The East Carolinian, October 21, 1997






TUESDAY
OCTOBER 21. 1997
Carolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
warn 73. issue w
ECU medical team
pioneering new
surgical techniques
Dr. Randolph Chitwood observes a monitor while leading a surgical team through a minimally invasive
video assisted heart surgery
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Minimally invasive
surgery less painful, not as
risky, inexpensive
Am win Bkim.s
Mill K I 1 I K
The ECU Dream Team may not include
Michael Jordan, but it docs consist of the
medical center's most innovative surgeons.
The Dream team consists of six doctors:
Randolph Chitwood. William Chapman.
Joseph Elberry, Lorraine Tarfa, Ken
McDonald and David Deaton. These six
doctors arc trying to perfect the minimally
invasive surgery in their distinctive field.
Minimally invasive surgery involves the
use of tinv cameras, smaller incisions and
revolutionary new tools that allow the
surgeon to do all the work from outside of
the body. This surgery reduces hospital
costs, pain, scarring, and reduces the risk of
infection.
Chitwood is the surgeon who put
together this team and developed the
prototype for these tools.
"We have formed a team approach to
build a program and introduce new
technologies. We would like to become a
nationally known center Chitwood said.
Chitwood's specialty is heart surgery, but
the team is using the minimally invasive
techniques on i ict surgeries.
"I laving a ream allows for a w idc range (f
expertise. There is specialization in
vascular, oncological, obesity and heart
surgeries said I larlcv Dartt. with News
and Information for the ECl' Medical
School.
Call bladder surgery was one of the first
surgeries to use minimally invasive
techniques.
Since this is a new form of surgery, it has
not been fully developed, and onlv 30
percent of all patients can have these
techniques performed.
"This is tremendous for the reputation
for the ECU Medical School Dartt said.
"This team is spear heading rhe minimally
invasive program. Our team is the best in
the country, and as far as we know rhe best
in the world
Computer executive
appointed to new position
Huskamp brings
experience to position
starting Nov. 1
J() I SI K I- I IK
MIH SKWS w HI I IK
Not only is Jeffrey Huskamp new to ECU,
so is his position: associate vice chancellor
for administration and finance-technology
"We feel that Mr. Huskamp chose East
Carolina University because it is one of the
most exciting universities in the country
said Dr. Richard Ringeisen. vice chancellor
of academic affairs.
Huskamp served as director of the North
Carolina Super Computing Center from
1 WO-1995 and has PhD in electrical
engineering and computer science from the
University of California at Berkeley. As well
as serving as vice president of the
Consortium for Scientific Computing at the
Yon Neuman National Super Computer
Center at Princeton, include only some of
them .
"We wanted to go for a higher level of
work said Blake Price, director of
Computing and Information Systems.
Huskamp's new position, which he will
be assuming Nov. 1 requires him to serve as
chief information officer. He will be leading
the university by helping to seek funding,
involving the staff in increasing technology
and benefitting the students by providing
them with highly advanced learning tools.
"Jeff is good at bringing in new funds as
well as assisting with strategic academic
plans Price said.
Many members of the faculty feel
Huskamp's arrival is an honor, Faculty
members hope he will help to lead the
campus to a new level in technology.
"We are very fortunate to have Mr.
Huskamp as a member of our staff
Ringeisen said.
Ringeisen stated
contribute to already
outstanding position
universities.
"We're doing things that other
universities only wished they were doing;
we want to be the best in the country
Ringeisen said.
Huskamp will
the university's
above other
Check out this week's
focus
on alcohol abuse.
Homecoming king and queen
candidates narrowed down to final eight
Festivities scheduled to
commence Oct. 24
Amanda At stin
I � s Kill 1 OK
The 1997-98 Homecoming celebration is
right around the corner.
The theme chosen to represent 1997 is
"All Decked Out for the 90th This refers to
ECU's celebration of 90 years.
Voting took place on Wednesday, Oct. 15
for one of homecoming's most awaited
event: the crowning of the king and queen.
The final eight candidates for king are:
Joshua Beardsley, Rob Eannon, Colin
McRae. Adrian Floyd, Kengie Bass,
Tremayne Nunley. Mark llarritan and
Carlton Blanton.
The final eight candidates for queen arc:
Nikki Noren, Jodi Warden. Leslie Pulley
Sharlynda Fleming, Sage I lunihan, Yallcncia
McCoy. Mary I'nderhill and Amy Berridge.
Some of the candidates running for king
and queen are excited about coming so close
to having a chance to represent ECU.
"I want to get involved on campus a little-
more than I already am said Joshua
Beardsley, candidate for king and
CottonFlemingJarvis representative.
"I love this school and it would be
wonderful to represent it in that way said
Jodi Warden, candidate for queen and ECU
ambassadors representative.
Other candidates are just looking forward
to having a good time.
"I am looking forward to just having a lot
of fun with it said Mark llarritan.
candidate for king and Kappa lpha Order
representative.
In addition to the excitement of
announcing the new homecoming king and
queen. ECU is planning a multitude of
events for all to enjoy
The ECl' Alumni Association and the
Office of Alumni Relations are sponsoring
events that will take place on Oct. 24 and
25.
The events are a parade, golf and tennis
tournaments, musical events, a pig picking
and a dinner to recognize outstanding
alumni.
Check out the Homecoming Court and
complete guide to all the scheduled
events in our Homecoming '97 tabloid
in Thursday's edition of the paper.
CLOCK wise?
THE FOLLOWING PICTURES
WERE ALL TAKEN IN THE
GENERAL CLASSROOM
BUILDING AT 2:00P.M.
Senior Chrissy Fredericks hurries down the hall in GCB in an effort to be on time for class.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
Want the
Real Time?
�Dial (919) 758-8900
�Turn to your TV to
channel 7, 9, 44, or
64
�Tune your radio to
AM 530
Inaccuracy due to
summer accident
J SCO l KI.INK D. Kl. I.I.I VI
-Ms I I SKtt'S I III I UK
Many students may have
wondered about the
clocks in the (ieneral
Classroom Building (GCB),
which seldom if ever show the
correct time or even agree with
each other on the wrong time.
"bu'd think with all the money the
school has, they could fix a problem like
clocks. Do they not want to fix them, or
do they just not know how said Jeff
Yurfest, a junior marketing major who has
all five of his classes in GCB.
According to Dr. George W. Ilarrell.
assistant vice chancellor of
administration and finances�facilities,
the constant!) incorrect times on the
(i( IB clocks arc the result of an electrical
burnout that occurred this summer.
"When we had the fire last
summerthat did about S380,000 of
damage. The equipment that used to
send the automatic signal to reset the
clocks was destroyed Ilarrell said.
Most of the clocks in GCB and a few
clocks in other areas on campus were
dependent on the signal system to
maintain accuracy
The function of the destroyed
equipment was to periodical! reset all
the clocks in GCB to make up for the
expected margin of error which will
result in any clock gradually losing time
and becoming inaccurate.
After months spent without the
correct time, several students, including
CLOCKS 3

TODAY
,
High 67
Low 46
WEDNESDA
frm.mnsilv cloudy
High 62
sA -
9
DdlaJKnow
Did you know that right
now in a hall in GCB it
is 11:15 and just down
that hall it is 2:30.
opinion5
Where are the ECU
Police when students'
cars are being broken
into?
lifestyle6
It's time to prepare your
costume for Halloween
sports.
The Pirates lose to
conference opponent
�7 I Tulane
fmian
'�
N 27858
phone
328 2000 idv
328 5558 fax
on line





M�


2 Tuniiy. October 21. 1997
Q6WS
The East Carolinian
New program aimed to reduce stress
ftpgram offers
academic support,
stress management
French company to build first North American plant
in Whiteviile
WHFTEV1LLE, N.C. (AP) A French manufacturer of electroplated
steel wire will construct its "first North American plant in Columbus
County; bringing 50 jobs to the region.
Conflandey SA will build the 104,000 square-foot facility at the
Southeast Regional Park in Whiteviile as part of a S15 million
investment, according to a state Commerce Department release
The company will receive a $4,000 tax credit for each new job
created, the department said.
Female officer claims sexual harassment
ASHEVILLE (AP) A female police officer has filed a federal lawsuit
that accuses a 24-year veteran of the department of sexual harassment.
The lawsuit alleged the woman was forcibly kissed while the officers
were on duty and that an unknown form of aphrodisiac was placed on
her ankle during a trip to fort Bragg with a group of teen-agers.
Patrol officer Mclinda Ingle filed the lawsuit in June in U.S. District
Court in Asheville against the city of Ashcville and Sgt. Wait
In Robertson's answer to the lawsuit, filed in court, he said that he
and
Ingle kissed, but that all contact between then was consensual.
Ingle, who joined the department 12 years ago, is seeking an
unspecified amount of punitive and actual damages.
The city denied the allegations. The lawsuit contends the city knew
prior sexual harassment by Robertson but did not take action to stop
behavior.
VICKIK BlCIIAN
STUK WRITER
There are several programs started
to help students with academic
problems and to help prevent
stress from occurring.
The Partners in Education
Program (RLE.) offers academic
support and stress management
for students who need it.
"FI.E is the driving force of
academic support center on
campus said Janice Johnson,
assistant director of academic
support and special projects for
university housing.
The program is for anyone, but
has been found to be most
beneficial to freshmen.
"A lot of freshmen come to
college with no clues as to how to
study or what college is even like
Johnson said. "They end up doing
poorly at the beginning of the
semester and digging to bring up
those bad grades for the rest of the
year. "Sometimes for the rest of
their college career
RLE. is offered five times
throughout the Fall semester and
five times in the Spring semester.
The workshops cover ropics
such as: how to study for nid-
terms and how to take tests. The
work shops are planned each
semester according to what they
feel students need.
Johnson feels that it helps
prepare students for the real
world.
"It helps them with the
transition into the academic
world Johnson said. "They need
this solid foundation
Another program geared for
freshmen is the SAI.L. (Students
achieve Through Involvement in
Learning). This program helps
make ECU a little more of a
familiar school to incoming
freshmen.
The program was started by Bill
Woodard, a coordinator in Belk Hall,
approximately two and a half years
ago.
This program deals with issues
such as: homesickness and academic
problems.
Margie Bradley, director of
SAI.L. believes the more students
that are involved, the more likely
they will stay with the university.
"We eventually want to have a hall
of just freshmen in the SAI.L.
program. We've found that freshmen
tend to be more eager to get
involved Bradley said. "Everything
is new to them
SAI.L. offers tours of different
places on campus and tells students
where to buy books and get general
information.
A special separate staff is also
there to counsel.
"I don't ant any student to feel as
if there is nothing they can do to
help their situation. Nothing is to
bad to work out Bradley said.
Students signed up for SAI.L
when they got their roommate
assignments in the mail before
school started. Once they agreed to
become a member they had to sign
an agreement to participate in
functions on campus.
Students who complete the
program will receive certificates and
pins for their achievement.
Car break-ins on campus
can be prevented
GREENVILLE AUTO REPAIR INC.
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830-6131
ior caste assembles in rare gathering
NEW DELHI, India (AP) More than 10,000 men from India's warrior
caste some of them descendants of ruling princes and maharajas
assembled Sunday to discuss ways of strengthening their ancient
kinship. � � l.
The gathering at New Delhi's Red Fort an Islamic emperors 16th-
century castle was the first such meeting in a century, organizers said.
The men discussed issues dividing their Khatri, or warrior, caste,
such as members contesting elections against one another.
Many also complained of India's treatment of their caste, whose
dominance ended in 1947 at the close of British colonialism.
The government took over most of the princes' property, leaving
them only personal homes and some palaces.
Governor announced task force to examine
low milk prices
ALBANY N.Y (AP) Gov. George Pataki has appointed a dairy task
force to find ways to offset low milk prices without impacting
consumers unfairly.
Dairy industry and consumer group representatives will work to help
protect dairv farmers from going out of business and at the same time,
provide customers with affordable milk, Pataki said Saturday
Milk prices have dropped more than 20 percent since last year,
forcing some farmers to auction off their cows.
Timothy Carey, executive director of the New York State Consumer
Protection
Board, is also co-chairman of the task force. The task force is
expected to report back to Pataki in 90 days.
Most cars broken
into not high dollar
automobiles
Hou.v Harris
ST UK WRI I KH
Mr. Rogers' neighborhood it's not.
ECU's campus is a prime spot
for car thieves to pillage
automobiles and annoy students
who must leave their cars on side
streets or in huge tots. But there
are ways to ensure the security of
your car, and make it more difficult
tor someone to escape with the
cont �� ��� -fir
"The cars actually broken into
are not high dollar care said Sgt.
Mtke Jordan of the campus police.
"Thev (thieves) look for the best
stuff.
Items that most commonly
attract a burglar's roving eye are car
phones. CD's and � very
frequently � stereo equipment.
It is more likely that a car will be
broken into by way of a window,
and not a picked lock, so often
damage to the vehicle is added to
the already costly burden of
property replacement.
The police department reports
thefts from cars are most frequent
in the freshman lots because they
are away from campus and traffic.
Adding to the problem is the
fact that most of the perpetrators
are not students. However, the
police department is taking steps
to combat the problem.
"You can't be in the lots 24
hours a day, but we patrol as often
as we can" said Sgt. Lafranee Davis
of the campus police department,
adding that often officers let
n v tmir we hi'v f� cf � I - - rr
aside
Loud car alarms, though
common devices, do seem to deter
thieves and protect cars, as they
are designed to do. It seems,
however, the most effective ways
to keep your car protected are the
most obvious. Jordan advises that
SEE TMiFT. PAGE 3
Monday-Thursday
"Food 101 nightly special at Cubbies"
5-9pm
�2 dogs $1!
�Free fries with any Cubbies size
sandwich . m
Only at downtown location with college ID
Wedhesa;
$1 long neck beer
with any Cubbies size sandwich
limit 3 beers
Only available at downtown location with
student ID
501 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 752-6497 or
K ' 600 E. Arlington
Greenville, NC 27E
(919) 321-8091
PRESCRIPTIVES
Shining Path Guerrillas blamed in deadly
ambush in Peru
LIMA, Peru (AP) Gunmen ambushed anti-drug police in Peru's
Amazon jungle, killing three officers and wounding a fourth, authorities
said.
ftlice blamed Saturday's attack on the leftist Shining Path guerrillas,
whose attacks have dropped off dramatically in recent years in the face
of a government crackdown.
TTie wounded officer said about 50 rebel gunmen ambushed the
police officers' van near Minas dc Sal, 240 miles northwest of Lima. He
said he survived because the attackers took him for dead.
Army troops and police searched the area after the attack.
The Shining Path has long been the most fearsome of Peru's leftist
guerrilla groups. About 30,000 people, mostly non-combatants, have
died in fighting between the rebels and government forces since 1980.
Violence by the Shining Path has fallen sharply since its leader and
founder, Abimacl Guzman, was captured in 1992.
Petrochemical explosion, fire kills 4 in Iran
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) An explosion and fire at a giant petrochemical
complex in southwestern Iran killed four people and injured three
others, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported Sunday.
The fire roared through the Razi petrochemical plant in the city of
Masjed Solcyman in southwestern Khuzcstan province on Saturday, the
news agency said.
A gas leak had touched off the explosion, the Kayhan daily
newspaper said.
It indicated the fire had been extinguished, but officials could not
be contacted for independent confirmation.
The extent of the damage was not immediately known.
Kayhan quoted Omidwar Rczaie, the areas representative in
Parliament, as saying poor safety conditions and mismanagement at the
complex were to blame.
The Razi complex, built in 1970, produces more than 3.7 million
tons of chemicals per year, including ammonia, urea and sulfur.
L
The Herbert Eckhoff concert
which was scheduled for
Wednesday, Oct. 22 1997 at
8:00 p.m. in Hendrix Theater
has been cancelled due to
the illness of the performer.
The Department of Marketing
regrets any inconvenience to
its patrons.
ECU'S Homecoming is Saturday October 25thLook sharp, be beautiful, feel virtual perfection!
Call Belk of Greenville Plaza now to book your appointment October 23rd-25th for your
complementary make over session. Bookings are limited. Prescriptives" is exclusive to Belk of
Greenville at The Plaza in this area! "Prescriptives trendy, updated and exclusive for You!
Belk of Greenville at The Plaza
iJn�
�fl
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'
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f
The East Carolinian
Tuesday October 21.1997 3
The History of Time
Egyptians kept time by the
dripping of water through a
hole in the bottom of a bowl
xzz
The first known clock was a
water clock built by Sun Sung.
400A.D.
1400 B.C.

The sand glass is believed to have
originated in the Middle East.
5ZZ
The quartz crystal clock was
invented by W.A. Marrison.
1430 B.C.
1090 A.D.
rz
XXL
1955 B.C.
1929 B.C.
The first portable clocks
became available.
'
The cessium-beam atomic clock is
accurate to 1 sec. every 3000 yrs.
Source: Colliers Encyclopedia Vol. 23 �93
Clocks
continued from page 1
Yiirfest, said they have adapted,
but still don't know why the clocks
are always wrong.
"Everyone asks me, in every
single class. I'm to the point where
I'm adapted. On each clock, I
know what time I get out, like if
the big hand's on the one, or
whatever Yurfest said.
ECU does plan to fix the
problem, however, they found that
it was more complicated than
simply ordering a new part.
"Unfortunately, the equipment
is no longer manufactured. We're
running off a temporary feed, and
we have not been able to replace
the system Harrell said.
Any available alternative to the
original signal system would have
been very costly to ECU.
"When we looked at what it
would cost to replace, the
automatic signal system, it was
about $300,000 Harrell said.
That price estimate is in
addition to the $380,000 to repair
the other damage done by the
accident last summer.
"The alternative to that is
changing all the clocks Harrell
said.
Harrell said there are
approximately 90 clocks in GCB,
and replacing ail of them, at a cost
of approximately $60 per clock,
would cost the university almost
$6,000, and there would then be
additional ongoing maintenance
costs.
Those clocks would also have
to be manually reset twice a year
to compensate for Daylight
Savings Time; the destroyed
automatic signal system did this
automatically.
"Nothing's simple, and nothing
costs just a Tittle bit Harrell said.
However, the University has
found an alternative that it
Theft
continued from page 2
students should always keep their
cars locked and their valuables out
of sight, or better, not in the
automobile at all. In case of a
stereo or audio equipment theft,
the police department can return
a lost item onlv if the student
believes will be cheaper in the
long run.
we can buy a reasonably
priced system to reset just the
clocks in GC at about $10,000
Harrell said.
The $10,000 system will cost
more initially than replacing the
GCB clocks, but will then be self-
maintaining and incur no other
ongoing costs.
Although the majority of the
clocks which ran on the destroyed
automatic signal system are found
in GCB, there are approximately
two dozen clocks throughout the
rest of campus that also used the
same system. Those clocks will be
replaced by Quartz clocks which
will run on batteries, or else be
removed
locations
redundant.
Harrell
University
entirely
where
in
they
those
are
added that
the
apologizes for the
inconvenience caused by the
accident. They hope to have the
new system installed and accurate
timing restored by the beginning
of next semester.
knows the serial number. Finally, if
possible, always park in a well-lit
area so the thief will think twice,
or the crime can be reasonably
reported if there is a witness.
The police department urges
anyone who has any information
about this kind of crime, or any
crime, to visit the anonymous
crime tips page on the web, report
it to Crime Stoppers, or call the
ECU police department.
WEIL GIVE YOU 10 WEEKS.
Ten weeks may not seem tike much time to prove you're capable of being
a leader. But if you're tough, smart and determined, ten weeks and a tot of
hard work could make you an Officer of Marines. And Officer Candidates
School (OC5)� where you'll get the chance to prove you've got what it takes
to lead a life full of excitement full of challenge, full of honor. Anyone can say
they've got what it takes to be a leader, �we'll give you ten weeks to prove it
Marines
Set yourself up for success,
see Capt. Beltran in the Student Stores
on October 22 or phone (800) 270-9874 ex. 1815.
The four commandments of
combating car theft
� Park in well-lit areas
� Keep your car locked at all times
� Do not keep anything of value in your
car, or if you must, put it out of plain
sioht
� if you have new serial equipment
record the serial numbers or the police
cannot help you reclaim it if it is found
Source: ECU Police Dsptrtmem
"

briefs
ECU student elected to
Phi Kappa Tau National
Council
Sean McManus, a senior at ECU,
has been elected to a two-year
term on the National Council of
the Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity.
McManus is a member of the
Fraternity's Gamma Eta Chapter.
A triple major in personnel,
curriculum development and
education, McManus is a native of
Karalee, Queensland, Australia.
His campus offices include SGA
Vice President; chair of IFC
philanthropy, Greek Games,
special events and community
service committees; Panhellenic
Council; SGA liaison; Student
Services Board; Resident Advisor;
Hall Council President, and
Residence Hall Association
president.
As one of the three
undergraduate national counselors,
McManus will work closely with
fraternity leadership directing the
fraternity's growth and
implementing new policies over
the next two years.
Winners of ECU pumpkin
decorating contest
announced
ECU students Phillip Carter,
Karen Fleenor and Rick Gray
recently demonstrated their
anistic talents by winning Dowdy
Student Store's Pumpkin
Decorating Contest. The contest
was held as part of the annual pre-
Fall Break Sidewalk Sale on Sept.
30. Thirty student contestants
painted, glittered and glued their
way into the competition using
free pumpkins and supplies from
the Student Store.
Phillip Carter's clown pumpkin
took first place, earning him an
ECU jacket. Karen Fleenor's cat
came in second place, winning her
an ECU sweatshirt. Rick Gray's
Men in Black themed pumpkin
earned him an ECU t-shirt.
Winning pumpkins and other
entries are on displa at the
Student Store.
The largest collegiate 3 on 3 Basketball Tournamant in the World is coming to:
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PLAY BEGINS MONDAY, OCTOBER 27TH
Entry Information
gC.cWL.0
OFFICIAL
COLLEGIA! b
30N3
BASKfclbALl
TOURNAMENT
Where:
Contact;
Student Recreation Center
'Cu-wo
Contact; Allison Kemp, 328-6387
When: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday - Friday
Entry Deadline: Mandatory Registration Meeting, Tuesday, October 21
244 Mendenhall Student Center
Registration, Wednesday, October 22
128 Student Recreation Center
For the latest Super Hoops information
www.schick.com
� Men's and Women's Divisions � Exciting Prizes from Schick � Winners advance to Regional Championships
t
?���
l"






The East Carolinian
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
VISA
. sjkt�.j �i
ACROSS
1 PoQtTeasdale
S Fishhook part
8 Convince
13 Designer
Cassini
14 Diva's song
15 Ladd classic
16 Citrus fruit
17 Window ledge
18 Merits
19 Rink material
20 Items on some
scales
22 Lowers in rank
24 Ancient
25 Raised
26 Night guide
31 Sterile
33 Showed great
affection
34 Fuss
35 Trumpet
36 Satan
37 Aid and �
38 Mime
39 Disencumbers
40 Small birds
41 Street mer-
chants
43 Equal
44 Inlet
45 Scholars
48 Sentinel's place
52 Coach
! Parseghian
53 Suit
54 Iowa city
55 Shoo!
96 Actor Jeremy
57 Motored
5"8 "I cannot tell �"
5,9 "Porgy and �"
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1 Firm
2 Wonderland girl
3 Brought to mind
4 Mature
5 Sewed lightly
6 Zodiac sign
7 Anger
8 Formal dance
9 Broken bits
10 City section
11 Landers and
Sothern
12 Affirmative reply
15 Shut tight
20 British gun
21 Emulate an Alps
singer
23 Algerian port
26 Worships
27 Elevator name
28 Temple
29 Mideast port
30 Decays
31 Fellow
32 Easy gait
33 Forest animal
3G Fear
37 Length times
width
39 Is coquettish
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Strmg �� ECU OTwrwy ma B& me E� Cimmw nutate 12X105 osemnriTixftniftmki.nln6&mnmliiamttt
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oumcw
, the students of ECU, spend a lot of time griping about parking and parking tickets, the
unreasonable cost of the "hunting license" and JKmited parking.
Wfeil, here's another angle on the parking situation why is it that Burking and Traffic Services
is so completely adept at finding every single car that is parked two inches too close to the curb
with its fading, coveiKwer-with-grassriSo-that-you-can barely-see-it yellow paint marking no-
man's land, and yet the campus police always happen to be somewhere else when our few worldly
possessions are being stolen?
Many students have had the unfortunate experience of having valuables stolen from their cars
while parked on campus or on one of the surrounding streets. Many of the "on-campus" parking
lots, especially the freshman lots, are actually located far away from campus in fringe parking, away
from heavy foot and vehicle pafiic that would provide potential witnesses to a crime and "thus deter
thieves. Many of the off-cainpus streets on which students typically park are not very well-lit and
also do not have heavy traffic, which is not only a safety risk to students walking back to their cats
late at night, but also encouraging to aspiring burglars.
It's not as if students as a group have ail that many valuables to spare. Being a full-time student
is notoriously hard on the finances. Most students work, either on-campus or off, to supplement
their income that they get from financial aid, scholarships, or family support. Most of our n oney
goes to pay for tuition, fees, books, rent, utilities and groceries. Extras and luxuries, such as CD's,
stereos, ssiee clothes, jewelry, assorted electronics or anything else for which students have to save
and sacrifice, have been too hard won to make their loss a small thing.
Now, we understand the division of duties between Paring and Traffic and the ECU Police
Deoarement. it is the police department's job to ensure the safety of our valuables, n t Parking and
Traffic's,
Still, think about how many cars from Parking and Traffic you see patrolling all over campus, aif
day, every day. As much time as they spend in ECU's parking lots, they should see every single theft
and attempted theft being performed. They could then call the police and let them know a crime
is being committed. With a little more cooperation between departments, a lot more crimes co? W
probably be prevented.
Parking and Traffic Services, the department that's making money for the university; is doing a
bang-up job of patrolling and ticketing. Campus Police, the department we depend on to keep us
and our valuables safe and secure, could take some patrolling lessons from Parking and TraTic
Services.
If ECU can afford to keep the ticket-givers in constantly rotating shifts all over campus, why can't
they do the same for the ECU Police Department?
The answer may be money. While giving tickets brings income to ECU, saving student's property
does not. Is this ECU's subtle way of letting us know which is more important to them?
OPINION
CoiumrtiSt
Marv
WEBB
Dean Smith, god to a small planet
dHey people said in a loud
voter. "Who (he heck is Dean
Smith? And what happened
to him?" The entire class
went silent and every head
swioeled towards me.
Several pairs of angry eyes
glared with hate.
Everyone was engaged in a deep
discussion and had solemn looks on
their faces when 1 walked into class.
Over all the hushed tones and
murmuring, I kept catching the
words "Dean" and "Smith
"Hey people I said in a loud
voice. Vho the heck is Dean
Smith? And what happened to
him?" The entire class went silent
and every head swivelcd towards
me. Several pairs of angry eyes
glared with hate.
finally one of my classmates,
usually a happy-go-rucky type,
leaned over the table and hissed
across his outrage. "How long have
you lived here?" he demanded.
"Everyone knows who Dean Smith
is � you need to go buy yourself a
dictionary and an encyclopedia
And with that, all the others
piled in. "bu're going to suck as a
journalist one of them informed
me triumphantly. Our instructor
tried to act as a referee but failed.
Even he was aghast at the notion
that someone who had resided in
North Carolina for five years knew
basically zilch about Dean Smith.
Anyway, at the end of all that
commotion, I still had no idea who
Dean Smith was. Evidently, I had
touched a raw nerve or something
because no one seemed able to
explain rtie facts in a clear and
precise r tanner. There was much
thumping of chests, shaking of the
heads and held-back tears going
around. ITiere seemed to be a lot of
emotion involved here and I had
just trampled on the whole thing�
totally without intention, ! must
add.
This was definitely a bad week
for putting my foot in my mouth.
Just a few days ago, I had
announced in class that Michael
Jordan was over-rated, overpaid and
over everything else I could possibly
think of! Needless to say, this was
forbidden territory as well and it
immediately caused an uproar
among the students. Nov. here I
was again, in he very midst of
another broken taboo.
Well to make matters right, I
sought out a few of my friends, told
them what happened and asked for
any help that they could offer. After
much rolling of eyes and anguished
looks, a few of them imparted their
knowledge of Dean Smith.
Apparently, he had been u North
Carolina co'ie6e basketball coach for
the last 36 years and hir, legacy
included two national tides as weli
as 27 straight 20in seasons.
Whatever that means. And now he
was retiring.
The reaction that my initial
question had provoked in class
made it obvious there was much
more to this Smith guy than just his
record. He seemed to be a greatly
admired and loved person. With
this in mind, 1 decided to take my
classmate's advice and go check out
the library for some additional facts.
There were plenty of people at
the reference area, all dispensing
with information in a very helpful
and efficient manner. "I am looking
for some data on Dean Smith 1
said to the lady behind the desk.
"Can you please help me?"
In a slow and precise fashion, she
put down her pencil and looked a
me. "Who on earth is Dean Smith?"
LETTER
to theftdftor
Cardboard village seemed overly glamorous
I am writing about the Pi
Lambda Phi with regard to how
they "roughed it out" for charity. Phi
Lambda may have had the right
intentions, but in the process I feel
they have misinterpreted what it
really means to be homeless.
Chris Feathers explained how
Phi Lambda made the community
aware while having fun in the
process. Well, Chris, there is
absolutely nothing fun about being
homeless. I have worked to combat
the problem with the homeless for
six years in Philadelphia. I have seen
firsthand all they must endure. For
instance, the homeless must beg for
money so they can eat; they have to
wear the same clothes, not shower
and ride out all of the different
weather conditions. This is why I
am so offended by their so-called
village. Maybe next year Phi
Lambda will have the courage to
live in their shanties in the middle
of the winter or at least a week.
Anyone could have lived under their
glamorized conditions for two
nights. Phi Lambda, you cannot
effectively portray the homeless
without putting yourselves in their
shoes.
Joshua Neil
Junior
Political Science
loU'SLe U smAZt Adb smut.
md lou pviTiea so ueu.
UN, IF 1 COULb PROTECT C4ZS
As usll 4 s You TTcrcr TYE�t
l'b It A Util� HeU CAMPUS
W-lt� tmioHBtioij
OPSNKDN
Golumnfst
Jeff
BERSMAN:
Television dumbed down too much
If I were to drink a
certain kind of beer, I
could get any woman I
wanted. I could just drink
a beer, sit back ami watch
the women flock to me like
I was a Big Mac and they
were Rush Umbaugh.
I sat down the other day and, in one
of my rare moments of peace and
solitude, I turned on the old idiot
box. Now, normally 1 would have
picked up a book, bur I had just
finished reading quite a few
chapters of Economics and a few
more about Congress; it was time
for a break.
I do not have cable. Gasp! Yep, I
live in the stone age, but I do have
running water, so that is a plus. As I
sat and flipped through the six
channels I have, I was disturbed.
Network programming is severely
tacking in taste and in talent.
The networks have taken what
is seemingly a good idea and beaten
it to death. T!ie so-called good idea
is the television show Friends. 1 am
tired of seeing 20-something
people doing anything. Or at least
they play that genre; in reality a few
have already hit 30.
Sickened is how I reel when 1
see rhese yuppy wannabes live a
lifestyle that is implausible given
their jobs. I am tired of the writers
stereotyping our generation as
whiney, with no real goals in life. I
am sick to death of this crap the
networks like to call
"entertainment" � and I use that
term rather loosely.
What else did this marvelous
creation show me? Well, if 1 believe
what I saw, I am either extremely
gullible or really stupid.
If I vere to drink a certain kind
of beer, 1 could get any woman I
wanted. I could just drink a beer, sit
back and watch the women flock to
me like I was a Big Mac and they
were Rush Limbaugh. This beer
would make me so irresistible I
would not even have to talk; the
beer would do that for me.
Wow, would you believe a certain
shoe can make you ran faster, jump
further and make you unbeatabfcz
All at the expense of some poor;
child, in some forgotten factory
working for the change I have in my i
couch. '�
Oh, do not forget the big oj
cars. Yeah, the big, huge sporty
utility vehicle is my dream car. Wfcy,
with the four-wheel drive, anti-lock
brakes, passenger side air bag and �-�
V-8 engine, not only can 1 pick up
the kids from day care, 1 can also go
off-mad. Speaking of which, when
is the last time you saw one of these
SUVs actually going off-road?
Remember, kids, a U-turn does not
count.
To those of you who own these
gas guzzlers, I cannot wait until the
United States miffs OPEC, and
another gas crisis hits. Tell me what
kind of gas mileage do these things
get 5,10,15 miles pet gallon? It I
remember cotrcctfy the Model T,
which came in any color you
wanted, as long as it was black, got
around 21 mites per gallon.
Television, God's gjfr to those
with no imagination. Or people like
me who are w tiled of thinking a
mindless show is good break.
LETTER
to the Editor
Students key to athletic programs success
As an alumnus of ECU, I would
personally like to. thank all the
students who attended the ECU-
Southem Miss football game.
Not enough can fecsaid about
the importance of student
particpation at a collegiate athllttc
event. The turnout at the game was
outstanding.
The athletic program at ECU is
one of which all "students and
alumni can be proud. Not only has
Steve Logan and his staff put
together a quality program both on
and off the field, so are the
basketball programs of Ann
Donovan and Joe Dooley. The men's
and women's soccer programs are on
the rise and with new leadership for
a couple of our spring sports,
baseball and women's softball, these
too will flourish even more.
The students' involvement is
much more important than what
seems to be obvious. Their
attendance and vocal support not
only helps with team successes,
with the recognition those
successes bring.
Private contributions both to the
athletics and academics increase
correspondingly. Even though ECU
is a public institution, private
support is of utmost importance in
our university's growth.
Thomas L. Southern
Alumnus, Class of 74
LETTER
to the Editor
SGA got away with unjust election again
I would just like to let everyone
know what has gone on in the SGA
elections. The SGA did a poor job of
promoting the elections. 1 only saw
one ad in The East Carolinian.
Second, the election rules state
plainly that an announcement of the
meeting for the candidates is
supposed to run in The East
Carolinian. I don't recall seeing such
an announcement. The meeting
was supposed to explain the
election rules, but lasted no more
than 10 minutes and the election
rules were not explained � just
skimmed over.
Now for tht big one: Everybody
has heard the reason why so many
names were taken off the ballot.
The excuse by Scott Forbes was that
candidates did not turn in an
expense report. He quotes the
election rules, but left out a very
important part. Article XII, Section
2 reads: "The elections committee
chairperson shall set the exact date
by which all expense accounts and
lists of workers must be submitted
to the elections committee. This
information will be provided in
written form co each candidate or
candidate's representative at the
mandatory meeting
No one got any writtc
information. How were
supposed to know the due date?
Undue blame for the invalid
election has been placed on the pott
tenders. But the fault rests solely on"
the elections committee and their
efforts to put their "people" in your
SGA. The elections committee has
broken the election rules and the
sad thing is they got away with it. �
Steve Hines
Sophomore
Communications
"If I open my mouth to speak, must
always be correct, and by whose
standard?"
Alice Walker, author 1983
j
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i I.I " 1 ��I "
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6 Tuesday. October 21, 1997
CD?4
review
lifestyle
ii � J 1 ' �' U�'i. " � �" '
The East Carolinian
Jazz it up Friday night with ECU Jazz Ensemble
Ml CCA II SMITH
STAFF WRITER
Hey all you cool cacs. If you've got che urge co kick back and
jam to the smooth grooves of a world-class jazz concert, you can
scratch your itch this Friday night, when the School of Music
presents the monthly Jazz ac Nighc performance, featunng che
musically gifted scudenc members of the ECU Jazz Ensemble
and various faculty of che School of Music.
Direccor Carroll Dashiell, who provides guidance ac che
keyboard during performances and dynamic leadership during
rehearsals, is full of his usual enthusiasm about the upcoming
concert.
"Just the fact that we can do the series over there and for
che scudencs co be able to perform in that kind of setting (is
great) said Dashiell.
And what a setting it is. Mendenhall's Great Room gets the
whole works, transformed magically into a candlelit bistro on
these Friday nights, corr.plece wich moody lighcing, free jazz-
food buffer and whice cableclochs.
I llluminaced warmly by che chandelier glow, combo after
combo takes the stage and pumps out classics from old jazz
masters like Cole Fbrter, Scanley Turentine, Miles Davis and
The Duke.
The mix is equalized by the addition of modern works as
well, but just as impressive was che 20-minuce rendition of
"Ellington's Caravan" last year.
New jazz just doesn't have the power to make me want to ,
gee up and dance. Now and then a sleek diva ascends the stage
and belts out a familiar tune or cwo; last month's highlights
included "Prelude to a Kiss
More often chan noc, however, che spoclight belongs to
instrumental soloists like Mitch Butler on trombone and Peter
Lamb on saxophone. Bassist George Knot and drummer Dan
Weiner will provide backbone to the various combos on Friday
evening's performance.
Be sure and get there early; Jazz at Night is famous for
standing room only. Jazz ac Night begins ac 8 p.m Puc on your
swingin' shoes and prepare co be dazzled.
iars of Clay
Much Afraid
4 OUT OF 10
ftumb
Plumb
5 OUT OF 10
JOHN DAVIS
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
3 i
Christian music has been in che
news, boch locally and nacionally, in
the past year quire a bic. Wich
TVs expose on che scrange,
cliquish Chriscian punk scene lasc
month and the attempts at
censorship in the Rec Center here
at ECU, the new Jars of Clay album
couldn't have come in che mail ac a
better time.
I'll make no bones abouc ic,
kids: abouc 95 percenc of
everyching which proceeds from
the mourh of Nashville, TN (che
home of che Chriscian music
industry) is fairly, if not
exceedingly crappy. "Crappy" is
strictly a technical cerm I picked
up from chis kid named Tommy
Barns back in elemenrary school. It
was the word he used to describe
the fake GI Joe action figures you
could buy at 7-11, (They didn't
Have the Kung-Fu grip like the real
GI Joes did.) Fortunately, there are
a few Christian music acts that do
transcend che bad taste of che
A&R deparcmencs of Chriscian
music labels.
However, neither Jars of Clay or
Plumb is such a band. Jars released
their debut album a few years ago,
which contained the surprise hit
"Flood which got heavy airplay on
modern rock and pop radio. They
immediately became che darling of
Christian music, replacing DC
Talk, who had been che induscry's
previous great white hype. DC
Talk never got anywhere, and
although Jars got a little further
than that with "Flood a licde
further than nowhere is still next to
nowhere.
� If they continue in the vein
they've been in, which is to fill
albums with an hour's worth of
sappy, wishy-washy mope-a-thons,
they'll meet DC Talk somewhere
near chat nowhere and maybe the
two bands can pray and ask the
good Lord for some talent, or
maybe some soul.
One of the frustrating things
about both of these bands is that
they don't seem to have realized
that the midlife crisis that rock
went through in 1991 is over. Kurt
is dead, and why would a Christian
want to act like the dear departed
Mr. Cobain anyway. Not that either
band comes close to writing songs
as good as "Tourette's which is
Nrivana's worse song, buc chey've
somehow adopced a very unjoyful,
complainacory actitude that is like
the fake 7-11 version of what we all
fondly remember as the Gen-X
attitude.
Last time I checked,
Cftristianiry was supposed to be
about how God makes people's
lives more joyful and fulfilled, not
sad carbon-copies of the popular
attitude of the day. Christianity, at
its best, ought to be scanding
against the factions of pop culture.
not mimicking them when they're
-fluty pMiwt btitttr things tn orange wrappers I
vHrH jJLLf
Rocks
Bs Mnfi-LM B�iH
Sweet tarts

Sneak a peak at Gattaca
Andy tirsrr
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
TOP FIVE
KtKiiilm
SEDTO
Our guide to Halloween
AVOID
Now that you've
been cajoled into
dressing up for
Halloween again, let
me present you with
a small list of worn-
out, used-up, sorry
old costumes you'd
better not be caught
dead (or undead) in:
MIC( All � i I I II
s I U I WKI . IK
The Crow- Now I
know ther's an
angst-ridden
resurrected corpse
inside you
somewhereif s just
that everbody else
does it. Every year.
A member of KISS-
Leather pants,
asbestos wigs and
smeary clownish
makeup all clash
with the puke on
your spiky black
boots.
Drag Queen- (see
KISS member)
Generic kitty cat
C'mon, ladies! Get
a due! Whiskers,
perky ears and a
black bodysuit may
have been sexyon
the Island of Dr.
Moreau!
Vampire (Anne Rice
style)- Just say no
to fluttery, pale goth
vampires. Try going
as Nosferatu
instead. Be a vamp
with attitude!
Alright, kiddies! Get out your trick-or-treat bags,
flashlights and homemade costumes! Mom will lovingly
apply ghoulish makeup to your face in your choice of
three not-too-complicated designs: witch, vampire or
pirate. After that, you can go around the neighborhood
for a bit with your friends and see who can score the most
candv.
Wait a minute! We're in college now. Mom's not here
to help anymore and that can be the scariest thing of all
about Halloween nowadays. This is definitely not a sport
for sissies. Forget the old bedsheet toga or ghost costume
of bygone days. Get creative! Now's your chance, the
only night out of the year when you can be whatever you
want, no questions asked.
This year I plan to get in touch wich my primirive
nacure by gadding abouc as an Amazon Woman in a
coscume 1 made myself ouc of fake fur from che Piece
Goods Shop. Now I know mosc of you aren'c as gifted
wich free time or harebrained ideas as myself, so I incend
co sceer you in che righc direction for coscume perfeccion
via che greac recailers of Greenville.
Charades, a remporary store located in the Carolina
East Mall, is not exactly costume heaven, but Cristie, an
employee, spilled the beans about popular costumesuhis
yean the I Dream of Jeanie costume and the M&M's
costume for adults. Straight from the horse's mouth,
some free advice on what not to buy. The laughable
prepackaged sequin devil lady, pirate queen, ninja
warrior and sheik costumes can be purchased here, as
well as a number of fun items. With a little creativity and
even less discretion, accessories such as hula skirts, blood
capsules, bull whips, plastic meat cleavers, spiky biker
gloves, nerd specs. Viking helmets and fishnet tights can
be used to vour costume's advantage.
Parrymakers, open all year, provides a much larger
selection of prepackaged costumes for every budget.
"I'm probably dealing with 11 companies here said
owner Rose Hathaway, who showed herself more than
willing to join in the merriment of costume picking.
Hathaway takes the costume business seriously,
attending Halloween shows once a year in Chicago,
where costume companies sport their stuff for dealers all
across the country. Here you can find a rwo-person cow
coscume, a dorky caveman costume or a nude body suit.
Parcvmakers can oucfic you as a Roman soldier, a gorilla,
Bucchead, Dilberc or your fave Scar Wars characcer.
"I also carry excra large sizes in here Hachaway said.
Don't forget to stock up on odd items here, too:
blacklight bulbs, realistic fangs, character noses and
assorted bloody rubber body parts.
If you're strapped for cash, you may want to buy some
theatrical makeup instead of a latex mask. Also, you
might try a thrift store or Dapper Dan's for costume
ideas. Ybii can always accessorize with cheap stuff from
SEE COSTUME PAGE I
Don't
sit around until
the last
minutego get 4
your costume
�now! A couple.of
places you might
want tn try:
Party Makers
317 E.
Arlington Blvd.
756-860&
Charades
Carolina East ,
Mall 355'3752 :
Call ahead to see
if they've got
what your
looking for. ,
If you're felling �
creative, hit a
thrift store or
two, ot even a
cloth store . Go
The fine folks at the Student
Union Films Committee are
bringing another free flick to
Hendrix this Thursday at 8 p.m.
Gattaca, starring Ethan Hawke
and Uma Thurman and wriccen and
direcced by Andrew Niccol, is set in
the 21st century where parents are
able to choose the
genetic makeup of their
children. If your
parents decide to go
nacural and noc choose
your generic makeup,
you may as well gee in
iine for a big old hiney
whupping, Gaccaca
scyle.
Buc as che cagline
says, "there,is no gene
for rhe human spirit
except, of course, Gene
Simmons. That tongue
has more spirit in it
than a Dallas Cowboy
cheerleader after her
fifth round of screwdrivers (you
didn't think of that did you, Mr.
Movie Mogul?).
Hawke is Vincent Freeman (get
it?), a young fella born of love and
hoochie coochie, noc in some dung
lab. He sees ouc co fulfill his dreams
of hightailing it on a rocket to Titan,
Saturn's 14th moon, a place where
they'll still shake your hand or
whatever else even if you aren't a
perfect specimen.
Before Vincent can hop on a
Uma. Ethan. Ethan,
Uma.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
COLUMBIA
rocket to happy land, he has to
deceive the folks at the Gattaca
Corporation. He does this by
assuming the identity of a once
superior genetic specimen who has
been paralyzed in an accident.
Vincent has to be on constant guard
to ensure that the Gaccaca smarties
don'c busc his jig. They have blood
tests, pee cests, even che Pepsi
Challenge, any one of which could
show Vincenc for che imperfecc lug
chac he is. Buc he rises racher
quickly chrough che
Gaccaca ranks and even
lands himself a sweec
liccle sugar booger named
Irene (Thurman).
All Helsinki breaks loose
when the director of the
space agency gets iced. A
search turns up an In-
valid's eyelash near the
murder scene. Guess who
the owner of the eyelash
is? Ut, oh Mr, Vinnie, you
in big stinky trouble now.
So, Vincent has to rely on
his natural instincts to
get out of the pits of crap
land and save his
imperfect boocy.
Ic all sounds kind of like chis
dream my cousin had after drinking
chree borrlcs of Brass Monkey and
passing our on my neighbor's
Ixjwlegged basset hound, Rocku.
But that dream didn't have
cinema's greatest actor ever named
Ernest, Ernest Borgnine, as Gattaca
does. Where Borg goes, fun and
spiritual awakening are to be found.
Pick up a pass at the Central Ticket
Office on Thursday.
Some films near make it
In the Emerald ('in.
Some arr too
loutmvrrs'uil. Some arr
too small. Whatever the
reason, ttejusl never get
to see some mighty good
movies
on ike hig srrreu.
When they kit video,
kovever, they're ours for
ike mking This series vill
look ut some of the films
thai tilth I make Ike
(ireeuville rut.
Make
something.
Goodwill 3109 :
Landmark Ave.
Hidden
Treasures 1012
Dickinson Ave.
Salvation Army
2337 Dickinson
Ave.
Evans St. Mall-
Piece Goods
Shop and
K-Mart
Depp equals Pacino in
complex Donme Brasco
Dale Williamson
SENIOR WRIT KR
Keanu Reeves is challenging his
acting skills yet again. This time,
the young thespian h
pushing himself to the
limits by acting in the
new film, The Devils
Advocate, alongside
none other than Al
Pacino, a modem-day
screen legend who has
starred in some of the
most respected
American films of all
time. Good luck,
Keanu.
While most film buffs laugh at
the very concept of Reeves playing
opposite Pacino, few were laughing
earlier this vear when former 21
Forget about it.
PHOTO COURTESTOF TRISTAR
Jump Streer star, Johnny Depp, noc
only co-scarred wich Pacino in che
cricically acclaimed Donate Brasco
but also equaled Pacino with a
pocenc performance chac recalled
the determined professionalism of a
young Robert DeNiro, Jack
Nicholson and, yes, Al
Pacino.
Donme Brasco is one of
this year's most praised
films and destined to be
an Oscar contender.
Unfortunately, it never
played Greenville
theaters. But, jusc like
you can'c scop che sun
from rising, you can'c
stop films of all sorts
from hitting the video
market. And, as the Fates would
have it, chis PacinoDepp
masterpiece is now on video for all
the Pirate country to enjoy.
SEE DEPP. PAGE 7
THEATRErevieAipf The Mystery ofEdwin Droodpleases audience
"fls'Jp
S ll-i'li II Rl ssi-1 l
s l"M I WRI I I.R
SEE JARS. PAGE I
East Carolina Plavhouse has begun the season with a solid
winner. The cast of The Mystery of Etarhi Droori grabs the
audience and pulls them along for the evening's wild ride. Cast
members vie for your vote like cheap politicians on election
eve. This show is sure to please everyone, especially because
vou, the audience, write the ending.
The Mystery qfErfcin Droml is a play within a play. A troupe
of London actors, performing at che Music Hall Royale in
1892, is our guide for the evening's hilarious journey through
Charles Dickens' final novel. The Mystery of Ethcin Drood. The
players, lead by the Chairman, introduce us to Dickens' cast of
characters.
We first meet the local choirmaster. Mr. John Jasper. He is
the music tur-r �f Miss U1 Bud. whom he ccicrK desirs.
The onlv problem is, she has been engaged co his dashing
nephew, Edwin Drood, .since birth. However, Jaapcr.uith Ins
Jekyl and Hyde personality and a penchant for opium, has
other plans for Edwin's future. Jasper's dark visions are
revealed in the opium den of the Princess Puffer.
To complicate mat ;rs, the Reverend Crisparkle (former
suitor of Rosa's mother, who died mysteriously) is rhe guardian
of cwo visitors from Ceylon, In the past, one of his charges, the
fiery Helena Landless, had tried to escape an abusive
stepfather bv disguising herself. She is protective of her
brother, the passionate Neville Landless. Neville joins the
competition for Miss Rosa Bud's affection. Tempers flare
between Neville and Edwin. The plot thickens.
On the way to Christmas dinner at John Jaspers home,
Drood and Rosa decide to break their engagement and
exchange tokens of friendshir When the arrive at che dinner
parry, The Landlesses and Reverend Crisparkle are chere.
Tensions run high among the guevts. Edwin Drood has
disappeared the next morning, leaving behind only a bloodied
cape. Has murder been committed?
The investigation reaches its climax six months later.
Princess Puffer has come from London to Cloisterham to
investigate her client's connections wich Rosa Bud. Dick
Dacchery, a myscerious detective whose true identity is
unknown, appears. Here, Dickens' novel ends.
The Music Hall Royale has the audience solve the case.
Almost everyone is a suspect, but our charming Chairman
narrows the possibilities. At this point, the audience boos,
SEE DROOD. PAGE I

T-






7 Tuesday, October 21, 1997
style
The East Carolinian
WALLACE
Towing and Recovery
24hr service
752-1798
Prompt Service, Jumpstart, and Lock out
Special rates 7:30 AM tilt 5:30 PM Monday
through Thursday
ECU Special-$20.00 up to 3 miles
within city limits
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
Depp
continued Irom page B
FMA
Investment
Club
Wednesday, October 22, 1997
GCB 1007 at 4:00 p.m.
Topic: Licenses and
Designations
Presented by: Ms. Eileen AWred, CFP
� No Membership Dues
� Open to All majors
� Free Giveaways At Every Meeting
Set in the late 70s, Donnie
Brasco is yet another gangster film,
but it is one fueled by such poetic
tragedy that it almost feels like a
contemporary Shakespearean play.
Depp plays Donnie Brasco, a
young hot shot who wants to be a
player in the New York
underworld. He gets his chance
when Lefty (played by Pacino)
enters his life. Lefty is an old pro
in the mob world. He has played
the game for 30 years, and he
knows all the ins and outs of Mafia
rules and regulations. Despite his
long years of service. Lefty has not
progressed up the Mafia's chain of
command as quickly as he should
have. Still, he is a determined man
with a hopeful eye constantly
towards the future.
Lefty takes to Donnie and
vouches for him. In Mafia terms,
this means Donnie becomes
Lefty's responsibility. If Donnie
does wrong. Lefty pays the price
because he brought Donnie into
the Mafia's elite circle and gave his
personal guarantee that Donnie's
okay.
As a result, Donnie and Lefty
develop a tight friendship,
something truly rare and highly
valued in the underworld. Donnie
becomes a surrogate son for Lefty,
and Lefty a father for Donnie.
The problem, and the film's
intriguing conflict, is that Donnie
is not okay, at least as far as the
Mafia is concerned. Donnie is an
undercover FBI agent who has
dedicated three years of his life
trying to make contact with
someone connected to the mob.
However, Donnie never counted
on becoming so involved with this
other life � involved to the point
that he will jeopardize his own life
and career to protect Lefty.
A great deal of credit needs to
be given to Paul Attanis, who has
created a beautifully involving
screenplay that fully develops its
main characters with one honest
and heartfelt scene after another.
In lesser hands, Donnie and Lefty
would be cardboard caricatures
that are more cliched than
believable. As it stands, though,
Donnie and Lefty are both tragic
heroes in the traditional sense.
They both carry the tragic flaws of
foolish pride that lead to their
ruin.
Not only are these men
believable as characters, but their
relationship is completely
realized. Unlike the characters in
the Harrison FordBrad Pitt film,
The Devils Oarn, there is no doubt
that Donnie and Lefty truly care
for each other. Donnie's sense of
reality unravels not only because
he knows that he has become a
gangster but also because he can't
choose between the law and his
friend.
Attanis' script is unnerving and
filled with complex character
relationships and situations, but it
is not without its sense of humor.
A delightfully hilarious moment
shines in the film when Donnie
tries to explain to his fellow FBI,
agents the subtle use of the mafia
expression "Forget about it It's a
classic piece of dialogue perfectly
played out by Depp and expcrtty
staged by Director Mike Newell.
Newell, whose previous
features include such
sophisticated features as Enchanted
April and Four Weddings and a
Funeral, hit the jackpot when he
got Depp and Pacino. Both actors
become their characters and give
award-worthy performances.
Depp, who has already proven
himself in films like Dead Man and'
Ed Wood, clearly develops a-
character torn between duty and
friendship. Depp consistently
chooses risky roles that he excels
in, and, as a result, has matured
into the best actor of his
generation.
Old pro Pacino tops himself as
an aged mobster who has the drive
and desire to succeed within his
crime-ridden world but only
seems to have the world pass him
by. Lefty is one of the few
despicable film gangsters that is
truly filled with pathos and, as a
result, forces the audience to
actually care for him, even if he is
a murderer.
I fully acknowledge that I
constantly overpraise movies, but I
do not jest when praising Donnie
Brasco as a brilliant, modem-day
masterpiece. It even exceeded my
expectations, and those
expectations were pretty high. If
you've got the time and money,
Donnie Brasco is worth every
moment and cent.
NC' Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 1 at ECU and
Top TOO College Ban in the
Notion by Way boy magazine
October 1997
Tuesday Oct 21 th
Pick A Pirate
7-10 PM 1.50 Domestic Bottles
Door
rizrs
admission
CoMeff
$1.50 Busch Light and MGD
$1.00 Hi-Balls
ECU ID $1.00 9-9:30 PM
Wednseday Oct. 22th
Door Prize
2 tickets for
Wiclespead
Panic
Thursday Oct. 23th
Breakfast
Club
admission
before 11 pm
ides peat I
Friday 24th
The
Jumpstarts
Saturday 25th
admission
for members
Free Admission with
Widespead Stub
Chairmen Of The Board
Beach Music's 1 Sho
w
Coming Oct. 30
Edwin McCain
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKULLY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
i:ff 5 MIKicf 5 Ml E: W& MIEiff S MH&S�, 5 M.
IMMM
�l All dressed up and nowhere to go on Halloween? Don't miss the Midnight
fPl Madness Halloween bash at Mendenhall Student Center.
JiJ, Free prizes, video karaoke, Laser Storm, psychics, bingo, dancing, Ghoul Cafe Q
open recreation and a midnight buffet. Horror flicks: Carrie and Scream in Hendrix
SU Theatre. Your ECU ID will get you in free. Guest passes are available. ���
k FRIDAY, OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M2 A.M. at Mendenhall Student Center ��.
Jf
j2 Chew on This 5
fill "Depictions of the BrainMind and Horror Science Fiction" Free Admission
US TODAY AT NOON in the Mendenhall Underground IfcJ
m
�� Widespread Panic SS
� Homecoming '97 rocks with this popular band.Tickets are available at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.Your ECU ID entitles you to a student
discount ticket for $18.50. All tickets are $20 at the door. mKe
FRIDAY, OCT. 24 AT 8 P.M. IN WILLIAMS ARENA AT MINGES COLISEUM

On the zf$if Screen g�
ft� Speed 2 (PG-13) screens IN HENDRIX THEATRE ON OCT. 23-25 AT 8 P.M.
��"� Your student ID gets you and a guest in for free.
� Payment Peat &
tjjm Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free in The Pirate Underground ,J
Z EVERY THURSDAY AT 8 P.M. in the MSC Social Room.This week: Third of Never m
2 GoNewYorkonaLowiuilget JM
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat trip to New York? The ECU p,
�� StudentUnion is sponsoring a trip to New York for as little as $155.
JH The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for three nights. �
�kJ To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip, drop by the Central Ticket Office. �J
ev - 3S
5� Lane Games jjj
Hi ALL-U-CAN BOWL�Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month m
from 8-11 p.m. at the bowling center for just five bucks (includes shoe rental). 5j
SS Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
S3 A
wj MONDAY MADNESS� Give your Monday a boost from 1-6 p.m. JJ�
CK with 50-cent bowling (shoe rental included). ��j
ONE-BUCK BOWLING�Make Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling wmm
r�� 10 frames for just $1 (shoe rental included). $1 games between 1-6 p.m. K&
5 14
iHmendenhau stiSHIHHIIHHHHIHHHM
jkl HOURS: Mon-Thurs. 8a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.mTJJJ
K2�!E?rr & Ml fcf I Si &!E:HB M! E ll! 5 M! fcii
: bi






Tuesday. October 21. 1997 8
fi
� style
The East Carolinian
Drood
continued from page 6
��-
hisses, claps, stomps and generally
misbehaves to sway the vote. The
Chairman brings the rowdy
audience to a vote and a possible
Solution to the mystery, which is
then acted out by the cast.
Chad Brown, Jennifer King, and
Emily Jernigan perform well as
John Jasper, Edwin Drood, and
Rosa Bud, respectively. The Music
Hall Royale's Chairman, and our
personal guide and know-it-all for
the evening, is played by Matt
Stevens. Stevens creates an
amazing chemistry with the
audience, controlling us as he
bounds around the theatre and
stage. The tempestuous
Landlesses are played by Heather
Guthrie and Danny Zyne. She
portrays the feline aristocrat and
he the haughty ladies man.These
two own their parts.
The Tony Award winning
musk is well performed by the
cast, chorus, and orchestra. Sandra
Jones is perfect for The Princess
Puffer. She nails the character!
Jones has a superb singing voice
and really gets to show it off in
Puffer's songs, "The Wages of Sin"
and "The Garden Path to Hell In
the smallish roles of a waiter and
Bazzard, Jim Bray has the audience
in the palm of his hand as he
captures the essence of his
character. Bray belts out his solo
song "Never the Luck" with
dramatic flair.
I have never been disappointed
in the sets of Playhouse
productions, but these are almost
unbelievable with their detail and
color. Kudos to Robert Alpers for
his amazing set design. The scene
in the opium den is well
choreographed and captures the
evil of Jasper's heart. Costumes
and lighting enhanced the overall
effect of the play.
The only problems with the
production were in hearing some
lines and technical difficulty with
the microphones used on stage. At
first, some people may be
confused by the play within a play
concept.
This is a definite must-see
production. You are a pan of the
action from the moment the lights
dim until the closing of the
curtain. Don't miss your chance to
decide how this mystery should
end.
Catch (he show tonight at 8 p.m. in
McGumess Theater. Tickets are available at
the theater box office lor $6-10 tot
students and children under 12. $11-13 for
ECU faculty and staff, and $13-15 for the
geneial public.
Jars
continued Irom page 6
five years out of date. If the Good
Shepherd does lead you through
the valley of the shadow of death,
you're supposed to end up at the
Lord's table. At least that's how
Psalm 23 paints the picture.
Plumb is not immune from this
syndrome either. While not as
mediocre and bland as Jars, Plumb
are still pretty boring. Instead of
sounding like a wimped out
version of Nirvana Unplugged, they
sound like a substanceless copy of
Garbage. Like Garbage, they build
their songs around drum loops and
a female singer. Unlike Garbage,
Plumb's beats all sound like they
stole them from a Def Jam records
reject pile. Run DMC would be
Costumes
continued from page 6
the costume stores. Walmart
and Kmart also carry finishing
touches to any costume. Just
remember to keep an open mind;
what you need may not even be in
the costume aisle.
Well, my children of the night, I
am confident in your abilities to
dress yourselves in
appropriate garb for
the Big Night. You
have been advised.
You have been
warned. My parting
words to you arc: get a
costume, wear the
costume, and go have
fun in your costume!
How else do you
expect the Great
Pumpkin to find you?
(Lusiitmcs r
For Adults And
Children
� Pet � Wigs
� Character � Masks
� Party Supplies � Make-l
Decorations � Accessories
Greenville's Best Selection!
rtymak
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317 E. Arlington Blvd. � Greenville, NC
kr Open 7 Daw A Week r'
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October 26,1907
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EDITH

ashamed to use these beats.
Unlike Garbage, Plumb's female
lead doesn't use her voice to evoke
spooky and thrilling emotion.
Tiffany Arbuckle barely sings with
a discernible melody, never mind
emotion.
Most of the songs could be
cool, if the band would shake off
whatever contractual obligation is
keeping them from actually
making rock music. For the most
part, the songs sound as though
they took what should have been
the moody bridges in the songs
and turned them into the songs
themselves
Fortunately, there is hope. God
is all-powerful, and perhaps if
these bands decide they want to
work at it, they could become
good bands. They aren't without
talent altogether, it's just that they
might want to pray that God gives
their music a Kung-Fu grip.
v1 T
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NOW OPEN! 1030-900 Mon-Sat, 1:30-5:30 SuiT
Carolina East Mall
355-3752
SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SELECTION!
@7i 1 E. 10th Street fNear Villa RomaJ
758-9595
We Welcome ECU Students and Faculty
Full Florist & Gifts
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bw-3
Grill &Pub
1 14 East Fifth Street 758 - 9191
Bruce Frye and
The Lonely Rider Band
Thurs, Oct. 30th
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring $3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancy at 758-1901
don't miss
M I D N I G.
MADNES
or
it will
ECU Tailgating
Special
80 Wings for $19.97
1 np. 1I-9V7
Char-Grill!
Chicken
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$3.99
.�J
Coming Soon:
53 BW-3 Game Room WOW! 3�
Wanted
A highly motivated
person who can be
at work around noon
to produce ads for
i the l� �
eastcarolmian
Could this person be you?
TO find out apply for a Production
Assistant Job at eastcarolinian
on the second floor of the Publications �
building, and you could be on your way! (J
v V
'4
�"Iff" i!L� �"
T





�M
The East Carolinian
"Wire down
but our guys
I have a lot of
spirit and
heart
Dwight Henry
Cornerback
ECU watches record
drop to 0-2 in
Conference USA
sports
Green Wave rolls past
Pirates in C-USA battle
Tuesday. October 21. 1997 9

AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
JTherc would be no partying in New
fcrleans this time.
S ECU traveled down to Tulane to take
jm the Green Wave who were picked to
finish last in the preseason coaches poll,
�While ECU was predicted to finish first.
But Tulane has been a surprise to many
Jn the conference and with their 33-16
win over ECU, they stand atop
Conference USA at 3-0, and 4-2 overall.
The Pirates, with a record of 0-2 and 1-5
are just ahead of last place Louisville.
Dan Gonzalez was picked off twice in
the first quarter, which led to one
touchdown and a field goal. That would
prove costly later in the game.
Tulane jumped out to a 16-0 lead in
the first quarter while the Pirates
struggled to find some offense. The
Piraces held Tulane to zero points in the
second quarter and added a Brantley
Rivers 45-yard field goal just before the
half. The Green Wave took a 16-3 lead
into the locker room.
The Pirates netted 150 passing yards
and 18 yards on the ground. Only seven
of those yards came from Scott Harley,
who was benched midway through the
second quarter for the rest of the game
by Coach Steve Logan, for an
unsportsman like conduct penalty.
"I told him he would not go back in
the game Logan said.
Tulane racked up 186 total offensive
yards, as quarterback Shaun King
completed nine of 16 passes for 123
yards and two touchdowns. Gonzalez
went 16 for 28 for 150 yards and two
interceptions.
The Pirates, used to being down at
the half, looked to have a new spring in
their step at the beginning of the third
quarter. Cornerback Dwight Henry
picked off King's pass on second and
four, and took the ball 25 yards before
being downed at the Tulane 27-yard
line. It only took ECU one play to score
when Marcellus Harris ran the ball in the
end zone to cut Tulane's lead to 16-10.
But then disaster struck. Just as ECU
was closing the gap, Tulane drove down
on their next possession and only
needed four plays to score another
touchdown. ECU was now down 23-10,
after breathing down Tulane's neck. The
score was a crushing blow to the ECU
defense.
'There's just no explanation for it
Henry said.
The third quarter ended with Tulane
ahead, 30-10.
ECU tried to fight back as Gonzalez
hit Jason Nichols in the end zone, on
their first drive in the fourth quarter for
the 11-vard score, but the Pirates still
trailed 30-16.
Tulane scored one more time after
Gonzalez fumbled the ball. Four plays
and nine yards later, the Green Wave
kicked a field goal and handed the
Pirates the 33-16 loss.
King finished with 258 passing yards
and four touchdowns, as Gonzalez ended
with 247 passing yards and two
touchdowns.
Harris was the leading rusher for
ECU with 33 yards, followed by Jamie
Wilson who ran for 24 yards. Jason
Nichols led the receiving corps with 70
yards, followed by Larry Shannon with
42 yards.
For many of the players, this season
has produced little hope and a lot of sad
feelings.
'Things are going as bad as they can
get Shannon said. "Me personally, for
the team, it's been a struggle all year.
Hopefully we can keep working and get
more mature
Logan understands where his team is
right now with all the inexperienced
players.
'We just have so many kids doing so
many brand new things Logan said. "I
thought we'd be a little further along
than we are, so you have to deal with
what is
But for Henry, he sees this as a
learning experience for getting better in
the future.
"We're down but our guys have a lot of
spirit and heart Henry said. "You can
bounce back on this. It's a good way to
build on things. It's definitely a learning
tool and we can build on this and get
better
The Pirates will look to rebuild
this Saturday and hold off
Memphis, who comes in with a
2-4 record and 0-1 in the
conference, after being idle last
week. Kick off is set for 3:30 p.m.
and the game will be televised on
Fox Sports South.
Larry Shannon participates in pregame workouts this past
Saturday in the Superdome.
PHOTO BY AMANDA ROSS
Women's soccer team loses to JMU,
still looking for record eighth win
Kim Sandhoff
Jennifer Reiley 23
Jennifer Reiley dribbles the ball down the held
during practice.
PHOTO VI AMANDA PfiSCTOft
STKVK LOSKV
SKSIOR WKITKR
In their four years at ECU,
women's soccer has never
reached the eight-win
milestone. On October 4, a 3-
1 victory against Wofford tied
the seven win record set by
last years soccer team. Their next game, against
Richmond, was a 2-0 loss. Their October 14 game
against Virginia Commonwealth was scoreless
throughout the first half, but a VCU goal midway
through the second half suspended their dreams of the
new record, at least until another day.
Hopes were high going into Sunday's CAA game
against James Madison University. Once again, they
had an excellent chance of breaking their record.
Unfortunately, despite their enthusiasm and drive, the
Pirates were unable to bring home the victory they so
badly wanted.
The Pirates found their offense shut down by the
James Madison Duke defense in the first half. They
had a tough job facing JMU's goalkeeper, who was
chosen All-American before the season began. ECU
was only able to attempt three shots in the first half.
JMU had 12 attempts, two of which scored.
uWe had very good chances said senior forward
Stacy Cause. "We didn't have as many shots on the
goal, though
The defense had a difficult time holding up against
JMU's first half offense. Each member of the Pirates
was forced to defend against JMU's unrelenting
offense. Their speed and tactics kept them away from
SEE SOCCER. PAGE 11
Who's Hot?
Shots Qq�s Assists Points
27
Women's Soccer Record
Dat� Aug. 30Opponent LibertyScore LO-1 W5-0 L1-2 L1-4 LO-4 W1-0 W2-1 W2-1 W2-1P9t? Sept. 27 Oct. 4 Oct. 8 Oct. 14 Oct. 19 Oct. 22 Oct. 26 Oct. 31 Nov. 2Opponent At NC State Wofford Richmond At VA Commonwealth At James Madison Campbell American George Mason Elon CAA TournamentScpre LO-3 W3-1 L0-2 L0-1
Sept3 Sept. 6 Sept 7At Barton At Radford At Virginia Tech
Sept. 10 Sept. 14 Sept. 17At William & Mary Appalachian State At Davidson
Sept. 21 Sept. 24UNC AshevUle Old Dominion At UNC Wilrningtor
Sept. 30. W1-0Nov. 5-9

ECU's Kim Sandhoff is one of the Lady Pirates' most
valuable players.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
SPORTS
gossip
Realignment not wise decision for baseball
STKVK LOSE1
SKMOK �m I ix
Professional baseball is in a state of crisis.
Since 1994's players strike crippled the game,
many have not foru n nose iavehed. Tl�e
reaction to the labor c - was akin to the furv
Professional baseball is in a state of crisis.
Since 1994's players strike crippled the game,
many have not forgiven those involved. The
reaction to the labor dispute was akin to the furv
so many years ago when the Dodgers left
Brooklyn. Longtime fans swore never to read
another word about baseball after Ebbets was
torn down. Many of my friends similarly ceased
to care after the strike. It was a disaster that
almost killed America's oldest professional sport.
But now, Acting Commissioner Bud Selig
appears determined to finish that job.
Selig, who has been the acting baseball
commissioner since Bart Giamatti's death in
1989 and also owns the Milwaukee Brewers, has
concocted a ludicrous plan to do away with 100
years of tradition in one fell swoop.
Under Selig's proposal, known as Plan A, 17 of
the 30 teams will change leagues-not divisions,
but leagues. The changes will accommodate
geographic locations to, in the words of Selig,
"take the game into the 21st century (Selig
must use the same speech writer as Bill Clinton.)
Lll me, wh. dues "the Zhr century" ; c i
The invalidatioi records that have stood suite
"take the game into the 21st century (Selig
must use the same speech wtiter as Bill Clinton.)
Tel! me, what does "the 21st century" mean?
The invalidation of records that have stood since
before many of us were born? The rejection of
the National and American Leagues that we
grew up with? The whole idea is shameful.
One of the reasons for dividing leagues by
region would be to cut down on costs for away
games. Once again, it all comes down to money.
Selig claims that realignment will renew local
rivalries among teams in the same town. That
may be true. Comiskey and Wrigley may
overflow. Yankees and Mets fans may relish the
games, but it would only be a few months before
CObs versus White Sox again?" would become a
familiar refrain. What of the many teams that
don't have teams in the same city; or even the
same state? Essentially, Selig would upset all of
baseball to provide a bit more interest to a
handful of teams.
Rivalries are not made by blue-suited
executives but formed over seasons by close
tueev i; u- I'Mttofvdsomes,and.yk iS.I
thc sometimes are assisted bv l'�arii 'W
Rivalries are not made by blue-suited
executives, but formed over seasons by close
races, hotly contested games, and, yes, Mr. Selig,
thev sometimes are assisted bv location. From
growing up in the DC area. 1 and other Orioles
fans eagerly awaited the next Orioles-Yankees
game. Under Plan A, we would still see many
more Baltimore New York match ups. What Plan
A would rob us of, however, would be the othet
close series that drove this season. The
Baltimore-Seattle games were some of the most
exciting games 1 had seen all season. If Plan A is
approved, we will have seen the last time Brady-
Anderson squared off against Randy Johnson's
lightning fastball.
- MISTAKF Par in
Hey, Pirate Football fans!
Believe it or not, the season will be closing soon, and oncei
again. ECU will be taking on the NC State Wolfpack for one
of the most exciting and most anticipated games of the
year. As always, the team wants nothing more than to look up into the stands antf
see purple and gold from their loyal tans.
The game is scheduled to be held at Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh on
November 22cd. Tickets will be available from today until Friday. Oct. 24 and cart
be purchased for $27 at the ECU Athletic Office. Students must present a currents
university ID and may purchase only one ticket per person.
i
Reliable player
brings needed
consistency to team
��
Marc Miller
leads golfers iri
stroke average
JKKKMY ANDKRSON
SI AH WRII'KK
This year, the Pirate Golf
Team has been struggling
with being consistent. The
one constant for head coach
Kevin Williams so far has
been Marc Miller, a
sophomore from Durham,
NC.
Miller leads this year's
team with a 72.9 stroke
average for the fall season.
He had his career best
finish in September at the
Palmetto Intercollegiate
Classic, placing in a tie for
first.
"I thought I played three
solid rounds. I bogeyed the
18th But overall 1 was
pretty happy Miller said.
Finishing near the top is
nothing new to Miller. At
Riverside High School,
Miller was a four year
letterman. In 1995, he won
the North Carolina High
School State Championship
and finished his senior season
with a 70.2 stroke average.
Iast year, in his first collegiate
season. Miller placed in the top 30
in all three tournaments he
participated in, including scoring
a tournament low round of 70 at
the CSl' Fall Invitational.
"lie fMiller) picked up where
he Lit i.ii Us: .jr. lie lus a
a tournament low round of 70 at
the CSU Fall Invitational.
"He (Miller) picked up where
he left off last year. He has a
super demeanor. His eourse
management skills are the best
I've ever seen for his age
Williams said.
"When I'm on the course, I just
try to play my game Miller said.
"His game" has been better
than most this season. He has two
top ten finishes and carded a low
round of 69.
Miller started playing golf at a
young age. He credits his father
Wi
Marc Miller
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SIO
with introducing him to the game.
"I started playing when I was
about ten. I went out to the
course with my dad and just
picked it (golf) up Miller said.
Miller admits there is still
room for improvement in his
game.
"I need to work on my irons
and i !ir of the hunker
more, i, outtina has improved a
game.
"I need to work on my irons
and getting out of the bunker
more. VIv putting has improved a
lot over the last six months
Miller said.
With the "Tiger Woods effect"
sweeping the nation, golf is
becoming popular with the
younger generation, a ttend that
Miller is glad to see.
"It has been gteat for the
game. More people are playing at
the high school and college level
Miller said.


�r





I
"�
'�mm
10 Tuesday. October 21, 1997
snorts
The East Carolinian
i
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Cross Country team runs
well in N.C. meet
EGU's men's cross country team
finished fifth, while the women's
squad placed eighth on Saturday at
the North Carolina Cross Country
Collegiate Championships. North
Carolina State swept both the men's
and women's team titles. The
Wslfpack men placed the top-seven
runners, while the Lady Wolfpack
had five runners in the top-ten.
Junior Jamie Mance (Wilmington,
Del.) led the Pirates running the
8,000 metercourse in 25:31, finishing
14th overall. Sophomore Justin
England (Raleigh, NC) finished
behind Mance running 25:32, placing
15th. Stuart Will (Lilburn, Va.) was
the squad's top freshman finisher
running in 25:45, placing 23rd.
Sophomores Brian Beil (Stafford,
Va.) and Jeremy Colcman
(Willtamsburg, Va.), finished as the
Pirates No. 4 and No. 5 runners. Beil
finished 37th in 26:05, while
Coleman placed 55th in �6:34.
"Every single runner on the team
Mistake
continued Irom page 9
Selig's goal, he has often stated, is
to bring in more casual fans. It seems
to be the case that Selig wants to
bring in a few fans who don't really
&are, even if it costs the scores of
jerious fans that came back after the
strike.
Speaking as one of those fans, I'm
ran hard today commented assistant
men's cross country coach Mike Ford.
"Our top four runners got off to a
good start today and hung on. Mike
Marini (Wilmington, Del.) pushed
our No. 5 through No. 9 runners to
run well today
Kerri Hartiing led the pace for the
Lady Pirates finishing 23rd. The
junior from Baypoint, NY finished in
18:25 on the 5,000 meter course.
Senior Karen Reinhard (Burke, Va.)
placed 39th in 18:52, while
sophomore Robin Bates (Winslow,
Maine) finished 41st in 18:56.
"Despite injuries our top-three
runners really stepped up today to
run their best times of the season
said women's head coach Charles
"Choo" Justice.
ECU's freshman tandem of Becky
Testa (McDonald, Ohio) and Fran
Lattie (Lumberton, NC) finished as
the team's No. 4 and No. 5 runners.
Testa finished 68th in 19:31, while
Lattie placed 75th in 19:42.
"Our performance and effort was
good Justice comments. "We still
have got to step it up to keep up with
the competition
starting to feel a bit like a cheap
hooker. No matter what, I keep
coming back. Sometimes I wonder
what it would take to forever turn me
off of baseball. The designate
hitter? Inteticaguc play? The strike?
The omission of an entire Worl
Scries? Because of money, there wil
always be an empty space on thi
records. That blank is the mark of
time when greed overcame reason. I
hope baseball doesn't suffer another
catastrophe-one that may actually be
fatal.
iti�
eastcarolinian
Apply at our office on the
second floor of the
Student Pub Building
Eat Carolina
tipPfBft
Pick -Up
Special
103.77
14" - 5.66
(1 - TOPPING)
CRAZY TUeSDftY
MEDIUM 1-TOPPING $2.99
PIZZA PICK UP ONLY
PIZZI&5UK
Block Buster Square
315 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
321-4862
(GUM-B)
LARGE SUB
DRINK & CHIPS
GOOD FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY
m
Sunday 11-1:30
M-W 11-2:00
Th-F 11-3:00
with T-he School of
�; Musk
You, The Audience
Decide Whodunit!
The Tony Award
Winning Musical
Mystery Smash Hit
MasterCard

It's Homecoming Weekend at ECU,
tnd it is expected that Dowdy-Ficklen will be packed on Saturday as
m Pirates take on the Memphis Tigers in a conference battle. Don't
forget to pick up your ticket for the game before they run out. Student
tickets are available at the Athletic Ticket Office and also at the ECU
Student Store, and as always, a valid ECU I.D. must be presented at
ime of pick-up.
EDWINDROOD
THE SOLVE-IT-YOURSEtr MUSICAL
EDWINDROOD
Rated: PG
October 16,17.18, 20 and 21.
1997
at 8:00 p.m.
Ocotbar 19,1997
at 2:00 p.m.
General Pubic: 13.0015.00
TtM FacultyStaff: 11.0013.00
ECU StoJents.hiSdren: 8.0010.00
Xatf3l8-6829
HcGinnls Theatre
ECU Main Campus
Comer of Fifth and Eastern Streets
come once, come twice
Bring your wallet, Buy a Datum
At the Attic
October f, 1997 8:00pm
Mmlsslon $s.oo
All Proceeds Benefit
TBDIBEAR: Child Advocacy Center
Come check out all the fun Club Sports
the Rec Center has to offer
All Terrain Cycling
Disc Golf
Crew
Kayaking
Lacrosse
Rugby
Swimming Club
Ultimate Frisbee
Underwater Hockey
Volleyball
Water Ski Club
Goju Shorin Karate
Isshinryu Karate
Tae kwon Do
Tai Chi Chaun
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Wednesday night,
Oct22
7-9pm
Student Recreation Center Sports Forum
For more information call 328-6387
i
S4
TT
rW
iar
i
�i'nii.ii
"I! '� T






r
11
11 Tuesday. October 21. 1997
MiOn:
The East Carolinian
ECU
Pirate
Talk
Pirate Home Games announced on
Soccer
continued from page 9
ECU

CONFERENCE
USA
U
91.3
So tune in for play-by-play action on
gametime hours. On ECU's college radio.
Simmmmi

i
ristian
and
s
Worship
ervice!
Sundays at
5:00 p.m.
Social Room Mendenhaii
Sponsored by Campus Christian Fellowship

Last week's
results
Saturday. Oct. 18
Tulane 33, ECU 16
Houston 41, Cincinnati 38 (2 OT)
This week's
games
Saturday. Oct. 25
Memphis at ECU 3:30 p.m.
Cincinnati at Miami (Ohio) 2 p.m.
Houston at Louisville 3 p.m.
Tulane at Southern Miss 2:30 p.m.
the Pirates and the ball on
ECU's side.
"They were very quick
Gause said. "They would
switch up on offense, which
made it hard to stay on them.
It was a very defensive game
for us
The second half showed
those in the stands what the
Pirates could do under
pressure. They held back 18
more shot attempts by the
aggressive Dukes, not allowing
a single goal in the second half:
Sophomore goalkeeper Amy
Horton, who earned four saves
in the first half, got seven more
in the second half for a total of
thirteen saves. Horton played
all ninety minutes of the game.
"We all did very good
Gause said. "We were under a
lot of pressure. We held them
to two goals, which was very
good, because they had about
30 shots
"Our defense is great
Gause continued. "We've got
sophomore defender Jill
Davis, and sophomore
defender Dana Derbin. It's
tough to get around her.
Sophomore defender
Chrissy Bernabe also did a
great job getting the ball
forward
The Pirates ended the
shutout with three and half
minutes remaining in the
game. Sophomore defender
Erin O'Neill passed the ball
inside the goal box to
freshman forward Kim
Sandhoff, who fired the ball
past JMU's goalie and brought
the Pirates to within one. It
was O'Neill's third assist of the
season and Sandhoff's tenth
point of the year.
"We're really the kind of
team that plays better in the
second half Gause said. "We
won the second half. We need
to play all 90 minutes that
way
"We played hard in the final
45 minutes said women's
soccer Head Coach Neil
Roberts, "and, hopefully, we
can build on that performance
this week
Unfortunately, there wasn't
enough time left to regroup
and score the tying goal. The
game ended James Madison 2,
East Carolina 1. ECU's record
is now 7-8, 2-4 in the CAA
The women's soccer team's
next match is tomorrow at
4:00. They will square off
against Campbell at Bunting
Field. Last year Campbell
gave them a 4-0 shutout.
The Pirates have four
games left before they start
the CAA tournament.
K7 N
THURSDAY-SATURDAY
October"23- 25
ALL FILMS STAki A! 8PM 0NLESS OTHERWISE
NOTED AND ARE FREE FOR ALL STUDENTS,
FACULTY, AND STAFF MEMBERS. (ONE GUEST
ALLOWED) WITH VALID ECU ID
fROM M DIRICWR 0' SPUD AND JWISHR
cjrttsrf eavrjrai
r
WIDESPREAD
IN CONCERT, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24 AT 8:00 PM IN WILLIAMS ARENA MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets are $18.50 advance and $20.00 the day of the show. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster
outlets and the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhaii Student Center (8:30 am-6:0Gpm, Monday-Friday).
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhaii Student Center Soaal Room 8 - 10:45 pm
Thursday, October 23,1997 Third of Never
(Come and win a free pair of WIDESPREAD tickets!)
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
by thgBmk
Tuesday October 21, 1997, 7:00 pm
Mendenhaii Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
Students $7.00
Faculty10.00
Public $15.00
Tickets available at the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhaii Student Center, MonFri 8:30 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday, October 21
"Depictions of the Brain &
Mind in Classic Horror
Pi W YIIIQ 12C0dXoon-1:00 PM Mmd C,aSS,C Horror
Vl I I III Van Mndnh.ill Underground and Science Fiction"
l'iestTiti v Sherry Ginn, Ph.D
Bring Your Lunch. FREE Drinks and Gourmet Dessert ilin-nl r,l l'w rtrifoq-y
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail: uuuniorxecuvm.cis.ecu.edu i-N
(AIDS AWARENESS MONTH
Real Stories from those �
affected by HI� and AIDS
Including: -PIQASO Director
-person living with
-Person who works wttn patients
with AIDS &- B
�Testing Counselor
Pitt Memorial
30 p.m.
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IT
S,





� �- �
12 Tussdiy. Octobir 21, 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom&
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
3 bedroom duplex, $200 a month plus
13 utilities. Washerdryer, big screen
TV. Call Dave at 752-1463
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease at Players Club. $220
month plus 12 utilities. Call 353-3481.
Please leave message.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apt. 3 blocks from
campus, $255 a month and 12 utili-
ties. Call 752-1652.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom townhouse at King-
ston Place. $870 per semester. Re-
spond ASAP to Anna a: 919-449-0923
or Jamie at 919-441-1449.
FREE UTILITIES, 1 BEDROOM.12
block from camps on Holly St. Cats al-
lowed with deposit. Rent $305 a
month. 757-9387.
ROOMMATE, MALEFEMALE TO
SHARE 2 bedroom apartment,
$175month, water included, plus 12
utilities, deposit. University Apart-
ments, one mile from campus. Call Fe-
lipe, 561-8061.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
apartment on 5th Street 1,2 rent and
12 utilities. Graduate preferred. Call
Susan at 768-8567. Fall Semester Only.
2 YEAR OLD APPLE 386 Performs
with color Stylewriter 2400 printer
$1,000.00. 2 year old Gateway lots of
extras $800.00. Full computer desk
$80.00. Call Joe, 752-8783.
APPLE HE COMPUTER, DISK drive,
color printer, paper. Print Shop, Apple-
works, manuals-excellent condition,
ono owner. Ideal for student. $500.
758-4952.
1398 NINJA BOO, EXCELLENT con-
dition, never been dropped, less than
1500m and under warranty. Great for
commuting. Asking $4500 OBO. In-
cludes helmet and cover. Call 353-
5810.
ROLLERBLADES, LADIES' SIZE 7
12, like new, paid $150, will sell for
$50. Color TV, 13 cable ready, $60.
Call 752-8102, leave a message if no
answer.
19- DIAMOND BACK AXIS Pro
Mountain Bike. Equipped with Shima-
no XT, Gripshift, Profile Superiite han-
dlebar, Siguno Cranks, Diacomp
brakes. Matrix and Bontrager rims,
Shimano LX hubs, only 23lbs. Call Hal,
756-3393.
WP 2200 BROTHER WORD proces-
sor with CRT display and spreadsheet
software. Like new. Asking $150. Call
and leave message, 756-5660.
1993 HONDA DEL SOL, 42k, black,
$9,995. Walnut Coffee Table (50in. x
23in), $30. Walnut phone stand (13in.
x 25in.) $15. Come take a look! Call
Tom @ 830-6943.
1988 HONDA ACCORD FOR sale!
Good shape! $3400. Caii Valerie at 752-
5926.
BEAUTIFUL RUG. NEVER BEEN
WALKED on. From Pier One, 6'x8
multi color. Call 931-0449.
Help Wanted
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE I
ED; 3 bedroom. Tar River, has pool,
washer and dryer, semi enclosed yard,
cable, 3 blocks from campus. Call
Dave at 752-0009.
CANNON COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route. Free
cable. Half month free to ECU students
on new one-year contract. Call Wain-
right Property Management, 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR 2 bed
room apt University Apts
$175month 1st months, on ECU Bus
Route. 12 cable, phone, utilities. Nik-
ki, 758-4325. Need by August 31.
ONE BEDROOM APT. 3 blocks from
campus. Brand new. Washer and dryer
hookup. Cable included in rent. Sub-
lease. Call 830-2606, leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP!
TWO blocks from campus.
$153.33month plus 13 utilities, free
cable. Dogwood Hollow Apartments.
For more info, contact Rebekah at 758-
5573.
CYPRESS GARDENS, 12 bed-
room condos on 10th Street. Free ca-
ble and water sewer. Half month free
to ECU students on new one-year con-
tract. Call Wainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6209.
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
Port tinne HANDYMAN 3 hour
doily. ONLINE Information services
seeks a person to help with cleaning
leaves of? lot, keeping windows
clean, going to get mail and other
mmor errands.
M-F 7AM-10PM
CaH Henry Parker at 757-2151
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting
irrffier o� summ
��n
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Cain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7.223.
Minimum GPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS OFFICIAL -
$4.95. Officiates intramural sports, re-
quires little or no previous officiating
experience or training. Must pass a
rules test for the prospective intramu-
ral sport and attend the designated
training sessions. Contact David Ga-
skins or Allison Kemp, 328-6387.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER
NEEDED TO care for 17 month old.
Some evenings, plus Friday and Satur-
day nights. Non-smoker. Must have
own transportation, references re-
quired. 353-1797.
LEAD INTRAMURAL SPORTS OF-
F1CIAL - $5.35. Officiates intramural
sports. Requires previous officiating
experience of at least one year in two
or more sports offered by the ECU in-
tramural sports program. Must pass a
rules test for the prospective intramu-
ral sport and attend the designated
training sessions. Contact David Ga-
skins or Allison Kemp, 328-6387.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATIONS
& Parks Department will be holding an
organizational meeting for all those in-
terested in officiating in the winter
adult basketball league. Position pays
$12-$15 a game. Clinics will be hold to
train new and experienced officials.
However, a basic knowledge and un-
derstanding of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Monday,
October 27, 1997 at 7:30 p.m. at Elm
Street Gym. Experience requirements,
clinic schedule, and game fees will be
discussed. For more information,
please call the Athletic Office at 830-
4550 between the hours of 2:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER, PICK up
from school, help with homework, and
transport to activities. Must have
NCDL and transportation. Call 752-
0748 and leave message.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES.
THS Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches for
the winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 7-18, in bas-
ketball fundamentals. Hours range
from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching.
Flexible work schedule around classes
and he'idays. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-Fe-
bruary. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please call
Ben James, Michael Daly or Quinton
Manley at 830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
BABYSITTER NEEDED TO SIT for
two children - ages 4 and 1, all day on
Tuesdays or Wednesdays. No
smokers. Call 355-7875
PART-TIME POSITION DISTRIBUT-
ING advertising materials. No selling
involved. All materials provided at no
charge. 1-800-YOUR-JOB. www.acm-
net.composteringyouriob. htm.
PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS.
VALOR Security Services has imme-
diate openings for public safety offic-
ers at Plaza Mall in Greenville. Quali-
fied applicants must have good public
relations and customer service skills,
pass a criminal background check and
be 21 years of age or older. We offer
flexible schedules for FTPT positions.
$5.25 ho ' to start, free uniforms, paid
vacation and 401-k. For information
call 800-876-6939.
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-$1,500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
TELEMARKETER; PART-TIME,
STRUCTURED program, good cus-
tomer skills, positive attitude. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
PART-TIME MAINTENANCE HELP
needed to clean office furniture show-
room. Some lifting may be required.
Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
WEEKEND AND PART-TIME securi-
ty officers needed for large industrial
site in Greenville. Pay starts at $6.60.
Must be 21 and have No criminal
record. Qualified applicants will be
subject to a background investigation.
Apply Tuesdays, 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
Guardsmark, Inc 3219 Landmark St
Suite 9B, Greenville, NC (919) 756-
1868. EOE
WFXI FOX814 IS LOOKING for a
fall intern. Candidate must get credit
fur internship. Creative business or
communications major preferred.
Must be willing to work a minimum of
20 hours a week. Intern will learn vari-
ous aspects of television, including
copywriting, sales and production of
commercials. Applicants should send
resume to LSM, WFXI-TV, 600 Country
Club Dr. Suite C, Greenville, NC 27858.
WFXI, GOCOM Broadcasting is an EOE
employer.
$6.00 PER HOUR. COMMUNITY Bi-
ble study, a women's interdenomina-
tional Bible study, is in need of several
young women to work with children
four and under. Tuesdays 9AM-
11:45AM at Covenant Methodist
Church in Greenville. Thursdays 9AM-
12:15PM at Christ Presbyterian Church
in Winterville. Sitters will provide pa-
tient loving care and instruction to our
youngest participants. Experience pre-
ferred, references requested, must
provide own transportation and make
commitment from August 26th until
December 11, 1997. Call Nan Garrett,
class coordinator at (919) 756-6084.
SHERATON GRAND NEW BERN is
now accepting applications. One Bi-
centennial Park, New Bern. For night
auditors. Please apply in person Mon-
day-Friday 9:00 p.m1:00 p.m. We off-
er excellent working conditions and
benefits. Equal Opportunity Employer.
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wanted Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.icpt.com
NEED A JOB7 PLAY at day and make
money at night! Work nights andor
weekends and have your days free
with The ECU Telefund. Make your
own schedule! $5.50hr. plus bonuses!
Stop by the Rawl Annex, Room 5 bet-
ween 3-6PM for more info.
PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPERCHtLD-
CARE: MONDAY-Friday, 12:00-4:00
p.m. Must have someone at house at
2:30 p.m otherwise, somewhat flexi-
ble about time, 20 hrs.week. Mini-
mum wage. Call 353-4239 evenings.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS SUPER-
VISOR - $4.75. Serves as a timer and
scorekeeper. Is responsible for the su-
pervision of intramural activities,
equipment check-out and control.
Must attend training clinics and meet-
ings as scheduled. Perform related
tasks as assigned. Contact Cliff Og-
burn, 328-6387.
PART-TIME IN HOME caregiver
needed for two children Tuesdays and
Thursdays. 7AM to 6PM. 752-5922 af-
ter 6PM.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
UNITED METHODIST STUDENT
WANTED for work with Bethel UMC
Youth group. Applicant must have a
strong Christian faith. Youth meet
from 5:00p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sunday
evenings. Pays $30.00 per week. Call
825-8041.
Services
Local Wholesale Nutrition Company
eeexino. port time, fMt, outoomg
pofsonalrty, sofiMWVMt compute, Mmn,
with good tawpnon i ikns IwMviquiii.
Duties include errands, pocking & shipping, gen-
eral office supports. Transportation a must.
Located 2 blocks from Kinko's on Tenth Street.
Hours: 1PM to 5PM hAf. Can work around
school schedule if necessary. $6.25 hour. Coll
Ken direct 830-1817 Mf 1PM-5PM.
DO YOU LIKE TO learn German,
French, Arabic? Call 754-2487.
JOIN THE BBC - Join the Buffalo
Brew Crew. BW-3 is now hiring kitch-
en, cashienand door staff for Fall Se-
mester. Apply within M-F, 1-5PM, 114
E. 5th St.
PERFECT PART-TIME JOB. Seeking
math tutor and a study buddy to work
with students on individualized basis.
Apply at: Sylvan Learning Center, 2428
S. Charles Blvd Greenville, NC
MALE DIVERS NEEDEDI ECU
Swim Team needs guys who like to flip
and twist. Call Coach Rose, ext. 0010
or come to Minges Pool Office.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT;
FULL TIME. Detail oriented, organ-
ized, good customer skills, excellent
computer skills, enthusiastic worker.
Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
PART-TIME TENNIS
ATTENDANTINSTRUCTOR
positions at River Birch Tennis Center.
Tennis playing and teaching
experience required. Start end of
August. Call 830-4559.
Personals
MANDI, TODAY MAKES A month
and it's been great. I hope you have
enjoyed it as much as I have. Let's
keep it going. R.
Greek Personals
ZETA TAU ALPHA WOULD like to
thank their flag football team. We are
really proud of you! Congrats to our
volleyball players on their recent victo-
ries!
THANK YOU ERIC HANSEN for all
your help in football. You're the best.
Love, Chi Omega
ALPHA DELTA PI, GREAT job in the
Flag Football Playoffs last Tuesday.
You played wonderfully! Love, your
sisters
CONGRATULATIONS, ALPHA PHI!
YOU girls were awesome Thursday.
We have made it to the finals in flag
football, let's go all the way. Go Alpha
Phi!
CHI OMEGA, WE HAD a wonderful
time last week at our 70's social. As al-
ways, we can't wait to do it again next
year. Thanx, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
SIGMA NU AND SIGMA PI, thanks
for a great pre-downtown Thurs night
with Alpha Zi Delta. We had so much
fun! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS ZETA NEW
MEMBERS on your pledge offices!
We love our Zeta Babies!
ALPHA PHI, WE HAD a great time
last weekend together. We look for-
ward to next year's Parent's Weekend.
Thanx, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
JILL, YOU DID A wonderful job Par-
ent's Weekend! Zeta Tau Alpha sisters
and new members
THANK YOU SIGMA. ALPHA Zi
Doha, Fi Kappa Alpna, Pi Kappa and
Kappa Sigma for an awesome band
party. Love, Chi Omega
THANK YOU SIGMA PHI Epsilon for
a great social Thursday night. Had an
awesome time, can't wait to do it
again! Love, Sigma Sigma Sigma
DELTA ZETA, THANKS FOR the
wonderful Parent's Weekend. Let's do
it again. Love, Tau Kappa Epsilon
TO ALL THE GOOD looking guys
who went to Chi Omega Grab A Date,
we had a great time cutting a rug at
the Elbo. Love, Chi Omega
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON. THANK
you for the disco social. The girls and
the cops had fun! Let's do it again real
soon. Love, Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS ZETA TAU
ALPHA on 99 years of sisterhood!
DELTA CHI, THURSDAY NIGHT
was so much fun. It was great hanging
out with you guys, we have to do it
again soon. Love, Alpha Phi �
SOCCER TEAM WE HAD a great
time. Losing that loving feeling with
you! Hope to do it again soon. Love,
Chi Omega
Travel
SPRING BREAK '98- sell trips, earn
cash and go free!I! Student Travel
Services is now hiring campus
repsgroup organizers. Lowest rates to
Jamaica, Mexico & Florida. Call 1-800-
648-4849.
Announcements
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH WILL have a special Wom-
en's Luncheon with Delores Corbett on
Thursday, October 23 beginning at
11:30 a.m. until 1:30. p.m. There is a
$10.00 fee which includes a barbecue
lunch. Pre-registration is required. The
last day to register is Wednesday, Oc-
tober 22. For more information please
contact Community Christian Church,
1104 North Memorial Drive, Green-
ville, NC 27834 (Across from the air-
port) 752-LOVE(5683)
THE GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY
Special Olympics will be conducting a
Soccer Coaches Training School on
Saturday, September 27th from 9am -
4pm for ail individuals interested in
volunteering to coach soccer. We are
also looking for volunteer coaches in
the following sports: Basketball Skills,
Team Basketball, Swimming, Rollera-
kating and Bowling. No experience
necessary. For more information
please contact Dwain Cooper at 830-
4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
IF YOU DRIVE TO class from out of
Greenville or if you live in Greenville
but are not located near a bus route,
check out the new weekdays commut-
er board in The W ;ht Place, where
you can find a RIDE or RIDERS to share
the driving, it you need a ride over
weekends or breaks, use the board in
Mendenhall Student Center. For mote
information, contact Commuter Stud-
ent Services, 211 Whichard, 328-6881.
.
HEY, GROOVY TIME THURSDAY
Alpha Xi Delta, Alpha Delta Pi and Sig-
ma Nu. Let's do this foursome thing
again sometime. From your good
friends at Sigma Pi.
ALPHA DELTA PI HOPES that every-
one has a great week!
KAPPA SIGMA. THANK YOU for a
wonderful Parent's Weekend. You
guys showed us and our parents a
great time. Love, Chi Omega
HEY, ALPHA DELTA PI, It's been fun
these past two weeks, how about
some jazz next time. From your friends
of Sigma Pi.
UZ-CONGRATS ON THE best fun-
draiser in Zeta Tau Alpha history. All of
your hard work really paid off. Love,
your sisters and new members
THANKS TO KRISTEN H. and Jen B.
for representing Zeta Tau Alpha in
Rookie of the Year. You two did great!
WAY TO GO CHI Omega Athletes.
You did great in football and volley-
ball. Love, your sisters
AD vim
Hit j��r
eastcaroli
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With the help of everyone who plans and schedules activities on campus,
were compiling the most complete calendar of campus events available.
If you're planning an event, go to our web site and submit it to our calendar.
If you're wondering what's happening, go to our web site to find out.
Campus Calendar - it's just another service of eastcarolinian
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I
2 Tuesday. October 21, 1997
The East Carolinian
Other options than driving under influence exist
.� Irtnlrintr LLr Lw liE fc�T- 7 TlB P i i i t 1 1 1 111!
CHRIS STOTF.SH RY
i i:rt ri: waiTCI
You ep downtown, have a few beers and are driving
home Suddenly, vou see blue lights flash behind you You
were speeding. The police officers suspect you have been
drinking. He asks you to get out of the car and perform
some simple casks like touching your nose and walking a
straight line. But when he asks you to recite the alphabet
backwards, you mess up on Q. Now you are going to jail.
Drinking and driving is a serious issue for the students
who like to go downtown. The downcown area is a very
appealing place for people to go and have a good time
The problem is that most people cannot tell when they
have had too much to drink before driving home. When
this happens the driver is putting himself, any passengers
riding with him and anvone else on the road at risk.
One 21-year old ECU student recalls the night he
drove home after drinking
"During the spring semester, I remember dnvmg me
and a friend back to his apartment, but 1 don't remember
the actual drive he said. "If 1 had been
pulled I would have been in so much trouble.
But 1 continued to drive after a night of
drinking even after that night
Sgt. Phil Worthington of the Greenville
Police Department, advises students to plan
ahead.
"If a person is caught dnving under the
influence who is under 21 years of age there is
zero tolerance
According to Sgt. Worthington, all a police
officer has to do is establish probable cause in
regards to drinking and driving.
"The best thing to do is not drive your car
downtown he said. "Get a taxicab to drop
you off and pick you up
Another ECU student who is underage said
she is usuallv the designated driver.
"I'm glad to be the designated driver because that way
I know mv friends get to and from home safely she said.
Around campus it is known as the "drunk bus, but the
"If a person is caught
driving under the
influence who is
under 21 years of age
there is zero
tolerance
Sgt. Phil Worthington
Greenville Police Depanmem
campus shuttle van is an option to avoid drinking
and driving.
Cabs are another way to go.
Aladdin, Dependable Cab, Eagle Cab
and Yellow 7 Checker Cab all tend to
have cars downtown to pick people
up. Most of these cabs can be found
on the comer of Fifth and Reade
Streets.
"A few weeks ago I went out
drinking said a 24-year-old grad
student at ECU. "1 didn't drive back
but instead walked to a friends' house
which was four blocks away. The next
day 1 was glad I didn't drive, but 1 should have
called a cab instead of walking to my friend's
house.
Taxi cab rides from downtown to
Plavers Club Apartments range from $3 to $4. Rides from
downtown to East Brook Apartments, on Greenville Blvd
range from $4 to $6.
Most students fall into the area covered by these two
Greenville Taxi Gab Companies
Aladdin
City Cab Co
Dependable Cab
Eaale Cab CoT
IMP����-�" ' '
Tucker Cab Co.
Yellow & Checker Cab.
apartment complexes, and are able to notice how cost
effective it is to pay a taxicab, as opposed to $80 plus a tine
for court fees.
Riding bicycles under the influence is another way to
get a ticket.
"I used to ride my bike downtown dunng the afternoon
to drink but then 1 found out 1 could get a ticket for riding
a bike under the influence said Jon, a Psychology major.
g the spring semester, 1 rememoer anving mc ��t
Resources available to help students handle alcohol issues
Alcohol prevention promoted on campus
Joanna Tinges
KK V! IKK VtlTEl
ANGELA KOKNK,
s !� KI: I It I'KVt I KKS KlilTOK
"1 ended up in the hospital with an l.V At that point 1 realized that
alcohol had taken over mv life �. A
"1 hate the way drunk people act and 1 don't like to see my fnends
dnTh�c are the words of anonymous ECU students that were written
and put on a display concerning how alcohol affects kw�.Thedapby
was part of an alcohol awareness campaign conducted by the Uttice ot
Health Promotion and Well-Being. . .
With college students across America mcreas.ngly engaging in binge
drinking ECU officials want students to know there is help available it
alcohol begins to consume a great portion of students lives.
"In the communirv there are counseling centers that have very good
treatment programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Jwjaj
Mental Health Center said Donna Walsh, director of the Office of
Health Promotion and Well-Being.
Students do not have to look off-campus for help however.
Information on alcohol �� id abuse can be rhrain thrughiftc
Student Helth Educator Heather Zophy and the Office of Health
Promotion and Well-Being. -
Counseling is also available to students through the Center for
Counseling and Student IXvelopment. According to Director Dr. Lynn
Roeder, individual counseling is available to students and students who
need long-term help mav be referred to the Pitt Mental Health Center.
"Usually if thev're saying they have a problem when they come in,
thev do in'fact have one Roeder said.
Assessment is done at the center to determine if a problem execs
through the use of a Substance Abuse Subtle Screen.ng Inventory
"This gets at the attitudes and behaviors (of the student) Roeder
Sa Experts say it is difficult to recognize when you or a friend has an
alcohol problem. . , . . ,
"If you're using a subsrance to negotiate life s problems, this is a red
flag to look at vour use patterns Walsh said.
"Some of the basic warning signs are if they start drinking alone, if
thev can't find fun without alcohol-can't socialize without alcohol, f
their tolearance goes up- it takes a lot more to get drunk. Student
Health Educator Heather Zophy said j,�.m
Other danger signs of alcoholism include using alcohol and drugs to
cope with difficult situations, hiding the amounts ot alcohol consumed
and becoming uncomfortable when alcohol and drugs are not ava.lable.
Roeder said another counselor will hopefully be added next semester
to the center who will specialize in subsrance abuse.
"Then hopefulrv we can become less reactive and more pn.active
offering programs and things on campus Roeder said.
Oct 13-17 was Alcohol Awareness Week on campus. A table
containing information was set up outside of the Wright Place and the
wall of "bricks" describing alcohol's influence was set up there.
"Eacultv and staff were encouraged to integrate alcohol issues into
their curriculum during the week Walsh said. "An example of this was
the use of the Alcohol 101 CD-Rom by one professor.
As part of the Alcohol Awareness Week. ECU students wrote how alcohol INas affected �� The "bricks- were then used to
v build a wall. The wall was on display last week in front on the Wright Pla.e.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Tips for remaining in
control while drinkinc
Limit the amount you drink
Sip drinks slowly
'Space drinks overtime
� Eat heavy meals or dairy products before or while drinking
? Avoid salty foods that make you more thirsty
? Drink diluted alcoholic beverages rather than straight shots
? Avoid carbonated mixers or sparkling wine because they speed the alchol
into your blood stream
� Avoid "spiked" punch and other drinks containing unknown amounts ot
alcohol
Source: the Americal College Health Association
fcAr. i
lOUUIKVll
about two-thirds of all violent behavior
almost half of all physical injuries
about one-third of all emotional difficulties among
students , � .
just under 30 percent of all academic
Self-Assessment
Analyze your attitudes and behavior
by answering the following self-
assessment questions.
1. Are you unable to stop drinking
after a certain number of drinks?
2. Do you need a drink to get
motivated?
3. Do you often forget what
happened while you were
partying?"
4. Do you drink or "party" alone?
5. Have others annoyed you by
criticizing your alcohol use?
6. Have you been involved in fights
with your friends or family while
you were drunk or high?
7. Have you done or said anything
while drinking that you later
regretted?
8. Have you destroyed or damaged
property while drinking?
9. Do you drive while high or
drunk?
10. Have you been physically hurt
while drinking?
11. Have you been in trouble with
school authorities or campus police
because of your drinking?
12. Have you dropped or chosen
friends based on their drinking
habits?
13. Do you think you are a normal
drinker despite friends' comments
that you drink too much?
14. Have you ever missed classes
because you were too hung over to
get up on time?
15. Have you ever done poorly on
an exam or assignment because of
drinking?
16. Do you think about drinking or
getting high a lot?
17. Do you feel guilty or self-
conscious about your drinking?
If you answered "yes" to three or
more of these questions, or if your
answers to any of these questions
concerns you, you may be using
alcohol in ways that are harmful
and may need to seek help.
Source: ihe American College Health Association
Source: the American College Health Association
Check out TEC's homecoming page on the web at
ii (1 c
lso check out our student survey, web enhanced stories,
.�a w -
md your chance to win a handheld color TV.
aslcarolinian's
foCll
An L.ROVSTKH Editor
CKI.KSl K WILSON Managing Editor
ANGELA KOKXKi Special Feature Editor
DAVID Sill IIIKKI.NI Special Feature Designer
The purpose is to take an in-depth look at issues of importance to students and
faculty at ECU.This issue is the third of six which will appear this semester. Look
for the next issue on designer drugs which will appear in November. Focus is a
class project for Shearlean Duke's Basic News Writing class.


��' ��





rUnn
3 Tuesday. October 21. 1997
4
f
fQCUS
iM.V.li.UII
The East Carolinian
Mel
Bar employees
trained in how to
spot phonies
Ryan Fitzgerald
F�VI!�E WRITER
it's Friday night and you have been
waiting ail week to go downtown;
you and all your friends plan to go to
downtown to drink beer and meet
people. You still have six more
months until your 21st birthday, so
you decide to borrow an ID from
someone else who is of age and looks
somewhat like you. The ID works
and the night lends itself as another
success in fooling the guy at the
door.
This kind of thing happens every
weekend, not only in downtown
Greenville, but across the country
Underage students who don't want
to be left out of the party scene find
ways of obtaining a fake ID, no
matter what the consequences.
Using false identification is such
a common occurrence that bars train
their employees on how to pick out
the phonics.
"Fake ID's are not that hard to
spot out if you know what to look for.
Usually just the way a person acts
when they hand me the ID gives
away how old they arc before I even
look at it said J.C. Glasgow, an
ECU student and former bartender.
N.C. law requires that
every drinking establishment
must have copies of drivers
licenses from various states
behind the bar to check to
see if an ID is authentic.
According to the Survey of
Alcohol and Other Drug Use
from the spring of 1997,
about 62 percent of students
say they consume most
alcohol in bars.
"It's easy to get into bars
in Greenville with a fake
(ID) I think student
Carolyn Weakland said. "All
you have to do is find an ID
that looks like you and act
responsibly
Although fake ID's may
be taken lightly by students,
it is not taken so lightly by
law enforcement. Penalties
for possessing and using a
fake ID can range from a
misdemeanor charge to a
felony for altering or mass
producing the ID. Alcohol
Law Enforcement (ALE)
and Greenville Police keep a
close eye on fake ID's and
are starting to crack down in
underage drinking
downtown.
"I think a lot of people
have fake ID's and use them
Erctty regularly student Ari
lagan said. "But sooner or
later everyone gets caught
and that's no fun
HHHflHHRHHHH
Patrons gather at bars to hangout with friends and consume alcohol. Bartenders and bouncers keep a clo�e watch on patrons to be sure underage customers
do not consume alcoholic berverao.es.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Halloween celebration draws hundreds downtown
JKAX WllAKTON
FKl'ITRK Wkl IKR
Halloween nights of dressing up as
Ninja Turtles trolling for candy may
be a thing of the past for many
college students, but ECU students
have their own "tricks and treats"
each year on Oct. 31.
More than strolling on the
sidewalk, spooking friends or
counting candy, Halloween at ECU
is a night to pack the streets of
downtown Greenville and drink. For
many, it is a night to dress up and
drink. Halloween and alcohol are
synonymous to many students.
"People definitely drink more
and just get crazy Junior Kelly
Wehmann said.
The holiday celebrations even
attract non-students and out-of-
town guests to Greenville to partake
in the festivities. Johnnie Umphlcc,
captain of patrol at the ECU Police
Department, said that many people
from outside ECU mid Greenville
visit on Halloween. Problems that
occur on normal nights happen more
on this night due to the large
amount of
alcohol
consumption.
Fighting, driving
while impaired
and underage
drinking occur
with greater
frequency, but
ECU is prepared.
"We want to
make sure that
our officers ean
help with any
problems
Umphlet said.
7'or always had fun,
but I don't drink. I
think that some
people just use
I Halloween as
another excuse to get
drunk
Candice Voigt
jUIIIOf
Six campus police officers will
join Greenville officers
downtown and 15 extra officers
will patrol campus on foot,
according to Umphlet. This is
in addition to normal patrolling
and two officers stationed at
Mendenhall Student Center
for Midnight Madness. Police
precautions help to prevent
serious problems.
Officers plan to ban on-
street consumption, according
to Captain John Emmis of the
Greenville PD. As in the past,
Fifth and Cotanche Streets
would be blocked off, allowing
people to fill the streets. Additional
officers and road blocks prevent
chaos from taking over on
Halloween.
Some students look forward to
the night and do not see the police
as a threat to their fun.
"You'd think that things would be
stricter on Halloween, but I don't
think they are Wehmann said.
Junior transfer student Robin
Moore said that she came to
Greenville for Halloween before she
became a student here. Moore is
looking forward to the night and
plans to drink with friends, have fun
and "meet a lot of new people
However not ail students plan to
drink.
"I've always had fun, but I don't
drink. I think that some people just
use (Halloween j as another excuse
to get drunk Junior Candice Voigt
said.
Midnight Madness, which is an
alcohol free event, will take place
between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m.
Halloween night. Horror movies,
karaoke and dancing will be among
the events taking place.
Survey finds college alcohol use more myth than reality
Campaign started on campus to
change misconceptions
AMY G 9. N K M
H Ml �?: tt'RI Til
For years ECU has been known as a "partv school In
fact. Playboy magazine even mentioned ECU along with
the top party schools in the nation. A study conducted
by the Division of Student Life shows that'ECU is not
much different from other campuses.
The department recently administered a survey of
alcohol and other drug use to students to see what their
behaviors and attitudes were and if the students'
perceptions about the drinking behaviors at ECU were
accurate.
What they found was that students believe more
drinking occurs than is actually reported.
"We are a social school, but that does not mean we are
a party school said Donna Walsh, director of the Office
of Health Promotion and Well-Being.
According to the survey, 74 percent of the
respondents think their fellow students drink at least
three times per week when only 17 percent reported
doing so. 95 percent of the students indicated that they
drink only on the weekends.
Jennifer Wienkie, a senior, felt that the rumor of ECU
being a party school was just a stereotype and that it was
a large misconception.
"Maybe a few years ago that would be true, but now
the standards are higher and students are primarily
concerned with their grades Wienkie said.
Junior Meridith Hines agreed that there is a
difference between the assumptions and realities of
drinking.
"People do go out and drink a lot here, but not as
much as outsiders may think Hines said.
Drinking in excess amounts is an increasing concern
among campuses across the country. On the national
level, 38 percent of the total respondents to the survey
reported binging on alcohol while the number here was
39 percent.
In order to change the high drinking perceptions that
the students have and decrease the amount of binge
drinking that occurs, a Misperception Campaign has
begun on campus.
The idea is that if the school can change the
students' misperceptions about binge drinking, then the
students may reduce binge drinking themselves.
"Many students think 'Well, if my friends are going
out and drinking, then I will too Most students want to
be in the healthy majority Walsh said. "What we want
to accomplish with the campaign is to bring perception
to reality
A similar campaign was done at Northern Illinois
University and the actual binge drinking rate decreased
almost 20 percent. The Misperception Campaign at
ECU hopes they can too can accomplish the same
results.
Wienkie felt that the campaign would not be
effective because people were going to drink with their
friends anyway. However, Hines feels that the campaign
might be effective because of the belief that ECU is a
party school above everything else.
"Maybe the campaign will help our reputation and
improve our image Hines said.
Plans for the campaign include informational
presentations, placement of newspaper ads, and putting
up posters around campus and fliers in sorority and
fraternity houses.
One of the first activities will be an information
session on Wednesday Oct. 22 in White Hall at 8 p.m.
I
What
known for?
1. Medical School
2. Pirate Football
3. Business School
4. School of Education
5. Rec Center
6. New Library
7. New Stadium
8. Sandra Bullock
If you said "party school then this message is
for you.
friends to drink responsibly oer
Homecoming and Halloween.







wm HH
I
I
I
What's your
favorite?
We're looking for your favorites in
our first Reader's Choice survey.
Just complete the survey form printed
here and drop it by our office or put
it in campus mail to us.
Or point your browser to our website
at www.studentmedkeou.edu and fill
out the survey orriii
Either way you choose, enter only
once. Put do it before 5 p.mv Nov. 7.
Once you enter, well throw your name
in with everyone else who responds
and draw out a WINNER at random.
That person will take home a Casio
hand-held color TV. Could winning be
any easier?
Then, look for the Readers Choice
favorites featured in a tabloid special
edition on Tuesday, Nov. 1?.
I the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. WEHN COMPLETED CLIANJD SUBMrTJTOjm
I
What's the best place to get breakfast after a late night?
RBSkfief SCjoce
What's the best place for lunch between classes?
What's the best place to take a date for dinner?
What's the best place to get a good pizza?
What's the best place to live off-campus?
Who has the best game-day picnic to go?
Whose fries stay the hottest all the way home?
What's the best place to buy a keg?
What's the best place to dance all night?
What's the best place to buy CDs?
What's the best place to get a haircut?
What's the best place to park illegally on campus and get
away with it?
What's the best reason to skip class?
What grocery store bestiits student's budget?
What's the best place to have your car repaired?
What cab company has the friendliest drivers?
What laundry won't eat your socks?
Name
Phone.
L.
J
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 21, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 21, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1233
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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