
of Mutilation Then, of course,
there's the down right Beach Boy-
like happy-pop of "Here Comes
Your Man" and Kim Deal's
seldomly used, yet gorgeous
vocals on "Gigantic They were a
pop band at heart, a three-eyed
alien pop band, but a pop band
nevertheless.
The first disc contains all the
taples: "Monkey Gone to
"Where is my Mind?"
ebaser While the live
ats many of the same
here are also many songs
not included on the first disc that
are thankfully included on it:
"Broken Face "Ed is Dead" and
"Hey Those who are not already
familiar with the Pixies may not
find the live disc quite as
accessible, but fans will certainty
appreciate the disc.
I still don't know what
alternative means. But if I had to
guess, I'd say it meant the Pixies.
V�
fe.
Third of Never 123IB)
SUPPORT
rOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, &
For more information, see our web page at vsww.ecu.edusludentunionpirateunderground.html
moments, their sound is one of
the most original in a good while,
without sounding at all like a bad
copy of that music.
Martin's organ playing is the
impetus for this fab five. At times
subdued and at times crazy-wild,
his organic noodles are catchy and
moody at the same time. Maroon's
guitar work compliments this
nicely, often mimicking the tone
and sound of the organ itself. The
rhythm section of Thomas Frank
(bass) and Matt Barrick (drums)
is tight as, well, as a drum, and the
contrast between Barricks marchy
snare and Martin's inspiring
churchy organ is so very tasty.
The sound Fire-Eater produce
is so close to what the soundtrack
of Oliver Twist would sound like if
Victorian novels had soundtracks.
Ringing and sparkling like a
Christmas tree, the booming
thunder that is Wolf Songs for
Lambs could inspire William Blake
to more innocence and
experience.
Lupton's lyrics reflect both the
Dickens-like mood and the
compare-and-contrast of Blake's
poetry. Filled with paradoxes and
allegories more obvious and yet
more believable than Miss
Havisham, Lupton's lyrics reflect
a search for beauty in the midst of
the soot and smog that is a big
city.
"Are married to an unfaithful
world?Will you carry the flags if
they come unfurledPAre you
locked into a projection booth that
shows the films of your troubled
youth?" asks Lupton in
"Everybody Plays the Mime
Lupton creates characters of
staggering humanity, such as this
lady-love in "The Shape of Things
that Never Came "Magazine
party in the old train yarda girl
had a seizure thereshe was
putting makeup in the club car
there's make-up everywhereyou
little princessthere's a look in
your eyes when your arms go
slack
From it's cathedral-sized
beginning, through its vaulted
ceilings, out into the ornate
narthex, and into the cemetery
and sculpture garden, the old
church that is Wolf Songs for Lambs
glistens with the color and the
sound of another world that is
much like ours, except with bigger
emotions, bigger hearts and spirits
that fill the cityscape.
L
r
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10 Thursday. October 23, 1997
ifcstyle
The East Carolinian
Cult
i
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tf � �'
-A if v
continued from page 8
interesting side bars, some that
salute the purveyors of trash
cinema or others that attend to
topics such as "Skeletons in Their
Closets: Stars Who Have Their
Roots in Trash Renowned B-
movic producers and directors
such as John Waters, William
Castle, Roger Corman, Russ
Meyers and Sam Raimi get their
due. The book also pays tribute to
the stars of cult and trash,
including Traci Ixirds, Linda Blair
and fern Grier, who will soon be
seen in Quentin Tarrantino's Jackie
Brown.
Cult Flicks and Trash Pics also
gives the reader plenty of
wonderful photos from gems like
The lncrcdibk Two-Headed
Transplant and Faster, Pussycat! Kill!
ASK'You also get great quotes from
movies such as the female prison
flick, The Big Doll House, which
offered, "They are so homysome
times at night you can hear them
honking
VideoHound offers its favorite
trash titles covered in the book. I'll
share a few of my own: Oh Dad,
Poor Dad (Mommas Hung You in the
Closet & I'm Feeling So Sad),
Incredibly Strange Creatures ftfto
Stopped Living and Became Mixed- Up
Zombies, Redneck Zombies, Invasion of
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Beyond Infinity and Fat Guy Goes
Nutzoid.
So, if your brain isn't dead by
the time you read about all that
stuff, VideoHound will take you
even further into the world of
trash cinema with its "Cult
Connections This section of the
book provides info on web sites,
magazines and books dedicated to
the pursuit of sleazy bad trash.
Now get out there and be
weird. Its Halloween, and, by
God, 1 can't think of a better way
to spend this time of the year than
watching Three On a Meathook or
Assault of the Killer Bimbos. Really, 1
can't. Help me. Help me, I'm not
���
c
IB
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring $3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
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The East Carolinian
ik
style
Thursday, October 23, 1997
Southpark
continued from page 8
t fc subject,of "making sweet love)
v th the voice of Isaac Hayes, Mr.
( irrison, the schoolteacher who
t ks to a hand-puppet during class,
a d Stan's NRA, gun-toting uncle
v to solves football dilemmas with
r. astic explosives, the show
jsades such topics as
kmophobia, euthanasia, genetic
jgineering and censorship.
Although there's only been six
bisodes, the show has caught on
Idly, garnering more new viewers
this short span of time than any
s ow on Comedy Central, and any
c rtoon on cable TV, ever. It's been
s veral weeks since a new episode
li s been aired, but that's only
because the show's creators have
been busy with their Halloween
show which airs next Wednesday, in
which there is supposed to be a big
throw-down between Jesus (who
lives in Southpark and hosts a cable-
access show called "Jesus and Pals")
Christ and Satan. (I'll give you three
guesses who wins and it's not the
Prince of Darkness.) More shows
are planned for this season and the
show has already been contracted
for next season as well.
So get out the cheesy poofs and
the happy tarts. "Terrence and
Phillip" got canceled because the
parents of Southpark picketed in
New York, but the First
Amendment is protecting this sassy,
sick new show. Word on the street is
that Kenny is going to die in this
episode. Tune in at 10 p.m.
Wednesday night and prepare to
laugh or be grossed out, or more
likely, both.
October
23 THURSDAY
Gattaca sneak preveiw at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
Pirate Underground from 8-10:45 p.m. in
Mendenhall
Cassat String Quartet at 8 p.m. in Fletcher
Recital Hall
The Breakfast Club at The Attic
Treading Evans at Firehouse Tavern
Guster at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
The Fire
Thursday
Treading
Evans
Friday
Running from
Aim
Saturday
Nemo(former!y
Level)
Tuesday
Jazz night
Possible
World
Wednesday
Ed Prophet
and Open Mic
Night
Greenville's
Tavern
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
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d get $1.00 off Admission
Asylum Street Spankers, Rhonda Bailev at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
24 FRIDAY
Jazz at Night, Carrol Dasheill Jr director, at 8
p.m. in the Great Room in Mendenhall
Speed 2 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theater (runs
through Oct. 25)
Oak Ridge Boys at Greenville Memorial
Auditorium
The Jumpstarts at The Attic
Running From Anna at Firehouse Tavern
Tender Idols at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
25 SATURDAY
Clarinet Quartet at 7 p.m. in Fletcher Recital
Hall
General Johnson, Chairman of the Board at
The Attic
Clarissa with Hobex at Cat's Cradle in Chapel
Hill
26 Sunday
Freddy Jones Band at Cat's Cradle in Chapel
Hill
Glenmont Popes, Smooch at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
27 MONDAY
Premiere Performances of works by ECU
Composers, Mark Taggart, director, at 8 p.m. in
Fletcher Recital Hall
28 TUESDAY
' Chew On This: "Evolution of the Brain Mind
and Horror Science Fiction" at 12 p.m. in MSC
Underground
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
Donna the Buffalo at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
29 WEDNESDAY
Comedy Zone featuring Mike Brennan at The
Attic
Ongoing
"Cajun Music and Zydeco" exhibition at
Mendenhall Gallery through Nov. 10
School of An Faculty Exhibition (through Oct.
29)
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event that you'd
like listed in our It's Showtime column? If so,
please send us information (a schedule would be
nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
copyright 1997KrogerMtd-AtiantJc items Ptett9aoainOrmriMe.inienetM(ltomM9Bi�ltlHmaMtoi�t�rt.
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12 Thursday. October 23. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
r
COMPETING
WITH ADVERSITYVJ
Runner dedicated
toward top finish
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
STAFF WHITE
Your senior season in any sport
should be when your training,
dedication and years of
experience pay off. You should be
able to end your career on your
own terms. Karen Reinhard's
final season on the ECU cross
country team has not followed
that script. Instead she has dealt
with lingering injuries and
frustratingly high times.
However, Reinhard has stayed
positive and things are turning
around.
Before Reinhard ran cross
country her sport was soccer.
"I wasn't very good at soccer
Reinhard said. "All I knew was
that i was one of the players they
put in at the halfback position
because I could run up and down
the field forever and I never got
tired
At the age of 12 Reinhard took
up cross country out of spite.
"My next door neighbor was
running cross country Reinhard
said. "She said she was going to
run in the junior nationals and I
knew I could run faster than her.
I just wanted to see if I could do
it, I guess. 1 was totally out to
beat her
ECU recruited Reinhard
heavily in high school, but she
chose to attend Oklahoma
University. After a year and a half
at OU she turned in her Sooner
crimson for the purple and gold
of ECU.
"Even though she's only been
running for us for the last three
years, she's actually been
involved in the program over five
years. She was one of the first
cross country recruit's we had
when we started really stepping
the program up said Head
Women's Cross Country Coach
"Choo" Justice.
"She's been through the ups
and the downs and now back on
the ups Justice said. "Karen's
been one of our top two or three
runners since she has been here
Reinhard held lofty
expectations for her senior
season. This was to be the year
her experience and consistency
paid dividends.
"I had really big goals for
myself because basically this is
my swan song Reinhard said.
"It's just frustrating because my
shins have been beat up and we
put in a lot of mileage and I've
gone into a lot of races and I've
just felt really dead-legged and
nothing's really come together
The season that was supposed
to be her "swan song" was turned
into an ugly duckling by injuries
and ineffective strategy.
"Early in the season she was
training so much and training so
hard she wasn't giving her legs a
chance to get healthy Justice
said.
Her legs were so bad at one
point she was in danger of
causing stress fractures if she ran
too hard.
"She's really had to go in the
pool and swim, get off her legs a
little bit and they're starting to
get better and that's starting to
show in her racing Justice said.
"Her strategy has always been
just to go out and run as hard as
she can for as long as she can and
it hasn't worked that well for her
this year Justice said. "She tried
something different at the race
this weekend, that was going out
a little bit more under control
Who's
Hot?
Karen Reinhard
Opponent time place
UNC 19:53 21
NCSU
VT
CAMP
19:41 33
19:35 20
19:35 20
NCCCCC 18:52 39
Karen Reinhard runs as one of ECU's Women's Cross Country leaders.
PHOTO COURTESYOf SPORTS INFORMATION
and she found she had a lot more better
energy and she finished the On Saturday at the North
second half of the race much Carolina Collegiate
Championships, Reinhard
turned in her lowest time of the
season, of 18:52.
Though her strategy and body
betrayed her this season, one
thing that cannot be
questioned is her dedication.
"Karen just has a certain level
of expectations and all season
up to this point after races she
hasn't been really satisfied with
herself. If she doesn't run what
she thinks she ought to run she
gets mad with herself and uses
that as motivation to train hard
and do whatever she needs to
do Justice said.
Although her senior season has
been mired with injury and
frustration, the one they call
"Poof ball" because of her curry
blond hair, remains confident.
Next month the Pirate cross
country team competes in the
CAA Championship Meet,
where Reinhard hopes they
finish high.
"I want our team to come in
the top three at conference this
year Reinhard said.
"Karen's like a ball of energy
Justice said. "Whenever she can
harness that energy she does
really well
FIRST HOME
GAMES
MEN'S-NOV. 5 �
7 P.M. VS NEXT LEVEL
SPORTS EXH)
WOMEN-NOV. 12 � 7
P.M. VS CROATIA
CENTER BAMA (EXH)
Basketball season begins
soon
Basketball teams prepare for upcoming season
JEREMY ANDERSON
STAFF WHITE
It may be hard to believe, but basketball
season is right around the corner. The men
and women of the Prate basketball teams
have been gearing up for the start of this
season.
The Pirates will be tested early, as third
year Head Coach Joe Dooley upgraded this
season's non-conference schedule.
"We will play Big East, Conference USA
and Atlantic Ten opponents this year
Dooley said.
This eariy season test will prepare the
Pirates for Conference play in the improving
CAA
"The CAA is the 10th ranked conference
in the country this year Dooley said.
The Pirates will be anchored in the back
court this season by seniors Tony Parham and
Othello Meadows. Parham averaged 8.5
points per game while Meadows was near the
top in the CAA in three-point percentage.
The Pirates will also have the ability to go
with a three guard lineup. Junior Alico
Dunk, from nearby Ayden-Grifton High
School, will sec action this year after
averaging 20 minutes per game and dishing
out 56 assists last season.
The Pirates also return senior Raphael
Edwards, who led the team in scoring last
year with 132 points per game and was
named second-team All-CAA Senior Dink
Peters will join Edwards up front. Peters
averaged almost six rebounds a game last
season.
Red-shirt freshman Alphons lerland will
have a chance to fill the role at center for the
Pirates. At 7'0 230 pounds, lerland worked
hard in the weight room and on the court last
season and was named the Pirates "Most
Improved Player
"We are cautiously optimistic. Our
seniors need to show leadership by setting
examples Dooley said.
The ECU women's basketball team will
look to build on last season's success. The
Lady Pirates shocked the CAA Tournament
last year by reaching the final after upsetting
third-seeded Richmond and defeating
Virginia Commonwealth in the semi-final
game.
"I'd like to see us pick up in November
where we left off in March Head Coach
Anne Donovan said.
Although the Lady Pirates lost their top
rcbounder and scorer last season, they will
look to senior Shay Hayes for leadership on a
young Pirate ball club. Hayes is a fifth-year
senior who sat out last year with a medical
red shirt, after back surgery.
"Her role as a leader this year is extremely
important Donovan said.
The Lady Pirates only other returning
senior, Jen Cox, is coming off a stellar junior
season. She recorded 61 blocks for the
Pirates last year and ranks second on ECU's
career blocks list.
"Cox is an experienced player capable of
great things Donovan said.
Donovan and her staff has worked hard in
the off season. The Pirates boast one of the
top 50 recruiting classes in the nation,
including four players from North Carolina.
Included in the freshman class is Charette
Guthrie of Winston-Salem, Jennifer Moretz
of Boonc, and Opal Johnson and Trica
Peckharh from the Triangle Area. Also
included in the new class is Nikki Brown
from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
"Last year we relied heavily on freshmen
and I don't expect this year to be any
different Donovan said.
One freshman who will asked to step up
immediately in the point guard role is Trica
Peckham.
"She will be looked upon heavily
Assistant Coach Ginny Doyle said.
The schedule for this year will be tough as
it has ever been. ECU will play some of the
top conferences in the nation, including the
ACC, SEC, and Big East.
It will get no easier for the Lady Pirates as
they reach CAA play, which includes two
games against last year's NCAA National
Runncr-Up Old Dominion.
With this challenging schedule and the
new crop of freshman, ECU has the
opportunity to establish itself as a power in
the CAA and around the nation.
"We will be very young, but have a lot of
talent. We have a good group that has really
been working hard Doyle said.
Swimmers
get ready for
first meet of!
year
Men and women
undefeated against
upcoming
opponents
Steve losey
SENIOR WRITER
Often Purple and Gold meets at
ECU can serve as a preview of the
upcoming season. If last Thursday's
meet is any indication, this season
will be one to remember for the
ECU swimming team.
On Oct. 16, the swimming team
S'it into two teams, Purple and
Id, and faced each other in a
scrimmage of sorts. The match is
usually a chance to see what their
intense practice schedule has"
prepared them foe
"It was the fastest Purple and
Gold meet in ECU history
beamed a proud Head Coach Rick
Kobe.
The Gold team won both
matches. Four ECU Purple and
Gold records were set that day.
Samantha Perry broke the record for
the women's 200-yard breaststroke.
Brandon Tilley also broke the men's
200-yard breaststroke record. Kesier
Pinther and Brougha! Martin broke
the record for the 400-yard relay
medley. Richard Chen broke the
record for the 200-yard fly.
"It's a good opportunity for our
swimmers to compere against each
other Kobe said.
The practice schedule for the
swimming team is only for the
dedicated. Each afternoon the swim
team practices for two hours. Twice
a week, the swim team rises before
dawn for a practice at six in the
morning before classes. Three
times every week, the team lifts
weights.
Ve've been practicing very hard
and swimming an average of 50,000
yards each week Kobe said.
The swimming team faces two
schools this weekend. On Saturday,
for ECU's first meet of the season,
the College of Charleston will visit
Greenville. After that match, the
swimming team will compete
against Georgia Southern on
Sunday. Expectations are high for
those matches.
"Vfc haven't lost against cither
team yet Kobe said.
This weekend at hoi
Football vs. Memphis
Stf.�3lp.
Women's Soccer vs. American
�.12 ml
Men's Soccer vs. High Pbmt
No surprise, stadium won't be ready until 498
Stadium dedication set for next year
Pail Kaplan
STAFF WRITER
With Homecoming this weekend and this Saturday's game against
Memphis, everyone is wondering, when will the stadium upper-
deck finally be completed?
Unfortunately, the stadium dedication ceremony has been
postponed until September 12, 1998, when the Pirates will be
going head- to-head against Heisman Trophy candidate Tim
Couch and the University of Kentucky. The stadium dedication
ceremony has been put off another season and ECU students and
fans won't be ibic to watch their favorite football team from a
higher altitude this weekend. Assistant Athletic Director Henry
VanSant said the construction is now progressing along at a much
smoother rate.
"The lights are up and working and the construction crew is
now installing the scats VanSant said. The construction is
expected to do more than just add an additional 8,000 seats to the
35,000 scat arena
"The upper deck will make Dowdy-Rcklen stadium into a
major college football stadium, which should bring higher profile
teams into Greenville such as Miami, Florida and Duke to name a
few VanSant said.
The addition will not only bring more fans into the stadium, it
will bring more people-alumni and parents alike-into Greenville.
People who will be staying in hotels, going to Restaurants and just
all around spending there money on local businesses helping the
local economy.
"I expect a lot of people to be surprised by the new addition
when they finally see it, VanSant said. "The upper deck will be
equipped with men's and women's restrooms, concession stands
and souvenir stands
PIRATESH
What is your
favorite sport? w
e sxree
'Badminton. Because I took a
class on it a couple of years ago
and it was fun and ore
complicated than I expected'
Tanesha Jones
senior, Accounting
'Basketball. It demands contant
intensity and requires great
teamwork
Kevin Spainhour
grad siuaem. Exercise Span science
Almost finished? Not! The new upper deck of the stadium won't be filled with fans until next season.
PHOTO BY ARMMM ROSS
'Gymnastics is tie best sport
because it's beautiful and
awesome to watch, and it takes
power from inside to do. It's
not just a physical sport�your
mtnd needs to get into it too
Melissa Cataniarite
freshman. French
'Lacrosse It's a very quid game
that combines many different
skills. It's tike hockey on afield
Matt SchuhMachtr
sophomore. Graphic Design

v�v-W






13 Tuesday. January 21. 1997
Vu.
0
s
The East Carolinian
ECU
Pirate
Purdue coach says key to success has been QB Dicken
ECU
So tune in for play-by-play action on
gametime hours. On ECU's college radio,
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Purdue's Boilermakers. ranked
among the nation's elite in football
for the first time in 13 years, owe
their success to quarterback Billy
Dicken. He's not a great runner or
passer, coach Joe Tiller says, but he
gets the job done.
Not bad for someone who started
practice last summer as a backup.
" 'We came out of the spring less
than overly enthused about our
productivity 'filler said Tuesday.
"We were concerned about team
speed, and I don't think that's
changed much. Probably the single
biggest change has been the
emergence of Dicken as the No. 1
quarterback and the way the guy has
really handled the offense, grabbed
hold of it, done a good job in
executing and made some plays on
his own
Dicken beat out John Reeves as
Purdue's starter, and through six
games Dicken has passed for 1,626
yards and 13 touchdowns. He also
has rushed for 269 yards, and he is
fifth in the nation in total offense
with 315.8 yards per game.
Even Tiller, who needs just one
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more victory to guarantee the
Boilermakers' first winning season
since 1984, is surprised by the way
Dicken has taken over.
He did not have a stellar
performance in the spring the first-
vear coach admitted during his
weekly teleconference from West
Lafayette.
Billy's problem in the spring
was his inconsistency and the fact he
didn't throw with real velocity. Over
the summer, he got better at it,
obviously, and in the fall he really
took over the quarterback job
Tiller said Dickens improvement
wasn't only in his physical ability, but
in learning and executing the
offense.
"Really, he matured in that
period of time and through our two-
a-day practices so that he became
much more effective at executing
the offense, and I think he
understands it better. 1 also think
he's a very competitive guy
Dicken was named Big Ten co-
offensive player of the week after
completing 16-of-22 passes for 311
yards and three touchdowns in
Saturday's 45-20 victory over
Wisconsin. He also rushed for 56
yards on six carries.
' We've always had the
quarterback draw in the system
Billy also has demonstrated his
ability to be pretty effective when
he runs Tiller said.
I don't see a great runner, 1
don't see a great thrower, I don't see
a big, physical guy. But he's very
competitive and (smart) in terms of
understanding the game and
handling the offense Purdue (5-1.
3-0 Big Ten) was ranked No. 22 by
The Associated Press this week, the
first ranking for the Boilermakers
since thev were 14th after beating
Ohio State in 1984. Wisconsin,
ranked 24th before the loss to
Purdue, dropped out of the AP poll.
Winning a football game such
as that against a team that was on a
six-game run certainly is good for oui
team Tiller said. The
Boilermakers, whose five-game
winning streak is the school's longest
in football since 1980, will be heavily
favored to make it six in a row this
week, plaving at winless Illinois (0-
6, 0-3). CKerall, the Illini have lost
12 straight games going back to last
season.
The Newman Catholic Student Center
would like to
WELCOME STUDENTS AND ALUMNI
and
INVITE THEM TO JOIN US FOR SUNDAY MASS
Mass Schedule At The Center � 953 E 10th Street
Sundays: 11:30 am and 8:30 pm
Stop by the Newman Center anytime
Fr. Paul Vaeth and the Newman Center Community (757-1991)
"5rfyjp-
prices include jewelry
call 561-7473
for appointment
ENERGY ALSO HAS:
POSTERS, LAVA LAMPS,
PIPES, CANDLES
CANDLE HOLDERS, HERBAL
TEAS, FLAVORED CIGARETTE
PAPERS, DETOX PRODUCTS
SATIVAH BRAND HERBAL
SMOKING BLENDS,
BLACKLIGHTS, POSTERS,
DECALS, TAPESTRIES,
BEADED CURTAINS, HAND
DIPPED INCENSE, INCENSE
HOLDERS, BODY JEWELRY,
HEMP JEWELRY, STROBE
LIGHTS, WAVE MACHINES,
DISCO BALLS, AND
PIPE ACCESSORIES.
CQWWWflTlljS WAKING KWTV
Tft'TM W$T AW
em&W twhwwii at
TK WmSTATUS
PUT pf m WiBTOWW.
FITNESS ?ENTCT, fP9V AW
yplMVBAM. 5PWT.
QAW VffW WSTWSS SFJWTS
AHP ?AM- MS ABftUT PMF
QCTPBP PdPPSIT SPE?!AW-
-�Jc4
214 Elm St. 5
f Greenville, NC 27858
Mas 919-752-4225
Ssq
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r
14 TtiMdty, J�nutry 21. 1997
snorts
The East Carolinian
Senate passes bill to register
sports agents
HARRISBURG (AP) � The State
Athletic Commission annually fields
hundreds of complaints against sports
agents or inquiries about an agent's
background.
On Monday, the Senate voted
unanimously to regulate the profession.
The bill would require sports agents
to register and put up at least a $20,000
bond with the commission before they
can work.
Similar legislation has either been
adopted or is pending in California,
Florida, Texas and 17 other states.
The House is expected to pass the
measure, which is designed to protect
student athletes "from unscrupulous
sports agents said Sen. Robert D.
Robbins,R-Crawford.
The bill would require annual
registration fees of $100 for an
individual, $200 for a partnership or
corporation. Agents would also pay a $50
processing fee and a $25 fee to file their
bond.
r
Deadline for decision about
Minnesota Twins' move
draws near
ROCK HILL, S.C. (AP) �York County
may soon be home to the Minnesota
Twins unless the Minnesota Legislature
meets next month's deadline to come
up with its own plan to finance a new
stadium.
Lawmakers have 40 days until Nov.
30 to approve a plan that would pay for
a new stadium for the Minnesota Twins.
If a plan is not approved, the Twins will
move to York County.
Three weeks ago, North Carolina
businessman Don Beaver signed a letter
of intent to buy the baseball franchise
and move it to the Carolinas. If the deal
goes through, Beaver's plan is for the
Amsrican League team to play in
Knights Castle in Rrt Mill in 1998 and
1999 before moving to a permanent
home near Greensboro, N.C. in 2000.
If a deal cannot be worked out,
Twins owner Carl Pohlad will sell the
team to Beaver. Major League Baseball
officials have already said they would
approve the sale and the relocation of
the team to the Carolinas.
Beaver is currently in the process of
buying the Charlotte Knights who play
in Foa Mi
Avalanche defenseman has
knee surgery
DENVER (AP) �Colorado Avalanche
defenseman Sandis Ozolinsh is
expected to miss 2-3 weeks after
undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his
left knee Tuesday.
Ozolinsh, who led NHL defensemen
with 23 goals last season, injured the
knee Friday in Colorado's 6-5 overtime
loss to Calgary. He did not play Sunday
against Edmonton.
Ozolinsh has a goal and three assists
in six games this season.
Briggs respects Foreman in
ring despite age
NEW YORK (AP)�George Foreman is
48, but boxing's old man is still able to
pull his weight in the ring, said Shannon
Briggs, who fights the former
heavyweight champion next month.
Foreman (76-4 with 68 knockouts) is
equally eager to fight Briggs, who
sustained his only setback in 30 pro
fights to Darroll Wilson in a third-round
knockout loss in 1995.
Foreman has been champion twice
during his career, losing the title the
first time to Muhammad Ali in the
rumble in the jungle" fight in Zaire in
1974, then relinquishing the crown in
1995 when he refused to fight a
mandatory challenger after knocking
out Michael Moorer in 1994.
Since then, Foreman has campaigned
hard for another title shot, but now
appears resigned that he probably won't
get that opportunity against any of the
three recognized champions Moorer
(IBF), Evander Horyfield (WBA) and
Lennox Lewis (WBC).
started 6-2 and the Jets 7-1. The
Giants, under Parcelb, went on to
win the Super Bowl; the Jets lost
their last five and were eliminated
in the second round of the playoffs.
Lee may be lost
for season
LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP)�Wyoming
free safety Brian Lee, the nation's
leader for interceptions, may be
lost for the rest of the season
because cf a broken arm he
suffered during last week's game
against Colorado State.
Lee, a senior, was injured with
5:23 left in Wyoming's game
against the Rams while trying to
break up a pass.
Lee finished the game before it
was learned he broke his left
forearm, said Tim Harkins,
assistant sports information
director for Wyoming.
The injury will require three to
four weeks to heal and Wyoming
(5-3 overall, 2-1 in the Western
Athletic Conference) has only five
games remaining in the regular
season.
As a result, Harkins said it is not
known whether Lee will return to
the Cowboy lineup for the rest of
the season.
In eight games this year, Lee
has had seven interceptions, an
average of 0.88 per game, the
highest number in the nation.
Lee earlier this year set the
Cowboy record for career
interceptions at 16 and last year, he
set a Wyoming single-season
interception record with eight.
True freshman Al Rich of
Colorado Springs, Colo is
expected to take over as starting
free safetv when the Cowboys face
Souther Methodist (2-4, 1-2) in
Dallas on Saturday.
American Airlines paying
$42 million to put name
on Heat's new home
MIAMI (AP)�Fans at the new
home of the Miami Heat shouldn't
have any trouble guessing the
team's corporate sponsor.
For $42 million, the American
Airlines Arena will have a life-sized
silhouette of a jet and company
logo on the roof, which will be
visible to travelers flying in and out
of Miami International Airport.
The carrier's winged-eagle logo
will be on refreshment stand
counters, zillions of small jets will
be on carpets and refreshment
containers, and the seat upholstery
pattern is made of A's.
Those arc the more subtle signs
of sponsorship in the designs
unveiled
Tuesday. The 20,000-seat arena
overlooking Biscayne Bay in
downtown Miami will have big
American signs and logos outside
and on the playing floor and
scoreboard.
The 20-year naming rights
agreement paying $2.1 million a
year is nearly as rich as shorter
contracts on an annual basis but is
longer than most. Continental
Airlines is paying $2.2 million a year
through 2007 for its affiliation with
the home of the New Jersey Nets
and Devils. United Airlines is paying
$17.5 million over 20 years for its
name on the home of the Chicago
Bulls and Blackhawks. Miami is one
of American's biggest hubs, and the
airline is the city's largest private
employer with about 9,000 workers.
(AIDS AWARENESS MONTH)
eaker
Giants are now small fish in
tuna's town
New York (AP)�Bill Parcells, who has
given the New York Jets an identity
they've lacked since Joe Namath's days,
was asked if he has been following the
parallel success of the New York Giants.
I haven't paid any attention he
replied. He was, of course, fibbing.
Parcells pays attention to everything
in the NFL, particularly when it
concerns the Giants, whom he coached
to Super Bowl victories in 1986 and
1990.
Yes, Parcells knows the Jets and
Giants are both 5-3 the Giants are first
in the NFC East anci the Jets are a half-
game behind New England in the AFC
East. Those 10 wins arc more than half
the total the teams combined for last
season, when the Giants were 6-10 and
the Jets 1-15.
That's the best combined start for
the two since 1986, when the Giants
Real Stories from those
affected by Hit and AIDS
Including: -PICASO Director
-Person living
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with A
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Sponsored by: Health Promotion
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drinking.everystudent.com
They say the friendships you
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For a free article on drinking and
college life, call 1-800-236-9238.
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to
15 Thursday. October 23, 1997
classifieds
The Eest Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
J bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
! some units, laundry facilities
Campus, ECU bus
tcurity Deposit
an o this coupon, c
vaMwMianyotM
JWOH SOUTH: 1 or 1 �
1 bath, range, refrigerator, free watersewer.J
washeooVyer hookups, free basic oabia in
Secu
�h )i mmrOnn of thl� coupon, oHw ��pif�
t4B)US7 not vaStf wttiaiy otter oaipon
WtSUPf COMMON SOUTH. 1or2 bedrooms, i
S blocks from
services. t
�pRR 2 bedrooms. 1 bathi
refrigerator, dishwasher, freet
rer, and basic cable, appro- 900
sq. � washerdiytr hookupf. central
heatfatr, 6 blocks from campus, r
COMPLETikT RENOWkTED UNITS AVAILABLE.
�AH Properties have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
I
I
I
I
I
J
Qnogement
�pnrsrti h urtoJ Hcejssx
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
3 bedroom duplex, $200 a month plus
13 utilities. Washerdryer, big screen
TV. Call Dave at 752-1463
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease at Player3 Club. $220
month plus 12 utilities. Call 353-3481.
Please leave message.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apt. 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utili-
ties. Call 752-1652.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom townhouse at King-
ston Place. $870 per semester. Re-
spond ASAP to Anna at 919-449-0923
or Jamie at 919-441-1449.
FREE UTILITIES. 1 BEDROOM.12
block from camps on Holly St. Cats al-
lowed with deposit. Rent $305 a
month. 757-9387.
ROOMMATE, MALEFEMALE TO
SHARE 2 bedroom apartment,
$175month, water included, plus 12
utilities, deposit. University Apart-
ments, one mile from campus. Call Fe-
lipe, 561-8061.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
apartment on 5th Street. 12 rent and
12 utilities. Graduate preferred. Call
Susan at 768-8567. Fall Semester Only.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: 3 bedroom. Tar River, has pooi,
washer and dryer, semi enclosed yard,
cable, 3 blocks from campus. Call �
Dave at 752-0009.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR 2 bed-
room apt University Apts
5175month 1st months, on ECU Bus
Route. 12 cable, phone, utilities. Nik-
ki, 758-4325. Need by August 31.
ONE BEDROOM APT. 3 blocks from
campus. Brand new. Washer and dryer
hookup. Cable included in rent. Sub-
lease. Call 830-2606, leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAPI
TWO blocks from campus.
$153.33month plus 13 utilities, free
cable. Dogwood Hollow Apartments.
For more info, contact Rebekah at 758-
5573.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
ROLLERBLADES. LADIES' SIZE 7
12, like new, paid $150, will sell for
$50. Color TV, 13" cable ready, $60.
Call 752-8102, leave a message if no
answer.
19" DIAMOND BACK AXIS Pro
Mountain Bike. Equipped with Shima-
no XT, Gripshift, Profile Superlite han-
dlebar, Siguno Cranks, Diacomp
brakes. Matrix and Bontrager rims,
Shimano LX hubs, only 23lbs. Call Hal,
756-3393.
WP-2200 BROTHER WORD proces-
sor with CRT display and spreadsheet
software. Like new. Asking $150. Call
and leave message, 756-5660.
1993 HONDA DEL SOL. 42k, black,
$9,995. Walnut Coffee Table (50in. x
23in), $30. Walnut phone stand (13in.
x 25in.) $15. Come take a look! Call
Tom @ 830-6943.
1988 HONDA ACCORD FOR saleT
Good shapel $3400. Call Valerie at 752-
5926.
BEAUTIFUL RUG. NEVER BEEN
WALKED on. From Pier One, 6'x8
multi color. Call 931-0449.
Help Wanted
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
Port time HANDYMAN 3 hours
doily. ONLINE Inrormotion services
seeks a person to help with cleaning
leaves off lot, keeping windows
clean, going to get mail and other
minor errands.
M-F 7AM-10PM
Call Henry Parker at 757-2151
��MslrflWI fHMl SifflMi. IMMBt. IH IfMlBTMl
ikbimimfcVy lunnwinji cmmmmc Rtvc
IVfatil JVfci fa alaMSsWaflA SBffllft. BfTkffi fffooL
Duties include �r-cmds, pocking 4 shipping, gen-
eral oftic supports. Transportation a must.
Located 2 blocks from Kinko's on Tenth Street.
Hours: IPM to 5PM hf. Can work around
school schedule if necessary. $6.25 hour. Call
Ken direct � 830-1817W 1PM- 5PM.
For Sale
2 YEAR OLD APPLE 386 Performs
with color Stylewriter 2400 printer
$1,000.00. 2 year old Gateway tots of
extras $800.00. Full computer desk
$80.00. Call Joe, 752-8783.
APPLE HE COMPUTER, DISK drive,
color printer, paper. Print Shop, Apple-
works, manualsexcellent condition,
one owner. Ideal for student. $500.
758-4952.
1996 NINJA 900, EXCELLENT con
dition, never been dropped, less than
1500m and under warranty. Great for
commuting. Asking $4500 OBO. In-
cludes helmet and cover. Call 353-
5810.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS OFFICIAL -
$4.95. Officiates intramural sports, re-
quires little or no previous officiating
experience or training. Must pass a
rules test for the prospective intramu-
ral sport and attend the designated
training sessions. Contact David Ga-
skins or Allison Kemp, 328-6387.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER
NEEDED TO care for 17 month old.
Some evenings, plus Friday and Satur-
day nights. Non-smoker, Must have
own transportation, references re-
quired. 353-1797.
LEAD INTRAMURAL SPORTS OF-
FiClAL - $5.35. Officiates intramural
sports. Requires previous officiating
experience of at least one year in two
or more sports offered by the ECU in-
tramural sports program. Muat pass a
rules test for the prospective intramu-
ral sport and attend the designated
training sessions. Contact David Ga-
skins or Allison Kemp, 328-0387.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATIONS
Si Parks Department will be holding an
organizational meeting for all those in-
terested in officiating in the winter
adult basketball league. Position pays
$12-$15 a game. Clinics will be hold to
train new and experienced officials.
However, a basic knowledge and un-
derstanding of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Monday,
October 27, 1997 at 7:30 p.m. at Elm
Street Gym. Experience requirements,
clinic schedule, and game fees will be
discussed. For more information,
please call the Athletic Office at 830-
4550 between the hours of 2:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER. PICK up
from school, help with homework, and
transport to activities. Must have
NCDL and transportation. Call 752-
0748 and leave message.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES.
THE Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches for
the winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 7-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours range
from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching.
Flexible work schedule around classes
and holidays. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Fe-
bruary. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please call
Ben James, Michael Daly or Quinton
Manley at 830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
BABYSITTER NEEDED TO SIT for
two children - ages 4 and 1, all day on
Tuesdays or Wednesdays. No
smokers. Call 355-7875
PART-TIME POSITION DISTRIBUT-
ING advertising materials. No selling
involved. All materials provided at no
charge. 1-800-YOUR-JOB. www.acm-
net.composteringyourjob.htm.
PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS.
VALOR Security Services has imme-
diate openings for public safety offic-
ers at Plaza Mall in Greenville. Quali-
fied applicants must have good public
relations and customer service skills,
pass a criminal background check and
be 21 years of age or older. We offer
flexible schedules for FTPT positions,
$6.25 hour to start, free uniforms, paid
vacation and 401-k. For information
call 800-876-6939.
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-51,500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
TELEMARKETER; PART-TIME.
STRUCTURED program, good cus-
tomer skills, positive attitude. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
PART-TIME MAINTENANCE HELP
needed to clean office furniture show-
room. Some lifting may be required.
Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
WEEKEND AND PART-TIME securi-
ty officers needed for large industrial
site in Greenville. Pay starts at $6.60.
Must be 21 and have No criminal
record. Qualified applicants will be
subject to a background investigation.
Apply Tuesdays, 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
Guardsmerk, Inc 3219 Landmark St,
Suite 9B, Greenville, NC (919) 756-
1868. EOE
WFXI FOX814 IS LOOKING for a
fall intern. Candidate must get credit
for internship. Creative business or
communications major preferred.
Must be willing to work a minimum of
20 hours a week. Intern will learn vari-
ous aspects of television, including
copywriting, sales and production of
commercials. Applicants should send
resume to LSM, WFXI-TV, 600 Country
Club Dr. Suite C, Greenville, NC 27858.
WFXI, GOCOM Broadcasting is an EOE
employer.
$6.00 PER HOUR. COMMUNITY Bi-
ble study, a women's interdenomina-
tional Bible study, is in need of several
young women to work with children
four and under. Tuesdays 9AM-
11:45AM at Covenant Methodist
Church in Greenville. Thursdays 9AM-
12:15PM at Christ Presbyterian Church
in Winterville. Sitters will provide pa-
tient, loving care and instruction to our
youngest participants. Experience pre-
ferred, references requested, must
provide own transportation and make
commitment from August 26th until
December 11, 1997. Call Nan Garrett,
class coordinator at (919) 756-6084.
SHERATON GRAND NEW BERN is
now accepting applications. One Bi-
centennial Park, New Bern. For night
auditors. Please apply in person Mon-
day-Friday 9:00 p.m1:00 p.m. We off-
er excellent working conditions and
benefits. Equal Opportunity Employer.
PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPERCHILD-
CARE: MONDAY-Friday, 12:00-4:00
p.m. Must have someone at house at
2:30 p.m otherwise, somewhat flexi-
ble about time, 20 hrs.week. Mini-
mum wage. Call 353-4239 evenings.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS SUPER-
VISOR - $4.75. Serves as a timer and
scorekeeper. Is responsible for the su-
pervision of intramural activities,
equipment check-out and control.
Must attend training clinics and meet-
ings as scheduled. Perform related
tasks as assigned. Contact Cliff Og-
burn, 328-6387.
PART-TIME IN HOME caregiver
needed for two children Tuesdays and
Thursdays, 7AM to 6PM. 752-5922 af-
ter 6PM.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
UNITED METHODIST STUDENT
WANTED for work with Bethel UMC
Youth group. Applicant must have a
strong Christian faith. Youth meet
from 5:00p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sunday
evenings. Pays $30.00 per week. Call
8254041.
JOIN THE BBC - Join the Buffalo
Brew Crew. BW-3 is now hiring kitch-
en, cashier, and door staff for Fall Se-
mester. Apply within M-F, 1-5PM, 114
E. 5th St.
PERFECT PART-TIME JOB. Seeking
math tutor and a study buddy to work
with students on individualized basis.
Apply at: Sylvan Learning Center, 2428
S. Charles Blvd Greenville, NC
MALE. DIVERS NEEDED! ECU
Swim Team needs guys who like to flip
and twist. Call Coach Rose, ext. 0010
or come to Minges Pool Office.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT;
FULL TIME. Detail oriented, organ-
ized, good customer skills, excellent
computer skills, enthusiastic worker.
Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
PART-TIME TENNIS
ATTENDANTINSTRUCTOR
positions at River Birch Tennis Center.
Tennis playing and teaching
experience required. Start end of
August. Call 830-4559.
JILL. YOU DID A wonderful job Par-
ent's Weekendl Zeta Tau Alpha sisters
and new members
THANK YOU SIGMA, ALPHA 23
Delta, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa and
Kappa Sigma for an awesome band
party. Love, Chi Omega
THANK YOU SIGMA PHI Epsilon for
a great social Thursday night. Had an
awesome time, can't wait to do it
again! Love, Sigma Sigma Sigma
DELTA ZETA, THANKS FOR the
wonderful Parent's Weekend. Let's do
it again. Love, Tau Kappa Epsilon
HEY, GROOVY TIME THURSDAY
Alpha Xi Delta, Alpha Delta PI and Sig-
ma Nu. Let's do this foursome thing
again sometime. From your good
friends at Sigma Pi.
ALPHA DELTA PI HOPES that every"
one has a great weekl
KAPPA SIGMA, THANK YOU for a
wonderful Parent's Weekend. You
guys showed us and our parents a
great time. Love, Chi Omega
HEY, ALPHA DELTA PI, It's been fun
these past two weeks, how about
some jazz next time. From your friends
of Sigma Pi.
LIZ-CONGRATS ON THE best fun-
draiser in Zeta Tau Alpha history. All of
your hard work realty paid off. Love,
your sisters and new members
THANKS TO KRISTEN H. and Jen B.
for representing Zeta Tau Alpha in
Rookie of the Year. You two did greatl
WAY TO GO CM Omega Athletes.
You did great in football and volley-
ball. Love, your sisters
TO ALL THE GOOD looking guys
who went to Chi Omega Grab A Date,
we had a great time cutting a rug at
the Elbo. Love, Chi Omega
Services
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Cain Hands-on
experience and build vour resume. Last
summers average earnings 7.223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON, THANK
you for the disco social. The girls and
the cops had funl Let's do it again real
soon. Love, Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS ZETA TAU
ALPHA on 99 years of sisterhood!
DELTA CHI, THURSDAY NIGHT
was so much fun. ft was great hanging
out with you guys, we have to do it
again soon. Love, Alpha Phi
SOCCER TEAM WE HAD a great
time. Losing that loving feeling with
you I Hope to do it again soon. Love,
Chi Omega
Travel
SPRING BREAK '98- sell trips, earn
cash and go free Student Travel
Services is now hiring campus
repsgroup organizers. Lowest rates to
Jamaica. Mexico & Florida. Call 1-800-
648-4849.
Announcements
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH WILL have a special Wom-
en's Luncheon with Dolores Corbett on
Thursday. October 23 beginning at
11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. There is a
$10.00 fee which includes a barbecue
lunch. Pre-registration is required. The
last day to register is Wednesday, Oc-
tober 22. For more information please
contact: Community Christian Church,
1104 North Memorial Drive, Green-
ville, NC 27834 (Across from the air-
port) 752-LOVE5683)
THE GREENVILLE-PTTT COUN-
TY Special Olympics will be con-
ducting a Soccer Coaches Training
School on Saturday, September
27th from 9am - 4pm for all indi-
viduals interested in volunteering
to coach soccer. We are also look-
ing for volunteer coaches in the
following sports: Basketball Skills,
Team Basketball, Swimming, Rol-
lerskating and Bowling. No experi-
ence necessary. For more infor-
mation please contact Dwain Co-
oper at 830-4844 or Dean Foy at
830-4541.
IF YOU DRIVE TO classJfrom out loJL
Greenville or if you live in Greenville
but are not located near a bus route,
check out the new weekdays commut-
er board in The Wright Place, where
you can find a RIDE or RIDERS to share
the driving. If you need a ride over
weekends or breaks, use the board in
Mendenhali Student Center. For more
information, contact Commuter Stud-
ent Services. 211 Whichard, 328-6881.
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips!)
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wanted Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.icpt.com
NEED A JOB? PLAY at day and make
money at night! Work nights andor
weekends and have your days free
with The ECU Telefund. Make your
own schedule! $5.50hr. plus bonuses!
Stop by the Rawl Annex, Room 5 bet-
ween 3-6PM for more info.
DO YOU LIKE TO learn German,
French, Arabic? Call 754-2487.
Personals
MANDI, TODAY MAKES A month
and it's been great. I hope you have
enjoyed it as much as I have. Let's
keep it going. R.
Greek Personals
ZETA TAU ALPHA WOULD like to
thank their flag football team. We are
really proud of you! Congrats to our
volleyball players on their recent victo-
ries!
THANK YOU ERIC HANSEN for all
your help in football. You're the best.
Love, Chi Omega
ALPHA DELTA PI. GREAT job in the
Flag Football Playoffs last Tuesday.
You played wonderfully! Love, your
sisters
CONGRATULATIONS, ALPHA PHI!
YOU girls were awesome Thursday.
We have made it to the finals in flag
football, let's go all the way. Go Alpha
Phi!
CHI OMEGA, WE HAD a wonderful
time last week at our 70's social. As al-
ways, we can't wait to do it again next
year. Thanx, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
SIGMA NU AND SIGMA PI, thanks
for a great pre-downtown Thurs night
with Alpha Zi Delta. We had so much
fun! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS ZETA NEW
MEMBERS on your pledge offices!
We love our Zeta Babies!
ALPHA PHI, WE HAD a great time
last weekend together. We look for-
ward to next year's Parent's Weekend.
Thanx, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
AD
Department
obert Andrews - Senior,
resentative
Joey Campbell - Accoi
Misty Et
Represent
� Mark
count
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WEWILLPAY YOU � � �- ?-
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FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable .
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10fl0-1200,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the paridtotmfontofW�dwrtodcrntcfidn
- ' M lU





OMECOMING
Book Signing Session:
TALK FOOTBALL with the Authors off
Backyard Brawl - The ECU vs. NCSU Rivalry
11t30 am -1:30 pm, Saturday, Oct M
Get your copy of this popular book before they're all gone!
ALUMNI HOMECOMING SPECIALS
Show your Homecoming Weekend Nametag and take
25 all regular price Alumni Apparel.
if Show your school ring and take l off your purchase
price for each year you've been away, up to 25.
(Discount off of resular price merchandise only. Computer hardware,
software, textbooks, and special order items excluded.)
Homecoming'97 T-Shirts available at the Registration
Table near the Mall.
See what weVe got in store
for you now. New ECU Cool
Weather Outerwear now in stock!
Come in and check out the new Polorfleece� blanket, jackets, vests, mittens scarves,
and wild style hats! ECU parkas, and varsity style jackets now available.
Student and Student Guest Football
Tickets available at Dowdy Student
Stores until 7:00 pm on Thursday,
October 93!
BUY
GET 1 FREE!
Select Stock of
T-SHIRTS
SWEATSHIRT
SELLOUT!
Buy 1 Reg. Price Sweatshirt,
Take 50 OFF
2nd SWEATSHIRT!
20 OFF
Regular Price
TRADEBOOKS
PLUS OTHER
In-Storc
SPECIALS
Saturday ONLY:
FREE HUGGER
with purchase
.first 500 shoppers
Visit us Homecoming Weekend! Open 'til 7 pm
Friday evening and 9:00 am - 3:00 pm on Saturday.
STUDENTS: Don't forget to
pick up your BEFORE &
AFTER GAMETextbook Give-
away Entry Forms when you
pick up your football tickets!
Nikki Murchison and Stacey
Byrum won FREE Textbooks
for Spring Semester 1998 at
the Southern Mississippi
Game. YOU could win next!
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright BuiWins318-6731www.studentstores.ecu.edu
"�mh & '�,?"�
-





mm
H?e East Carolinian
Distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday, The East Carolinian
serves the campus as the major
source of information about activi-
ties and events as well as a forum
for discussion of issues and ideas.
This student-run paper provides
numerous opportunities, including
communications, business and
management experiences where
students can apply what they learn
in the classroom.
TEC Newsroom32S-63S6
TEC Advertising � 328-2000
WZMB is ECU'S student-run
FM radio station that offers a vari-
ety of alternative music including
rock, jazz, rap and heavy metal.
The station also offers news and
sports reports and call-in type par-
ticipatory shows at 91.3 on the dial.
Various opportunities, including
both on- and off-air experiences,
are available in this hands-on envi-
ronment, allowing students to pre-
pare for a future career.
WZMB StaMfo324751
Request Line MNJtl3
Expressions is a magazine that
serves as the voice of the campus
minority population.
Published four times a year, its
pages carry stories, artwork and
poetry that address the concerns
and problems of the various ethnic
and religious groups represented
on this multi-cultural campus.
Various opportunities to write,
design and illustrate are available
between the magazine's covers.
328-��27
offer
erienc
lifetime.
The Rebel is EClTs literary arts
magazine published annually each
Spring. The featured artistic and lit-
erary pieces are selected by a panel
of judges from entries submitted by
the ECU community. An annual art
display showcases those selections.
Staff members can get various
types of experience from adminis-
tering the contest to arranging the
annual art show to producing the
magazine.
i se xcuei ������������
ECU Student Media
Gold Looks Good In Any Degree
Jostens gives the highest degree of:
.Quality
. Customer Satisfaction
. Service
.Warranty .
. Payment Plans
Order your college ring NOW.
JOSTENS
AMERICAS COLLEGERING�
Date- October 20-25 Time, tO"6 (Monday-Friday )& 9-3 (Saturday)
Piare: Bookstore
Payment Flans AwteMe ,
SB
Meet with your Jostens representative for M details. See our complete riigsele�n on dferiyo
j23CP -331 ��)
Or for a portable CD player,
whichever floats your boat
The administration has said they're looking
for a new university symbol, something
other than VeeVee Pirate.
We at The Eat Carolinian would like to
help them in their deliberations.
Send us your idea for a new ECU logo be-
fore our Nov. 28 deadline.
We 11 pick our favorite and give that person
portable CD player. Then we'll run all of
serious logos we receive in the Dec. 4 issue
of the paper and on our website at
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Heres a chance to help the administration
and show your school spirit (or how badly
you want a portable CD player).
Bringyour entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
If'IM'f)
'rtf,
im ;Tl���� �� ����






Whats your
favorite?
We're looking for your favorites in
our first Reader's Choice survey.
Just complete the survey form printed
here and drop It by our office or put
it in campus mail to us.
Or point your browser to our website
at www.snidentinedkecu.edu and fill
out the survey on-line.
Either way you choose, enter only
once, ftit do it before 5 p.m7 Nov. 7.
Once you enter, well throw your name
in with everyone else who responds
and draw out a WINNER at random.
That person will take home a Casio
hand-held color TV. Could winning be
any easier?
Then, look for the Readers Choice
favorites featured in a tabloid special
edition on Tuesday, Nov. 18.
i the 1 � �
eastcaroliman
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. �Nj;�LETja CUPAN�
What's the best place to get breakfast after a late night?
ReadersO2i2?
What's the best place for lunch between classes?
What's the best place to take a date for dinner?
What's the best place to get a good pizza?
What's the best place to live off-campus?
Who has the best game-day
Whose fries stay the hottest all the way home?
What's the best place to buy a keg?
What's the best place to dance all night?
What's the best place to buy CDs?

What's the best place to get a haircut?
What's the best place to park illegally on campus and get
away with it?
What's the best reason to skip class?
What grocery store best fits student's budget?
What's the best place to have your car repaired?
What cab company has the friendliest drivers?
What laundry won't eat your socks?
Name
Phone.
L.
J
1
V
. ���
Y
�4 .till. W
II � �
T











r

Contents
Preview of Gamepage 3
Schedule of Eventspage 4
First Football Teampage 6
Parade Lineup page8&9
VANA
Homecoming at East
Carolina over the years
has changed in many
ways to be what it is
today. In The East
Carolinian s
Homecoming tab,
we feature pic-
tures of the first
Homecoming
gueen, the first
football team and
stories about how
Homecoming has
changed over the
Homecoming CourtpageUMfcl vears. Also includ-
ed are stories on the
cheerleaders,
PeeDee the Pirate and
the Marching. Pirates.
The East Carolinian wish-
es the Pirates well and wel-
comes back all the alumni who have .
come home to celebrate Homecoming. Lets paint
Homecoming '97 purple and gold!
Cheerleaders, Marching
Pirates, and Pee Deepage 12
i n i
ling of the Pastpage 13
e
astcarolinian
Amy L.Royster Editor
Celeste Wilson Managing Editor
Derek Sernak Covor Doaionor Tracy Laubach At. Sports Editor
Matt Hece Advortmng Director Jensina Sturz Tabloid Editor
Amanda Ross SportiEditor Carole Mehle Head Copy Editor
John murphy Staff Illustrator
Serving to ECU coawMnty wet 1S& to East Caraeman pubtahes UOOO coom even; Tuesday and Thursday The
lead eettonal m each edibon is to opmon of to fadttnai Board The Eest broken wefcomes letters to to ednw sow-
ed to 250 worts, when may be edited tor decency or brevity Th� East Carobman reserves to nflht to edit or reject let-
ten lor pubVcabon Al letters must be signed. Letters should be eddressad to: opinion editor, to East Carolinian.
Publications MM ECU. Greeny. ZWM351 For information, cell 91SJ2183SI
ALL DECKED OUT
FOR THE 90�
31
Si
31
Touchdown at Cl
1 a Price Pitchers
of Draft & 12 Price Wing
Every Monday!
i
Downtown Greenville 757-1666 All ABC Permits tg Days kSl
Mexican Restaurant
Catch the game
on our 5 TV's
OQOp.m. til Closing
Open 7
The East Carolinian
��

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Wln
Sundgy
All day
Pizza
Free
(Mention The Firebouse
At Gumblno's
and get Sloff Purchase)
$1.50 32 oz draft
$.75 16 oz draft
NFL on DSS
Mpntoy
$.75 Southpaw bottles
NFL on DSS
Tuesday
Live Jazz Night
ONIX Cigar Display
Wine Tasting
$1 domestics
Wednesday
Live Music downstairs
ALL Request, Anything goes
upstairs
$1.75 Imports
Thursday
Live Music downstairs
$1 domestics
Friday &
Saturday
Beer Tub Specials
Live Music downstairs
Thursday.
Friday &
Saturday
Dance to DJ Mad Mike
Upstairs
Live Music Downstairs
Tigers roaring to spoil
Homecoming game
ECUJVlemphis
face off for
eighth time
Amanda Ross
sports editor
ECU is no stranger to the Memphis
football team. Since 1990 these
two teams have played one another
each year, and ECU holds a 5-2
victory margin.
Trie Tigers are 24 (0-01) and
were idle last week after beating
Arkansas State on Oct. 11,38-9.
Three of the four losses
Memphis has suffered were by
three points each. The defense is a
style the Pirates have seen before
this season, as Coach Steve Logan
compared the Memphis defense to
that of Southern Miss Triey've
kind of adopted a Southern Miss
defense where they're blitzing just
about, easily, 65 to 70 percent of
the time Logan said.
Offensively, Logan is more con-
cerned with the passing game that
has gained 1387 yards, than with
the running game which has post-
ed 610 yards.
"They are throwing the ball
fairly effectively right now Logan
said. Running is not quite as
effective as in the past, which may
or may not be by design
Senior flanker Jason Nichols,
who only needs three more catches
to pass Mitch Galloway as the
Pirates all-time pass reception
leader, expects the Tigers to play
man-to-man, and he's ready for
that type of defense.
"As a receiver you have to be
up and ready for that challenge
wnen people want to get in your
face and play you man-to-man
Nichols said.
Logan did see some individual
Pirate defensive performances
against Tulane that caught his eye.
"1 was pleased to see Dwight
Henry come back and play a little
bit more like we had been accus-
tomed to him playing in '95
Logan said. "He looked like the old
Dwight the other night on several
occasions
Henry sat out last season after a
knee injury but has recorded 24
tackles this vear and one interceo-
"They 've kind of adopted
a Southern Miss defense
where they 're blitzing just
about, easily, 65 to 10
percent of the time
Coach Logan
tkm.
Logan was also pleased with the
performance of Kelvin Suggs, who
was moved to free safety earlier
this year, and had six tackles
against Tulane, which gives him 29
on the year. According to Logan,
Suggs has helped to iron out some
of the wrinkles in the ECU sec-
ondary.
"I think Kelvin Suggs playing
the free safety position continues
to settle that situation down back
there Logan said.
The Pirates will hit the field at
3:30 p.m. this Saturday, as the
game will be televised on Fox
Sports South.
aS
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for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
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Join us for dinner before
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Fax:830-1735
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UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
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9S

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,
Five losses brings frustrations
Players looking to
rebound .record win
Ah an d� Ross
SMUTS EDITOR
It's been a rough year � just ask the
players.
With four straight losses so far, frus-
tration on the players' part has risen with
each game. Coach Steve Logan said it's
normal for his players to feel down after
a 1-5 start, and said he's glad to see the
team isn't taking the losses with a grain
of salt.
"After the game flulane) there were a
lot of kids in the locker room really, real-
ly, hurt and upset and that's good
Logan said. "There's not a lackadaisical
rof attitude. They're not accepting
losing, which is healthy. There's a
healthy frustration among the kids,
which is a motivator
Towards the end of the Tulane game,
many players showed their disappoint-
ment freely with sorrowful faces and
tears rolling down their cheeks. The frus-
tration is there, and flanker Jason
Nichols said because of the slow start,
they aren't taking any games for granted.
ECU has won the last three games
against Memphis, and Nichols points out
they way the Tigers have been playing,
Memphis might think they can already
count this game as a win.
"With us being 1-5, they're probably
trying to chalk this up as a win and they
haven't beaten us the last three years,
Nichols said. "The way we're playing
now, every game is a challenge for us. We
don't take anybody lightly
The defense is tired of watching the
opponents score on them and according
to linebacker Rod Coieman, who has 35
tackles, the Pirates know things are get-
tine serious.
We realize things are critical around
here Coieman saw. "We're just trying
to get it all up for a win
The Pirates haven't had a losing
streak like the current one since "93,
when they lost their last five games.
For Logan, he doesn't see any part of
this team giving up on the season.
"The kids are working and fighting
hard Logan said. "As long as they're
doing that you can coach them
Campus groups gear
up for competitions
J E H SI N A S T U �2
TAB EDITOR
The football team isn't the only
team who's been preparing for a
little competition during home-
coming. Campus organizations
have gearing up for Homecoming
court and competition in banners,
floats and house decorations.
First, all groups pick a
Homecoming representative who
best represents his or her group.
Each representative has to be in a
officially-registered university
organization such as: departments,
unit and residence halls. The min-
imum requirements for all repre-
sentatives is they must have a min-
imum GPA of 2.5, two semesters
at ECU and only one male and or
female registration per organiza-
tion.
"Representatives are not
allowed to campaign. If the
Homecoming committee finds out
of this, the individual who does
campaign will be immediately dis-
qualified from the court. And sanc-
tions will be taken against their
organization for future participa-
tion in other Homecoming activi-
ties decided the Homecoming
committee.
After the Homecoming repre-
sentative is taken care of, the
group next decides on a float A
committee is nominated to design
the float. The first decision is what
theme does their group want to
portray. Then the building begins.
A trailer or a truck is purchased
in which the float will be built.
"Next, the decorations and
materials are bought, but hopeful-
ly will be donated said Chassidy
Millsap of Alpha Omicron Pi.
After most of the float is built
inside or under a shelter. Then it is
brought outside right before the
final alterations have to be done
said Millsap.Then All the build-
ing, mending and fixing should be
started a couple of weeks before
Homecoming day.
During the building time of the
float another activiity is being
done. A smaller committee is cho-
sen. They decide on what will go
on the group's banner. The design
is usually a mottor or symbol that
best represents his or her group.
Another popular and creative
activity is the househall decora-
tions. These houses and halls will
be judged on creativity, color,
design and use the groups team.
Their Homecoming theme
should represent at least two-
thirds of the total decorations with
the reminder available to promote
their organization said the
Homecoming committee, of East
Carolina.
Celebrating 10 years
Pirate's
Favorite
Serving. Lunch Specials
under S4 no tax.
Downtown and Plaza Mall
Sir-M-Tu-W Beer Specials
Domestics $1.25
Imports S1.50
(Above) The football team
practiced hard .but still suffered
several disappointments this
season. (Right) Larry Shannon
runs for a touchdown in a
home game last season.
RLE PHOTO
Go ahead and make reservations for Homecoming
, blues tuesday
"limits
658 easf ariington blvd 355-1111
4 The East Caroli

X

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r





r
SUiiBaB.
You're Invited
To Attend The
ECU Homecoming
Autograph Party.
Carolina East Mall will host the ECU Homecoming
Autograph Party. The party will be held at
Carolina East Mall, October 21st at 7:00 pm
FM
WCZ) FM 98.3
Evening of Events
The Pirates at Seven Brian Baily Radio Show,
Live at the mall from 7-8 pm on 983 WCZ1
Stadium Seats to be given away to the 1st 400 people
Your favorite ECU athletes from the following sports will be on hand for autographs;
SwimmingDiving, Soccer, Women's Softball, Football
Register to win the "Pirates Chest" filled with goodies from Carolina East Mall
merchants and an autographed football and basketball
�-�cTowmtetAnUe
for the FCU mm
Carolina east
tvi A L L
Belk, Brody's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria & 50 shops
Open Monday-Saturday 10-9, Sunday 1-6
Located on Highway H, just 2 blocks south of Greenville Blvd.
" ���� - ;� �
w �





ECU'S first football team: no coach, no field
Editor's note: The information
for the following chronicle of
early football teams was found
in several yearbooks located in
Joyner Library.
Jensina Stuhz
tab editor
In a musty old yearbook from 1933 located in the library's archives, there
is a photograph of the members of ECU's first football team.
Under the photo are the simple words, "football group This so called
football group did not have a coach and they played on a grassy field.
Later in 1935, another team led by a coach began competing in games
with other teams.
Reviewed in the light of past football achievement here, the 1935 sea-
son was highly successful and packed with thrilling moments.
A deceptive aerial attack, which culminated in the intricate "Flying
trapeze" play, coupled with brilliant running and blocking, made it possi-
ble for the 1935 Pirates to combat heavier and more powerful teams suc-
cessfully.
With the Wingate game the lone exception, the East Carolina Teachers
College team displayed a fighting spirit of which any college may be truly
proud.
When Oak Ridge came to Greenville, the Cadets did not expect to
encounter the twisting, fighting team which barely missed winning in the
final seconds of the game. The first win came at the expense of Chowan
College, and was followed by another victory from the highly rated Norfolk
Branch of William and Mary team.
In the first game of the season East Carolina Teacher's College lost to
Wingate, 6 to 0. Wingate made the only tally of the game in the third play
by a pass. During most of the game there was a continual exchange of
punts. In the last few minutes Thomwall Gibson, who was the quarterback
at the time, carried the ball a gain of 50 yards, the longest run of the game.
The defensive work of the Pirates was superb; however, they were weal on
offense.
The next team E.C.T.C played was Oak Ridge, this team was consid-
ered a much strong team than the Pirates, the Oak Ridge Cadets were able
to win by only a small margin, 6 to 2.
Both scores were made in the final quarter. Cadet Smathers the other
team's player, intercepted a Teacher's pass on the 50-yard line and ran for
the touchdown. The teachers' two points came on a safety when Stowe
attempted to pass to Lindsay. Brinkley downed the ball behind the goal
posts.
The Teachers' first half play was marked by strong defense, led by
Johnson, tackle, who was in almost everv play.
As a whole the Pirates outplayed the highly favored Cadets by holding
them for downs at opportune times. It was case of who
would get the breaks and the breaks went to the Cadets.
E.C.T.C. Pirates defeated Chowan College 46 to 0, the
largest score that they have ever run up at one time.
During the first half the Pirates did not show the fire that
was well exhibited in the last half. The first half was
marked by many fumbles, ending with a score of 7 to 0.
But the story was quite different the last half. Stowe
scored three touchdowns to lead the Pirates.
Next, E.C.T.C played William and Mary. Scoring a
touchdown and two safeties, E.C.T.C. pirates shattered
the hopes of the Norfolk Division of William and Mary-
RRl. team of a perfect season, winning by 10 to 6.
After a scoreless first quarter, the Pirates made an
attack the second quarter that netted a touchdown. Taking
the ball on their own 42-yard line, the Pirates marched
down the field with a dazzling passing attack which, cou-
pled with a 15-yard penalty against the Braves, put the
ball on the Division 2-yd line. A lateral from Stowe to gib-
son scored on the fourth try. The Braves came pounding
back and inaugurated an 88-yard mark, topped with a 40-
yard gallop to score. Halfback Cunningham boomed a
long punt that fell on the Division eight-yard line. A bad
pass from center was downed in the end zone to give the
Pirates the first safety. The second came about in the
final quarter when the Braves' center uncorked another
wild heave.
Playing through a heavy snow and intense cold, the
Pirates led the mountaineers 6 to 0 at the half. The touch-
down came in the second quarter after they had advanced
from their own 35-yard line to the Moutaineer's 15-yard
line, gibson made a long pass to Cunningham who made
10 yards when he passed to Stowe who scored. For no
length of time during the first half did the Mountaineers
threaten the Pirates' territory.
Applachian's first score came in the latter part of the
tird quarter after they ahd blocked a punt on the Pirates'
30-yard. A succession of line drives brought another
touchdown in the fourth quarter giving the Mountaineers
a victory of 14 to 6.
The last game of the season was ended with E.C.T.C.
played Louisburg College Trojans, they won 13 to 0.
Scoring was in the second and final quarters. Each touch-
down came on the end of a 30-yard advance, with Gibson
doing all the scoring. The Pirates made the first scoring
advance with ground plays, but in the second a pair of
passes set the stage for Gibson vial line plunges.
1st football team
1st organized football team
These past paragraphs came from what was said in the yearbook of
1937 about the first organized football team of ECU.
HOMECOMING SALE
.through. Saturday. Octob
You should see what we've got in store for you now
TALK FOOTBALL with the Authors of
Backyard Brawl The ICU vs. MCSU Rivalry
11:30 am � 1:30 pm, Saturday
ALUMNI HOMECOMING SPECIALS
Show your Homecomins Weekend Nametas and take 25 all
re3ular price AKimni Apparel. Show your school rirq and take 1
off your purchase price for each year you've been away, up to
25. (Discount off of resular price merchandise only. Computer
hardware, software, textbooks, and special order items excluded.)
APPAREL,
GIFTS, AND
BOOKS ON
SALE!
Saturday:
Free Hugger
with purchase
(first 500 shoppers)
Visit us Homecoming Weekend Open VlJpm Friday
evening and 9:00 am - 3:00 pm on Saturday.
"Grenville's best
Pizza once again"
Greenville Times
Reader's poll
-Tij
Jsiki:i i
pizziiim
Ronald E. Dowdi
ECU PRO
?' SHOP NOW
� OPEN! �
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
WftsMMdas ?311-4731 ?oww.tluattititofei.eea.edu
� Chicago Style Pizza ,
� Subs � Stromboli s
� Lasagna �
� Salads � Beforios
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752-BOLI (2654)
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Homccominj " T-shirts available Friday & Saturday, Alumni Registration Table en the Mall
Peel and Eat
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jdS
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Half
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I Dine In Only. Valid Monday Thursday only Dine-in
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Exp. 10-3197.
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m Peel and Eat
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$2 off S
One
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Only. Not Valid with other specials
Exp. 10-31-97.
6 i The East Carolinian
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ECOMING1997

Monday, October 20
Tuesday, October 21
Wednesday, October 22
Thursday - Saturday
October 23-25
Thursday, October 23
, October 24
Saturday, October 25
ALL DECKED OUT
FORTHE90TH
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS



1997 Homecoming Court Reception
7:00-9:00 pm, Mendenhaii student Center Great Room
Autograph Night
7:00-8:00 pm, Carolina East Mall
Mystery Dinner Theater
7:00-9:00 pm, Mendenhaii Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
Tickets on sale now at the Central Ticket Office
Banner Contest Judging
l1K)0-fl:45 am. Mendenhaii Student Center Brick Patio
Speed 2
Mendenhaii Student Center Hendrlx Theater
Sneak Preview: gattaca
8:00 pm, Mendenhaii Student Center Hendrlx Theater
6:30-8:00 pm, Mendenhaii Student Center Brickyard
The Pirate Underground - Featuring "Third of Never"
8:00-10:00 pm, Mendenhaii Student Center Social Room
Letter winners Golf Tournament
11:00 am
Concert - widespread Panic
8:00-11:00 pm, Minges Coliseum
Tickets on sale now at the Central Ticket Office
HOMECOMING PARADE
9:45-11:00 am
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME: ECU PIRATES VS. MEMPHIS TIGERS
3:30 pm
HOMECOMING COURT ANNOUNCEMENT AT HALF-TIME
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1997 Parade Lineup
"All Decked out for the 90th: Homecoming 97
Saturday, October 251997 at 8:00 a.m.
Start on Elm Street
1 Greenville City Police
2 ECU Police
3 Air Force ROTC Color Guard
4 Outstanding Alumni-Frances Eason
5 Outstanding Alumni-Walter Worthington
6 Outstand Alumni-Sandra Bullock
7 Soace
8 ECU Marching Pirates
9 1996 Homecoming King Brian Dilday & Queen Heather Cox
10 Float-Sigma Pi FraternityAlpha Delta Pi Sorority
Float-American Chemical Society
12 Band-James B. Hunt H.S. Warriors
13 Fioat-Epsiion Sigma Alpha
14 Homecoming Court Candidates
15 Float-NSSLHA
16 Band-East Carteret H.S. Marching Mariners
17 Float-Jones Hall
18 Space
19 Homecoming Court Candidates
20 Band-North Lenoir H.S. Hawks
21 Float-Gospe Choir
22 Float-Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity
23 Homecoming Court Candidates
24 Band-Rocky Mount Senior H.S. Gryphons
WIDESPREAD
jmr
Friday, October 24,1997,8:00 pm
Williams Arena Minges Coliseum
Tickets available through Ticketmaster outlets
and the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center (8:30 am-6:00 pm, MonFri.).
TICKET PRICES
$18.50 in advance
$20.00 day of show
For more information, coil 323-6004 or 1-800-ECU-ARTSor visit our
at www.ci$.ecu.edustudentunkMitliehomepage.l�tm! 'saSsST
o The East Carolinian
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-
25 Float-Aquatic Sciences Club
26 Float-Chi Omega SororitySigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity
27 Space
28 Ffeat-Zeta Phi Beta
29 Band-Rosewood H.S. Marching Eagles
30 Float-NAACP
31 Homecoming Court Candidates
32 Float-Alpha Omnicron Pi Sorority
33 Float-B-Glad
34 Band-D.H. Conely H.S. Marching Vikings
35 Purple & Gold Dancers
36 ECU Cheerleaders
37 Float-Delta Zeta Sorority
38 homecoming Court Candidates
39 Space
40 Band-Farmville central H.S.
41 Float-Sigma Sigma-Sigma SororityLambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
42 Band-Northeastern H.S. Eagles
43 Homecoming Court Candidates
44 Float-Criminal JusticeSocial Work Alliance
45 Band-Mattamuskeet H.S. Lakers
46 Space
47 Homecoming Court Candidates
48 Float-United to Create Inclusion
49 Band-Charles B. Aycock H.S. Marching Falcons
50 Float-Ambassadors
51 Homecoming Court Candidates
52 Band-Richlands H.S. Marching Wildcats
53 Float-Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity
54 Sweeper
99tTt9tt9?9999i999TT99999999TtZZXXZZZtZZi l 2,11
EAST8ROOK G VILLAGE GREEN
APARTMENTS
ARE PROUD TO SUPPORT
IN
Homecoming T9T!
BEA T MEMPHIS!
-

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Homecoming
Kings
Colin A. Mcrae
Major: Economics
senior
Service to
Organization:
Ambassadors
Volunteer Work: Pitt
Memorial Hospital
Adrian C. Floyd
Major: Occupational
Therapy
freshmen
Service to
Organization: Belk Hall
Volunteer Work: Trident
Medical Center, Trident
Head Clinic
Joshua Jeremicah
Beardsley
Major BiologyPre
Physician Assistant
junior
Service to
Organization: Resident
Advisor for Cotten,
Fleming, Jarvis
Volunteer Work:
Rainbow Cancer Buddies,
Habitat for Humanity
Other Student
Organizations: Resident
Advisor for Fleming Hall,
Honor BoardSGA
Rob Fannon
Major Exercise
Physiology, Pre Physical
Therapy
sophomore
Service to
Organization: Sigma
Alpha Epsilon,
Scholarship Chair
Volunteer Work: Pitt
County Boys and Girls
Club, March of Dimes
Walk-a-Thon
Other Student
Organizations: SABRE
Group
Mark Harritan
Major: Marketing
senior
Service to
Organization:
Scholarship Chair, Ritualist,
IFC Representative
Volunteer Work: IFC
Adminitrative Vice
President
Other Student
Organizations: Order of
Omega, Orientation Staff,
Phi Kappa Phi, Beta
Gamma Sigma, WZMB
Executive Staff
Tremayne Nunley
Major: Accounting
sophomore
Service to
Organization: Active
Hall Council Member
Volunteer Work: Soup
Kitchen Volunteer
Other Student
Organizations: Pi Eta
Sigma National Honors
Society, Men's Track
Carlton Blanton
Major: Communications
senior
Service to
Organizations: House
Manager, Big Brother, Pho-
Alumni Secretary,
President of Lambda Chi
Alpha
Volunteer Work: Ronald
McDonald House, Adopt-a-
Highway, National food
drive
Other Student
Organizations: IFC rep-
resentative Day-Rep
Kengie R. Bass
Major: Elementary
Education
freshmen
Service to
Organization: Member-
Fletcher Hall Council
Other Student
Organizations:
Residence Hall
Association, Elementry
Education club, SNCAE
Farm Market
wheat straw, Mums
Bundled corn stalks,
& pumpkins
plus a variety of other
10 The East Carolinian
���





Homecoming
Queens
Mary A. Underbill
Major Nursing
sophmore
Service to
Organization:
Alpha Phi Sorority
Volunteer Work: open-
ing crew of Tyler Hall,
candy stipei at Nash
Health Care System, Big
Sister program at YMCA
Leslie Pulley
Major: Public Relations
junior
Service to
Organizations: Chi
Omega Sorority
Volunteer Work:
Operation Sunshine,
Republican headquarters,
March of Dimes walk-a-
thon, Ronald McDonald
House, Knights of
Columbus Charity
Other Student
Organizations: SGA stu-
dent body secretary. Vice
President UN Model
Group, College
Republicans, Rush Chair
Chi Omega Sorority
Sage Hunihan
Major Fashion
Merchandising
junior
Service to
Organization:
Panhellenic Council
Volunteer Work:
Operation Sunshine, Little
Willie Center, MADO,
Boys and Girls Club
Other Student
Organizations: Sigma
Sigma Sigma-Social Chair
Fall 96, Pledge Class
President Junior
Panhellenic Rep. Fall 95,
crew lead Gamma Rep
Fall 96
Jodi Christine Warden
Major: Elementary
Education
senior
Service to
Organizations:
Ambassadors
Volunteer Work:
Greenville Homeless
Shelter, currently working
with Adopt-A-City Street
program
Other Student
Organizations:
Elementary Education Club
and Gamma Beta Phi
Vallencia McCoy
Major: Biology
sophmore
Service to Organization:
Resident Hall Association
Volunteer Work vari-
ous Hall Council programs
Other Student
Organizations: peer
mentor for the Ledenia
Wright African American
Cultural Center
Sharlynda Fleming
Major: Chemistry
junior
Service to
Organizations: Ladies
Elite Service Organization
Volunteer Work: lunch
with Alheizmers patients,
afterschool tutorial
Ofier Student
Organizations:
Revelation Steppers,
Koinonian Campus Ministry
Amy L Berridge
Major: Nursing
sophmore
Other Student
Organizations: New
Generations Campus
Ministries, Gospel Choir
Nikki Noren
Major: Biology
senior
Service to
Organizations:
Alpha Delta Pi
Volunteer Work: Ronald
McDonald House,
Operation Sunshine
Other Student
Organizations: Omicron
Delta Kappa, Tri-Beta.
Golden Key National Honor
Society, Aquatic Science
Club, Order of Omega
(Greek Honor Society')
THE PLACE
FOR ALL YOUR
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3140 A Moseley Dr.
(Behind Parker's BBQ on
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o
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Mori Sat: 11 to 7
Sunday: 1 to 5
Aquariums & Supplies
Saltwater and Freshwater fish
Reptiles. Small Animals, and Supplies
Live and Frozen Food
Tank Maintenance and Leasing Available
FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF
RAtt TCWiCCA
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Handmade j
Cigars
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: The Victory Cigar for Pirates
Walk-In humidor w largest selection east of 95
The East Carolinian
11
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Cheerleaders, Pee Dee,
Marching Pirates ready to
start new Homecoming
game traditions
Get Ready for a
PIRATE INVASION!
Crush Memphis
TAB EDITOR
Watch out, football fans. PeeDee the Pirate and the
cheerleaders are looking to get the Pirates all fired up
from the start with some new homecoming traditions.
"We want to start a new tradition by getting peo-
ple in the stands during the pre-eame to greet the
team said Kim Walker, cheerleading coach.
Walker said that during the past home football
games the cheerleaders have been trying to start this
tradition, but have not been verv successful. They are
hoping that Homecoming would give them a better
turnout.
For the half-time of Homecoming the cheerleaders
will be wearing uniforms from the past. Also, they will
invite the alumni to come out and cheer with them.
The cheerleaders are taking part in the
Homecoming parade, as well as appearing at area
malls for Autograph Night. Their homecoming float
will be sponsored by the fire department of Eastern
Pines, Ualker said.
Helping PeeDee and the cheerleaders will be the
Marching Pirates. The popular cheer "Hey, hey, hey,
EC you look so good to me" will be chanted and
the alma mater will be sung. The words to the victo-
ry song are:
Cheer for East Car'lina,
Cheer for old E.C
We know we're the finest,
Onward to victory! Go PIRATES
Cheer for East Car'lina,
Cheer on for old E.C
Loyal and Bold, we're the purple and gold,
WE ARE THE PIRATES OF E.C.U
"Dunne half-time at the football game the band
will play music from the Star Wars trilogy said
Band Director Chris Knighten.
In the middle of the half-time show, the Homroming court will be announced. Ihe Marching Vmates will
also be attending the parade and the Pirate fest.
STOP SHOP features one of
Greenville's widest variety & largest
supplies of ice-cold kegs and
STOP SHOP also has atl the setups:
Ice, cups & munchies, too!
Pee Dee the Pirate is actually several students taking
turns.
STOP
SHOP
12 The East Carolinian
ECU'S Party People
connect at
STOP SHOP!
CALL TODAY
752-6366
Corner of 5th and Reade Streets in Downtown Greenville
' Wi�' �
V






Homecomings of the past build tradition
Jensina Stuiz
tab EDiroa
(Research done by Roger Hammerer,
compiled by Jemima Stun)
East Carolina's Homecoming is known for
its tradition of fun, spirit, remembrance
and pride. So, let us go back in time and
see now Homecomings of the past have
shaped this year's.
Looking back over the years to the
first Homecoming back in 1932, it was
called Founder's Day and celebrated in
the spring. East Carolina's Teachers
College's first Founder's Day was March
5,1932. Attending this event were eight
out of 11 original faculty members. This
day was celebrated thereafter every year
on the Saturdav closest to March 8, the
day ECTC was founded in 1907.
The first Homecoming that involved
sports was celebrated at ECTC on
November 20, 1936. This day included
morning programs, a barbecue dinner,
then an afternoon game of football, fol-
lowed by an evening dance.
This pattern for Homecoming went on
until fall of 1939 when Homecoming was
held off until March 9, 1940 to allow
Governor Clyde R. Hoey to decdicate the
E.G. Flanagan building.
The Homecoming of March 18,1941
included the addition of a parade before
the game, which has become one of the
highlights of the whole weekend.
EuCs next Homecoming was not
until the spring of 1946 because of World
War II. Homecoming 1946 was known as
"Veterans Homecoming and May Day" to
honor all the ECTC alumni who had
served in the armed forces.
The next annual Homecoming took
place on Nov. 8,1947. The football game
was held at Guy Smith Stadium.
Homecoming 1948, held October 16,
had a mammoth pep rally and bonfire,
followed by a torchlight parade the night
before through downtown Greenville. On
Friday night another parade took place
downtown, led by the cheerleaders and
marching hand wearing their new purple
and gold uniforms. And again
Homecoming weekend festivities began
following a pattern. Pep rallies, bonfires,
dances, receptions parades and theatrical
productions occured during this week-
end.
The Homecoming football game of
OctoberS, 1949 was held in the new col-
lege stadium on east campus, which was
dedicated during the first game of the
season. Following the game a reception
was thrown at the President's house on
Fifth Street which was purchased the
previous summer.
Homecoming of October 14,1950 saw
the first appearance of a towering paper-
mache Pirate called "Captain Teco
Symbolic of the school's spirit, it was the
center of attention for many festivities to
come.
In August 1952, the summer school
student government presented the school
its first mascot, a Great Dane named
"Boc This represented the school's
"tough spirit"
The big event of the Homecoming of
October 10,1953 was the crowning of the
first Homecoming Queen, Kitty Gerringer
Brison of Draper, N.C chosen by the stu-
dent body.
The school's 50th anniversary was
celebrated during the Homecoming of
October 12,1957, but the most unforget-
table homecoming was held on October 7,
1961. The theme. "Dixie Days com-
memorated the centennial observance of
the Civil Wat On the Friday night before,
the School alowed its first rockandroU"
concert on campus. On Saturday every-
one was danced in civil war clothes,
including college President Leo W.
Jenkins, who was clad as a Confederte
officer.
Homecoming of October 20,1962 was
threatened by a hurricane, included a
nationally known star, and was the begin-
ning of a new era for football. Activities of
1962 included as master of ceremonies
Frank Gorshin, a comedian and actor,
later known for his portrayal of the
Riddler in the Batman television series.
This Homecoming game was the final
Sue played in tie old college stadium,
e whole event was threatened by
Hurricane Ella, which luckily held off
after the celebration ended.
Homecoming of September 21, 1963
was the first game to be played in the
school's new stadium, James S. Ficklen
Memorial Stadium. Governor Terry
Sanford at the football game. The new sta-
dium was not all the school wanted to
show off; Homecoming was also used to
debut the new computer housed in die
basement of the Austin building.
Homecoming of November
14, 1964 is remembered for two rea-
sons:the Homecoming Wueen was
crowned during the half-time ceremonies,
instead of the night before; and East
Carolina's then-undefeated and untied
Pirates, known as the "Christenbury"
team, were honored. The team named
paid tribute to Coach John B.
Christenbury, a coach from 1940 to 1943
who was killed in the Navy in 1944
The next successive Homecoming
weekends were highlighted by big home
entertainers such asihe Lettermen in
1963, Ray Charles in 1964, The Platters
in 1965, The Four Seasons in 1966, The
Happenings in 1967, Faul Anka in 1968,
Dionne Warwick in 1969, Jethro Hill in
1971, and Stevie Wonder and the Beach
Boys in 1972.
There are so many years gone by, and
so many memories to be shared, but many
more homecoming memories are yet to
(top right) Pottie McEwen was
the 1960 Homecoming Queen.
(bottom right) Susan carol
Watton was the 1970
Homecoming Queen.
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The East Carolinian
13
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Who, What, When, is PIRATEFEST?
PIRAEFEST is the culmination of a week's festivities
WHAT: A tremendous pep rally to get those Purple and Gold juices flowing.
WHERE: PIRATEFEST will held on the Mendenhall Student Center Brickyard.
WHEN: PIRATEFEST will be held on Friday, October 24, 1997, before the game,
beginning at 7 p.m. and lasting an hour.
ACTIVITIES: 1. Unlocking of the Pirate's Chest. If you can tell a Homecoming represen
tative what this year's Homecoming theme is they will give you a chance to crack the
Pirate's Chest and win the prizes inside.
14 The East Carolinian

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2. Meeting and announcing the Homecoming Court.
3. A performance by the Marching Pirates and the Pure Gold Dancers.
4. Cheers by the Pirate Cheerleaders.
5. Judging of the floats.
6. Announcement of the Banner Contest Winner.
7. Fireworks Display.
OTHER INFO: Points will be awarded at PIRATEFEST for groups who bring non-perish-
able canned food items. One point per can per person will be awarded to each group.
All cans collected will be given to the Salvation Army Food Drive, so please bring a
can!
QUESTIONS: Call J. Marshall or the Student Homecoming Committee at 328-4711.
Don't be just a
fair weather fan.
Clothes for cold and rainy days, too.
All-weather gear is available at our
newly expanded Sportswear Center.
Coats � Outerwear � Hats � Rainsuits � Stadium Blankets � Sweats � Socks � More
516 & Cotanche St � Uptown Greenville � www. ubeincoom � 758-2616 � Open 9D0 am - &00 pm Every Home Football Saturday
The East Carolinian 1J
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 23, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 23, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1234
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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