The East Carolinian, October 14, 1997






r1
:
TUESDAY
EASTCAROUNAUNrVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Fridley accused of making false statements to media
McLawhorn asks Board of
Elections to look into comments
ambkr Tatun
STAFF WHITF.H
The District 3 race for City Council heated when Steve
McLawhorn challenged his opponent, Inez Fridley, on
her statements concerning student voter registration.
Fridley stated that when a student registers in Pitt
Towel theft
problem at
Student Rec
Center
Loss causes switch to
cheaper, smaller towels
County he should change his
address on his driver's license and
pay local taxes.
Fridley said, "The posters on
campus make voting seem easy.
It's just not the case.
Steve McLawhorn has found
supporting evidence that proves
Fridley's comments as false;
however, she still stands by her
words.
In Fridley's letter to the editor
that can be found on the opinion page, she says,
Steve McLawhorn
"Students who choose to register in
Greenville should be informed of
their responsibilities pertaining to
their new residence
An inspector with the Department
of Motor Vehicles, Andy Riggs said
a citizen does not have to change
their driver's license when they
change their voter registration.
"The law, according to the DMV,
says when you register here (Pitt
county) a duplicate driver's license
is required said Fridley.
Inez Fridley
Margaret Hardee, the director of the Pitt County
Board of Elections, said the board does not ask people if
they have changed their licenses or if they pay local
taxes when they vote.
In The Dairy Reflector, Steve McLawhorn said,
"Both of these things are false.You don't have to have a
current license or pay local taxes to vote. It makes
sense. What about people who don't have a driver's
license?"
"I was simply reflecting that this has been an issue in
the last two elections said Fridley. "I did not say
students should not vote
Jennifer vickkrs
staff write
ECU's Student Recreation Center has lost
almost 500 towels since Aug. 1.
"Overall, to provide the towel service,
from laundry to soap to personnel managing
those towels, it costs about $1 per student.
So, it costs us about $17,000 to maintain that
towel service said Todd King, marketing
coordinator.
King claims that in the last two months
seven dozen large towels and 33 dozen hand
rowels have been stolen. This problem,
noticed back in March, is threatening the
future of the towel service the SRC
provides.
The first step the SRC implemented was
to go from the big, luxurious, terry-cloth
towels, which cost $3.17 per towel, to
smaller terry-cloth towels, costing $1.75 per
towel.
"People arc walking out of the SRC with
the nice towels; therefore, causing all of the
SRC users to have to use a cheaper, smaller
towel King said.
Students have already started
complaining about the smaller towel the
SRC had to start using.
The next step the SRC implemented was
to limit the number of towels the students
were allowed to use.
"The service has been exacerbated by the
fact that students grab a towel, wipe their
face and grab another. The students use too
many towels. They use one to stand on, one
for the hair and a couple to dry off with.
We'll go into the locker room and find them
on the floor or find some still folded that the
students didn't even use said Pat Cox,
associate director for the SRC.
The service has gone from the ability to
use an unlimited amount of large towels, to
the ability to use just one large towel.
Howerver, the towel theft didn't stop;
therefore, the students are now only allowed
two small towels per person.
"We're doing all we can. We think it is a
vital service, we think the students
appreciate it, and we're doing all we can to
save it. By January, if this stealing does not
stop, we might have to do something
different. If it came down to it, whether to
have the towel service or increase student
fees to maintain the service, more than likely
we would discontinue the towel service, or
limit it severely in some fashion King said.
Towels arc not only being stolen at the
Marguerite Benjamin, a graduate student, helps graduate student Carla Pastor. Matt Coley and Jeff Daniels in the Writing Center.
PHOTO BY AMNDA PROCTOfl
ECU trying to
compensatearto
graduate salaries
Natasha Phillips
STAFF WRITER
Large towels, like the one student Robert Ross is
picking up above, have been disappearing from
the SRC.
PHOTO BT AMNDA PROCTOR
S�E TOWEL .PAGE 3
Low salary for graduate students at ECU is a
direct downfall to being a smaller university.
A recent survey in The East Carolinian
concluded that ECU offers a lower salary than
several other universities and no medical
benefits to their graduate teaching assistants.
However, the article did not include the
reasons why ECU lags behind other state
universities.
"All universities want to be able to offer their
graduate teaching assistants sufficient salaries
and adequate medical benefits; however, not
all universities are able to do so. We simply do
not have the funding. North Carolina supplies
funding to universities based on a formula
driven process. The larger the university, the
higher the probability for financial assistance
and additional state funding said Andrea
Harrcl, administrative manager for the division
of research and graduate studies.
ECU does offer other services to the
student body; however, some of these
programs don't technically qualify as benefits.
"We offer 63 out-of-statc waivers a year
based upon the student's admission testing
scores and overall GPA. It's based on a first
come, first serve basis Harrcl said. "When the
63 are gone, that's it. Students do have to have
an assistantship in order to get the waiver;
however, it's not a benefit because it's not part
of the assistantship
In addition to offering numerous
educational benefits, several departments, also
offer advancement possibilities.
The English department has approximately
45 graduate student
assistants who work in
specialized lab settings
or participate in
tutorial work programs.
"Some of our graduate
teaching assistants
may attend
conferences and
present papers. The
English department,
out of our own funds,
helps students defray
costs for presenting
papers. For example,
we may pay for
mileage. In other words, we'll pay for a van for
out-of-state conferences said Angel Savage,
assistant to the chair.
The English department offers stipends
through research; however, the math
department doesn't offer any benefits other
than the pay.
"We have between seven and ten graduate
teaching assistants every semester. When I
receive extra funding information, I make it
available to the students. It's also posted
outside of my door said Dr. Robert Hursey,
director of graduate studies.
ECU may not currently offer any of the
major benefits of larger state universities, but
the faculty and staff are working on promoting
new ideas and new programs. Hopefully, these
innovative plans will eventually materialize.
"There's always talk to do more for
students Harrcl said. "Currently, nothing's in
writing. It's in the discussion phase and no one
knows what will become of it
Graduate level
on
Graduate
Students
1392
1993
m&A
1995
1996
2,913
2,959
3,068
3,147
3,11 a
fc What does a graduate
assistant do?
: A graduate assistant works
for a specific department,
usually the department they are
getting their degree from, while
attending classes.
Q: How many graduate
programs are offered at ECU?
A: ECU offers 49 graduate
programs. The most popular
programs are in the School of
Education.
Q: How many class hours are
considered full-time for a
graduate student?
Ms Nine class hours.
Q: How many graduate
students are currently enrolled
at ECU?
Ms The preliminary figure for
this year is 2,844; exact
numbers not currently available
Check out this week's
focuS
downtown-
Alcohol
deaths
affect
campus
groups
IFC sets guidelines
regulating alcohol
Jim Martin
STAFF WKIIKR
Recent deaths on college
campuses arc opening eyes to
alcohol awareness.
Alcohol is a big issue on
college campuses, especially
concerning fraternities and
sororities.
The fraternity and sorority
groups at ECU abide b rules of
their own, aside from rules the
national headquarters
establishes.
The country has recently
had to death with alcohol
related deaths at LSI' and
MIT. These deaths are forcing
many colleges to step back and
take a look at themselves and
their use of alcohol.
"Our IFC has attempted to
take a responsible approach to
the problem of alcohol abuse.
When there have been
problems they IFC have
responded by holding the
individual group or members
accountable. Currently they
arc reclairifing their policies in
light of the tragic events at
LSU and MIT said Dr. Ronald
Sp.icr, dean of students.
The national headquarters
for these groups sets
guidelines to ensure the safety
of the students. Prohibiting
drinking games and illegal
drugs arc just a couple of the
rules established. The IFC set
aside rules of their own that
further ensure safety, such as,
prohibiting kegs, liquor stored
in large containers and alcohol
at intramural events, rush
functions or pledge programs.
Furthermore, these groups
contain written alcohol
programs which members
should attend.
"These programs try to
educate on the risk. We spend
a lot of time educating
members on the use of
alcohol said Assistant Dean of
Students Laura Sweet.
The university as a whole,
introduces alcohol-free events
for the entire student body to
participate. This gives
students an opportunity to
have fun and not drink.
'The university has an
attempt to give an alcohol free
environment such as the
Midnight Madness on
Halloween night Sweet said.
Duke University has
stepped forward and decided
to make changes of their own.
The university has banned the
distribution of alcohol by
fraternities. This decision was
voted on by their own Inter
fraternity Council (IFC).
V???????'
TODAY
Y partly cloudy
High 82
Low 58
y partly cloudy
fc High 70
Jk. Low 53
WEDNESDAY Dld Y�U knOW that
1996 there were 10,277
women enrolled at ECU
and only 7,202 men.
opinion5
Is Fridley concerned
about the students?
lifestyle8
The mysterious Edward
Drood
sports.
10
Pirates lose first game
in Conference USA
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLQG,
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across Irom Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
i





WHMM
i'leWS
The East Carolinian
Friends of Joyner Library sponsor book sale
Hot, dry weather stunts pumpkin crops
.4SBORO (AP) - A hot summer and too little rain has squashed the
owth in some pumpkin patches. .
Agronomists say that many of the pumpkins that do survive may be
russhapen and look odd. . . � Kir - .
Lcssthan 10 percent of pumpkin producers irrigate, said N.C. State
orticulturist Jonathan Schultheis. Pumpkins aren t a cash c?rop and farmers
cus exrjensive irrigation efforts on crops like tobacco.
XtSS say There arc between 100 and 500 pumpkin growers ,n
sforth Carolina. About 3,000 acres of pumpkins were grown last year,
cording to the state Agriculture Department.
Last year. Hurricane Fran damaged pumpkin patches. This yeai; heat
rid lack of rain is to blame.
Citizens protest drug trade death
DURHAM (AP) - A citizens' group trying to call attention to
drug trade took its message to the streets with a roasch to the grave ot a
teen-ager kilted in a drug dispute.
About 25 people, mostly teenagers, walked Sunday GreySronc
jBaptisc Church to Wbodlawn Cemetery and the grave of Stan Lmory; a
Southern High School student.
J " Emory, 17as shot dead in 1978 after a dispute over h� drug d�ds-
Ted Stone, chairman of Citizens United to Kght Drug Abuse, arranged
the walk across Durham because, he said, Emory s(death illustrates the
depth of America's dmg problem. He was a friend of the wcum.
Legendary John Denver dies in plane crash
PACIFIC GROVE, Calif. (AP) � John Denver, whose 70s Juts suchje
'Roci Mountain High" and "Take Me Home, Country Roads gained
him millions of fans worldwide, was killed when ha experimental plane
crashed into Monterey Bay. He was 53. ��. ��h
The identity of the body pulled from the waters after Sunday s crash
was confirmed from fmgcrpnnts seat from Colorado, Monterey County
Sheriff Norman Hicks said today. An autopsy was planned. .
As the sun rose over the crash site today, a Coast Guard helicopter
circled overhead, appearing to took for more debns from the crash, and a
Coast Guard ship floated over the sise about 100 yards from shore.
, The plane, which he owned, was made of fibergtass with a single engine
and two scats. It was considered an experimental aircraft, saidl'acinc Grove
police Lt Carl Millet It took off fromMdnterey Airport stortry after 5 p.m.
Sunday, with the first reports of a crash at 5:27 p.m. Only Denver was
3bWitness Carolyn Pearl told KCBA-TV that she saw a puff and heard a
"poppinc" sound before the crash. ,
Denver, a licensed pilot, was in a previous plane accident in April ivsv
He walked away uninjured after the 1931 biplane he was piloting spun
around while taxiing at an airport in northern Arizona.
Gas prices continue to decline, survey says
�LOS ANGELES (AP) - Gasoline prices declined nationwide despite a
�rise in cruder priow wggered-by tensions in theMtddfc East, an industry
iThe lighted average gasoline cost, including all grades and taxes, was
$1.2817 pet gallon Friday, according to the Lundberg Survey of 10000
stations nattomvide. That was down 2.72 cents from the last survey Sept.
19 and down about 4 cents since the summer peak on Sept. 5.
! Lundberg said the autumn drop in gasoline usage, combined with a
jKsalthy supply of gasoline, brought about the price decline.
At seff-service pumps nationwide, regular gasoline averaged 51.J3o5,
mid-grade was $U350and premium was SL4175. miAM. ��
At fail-service pumps, regular gasoline averaged $1.5903, mid-grade was
$1.6750 and premium was Ji.7421. .
The oil-BCh Middle East has been tense since Sept. 29, when Iranian
warplane bombed two Iranian insurgent bases in southern Iraq, violating
the 'nov f,one" created by the United States and its allies.
JAC.OI Kl.INK D. KlU.l.tM
NKWS tniTiii
There will be a book sale this week
at Joyner library, sponsered by the
Friends of Joyner Library.
All proceeds of this sale will go to
buy more books, periodicals, and
any other equipment which the
library mav need.
"VWc support the library and its
needs with the money we make
from book sales said Richard
McKee, a member of the Board of
Directors for the Friends of Joyner
Library.
These sales arc held twice a year,
and this vear will take place on
Wcdesday'from 9-8 and Thursday
from 9-5 in tht lobby of the new
addition.
In addition to the book sales, the
Friends of Joyner also sell artistic
prints by local aitist Bob Rttman for
$50 each and an historic map of
eastern North Carolina as it was in
1733 for $10 each.
The Friends also have
established an endowment for the
have an endowment, and
they are going to put a bronze
plaque up ui Joyner with the names
of people who gave1,000 or morer
McKee said.
Other funding efforts offer
contributors the chance to put their
name on a part of the library.
"We're also trying to get
donations for those study cubicles
and study areas. People who give a
little more can fund one of those
and have their name put on it
April Matthews (Ml) and Rhonda Joyner (right) prepare for the book sale that is beim8 sponsored by Friends of Joyne. library.
Mtero sv amahoa woctm
McKee said.
While the money raised by the
Friends is primarily used for new
books and periodicals, it is not
limited to those things.
"If the library needs computers
or whatever they needwe put the
money in a fund and they use it for
their needs McKee said.
The Friends was established in
1977 and has been helping to fund
the library ever since.
"Once you establish something
like this, and get people
interested, it becomes Xpart of the
library, and they count on that
help McKee said.
The Friends hope to get a good
response from their fund-raising
efforts this week and on a
continuing basis, especially from
students.
"I don't think we've
communicated with the students as
much as maybe we should have.
They're the primary users of the
library. Vfc don't expect them to
join, but we would hope they would
support us McKee said.
Lawyers quiz Ma Jones' mother
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) �
Paula Corbin Jones showed up at a
downtown law office Monday as
depositions began in her sexual
harassment lawsuit against
President Clinton.
Mrs. Jones, and husband Steve
accompanied her mother, Delmer
Lee Corbin, who was among the
first potential witnesses questioned
by lawyers in advance of a May trial.
A sister of Mrs. Jones, Lydia Cathcy,
is expected to give a deposition
under oath Tuesday about what
Mrs. Jones told them about an
alleged 1991 hotel-room encounter
with Clinton.
Mrs. Jones' appearance came a
month before she is to be
questioned by Clinton attorney
Robert Bennett.
She and her husband emerged
with Mrs. Corbin after u morning-
long session at the law office of
Clinton's local attorney, Kathlyn
Graves. Neither of Clinton's
Washington lawyers attended.
Mrs. Corbin hid her face with her
hands as they left the building.
Mrs. Jones said she did not give a
statement Monday but would soon.
She waved off other questions from
reporters.
Mrs. Corbin did not answer
telephone calls to her home
Monday afternoon. Mrs. Cathey has
an unlisted telephone number.
Holmes said other depositions
would be taken later this week in
Fayetteville, but he declined to
identify who else would be
questioned.
Mrs. Jones claims Clinton
exposed himself and asked her to
perform oral sex in an alleged
encounter May 8, 1991, when he
was governor and Mrs. Jones was a
state employee.
She has accused Clinton of
sexual harassment. Mrs. Jones also
sued state trooper Danny Ferguson
for defamation, accusing him as the
source of a published account that
depicted her as eager to be
Clinton mistress. Both arc named
in the $700,000 suit.
Ferguson's lawyer. Bill Bristow,
has subpoenaed a half-dozen
witnesses to attest to Mrs. Jones'
sexual reputation, including past
boyfriends and a former employer,
in depositions to begin Friday.
bbies
Biair and Sinn Fein hold historic meeting
BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP) - Prime Minister Tony Blair held
historic talks with Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams today, burning the first
British leader in 76 years to meet with a member of the IRA-aHicd party.
Blair's aides confirmed he shook hands with the Sinn Fein Icadei;
although with cameras banned from the meeting the politically volat.le
gesture took place out of public sight. An angry Protestant crowd later
booed Blair for offering his hand to Adams, shncking, lraitor!
; It was the first meeting between a British prime minister and a Sinn
ficin leader since David Lloyd George met Michael Collins inl9Zlhen
they signed the treaty giving the overwhelmingly Catholic Republic of
rc Later today, about 100 Protestants jeered and jostled Blair when he tried
to tour a predominantly Protestant district of Belfast.
Satellite images show Indonesian fires may be
increasing
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) � Satellite images appear to show an increase
in the number of Indonesian forest fires adding to the smoky haze over
Southeast Asia, the government said today � cn�tm
The haze drifting over Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, southern
Thailand and parts of the Philippines spread today with the return of dry,
hot weather.
A government coordinating center said the number of hot spots, or
suspected fires, had risen from 40 over the weekend to 62 today.
ksaid ground inspections would be needed to determine whether each
hot spot was a wildfire More hot spots might also be hidden by the thick
1Thc increase in hot spots came less than a week after rain doused the
flames in some areas. , n
Most of the wildfires are burning on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo.
Many were deliberately set by plantation owners and timber companies to
clear land cheaply. . . . Lm rv���i
Britass Saloh, an environmental official in the province ot ientrai
Kalimantan on Borneo, told the official Antara news agency that the rain
forests would take 25 years to recover from the fires.
After several days of showers and relatively clear weather, Singapore
issued a health alert today as murky, gray smog increased. �
The air quality recently has been good or moderate, providing relict
from the noxious haze. The Pollutants Standard Index at mid-morning was
at a level considered unhealthy, the Ministry of Environment said.
� DWI Assessments, Evaluations And Treatment Programs
�Counseling services include
Individual. Family, and Group Therapy
Your assessment & treatment (if required) will
e done in a professional yet laid back manner in
a private, comfortable setting for less money
than you would spend with some larger agencies.
Appointments Scheduled Around YOUR Work or School
KK Schedule
All services Are Fully Licensed & Credentialized By The State
of North Carolina
Fees based upon income
Located on Evans Street Mall
Within Walking Distance of Campus
"Old Fashioned Hamburgers & Hotdogs'
Monday-Thursday
"Food 101 nightly special at Cubbies'
5-9pni
�2 dogs $1! lL. .
�Free fries with any Cubbies size
sandwich ,
Only at downtown location with college lu
Wednesday
@HMWW Wt t 111 tli�
Michael G. Morris, CDWIE, CRT, CSAC
315 S. Evans Street; Suite B; Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: (919) 752-1333 Fax: (919) 757-3995
QmBB3no
$1 long neck beer
with any Cubbies size sandwich
limit 3 beers
�Only available at downtown location with
student IO
501 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
,(919)752-6497 or g
Greenvilie, NC 2785
(919)321-8091
ECU Gospel Choir
Fall Concert
Have a hefty
helping of some
cool classics.
Special Guests
WITNESS FOR CHRIST
REVELATIONS STEPPERS
NIKKI BENNETT
Wednesday, October 15, 1997 8:00 pm Wright Auditorium
Advance Student Tickets $7
Tickets at the door $15
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
919.328788 or 1.8O0.ECU.ARTS: Oeafspeech-impai.ed access 919.328.4736
Student discount tickets ivailable with ECU 10 at the Central Ticket Office until 6 pm
on the day of the twnt, providing tickets remain. All tickets at the door are full-price.
AIS0 �o PRESENTATIONS OF
DANCE AND RAP
WHATCHA y NCW
COME ON OUT AND LET'S HAVE A
GREAT TIME GLORIFYING
JESUS
WHEN OCTOBER 14. 1997
WHERE HENRRIX THEATRE
TIME: 1:1� RH
OMISSION: J2.CC AM THE DOOR
i
� .
��
M
i1






r
3 Tuesday. October 14. 1997
The Eitt Carolinian
UT6 REPAIR INC.
ALL TYPES OF AUTO & TRUCK REPAIRS
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Major & Minor Repairs
Manual Transmissions
�Brakes, Tires & Batteries
Free Towing With
Major Repair
627 S. Clarke
Greenville
dutches
-Tune-Ups
10 off with
college ID
830-6131
Virtual grocery shopping makes chore
hassle-free, eliminates cashier lines
ST. LOUIS (AP) - Time to
shop again. The list is long, but
Robin Hubbard isn't worried about
lines, parking or keeping her kids
out of the cereal aisle.
Brown & Brown
I VI TORMVs VI LWY
Tlruth,Equality,Justice
123 WSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
vote:
Steve
McLawhorn
BABY!
Greenville
City Council
Register By:October 10
Vote Nov 4th I
J
fM for by ihe Slew MrLmton Camaign
Eap Carolina
ith The feh
Music
You, Th� Audience
Decide Whodunits
The Tony Award
Winning Musical
Mystery Smash Hit
She sits down, fires up her
computer and fills her virtual
shopping cart with a few clicks of
her mouse.
"I have some chronic health
problems so at times it's really
difficult for me to get out she
said. "I also have two kids and the
baby just does not like shopping
carts
She and her baby arc not alone.
Online grocery services are
spreading nationwide, letting
wired shoppers fill the 'fridge and
pantry without leaving home.
It doesn't come free. It costs
Mrs. Hubbard $14.95 for each
same-day delivery, or $9.95 for
next-day, from Schnucks Markets
Inc St. Louis' dominant grocery
chain.
Peapod Inc a service that
stretches from the South to New
England, charges $4.95 for
monthly membership, and $4.95
per delivery.
Most online grocery shoppers
are young professionals with
school-age children - "two-income
families whose weekends arc
filled with soccer games and T-
ball said Larry Maggio,
marketing services director for
Schnucks.
Lots of elderly people use it,
too, he said.
"We were afraid they didn't
crime
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IOSTALGIA NEWSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville.NC 27834
(919) 758-6909
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Rated: PG
October 16.17, IS. ZO and 21.
1997
at 8:00 p.nt
Ocotbcr 19.1997
at 2:00 p.m.
General Pablc: 13.0015.00
rtu FacultyStaff: 11.0013.00
EC(I StudentsChildren: 1.0010.00
Call-328-6829
McGinnii Theatr
ECU Main Campus
Comer of Fifth and Eastern Streets
COMIC BOOK
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RAMADA INN
Greenville. 9AM-5PM
FREE ADMISSION
For More Info, Call 758-6909
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT L AW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
o Insights
Presents
Heather Zophey
Health Education Coordinator
topics: Sexual Habits
& Tendencies of "ECU Students
Wednesday, October 15
at 8:00 pm
October 4
Damage to Real Property�
Approximately 50 plants were
pulled up from the bcrm located
between 10th Street and the
parking lot located at the
southwest comer of 10th Street
and College Hill Drive.
October 5
Larceny�A worker at the
Dowdy-ficklen Stadium
construction area reported
someone broke into his toolbox
and stole two "C" clamps.
have computers Maggio said. "It
turns out they do
For Mrs. Hubbard, it works like
this:
She dials into Schnucks' web
site, then clicks on the icon for the
Schnucks Home Shopping Club.
Once there, the shopper can
visit 23 departments - meats,
produce, deli and the like. Each
department has lists of products,
with prices, sales, nutritional
content and freshness dates.
Or Mrs. Hubbard can simply
type in a desired product - say a
favorite ice cream - and the
computer will search for her.
She finds what she likes and it
goes in the cart. When the list is
finished, she clicks "Checkout
Payment is by credit card only,
online or when the delivery
arrives; no food stamps or coupons
are accepted.
Total time is about 10 minutes
for Mrs. Hubbard, since there are
fewer groceries online and she
works off a list already stored from
her last visit.
Despite the fee, Mrs. Hubbard
said she actually saves by shopping
from home.
"It cuts down on the impulse
shopping she said. "Like the
other day I thought I needed soup.
I just walked into the kitchen and
found I had 16 cans. If I'd have
been shopping at the store, I
would have bought a dozen cans
The idea for online groceries is
coming back after a false scan in
the late 1980s.
"IVc been skeptical for a long
time said Gary Vincbcrg, an
analyst who follows the
supermarket industry for Merrill
Lynch. "I suppose eventually it
will work. 1 just don't think we're
there yet
Others arc more hopeful.
Schnucks, with more than 90
stores in the Midwest, started
their service this summer, and
plans to expand into Illinois.
Peapod and Shoppers Express
Inc. contract with supermarket
October 8
Suspicious Message�A staff
member reported a suspicious
message was left on her answering
machine in the Speight Building.
Assist Rescue�A student
complained of a severe headache
after being hit on the head by a
board two hours earlier in
McGinnis Theater while working
on the stage.
Harassing Phone Calls�A
resident of Clement Hall
reported receiving numerous
phone calls in her room from an
unidentified male.
October 9
Assist Fire Rescue�An officer
responded to the General
Classroom Building in reference
to smoke being seen inside the
building. Greenville Fire
Department personnel arrived
but could not locate any smoke.
An electrician discovered an
overheating water fountain which
caused the problem.
Possession of Stolen
Property�A staff member
reported observing a vehicle with
a stolen parking decal. The
student was issued a state citation
for possession of stolen property.
The citation was issued at Scott
Hall.
Worthless Check�A student
was served with a summons for a
worthless check at the ECU
Police Department.
Larceny from Motor Vehicle�
A student reported the larceny of
a compact disc player from her
vehicle. The vehicle was parked
south of Christenbury Gym.
October 10
Intoxicated & Disruptive�A
non-student was issued a trespass
warning after being warned about
his loud and disruptive behavior
on three occasions. The non-
student was allegedly beating on
windows at Gotten Hall.
Assault on Female�A student
was served a warrant for arrest for
assault on a female.
Simple Affray & Assault�Two
students were assaulted by
several unknown males outside
Todd Dining Hall. The affray
resulted from a verbal altercation
inside Todd Dining Hall.
chains. Peapod lets customer
shop at Bruno's Inc. in the South
and Stop & Shop in New England.
Fees cover their costs; grocers get
more business.
Those with Peapod's monthly
membership grew from 13,000 in
January of 19 to 53,000 this
month, said Mary Wade of Peapod,
based in suburban Chicago.
It may keep on growing if Mrs.
Hubbard is any indication. After
the delivery man pulled up with a
cooler and plastic bags full of
groceries, she looked it over, and,
satisfied, announced, The milk's
cold, and the bread's not
smooshed
Towel
continued from page 1
SRC; students arc also taking
advantage of the towel service
provided.
"It is one of the missions here
to run as efficiently and low cost
to the student participants as we
possibly can. Being in a new
facility there are all kindsOf
growing pains that take place
Cox said. 5
The SRC, rather than having
to increase costs to maintain the
towel service, wishes to use this
money to provide for other
services at the SRC that may be
vital.
"Alternatives, like checking
towels out on the student ID, are
all incoveniences to the student
Cox said.
The SRC wants to inform ehe
students that if the towel theft
does not stop, then the towel
service may. Thc towel service
used to allow any student to walk
in and grab a towel at his or her
leisure. But if the current trend of
towel theft continues, the- towel
service may not.
Visiting professor to
perform in ECU recital
American bass-baritone
Herbert Eckhoff will perform
German songs in EClTs Hendrix
Theatre Wednesday, Oct. 22,
beginning at 8 p.m.
Eckhoff holds ECU's first
Robert L. Jones Distinguished
Professorship for 1997-98. His
recital accompanist will be John B.
O'Brien, a fellow member of the
ECU School of Music faculty.
A veteran performer in opera,
oratorio and song recitals
throughout the world, Eckhoff
will present several works
considered to be the best of the
German lieder genre, among
them selections by Strauss and
Schubert as well as Brahms cycle
of sacred text, Four Serious Songs,
and Wolfs cycle, Michelangelo's
Songs.
In addition to performance
credits, Eckhoff is a highly
regarded teacher. Eckhoff holds
degrees in German language and
literature as well as vocal
performance. Before his arrival at
ECU this fall, he spent a portion
of the summer performing in Italy
Foreign Languages
College language professors
from several states and countries
will attend the Mountain
Interstate Foreign Language
Conference Oct. 16 through Oct.
18 in the General Classroom
Building. Conference speakers
will give talks related to a variety
of subjects including French,
German, Italian, Russian, Spanish,
linguistics, pedagogy and the
cinema. The featured speaker is
Dr. Antoine Campagnon, a
renowned language scholar who
teaches at the University of Paris
(Sorbonne) and Columbia
University. Contact: Dr. Martin
Schwarz, department of foreign
languages and literatures at 328-
6539.
Distinguished
Educators
Tp educators from the region
will be recognized at the James W
Batten Distinguished Educator
Award Ceremony at 6 p.m. in the
Multipurpose room of
Mendenhall Student Center on
Oct. 17. The award recipients are
James W Cahoon, the principal at
Columbia High School, and
Fanette Entzmingcr, a science
teacher at Tarboro High School.
Both recipients arc graduates of
ECU.
Moooooooove
on over to a
job at The East
Carolinian.
TEC is now
accepting ;$
applications for
all writing
positions.
Apply at our
offices on the
second floor of
the Student
Publications
Building.
Support
student-run media
To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired,
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept.
TEC.
Student Pubs Bldg
ECU
Greenville, NC 27858
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D Second class mail$110.00
SuOadription bgtn with tha fir papar MM and run
for on dinar t. i� � �
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ThurwUy. Octobtr 9, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
Wackep-Otjt Sam
'Due lQ TeVUT cat XfitCituaes W.O.S.
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"you Henrd -fhe MA
Stressed?
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featuring Marie Ingram from "The HUMOR Project"
Wednesday, October 22, 1997
2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Tickets now on sale at the Mendenhall Student Center Central Ticket office
$15.00 admision includes the book and refreshments
Laffirmations: '1,001 Ways to Add Humor to Your Ufe and Work
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5 Tuesday. October 14. 1997
ea siCarolinian
Amy L.Rovster Eta
CRLESTK WILSON MsiugmrjEditor
MTT HEfiE MwnisngDmaor
JACOI'F.I.INK 1). KKI.I.I'M NewsEdirar
AMANDA AUSTIN Assi. NewsEdrtor
ANDY Tt'RNKR titeyte Eta
JOHN DAVIS AssamUtesnEditor
AMANDA ROSS SfjrjrtsEditor
TRACY LMiflACI! Assisijni Sports Editor
CAROLE MEIILE HeadCopyEta
JOHN MURPHY StaffIHusmtor
Heather Burgess Wire Editor
Sc to Hie ECU cammgrm, sea 82& Hit Em Carotoion publisrw 12.000 capm mry Tutsttv tnd Thursdqr Hie EelrJ t&an m etch afeuort is me
opiniji at the Erjrtorul Bwrt Tht Ets Clrrtrinf. attains l�ers � � tdur. tomd to 250 words, �rw ma, bt �w fw dtctnet w tawnr Tt� E�
Csroinwn rtstrw irtt ririr to el or rtpcl Itrars tor put- :aion M Irmn must bt Bflntd inters snouto Or tddrestM to: opeiion editor. Iht-Eist
drrtnitn. Piitiamm BuMeij. ECU GrttiwHe. 2785M353 for rformttjan. call 98.328 6366
opinion
The East Carolinian
oumew
It's close to election time and things are getting a little heated in Greenville. The
latest greatest controversy is Steve McLawhorn's accusations that Inez Fridley
misrepresented election laws to cause confusion. Fridley apparently claimed, in an
interview printed in The Daily Reflector, that if students wish to register to vote in Pitt
County, they must also change their driver's license and pay Pitt County taxes. This is,
according to the DMV and the Pitt'County Board of Elections, quite untrue. The
requirements for registering to vote are listed on the registration.
r As things stand, there are quite a few students who were confused by the statement
and kept from registering to vote. That's just a few voices snuffed out, but in a country
such as ours, when even one voice is snuffed out, it hurts us all. Democracy is supposed
to be a thing for all people. When a specific class or group of people is singled out as not
being eligible to vote due to the class or group they belong to, that is called
discrimination.
So the question here is not whether or not Fridley misrepresented the laws and caused
confusion. The real question is, did she do it on purpose? Of course, no one but Fridley
can answer that question, and when interviewed last Monday, she stated that she stands
by her comments.
However, it is possible that she really did think that those were the election laws. But
if that is the case, then one must wonder how she has been able to stay in office so long
and not even know the election laws of the county she works for.
Furthermore, as our representative, such incompetence would mean that Fridley is not
concerned about the students of ECU enough to check up on her facts before making a
statement that affects so many of us. A representative who cares about ECU would do
his or her homework to ensure the proper information is being conveyed.
Finally, though The East Carolinian does not endorse any specific candidate or party, we
find that whether by intention or incompetence, Inez Fridley's comments were the
source of more confusion in an already heated and confusing campaign. We at TEC hope
students will continue to turn to our pages to follow coverage of this situation as details
develop. Students can empower themselves by staying informed of turns in the
campaign and making an informed decision on election day.
OPINION
Columnist
BERGMAN
Final judgment given on SRC music
The question now becomes: do
we change the station every
time someone does not like the
musk? The answer is no. I
have found some musk in the
SRC offensive not to my
religious belkfs, rather they
offend my good taste.
I am tired of all the bickering. Tired
of all the people complaining. Tired
of all the arguments for and against
Christian music being played in the
Student Recreation Center.
As for the constitutionality of the
argument I am inclined to agree. I
agree that church and state should
be held separate. The question now
becomes is playing Christian music
at a state run institution, where the
public has little choice in listening
to the music, a violation of the Bill
of Rights.
1 have never claimed to be a
Supreme Court judge but I do play
one in the newspaper. Since the
chance of the High Court hearing
this case is about the same as me
passing the nomination process I
will help you solve the problem.
In the case of the SRC versus
those who find Christian music
offensive I rule in a 1-0 that the
SRC docs not cross a line drawn by
the founding fathers. The playing of
Christian Music is a not violation of
the first amendment, but a catch
exists.
The second one person comes
up to a SRC employee and asks that
the music be changed, because they
fee! it is offensive to their religious
beliefs, it must be done without
question. To allow music that one
finds offensive, in respect to their
religious beliefs, is a gross violation
of the separation between church
and state.
However, if all I have written is
true, then a problem exists; define
Christian music. Not all Christian
music is easily labeled. Christian
music crosses all genres. No, I do
not mean Christian music is so good
that it eclipses all other types of
music. I simple mean that
numerous forms of Christian music
exist, from rap and country to,
believe it or not, hard-core metal.
Yet another problem pops up
some people may find certain types
of music, which is debatable as to
whether it is religious music,
offensive to their Christian beliefs.
Anti-Christ Superstar Marilyn
Manson, could be called by some as
the devil's music. Pantara, Prong,
Black Sabbath and numerous other
bands have all been called the
devil's musk.
The question now becomes: do
we change the station every rime
someone does not like the music?
The answer is no. I have found
some music in the SRC offensive
not to my religious beliefs, rather
they offend my good taste.
Now we come to a cross-roads.
Which fork do we take? Do we allow
Christian music to be played on the
SKC, do we ban that genre of music
or do we allow anybody to claim that
music is offensive to their beliefs
and allow the station to be changed.
Well I propose two possible
solutions: one bring a walkman, ear
plugs or whatever so you do not
have to listen to the music.
The second solution is so
obvious it seems to have been
overlooked. We have a college radio
station. The SRC is supposed to be
for the college student, alumni that
wants to pay and faculty that also
has to pay. WZMB is supposed to be
for college students. Well how about
that! A perfect match.
Simple enough, two solutions
both equally good.
LETTER
to the Editor
Little hope for SGA, former rep says
As an SGA presidential candidate
from the Spring '97 executive
council elections and the
Sophomore Class president from last
year, I have had the opportunity to
talk with students, many of whom
do not have a clue what the SGA is
or what thev do. The Student
Government has the capability of
becoming a powerful organization on
campus. The problem that stands in
the way is the corruption throughout
all three levels of the Student
Government, including the
administration. When someone the
SGA officials do not like or agree
with comes from t lie outside and
tries to change something in the
SGA, they find some way of getting
rid of him or her. It does not matter
whether they may be trying to
actually do something for the
student body; if they do not like the
person, they arc booted.
In a recent article, Scott Forbes,
our SGA president, said it was the
students' fault that the electron
went so badrv. How could this be?
l"he SGA executive council picks
the election chairperson. If the poll
workers would have been doing their
job correctly, then there would not
have to be another election, which
each pollster gets paid $50 to do. So
why are we having a new election? It
is because the elections committee
didn't know what they were doing,
not because the SGA is ethical. Hey,
the elections committee even gets
paid for working another election.
On Oct. 14, go vote for students
who you want to be our
representatives and hey, if you don't
know anybody, vote for yourself �
at least you could say you voted.
In closing, I give the SGA $9.75
per year to function, which comes to
$39 for the four years 1 am here. 1
would probably spend this amount
in toilet paper over four years, so
who cares what the SGA does? It has
been corrupt for so long, they will
always push the "good guys" out. As
a hopeful, I wish all the newly
elected representatives and officers
good luck.
Cliff Webster
Junior
Marketing
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OPINION
Stacey
COCHRAN
Columnist
Today's rebels left without cause
' It's a sad state when
rebellion has become
commercialized, televised,
info-mercialled,
billboarded,
McDonahied, and
Disney landed to fit a
mainstream audience of
rebels.
Has rebellion become obsolete?
Has America's youth rebelled to the
point of conformity? Look around
you. How many pierced noses,
tongues, eyebrows, belly buttons, or
lips does it take to be a rebel these
days? How many tattoos, shades of
hair color, or scabs and scars will it
cost me to be a rebel?
I want to know. I want to fit in.
It's a sad state when rebellion
has become commercialized,
televised, info-mercialled,
billboarded, McDonalded, and
Disneylanded to fit a mainstream
audience of rebels.
Late '90's music courtesy of
commercially-viable MTV has
become a teeming plethora of
ardent youth decrying the
established norms, all the while
fitting neatly into their own cliquish
norm.
I read an article in. Time
magazine a month ago, where one
green-eye-shadowed, nipple-and-
clitoris-pierced youth said the only
thing left for her generation to rebel
against was rebellion itself. Obvious
oxymoron aside, there is truth
hidden in this phrase: rebel against
rebellion.
The problem with "the rebel" as
a Western ideological icon as old at
least as Jesus Christ is that rebellion
inherently involves a rebel and
something rebelled against
(political regimes, religious
persecution, mom & dad).
Perhaps, the next real rebels will
be some weird bunch of anti-rebels.
Rebels who utilize knowledge,
sophistication, mainstream and
rebellious ideology to subvert the
very notion of what rebellion is; that
of having to rebel against
something.
Ferhaps, the next real rebels will
rebel against having to rebel.
Ferhaps, the next real rebels will
make rebellion obsolete by showing
how cream-puffed rebellion is and
has always been. Ail rebellion begins
and ends here, they'll say. A
revolution of thought.
We in cozy little America are just
as much a part of rebellion as
icoiiographit aymbot as Britain,
Spain, Italy or Fiance is. It is a part
of our way of thinking and of living
Perhaps, the next real rebels will
revolutionize Western thought and
shake the foundations of rebellion
at its core.
Or we can go on with our Marilyn
Manson, Kurt Cobfein, Mctallica,
Black Sabbath, Jimi Hcndrix, James
Dean generation after generation of
rebels without a clue.
Perhaps, the ominous power of
the new millennium will catalyze a
new wave of Western thought.
Maybe, just maybe, there is a young
guru out there who will study, learn,
and understand all in a cause to
deconstruct rebellion as we have
known it for over 2,000 years, in a
cause to deconstruct thought.
LETTER
to the Editor
Tailoring parking policies unsafe to fans
This letter is in response to Russell
Lewis, TEC Sept. 23 and the
commentary by Johnny Moore in the
Pirates Chest, a publication devoted
exclusively to East Carolina Athletics.
There is a problem with parking at
ECU. The parking problems were
there before I began studies at ECU,
parking was a problem to me during
my studies at ECU, and parking
problems still exist.
This letter addresses parking
during football games and policies the
University has implemented.
The situation is very simple.
Attendance and stadium capacity
have increased. Increased attendance
yields increased demand on parking
resources. The construciron in front
of and behind the Allied Health
building has substantially decreased
parking resources. Therefore, there is
an increased competition for parking
especially in the area of Charles
Street.
The traffic problems this created
before the first two football games
were hazardous to motorists and
pedestrians on Charles Street.
So, how does the University
handle this you ask? The University
enforces a policy of not allowing
vehicles into the tailgate area until
four hours before the game, and, via
cordoining off areas, reduced the
parking spaces available in the
tailgate area.
These two decisions were not
wise and should be rescinded by the
University. Let people go to the
tailgate area as soon as they want and
free up the parking that is roped off
during games. The hazards created
by these policies are unsafe to ECU
fans.
Michael A. McDermott
Alumnus
LETTER
to the Editor
Fridley responds to opponent's allegations
On Tuesday, Oct. 6, my opponent in
the District 3 race, Steve
McLawhorn, accused me of
misrepresenting North Carolina
election law, avery serious charge that
I find offensive and which is
inaccurate. I believe the Board of
Elections will bear this out.
Meanwhile, I also feel a need to
respond to these allegations since
they attack my character.
When I was called by The Dairy
Reflector newspaper on Oct. 3, 1997
to comment on the student
registration drive in the campus
newspaper, my main concern was that
students who choose to register in
Greenville or change their
regist-ation to Greenville be
informed of their responsibilities
pertaining to their new residence in
Pitt County. To be eligible to register
to vote in Pitt County, a student must
be considered a resident of the
county for at least 30 days prior to the
election and, when registering to
vote, the registrant declares that his
residence is located in Pitt County.
The state law defining residence for
voting purposes provides that a
student may claim the college
community as his domicile if he
intends to make his home in the
college community while he is
attending school and he has no intent
to return to his former home after
graduation.
In the last electi n, and now again
in this one, students have been
encouraged to register in or change
their registration to Greenville; this
action is portrayed as a simple
exercise that takes no effort and has
no ramifications. That simply isn't
true. Motor vehicle law and voting
laws are not connected and do not
reference each other, but they are
clear in their intent as to the
definition and responsibilities of
citizens. I did not connect or cross-
reference these two laws in my
statements to the press.
During the course of my present
and past campaigns, I have never
discouraged students from registering .
to vote .as implied by Mr. :
McLawhorn. 1 believe that everyone I
eligible to vote should register and -
vote; it is the choice of their location
that is under discussion. When I was1
called by The Dairy Reflector, my
only concern was that students be'Jl
aware of their responsibilities should
they choose to become Pitt County
residents. 1 did not initiate this as a '
campaign issue, however, student
voter registration has become a
significant tactic by severaL
candidates in two elections in,
Greenville. 1 see no reason to
continue to ignore it. I have worked
cooperatively with students
throughout my entire career at ECU -
and foun j students to be mature and
thoughtful young adults who like to
be fully in rmed. u
Inez Fridley
City Council, District 3
Greenville
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HOMECOMING 1997 -HOMECOMING 1997 -HOMECOMING 1997 -HOMECOMING 1997
All Decked Out For The 90th
HOMECOMING
CANDIDATES FOR KING
Adrian Floyd (3)
Belk Hall
Kengie Bass (6)
Fletcher Hall
T Joshua Beardsley (7)
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Fabian Williams (11)
White Hall

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Sage Hunihan (85)
Panhellenic Council
Carl ton Blanton (10)
Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
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Giai Tran (8)-Alpha Phi Omega
Harry Milter (9)
Resident Hall Association
Mark Harritan (4)
Kappa Alpha Order
PAUL WASH BURN (1)
Clement Hal!
Colin Mcrea (12)
Ambassodors
NO PICTURE
AVAILABLE
Rob Fannon(13)
Chi Omega SororitySigma
Alpha Epsilon Fraternity
Tremayne Nun ley 5)
Jones Hall
Corey Algood (2)
Gospel Choir
CANDIDATES FOR QUEEN
Vallencia McCoy (61)
Resident Hall Association
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finia Lynn Wasler
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Jones Hall
Tracy Lee Mason (82)
Fletcher Hall
NikkiNoren(71)
Alpha Delta Pi .Sorority
VOTING
Mendenhall Student Center
Information Booth
9-6
Wright Plaza
8-5
Vote
Wednesday,
Oct 15
Must have valid student I.D.
HOMECOMING 1997 -HOMECOMING 1997 -HOMECOMING 1997 -HOMECOMING 1997
Base of College Hill
8-5
Belk Allied Health Building
8-5
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HOMECOMING 1997 'HOMECOMING 1997 .HOMECOMING 1997 .HOMECOMING 1997
All Decked Out For The 90th
HOMECOMING
Erasure
Aycock Hall
Erin Stewart
Clement Hall
M
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Stephanie Jones
Pi Delta Sorority
O
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Crystal Denny
Order erf Omega
Jodi Warden
Ambassadors
1997
CANDIDATES FOR QUEEN
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2
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Andrea Davidson
Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
Jennie Reiner
Alpha Phi Omega
Amy Berridge
White Hall

Ellyn Page Felts
Gamma Sigma Sigma
�M Hi
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Ashley Poplin
NCCTM - Gamma Chapter
Christina Abbott
Alpha Omicron R Sorority
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Mary Paige Early
Alpha Phi Sorority
Mary Underbill
Tyler Hall
Ghasidty Evangelista
Delta Zeta Sorority
Sharlynda Fleming
Ladies Elite Service
Organization
Emily Freeman
Epsilon Sigma Alpha
Jennifer Rutherford
CottonFlemingJarvis
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Leslie Mitchell
NSSLHA
Mary Schubert
Belk Hall
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Leslie Pulley
Chi Omega SororitySigma
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HOMECOMING 1997 .HOMECOMING 1997 'HOMECOMING 1997 'HOMECOMING 1997
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8 Tuesday. October 14. 1997
ifestyle
The East Carolinian
mm
ISlll.lrll
review
R Lams rough it for Ronald McDonald House
pa
Heaven's Bright Sun
�(Live)
9 12 OUT OF TO
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
With the recent popularity of stage
performances like Rkerrance, there
has been an upsurge in Celtic music
the past few years. Celtic and
jltic rock bands have been oozing
mt of the woodwork. Unfortunately,
jh of what has been-offered has
jn nothing more than clever mar-
ting to cash in on the trend. Five
its ago it was Gregorian chants,
its year it's Celtic music.
The result of this is a large cata-
log of substandard music aimed at
v-pleasing the fickle whims of the
'jnusic buying public. Kven
URiverdance itself has a bit too much
if the pop mentality in it. While it
in't be helped that Irish things and
lusic are trendy additions to the
jver-increasing "social conscious-
ness" of yuppies and New yc lanni
disciples, there are those Celtic
bands who have been around since
before it was a trend and will be
' around long after the pop stream
I has flowed on to salsa or Indian sitar
j music.
Two of the better Celtic bands
if have been around for nearly twenty
I years, The Chieftains and Clannad.
Compared to these bands, lona is a
relative newcomer, having only been
around for eight years. What they
lack in age, they make up for in soul
and skill.
Unlike the Chieftains, who con-
centrate on canonizing the best of
traditional music on compact disc
(and hobnobbing with famous rock
personalities) or Clannad. who
devote their Celtic pop style to old
pagan lore and songs, lona focus on
the period in Ireland's history from
the fourth to the ninth centuries.
That time was the great Christian
era of Ireland, when the likes of St.
Patrick were founding monasteries
and preserving much of the Western
literary canon.
This live album features songs
from the band's previous four
albums, each of which focused on
one central theme in Ireland's
Christian history: St. Columba (who
founded the lona monastery), The
Book of Kells (an ancient illuminat-
ed manuscript of the Bible intended
as a gift to the Emperor Justinian),
St. Brendan (who journeyed in a
tiny boat to Newfoundland) and the
eighth century hymn, "Be Thou My
Vision
lona has been long reputed as
having amazing live shows, and here
on Hfazen's Bright Sun, they prove
the rumors to be true. Since there
are seven people in lona, they can
reproduce the complexity and beau-
ty of the music on their albums.
Fortunately, this album isn't just a
greatest hits album with dubbed-in
cheering. The versions of the songs
on this album feature much impro-
vising and reworking, especially of
the older material. Every member of
the band is an accomplished musi-
cian, proficient on several instru-
ments, and together, they are a tight
unit.
Over the span of the album's two
discs, the band delivers a strong per-
formance, moving from all our reels-
turned-rock sonj;s to oothing bal-
lads on bagpipe and flute. Though
the band has, on their past album
featured the talent of such musi-
iona 9
SHANNON MRKK
STAKE WRITER
After a much needed fall break, most ECU students returned to campus and
settled into the comforts of their dorms and apartments. They returned to
the routine of work, classes and social life. However, one campus fraternity
decided to benefit their surrounding community
The members of the R Lambda Phi fraternity sacrificed their opulent
housing for a good cause. They constructed a cardboard village in the cen-
ter of the mall in order to raise money for their local philanthropy, The
Ronald McDonald House.
The fraternitv members slept in their cardboard village from last
Wednesdav to last Friday; informing the East Carolina University student
bods about the charity and accepting various donations.
"We have been doing this for three years said Chris Feathers, Pi
Lambda Phi president said. "Sleeping outside to raise money has not only
benefited the community but has given us a chance to bond as a brother-
hood
Feathers also explained how they have not only made the community
aware of the charitv but have had some fun in the process. The past year the
fraternitv raised $1,200 for the Ronald McDonald House. The proceeds
help the Ronald McDonald House provide lodging for families with seri-
ously ill children. Since the house opened in 1987, it has served over 4,200
families from 68 counties in North Carolina.
"It has given us a great opportunity to give back to the Greenville com-
munitv Feathers savs.
Last year, fraternities were responsible for 25 percent of all community
service hours of campus organizations, and these organizations are constant-
ly- benefiting their environment. Philanthropy- is a tremendous part of fra-
ternity life and like the members of Pi Lambda Phi, other fraternity organi-
zations are constantly sacrificing their time, comfort and security in order to
raise monetary funding and support to organizations which provide for the
betterment and quality of life.
"We like to thank everyone for their support, especially Sigma Sigma
Sigma, Alpha Phi, Nancy from Brook Valley Country Club, Delta Zeta and
many others who made this year another success
Student Health promotes breast cancer awareness
KELLY KNOX
Ml HUNT II KM.1TI SERVICE
Many of you have heard or know of someone
who has had breast cancer. Because this dis-
ease affects so many lives today, October has
been dedicated as National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month.
This month is a great opportunity to
learn more about this disease. Student
Health Services will have information
booths set up in its waiting areas all this
week.
Students can come by to get information,
brochures and breast self-exam reminder
stickers and shower cards. Pink ribbons will
also be available for students. Come by and
get a rib!on to wear to show your support for
Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
This event is devoted to educating men
and women about breast cancer facts, espe-
tiaBy the ri-k factors, warning signs and
early detection practices. Since an estimat-
ed one in eight women are at a greater risk,
it is important that they begin to familiarize
themselves with their risk factors and fami-
ly history and begin practicing early detec-
tion techniques.
Breast cancer is the second leading cause
of death in women. However, early detec-
tion and treatment can dramatically
improve the chances of survival. Although
most vomen are aware of the eatly detec-
tion guidelines established by the American
Signs and W) Symptoms
of BreastCancer
� Lump in Breast
� Unusual increase in size of one
breast
� One breast unusually lower than
the other
� Puckering of the skin on the
breast
� New dimpling of the nipples
� Discharge of bleeding from the
nipples
� Change in skin of nipple
� Enlargement of lymph nodes
� Unusual swelling of upper arm
For More Information Call
Student Health Services
328-6841
Cancer Society many do not practice these rec-
ommendations. This is the case with many col-
lege women.
Women over age 20 are encouraged to perform
breast self-exams (BSE) each month. Why is it
so important to start this practice so early?
There are several reasons. First of all, no one
knows your breast better than you do. The
more familiar you are with what is normal for
you, 'the more likely you will be to detect a
change.
Secondly, over 500 women under age 30 get
breast cancer each year, so you are not risk-free.
Finally if vou get in the habit of performing
BSEs now, you will likely continue the practice
throughout your life as you enter into the high-
er risk age groups.
The ten minutes a month it takes to administer
a BSE may some day save your life. Statistics
show that nine and one-half out often women
who are diagnosed and treated early for breast
cancer will be alive five years later. Early detec-
tion is the key element for survival.
Although oiilv about 1,400 men are diagnosed
with bteast cancer each year, they are just as
likelv to be effected by the disease as women
are. Many men witness the traumatic effects of
this disease as they go through it with their
mothers, aunts, wives and girlfriends. It is
equally important for men to understand the
facts related to breast cancer.
If vou are unsure how to perform a breast self-
exam, ask vour health care provider. You can also
call 328-6841 or come to the Student Health
Services for information.
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I
Tuesday. October H. 1997 9
JLcAMa
Tobacco
mw
Also:
Blacklight Room,
Herbal Teas,
Detox products &
Sativah Herbal Smoking Blends
Live Glass Blower
(applies to selected items w full price purchase)
PJ$f&&
Sandier to perform in Rocky Mount
429 S. Evans Street
561-PIPE(7473)
Body Piercing
4 �:
The Fi
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Kernal
Goat
Friday
Underfoot
Saturday
Karl
Eviry
Greenville's
Tavern
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
Pizza
all day
32 che. Domestic
Draft $1.50
14 ex. Domestic
Draft 7S
FREE FOOOIII
NFL Ticket
on DSS
Monday
Foonxzll
73 Souihpaw
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
TastingDisplay
Bob Barker and Adam Sandier get it on in Happy Gilmom.
fWTO COUfTTESY Of UNIVERSAL PICTURES
STAFF REPORTS
Comedianactorwritersingcr
Adam Sandier will perform at the
Dunn Center for the Performing
Arts at North Carolina W;sleyan
College in Rocky Mount on Oct.
15 at 9 p.m.
The former Saturday Night
Live star has produced two plat-
inum-selling, Grammy-nominat-
ed, comedy-song albums, They're
All Gonna Laugh at You and What the
Hell Happened to Me. His third
album, What's Your Name, was
recently released.
Sandier has also starred in the
movies Bulletproof and Happy
Gilmore. He will appear with
Drew Banymore in The Wedding
Singer this winter.
Tickets for the show are $15
and available at the Bclk Box
Office. Call 919-985-5197 for
more information.
lona
s
�2
3t
Edwin
continued from page 8
L Sports Bar
Marcus Olson, new faculty
member and head of the Musical
Theatre program in the
Department of Theatre and
Dance, makes his East Carolina
directorial debut.
Olson comes to ECU from
Wright State University (Dayton,
OH) where he taught and direct-
ed. He is a recent Broadway veter-
an with many years in acting and
directing.
As always, look for great sets
and lighting from Robert Alpers
and Ken White. Both men are sea-
soned professionals, long familiar
to ECU audiences. You may
remember their work in Dark of the
Moon, Big River, and Someone to
Watch Over Me.
Jeffery Phipps will design cos-
tumes for the show. He has won
awards for his past work at the
University of Miami (Coral Gabies,
FL).
East Carolina Playhouse has a
long tradition of entertaining and
thought provoking productions. It
brings to Eastern North Carolina a
touch of Broadway, a touch of the
world, a touch of humanity
So, instead of sitting at home
watching televison shows where
you can guess the ending, join the
East Carolina Playhouse audience
and help create a unique ending to
a unique play.
cominued trow sage 8
cians as Robert Fripp (of Kir�j
Crimson) and Maire Brennan (
Clannad), they prove here that
they need no guest stars as they
paint a vivid portrait of the hearts
and minds of the Christian Celts
in a tapestry of unforgettable-
music.
Lyrically, the band members
are no slouches either. While fus-
ing their unique blend of progres-
sive rock and traditional Celtic,
arrangements, the band maintains
a reverent and ethereal mood,
focusing on the poetic aspects of
the Christianity of the ancient
Celts, as well as developing a wor-
shipful personality of their own.
Moving and bright with the
glory of another world, Iona's lat-
est album is a doorway into an
earthly paradise. Each song boms
with the intensity of a tested fakh
and beautiful truth, like the art-
work and writing of those ancient
Celts, Heaven's Bright Sun trans-
ports listeners to a forgotten time
of brave men and daring life.
�J


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lirasp
WIDESPREAD
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Quartette Gelato: Classically Twisted Fun
Quartetto Gelato puts a new twist on the Classics. Four musicians, eight
instruments, one fun concert. Student tickets are available at the Central Ticket
Office for $7. All tickets purchased at the door:15. .
Clip out the coupon on page 177 of your Clue Book and get in for just $5.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
DROPTOE'i
Herbert Eckhoff, one of America's finest bass-baritones, will awe you
with his vocal virtuosity in his concert entitled, German Lieder. Come check out
the ECU School of Music's first recipient of the Robert L.Jones Distinguished
Professorship. Student tickets are available at the CTO for $5. All tickets are12
at the door. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 22 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Have a Widespread Panic Attack
Popular rockers take to the stage for Homecoming '97.Tickets are available
at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center. Your ECU ID entitles you
to a student discount ticket for $18.50. All tickets are $20 at the door.
FRIDAY, OCT. 24 AT 8 P.M. IN WILLIAMS ARENA AT MINGES COLISEUM
Lose Yw Mi fcf at MMJfijKt Madtfess
All dressed up, nowhere to go on Halloween? Don't miss the Midnight Madness
Halloween bash at Mendenhall Student Center.
Free prizes, video karaoke, Laser Storm, pyschics, bingo, dancing, and
a midnight buffet. Horror flicks: Carrie and Scream in Hendrix Theatre
Your ECU ID will get you and a guest in free.
FRIDAY, OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M2 A.M. AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Screen the cene
My Best Friend's Wedding (PG-13) screens in Hendrix Theatre on
OCT. 16-18 AT 8 P.M. Your student ID gets you and a guest in for free.
BOTTOM OW FOB TOP BOCK
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free in The Pirate Underground
every Thursday at 8 p.m. in the MSC Social Room.
This week: Corey Rhodes and Juice Baby
6o New York on alow Budget
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat trip to New York? The ECU
Student Union is sponsoring a trip to New York for as little as155.
The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for three nights.
To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip, drop by the Central Ticket Office.
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IK
IN CONCERT, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24 AT 8:00 PI IN WU1IAKS ARENA HINGES COUSEWR
Tickets are $18 50 in advance and $20.00 the day of the show. Tickets are available through Ticketmasier
outlets and the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center (8:30 am-6:00pm, Monday-Friday).
THURSDAY-SATURDAY
October 16-18
ALL FILMS START AT: 8PM UN!
NOTED AND ARE FfcEEFOR ALI
ALLOWED) WITH VAIILHUJ tl
Tlw Best Rumsntic
Comsdy Of TKe Y�rT
JULIA It O B EKT S
MY BEST
FRIEND'S
Cajun Music and Zydeco
An eloquent and irrepressible photograph collection capturing
the poetry, rythms, and energy of these outstanding musicians
and their communities.
Mendenhall Gallery, ECU
October 13 - November 7,1997
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall SU
.enter ooc
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5
Thursday, October 16, 1997
Corey Rhodes Juice Baby
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
Mmtet br$ tfot Book
Tuesday, October 21, 1997, 7:00 pm
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
Students $7.00
Faculty $10.00
Public $15.00
kl HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m
�5S!feffSM!fcKr
12 am Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
�W5 MlfcWB MHfca
Tickets available at the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, Monrri 8:30 am - 6:00 pm
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For more Information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. E-mail: uuunion�ecuvm.cis.ecu.ecru
�"� A V"





10 7u�8diy. October 14, 19S7
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirates come close but fall short in C-USA opener
ECU loses first
conference game
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS EDITOR
Close, but yet so far away. That's
what could be said about Saturday's
23-13. loss to Southern Miss.
i The game marked ECU's
enHance into Conference USA, as
lor Richard Eakin was given
game ball after the first kickoff.
t also marked what many thought
would be a new start to the season,
-since the conference champ goes on
Jim Flaming draws rat the plays for John Williamson and Brian
Berrtiey on the sideline.
PHOTO 8Y JONATHAN GREEN
to the Liberty Bowl. If ECU was
still an independent, their bowl
chances would be slim to none.
Heading into the game, ECU
had gone nine scoreless quarters,
until Andrew Bayes kicked a 47-
yard field goal.
The Southern Miss offense felt
the presence of the Pirate defense
in the first quartet, gaining only 29
total yards, compared to ECU's 59
yards.
At the beginning of the second
quarter, the Golden Eagles drove 81
yards on eight plays down to the
ECU 12-yard line. Harold Shaw ran
for 20 yards and Eric Booth went for
32 yards to help during the drive
and get Southern Miss within
scoring
position.
Two plays
after Booth's
run, USM
did score on
a Lee
Roberts pass
to Todd
Pinkston, 7-3
Golden
Eagles.
But ECU
wouldn't go
away. The
first two
possessions
for ECU
produced
nothing. But
the last
possession of the halfgavc them
another three points. The Pirates
drove 68 yards on 17 plays and with
12 seconds left in the half Brantley
Rivers nailed the 19-yard chip shot
to pull within one, 7-6.
But on the ensuing kickoff, Eric
Booth ran the ball back to the ECU
32-yard line. Tim Haidaway came
out for the 49-yard attempt and
made it upping the Southern Miss
lead, 10-6.
At the half, ECU had 104 total
yards, while USM racked up 147.
Scott Hariey rushed for 21 yards in
the first half, while Dan Gonzalez
completed 12 passes for 67 yards.
The top receiver in the first half was
Troy Smith with three catches for
20 yards.
The third quarter was a see-saw
back and forth between the two
teams. But ECU struck gold first.
Tabari "Snoop" Wallace, picked up
an Eddie Shaw fumble and took it
down to the USM 25-yard line. Five
plays latei; Gonzalez round Jamie
Wilson in the endzone. That
marked the first touchdown in 11
quarters for ECU. Now ECU was up
by three, 13-10.
At the end of the third, the score
was tied 13 apiece after Hardaway
booted a 46-yard field goal attempt.
Defensive tackle Travis Darden,
who recorded five tackles, said they
had it going their way on defense.
"R� the most part, defensively,
we had the momentum going
Darden said. "We were put in a few
tough situations,
and Southern
Miss made a lot
of good plays and
some field goals
which hurt us
Then came
the fourth
quarter. Two
turnovers, one by
Hariey, the other
by Gonzalez,
resulted in 10
u nanswered
Southern Miss
points, the
difference in the
game as ECU
lost 23-13 in
their conference
h e
Miss
opener
It rp
Southern
football team is
one of the really
better, better
football teams
Logan said. "I
knew the pme
was going to be
won in the
fourth quarter
Hariey
finished with 55
yards; Gonzalez
completed 25 of
44 passes for 223 yards and one
touchdown; Smith caught seven
balls for 71 yards. The surprise was
the return of Larry Shannon, out
Marchant Kenney sacks Dan 6onzatez during the 23-13 loss suffered at the hands of Southern Miss
marked the first match-up for ECU in Conference USA.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEK
This game
with an injury to his ankle, made his
'97 debut and caught two catches
for 24 yards, both on third downs.
The Pirates will have to bounce
CM
with . . .
Danny Vitale
Q: Where are you
from?
b Raleigh, N.C.
Q: Why did you
decide to come to
ECU?
jHfl ECU offers ray
major and t had a
chqpce to play
2 soccer here. That
, was a combination
11 was hoping to
2 find.
4-
i.
IQ: When did you
start playing
-soccer?
A: 1 first started
when I was four
jyears old.
� � �

Or- If you could
thartk one person
for nis or her
support, who
would it be and
why?
Mz Definitely my
JuJ. I 1c nuj 11iv
first soccer coach,
and of all of my
games, home and
and away, he has
missed only one.
He gives me so
much
encouragement.
Richmond hands Pirates
1-3 loss
Tracy M. Lai:bw:ii
Assisrwr spouts . ditok
The ECU Men's Soccer team suffered a
disappointing 1-3 loss to the Richmond
Spiders on Sunday at Bunting Field. The
Pirates arc now 1-2 in the CAA and 4-7
overall, a record that stands for the
highest winning percentage the team has
seen in over a decade.
Richmond took the field on Sunday 0-3
in the conference after suffering losses to
CAA opponents William and Mary,
Virginia Commonwealth and American
University. All three are ranked within the
county's top 20 soccer programs. With the
victory, the Spiders improved their record
to 5-4-2 overall and 1-3 in the conference.
Senior goalkeeper Jay Davis said that
although the Pirates didn't walk away with
a win, many positive things can be brought
out of the game.
"We played much better than wc did
on Wednesday against N.C. State Davis
said. "We got off to a slow start, but we
played hard all the way until the end
The Spiders were the first to get on the
score board
when at the
10:25 mark,
sophomore
forward Brent
Cesarc sent
the ball to the
net from five
yards out. A
little over six
minutes later,
teammate
Peter Luzak
improved the
Richmond lead
to 2-0 with an
eight yard shot
assisted by
Andy Carfyle.
The Pirates
scored their
only goal of the
game just
minutes before
the half when
sophomore
Scan Haw ley
delivered a
crossing pass to
sophomore
forward Danny
Vitale, who
sent in a shot
from 10 yards.
The goal was Vitale's first of the season
and second of his career.
"When they were ahead, wc starred to
get nervous, but wc still felt that we had a
chance to turn things around Davis said.
"Wc kept playing hard, but we just
couldn't tic things together. Richmond
was a hungry team
According to Vitale, all of the team's
conference opponents are on ECU's list of
challenges.
"Any time you arc up against a
conference team, they arc going to be
good and it is going to be a battle Vttale
said. "We just need to put this toss behind
us and look forward to our upcoming
games
Although ECU recorded seven shot
attempts in the second half, they were
unable to tie the score and at the 62:42
mark, senior defender Paul Sterbenz sent
in the final goal of the game for the
Spiders.
"We made some mistakes defensively
Davis said. "We need to focus on marking
in the back to get ready for our upcoming
games
Vitale said that too many corner kicks
were given up throughout the game,
something that could have made a big
difference in the game's outcome.
"We made it too easy for them to get
possession Vitale said.
The Pirates have a week to prepare
before taking on Methodist College in a
non-conference battle this Saturday and
conference opponent Old Dominion on
Tuesday.
"I feel good about the games Davis
said. "As long as wc keep playing like we
have been, we have a really good shot to
win both games. Even though wc lost the
Richmond game, we have some positive
things that we can pull from it
Vitale agrees that the Old Dominion
game very well may be the second
conference win for the Pirates.
"Old Dominion beat us 1-0 last year,
but this year we are a better team Vitale
said. "We are an older team now because
we are all more experienced than we were
last year, so we can handle the pressure
better. We are better as a unit
With a 4-7 overall record on the season,
the Pirates arc off to their best start ever
in the past decade. Davis said that
positive team attitudes and good defense
have been the keys to making this season
one for the record.
"We picked up some wins early in the
season, which helped build up our
confidence Davis said. "Everyone out
there this year is really positive and works
hard
with .
Jay Davis
Sophomore Brett Waxer dribbles the ball down the field past an opponent. The ECU Men's Soccer team is off to its best start ever in
conference play and holds its highest winning percentage in over a decade.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PBCCTOB
A Peek into the Past"
1987 2-10
1989 1-13-1
H"T7
1991 2-9
m 1-9
1990 4-12-1
1993 4-10
1995 2-11
Q: Where are
you from?
A: Wilson,
N.C.
Q: What do
you like best
about ECU?
A: There is a
small
atmosphere at
a big school.
ffc Do you
have any
brothers or
sisters?
A: Yes, one
older sister
named Brooke.
She is a teacher
in Chapel Hill.
Q: What are
your plans for
after school?
A: I want to
head out west
to Colorado.
1997 4-7
1992 2-8
1994 0-9-1
I
1996 1-8
back and face Tulane
Superdome this Saturday
Orleans.

CONFERENCE
in the
in New

Last week's
result 5
Tulane 64, Louisville 33 .
Southern Miss 23, ECU 13
Cincinnati 33, UAB 29
Memphis 38, Arkansas State 9
This week's
games
Cincinnati at Houston
ECU at Tulane
X-Countiy
runner shows
maturity
Freshman runs toward
top
Stephen schramm
STAFF WRITER
Stuart Will has established himself as
one of the top runners on the ECU
cross country team. He has posted
times that are among the ten fastest
in school history and has already
reached many of the goals he set for
himself this
season. All this
and Will is only a
freshman.
"My goal for
this season was to
run in the top
five
consistently
Will said.
So far he has
done just that,
and then some.
At the UNC-
Wilmington
S e a h a v k
Invitational. Will
second fastest
Stuart Wili
Timeline reflects overall records
as of Oct. 14 of each season.
The 1997 ECU Men's Soccer team currently holds its highest winning percentage in over a
decade with a CAA conference record of 1-2 and and overall season record of 4-7.
turned in the
time on the ECl"
squad. The next week he ran a 26.34
at tlv I'NC-Chapd Hill Invitational.
At the William and Mary
Invitational, which is viewed as a
preview for the CAA Championship
Meet, the Lilburn, Georgia product
rose to the occasion. He ran the
second fastest time on the team � an
impressive 25.08.
"I'm thrilled that I ran as fast as I
did" Will said, I never expected to run
25.08 this year, at least not at the
SEE X COUNTRY PAGE II
�.���
)
HI . 1 I
w
�� �
v
?'





9m0m
The East Carolinian
snorts
Tuaadav. Ottofcar 14. 1897 11
CHARAOE
from Infants to adults
Costumes Accessories
NOW OPEN! 1WJ0-M0 Mon-Sat, 1:30-5:30 Sun
Carolina East Mall
355-3752
SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SEliCJlON!
ft
in.
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Body Piercing
10 off all
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with Student ID
Expires: 113097
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
4685 Suite A US Hwy 13 Greenville NC
Headed down to bayou country
Football team gears
upforTulane
AMANDA R�SS
�.PORTS BDITOS
ECO
Environmental
Conservation
Organization
Ladies-And Mens
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At Discount Prices
atalog
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73SS(,I2
i. Sun. 1-5-
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
For only the second time, Tulane and
ECU will go head-to-head, and this
time it's in conference play.
Tulane took the last decision in
1991, with a 38-28 win, in route to an
11-1 season and a final number nine
national ranking. Last week Tulane
routed Louisville, 64-33, to win their
second C-USA game as ECU lost
their first.
Tulane's head coach Tommy
Bowden comes from a rich tradition
af coaching. His father is Bobby
Bowden of Florida State and his
younger brother Terry is the head
coach at Auburn. The Bowden family
is the first to have three Division I-A
head coaches at the same time.
Coach Logan says they will have
to look out for quarterback Shaun
King who has the same moves as a
former ECU player.
They've got a quarterback that is a
Marcus Crandell type Logan said.
'He runs and throws. He's the guy
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
X-Country
continued Worn page 10
Come Join us for our first meeting!
When: October 16
Where: Biology N109
Time: 4:00 PM
For more info call Sarah at 328-3246
Communication Majors
The ECU Athletics Department's
Media Relations Office is seeking to
hire enthusiastic student assistants for
the current academic year, preferably
freshmen and sophomores
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable
experience in the field of communications.
If interested, call the media relations office
at 328-4522 to set up an appointment.
beginning
Will did not decide to attend ECU
until two days before his high school
graduation. However, he did not
waste any time before preparing for
cross country on the college level.
"He made the commitment to
running very early in the summer
said Men's Cross Country Coach
Mike Ford. "To go from high school
to college, being a male runner you
increase vou distance from 5,000 to
8,000 meters Ford said. "He
definitely improved his fitness level,
land improved his distance
Will's early success can be
attributed to this off-season training
and a fiercely competitive attitude
towards racing.
"1 Ic runs like a demon Ford said.
"He runs like he is possessed
"If you have a good race, you think
'Wow, I'm glad I did that' and you
feel really good Will said. "When
you have a bad race, you think i wish
1 could race again, I wish I could race
right now and just go faster You look
forward to the next race. It's a
continuous cycle during the season
they begin and end with as they go,
and they have been going pretty well
on offense
King has completed 94 passes for
1,387 yards, with eight interceptions
and 11 touchdowns.
On the other side of the ball,
Logan said their defense is
consistent.
'The defense is playing steady so
we're going to have to go score some
points to beat this football team
ECU will play in the Superdome
which hosted Green Bay and New
England in last year's Superbowl.
The dome is big and Logan said you
don't get that close feeling because of
the size.
"I've been in the Astrodome and
Carrier Dome and I've coached in
this dome and it is different. It's
really big and open and it's not the
same close feeling that you get in the
Carrier Dome or the Astrodome, so
it's going to be different. There will
be very little fans there in
relationship to the size
Because of the empty seats that
will surround them, Logan said they
will have to make their own
excitement.
"We're going to have to go out
there and generate our own
enthusiasm
This drive leads to lower times
but also to what Ford calls "a
stereotypical freshman thing
"He wants to race every week
Ford said.
For the time being, Will is slowed
by a strained quadricep.
"I need to get it healed up for the
really big meets Will said.
The "big meets" later this season
are the CAA Championships and the
NCAA Regionals.
Will's dedication extends beyond
athletics. In high school he was
awarded Georgia's prestigious Hope
Scholarship. He turned it down to
attend ECU. He also participates in
the cross country teams many
community outreach projects.
Will still has goals for this season
that have not yet been reached.
"I'd love for our team to finish
second or third in our conference and
break into the top ten in regionals
Will said.
However, one goal still looms large
in Will's mind.
"I think I have a good shot at
being the CAA Freshman of the
Year, Will said.
Ford agrees.
"I'd say he's got as good a shot as
any other freshman in the
conference, and we've got some very
good freshmen running in our
conference right now Ford said.
RECREATIONAL SPORTS
5:00 pm MSC 244
5:30 pm MSC 244
5:00 pm SRC 128
5:00 pm SRC 128
SIGN UP TODAY!
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
EAST
CAROLINA
ITNIVERSITY
COLLECT is the easy way to save the people you call collect
'r





P"
12 Tuesday. October H. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
PLAYERS Club Apt 14 of rent and
expenses. Call today, 321-7613.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share 3 bedroom duplex on
Meade St 4 block, from campus. Rent
$191.6613 utilities. Call Leah or Erik,
830-2636 evenings.
FEMALE NEEDED ASAP TO sub-
lease 2 bedroom apt $212.50mo 12
utilities. Call Amy, 752-7838.
AVAILABLE NOW SPACIOUS 2
bedroom , 1 bath apartment, stove,
fridge, water, sewer, basic cable in-
cluded. 2 blocks from ECU campus. No
pets. Call Dogwood Hollow Apt at
752-8900 for more Info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share great 3 bedroom town-
house. Rent $205.0Qmonth plus 13
utilities. Call Apple or Jeni at 754-8157.
Please leave message.
TWO BEDROOM & Loft, 20' ceilings,
high-tech security, washerdryer in-
cluded, downtown, available now. Re-
ally cool apartment with terrific park-
ing and excellent price. 353-5839,
please leave message.
APT. FOR RENT: TWO bedroom, one
bath, dose to campus. Pets allowed.
$350 rent Call 752-3333.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO FILL one
bedroom, one bath in upstairs of
house. $187.50 per month plus utilities
deposit needed). Close to campus.
Call 830-4943.
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT 4 blocks
from campus. Stove, fridge, water,
sewer, bade cable, washer, dryer in-
cluded. Call Woodcltff Rentals at 758-
5005 for more Info. No pets.
TWO BEDROOM, OCTOBER-JULY.
Washerdryer, hook-up, celling fans,
pets allowed with fee. Very dose to
campus, only $325 a month. Call 752-
0277 or 413-0978.
ROOMMATE NEEDED MALEFE-
MALE TO share 3BR duplex on Lewis
st 12 Mock from campus. Own room
and bath. $230month plus 13 utilities.
752-8118.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
sublease 3 bedroom in Wilson Acres,
$230 a month. Call Tracy, 758-9245.
TWO OR THREE FEMALES needed
to take over lease ASAP. $220 per
month, 14 utilities. Please contact
Sheila, Yuka, or Lauren at 353-2471 or
leave a message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, FE-
MALE to share 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment 12 rent and 12 utilities.
Nice and quiet area. Call 758-5593.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. DOUBLE
WIDE, Four bedrooms, two baths.
Male or female, upperdasaman pre-
ferred. $125month plus 14 bill. Call
756-0857, If no answer leave message.
ASAP FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED, $220 a month, 14 utilities. Call
Deanne, 355-2285.
TO TAKE OVER LEASE, one bed-
room spadous apartment, extra nice,
washer and dryer hook up, basic cable,
water and sewage included. Call for
more information, 752-8085.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED-
PLAYERS aub Apts. 14 of rent and
expenses. Call today, 321-7613.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR TWO
bedroom apartment Female or male.
Close to campus. Rent $197.50. Call for
more information, 757-1274
STANCILL DRIVE 2 BEDROOM. 1
bath duplex, cable TV, washerdryer
hook-up, refrigerator with ice maker,
$400month, pet fee, $500 deposit Call
830-1491.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE a
two bedroom apartment 1 12 bath,
partially furnished, $200 month, 12
utilities. 3 blocks from ECU. Call Ryan
at 758-5756.
TOWNHOUSE TO SHARE 3 bed-
room, 1 12 bath, washerdryer, cable,
fireplace, bedroom comes furnished
or unfurnished. Available November 1.
$320month plus 12 utilities. 355-2803.
SPECIALIZED ATB - NOW ON
SALE - Save lota of $$. Close-out
prices on last year's models.
Come In and teat ride today. Aak
for Benny or Derrick, 355-8050.
STUN GUNSI SAFE AND easy to
use. 919-946-6830.
1992 TOYOTA CAMRY, EXCEL-
LENT Condition, 77,000 miles. 919-
946-4419.
BEAUTIFUL SOFA. LOVESEAT.
COFFEE table, two end tables, assort-
ed paintings, lamps and dresser. Ex-
cellent condition. Very cheap, must
sell ASAP. Call Mary at 551-1841. leeve
message, make offer.
FUJI TAHOE MT. BIKE, all Shi mane
component Onza bar end Call Fred.
353-6228.
LOVESEAT MADE BY THIS End Up
in very good condition. Asking $120
but Is negotiable. Phone Babs at 754-
2944 and leave message.
GE WASHER AND DRYER, 1 year
old. excellent condition. $680. Futon,
$50. Call 353-7196.
FOUR FOUR-LUG ALUMINUM sev-
en star rims for sale. Asking $250.00.
Ceil Renee between 9:30 p.m. and
11:00 p.m 321-5570.
A PAIR OF 12" 400 watt Pioneer sub-
woofers in Q Logic fiberglass box. Ex-
cellent condition. Must see! Only $250.
Call or leave message for Lament, 754-
0981.
1995 MAXIMA, DARK GREEN. 5-
speed, exc. condition, loaded, non-
smoker. 1-owner. Very sporty. For
more details, call 830-4731.
LIGHT COLORED SOFA IN good
condition - $50. Like new TV stand on
wheel $15 OBO. Call Susan, 758-7358
before 9:00 p.m.
RED 1988 SUBARU DL. great get-
around car for student. 95K miles.
Good condition. Must sell. $750 or will
take best offer. Call 756-8458.
CALLAWAY BIG BERTHA WAR-
8IRD 11� loft, rarely used $100; Shoe!
X-8 white two shield. $90; Fox Gaunt-
let Glove. $40; New plug dutch lever
end cable, owner, manual for CBR900
$50; Chase Harper Tank bag $20; Hein
Gericke First Gear jacket with remov-
able liner. Call 752-8288.
APPLE POWER MAC 7500100 for
sale. 24 MB RAM, 500 MB HD. 4X CD
ROM, extended keyboard, 16" Apple
monitor, 14.4 Zoom modem, loaded w
graphic design programs! $1650. Call
321-1440.
CANNONDALE DELTA V500
MOUNTAIN bike. Front end suspen-
sion. Hardly used. Paid $1000, asking
$700 OBO. Includes Rhode Gear rack.
Trek helmet 757-3475.
NISSAN ALTIMA 1995 GXE. au-
tomatic, air. cruise, AMFM cassette,
power windows and locks. $10,996
OBO. 757-3475.
Help WantecT
LOCAL LAW FIRM HAS (2) part-time
mail room positions available. Duties
include general office support, er-
rands, and filing. Own transportation a
must Hours 9-2, M-F or 1-6, M-F. Send
resume to: Legal Administrator, 1698
E. Arlington Blvd Greenville, NC
27858. (919)321-2020
HELP WANTED: GRADUATE
STUDENT with physical disabilities
seeking administrative assistant tor
the month of October. 16 hourweek,
flexible hours. Call Kevin at 561-7218,
leave a me
HELP NEEDED NOW TO prep and
paint in furniture painting studio. Ap-
prox. 5 to 10 hours per week. Painting
experience is helpful. Call Mark at 754
8030.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS. THE ColorWorks is
currently recruiting on campus for a
limited number of summer '98 man-
agement positions. Gain Hands-on ex-
perience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings $7,223. For
more Information and to schedule an
Interview call 1-800-477-1001.
THE CATERING DEPARTMENT AT
ECU Is now taking applications for
Banquet attendants. We offer flexible
work schedules and competitive pay.
Please pick up applications at the Cam-
pus Dining Office, Mendenhal! Student
Center. EOE.
6 TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. DO
you like talking on the phone? If so, we
have the job for you. Hours: 5:30-
9p.m Monday-Thursday; 4:30-8p.m.
Sunday. Hourly pay plus bonuses. Ap-
ply in person, 4:30-8p.m Energy Sav-
ers Windows and Siding, Inc Winter-
green Commercial Park, Suite O, Fire-
tower Road, Greenville.
MALE STUDENT SEEKING PER-
SONAL care attendant on Tuesday
and Thursday mornings. Only requires
minimum assistance. Preferably male.
Contact Shawn at 328-3139.
CAREGIVER NEEDED IN MY home
for five year old with mild lung disease
from 12:00-5:00p.m. Monday, Wednes-
day, Friday. Must have own transpor-
tation, references. Criminal check.
Leave message after 5:00 p.m. 830-
9082.
Port Time Jobs
Earn Money and Resume
Experience working for
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
� �-
$
8
Per
Hour
Mort-Fri 5 to 9 pm
Sat 8 am to noon
Online Collections is looking for the
10 most aggressive people on ECU's
campus to work as telephone collec-
tors. The perfect part time job.
Excellent pay. Our grads get hired
based on their experience working
for us. We also have full mornings or
afternoons to work. Contact Chris
Murphy at 754-1615
or Pat Hutchins at 757-2130.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7686.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED. Need
someone to work Sundays. Contact
Warren "Hot" Dog 1938 North
Memorial Drive.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO WORK
part time or full time 2-3 days per week
10-30 hour, a week. $10 per hour.
Must pas. credit check, criminal and
drug test. Send resume to PO Box 493,
Tarboro, NC 27886.
BRODY'S SEEKS FASHION FOR-
WARD individuals who can provide
friendly, courteous service. Work with
the fashions you love to wear: Ju-
niorsMisses, and Young Men's. Flexi-
ble schedules for the "early birds"
(10a.m. -2p.m.) or "night owls"
(12p.m9p.m. or 6p.m9p.m.). All po-
sitions fndude weekends. Merchan-
dise discount offered. Applications ac-
cepted Monday-Thursday, Brady's.
The Plaza.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics, Office of Student
Development is currently hiring full-
time ECU undergrad and graduate
students to tutor student-athletes in
the following subject areas: ACCT
2401; ASIP 2311, 3220, 4300; BIOL
1060; BIOS 1500; ECON 2133. 3030.
3960; FINA 3724; JUST 2000; MATH
1066, 2283, 3307; PHYS 1050; RCLS
2000; SOCW 1010, 3401. Also interest-
ed in graduate students with strong
background In PSYC. SOCW. andor
CDFR. Minimum 3.0 GPA required. Call
328-4550.
FREE T-SHIRT
$1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
whopping S5.00VISA
application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT
Services
TYPING AVAILABLE- REASON-
ABLE RATES. For Info, call 355-6753,
leave meesage.
TUTORING AVAILABLE FOR EMST,
ENGL, PHIL, PSYC, SOC, OEOL 1500,
FREN l&ll, LOGIC and various eiec-
tives. For Info, call 355-6753, leave
meesage.
COSTUMESI WIDE SELECTION OF
rentals and custom-made. Many ac-
cessories available. Frani Boberg,
Farmville, 753-4009.
Personals
LADIES: GIVE ME YOUR sore, ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur would
like to practice on your back. 1-800-
484-8546 (code 2465) or Brian, POB
8663, Greenville 27835.
�jat ' a " "�jbl ' j i
Greek Personals
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEWLY initiated Alpha Delta PI sis-
ters: Melissa Barrington, Allison Bar-
rows, Lindsay Deutsch, Jennifer Gallo-
way, Anisa Gherari, Colleen Gillis, El-
len Hartzoge, Tori Johnson, Shana
Maxon. Krlsten McKefthen. Amy Mill-
er, Kasie Sanderier, Rachele Shifler,
Layne Summerfleld, Ashley Triplett,
Allison Ward, Christina Wlchrlch,
Courney White, Katie Williams, Sarah
Winchester, Jackie Wright, Andrea
Young. We love you! Love, your sisters
KAPPA ALPHA, THANKS FOR
showing our little sisters a great time.
You guys always show us a good time.
Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta.
Do you like to draw
comics? If so then you may
want to apply for a job as a
staff illustrator for us at The
East Carolinian.
Apply in at office on j
the second floor of j
the Student
Publications
Building across
from Joyner.
GOOD JOB REPRESENTING US in
the pledge of the year contest Shan-
non, Jessica, and Erin. Love, the sis-
ters and new members of Delta Zeta.
ALPHA PHI, GOOD LUCK with Flag
Football playoff Your practice ha. re-
ally paid off! Thank, for being such a
great coach. Drew. Love, Alpha Phi!
CONGRATULATIONS NIKKI NOR-
EN AND Becky Lockerman for being
chosen to represent Alpha Delta Pi
during Homecoming! Love, your de-
ters
GOOD LUCK SIGMA IN the Flag
Football Playoff Tonight!
LAMBDA CHI - THANKS FOR fami-
ly tailgate on Sat! Our parent, were
definitely impressed! We all had a
great time. Love. Alpha Delta PI.
TO ALL THOSE WHO attended Slg-
ma Bring-a-Date, we hope you had a
great time.
THANKS TO PI KAPPA Phi for a
great social last Thursday. Love, the
sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD like
to thank Kappa Alpha for a great time
during Parent's Weekend. We had a
blast and our parent, loved it!
PHI TAU, THANKS FOR the eodal
lest Thurs. night We had a great time.
Looking forward to our upcoming eo-
dal! Love. Alpha Delta Pi
TO THE BOYS OF Sigma Phi Epsllon,
Thanks for the great social. We should
have done it sooner. Here's to a great
time and many more to come. Love,
the deters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
PHI TAU, THANKS FOR splashing
around with our new girls at their pref
party! We all had a great time! Can't
wait to get together again real soon!
Love, the sisters end new members of
Alpha Omicron PI
CHRISTINA ABBOTT- CONGRATU-
LATIONS on your Alpha Omicron Pi
homecoming nomination. No matter
the outcome, you will always be a win-
ner! Love, your Big Sister, Megan
SIGMA PI. THANK YOU forthepre-
downtown Thurs night The bonfire
was great We had fun! Love. Alpha
Delta PI
SIGMA NU: WE HAD a great time at
Jamaican Me Crazy! Thanks for com-
ing over! Love, the sisters and new
members of Alpha Omicron PI
SISTERS OF THE WEEK - Alpha Dei-
ta, Becky Lockermann, Jayme Reeves.
Alpha Omicron Pi-Tina Justice, Noell
Ellingsworth. Alpha Phi-Jami North-
am, Jill Wells. Alpha XI Delta-Sara
Hudgins. Lindsay Wilder. Chi Omega-
Jennifer Buckley, Tera Stutzman. Delta
Zeta-Usa Waterfield, Gennelle Bran-
denburg. Sigma Sigma Sigma-Carrie
Brewer, Kim Kelly. Zeta Tau Alpha-Liz
Gibson, Shelly Branch. Pi Delta-Mlchai
Wagner, Lexi Hasapis.
Travel
Other
Need, help?
"Ruumtt � Ztmjbptu � hjouotUftt
TSutxttt CuAt � StedUtc � NtKtUttnt
PfmfiuUnol mul IntMpnrim
tnatketinf jfOU
(919) 931-0022
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your Area. Toll Free
(11800-218-9000 Ext H-3726 for current
listings.
$1000'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART-
time. At Home. Toil Free (1)800-218-
9000 Ext T-3726 for Listing
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD Your Area.
Toll Free (1)800-218-9000 Ext A-3726
for current listings.
Announcements
AAAAl SPRING BREAK CANCUN
& Jamaica $379! Book Eariy-Save $50!
Get A Group-Go Free! Panama City
$129! South Beach (Bars Close 5AM!)
$129! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678386.
��"EARN FREE TRIPS&CASHI
CLASS TRAVEL needs students to
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students can earn a free trip and over
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tor! Call Now! 1-800-838-6411.
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WOMEN. WANT THE PERFECT rela-
tionship, healthdiet? Our Women's
Health and Fitness Series shows you
how! Call foir our FREE report! ECI
Books, 454-00)39, ext 1.
LADIES, ATTRACT THE RIGHT
man! Get datsn, attention, love. Sensa-
tional techniques, call for FREE Wom-
en's Health and Fitness Series Catalog,
ECI Libraries 454-0039 ext 1.
ABANDONED PUPPY NEEDS LOV-
ING home. Ginger is a sweet-tem-
pered Shepherd mix, approx. 6
months old. Since found she's been
spsyed, worrmed, and received shots.
If interested, 919-638-6617.
TIME MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP:
WEDNESDAY from 3:30-4:30 p.m.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program the week of October 13th. if
you are interested In this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
INTERESTED IN HIGH SCHOOL
Ministry? Come to Young Life Leader-
ship Training, Monday Oct. 13, 6-7
p.m. GC1025. For more information
call Jeff at 756-2435.
TAR RIVER EXPEDITION: ESCAPE
to nature! Water and wildlife explora-
tion dose to home. $5 student cost
covers equipment and transport Next
trip: Wed. Oct. 22, 2:30-6:00 p.m. Dept
. of Rec Services, 328-6387
YOGA CLASS: BEGINS MON. Oct.
13, SRC Rm. 238,5:15 p.m. Continues
on Mon. and Wed. evening, thru Nov.
11. Dept of Rec. Service. 328-6387
THURSDAY, OCT. 16. SENIOR Red-
tal, Chris Whitehurst, percussion, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 p.m. Satur-
day. Oct. 18 - Clarinet Quartet. Nathan
Williams, Director, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00 p.m. Sunday, Odo. 19 - East
Carolina Symphony Orchestra, Doug-
las Morrison, Conductor, Wright Audi-
torium, 3:00 p.m. Sun. Oct 19 - Facul-
ty Recital, "The Music of T.J. Ander-
son Mark Taggart, saxophone. Lou-
ise Toppin, soprano, John B. O'Brien,
piano with guest artists William
Brown, tenor and James Dargan, vio-
lin. A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Monday, Oct 20 - Faculty redtal, Mark
Ford, percussion, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 p.m.
ENHANCING SELF-ESTEEM FOR
Woman workshop: Thursday 3:30-5:00
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of October
13th. if you are Interested in this work-
shop, contact the Center at 328-6661.
PSI CHI WILL MEET Wednesday. Oc-
tober 15, at 5:00 p.m. in the Psi Chi Li-
brary. Come and heat about "The
Graduate Students' Perspective
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION
LACK fun and energy? Student Lead-
ership Development Program, has the
game.for you Thursday, October 16-
4p.m. at 109 Mendenhall - Steve Bob-
bit. Adventure Program Director, will
organize games that can re-energize
and motivate your members. Call 328-
4796 to register.
CREATING CONNECTIONS: CA-
REERS IN STUDENT AFFAIRS. Na-
tional Careers in Student Affairs Week.
October 15,1997, 5:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m.
MSC Room 221. Be introduced to the
Student Affairs profession, hear a pan-
el of professionals discus, their ex-
perience get tip. on getting through
the application process, and meet
many great people who can help you!
For more information and directions,
contact a Student Life Professional on
our campus or the Student Develop-
ment office at 328-4223. Sponsored
by: The Dividon of Student Life
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet Oc-
tober 14 at 5 p.m. In Ward Sport. Med-
icine Building in Room. 237D and
236C. Ward Sports Medicine Building
I. located between Minges and the
stadium.
PSI CHI WILL SPONSOR a GRE
practice exam on Saturday, October 18
from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. In R130. All
majors welcome! There will be a $5
fee to participate.
AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL
COLLEGE Campus Ministry meeting
at Methodist Student Center, 501 East
5th Street � ECU Campus, Thursday
Night. 6:00-8:00 p.m. Please join u. for
Christian Fellowship, Rap Sessions,
Refreshment Music, and Bible Stud-
ies. Contact Coordinator -Rev. Mary
Faircioth 321-1665.
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR
Society will hold Its next meeting
Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 5:30 p.m. at
GC1010. Please attend.
TEST-TAKING SKILLS WORK-
SHOP: Tuesday from 11:00-12:00
noon. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
thl. program the week of October
13th. If you are interested in thl. work-
shop, contact the Center at 328-6661.
"I'VE GOT THE TIME. Do you?" The
Key Is Time Management! Learn to fit
all of your activities Into one week.
Stephen Gray, Aseoc. Director Uni-
versity Union, will present thl. pro-
gram Monday, October 20 at 4:00 p.m.
in MSC Multi-Purpose Room. Call
Student Leadership Development Pro-
grams at 328-4796 for details.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND a Ca-
reer Workshop: Monday from 2:30-
3:30 p.m. This I. a four session work-
shop which requires pre-reglstration
and a $10 fee to cover assessment ma-
terials. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of October
13th.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARE-
NESS MONTH Activities: interfaith
Breakfast - Thursday, October 16. at
the Church of God, 7:30-9:00 a.m. Thl.
breakfast will Involve leader, from
many faiths, religious groups, and
concerned citizen, discussing how to
end violence against woman and their
children. 1 Year Anniversary Sale - Sat-
urday, October 25 makes 1 year My
Sister's Closet has been operating.
There will be a bag sale from 9.00 a.m.
to 1:00 p.m. Candlelight Vigil & T-ShJrt
Display - Thursday, October 30 at the
Percolator Coffee Shop from 6:00-7:30
p.m. On display will be T-shirts with a
meesage concerning the impact that
domestic violence has had on sur-
vivors. The vigil I. to honor women
who have lost their live, etthehends
of an intimate partner. To register for
these events call New Directions at
758-4400.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY from 3:30-5:00
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of October
13th. If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the Center at 328-6661.
THE ECU POETRY FORUM will meet
on Wednesday, October 15th in Men-
denhall Student Center, Room 248, at 8
p.m. Open to the general public the
Forum is a free workshop. Those plan-
ning to attend and wanting critical
feedback on their work should bring 8
to 10 copies of each poem. Listener,
welcome.
DONT FORGET TO VOTE for Home-
comlng King and Queen tomorrow,
Wednesday, October 151 Vote for your
top four choice, for king and top four
choice, for queen. Polling locations
will be at Mendenhall, College Hill, Al-
lied Health, The Wright Plaza, and Bro-
dy SOM. Make sure you have a valid
ECU ID and current activity sticker.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH WILL be sponsoring a
Men's Conference on Friday, October
17 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, October
18 beginning at 8:30 a.m. All man (13
and older) are invited to attend. Break-
fast and lunch will be served. There I.
not an admisdon or registration fee.
The Conference will be held at Com-
munity Christian Academy located at
2009 Highway 33, Greenville, NC on
Old Paetoius Road. Pastor James D.
Corbett will be ministering along with
.pedal guest Van Crouch. For more In-
formation please call the church at
752-5683.
THE SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT of Management (SAM) will
hold its 3rd Annual Yard Sale Satur-
day, October 18. Rain or shine, ft will
take place next to Parker BBQ on
Memorial Drive. Contact 756-2816 to
offer any donation, to thl. fundraiser.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP: WEDNESDAY 3:30-
5:00 p.m. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development will be of-
fering this program the week of Octob-
er 13th. if you are interested in this
workshop, contact the Center at 328-
6661.
E.C.U. LAW SOCIETY WILL hold Its
next meeting on Thursday, October
16th in Rawl Room 130. Join us as we
discuss what it takes to get Into law
school, and what being a lawyer Is all
about! Open to all majors!
PICK-A-PIRATE IS Coming
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION WORK-
SHOP: TUESDAY 11:00-12:00 noon.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program the week of October 13th. If
you are Interested In this workshop,
contact the Center at 328661.
COME JOIN US AT Tho Wedey
Foundation for fellowship missions,
worship and fun. For the rest of the
semester we will be holding a Sunday
night worship service at 7:30 p.m. in
the chapel at the Methodist Student
Center (on 5th Street) across from Gar-
ret Hall. We also hold a Wednesday
night meeting from 6p.m7p.m. to
plen activities throughout the semes-
ter on October 22 end November 19.
We will be having dinner at these
meetings for free!
lei u do the IVoik
Advertise with US!
th
eastcarohnian
s 2 8-0000

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2 Tuesday, October 14, 1997
feature section
The East Carolinian
Safety
of patrons means
more than
Ming
BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Tori Lockamy
FEAT! RE WRITER
Paul Baggett spends a lot of time at Pirates' Cove
Underwater Cafe and Bar in downtown Greenville.
But unlike most people in the bar, Baggett does not go
there to drink. He's there to watch others drink and
make sure they don't get out of line. Baggett, a 21-
year-old ECU student, is a bouncer, one of about a
half a dozen who work the bar on a busy night.
He arrives at work around 10 p.m. A line forms at
the door and seating area is full. As men and women
begin shuffling in, already a little tipsy, Paul, about six
feet tall and of medium build checks ID's. He watch-
es as they become rowdy as the night progresses, hop-
ing no one will start a fight. But if they do, he is ready
to handle it, by calming the person down and escort-
ing them out.
Being a bouncer downtown takes patience and
hard work. Fortunately, Underwater does not have a
lot of drunken, unruly customers.
"The crowd that we cater to, is older and not as
disruptive as some of the other bars downtown said
Baggett, who has been a bouncer there for eight
months. Just as a precaution. Underwater has at least
five to six bouncers there Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday nights.
It is Wednesday night, karoke night. The more
people drink, the more willing they are to get up and
sing. Most people have had one too many and begin
making fools of themselves. One guy is dancing to a
song and begins to take his shirt off. The bouncers
find this amusing at first, but when he starts to unbut-
ton his pants, he has to be stopped. One of the
bouncers tells him he is not allowed to strip. The
man embarrassed quickly sits down at his table.
"We help each other out when fights break out
Baggett said. "When fights break out, whoever is clos-
est begins to break up the fight, then others follow
If someone is injured during a fight or knocked out,
Baggett, who is trained in CPR, grabs a First Aid kit,
and the bartenders arc ready to dial 911. Bouncers do
not have to be trained in CPR, but it is good to have
someone who is around just in case of an accident.
Bouncers, such as Baggett, are there to keep things
safe and running smoothly. If things get out of hand
they step in.
"We realize the person is drunk, first we calm them
down, then quickly escort them out of the bar before
they cause more trouble Baggett said.
"Sometimes it can be rather amusing to see all of
the people having a good time, but when things get
out of hand, it is time to get serious he said.
As the night winds down, stumbling people leave
the bar, hopefully to catch a cab home; it's cleanup'
time for the bouncers. It takes a good hour and a half
to two hours to clean the bar after a busy night.
Various services offered to make students feel safe
Poorly lighted areas
concern
for students
ANORKW Pill BBS
EE VII RE WKI I ER
On-campus safety is a very
important issue. Many of us hear
over and over the do's and don'ts
of being safe; don't walk alone at
night, park in well-lit areas, stay
away from dark corners; but how
many of us realty pay attention?
Whether coming back from
downtown, going to the library or
off to visit friends, students are
constantly walking on campus
late at night. Unfortunately,
many feel threatened to do so.
"In certain areas, I don't like it
(walking on campus) because
there are no lights, especially
around the mall area senior Lee
Ann Odom, said.
Kima Nixon said, "1 follow the
precautions, but I would feel
safer on campus if there was bet-
ter lighting
Students should always be
aware of their surroundings and
know where the blue lights are.
According to Sgt. LaFrance
Davis, of the KCU Police
Department, more blue lights
have been put on campus within
the past few weeks. New ones are
being placed on brown, eight feet
poles with the blue lights on the
top.
"There are two new ones in
the Reed St. lots, another one in
Curry Ct. and one south of
Minges Davis said.
The ECU police officers have
had input as to where the loca-
tion of the new phones should be.
"There may be an advantage
to putting them (blue lights)
closer to the sidewalk and we can
advise them on this Davis said.
Sophomore Rinardo Reddick
feels safe on campus becuase of
these lights.
"I feel safe walking on campus
at night because I know where
the blue light phones are, should
I need help Reddick said.
According to Officer D.J.
Gregory of the ECU Police
Department, "students
don't take the precau-
tions necessary to be safe
enough
He said that students
often forget to lock doors,
not only in their cars, but
in their rooms; students
should not leave valuables
out in the open, and
should even lock their
room door when they are
there. Gregory also said
that students should
always let friends know
when you are going out
and to always walk in a
group, especially coming
back from downtown late
at night.
The university offers a
police escort and Pirate
Ride, a van that runs until
the early morning hours
going from downtown to
College Hill and all
points' in between. This
is used in hopes of deter-
ring students from walk-
ing home late at night.
The police department
has student patrols, officers on
ECU � Crime Stats
Criminal Offenses 199619951994
Aggravated Assault 1897
Drug Possession 362832
Driving While Impaired 425166
Larceny 354339354
Liquor Law Violations 225
Phvsical Assault wSexual Motives 014
does not include the number of state citations issued. There were 261 state citatio Source: ECU Police Dept.ns issued for this offense.
also
bikes and in cars constantly
patrolling campus.
"The main thing to remem-
ber said Gregory, "if you don't
put yourself in a situation for
there to be a problem, then there
won't be a problem.
Increases in government funding allows for more patrols downtown
Alcohol violations,
fights, larcenies
lead calls answered
Gabriel no it
EEHIRE WRITER
Greenville's downtown is a popular
watering hole for many, and when
high spirits are mixed with large
crowds, results are often severe.
Downtown, also referred to as
Target 2 by the city police, runs
from the Tar River to Evans Street
and Reade Circle back up to First
Street. Police have taken particular
interest in this area because of
increasing crime. In fact, funding
has been approved to allow authori-
ties to step up patrols to prevent
situations that in the past were hard
to control due to lack of manpower.
Cheryl Tafoya, crime analyst for
he Greenville Police Department,
offers data on calls made in the
Target 2 area from January to
September of 1997. Among the
more alarming calls listed were 297
alcohol related violations, 90 fights
and 88 larcenies involving vehicles.
"These were service calls only
Tafoya said. "Not all led to an arrest
or issuing of a citation
Assaults are also common and
have been broken down into six cat-
egories, assault on a law enforce-
ment officers being one. Others
include assault with a deadly
weapon and assault inflicting seri-
ous injuries. All totaled, these
offenses account for 60 of the 2,371
calls listed from the downtown area.
Two years ago, the city decided
to tackle these issues head-on and
applied for federal funding offered
through President Bill Clinton's
campaign to place 100,000 new
police officers on America's streets.
On July 15, 1995, the federal gov-
ernment granted a three-year sub-
sidy which will end in July of next
year. At that time the city council
will investigate the success of the
program and vote on whether to
continue its services using city
money.
As soon as the grant came
through, community based units
were deployed and one subunit was
assigned to Greenville's downtown.
"Before, most incidents occurred
during hours officers were not
patrolling in the area said Corporal
Earl Phipps, supervisor of Target 2's
tactical unit. "Today these crr.ii-
nall elements are finding it hard to
operate, thanks to our 24-hour
around-the-clock patrols
Phipp's team consists of six offi-
cers, two assigned to the day shift
and four, including a supervisor, at
night. Rounds are conducted day
and night on foot or bicycle.
"This tends to add a personal
touch to our relationship with the
public said Phipps, who is a for-
mer ECU student. "Officers are
easier to approach rather than try-
ing to stand in the middle of the
road flagging down a passing cruis-
er
Some of the patrol's busier
nights include Halloween,
Homecoming and weekends of
home football games. People come
from all over to partake in
Greenville's rich night life.
Ordinarily, they are students from
outside schools and military person-
nel. It is hard to pinpoint a single
group that causes the most prob-
lems. According to Phipps, the
largest of groups can also be the
most behaved. Other times one or
two can set off major problems.
During the two years of the
increased patrols Phipps says he's
seen improvement. "We tactical
officersl hold a vested interest in
the this area, I love coming to work
and think of downtown as my own
backyard Phipps said.
City of Greenville �
Incidents Reported for 1996
Area around ECU
Assault (1)
72
Auto Larceny
37
Burglary(2)
141
LarcenyO)
499
Rape (4)
�This area covers all property enclosed within the following streets: Elm street from 14th Street
north to the Tar River, Evans Street from the Tar River south to Uth Street.
These numbers do not include the area around campus.
1. Includes assaults inflicting serious injury, assaults with deadly weapons, assaults with intent to
kill and aggravated assaults.
2. Includes commercialresidential breaking & enterings, commercialresidential breaking & enter-
ing larcenies, and first & second degree burglaries.
3. Includes larcenies, larcenies from motor vehicles, shopliftings and gas drive-offs.
4. Includes armed and strong-armed robberies.
Source: ECU Police Dept.
Check out TECs homecoming page on the web at
w w w. studentmedia. ecu. edu
.
tytww
Wnsi'po
'�g 'i





.
3 Tuesday. October 14. 1997
feature section
The East Carolinian

Rescue workers on hand, prepared to
handle emergencies at Dowdy-Ficklen
Hundreds of workers ensure
safety for football fans
JOHN HOWARD
ra.TMUMUTHt
On a beautiful fall Saturday afternoon thousands of
Pirate football fans fill the stadium. The band plays
the fight song as the crowd cheers. Such a scenario
happens every Saturday in the fall in college towns
throughout the country. The focus is on the field and
the players. If a player gets injured, help comes swift
and sure. But what happens if a fan gets injured? Or
what about an emergency requiring immediate action?
Three weeks ago at a game in Chapel Hill, an offi-
cial suffered a massive heart attack. Rapid response of
the emcrgcncypcrsonnel probably saved his life.
At Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, a staff of 200 emer-
gency workers stands by at each football game to
ensure the safety of the fans and officials, according to
Dr. Henry VfcnSant, associate director of athletics.
Many variables, especially when mixed with alco-
hol, contribute to a safety problem. "vanSant said that
things would be safer if people come to the game to
watch rather than to consume alcohol.
"I just don't understand why people would want to
go to a sporting event intoxicated. It's a law not to
have alcoholic beverages at collegiate sporting events
V&nSantsaid.
Another variable that can lead to problems is the
weather. It is important to drink plenty of water and
sodas when it is hot to avoid dehydration or heat
stroke.
Other injuries that require emergency assistance
include bee stings. At home games bee stings are the
most common medical problem. Emergency person-
nel also see their share of twisted ankles.
The university employs three fully-staffed rescue
units at each game. These units are on a rotation and
arc from various rescue squads throughout Pitt County
and the city of Greenville. Their trucks are parked in
the end zone area for easy access in any emergency sit-
uation. In addition to the rescue squads, there is a
fully-staffed nurse's station located under the north
stand near the visitor locker room.
In addition to the numerous personnel on the field
level and in the stands, there is a security coordinator
in the press box who is in constant communication
with the emergency and security staff. The security
coordinator acts as a dispatcher: Also, a video camera is
used to watch the fans throughout the course of the
Warm temperatures on football game days out fans at risk for heaHelated injuries such as dehydration. Security personnel must remain ever ready to aid people in large crowds such as this.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
game. V&nSant said this is a valuable tool in pinpoint-
ing a problem in the mass of 38,000 people.
"It is a never-ending job ensuring the safety of the
fans. Our grounds crew and housekeeping staff does a
remarkable job in making all the grounds safe,
VanSant said.
�knSant said that the university employs many out-
side agencies to assist the university staff. An organi-
zation from Raleigh handles all the parking lots.
During the game workers act as security to eliminate
the threats of vandalism and theft of parked cars. One
staff is responsible for ushering and crowd control in
the stands during the game. The NC State Highway
Patrol arrives four hour before game time to discuss
with VinSant the strategy for directing traffic.
They (Highway Patrol) have always done a great
job in controlling the traffic before the games
VanSant said. .
The largest group of safety personnel is ECU
Public Safety. They are stationed in areas surrounding
the stadium. They are assisted by some off-duty
Greenville police officers to maintain order and gener-
al safety during the game.
VanSant stresses that alcohol is the root of most
potentially threatening situations. "I urge the fans to
be responsible. Make going to a Pirate football game a
�;reat experience for you and the fans around you. Use
common sense and good judgment VanSant said.
Leap on over to a job
at eastcarolinian
Many services available pn-campus
for sexual assault victims
Student health
workers want to
help students
handle crisis
tflid is no-w accepting
application for all writing
positions.
jipply at owr offices on the
Second floor of the Student
"Publications Building.
)knife! bankrr
Maria Edirsk Odkriz
FKATI RK WRITERS
At 9:30 p.m walking alone from
Joyner Library the student clutch-
es the straps of the book bag and
hurries back to the safety of the
residence hall. Students, both
men and women, out alone at
night are wary. No one wants to be
a victim- especially a victim of
sexual assault. Sexual assault does-
n't discriminate against gender,
race or age. If it happens at ECU,
where do you turn?
Sexual assault goes unreported
every day according to Heather
Zophy, Student Health Educator.
Sexual assault is an unwarranted
advance that makes the person
uncomfortable.
"Sexual assault is a form of ter-
rorism for the victim, they might
not use lethal weapons, but the
beating around and the mental
anguish is enough said Jolene
Jernigan, RNC FNP Nursing
Supervisor at Student Health
Services.
Each year ECU publishes a set
of sexual assault policies and pro-
cedures in the Campus Security
and Safety brochure and in the
Clue Book.
"There is a law that we have to
have this information posted for
students to know (the policies)
said Dr. Martha Wisbey, dean of
student development.
These policies arc intended to
make students aware of this issue
and to make people aware of the
University Disciplinary Procedure,
which is applicable in instances of
alleged sexual assault.
This policy defines sexual
assault as any attempted or
actual sexual activity that is
unwanted or unconscntual includ-
ing oral or anal penetration, sexual
touching, fondling, rape and other-
sexualfy related acts
Other services this provides
include a list of things for one to do
when sexually assaulted and the
victim's Bill of Rights.
The victims who come into
Student Health Services have the
option of repotting the assault to
the ECU Police Department or do
an anonymous report.
"The anonymous report
excludes names but is sent to the
ECU Police Department and the
Vice Chancellor of Student Life so
they can look for trends Zophy
said.
Jernigan believes that students
should face the reality of the sexu-
al assault if they are a victim.
"Don't hide from the assault
because it doesn't go away; lay it
on the table, find someone you are
close to and share it. All relation-
ships are based on trust and if you
can't share your story (of assault),
it makes it hard to trust Jernigan
said.
The staff at Student Health
Services tries to provide a safe and
comforting environment that is
compassionate and understanding.
Student Health Services Nurse
Holli Williams stresses that the
staff offers a supportive environ-
ment.
"We are here for students in cri-
sis and everything is confidential.
We are here for support and not to
judge the victim Williams said.
Jernigan and Williams agree
that students should know that
sexual assault can happen. Always
be aware of your surroundings and
don't be afraid to get help when
you need it.
Student Health Services offers
suppon, STD screening (exclud-
ing HIV testing), emergency con-
traception, counseling and access
to rape kits.
In addition to Student Health
Services, the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development has staff members
on call after hours and may be
accessed through a resident coor-
dinator, support groups for people
who have been sexually assaulted
and individual counseling.
Student Development, a divi-
sion of Student Life, has a Student
Life Sexual Assault Coordinating
Committee which last year worked
on policies and procedures for the
the campus.
"They also worked on protocols
like the concept of an advocate
program so that there would be
trained staff members available to
help students Wisbey said.
There is also an Education
Committee which plans program
outreach. According to Wisbey this
group works with event planning
for Sexual Assault awareness Week
and programs encouraging aware-
ness for students Wisbey said.
Both committees are com-
prised of student and faculty
members. There will be a table
outside of the Wright Place today
DID YOU KNOW
FACTS ABOUT
RAPE?
� One in three
women will become a
victim of sexual
assault during her life.
�Every day in
America 1,871
women are forcibly
raped.
�Alcohol and drugs
contribute to 60 per-
cent of date rapes.
east Carolinian's
focil
MR L.ROYSTF.R Editw
CEI.KSTF. WILSON ManagingEditor
A(iKI.A K0CXIC Special Feature Editor
DAVID SOI'THKULAND Special Feature Designer
The purpose is 10 lake an m-depth look ai issues ol importance to students and faculty at ECU.This issue is the
second of si. which will appear this semester Look lot the net issue on alcohol which wilUppear ne� Tuesday.
Focus is a class protect lor Sheartean Puke's Basic News Writing class
IMPORTANT RESOURCES:
Counseling Center 328-6661
Student Health (medical) 328-6841
Student Health (mental health) 328-6795
Campus Ministries 758-2030
REAL Crisis Center 758-4357 (758-HELP)
Dean of Students Office 328-6823
University Housing Services 328-6840
�Only 16 percent of
rapes are ever report-
ed. Most cases they
are reported within
24 hours of the
attack.
�75 percent to 80
percent of rape vic-
tims blame themselves
for the crime.
�Over 700,000
women are sexually
assaulted each year.
Source: REAL crisis Center of
Greenville
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4 Tuesday. October 14. 1997
feature
The East Carolinian
You could
stuff!
We want to
think a
looks like
We
Nov.
Submit orgina
artworklogos to
east Carolinian
We are located on the
second floor of the Student
Publication Building.
Judging will be done by the staff of The East Carolinian.
All reasonable and tasteful logos
will be printed in the
Dec. 4th paper.


Title
The East Carolinian, October 14, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 14, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1231
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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