The East Carolinian, October 16, 1997







THURSDAY
OCTOBER 16.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROUNA
ECU police officer accused of improper conduct
Chief says internal
investigation underway
jACQl KI.1NK D. KKI.I.IM
NEWS KDII OK
An arrest of a fan during Saturday's game
turned into an investigation of the arresting
officer.
ECU closes
yet another
parking lot
Parking lot between Raw! and Austin is soon to
become a pedestrian walkway.
"PHOTO BY JONATHAN SHEEN
Staff lot near Rawl
building expected to
close soon
Ambkr Tatim
STU'K WRI IKR
Another parking lot "bites the dust
Plans.are currently under way to remove
the staff parking lot between Rawl and
Austin Classroom Buildings.
"It'll be down for an extended period of
time for installation of an elevator in Rawl
followed by the installation of a twin
elevator in Austin said Chancellor Richard
R. Eakin.
As the elevator construction transpires,
the parking lot will be used as a construction
management site. When the elevator project
is completed, the lot will then be turned
into a pedestrian walkway.
"It's all part of comprehensive facilities
for a pedestrian corridor from one end of
campus to the other said Layton
Getsinger, vice-chancellor for
Administration and Financing.
According to the Director of Facilities
Planning, Design and Construction, Bruce
Flye, the lot was supposed to close on
Oct 13 however the contractor was not
able to show up. Therefore, the date is
indefinite.
"We (ECU) will lose 40 regular spaces
and four handicap spaces said Johnny
Eastwood, manager of External Operations!
Another parking lot will open to
compensate for the loss of these spaces.
"The small parking lot on the east side of
College Hill will become staff from 7 a.m. to
4 p.m Eastwood said.
"We (Facilities Planning) are
incrementally increasing the number of
parking spaces as old ones are removed
Flye said.
Funding for the project is presently
uncertain.
"We're into the second phase as funding
and issues come together Flye said.
Hopes to finally cure the parking blues of
ECU students are soon to become a reality.
"We are trying to acquire additional
property in need of 2,000 more (parking)
spaces Getsinger said.
Election News
As reported by TEC, SGA
held a write-in election
on Oct. 15 to fill slots
ruled invalid in the
previous election. Look
inside on page 2 for
results.
"At the time the incident occurred, the
officers on the scene felt we needed to
investigate said ECU Police Chief Teresa
Crocker.
Football fan Michael Radford was
arrested for second degree trespassing,
resisting, delaying and obstructing a public
official, according to an ECU police report.
The arresting officer, W.C. Peebles,
allegedly mistreated Radford during the
arrest. ECU police confirmed that they had
received complaints, although not from
Radford himself.
An investigation was begun on the spot
for practical reasons. Officers on the scene
were concerned that they would not be able
to find witnesses to the incident after the
game.
"If you had come back after the fact
(after the game), it would have been very
difficult to find witnesses Crocker said.
It was alleged by witnesses that Radford
complained to Peebles about the officer's
treatment of a child in Radford's care.
Radford was allegedly sprayed in the face
with pepper spray and forced out of the
Tersea Crocker
ECU Police Chief
stands by the officer.
While Crocker said that
she had received no
complaints from the
alleged victim, the
investigation was
begun to make sure
that all proper
procedures were
followed.
"Anytime you have a
situation that might
appear as if something
happened that could have ramifications
down the road Crocker said.
Crocker said that so far the investigation
had not confirmed the allegations of
improper conduct, but she was not able to
divulge any other details of the investigation
concerning the officer's actions.
"We arc currently conducting an internal
investigation Crocker said. "It's a
personnel matter. It's not open to the
public
Neither Radford nor Peebles were
available for comment.
E
LARM
Fire prevention steamy
subject after Aycock fire
T
Am.ki. Koemg
STHI WKI I IK
ihe fire in Aycock Hall last week
proved to students that fire
prevention and safety goes beyond
the "stop, drop and roll" learned at an
early age.
"Fire prevention is every day of your life and it's
for everyone said Captain Michael Branch .
Branch, who is the Fire Prevention Specialist Coordinator for
Greenville Fire and Rescue, advises that the most important way to be
safe with fire is to have a smoke detector or fire alarm system.
"The number one thing is that where they live they have a working
smoke detector of a fire alarm system which lets everyone know that
there is a fire like the one on Aycock Hall Branch said.
There are three types of smoke detectors. The first type is electric.
"If you are living in a home which was built after 1975, it has to
have one (smoke detector) near the sleeping rooms Branch said.
Branch said that national statistics show that most deaths from fire
occur between 12 a.m. and 6 a.m while people arc sleeping.
The second type runs off batteries and is the kind that is
commonly bought and installed by the occupants. The third is an
ACDC type. This has a battery back-up in case the electricity, which
normally runs ir is cut off.
Branch advises that people check the smoke detectors once a
month.
"When you change your clocks, change the battery in your smoke
detector Branch said.
According to Branch, landlords are required under the landlord
code to have a working smoke detector in each apartment unit.
"They are required to put one in and have it operational at the
time the lease is signed Branch said. "If it is not working at any
time, (the resident must let the landlord know
Branch said that preventive measures should be taken at all
times.
"National statistics tell us that once in a lifetime you will
be involved in a fire, and we hope you will be prepared for
it Branch said.
Branch recommends having a fire extinguisher in your
home or apartment and car.
The fire extinguishers on campus must be checked
at least once a year. Manny Amaro, director of
university housing services, said that after the fire in
Aycock Hall the fire extinguishers were
immediately replaced.
When buying a fire extinguisher for a
rcri.lential area, make sure it is an ABC fire
c- ringuisher. This represents the kinds of fires
the extinguisher can put out.
Resident advisors are trained in how to
operate the fire extinguishers which are
placed in residence halls on campus,
according to Amaro.
When buying a fire extinguisher for
your car, buy a 1A10BC. This will put
out fire of combustible materials, 10
SEE FIRE. PAGE 3
Fire trucks, like the one at the fire station on Fifth Street, were available to be shown to the public during fir revention week.
PHOTO BY CUT BUCK
,
ABC

Firefighter Richard Prttman talks about fire prevention with Jessica
Cleaton during fire prevention week at the Plaza Mall.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
ces repre
: kinds'of
epreseuts com
stible materials
nable nqmds
as qssolin
A red slash through
any of these letters
means the extin-
guisher is not
designed to put out j
fres of this kind.
A yellow fire coat and boots hang in the fire department on Fifth Sflaat,
ready for the next emergency fire fighters must go to.
PHOTO 8Y ClAY BUCK
THURSDAY
TODAY
t partly cloudy
High 64
'� ' -A Low 54
p"yf
FRIDAY
f partly cloudy
High 64
Low 54
??????? (ft?????????????
� it&IairV-
Did you know that there
are only 69 shopping
days til Christmas?
opinion6
Perks unlikely for
graduate students
lifestyle.
Local bikers search for
1 perfect trail
sports10
Twist of fate in ECU,
Tulane predictions
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOG.
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
Shone
28-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studeotmedia.ecu.edu





2 Thursday. October 16, 1997
w
The East Carolinian
aero
the state
Two counties choose pilot welfare program
Commissioners in Davidson and Alamance counties voted to
participate in a new welfare program that gives local authorities greater
control over the dispersal of benefits.
Davidson County commissioners voted Tuesday to apply for the
program, and their counterparts in Alamance County gave unanimous
consent to an application Monday.
Under reforms approved by the General Assembly, up to 15.5
percent of North Carolinians who now receive standard welfare
benefits may be covered by plans developed at the county level starting
next summer.
Counties have until Oct. 31 to choose one of two options � remain
a standard county whose welfare eligibility and criteria standards are set
by the state, or gain more authority by becoming a pilot county.
Counties approved by the state for participation in the pilot program
will be given the added freedom to decide who should be eligible for
cash benefits, how long people will receive them and the amount
recipients will get.
In cither scenario, Medicaid and food stamp programs will not be
affected.
Cohen formally welcomes Gen. Shelton to Pentagon
WASHINGTON (AP) � Gen. Henry Shelton was praised Wednesday
as a warrior and statesman during a Pentagon ceremony welcoming the
North Carolina native to his post as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff.
Defense Secretary William Cohen formally welcomed the former
Rrt Bragg commander, saying Shelton demonstrated "courage and
flexibility during his command of the U.S. military entry into Haiti in
1994, when last-minute negotiations switched the move from a combat
invasion to a peaceful entry of troops.
The four-star Army general displayed "the sword of the warrior and
the statesmanship of a diplomat" during the Haiti mission, Cohen said,
attributes he will need aplenty as he serves as the nation's top military
officer.
The general pledged to work to keep America's soldiers, sailors,
airmen and Marines primed to do their duty, saying "readiness will be
the cornerstone" of the nation's armed forces under his leadership.
Shelton actually took over the job Oct. 1 as the 14th chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
His formal welcoming ceremony, which was to have been held on the
Pentagon's parade grounds, was hastily rescheduled indoors at the
Pentagon due to wind and rainy weather.
Early love for stocks paid off for Nobel prize winner
BOSTON (AP) � Rarty on. Robert C. Merron knew he loved the stock
market, squeezing in a few hours before graduate classes to trade
securities.
That effort rewarded him and fellow economist Myron S. Scholes on
Tuesday when the two shared the Nobel prize for their work on
derivatives, the lucrative but sometimes risky investment.
He and Scholes, a professor emeritus at Stanford University, were
honored by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for devising a
formula for pricing derivatives, such as stock options.
The risky investments have brought riches to some but ruin to
Britain's oldest bank and California's Orange County.
Derivatives arc securities linked to, or derived from, an underlying
asset, such as stocks, interest rates or a currency.
Scholes, 56, originally developed the theory on how to value
derivatives while working with Fischer Black, who died in 1995. After
the BJack-Scholes formula on valuing stock options was published in
1973, Merton helped apply the work to additional markets.

Ten dead in downtown shootout and bombing
in Sri Lanka
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) � Nine people were killed in a series of
bomb blasts in downtown Colombo early Wednesday, and security
forces shot a suspected Tamil rebel to death in a gunfight near the
presidential office.
At least 104 people, including 31 tourists, were wounded in the
explosions, which could be heard as far as 15 miles away, said a
government minister, AH.M. Fbwzie. The nationalities of the tourists
were not immediately known.
Police said up to eight rebels were holding several hostages inside
the offices of a government publishing company. Earlier in the morning,
the sound of automatic gunfire echoed for 20 minutes through the
business district as rebels battled with police and soldiers.
Two explosions ripped through the parking lot of the Galadari luxury
hotel just before the 7 a.m. gunbattle began. At least one of the bombs
was concealed in a car.
A third explosion was heard some two hours later, followed by more
gunfire near Lake House, headquarters of the government-run
newspaper publishing house.
The ball room of the Galadari Hotel was destroyed and parts of the
newly built twin towers of the World Trade Center were damaged,
wanesses said.
President urges business leaders tc educate
workers, poor
SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) � Treating business and education as
bookends upholding prosperity. President Clinton is urging employers
to pout energy into teaching their workers.
In an address before Brazilian business leaders today, Clinton was
expected to encourage open trade and stress how vital an equitable
education system is in this nation of city skyscrapers and hillside slums.
Following the speech, Clinton was flying to Rio de Janicro to visit
the Mangueira School, a privately funded model project that combines
education and sports to uplift children from one of Rio's poorest slums.
Clinton planned to tell Mangueira students to take the fullest
advantage of educational opportunities � especially those offered by
private companies � so they someday can earn an income that supports
a better lifestyle.
The president hoped this fresh spin on his trade spiel would
encourage Latin American nations to shed a cultural tradition in which
limited access to education fosters the glaring disparity between rich
and poor, said Jim Steinberg, Clinton's deputy national security adviser.
Write-in election results
Legislature Results
Board members
troubled by deaths
Freshmen Kim Kelly votes for SGA legislature at Mendenhall Student Center during
the write-in election while pollster Jack Moore looks on.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Senior Class President-
Carlton Blanton
Day Representatives
a Adams
Jayteder
liie Brewer
$&m Sroderick
b&fm Causey
Q&M Courtcilrnaa
Andres Oaviel
Mk� Davis
SfOofeOiener
Faafcfaipiing
fer fence Eyias
Kuisha fennefi
hm Godfrey
Vickie Harrin
Carrie Herman
Diane Hill
Melissa Hajimihalis
YorgKla Hargrove
telly tayff
jita Lynch
Raymond McGiR
Chad Matheuna
Nakia Medley
John Meriae
Sheeda Miles
latum Moise
Jen O'Connor
JakePerry
David Presneil
Mustafa Rashid
Christia Rey
Beth Roberson
Vterren Sherman
Alison Singletary
Jared Smith
Kate Smith
Jerome Sutton
Chuck Wendell
Shannon Whittington
Robin Wilson
State board urges
alcohol ban on
campuses
NORTH ADAMS, Mass. (AP) - The
Massachusetts Board of Higher
Education voted to urge near-total
bans of alcohol on state campuses,
saying that current
policies aren't
working.
Board members
said they were
troubled by the
deaths last month of
a student at the
Massachusetts
Institute of
Technology who
collapsed after a
fraternity party and
another at the
University of
Massachusetts who
fell through a greenhouse roof at the
Amherst campus during
Homecoming Weekend.
The board adopted the measure
by a 9-0 vote during a meeting
Tuesday on the campus of the
Massachusetts College of Liberal
Arts.
"On campus, we have kind of a
winking, blinking, nodding
acceptance of the practice that you
drink when you're under age board
member Aaron Spencer said.
The board, which sets policy for
the 29 campuses of the state
university, state colleges and
community colleges, asked the
trustees of each campus to adopt the
ban on drinking at any age. But the
policy also says the trustees may
"On campus, we have
kind of a winking,
blinking, nodding
acceptance of the practice
that you drink when
you're under age
Aaron Spencer
board member
allow exceptions in designated
places or for certain events.
The measure says violators
should be subject to dismissal, but
also says the campuses should
provide strong alcohol education
programs for students.
Board member Howard Jacobson
said he was sorry it would be
impractical to pass a total ban.
"I'd like to see no alcohol at all
he said. "I think that's impossible for
us to do
However, it was unclear
how much impact even
the more limited policy
would have.
Thomas Aceto,
president of the College
of Liberal Arts, said he
didn't believe his
campus of 1,600
students needs any
major change in its
alcohol policies. The
school prohibits
drinking in the
freshman dormitory and
does not have any on-campus bars.
'The reality is that we're forcing
students off campus he said.
The state university's flagship
Amherst campus was already
reviewing its alcohol policies after
the death there. Last week, the
school banned alcohol at sports
tailgating parties.
Kay Scanlan, a spokesman for that
campus, said Tuesday that the
board's proposal would be "difficult
to monitor and enforce
Jessica Beighley; a freshman at
the College of Liberal Arts, said
campus alcohol bans would serve
little purpose. "I think alcohol is
going to be here, no matter what
thev do
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The East Carolinian
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America Oniine founder to
speak at ECU banquet
The impact of the Internet
upon the American public will be
discussed by James V Kimsey,
founder and CEO emeritus of
America Online Inc in a banquet
address to members of the Friends
of Joyner Library on Tuesday Oct.
21.
Kimsey founded the nation's
leading independent provider of
interactive online services in 1985.
He has also been a leader of such
businesses as United Financial
Companies, Capital One Bank and
Financial Corporation and
University Support Services.
The 7:30 p.m. event, to be held
in the Great Room of ECU's
Mendenhall Student Center, will
be preceded by a 6:15 p.m.
reception hosted by Chancellor
and Mrs. Richard Eakin at the
Chancellor's residence on East
Fifth Street.
Presiding at the Friends
banquet will be Dr. David Stevens,
president of Friends of the ECU
Library.
Other board members are Mary
Barden of New Bern, Marty
Hackney of Blounts Creek, Sarah
Rose of Kinston and several
Greenville residents.
Fire
continued from page 1
square feet of flammable liquid
and energizer electricity.
Branch also advises people to be
careful when opening the hood of
cars.
If you do have a fire
extinguisher in your car it is
important to have it secured so
that it will not be damaged while
you are driving. Branch advises
checking it once a week for
damage.
It is also important to
remember the proper ways to put
out other types of fires as well.
Grease fires can only
be put out with
fire
Remember,
only you can
prevent dorm
fires
extinguisher,
pouring baking soda
on it or by covering the fire
with a lid to a pan. Electrical fires
will also not be squelched by
having water thrown onto them.
"Remember that there are three
things that are necessary for a fire;
fuel, heat and oxygen and if you
can eliminate one you can
eliminate the fire Branch said.
It is important to remember
that getting away from the fire is
more important than putting it
out.
"1 would sav that if vou don'r
think you can get to the fire
extinguisher and get it out in
about 30 seconds, then just get
out Branch said. "Leave the big
fires to the firemen and use the
fire extinguishers on the little
fires
Another way to stay safe is to
have an emergency exit plan. This
should include at least two ways to
escape from rooms as well as a
meeting place for occupants.
Branch advises that people always
be aware of possible escape routes,
especially when in new places.
In residence halls, RAs, who are
trained in evacuation, are
responsible for formulating an
escape plan for their residents and
posting this information along with
a meeting place once outside the
hall.
The success of these plans was
evident in the Aycock Hall fire in
which almost 250 people
evacuated in less than four
minutes and residents met in their
designated locations, Amaro said.
Another fire risk is halogen
lamps.
"Those lights have caused many
fires because of
the heat
of the bulbs Branch said.
Guards can now be obtained
from the stores in which the lamps
can be purchased. The guards are
placed on the top of the lamp and
prevent material from falling into
it and catching fire.
Students living on campus arc
given a list of the safety rules for
residence halls with their room
assignments. In addition to this,
the rules are discussed at the first
hall meeting at the beginning of
the year.
Amaro said that each semester
the fire systems in each building
are tested although they legally
only have to be checked once a
year. This is done to ensure that
the systems are operating properly.
Inspections are also made of the
electrical systems in the buildings.
This year mailers were sent to
on-campus residents
concerning fire safety.
Tampering with the fire
extinguishers and equipment
is an offense housing officials
do not take lightly. If a
resident is caught tampering
with equipment, they
must move out of the
residence hall.
'They cannot live
with us if
they're going
Tips for preventing fire
1- Have an operating smoke detector
andor fire alarm system.
2- Check the detector and alarm monthly.
3- replace the batteries in you smoke, detector every 6
months.
4- Never leave candles burning unattended.
5- Be careful when smoking indoors not to drop ashes in
furniture cushions or on carpet.
6- Do not leave grease or other foods unattended while
cooking.
7- Have an emergency evacuation plan that includes
two ways to exit and a meeting place for
residents.
8- Do not leave halogen lamps lit for extended
periods of time.
9- Keep material such as curtains and
bedding away from halogen
lamps.
to tamper
with our
system
Amaro
said.
He also
said that
t h e
incidence
o f
tampering
has
decreased so
far this year.
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4 Thursday. October 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
comics
W If
WdsWrtdrcfl
Ik . A
Everyday Life
BY MlCHAKIi LlTWIN
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1 Components
6 Crow's cousins
10 Wood for
shipbuilding
U Like a lot
15 Cleveland's lake
16 She, in Chartres
17 Frugal one
18 Letter closing
20 Govt agents
21 Fibbed
22 "� Get Your
Gun"
23 Sauce
26 Plus
27 Hirt and Pacino
30 Break a fast
31 Long river
33 Water pipes
35 Shone
39 Month
40 Poetic Muse
41 Skullcaps
44 City's profile
46 Raison d' �
47 Bind
48 Damage
49 Crone
DOWN
1 Gone by
2 "� Beds"
3 Wander
4 Fashion
5 Preacher's talk:
abbr.
6 Stops
7 Ram
constellation
8 Circuitous
9 Dry. said of wine
10 Coastal bird
11 Actress Verdugo
12 "� the Family"
13 Excited (with
"up")
19 Keen-sighted
21 Jacob's wife
24 Facts
25 Zero
27 Melville captain
28 Easy gait
29 Shore bird
32 Man of rank
34 Cows,
archaically
36 Cripple
37 Lab burner
55 See eye-to-eye
57 Went quickly
58 Ardor
62 Mushroom
64 Kitchen item
65 Ireland,
poetically
66 English
composer
67 Gaseous
element
C8 Actor Andrews
69 Pair
70 Trapshooting
42 Eagle
43 Pertaining to
perception
44 Hardened
45 Type
49 Disliked a lot
50 Old place ol
assembly
51 Cereal
Soz.
Dannon
Light Yc
1902.
Campbells
Chunky Soup
lOoz. �
Aunt Jemima
Waffles
Erink Feature
8 cm.
Muellers
Noodles
6 oft
SeaPak
Shrimp Poppers
In The Bakery
6 pk. 12 oz. cans
Diet Coke
or Coca Cola
O 1997 Trtbune Media Services, Ity
Alt right reserved.
53 "Once -
midnight
54 Missouri
mountains
56 Best or Ferber
59 Rim
60 Succulent plant
61 Time of fasting
63 Small child
64 � Palmas
With
VIC
Card
Crusty
Baguette
Bread
With VIC Card
Prices Effective Through Oct. 21,1997
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday. October lThrough October 1997 In Our Raleigh Area Staw ,
Only. We Reserve The Right lb Limit Quantities. None Sold lb Daaler&VJoaikr An-i-iCnOi�.
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to apply om.ne go to www.discovercard.com
1997 Greenwood Trust Company. Member FDtC. "Up to 1 paid yearly
based on annual level of purchases.
�i ii





6 Thursday, October T6. 1997
as Carolinian
AMY L.ROYSTEH Editor
CEI.KSTK Wll.SON Minting Editor
AMANDA ROSS SponiEditor
TRACY l,AtRAC:il Aaisiwi Seam Editor
CAROI.K MKIIi.E Hw) Copy Editor
JOHN MI'HPHY SuMHuarMor
HEATHER BURGESS WntEdrm
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MATT HE(.E Mwflismg Director
JACOUEI.INE l. KEI.I.UM KmreEditor
AMANDA AUSTIN Asst.KsmEdttor
ANDY TURNER Uiayta Editor
JOHN DAVIS Assisum LiiestySe Editor
opinion
The East Carolinian
oumew
Would you take a job at a company knowing that even though the company is the third
largest in the state, you'U be paid less than workers at smaller companies and you won't
even get benefits?
Graduate students at ECU have been asked to do just that.
Graduate school is a large, costly undertaking for a student who chooses to pursue
education beyond their undergraduate degree. What makes this so large is, unlike
undergraduates, graduate students are only eligible for loans; undergraduates get grants
and loans. Many make the choice to brave graduate .school without financial aid, without
going deeper into debt for their education.
Considering that ECU pays only $2,750 to graduate students per semester, this just
can't be done. Students are forced to work at least one part-time job along with an
assistantship and classes.
And without benefits, some graduate students who desperately want to do an
assistantship simply cannot afford it. Graduate students can't afford to get sick. Their
income has to be so fixed, any unexpected expense can wipe them out.
Whether teaching class, conducting a lab or doing legwork for a professor, graduate
students are a vital part of the university, they are representatives of the department for
which they work � in some cases the only representatives.
Departments get much needed help and, in some cases, are able to offer vital services
for students, for example, the English department's Writing Center. Graduate assistants
are assigned to teach introductory level classes, which means the faculty is available to
teach higher level classes. This also allows a department to offer more classes. Students
are getting on-the-job experience, but experience doesn't pay the bills.
ECU is a growing university, perhaps the formula used to determine how much
graduate students are paid needs to be reevaluated. Perhaps ECU should consider
offering perks, like staff parking privileges and tuition waivers, or even partially paying
for benefits.
Perks, unlike fully-funded benefits and a pay hike, don't cost much and would be
greatly appreciated by graduate students in the trenches who are being paid minimally
to be there.
OPINION
Columnist
John
DAVIS
Do mercy, justice apply to politicians?
Do we have such Justice and
mercy today, in Greenville, at
ECU? Is something just
simply because it is legal? Is
it the action of a merciful
public servant to design a law
which allows students to be
evicted from their homes
without warning?
� On the Sunday during rail Break, I
found myself standing on the Mall
1 in Washirgton, D.C. as the Promise
Keepers cleaned up their million-
man mess and headed back to their
homes all across the nation. At the
time. Promise Keepers weren't
really on my mind that much; I was
in D.C. to relax and see some of the
monuments I hadn't seen in a long
time.
Regardless of my desires, I came
face to face with the P.K.
phenomenon, and with many
Promise Keepers themselves, all
who were elated and seemed as if
they'd been to heaven rather than
the Mall.
I couldn't help but notice there
were many vocal critics of the
Promise Keepers, though few of the
critics seemed to get much more
across in their complaints other
than the fact that they didn't like
the Promise Keepers. The National
Organization for Women doesn't
like the "man as head of household"
theology, though it's been reiterated
over and over that Promise Keepers
consider such leadership as a
position of humility and service.
Various racial interest groups
complained about the P.K.s' lack of
attention to the "race question
though it seems to be one of the key
issues addressed at Promise Keeper
rallies.
The more I thought about it, the
more it nagged me until I came to
the conclusion that the thing that
makes the Promise Keepers
annoying to so many people is that
they weren't assembled in DC to
appeal to Congress or the President,
but rather to something beyond
politics, media, and special interest
groups. They were there to appeal
to their God, and in the eyes of
political organizations, that's pretty
scary.
The end of my Mall trip took me
to the Lincoln Memorial, where I
was moved to remember the
fundamentals our nation was
founded on. As I read the words of
Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
carved in stone, I found that
Lincoln felt the rift in his nation
very deeply.
He wrote, "Now we are engaged
in a great Civil War, testing whether
that nation, or any nation so
conceived, and so dedicated (to the
proposition that all men are created
equal) can long endure
In Lincoln's day, and in the days
of the founding fathers, the idea
that all men wt s created equal was
a radical idea. Moat political
thinkers thought the common
people were unfit to rule
themselves, given to fashion and
lack of critical thinking. That our
founding fathers trusted us with the
rule of this nation was a terrible risk,
and looking at the way local politics
and our own SGA are run, I'm not
sure that I could say it was a
success.
Lincoln could fight, and even
surrender his life for that idea
because Lincoln believed in a
justice that made him fight for the
freedom of the slaves. And he
believed in a mercy that allowed
him to admit that both the North
and South were partners in the
horror of the war. It was a mercy that
allowed him to pray for the welfare
of his enemies.
Do we have such justice and
mercy today, in Greenville, at ECU?
Is somethingyBtf simply because it
is legpP. Is the three-person
occupancy law Just? When Parking
and Traffic Services continually sell
parking spaces they don't have, is
justice being served? When the last
SGA voted themselves tuition
waivers, it was perfectly legal. Was it
jusrt
Once we answer these
questions, we must also look at
mercy. It may be legal lot Laura Boyd
to keep pressing her campaign to
eradicate Christian musk from the
Rec Center, but is it mercifuP. Is it
the action of a merciful public
servant to design a law which allows
students to be evicted from their
homes without warning? Is it a
merciful thing to enforce such strict
parking laws when there is simply
nowhere else to park? In truth, I
wish we had some promise keepers
in office right now.
And so we come back to the
Promise Keepers. You may find
them disagreeable, but the truth of
the matter is that they find
themselves subject to something
higher than politics or special
interests. And somehow, that is
making them go home to their
families and surrender to them; it is
making them become more
honorable and trustworthy. Like
Abraham Lincoln, they believe in
something above and beyond
themselves, something that they
serve, something that urges them to
servanthood. Imagine a world where
the SGA, Inez Ridley, and Steve
McLawhorn were compelled to be
what they in titie are: public
servants, serving not us, or
themselves, but eternal standards
like justice and mercy.
"Reading is important � read
between the lines. Don't swallow
everything
Gwendolyn Brooks, poet, 1975
MAY yfyr $0M�
OPINION
Columnist
Keith;
COPPER
Faculty needs more racial diversity
recruitment policies,
sometimes convoluted,
must suggest creative
strategies to attract
qualified African-
American scholars
waiting to be tapped.
The administrations of most
universities around the country
often brag about promoting
racialethnic diversity on their
respective campuses. Is the
definition of diversity an
aberration? Specifically, what has
ECU done to diversify its faculty?
This is an important question
because students took for positive
faculty role models to emulate and
respect. Therefore, they certainly
want to sec someone who looks like
them. Affirmative Action, by the
way, has yet to address, adequately,
the lack of appreciable racialethnic
diversity on the ECU faculty. There
are huge disparities in the
representation of African-
Americans and whites on the
faculty. Let's see what ECU really
means by diversity, a relative term,
on its faculty.
As of the current date, the
following appealing status reflect
the African-Americans and white
faculty count on random
departments throughout the
campus: Library Science: WH
(white) � 27, BL (black) � one;
School of Art: WH � 47. BL � 0:
Accounting: WH � 14, BL � 0;
School of Education: WH � 42.
BL� 1; Biology: WH �34, BL�
0; Chemistry. WH � 22, BL � 0;
English: WH � 61, BL � 3;
foreign Language: WH � 29, BL
� 0; History: WH � 32, BL � 1;
Mathematics: WH� 43, BI1;
Philosophy: WH � 12, BL � 0;
Political Science: WH � 16, BL �
0; Psychology: WH� 38, BL� 3;
Sociology : WH � 18, BL � 1;
Social Work; WH � 23, BL � 6;
Exercise and Sport Science: WH �
22, BL � 0; Family Medicine: WH
� 58, BL � 3; Medicine-
Internal: WH �28, BL � 0;
Pediatrics: WH � 28, BL �0;
Surgery: WH � 18, BL � 0.
The above numbers don't reflect
meaningful racial diversity at all.
Thus, recruitment policies,
sometimes convoluted, must
suggest creative strategies to
attract qualified African-American
scholars waiting to be tapped.
Additionally, a faculty-exchange
program is one of many innovative
ways to encourage faculty diversity.
There are many academically
competent African-American
scholars around America. Many
have master's, while other possess
PhDs. Such a plethora of talent
urgently needs to be recruited.
A faculty-exchange program
means that the university will send
professors to other universities to
teach, contractually, in exchange for
visiting professors to replace them.
This will promote healthy, racial,
erudite diversity on the faculty.
Furthermore, new nersoectives
and backgrounds will enhance an
otherwise persnecrive-deficient
faculty. 1 might add, if alumni
munificent contributions are
contingent upon both student and
faculty diversity, the university
might do the right thing.
The above statistics must be a
wake-up call to those dogmatic
naysayers unconcerned about
making racial diversity a reality and
a praiseworthy legacy for the next
generation of students. A racially
homogeneous faculty only feeds
student resentment. A house
divided is an unhealthy way to
move a university into the 21st
century.
Supporters of racialethnic
diversity on the faculty must
demand that recruitment programs
be fair and geared toward reaching
out and touching African-Americans
hungry for a fair share of the faculty
"pie Indeed, diversity must
become the country's and
university's greatest strength.
I
LETTER
to the Editor
Campus dining servers need to wear gloves
On Friday, Oct. 10, some friends
and I were eating at one of our fine
dining halls. I had already gone
through the line once and was
hungry for some tater tots and a
grilled cheese sandwich. I returned
to get some more food and the
grilled cheese sandwiches were
cooking. I waited around for them to
get done and watched the server do
certain unsanitary acts. First, he
moved a trash can, which requires
touching the inside. He then
proceeded to wipe the sweat off his
face, using both hands. After doing
these acts he then gave me my food.
Needless to say, I did not eat any of
it. That evening I filled out a
comment card and slipped it under
the door of dining services. I
recommended the use of gloves by
the food servers.
I have worked at a fast food place
in the past and I am familiar with
most of the North Carolina
Sanitation Laws. What this man did
broke these laws. I had to wash and
sanitize my hands after touching a
broom, the door, my face and money
and after using the restroom when I
worked at Taco Bell. This man did
not even make a conscious effort to
wash and sanitize his hands. The
ladies to the left and right of him
were wearing gloves; why wasn't he?
Even the servers at the other dining
hall wear gloves.
How sanitary are our dining halls
and cafes? How clean are the
employees' hands? Ask yourselves
these questions when you see the
person on the other side of the
counter making that deli sandwich
you had been hungry for since
breakfast or anytime you see an
employee not wearing any gloves.
Think of all the germs and diseases
they could be spreading. You do not
want their cold or flu, just that
delicious sandwich.
I returned to the dining hall to
see what kind of action had been
taken. The same man was serving
again, without gloves.
Jeremiah Johnson
Freshman
Math Education
LETTER
to the Editor
Opportunities to stay informed of politics i
I have read with
ongoing discussions

interest the
about East
Carolina student responsibilities as
registered voters. Unfortunately, the
focus has not been on what I deem
to be their most important
responsibility � that of being an
informed voter. To actively
participate as citizens in this
democracy is an important
responsibility we all share, however,
this means more than just showing
up. Yes, I know most people in this
country don't even bother to show
up to vote, but that does not mean
it is appropriate behavior! I would
urge all students who have chosen
to register to vote to be sure they are
knowledgable of the issues facing
the towns, cities and skates where
they have chosen to become
members of a community. The
voting community in this cases is
not East Carolina's campus, but
Greenville or the town in which
they reside.
To assist local voters become
informed the League of Women
Voters of Pitt County, a non-partisan
organization committed to citizen
participation in government,
sponsors Candidate Forums to allow
voters to ask questions and raise
issues they deem important. The
Greenville Candidate Forum,
cosponsored with the Chamber of
Commerce of Greenville-Pitt
County, will be held on Tuesday
Oct. 28 from 7-9 p.m. in the City
Council Chambers at Greenville
City Hall on 5th Street. All student
voters are welcome. If attendance is
a problem, this forum will also be
concurrently . a'fed on tne
Government Information Cable
Channel 9; call-in questions an
encouraged. Additionally a tape of"
this forum will be aired on Channel
9 at noon and 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
Oct. 29, Thursday, Oct. 30 anc
Sunday, Nov. 2.
Greenville, like all small cities in
this rapidly changing society, has
many challenge to face over the
next few years. Decisions will be
made which will influence the
quality of life for its citizens well
into the 21st century. If you plan to
vote in Greenville, take advantage of
this opportunity to become an
informed voter and responsible
member of this community.

Elizabeth A. Trought i
Voter Services, League of
Women Voters of Pitt County


l"1�'��





p -
7 Thursday, October 16. 1997
style
�j
The East Carolinian
CD
review
The Blasters
American Music
9 OUT OF 10
ANDY Tl RNKR
UFESTTLE EDITOR
Certainly is it appropriate that the
Americana and electronica
; movements are among the popular
; music scenes at the end of the 20th
century. One looks back and one
looks forward, but they both have the
same purpose: to make interesting
music.
Electronica claims to be the
music of the future; the purveyors of
this music say it pushes the limits of
music farther than it has ever been
pushed. Whether electronica
actually pushes "limits" anymore
than, let's say; hair metal, remains to
be seen.
Americana music looks to the past
for inspiration, to the legends of
blues, folk, country, jazz and other
'American" music. But do Americana
artists take the music anywhere it
hasn't already been over and over
again?
Hightone Records has helped to
answer this question with the rc-
release of The Bltcr' Amerium
Must, their debut album originally
released in 1980. This classic album
Vill thankfully now be in a few more
record collections as only 2,000
copies of the original album were
manufactured.
The Blasters are at their young,
blazing best on this album. They tear
through 19 songs in a little more than
45 minutes with only two songs
making it past three minutes. Phil
Arvin (vocals), Dave Ahin (guitar),
John Bazz (bass) and Bill "Buster"
Bateman (drums) were at their
toughest and tightest on this one.
The band tackles a variety of
musk styles on American Music. R &
B, rockabilly, hillbilly, blues and
cajun. They couldn't have thought of
an album title that was more fitting.
There are only a handful of
original compositions on the album,
but the ones that are here are
outstanding. "Marie, Marie" and
American Music both written by
Dave Arvin, are classic rockers. In
"Marie, Marie the narrator of the
song pines over an unrequited love
he imagines to be as lonely as he is.
"American Music" is a mission
statement for the band. The song,
like the album, is a celebration of
American music.
The album goes from the hillbilly
yodel of "Never No More Blues" to
the swamp blues of "Buzz Buzz
Buzz" without flinching.
American Musk is an album that
paid tribute to musical styles that
were popular more than 20 years
before. Its re-release, nearly 20 years
later, finds it just as wonderful and
vital as it was then and will always be.
American Musk is successful because
of the honesty and energy evident
throughout the entirety of the
album. Those two qualities are what
make Americana still vital and
interesting. And it doesn't hurt that's
it's all possible without some
darrned computer.
IFC organizes charity games
Shannon Mkkk
STAKK WRITE!
It was an unique idea that was inspired by The Revenge of The Nerds.
The idea was first thought of as a way for fraternities and sororities to gather for a day of
friendly competition and enjoyment, and grew as a way for the societies to have fun but also
better the community.
On Saturday October 18, nine teams, which consist of two fraternities and one sorority, will
participate in the Greek Games. While the amusing events are taking place on Saturday, the
most important aspects of the Greek Games will occur in the week before and the week
following the actual games. During these weeks, the teams will donate their time and efforts
in order to benefit the Greenville community.
Throughout the normal school year, each individual fraternity and sorority support their
philanthropies, both nationally and locally A major portion of fraternity and sorority life is
philanthropy. In fact, they are responsible for a large majority of community service in
Greenville. While fraternities and sororities at ECU are primarily social, they do have
worthwhile efforts. They are combing these efforts to better the community around them.
Sean McManus, SGA vice president, member of Inter-Fraternity Council as well as inventor
of the Greek Games, feels that these games will provide ample opportunity to show that
members of fraternities are not always portrayed accurately. "Given the negative publicity that
we have received, and the unfortunate events at MIT, the Greek Games will provide an
unique but more importantly an accurate perspective about what fraternity and sorority life is
all about at ECU
McManus feels the fraternities and sororities of ECU have a responsibility to bring positive
change.
Hell of a ride
To crash
To go over the handlebar
Efjafc a tynno-geeK
TAemIu Togolhroug
real fast
Cl�nt Ride a section without
putting your
foot down. As in "I cleaned that
section of trail
Did Not Finish
DFL: Dead PffVS& Last
Txhnk�b Difficult section of trail
Rough and rocky
People who primarily
ride road bikes. See also Fred.
Jeremy Conn (above) gets a little air while Chuck
Meek heads for the home-stretch.
PHOTOS BY SHANNON MEEK
Local mountain bike enthusiasts search for the perfect trail
Shannon Mkkk
STAKK V. KII KII
My dad's eyes are shining. In them
are the dreams of dancing through
the trees, climbing up treacherous
hills and flying down mountain
sides. He is awake before the light
spreads against the sky. He fills up
water bottles and puts on tight
spandex while most people are
rolling over in bed. My dad is a
mountain bike racer.
The sport was first started by a
couple of daredevil philosophers in
California. Gary Fisher and other
innovative designers wanted to
modify bikes so they could be
ridden in the treacherous terrain
of Mount Tam. They placed fat
tires on a bike frame and birched a
new sport, one that is exhausting
as well as exhilarating.
"The thing about mountain
biking says Beth Cox, who does
public relations for mountain bike
racing, "is that it contains a
benevolent environment. It
incorporates families The people
who are serious about the sport,
they lead very healthy, drug-free
lifestyles
It's true. Anyone who attends a
mountain bike race will see kids
cheering for their daddies, young
men getting photographed by
their new wives and mothers
praising their daughters who glide
down the mountain side.
There are even
races held in
Greenville. They
take place on a
trail that The
Bicycle Post
maintains and
leases. The next
two races will be
on Occ. 26 and Nov. 16. But
anyone can ride this trail located
on the outskirts of Greenville and
enjoy the thrills and tranquility of
the sport. This trail is one of the
few places that people in this area
"I gotta ride, it
keeps me alive"
Bicycle Post Mountain Bike Trail
8 Mile Loop
2nd straightaway
From Greenville
go north on
Highway 43
7 miles past
Pitt Hospital
!l
Short Bridge Rd.
Sfbi
Johnson
Stables
� Parking
Area
� Start of
3� Trails
can ride their bikes. There is a
continuous outcry for more trails
as the sport's popularity expands.
"The sport is great, but there is
a lack of trails. We need more
involvement and support from
organizations such as the Park and
Recreational centers Tim
Matthews, manager of the Bicycle
Post explained.
Monica Smith, an East Carolina
student, shares in the irritation
that there seems to be an absence
of trails in this
area.
"I don't like it
because I have to
go to
Chochowinity to
Chuck Meek �fr m? SP��
There is nothing
more refreshing
than it being fifty degrees outside
and have sweat running down your
forehead as you pump up a hill
Smith said.
She loves the vigorous workout
that she receives from mountain
biking.
"There is nothing more
refreshing than it being fifty
degrees outside and have sweat
running down your forehead as
you pump up a hill Smith said.
Mountain biking is all these
things: racers standing on the
starting line in their flamboyant
jerseys for a glimpse of the taste
of victory; young men popping
wheelies over fallen trees and
huge rocks; amateurs out for a
Sunday ride to inhale the sight
of nature; and strong men and
women riding hard to
strengthen their bodies and test
themselves. It is a sport with a
calm, adventurous and healthy
craziness. As my father says, "I
gotta ride, it keeps me alive
Dinner and
murder in
Mendenhall
MiocMi Smith
STM-T 111 I KR
Ready for the bad news? Perry Mason's dead. Matlock's getting too old
and rusty to solve murder mysteries. Agatha Christie and Sir Arthur Conan
Doyle both stopped churning out the good stuff before your grandparents
were bom and not even Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys look quite as
appealing anymore.
If you're a mystery buff ir's time for some new blood (literally and
figuratively speaking), and the good news is that you can get it right here
at ECU on October 21 at 7:00 p.m when the Repertory Theatre of
America brings Murder by the Book, a suspenseful live murder mystery, to
Mendenhall.
The exciting interactive play will be brought to ECl' in an effort "to.
provide the students with something different said Lynn Caverly,
Assistant Director of Student Activities. "Our goalis to meet the
entertainment (and) cultural needs of the students
If your entertainment needs include live action, a suspenseful plot, role
playing, audience participation and some great chow, this show's for you.
The audience will enjoy the mystery as a dinner theatre at which
Caesar salad, Italian grilled chicken breast, sugar snap peas, twice baked
potatoes, coffee, tea and dessert will be served.
As the plot unfolds, audience members will find themselves interacting
with various characters from the show and with each other during dinner,
which is actually staged as a banquet for a pair of sisters, Mona and
Matilda, a writer and an actress, and MC'd by an ECU student.
Two other students will also take part in the play as characters (an arts
patron and a businessman). The audience will soon find itself acquaThted
with the main characters.
When the festivities suddenly include murder, however, the evening
will take a dark turn and the audience will find itself caugh- up in the
intrigue. Texas Ranger Detective Leslie Lynofire will take over the case as
soon as the murder is committed, and it will be up to the audience
members, with his help, to find the clues and evidence to identify the
The cast of Murder by the Book
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALPHA-OMEGA PLAYERS
killer in their midst.
The audience will receive clues throughout the evening and will be
given a chance to identify the killer aftet Detective Lynofire has
speculated and once dessert and coffee have been served.
Tickets are available in the Mendenhall ticket office ($7 for students)
and cannot be purchased the night of the show. Don't miss this chance to
participate in a real live murder mystery. It promises to be a night full of
surprises, fun, suspense, great entertainment and, most importantly,
murder!
COncertreyie
Primus sucks in Raleigh
w
Steve Losev
MM (IK U HI I I.K
Most people turn their noses up at Primus. Despite the
opinion of that majority, there are people that will swear
Primus is the greatest thing since sliced cheese. On
Sunday, Primus showed the crowd that packed the Ritz
exactly why they have such a following.
The crowd eagerly anticipated the show with shouts
of "Primus sucks They erupted into cheers when
guitarist Larry LaLonde strode onstage and began the
siren intro to "Those Damned Blue-Collar Tweekers
from their album Sailing The Seas (Jf Cheese. When bassist
and singer Les Claypool began singing, the place
exploded.
Many of Primus' songs, such as "Tweekers" and
"Bob's Party Time Lounge are laid back during the
verses, allowing those up front to relax for a minute.
D iring the chorus, however, the crowd started to jump
and move to the music. Except for a few skinheads
furiously moshing, the crowd only wanted to dance and
have a good time.
This tour serves as the debut for Brain, Primus' new-
drummer. Brain replaced long time Primus drummer
Herb Alexander last year, with much controversy. Brain
was able to play all of the drum parts to the older songs
as well as, if not better than, Alexander. In the middle of
"Tommy the Cat Claypool stopped piaying and
introduced Brain to the crowd. Brain then played a
raging drum solo that included blind ngly fast one-
handed drum rolls that dropped jaws in the audience.
Brain mut have had a bad experience with drums as a
child. I've never seen someone beat something so hard.
He looked like Animal, the Muppets' drummer, back
there. Twice during the solo, Brain threw out his
drumsticks, one of which I was lucky enough to catch.
LaLonde is a unique guitar player. Not many can find
a way to be heard over such an aggressive bassist as
Claypool. LaLonde spent the concert alternating
between weaving melodic lines and pounding out
frenzied chords. Songs like "Jerry Was A Race Car
Driver" and "Groundhog's Day" culminated in
La'xjnde's frenetic solos and the crowd responded
gleefully.
Claypool, as always, stole the show from his
bandmates. He slapped and plucked his six-string bass,
sounding like the illegitimate son of Bootsy Collins. His
lyrics range from outright ludicrous, as in "Puddin' '
Taine "Vnd if I shank my trousers down I'm hung just '
above the knees" to the black comedy of "My Name Is
Mud" "We had our words, a common spat So I kissed
him upside the cranium with an aluminum baseball '
bat
Between singing lines in his nasal whine, Claypool �
either swaggered around the stage with his peacock
strut or kicked his leg up like an old dog. It's no wonder
that these were the guys picked tu w rite the theme sung
for the cartoon show, South Park. Unfortunately, despite
numerous requests, the band didn't play the theme,
instead focusing on their older material with a few songs
thrown in from The Brovn Abum, their latest CD.
The Bron Album is the best recording Primus has put
out in a long time. "Puddin Taine" is like early Primus:
good grooves, quirky rhythms, and tremendously goofy
lyrics. "Bob's Party Time lxunge" is a tale of drug
excess at a parry w ith some great jamming at the end.
The best song, however, was "Over The Falls For that
StE PRIMUS "AGE I
mSrnd






'
Primus
VWWStudentmedia.ecu.eclu
� Check It Out
J
i i
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and
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blindt
!
7 FRIDAY
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
denhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
Thursday, October 16, 1997
� � . "t i
October
�� ttMf
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
-formation see our .veb page at www.ecu.edusrudentunionpirc'eunderground html
16 THURSDAY
Ih, M � �
.
rhrir
1
p.m. i i '
Bi
13 SATURDAY
I
II
I
H
. FIMt
HENDRIX FILMS
Thursday, October 16
Be sure to redeem your orange Thirsty Thursday coupon
at The Spot for a free 16 oz. drink when you make a purchase.
Friday, October 17
Saturday, October 18
n iv mi
a n t u
�v�� n. .k. i 11 ,i.i mi � ���t A" letters to the Editor
Yea, Buffy, I totally can t must be 25Q words
believe they really printed or ,ess Must include
my letter to the editor your name, major, year,
and phone . Send to:
East Carolina University
2nd Floor Student Pub.
Building
Greenville, NC 27852
Like, I heard they want to
publish yours too
For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
I LI I. I A K O B I R I S
MY
FRIEND'S
Jr.
comc
9
old Looks Good In Any Degree
Jostens gives the highest degree of:
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i





i
9 Thursday. October 16, 1997
IT
I i it
style
The East Carolinian
It's Showtime
continued irom page 1
Illbilly Boys at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
,19 SUNDAY
East Carolina Symphony
prchcstra, Douglas Wright
conducting, 3 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
Faculty recital, The Chamber
JMusic of T.J. Anderson at 8 p.m. in
Fletcher Recital Hall
Big Ass Truck, Soul Candy at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
20 MONDAY
"Laundry" and "Ambulance" read
by Susan Onthank Mates, M.D at
12:30 p.m. in Brody, room 2s-12
Faculty Recital, Mark Ford,
percussion at 8 p.m. in Fletcher
Recital Hall
21 TUESDAY
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
Old Pike, Los Infernos at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
22 WEDNESDAY
Comedy Zone featuring Ronnie
Bullard at The Attic
ONGOING
"Cajun Music and Zydeco"
exhibition at Mendenhall Gallery
through Nov. 10
School of Art Faculty Exhibition
(through Oct. 29)
Men In Black invade your TV
Dai.k Williamson
SKMOR I'll I I K
m vdlrh TOf n�itM' im ln � jkmv an
Wi-iciii. lot �ak h TV. .n-ak TV. liw TV.
Uvm�- TV Ia!T(��' kiMN Hut. hal mhi
(liihT knrm is llul TV b Hatching �ou
�a, �J
Communication Majors
The ECU Athletics Department's
Media Relations Office is seeking to
hire enthusiastic student assistants for
the current academic year, preferably
freshmen and sophomores
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable
experience in the field of communications.
If interested, call the media relations office
at 328-4522 to set up an appointment.
Friday 17th and Saturday 18th
Home Grown
Music Festival
Friday Saturday
Acoustic Bus, moon boot towr
, j maturing ww members of j f
(purpjo schoobw scnleiciiiO:�
J5 j��fnn9 the recipe j
WjLnrnu
POST JUNCTION �1M!e
Hipbone ogunoSu
Coming Ocrv 30
Edwin
McCain
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs, Award Winning Fajitas
Grande, New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks, Fresh Vegetable Pasta,
I!
RESTAURANT S BAR
jmuaniju �tlMH
Roadside Chicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese
Sandwich, Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts. It's all specially priced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
Does not include Alcoholic Beverages
31
800 East 10th Street f 752-1907
7 OUT OF 10
In the entertainment industry, the key
philosophy that keeps the wheel of
fortune spinning and the money flowing
is if something works once, milk it for all
you can.
Television fans have accepted the entire idea
of the spin-off series (you know, a TV series
whose sole existence is inspired from some
other successful, popular source) as a necessary
evil in the business. The spin-off concept has
resulted in a mixed bag of goodies.
Thanks to the success of Cheers, the
world has been blessed with the sophisticated
and intellectual humor of Frasier. However,
nobody was laughing when Happy Days
spawned the dreaded Joanie Loves Charm.
The world of movies has also contributed to
the spin-off phenomena. Robert Altman's
critically acclaimed film, MASH,
eventually resulted in one of the most
endearing and enduring sitcoms ever. But does
anyone remember a Sandra Bullock vehicle
based on the Harrison FbrdMelanie Griffith
film, Working Girl?
Spin-offs are ingrained into the television
mentality. It's a crap shoot, but sometimes a
jackpot is won.
The latest entry into the gambfing world of
spin-off television is slightly different from the
rest of the pack in that it's a cartoon based on a
blockbuster feature film that was originally
inspired from an independent comic book. Men
In Black (a title that has almost become a household
name) has a longer history than most will give credit,
but for the bulk of mainstream America, it is a fairly new
trend that began this past summer when Tommy Lee
Jones and Will Smith put on their sleek, black shades
and fought off "the alien scum of the universe
With high hopes that the film's appeal will carry over
to television. Men In Black, The Series premiered this past
Sunday morning on WGN, and it is surprisingly well
done. This is not to say that the show pushes the
boundaries of animation or that it even matches the
feature film on which it's based. Still, MIB illustrates
much promise that may make it a worthwhile addition
to WGN's Sunday morning line-up (which is already
fueled by such outstanding fare as Superman, Batman,
and Animaniacs).
For all those new to Earth's solar system, the basic
premise of MIB centers around the otherworldly
adventures of Mr. J and Mr. K, code names for two
agents in the ultra-secret government organizarion
known as the Men In Black (Ignore the sexist title;
women work here too). The purpose of this
organization is to police aliens from outer space who
have decided to disguise themselves as humans, dogs or
any other earthly form of creature and live on our fair
planet. If any alien steps out of line or breaks any of the
many established galactic laws, then the MIB have to
take action.
It's a great concept for any science fiction story. And
since the feature film was such a huge hit with children,
transforming it into a kid's cartoon is only natural.
Even though MIB ultimately is a kid's show, any fan
of animation or science fiction should get a kick out of
it. The animation isn't exactly fluid, but the character
and scenic designs are striking and somewhat unique
(The.opening and closing credits alone almost make
the show worthwhile). The voice actors, while not quite
carrying the wit and sense of timing that made Jones
and Smith such a perfect pairing, eventually fit nicely
into their characters. And, let's not forget, the writers
seem to know their turf.
If Sunday's episode is any indication, the MIB plots
Men in Black The Series, already?
PHOTO COURTESY OF W6N
are sure to keep audiences tuning in. The premire
episode centered around Mr. J's "unprofessional" ways
of handling his job. After accidentally killing a renegade
alien, Mr. J is "marked" by the entire alien breed, which
means that an entire race of aliens will stop at nothing
to hunt down and kill Mr. J for offing one of their own.
This may not sound like a story suitable for children,
but relax; this show doesn't take it self seriously. It's sole
purpose is to have a good time. The show's writers have
fun by making this alien breed out to be some sort of
intergalactic mafia that the MIB organization just
seems to accept, even if this mafia is after one of their
own men.
The show's humor is pretty much in line with the
film, though at times the humor does feel a bit forced
or slightly out of sync. Still, the show wins in the end by
simply indulging in its own absurdity.
As a result of all the hype surrounding the movie.
Men In Black The Series was destined to be a hit, even if
the show exhibited no talent or thought. Lucky for
those of us who care, the show seems to have some solid
legs to stand on and should satisfy us GGEs (Geeks
Craving Entertainment) until the inevitable sequel to
the film arrives in theaters.
The ECU Student Union Special Events Committee presents
a Dinner Theatre Presentation of
An Evening of Comedy, Mystery, and Intrigue
Tuesday, October 21, 1997, 7:00 pm
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
Students $7.00
Faculty $10.00
Public $15.00
Tickets available at the Centra!
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center,
MonFri 8:30 am - 6:00 pm
Murder is on the menu, and the searchlight of suspicion is on you!
Advanced ticket purchase required by Oct. 16. For more information,
call 919-328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. TDD 919-3284736.
MastercardVisa accepted. Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Special Events Committee.

i'i� i ' i mi





Ofc
10 Thursday. October 16. 1997
sports
Th� East Carolinian
Swimmers ready for annual challenge
Intrasquad PurpleGold
meet today at 3 p.m.
P.l I. K AIM. AN
STUF WRITER
The men's and women's swim teams arc
getting ready for their annual PurpleGold
meet.
Today the swimmers will be going head
to head against each other in their annual
intrasquad meet. The meet comes at a time
at the end of the athletes most grueling part
of the training season, September through
mid October.
"The Purple-Gold meet gives the
Freshman swimmers a chance to get used to
the format of meets at the college level
said assistant coach McGee Moody. "It also
gives all the swimmers on the squad a
chance to get a time under a serious
competitive atmosphere, and also to get a
feeling for what events they will be
competing during the upcoming season
The ECU Women are returning from a
great season. Last year they finished with a
record of eight wins and only two losses,
topped off by winning the GAA Conference
tournament for the third straight year. In
addition to those accomplishments the girls
won Academic Ail-American honors, with
the top 25 cumulative GPA in the United
States.
The men's squad last year had an equally
outstanding season, although they did not
win the CAA, their record was 9-1 with their
only loss coming against UNC-Wilmington.
"We swim in a very competitive
conference, which makes for a lot of very
close meets Head Coach Rick Kobe said.
Looking beyond the PurpleGold meet
and at this upcoming season, the entire
coaching staff is very optimistic.
"Both the men and women's teams are
stronger this year, Moody said. There is
much more depth on both teams, and we
picked up 12 new swimmers this season �
five Guys and seven girls which will help us
replace the nine who graduated last year
Both teams have a chance to go without
a loss this season.
"I'm looking forward to this season
Moody said. "Both sides have a great chance
to go undefeated. All the athletes work well
together and their is a lot of excitement and
enthusiasm for the upcoming season
On the other side of the pool, the ECU
divers will look to another strong season.
"I am very excited about the upcoming
Purple-Gold meet and even more excited
about the upcoming season Diving Coach
Jon Rose said.
Two divers to look out for this season on
the boards arc sophomores Ryan Baldwin
and Casey Dodge.
u Ryan Baldwin has been working very
hard and has been looking very good so far,
he should be our top male diver Rose said.
"Dodge won a silver medal last year at the
championships on the one meter board and
is expected to be our top female diver
Last season the diving squad had two
divers in the top 16 in the CAA.
The meet begins today at the Minges
Pool at 3 p.m.
Pirates face
test against
Tulane
Hey
Pirate
Football fans!
Believe it or not, the season will be
closing soon, and once again. ECU will
be taking on the NC State Woifpack for
one of the most exciting and most
anticipated games of the year. As always
the team wants nothing more than to
look up into the stands and see purple
and gold from their loyal fans.
The game is scheduled to be held
at Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh
on November 22nd.
Tickets will be available from today
until Friday, Oct. 24 and can be
purchased for $27 at the ECU
Athletic Office.
Students must present a current
university ID and may purchase only one
ticket per person.
Tulane surprising
conference foes
AMANDA ROSS
sports eorroR
At the beginning of the football
season, the buzz was all about ECU.
They were picked to win the
conference and Tulane was picked to
finish last. But what a difference a
fewgames makes.
Tulane is coming off a 64-33
thrashing of Louisville and currently
is just behind number one Southern
Miss in C-USA standings.
For ECU to record a victory,
Coach Steve Logan said each week
someone new has to step up and
make the plays.
"I think it has to come from an
unexpected source each Saturday
and then you'll begin to score points
Logan said. "You'll begin to keep
people out of the end zone and do
the things that arc necessary to win
Tulane's offense thrives off the
passing game. They have
accumulated 1,418 yards in air, while
ECU has thrown for 986 yards.
ECU quarterback Dan Gonzalez
said Tulane wasn't on the minds of
too many people at the beginning of
the season, but now that they have
proven themselves, it's no surprise
wrrv they keep notching wins.
Going into the season, people
weren't saying too much about
Tulane Gonzalez said. "It's no
surprise why they're winning games.
They're playing positive football.
They've got a good offensive scheme
that suits players well
That offense is going to test the
ECU defense. Cornerback Tabari
Wallace said they must stop the air
attack.
"We have to stop the pass; that's
the first priority Wallace said. "We're
back down to another Donovan
McNabb and Anthony Wright. He
(Shaun King) runs around the pocket
and makes things happen
Consequently, that will provide a
tough challenge to the defensive
backs.
"This is the db's test right here.
We've been waiting for a test all year
Wallace said. "We got � tested at
Syracuse; we got tested with Wake
Forest. This is the biggest test of all.
This is the exam
How well the Pirates studied for
their exam will determine how well
they will come out this Saturday. If
they can clinch this win, it might
mean a whole new outlook on what
has been a frustrating season so far.
Sibling
Rivalry ?
Sibling athletes share more than
just teammates
TRACT M. LAI BACH
ASSISTANT SMUTS KDITOR
"Off the court, me help
each other with our
schoolwork. We are
not at acompetitive
frith each other. We
just try to be therefor
each other
LaKeya Mason
You've got your bags packed and you arc off to
college. Going off to school usually marks the start of
a new life, meeting new people and moving away
from those you have
known for your entire life.
However, this is not the
case for four of ECU's
athletes. Although sisters
Lr.Keya and LuCinda
Mason and siblings Niki
and Nathan Kreel have
moved away from home,
they are spending more
time than ever before with
their family.
The Mason sisters are
no different from two peas
in a pod, as they share a
room, a team, and many of
the same interests. LaKeya, the older of the two,
spent two years at North Carolina A&T and
transferred to ECU to join her sister LuCinda on the
Pirate volleyball team this year. LuCinda chose to
come to ECU for several reasons.
"I was impressed with the beautiful campus, and
when I met the team, they were all so nice
LuCinda said. "Also, I had known Coach Kim Walker
from a winter league that I had played on, and she
was a very good coach
Aside from the desire to attend school with her younger and only
sister, LaKeya felt that she could gain a lot more from ECU's volleyball
program than she was getting at North Carolina A&T.
"1 really felt like I could learn a lot from Coach Walker LaKeya said.
The sisters are also big fans of basketball, softball and track, in high
school, LaKeya played basketball and ran track, while LuCinda played
basketball and was a member of the softball team.
"I was actually offered more basketball scholarships than volleyball
LaKeya said. "But I just like playing volleyball better
Trie ladies began playing volleyball at about the same time, although
it was LaKeya who first expressed an
interest in the sport at the age of 11. At
that time, LuCinda was nine.
UI always wanted to do everything that
LaKeya did when I was younger
LuCinda said. "When she started playing
volleyball, I wanted to do it too
Aside from volleyball, the sisters also like
a lot of the same movies and music. They
work together and help each other out
both on and off the court.
"On the court, we encourage each other
by letting each other know what we arc
doing wrong and
THE LUCINDA PROFILE
(L-fl) LuCinda and LaKeya Mason of the ECU
volleyball team.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
Place of BirthDurham, NC
Favorite MovieSet it Off
Favorite FoodPasta
MajorBiology
Began volleyballAge 9
Role ModelMother
ClassFreshman
GraduationSpring 2000
THE LAKEYA PROFILE
Favorite MovieSet if Off
Favorite FoodSeafood, just
about anything
though
MajorBiologyMath
MinorEconomics
ClassJunior
GraduationSummer 1998
Started VolleyballAge 11
Role ModelMichael Jordan
"Even though we have
our differences, we get
along like friends. No
matter what, we always
end up okay because
nothing gets between us
Nathan Kreel
what we need co do to make it right LaKeya said. "Off the court, we
help each other with our schoolwork. We arc not at all competitive with
each other. We just try to be there for each other"
Both LaKeya and LuCinda respect their mother and Michael Jordan
as their role models.
"I like Michael Jordan because he is not a cocky player LuCinda
said. "He knows he could be better, and he is a very positive person. My
mother always supports us and it was tough for her to raise two kids on
her own, but she did it and she did just fine. She has always encouraged
LaKeya and I to do whatever we wanted to do
Another thing the sisters agree on is what they would be doing with
their time if they weren't athletes at ECUslecping longer and
studying more.
"The study hours that are mandatory for freshman have really
helped me out a lot LuCinda said. "When you arc in your dorm, the
last thing you want to be doing is studying because there arc so many
other distractions. If you are where you have to study and there is
nothing else to do, you really get a lot done. I will probably still go to
study hours next year
In reflecting on the season so far, the ladies agree that it could be
better, but by making the team come together more, ail of the
problems should be able to be worked out.
"We are struggling right now on a four-game losing streak, and it is
SEE SIBUN6S, PAGE 11
THE NATHAN KREEL PROFILE
THE NIKI KREEL PROFILE
Hometown
Place of Birth
Favorite Food
Favorite Movie
Class
Started ojvimming
Major
Graduation
Raleigh
Fayetteville
Sweet Potatoes
Star Wars and Con Air
Sophomore
Age 5
Biology
Spring 2000
Place of Birth
Favorite Movie
Favorite Food
Major
Minor
Class
Graduation
Began Swimming
High School
Fayetteville
Jerry McGuire
Pasta
Hospitality Management
Business
Junior
December 1999
Age 7
Apex High School
(L-R) Nathan and Niki Kreel of the ECU
Swimming team.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
Women take
break from
conference
play
Lady Woifpack
invade Minges for
match
STKMIKN Sciirwim
XTUK tt Kl IKK
The first half of the CAA regular
season is over for the ECU volleyball
team. The Pirates and head coach
Kim Walker hope to regain control of
a season derailed by injury and
inexperience.
The season's early results looked
promising for the Pirates.
"We started off pretty strong the
first couple weeks of the season
Walker said. "Senior leadership was
definitely something we had in the
beginning
The Pirates jumped out to an 8-2
record before disaster struck.
During a match at the Pirate
Invitational in September, senior Kari
Koenning fractured her left arm in a
collision with a teammate.
"We had one of our senior leaders
get hurt and we've been struggling to "
get our feet back under us, WalkeC I
said. ; I
The injury to Koenning began aj li
stretch where the Pirates went 4-9.
Another factor in the volleyball! �
team's skid is their lack of offensive! 3
productivity. I
"Our problem is that we're nop ��$
generating any offense Walker said Zf
We have got to find a way to scored 23
We get the ball back well, but we! Eg
can't score points J ;
The Pirates' rocky season has not; J
been without bright spots.
"Our blocking and defense is! "
picking up" Walker said
The ECU blocking is ranked first
in the conference. ���
Another bright spot is the play of;
the freshmen. In ECU's loss to
conference leader James Madison on! ; I;
Friday, Sarah Kary, a freshman, led the! -I
team in kills, and fellow freshmen; g j
Cinta Claro and Liz Hall have also
played well this season. The- j
abundance of talented freshmen
bodes well for the future of ECU" M
volleyball. . t
"The future looks real bright. It's; I;
just a matter of growing through it
and that's a little tough Walker said.
Next week the Pirates resume
their conference schedule.
"Our focus right now is winning
conference games because we need
to position ourselves more to advance
in the conference tournament at the
end of the year Walker said.
Before ECU can play for CAA
redemption in the second half of
conference games, they host area rival
Friday night ;
���
i
North Carolina State,
Oct. 17 at 6 p.m.
"It's always fun to play ACC
schools Walker said. "It's getting to
the point where our conference can
compete with the ACC
1
Women's tennis season packed with wins
Players netting wins
for team
STKVK LOSKV
SIMCIR WTKITKK
The ECU women's tennis team has been
delivering one solid performance after
another in tournaments in the North
Carolina area. Most recently, an excellent
performance two weekends ago yielded more
victories for ECU's tennis players.
The women's tennis team played a
tournament at UNC-Wilmington Oct. 3-4.
ECU was one of four schools that sent teams
to compete. The other schools that showed
up were the College of Charleston, Coastal
Carolina, and the home team, UNC-
Wilmington.
"The College of Charleston was our only
real competition said Women's Assistant
Head Coach Brian Jackson. "They played
very well. We match up very evenly against
them
Each team had eight players come to the
UNC Wilmington tournament. They
competed in four different categories, called
flights, that ranged in levels from A to D.
The tennis team was hampered by the
unavailability of their best player, due to
family matters.
"We had to shuffle around our players
because of that, but we still did great
JjLkMjn said.
Despite that setback, several players took
crucial victories. Freshman Maggie Meginnis
won the C flight, turning in quite an
exemplary performance for her first season of
college athletics. Senior captain Mona Eek
took fourth place in the A flight. Junior Asa
Ellbring, a transfer student and native of
Sweden, won third place in the A flight.
"We've been doing very well this season
Jackson said. "There have only been three
tournaments that we have played in so far,

V
and we've done very well in all of them
One of those three tournaments was
hosted at ECU Sept. 26-28. The women's
tennis team took advantage of playing at
home and soundly defeated all the other
teams.
For the tennis team, the fall season is
really more of a warmup. Instead of
competing as a team, individual players
representing schools play and win by
themselves. The spring season is when the
matches become very intense and the players
seriously concentrate on the tennis court.
Next the women's tennis team plays a
SEE TENNIS. PAGE tt
'III
41
4
I

-�
m
�4
'�-�W





Th� Eut Cirolinisn
s
)01tS
Thursday, Octobtf 18, 1997 11
Stressed?
� We can help!
Sponsored By
Student Leadership
DeveJopmtnt Progowa
and the Division of
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"Humor and Stress Management:
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featuring Marie Ingram from "The HUMOR Project"
Wednesday, October 22, 1997
2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
"Tickets now on sale at the Mendenhall Student Center Central Ticket office
$15.00 admision includes the book and refreshments
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Fall tournaments test golfers
Coach looking for
solid play
JKRKMY ANDKRSOS
ST.UF WRITER
Consistency.
That is the one word ECU Golf
Coach Kevin Williams would like to
sec become a reality for his golf
team.
"We just aren't consistent
Williams said.
Although they have not been
consistent as a team, the Pirates(26-
21) have posted some good
individual scores, this fall.
Sophomore Marc Miller has played
especially well placing in the top ten
in the last two tournaments,
including a ninth place finish at the
UNC-Wilmington Belvedere
Intercollegiate.
"1 didn't play spectacular, but I
played pretty consistent both days
Miller said.
Williams would like to see the
rest of the team rise to Miller's level
of play.
"Our two, three, four players play
good and then have one bad round
every tournament Williams said.
They need three consistent solid
rounds. We need to help Marc out
The Pirates finished eighth in
the 17 team event held at Belvedere
Plantation in Wilmington. Williams
would like to see his team finish
closer to the top of the pack to make
a better case for postseason play
"We've really put ourselves in a
hole Williams said. "Wfc have
piaywell in the spring
These tournaments now, allow
the Pirates to gear up for conferc
matches, which are worth
conference championship.
The Pirates are current
competing Adams Cup of Ncwpoi
Williams is confident his team w
do well.
"We are real excited. Robby Perry
and Kevin Miller have been
struggling with there putting. Both
have improved in practice Williams
said.
The tournament field that will
challenge the Pirates this week in
Rhode Island includes two top 25
teams.
"We have the toughest schedule
that we've had since I've been
here Williams said.
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Last
women's soccer team
The Pirates of ECU made a second
attempt at a school-record eighth
win of the season here Tuesday, but
a hot Virginia Commonwealth squad
stopped ECU, scoring in the 63rd
minute for a 1-0 CAA win. With the
victory, VGU improved to 5-8-1,2-3-
1 in the CAA; while ECU fell to 7-7,
2-3 in the CAA, with this defeat.
The first half was a defensive
showcase as both teams were unable
to crack the scoreboard in the 45-
minute frame. At the intermission,
the Pirates had registered four shots
on goal to nine for the Lady Rams.
ECU sophomore keeper Amy
Horton (Raleigh, NC) tallied three
first-half saves; while VCU senior
keeper Nicole Bauguss had notched
two saves at the half.
. In the second half, Va.
Commonwealth scored the game-
winner when it redirected a ball
back into the goal box, and freshman
defender Traci ruhrmann knocked
in a header from five yards out at the
62:42 mark. Lady Ram sophomore
forward Annie Sullivan recorded the
assist on the play.
For the match, ECU tallied eight
shots, led bv sophomores Jill Davis
(Pinehurst, NC) and Chrisy
Bernabe (Burke, Va.) who had two
apiece. VCU recorded 10 shot
attempts with Sullivan providing
four. Horton notched six saves,
anchoring the back, line for the
Pirates for the entire 90 minutes.
Bauguss registered three saves for
the Lady Rams.
"It was an evenly-played match
said ECU head coach Neil Roberts.
"We got off to a rocky start to open
the contest, but we were able to
settle down and get our composure.
In the second half, VCU was able to
put some solid pressure on us which
prevented us somewhat from
generating any quality scoring
chances. It was unfortunate to lose
this one, but we arc still not out of
the conference race. Well regroup
and be ready for this weekends
match at JMU
The Pirates return to action on
Sunday, Oct. 19, at JMU and will
again be striving for a school-record
eighth win of the season, first touch
is scheduled for 1 p.m.
Tennis
continued from page 10
Siblings
continued from page 10
realrv frustrating LuCinda said.
"But we are really good, and I know
that if we pull together on the court,
we can turn things back around in
the right direction and play like we
did at the beginning of the season
The sibling swimmers share just
about everything that the Mason
sisters share other than a room.
Nathan Kreel began swimming at
the age of five, following in the
footsteps of both of his older sisters.
"Niki and I are only 14 months
apart, so we have always swam
together and done a tot of things
together Nathan said. "Even
chough we have our differences, we
get along like friends. No matter
what, we always end up okay
because nothing gets between us
Niki agrees that having part of
her family at ECU is an advantage-
"We really 'enjoy each other's
tournament hosted by Charieston
Southern this weekend. It will likely
be a much larger tournament than
the ones hosted by IFNC
Wilmington or ECU. Around seven
or eight teams are expected to show
up.
"We've done great against them
in the past Jackson said. "We
plaved them at the ECU
tournament. We're quite a bit
stronger than they are.
company Niki said. "We are
competitive with each other but
more so outside of swimming. He
understands what I am going
through and 1 can do the same for
him. It is nice to have him here for
when 1 need someone to talk to or
when I am feeling homesick
The Kreels' older sister Ten
swam at Carolina for two years.
Nathan said that if he could thank
one and only one person for their
support through his career as a
swimmer, it would definitely be her.
Niki refers to Teri as her role model.
"The idea to quit has crossed my
mind many times, but Ten has
always been there to encourage me
and bring me up when I am feeling
down Nathan said. "She really
pushes me to keep going
Nathan had his heart set on
attending Florida State University
until a recruiting trip persuaded him
to attend ECU.
"Everyone that I met at ECU was
really nice, and I saw how much
Niki liked it here, so I decided that
this was the best place for me to go
Nathan said.
Niki based her decision to come
to ECU on the fact that it was close
to home, and the people here were
so nice that she felt at home. Her
scholarship offering is what helped
her make her final decision among
other schools including NC State
and UNC-Wilmington.
Nathan enjoys volunteering and
said that if he were not involved in
swimming, he would spend a lot of
his time helping out with the
Special Olympics.
When not in the pool, Niki
enjoys being involved with other
sports and spending time with
friends. If swimming were not a part
of her life, she would dedicate more
time to being involved with clubs
and other school-related activities.
Both Niki and Nathan arc breast
strokers, so throughout their
swimming career, they have always
been on the side of the pool
cheering each other on.
"Growing up, it always worked
out that she would swim and then I
would or the other way around, so
we were always on the boards
together Nathan said.
The Fire
Thursday
Kernal
Goat
Friday
Underfoot
Saturday
Karl Shuman
Band
Sunday
tfttfMft
all day Sunday
4pm Panther
Game
Live Remote with
99X. 1st drawing
for Superbowl Toe
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to DJ Will
upstairs a
Greenville's
e Tavern
Thursdays
SI .00 Domestics
Fri&Sat
Sunday
32 ex. Domestic
Draft S1.6C
14 ox. Domertlo
Draft7R?
FREEFOOORi
NFL Ticket
on DSS
Monday
Night
Football
75c Southpaw
Tuesdays
wine tasting
Onix Cigar
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L Sports Bar
�' -rf . i'
rrr.





tmm
12 Thursday. October 16. 1997
Oi Lb
The East Carolinian
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)758-6909
(rTMOC COMM � 1 �M
COMIC BOOK
SHOW
SUN. OCT. 19th
RAMADA INN
Greenville. 9AM-5PM
FREE ADMISSION
For More Info, Call 758-6909.
Legislative panel
considers stadium, slots
plans
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) � It's
looking more and more like
lawmakers will return to the
Capitol for a special legislative
session next week a long way from
agreement on how to deal with the
Twins stadium issue.
But even though prior
agreement appears unlikely,
legislative leaders are now saying
they're inclined to limit the
session to a few days rather than
take advantage of the Nov. 30
deadline Twins owner Carl Pohlad
has imposed with his deal to sell
the team to North Carolina
businessman Don Beaver.
House Speaker Phil Carruthers
said Tuesday there aren't enough
votes to pass a stadium bill, and he
sees no movement that would
justify extending the session.
"I'm not sure it makes a
difference if we're talking a few-
days or a few weeks he said.
What is arguably the most
popular funding option, a
recommendation to pay for a
stadium with lottery and slot
machine money, wasn't rejected
outright by a key committee
Tuesday, but it was smothered in
alternative proposals.
The Legislative Commission
on Planning and Fiscal Policy is the
first committee to take up a task
force recommendation that the
state contribute S250 million to a
stadium from a combination of
user fees, lottery proceeds and
money from slot machines at
Shakopee's Canterbury Park-
Although the commission
didn't dismantle the
recommendation, it spent
considerable time discussing other
ideas � everything from lawsuits
to community ownership of the
team.
San Francisco awarded
2003 Super Bowl
WASHINGTON (AP) � Four
Open 7 Days a Week � Mon-Sat II - 10 � Sun 12-9
Good Food at a Good Price
Across from Carolina East
Mall in Pier One Shopping
Center, Hwy 11 South, Greenville -355-7168
We steam & use less oil � Lower Fat Cooking
years later than originally planned,
the Super Bowl will make its first
visit to San Francisco.
NFL owners today awarded the
city the 2003 title game, to be
played in a new stadium that will
replace 3Com Park.
The owners had initially-
awarded the 1999 Super Bowl to
San Francisco, but that was
contingent upon a proposed $26
million upgrade to 3Com Park.
Instead, voters in June approved a
$525 million mall and stadium
complex to be built next to the
current park
NFL commissioner Paul
Tagliabue had promised the
league would grant the San
Francisco a later Super Bowl to
replace the'1999 game if voters
endorsed the new stadium plan.
The Super Bowl will be played
in San Diego in 1998. Miami has
ben given San Francisco's spot in
1999. Atlanta will play host in 2000
and Tampa in 2001. The site of
the 2002 game will be decided at
the owners' spring meeting.
I
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I Raleigh-Sun. Oct. 19
10-5 Marriot on
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Glenwood across from
& CD
SHCW
Yard Sale I
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Sponsored by tf�e mil pledge
Class of 6amma Sigma Sigma.
� Crabtree Valley Mall
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Saturday, October 18
7am - 12pm
GUC Express
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1000'sof IP's- CD's
� 45's music collectibles
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� info 919-839-2153
Greenville Student 211 - Composite
Copyright 1997 -The Kroger Co. items I p�.� in CreerMte. We reserved right to Br
items Prices Good Thru Oct. 18,1997 wga. 151 Thur. 161 mi7lSattt
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WEDNESDAY CLASSICS NIGHT
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The Best in Classic,
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70's, 80's and
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Tortilla Chips
7.5-9-oz.
Assorted Varieties
Cap'n
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14-16-oz.
Assorted Varieties
Frozen
Red Baron Deep
Dish Singles
12-oz.
Kroger Taters or
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French Fries
2-lb.
Thirsty Thurs. LADIES NIGHT
In The DeliPastry Shoppe
Cooked Ham
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r






13 Thursday. October 16. 1997
c
lassifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�an
NISSAN ALTIMA 1995 GXE, au-
tomatic, air, cruise, AMFM cassette,
power windows and locks. $10,995
OBO. 757-3475.
FOUR FOUR-LUG ALUMINUM sev-
en star rims for sale. Asking $250.00.
Call Renee between 9:30 p.m. and
11:00 p.m 321-5570.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, FE-
MALE to share 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment 12 rent and 12 utilities.
Nice and quiet area. Call 758-5593.
STUN GUNSI SAFE
use. 919-946-6830.
AND easy to
.i.u�inr.Jt iivwnu, liVWVBOKi WSJBMSJST hi:
some units, laundry facilities. 5 blocks from
icampus, ECU bus services.
iranoJi" remratOjgf" alsnwapr freei
n. ll washiirfiriM rihk o5? SHtra
icampus
�AM fwptmm htm 2 hr amffncy amkmnm-
I
t
1
I
I
-J
� poparty
lantsg
onoQemery
ApoMnk 4 Bank Houmi
ROOMMATE NEEDED MALEFE-
MALE TO share 3BR duplex on Lewis
st 12 block from campus. Own room
and bath. S230month plus 13 utilities.
752-8118.
STANCILL DRIVE 2 BEDROOM, 1
bath duplex, cable TV, washerdryer
hook-up, refrigerator with ice maker,
S400month, pet fee, $500 deposit. Call
&J30-1491.
W

r
APT. FOR RENT: TWO bedroom, one
bath, dote to campus. Pets allowed.
$350 rent Call 752-3333.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share great 3 bedroom town-
house. Rent $205.00month plus 13
utilities. Call Apple or Jenl at 754-8157.
Please leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
sublease 3 bedroom in Witson Acres,
$230 a month. Call Tracy, 758-9245.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
8 PLAYERS Club Apts. 14 of rent and
expenses. Call todaY, 321-7613.
TWO OR THREE FEMALES needed
to take over lease ASAP. $220 per
.ijsnonth, 14 utilities. Please contact
Sheila, Yuka, or Lauren at 353-2471 or
jave a message.
I TO TAKE OVER LEASE, one bed-
room spacious apartment extra nice,
; washer and dryer hook up, basic cable,
water and sewage included. Call for
� more Information, 752-8085.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR TWO
f fbedroom apartment Female or male.
Z fCiose to campus. Rent $197.50. Call tor
imore information, 757-1274
FEMALE NEEDED ASAP TO sub-
- Sees� 2 bedroom apt. $212.50mo 12
- utilrties. Call Amy, 752-7838.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO FILL one
� ibedroom, one bath in upstairs of
house. $187.50 per month plus utilities
(deposit needed). Close to campus.
I Call 830-4943.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED-
PLAYERS Club Apts. 14 of rent and
i expense. Call today, 321-7613.
t TWO BEDROOM. OCTOBER-JULY.
J Washerdryer, hook-up, celling fans,
- pets allowed with fee. Very dose to
v campus, only $325 a month. Call 752-
: 0277 or 413-0978.
FUJI TAHOE MT. BIKE, all Shimano
components, Onza bar ends. Call Fred,
353-6228.
A PAIR OF 12" 400 watt Pioneer sub-
woofers in Q Logic fiberglass box. Ex-
cellent condition. Must see! Only $250.
Call or leave message for Lamont, 754-
0981.
LIGHT COLORED SOFA IN good
condition - $50. Like new TV stand on
wheels. $15 OBO. Call Susan, 758-7358
before 9:00 p.m.
FREE MOTOROLA PAGER, AVAIL-
ABLE options include voice mail e-
mail services. Call 1-800-784-6452
ld1675167 or write to free pagers, PO
Box 4112, Greenville, NC 27836-2112.
SOFA BED FOR SALEII Seats
3sleeps 2 comfortably. Great condi-
tion. Great for dorm or home. $55. Call
353-3138, leave a message.
CANNONDALE DELTA V500
MOUNTAIN bike. Front end suspen-
sion. Hardly used. Paid $1000, asking
$700 OBO. Includes Rhode Gear rack.
Trek helmet. 757-3475.
1995 MAXIMA, DARK GREEN. 5-
speed, exc. condition, loaded, non-
smoker, 1-owner. Very sporty. For
more details, call 830-4731.
LOVESEAT MADE BY THIS End Up
in very good condition. Asking $120
but Is negotiable. Phone Babs at 754-
2944 and leave massage.
FREESTYLE BIKES BY HARO, Mon-
gocse, Huffman, and Diamond
Back. Check out our freestyle ac-
cessories. Call 355-8050, ask for
Derrick or Benny.
Help Wanted
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
Part time HANDYMAN 3 hours
daily. ONLINE Information services
seeks a person to help with cleaning
leaves off lot, keeping windows
clean, going to get mail and other
minor errands.
M-F 7AM-10PM
Call Henry Parker at 757-2151
For Sale 1
BEAUTIFUL SOFA. LOVESEAT,
COFFEE table, two end tables, assort-
ed paintings, lamps and dresser. Ex-
cellent condition.Very cheap, must
sell ASAP. Call Mahr at 551-1841, leave
message, make offer.
RED 1988 SUBARU DL, great get-
around car for student. 95K miles.
Good condition. Must sell. $750 or will
take beet offer. Call 756-8458.
FOR SALE: 1995 HYUNDAI Accent
purple, tinted windows, AC, CD play-
er, keyless entry, new tires. Must sell!
Will let go cheap! Chris, 757-2037.
THE CATERING DEPARTMENT AT
ECU is now taking applications for
Banquet attendants. We offer flexible
work schedules and competitive pay.
Please pick up applications at the Cam-
pus Dining Office, Mendenhail Student
Center. EOE.
SEASONAL HELP NEEDED
(THROUGH Christmas). Hallmark
Creations, University Commons, 3040
So. Evans St Stop by ASAP
8 TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. DO
you like talking on the phone? If so, we
have the )ob for you. Hours: 5:30-
9p.m Monday-Thursday; 4:30-8p.m.
Sunday. Hourly pay plus bonuses. Ap-
ply in person, 4:30-8p.m� Energy Sav-
ers Windows and Siding, Inc Winter-
green Commercial Park, Suite 0, Fire-
tower Road, Greenville.
EARN
$750-$1500 WEEK
Raise all the money your group
needs by sponsoring a VISA
fundraiser on your campus.
No investment & very little time
needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for information today.
Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT �DU-
TIES INCLUDE the engraving and as-
sembling of plaques, trophies and oth-
er awardgift items. Highly developed
fine motor skills, the ability to align
and proof for quality, and being com-
fortable with computers is required.
Experience with Corel Draw (or a simi-
lar graphics package), and in layout,
design and assembly is preferred. This
person will need to be a team player
who can prioritize according to the
various processes involved in the
items on schedule. This person will
also be standing and walking for long
periods of time. This position involves
15-25 hours per week (including 5
hours for one Saturday each month).
Wage rate during the 3 week proba-
tionary period will be $5.75 per hour. If
employment continues after proba-
tion, the wage rate will be $7.00 per
hour. Call 756-4355, ask for Teresa.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED. Need
someone to work Sundays. Contact
Warren's "Hot" Dogs, 1938 North
Memorial Drive.
BRODY'S SEEKS FASHION FOR-
WARD individuals who can provide
friendly, courteous service. Work with
the fashions you love to wear: Ju-
niorsMisses, and Young Men's. Flexi-
ble schedules for the "early birds"
(10a.m. -2p.m.) or "night owls"
(12p.m9p.m. or 6p.m9p.m.). All po-
sitions include weekends. Merchan-
dise discount offered. Applications ac-
cepted Monday-Thursday, Brody's,
The Plaza.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS. THE ColorWorks is
currently recruiting on campus for a
limited number of summer '98 man-
agement positions. Gain Hands-on ex-
perience and build Your resume. Last
summers average earnings $7,223. For
more information and to schedule an
Interview call 1-800-477-1001.
MALE STUDENT SEEKING PER-
SONAL care attendant on Tuesday
and Thursday mornings. Only requires
minimum assistance. Preferably male.
Contact Shawn at 328-3139.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO WORK
part time or full time 2-3 days per week
10-30 hours a week. $10 per hour.
Must pass credit check, criminal and
drug test. Send resume to PO Box 493,
Tarboro, NC 27886.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE Mm great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7686.
SALES ASSISTANT- DUTIES IN-
CLUDE assisting customers, writing
up, pricing and scheduling orders,
proofing work-in-process and finished
products, assisting with production
and accounts as needed. This position
requires basic math skills, legible
handwriting, a friendly personality, a
helpful attitude, the ability to work un-
der pressure, standing and walking for
long periods of time. Position will in-
clude 15-25 hoursweek (including 5
hours for one Saturday each month).
Training pay is $5.25 during 3 week
probationary period, if employment is
continued after probation, wages will
be $6.00 per hour with regularly
scheduled reviews for increase. Cus-
tomer service experience preferred.
Call 756-4355, ask for Teresa.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics, Office of Student
Development is currently hiring full-
time ECU undergrad and graduate
students to tutor student-athletes in
the following subject areas: ACCT
2401; ASIP 2311, 3220, 4300; BIOL
1060; BIOS 1500; ECON 2133, 3030,
3960; FINA 3724; JUST 2000; MATH
1066, 2283, 3307; PHYS 1050; RCLS
2000; SOCW 1010, 3401. Also interest-
ed in graduate students with strong
background in PSYC, SOCW, andor
CDFR. Minimum 3.0 GPA required. Call
328-4550.
HELP NEEDED NOW TO prep and
paint in furniture painting studio. Ap-
prox. 5 to 10 hours per week. Painting
experience is helpful. Call Mark at 754-
8030.
Services
COSTUMESI WIDE SELECTION OF
rentals and custom-made. Many ac-
cessories available. Frani Boberg,
Farmvllle, 753-4009.
Need help?
TSuttitif Cntdi ' Stodutm � Akudttut
Pnftuietud ami huxptnsn
(919) 931-0022
Personals
� �'
LADIES: GIVE ME YOUR sore, ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur would
like to practice on your back. 1-800-
484-8546 (code 2465) or Brian, POB
8663. Greenville 27835.
Greek Personals
CAREGIVER NEEDED IN MY home
for five year old with mild lung disease
from 12:00-5:00p.m. Monday, Wednes-
day Friday. Must have own transpor-
tation, references. Criminal check.
Leave message after 5:00 p.m. 830-
9082.
eastcarolinian
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON. OUR tra-
dition continued this past weekend as
our families enjoyed a day of tallgating
and socializing. Thanks, guys. Love,
Alpha Phi
TO GAMMA SIGMA. GREAT time
had at the toga party and thanks for all
the support for Cardboard Village. The
Gentlemen of Pi Lambda Phi
TAU KAPPA EPSILON, THANKS
for the pre-downtown at Peasant's last
Wednesday night We had a blast!
Let's do it again soon! Love, the sisters
of Alpha Xi Delta
PI DELTA, ONCE AGAIN we had a
great time dancing the night away.
Can't wait for the next social. The Gen-
tlemen of Pi Lambda Phi
PHI TAU-PARENTS WEEKEND was
the best. Thanks for showing our par-
ents a great time. Lefs get together
again soon. Love, the sisters of Alpha
XI Delta
THE MU PLEDGE CLASS of Gamma
Sigma Sigma is proud of our Pledge
Mom. Thanks JLove for all your hard
work. We love you! Love, the pledges
THANK YOU ALPHA PHI for partid-
pating in the soda), it was a blast. We
hope it was as much fun for you all as
it was for us. The brothers of Theta Chi
GOOD LUCK ALECIA PAGE and
Sage Hunihan on your National Award
Nominations. Love, your Sigma sisters
DELTA ZETA BIG SIS'S you thought
you had us fooled last week, but we
will see who is fooled at the Big Sis
Party! Love, the new members.
THANK YOU SIGMA SIGMA Sigma
and Tau Kappa Epsilon for volunteer-
ing your time! Much appreciated,
Greenville Area Preservation Associa-
tion
THANKS ZETA TAU ALPHA for at-
tending the social last Thursday. It
was a blast and we can not wait until
the next one. The brothers of Theta Chi
TAU KAPPA EPSILON. THANKS
For showing our parents a good time
at the tailgate. We all had a good time
and we're looking forward to getting
together again, love, the Delta Zeta
sisters and new members
KAPPA SIGMA - THANKS FOR the
pre-downtown last Thursday night
We had a great time, lefs do it again
soon. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha XI Delta
CONGRATS TO PI LAMBDA PHI. 5
years Today! Greeks come celebrate
with us at our Band Party on Saturday
night after Greek Games.
DELTA ZETA BIG SISTERS: Thanks
for spoiling us last week. You guys are
the best. Love, your Little Sisters.
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1827 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-3526
Services: Worship 11 a.m
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF CHRIST
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE
752-6376
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m 6
p.m. Sunday. 7 p.m. Wednes-
day
WE WELCOME YOU! LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAY
FROM HOME
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Corner of Crestline Blvd. &
Greenville Blvd.
756-6545
Services: Bible School 10 a.m
morning worship 11 a.m
evening worship 6 p.m.
REACHING OUT TO
GREENVILLE WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)
756-6600
Services: Sunday School 9:45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAY
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 AM
EACH SUNDAY
THE MEMORIAL
BAPTIST CHURCH
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
756-5314
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinner
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHER
STUDENTS FOR AWESOME
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANT
WORD
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
752-1898
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP a SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
ECU CAMPUS
ST. JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E 6th Street
752-6154
Services: Worship-Sunday
8:30 a.m 11 a.m Sunday
School 9:45 a.m.
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS
ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
A VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FOR INSPIRATION
UNITARIAN UNIVER-
SALIST CONGREGA-
TION OF GREENVILLE
131 Oakmont Drive
355-6658
Services: 10:30 a.m. each
Sunday
A CHURCH GROWING IN
CHRIST. CARING FOR PEOPLE.
PROCLAIMING THE WORD
GREENVILLE CHRIS-
TIAN FELLOWSHIP
1411 S. Evans Street
752-2100
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
SINGLE VISION-PBCS
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY;
ECU STUDENTS B SINGLES
WELCOME
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST
CHURCH
1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-2822
Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
10:45 a.m 6:30 pjn
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
COME AND JOIN US IN
PRAISING THE LORD!
SYCAMORE HILL
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
226 W. 8th Street
758-2281
Services: Every Sunday
For information about being included in our Church Directory call 328-6366.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
$ G A S H .nd.ho.ri Good J�.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO. LEVI, GAP. ETC.
We also buy: GOLD k. SILVER � Jewelry 4: Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the partdng lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer
With the help of everyone who plans and schedules activities on campus.
we're compiling the most complete calendar of campus events available.
IF you're planning an event, go to our web site and submit it to our calendar.
If you're wondering what's happening, go to our web site to find out.
Campus Calendar - it's just another service of eastcarolinian

"jflp
m





14 Thursday, October 16, 1SS7
JLCtkjO
V.t East Carolinian
Other
QOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on SI. Delinquent tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your Area. ToM Free
1,800-218-9000 Ext H-3726 for current
listings.
LADIES, ATTRACT THE RIGHT
man! Get dates, attention, love. Sensa-
tional techniques, call for FREE Wom-
en's Health and Fitness Series Catalog,
ECI Libraries 454-0039 ext 1.
STOOO'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART-
time. At Home. Toll Free (1)800-218-
9000 Ext T-3726 for Listings.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Pomh-
es, Cadillacs, (Rievys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free (1)800-218-9000 Ext A-3726
for current listings.
WOMEN, WANT THE PERFECT rela
tionahip, healthdiet? Our Women's
Health and Fitness Series shows ycu
how! Call for our FREE report ECI
Books, 454-0039, ext 1.
Announcements
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION
LACK fun and energy? Student Lead-
ership Development Programs hat the
games for youl! Thursday, October 18-
4p.m. at 109 Mendenhat! - Steve Bob-
bit Adventure Program Director, will
organize games that can re-energize
and motivate your members. Call 328-
4796 to register.
ADVANCED CLIMBING SESSION
II: Come join us every Wednesday
starting Oct. 15 through Nov. 19, Reg-
istration has already passed. Deot. of
Rec Services 328-6387
A HAUNTED FOREST. The Recrea-
tion and Leisure Studies Department
at East Carolina University in conjunc-
tion with Plggly Wiggly is sponsoring
"A Haunted Forest on October 28. 29
and 30th from 6 to 10 p.m. The event Is
to be held rain or shine at the Frlsbee
Golf Course on East Carolina's cam-
pus. Admission is $2.00 for adults and
$1.00 for children under 10. Special
Guests for this event will include the
Governor's Program and Power of
One.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL of Medicine Readers Thea-
ter Company presents "Laundry" end
"Ambulance" two stories about prac-
ticing medicine by Susan Onthank
Mates, M.D author of The Good Doc-
tor. A discussion will follow the perfor-
mances. Brody Medical Sciences
Building, Room 2s-12, 12:30 p.m
Monday. October 20, 1997. Free and
Open to the Public. For further infor-
mation contact Department of Medical
Humanities, 816-2797.
THURSDAY. OCT. 18, SENIOR Red-
tal, Chris Whitehurst, percussion, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hail. 9:00 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct 18 - Clarinet Quartet, Nathan
Williams, Director. A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. 7:00 p.m. Sunday, Octo. 19 - East
Carolina Symphony Orchestra, Doug-
las Morrison, Conductor, Wright Audi-
torium, 3.00 p.m. Sun. Oct. 19 - Facul-
ty Rectal, "The Music of T.J. Ander-
son Mark Taggart, saxophone, Lou-
ise Toppin, soprano, John B. O'Brien,
piano with guest artists William
Brown, tenor and James Dargan, vio-
lin, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:06 p.m.
Monday, Oct 20 - Faculty rectal, Mark
Ford, percussion. A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hail, 3:00 p.m.
BACKPACKING-CRANBERRY Wit-
DERNESS, WV: Backpacking at Cran-
berry Wilderness, WV starts Oct. 17-
19. Registration has already passed.
Dept. of Rec Services 328-6387
FREE WEIGHT TRAINING: TAKE ad-
vantage of the free training Oct 18 at
10:30 a.m12:30 p.m. The session will
be held at the Student Recreation Cen-
ters Fitness Area. Dept of Rec Servic-
es 328-6387
THE SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT of Management (SAM) will
hold its 3rd Annual Yard Sale Satur-
day, October 18. Rain or shine, it will
take place next to Parker's BBQ on
Memorial Drive. Contact 756-2816 to
offer any donations to this fundraiser.
PSI CHI OFFICERS WILL meetWed-
nesday, October 22, at 5:00 p.m. in the
Pel Chi library. '
LAST CHANCE: IRONMAN REGIS-
TRATION extended! The fitness chal-
lenge requires completion of 26 mites
on the track, 2 miles In the pool, and
116 miles on the tectrix bike. Competi-
tors are eligible for prizes In addition
to the distinction of conquering the
multi-skill event Last date for register-
ing is now thru Friday, October 17. Fur-
ther information is available at the
SRC Main Office 328-6387.
CLIMBING-LINVULE GORGE: THE
climbing expedition of Unville Gorge
begins Oct. 17-19. Registration has al-
ready paseed. Dept of Rec Services
328-6387
E.C.U. LAW SOCIETY WILL hold its
next meeting on Thursday, October
16th In Rawi Room 130. Join us as we
discuss what It takes to get into law
school, and what being a lawyer is all
about! Open to all majors!
LIFEGUARD TRAINING: TRAIN TO
be a lifeguard Oct. 20 through Nov. 12
at the Student Recreational Center's
pool. It will be held at 6:30 -9:30 p.m.
Dept of Rec Services 328-6387
LADIES, GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
presents Plck-A-Pirate at the Attic
Tuesday, October 21, 1997 8:00 p.m.
Doors open at 7.00 p.m. with all pro-
ceeds benefiting TEDI BEAR: Child Ad-
vocacy Center. Bring your wallet. Buy
a Date
YOGA CLASSES: YOGA CLASSES
will be offered by Recreational Servic-
es at East Carolina University. The
classes wilt meet Oct. 13-Nov. 5 Mon-
day and Wednesday nighrs from 5:15
p.m6:30 p.m. These das&es, instruct-
ed by Debi Neswander, ar open to the
general public. Cost of the classes is
$15 for SRC members and $25 for non-
members. For more Information
please call 328-6387.
-I'VE GOT THE TIME. Do you? The
Key is Time Management! Learn to fit
ait of your activities into one week.
Stephen Gray, Assoc. Director Uni-
versity Unions will present this pro-
gram Monday, October 20 at 4:00 p.m.
in MSC Multi-Purpose Room. Call
Student Leadership Development Pro-
grams at 328-4796 for details.
SWIM STROKE CLINIC: THIS is a
class for intermediate swimmers who
want to improve stroke efficiency and
speed, turn technique and develop an
effective training program. Classes
meet Tues. and Thure. from 6:30p.m
7:30 p.m. October 14-23. Register at
ECU Recreational Services. Call 328-
6387 for more information.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH WILL be sponsoring a
Men's Conference on Friday, October
17 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, October
18 beginning at 8:30 a.m. Ait men 13
and older) are invited to attend. Break-
fast and lunch will be served. There is
not an admission or registration fee.
The Conference will be held at Com-
munity Christian Academy located at
2009 Highway 33, Greenville, NC on
Old Pactoius Road. Pastor James D.
Corbett will be ministering along with
special guest Van Crouch. For more in-
formation please call the church at
752-5683.
NO HOLDS BARRED1: BE prepared
to be pushed to new levels. This class
combines elements of Intensive aerob-
ics and resistance training. Join us
Oct 20 through Nov. 16 every Mon. &
Thu. at 6:30-9:30 p.m. in the Student
Recreational Center's Studio 238. Dept.
of Rec Services 328-6387
COME JOIN US AT The Wesley
Foundation for fellowship missions,
worship and fun. For the rest of the
semester we wilt be holding a Sunday
night worship service at 7:30 p.m. in
the chapel at the Methodist Student
Center (on 5th Street) across from Gar-
ret Han. We also hold a Wednesday
night meeting from 6p.m7p.m. to'
plan activities throughout the semes-
ter on October 22 and November 19.
We will be having dinner at these
meetings for free!
STRESSED? WE CAN HELP! "Hu-
mor & Stress Management: Tickling
Stress Before It Tackles You Wednes-
day, October 22. 2p.m6p.m. In MSC.
Presented by Margie Ingram of the Hu-
mor Project. Seating' limited. Buy
tickets st MSC Centra! Ticket Office.
Sponsored by Student Leadership De-
velopment Programs & Division of
Student Life. 328-4796
WEIGHT-TRAINING CLINIC: LEARN
how to build those muscles properly
by joirjing us Thursday, Oct 16. The
Clinic will be held at 6:30-7:30 p.m. in
the Fitness Area. Dept. of Rec Services
328-6387
AEROBICS SESSION II: COME join
us for our aerobics session beginning
Oct 13. This program is $20 and can
be purchased in the Student Recrea-
tional Center office from 9tf0 a.m6:00
p.m. Bring Student ID. The sessions
will be in Rooms 238, 239, 240 in the
Student Recreational Center. Dept. of
Rec Services 3286387
ADULT BEGINNER TENNIS LESS-
ONS: learn forehand, backhand, serve
and game rules In this beginner tennis
classes offered by Recreational Servic-
es. This program is open to SRC mem-
bers and the general public for a fee of
$20 and $35 respectively. Lessons are
held Tuesday and Thursday nights
from 8:00 p.m9:30 p.m. from October
14th to October 30th. Register at the
Student Recreation Center between
9:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Call 328-6387
for more information.
ECU FMAINVESTMENT CLUB
MEETING on Wednesday, October
22nd at 4p.m. in GCB1007 featuring an
in-depth discussion of Licensing and
Designation. This meeting is proudly
sponsored by Professor O'Cool's.
RESUME WORKSHOPS. POLISH
UP your skills in developing a profes-
sional resume to use in your Job
search. Learn th latest techniques in
making it technology friendly. Gradu-
ating students will need resumes for
career days, interviews on campus,
mailing and faxing to employers, and
putting them on file with Career Serv-
ices. Workshops will be held in Career
Service, Room 103, 701 E. Fifth Street
on Wed. Oct 15 at 4:00 and Tue. Oct
21 at 2:00 p.m. Resume Critique ses-
sions will be held Wed. Oct 15 at 10:00
for those who would like to have their
already-prepared resumes reviewed
by a staff member.
INTERVIEW LIKE A PRO) Find out
how to sell yourself in an employment
Interview at Career Services on Thur.
Oct 16 at 3:00 or Wed. Oct. 22 at 4:00.
Learn the "Three Ps" of Interviewing -
Preparation, Packaging and Presenta-
tion.
PSI CHI WILL SPONSOR a ORE
practice exam on Saturday, October 18
from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. in R130. All
majors welcome! There will be a $5
fee to participate.
CAREER SERVICES ORIENTATION.
SENIORS and graduate students
graduating in December 1997 or
SpringSummer 1998 are invited to
register with Career Services for help
In your job search! Come to our Orien-
tation on one of the following dates:
Tue. Oct 21 at 2:00 p.m. or Learn how
to use the many services available to
you such as interviews on campus, re-
sume referral to employers, reference
(credentials) file, Internet job search-
ing, job listings and much more.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARE-
NESS MONTH Activities: Interfaith
Breakfast - Thursday, October 16, at
the Church of God, 7:30-9:00 a.m. This
breakfast will involve leaders from
many faiths, religious groups, and
concerned citizens discussing how to
end violence against women and their
children. 1 Year Anniversary Sale - Sat-
urday, October 25 makes 1 year My
Sister's Closet has been operating.
There will be a bag sale from 9:00 a.m.
to 1:00 p.m. Candlelight vigil & T-Shirt
Display - Thursday, October 30 at the
Percolator Coffee Shop from 6:00-7:30
p.m. On display will be T-shirts with a
message concerning the impact that
domestic violence.has had on sur-
vivors. The vigil is to honor women
who have lost their lives at the hands
of an intimate partner. To register for
these events call New Directions at
758-4400.
Travel
���EARN FREE TRIPS&CASH!���
CLASS TRAVEL needs students to
promote Spring Break 1998! Sell 15
fips and travel free! Highly motivated
students can earn a free trip and over
$10,000! Choose Cancun, Bahamas.
Mazattan, Jamaica or Florida! North
America's largest student tour opera-
tor! Call Now! 1-800-838-6411.
AAAAI SPRING BREAK CANCUN
& Jamaica $379! Book Early-Save $50!
Get A Group-Go Free! Panama City
$129! South Beach (Bars Close 5AM!)
$129! 3Dringbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386.
AAAAI SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS Party Cruise! 6 Days $279! In-
cludes Meals, Free Parties, Taxes! Gist
a Group-Go Free! Prices Increase
Soon-Save $50! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus for a limited number of summer
'98 management positions. Cain Hands-on
experience and build your resume. Last
"summers average earnings 7,223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and to schedule an inierview
Call 1-600-477-1001.
Uphold
your 1 st
amendment
right:
Freedom of
the press!
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at
eastcarolinian
today!
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 16, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 16, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1232
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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