The East Carolinian, October 9, 1997






. � I
THURSDAY
0GTO8ER2. S97
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Electrical short-circuit causes fire in Aycock Hall
Damage confined to one
residence hall room
ANGELA KOENIC
STAFF WRITKR
Residents of Aycock Hall learned first-hand
the importance of fire drills whenreturning
from Fall Break on Tuesday evening. A room
TEC takes
The last major fire on ECU campus was
April 1. 1915. when the roof to the
Student Publications Building was
destroyed. At that time the building
served as the dining hall.
"The friction of the
cord with the chair and
the floor eventually
shorted it out
Teresa Crocker
ECU Police Oept.
on the third floor caught fire at approximate-
ly 6:45 p.m. when an extension cord which
was placed under a desk chair
short-circuited.
"The friction of the cord
with the chair and the floor
eventually shorted it out
said Teresa Crocker, chief of
the ECU Police Department.
Damage in the residence
hall was confined to the room,
and residents in surrounding
rooms were able to return to
their rooms that evening.
Police officers responded to the call,
which came through the fire alarm system,
and were able to put out the fire using fire
extinguishers. Crocker said the officers
entered the room to ensure no one was
inside.
"They couldn't see because the the
smoke was so thick so they were down on the
ground, trying to see if anyone was in there
Crocker said.
As a result of this, six officers were hospi-
talized for smoke inhalation.
"They were all released Tuesday night
and they are doing fine Crocker said. "The
thing about smoke is it doesn't bother you for
a few days, but then a couple
days later, you get sick, so we
wanted to be sure to get them
checked out Crocker said.
Police officers do not have
protective gear used by fire fight-
ers.
The officers will be evalu-
ated in a few days to see if they
are able to return to work or need
further medical attention.
Officers also assisted in evacuat-
ing the residents of the residence hall.
No students were injured during the fire
and the residents of the room were not in
their room when the fire occurred.
According to Manny Amaro, Director of
University Housing Services, the fire alarm
system worked perfectly.
"Every alarm in that building was ringing;
every light was flashing and every automatic
door closed Amaro said.
"The residents of Aycock did a good job
SEE FIRE. PAGE 4
Aycock Hall, which is on College Hill Drive, was temporarily evacuated due to a fire
on the third floor as students arrived back from Fall Break Tuesday night.
PHOTOCOURTESY OF AISDKFJA.LSDFJLSKDJF
Invalid election process leads SGA to call for write-in race
Most positions up for
grabs Oct. 14
Amanda At sii
SSIS I VN I ShWS I llll II
After a light ballot in recent legislature
elections and unclear polling practices,
the Student G-overnment Association
(S(. V has decided to hoM : r.vlccti� ��
An all write-in election will be held on
Tuesday, Oct. 14 for the positions in the
legislative branch.
During an SGA meeting,
elections chair Jonathan
Ellerbe, attorney general
Haden Jennings and the
executives of SGA deter-
mined the initial election
would have to be null and
void; only some positions
stand as valid.
"Any of the class officers
v iio ran unc r�tot ' in lie
election will stand. The
The only mistake was
everyone (pollsters)
wasn' on the
same kilter
Haden Jennings
SGA aur �. � iera
senior class president will rerun Jennings
said.
The three day reps who
appeared on the ballot will
also hold their position as
stands.
"The only mistake was every-
one (pollsters) wasn't on the
same kilter,? said Jennings.
Pollsters were unaware of the
correct guidelines of how stu-
dent were to vote for a write-
in c id . Guide nes �
ied from poll to poll.
Though this was not considered to be
an illegal election, SGA officials felt the
election was clearly unfair to some candi-
dates.
"This is not an elections violation
because the candidates did not break the
rules. It was not illegal; it just was not
valid said Jennings.
The constitution does not specifically
state the rules by which write-in candi-
dates are to be voted for.
"The rules don't specifically say you can
only writ in one candidate said
Jennings.
Now that this problem has been point-
ed out to the SGA, they plan to prevent it
from happening again in future elections.
"They are adamant about wanting elec-
tion rules to state the way write-in and bal-
lots should be submitted, as to being
unclearsaid Jennings. "Here is the prob-
lem, we see it, let's set the precedent to be
clearly done from here on out
SGA hopes that students will take part
in all future elections, as well as the elec-
tion process because that is what improves
SGA.
�VI v
Reconstructing Joyner's Past
ECU to recycle original
library columns
AMHKR TT( M
STUT WRI 1T.R
JJ
Amid all the new construction going on
around campus, one of the latest addi-
tions to Joyner Library includes the
library's original columns.
Joyner, originally built in 1954, was
named for James Yadkin Joyner, as bene-
factor of the university in 1955. It is now
the east wing, the section of the library
that is adjacent to the Student Health
facility-
According to the University Archives'
Building Inventory List, "this building
was L-shaped, 268 feet across the front,
with a central four-columned portico
The original architect was Eric G.
Flannagan of Henderson.
Joyner has undergone many changes
since its pioneer days. Before it existed,
the Austin building served as the library
and was succeeded by the Whichard
building until Joyner was erected. The
total cost for the maiden construction of
the library was $465,000; the building
covered a total of 84,641 square feet.
"The original columns were put back
up for financial reasons as well as their
historical value said Steve Mead, a pro-
fessor in the construction management
department.
Just one of the pillars may cost as
much as $10,000 or more. With other
expenses, such as fill dirt, labor, and
structural supports, the university would
not be able to replace them.
"They (the columns) are made pri-
marily of limestone said John Shenette
of Facilities Planning.
The reinstallation of the columns will
last the length of the semester.
The limestone columns, which were part of the origianl Joyner Library, are being
resurrected to be part of the new Joyner Library addition.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Components such as fill dirt, steel beams, and structural supports are a
big part of the job. These things are crucial to the construction process
and take a significant amount of time.
"We have taken the veranda down and pieced it back together
Mead said.
All the original parts including the beams, pillars, and supports have
been conserved so that they may be used again.
Sentimental reasons also intermingle with the choice to keep the
structures.
"The columns were dedicated to our university by a family-owned
business said Dr. Gail Munde of Library Administration.
Because a new entrance is underway, tearing down the columns was
unavoidable. The library will include a plaza with seats and landscaping
as well. Library patrons coming from the campus mall will pass through
the columns and through the plaza to get inside the library.
The pillars will be free-standing with beams across the top so that an
open, breezeway-type entrance is shaped.
"Changing the entrance will be easier access to the libraryl said
Mary Jo Bratton, a former history teacher from ECU.
The construction process of the new entryway will be done shortly.
"Our schedule shows late October for completion of the columns
Shenette said.
However, the plaza will take a little more time to be finished.
"The (completed) area will be finished for rhe return of spring semes-
ter in January 1998 Shenette said.
From the archives
The original library was 84,641 square
feet.
The initial cost of the library was only
$465,000.
In 1954, there were 230,000 volumes in
the library including microfilm.
As of July 1997,1,053.883 volumes were
counted (books and journals).
The 1 millionth volume was not acquired
unil 1995.
In 1909, ECU was a teacher's training
school with enrollment of only 174 stu-
dents.
By 1960, enrollment was up to 5,000.
Joyner Library in the old days.
PHOTOCOURTESY OF JOYNER LIBRARY
v. Jk&
4
TODAY
sunny
High 8b
Low 61
WEEKEND
sunny
High 85
Low 60
The last time ECU
was shut out in back-to-
back football games was in
1970 against East Tennessee
State and The Citadel.
opinion7
Precautions should
shed light on rape
lifestyle8
Piercing: Not just for ears
anymore
sports12
Southern Miss, grudge
match this weekend
the east Carolinian
GHEENVILIE, NC 27851!
atioss Imm Joynpr
phone
328 6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328 6558 tax
on line
www.siudentmedis �





?
2 Thursday. October 9, 1997
new
The East Carolinian
Florida to assemble pfiesteria task force
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) � The state will convene a task force to exam-
ine a deadly algae blamed for killing millions offish in coastal nvers in the
eastern United States and the risk of it arriving in Florida.
Pfiesteria piscicida devastated the Chesapeake Bay area this summer
and killed scores of fish in North Carolina over the past six years. The
microbe is suspected to afflict some watermen with dime-sized lesions,
memory loss and respiratory attacks.
An algae resembling pfiesteria has been found in Florida, most recently
in the St. Johns River near Jacksonville. But officials say it has not been
identified as pfiesteria.
Mdlester pleads innocent
DURHAM (AP) �A convicted child molcstcr accused of taking indecent
liberties with two Durham girls and stalkinga third has pleaded not guilty.
Rex Haislip, 33, also pleaded not guilty Tuesday to a charge of assault-
ing the police officer who arrested him last year.
This summer, Superior Court Judge A. Leon Stanback declared Haislip
mentally fit to stand trial after Haislip underwent 11 months of evaluations
at Dorothea Dix Hospital in Raleigh following his arrest.
Upon his release, Haislip pleaded guilty to two counts of taking inde-
cent liberties and was sentenced to five years' probation.
High Court ingnores judge's censure appeal
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) The U.S. Supreme Court will not hear an
appeal by a former Superior Court judge who was censured for a sexual rela-
tionship with a courthouse employee.
The high court Monday let stand the punishment imposed on former
Judge Robert C. Flanagan.
Flanagan had asked the court to hear his appeal of the censure imposed
in
March by the Connecticut Supreme Court.
Flanagan, who was not reappointed when his term expired last year, has
argued that his case was handled improperly and that he was denied due
process.
Last year, the state Judicial Review Council voted to censure Flanagan
for failure to uphold the integrity of the judiciary and failure to act in a
manner that promotes public confidence in the judiciary. Flanagan carried
on a three-year relationship with a married court reporter who was regular-
ly assigned to his New Haven courtroom.
Clinton's Line-Item veto axes S.C. Guard training center
mi JIMB1A. S C (AP) Some $3.8 million to enlarge a South Carolina
NnnR was among the 38 projects ftt from a
nSv construction bill by President Clinton's line-item veto.
Slrtom Thurmond, R-S.C, had inserted the �Wn�J
tramSt cent� in southern Richland County into a regional!facility; Aides
Sd the Senator asked for the money at the request oSouth Carolina
GuardIrfSab and was stunned when it was sliced out of the $9.2 billion
blU: The regional simulation center was considered a mission essential to
the South & olina National Guard Thurmond said President Cl.nton s
veto of this oroiect shows his continued lack of support for our men and
wome�n IE, despite his willingness to engage our troops ,n an
UnTeto
simtirStt the Guard's sburg Taimn; Center. The new facil-
iry would have replaced one that is only 4,200 square ieet.
Mike Ruff runs for City Council District 1
Candidate stands for
student's rights
Dawn erntkman
STVKF WRITE!
District 1 City Council candidate
Mike Ruff says he is running in
favor of student's rights.
"City council got my attention
when they decided to break up
campus into several districts
Ruff said.
Ruff's platform consists of four
major points: crime, parking, the
three person occupancy ordinance
and the redistricting of ECU.
If elected. Ruff plans to repeal
the three person occupancy law in
Greenville.
"This law is obviously directed
at students. It's discriminatory
against students Ruff said.
The police department is
another area of concern for Ruff.
They need to seriously look
at prioritizationthey need to
spend too much time on the small-
er crimes and not enough time on
the more violent crimes
The parking problem is also a
priority on Ruff's platform. Ruff
believes that ECU's failure to
remedy their parking problems is
part of the reason that Greenville's
parking has become so problemat-
ic.
"ECU is part of the cause of the
parking prob-
lemsome-
thing needs
to be done,
but it is a
hard situa-
tion to deal
with Ruff
said.
Ruff, if elect-
ed, plans to
get rid some
of the No
Parking signs
downtown and provide more
dependable, 24-hour, cheap trans-
portation such as buses.
Redistricting is a large part of
Ruff's platform. Ruff would like
to put the city back into more
equally-divided, consolidated dis-
Mike Ruff, city
council candidate
triers.
Ruff, 25, served in the LS army
from 1990 tol993. Ruff also served
in both the Army Reserves and the
National Guard. Ruff is paying for
school through the G.I Bill.
Currently, Ruff is working to save
money to go back to school in the
spring.
Ruff is running for District 2.
This includes: Fletcher, Greene,
White and Clement residence
halls. It also includes: Ringgold
Towers, Georgetown Apts. and
residents around the hospital.
For more information about
Ruff, contact his web site:
http:members.wbs. nethome-
pages mrumruff.html
Disability services expands, increases enrollment
Hoi.i.y Harris
STAFF WRITER
Disability Services Provides
Assistance to Record Numbers
This Year
Providing diverse services for
individuals with disabilities is not
only a priority of ECU, but the
major goal and function of the uni-
versity's department for Disability-
Services. Aiding 267 students that
have a variety of needs to consider,
the program accommodates prob-
lems that range from housing diffi-
culties to scheduling assistance.
"We monitor students and like
for them to tell us if they are hav-
ing problems on campus" says
C.C. Rowe, director of the disabil-
ity service program since 1979,
adding that the responsibility of
the department does not end t
the classroom.
"Someone might need to go to
a play or to their advisor" he
emphasized, and pointed out that
the student would be helped to
have access to all University
events, not only those of an acade-
mic nature. One of the main
responsibilities of the program is
to give the student a high level of
independence while attending to
their individual concerns.
"Mr. Rowe and the staff are
very helpful and they'll do whatev-
er they can to make sure you get
what you need" says Jennifer
Padin a mobility impaired fresh-
man transfer student. "I don't use
it much, but its there when I need
itI think the theory is mainly
mainstreaming
T,hough most buildings on
campus are wheelchair accessible
to at least the first floor, funding
has been allotted to put new ele-
vators in Rawl and Austin in order
to bring the university up to par
with student expectations. Other
new plans include the continuation
of faculty workshops to help univer-
sity staff better understand the
needs of disaffiliated students, and
implementation of a new data base
developed in conjunction with
Frieda Pollard and Charles Gurganus
from computer and Information
SEE SERVICES. PAGE 3
Harris Teeter Shopping Center
Nail Care Salon
MOO S. Charles Blvd
Suite 60O0H
Creenville. NC 27858
Nail Care Salon
Specialized Oriental Manicurist
For Ladies & Gentlemaen
Walk-Ins Welcome
OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK
MONSAT lOanKSpm
Telephonei919l 931-0537
FULL SET
$19.99
FILL- INS
$11.99
PEDICURE !MANICURE! DENT
$17.00 $10.99 iffiSSSS'
Dr. Hcuse and Dr. Darwick
are pleased to announce the relocation of
� ����������
SILVER
BULLET
1 Doots Open: 7:30 p.m. 'A Touch Of Class"
756-6278




Y�
Animal Hospital
of Pitt County
From Greenville Boulevard to our new clinic at 107 TRADE ST.
(between Golden Corral tSr Parkers Restaurant)
�Medicine & Surgery Small Animals � Farm Animals & Horses
� Boarding - Air Conditioned
756-0148 Nights & Emergencies355-3825
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
ffiHU
TUESDAY:
� WEDNESDAY:
. THURSDAY:
� km I FRI&SAT:
m mMm 10 OR MORE GIRL
J I DANCERS EVERY

fSfy(dT�







Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers



NIGHT!
Ueatod 5 Mik� W�tt of GrwovflW M 264 AH. (Behind Alddin Limo Servi�

'

Guards overpower armed hijacker on Iran air flight
TEHRAN Iran (AP) A hijacker on board an Iranian passenger jet fired
two srs and ordeTedlhe plane to be flown to Iraq, but pla.nclothcs secu-
ngSaSsverpowered him and the plane landed safely, news reports stud
t0The hijacker and guard were both injured, but the nature and severity
of tnefr Eries was not immediately known, state-run Tehran radio sad.
Iran Ai Flight 257 was bound for the southern city of Bandar Abbas after
JnToff from Tehran on Monday when the hijacker pulled a gun, the offi-
cial Islamic Republic News Agency reported.
IRNA said the hijacker, who was in his 30s, fired two shots demanded
to beVake??o Iraq, and mentioned Israel as an altcrr.at.ve dest.nat.on
The pSndeTsafely in Bandar Abbas and the hijacker was arrested, .t
said.
Bus slides off ferry in Vietnam, five killed
HO CHI M1NH CITY: V.ctnam (AP) A bus without a parking brake slid
offaferry and plunged into the Mekong River in southern V.etnam, kill.ng
PthTp� driver had disembarked from the vehicle
Oneof'the vfctimw being transported to a local hospital when the
vehicle rolled off the side of the boat. The four other vtcums were relat.ves
�f TheeSS a parking brake and the driver instead
turned the engine off andt the vehicle in first gear to keep .t stat.onary,
dSlSyear-old nephew, however, took the bus out of gear,
allowing it to roll off the side of the ferry.
State tests use of credit cards
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
! o.
BSE;
Joker
Vibrant Green
SUPPORT YOUR I0CAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
For more information, see our web page atwww.ecu.edusrudenLunionpiroteunderground.hrml
RALEIGH (AP) � The state has
begun experimenting with the use
of special credit cards in an effort to
reduce paperwork and save money.
The Division of Purchase and
Contract has issued "procurement
cards" to a dozen state agencies,
including several universities, com-
munity colleges and school systems.
Employees who use the cards,
v Inch arc similar to credit cards, will
no longer be required to submit
paperwork requesting approval
before they shop for less than $2,500
worth of government supplies.
"We've put an element of trust in
the process, but we think the oppor-
tunitv for savings are tremendous
said John Leaston, the state's pur-
chasing officer.
State agencies now spend
between $75 and $150 to process
the paperwork involved with a rypi-
cal purchase of supplies. Much of
that cost is the result of staff time-
spent reviewing purchase requests
and filling out the forms necessary
for approval or rejection.
By using procurement cards, the
paperwork cost should be cut to less
than $20 per transaction. Iraston
said.
Aj. ncies will also save money, he
contends, by writing fewer checks.
Now, agencies typically cut separate
checks for each purchase they make,
however small.
In the future, agencies will
instead write monthly checks to a
bank that manages the procurement
cards. The bank will be responsible
for paying individual vendors.
If the procurement cards prove
successful, the new system could be
expanded statewide next year.
HENDRIX FILMS
Thursday; October 9
Br . � � -deem your orange -Thirsty Thursday coupon
t, . � � .� e .jz. drink when you-make a purchase
Friday, October 10
Saturday. October 1.1
: -TV
For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to StudentsFaculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
The Movie Event Of
The Summer Is Here!
&!
PG13
BPTMRN
ftOBIN
FREE
'nieMosgjj
Courtesy of
PreviewTheater
I ka
.





r
-
3 Thursday. October 9, 1997
HWS
The East Carolinian
briefs
Four area nurses make
N.C. Great 100 List
Three nurses from Pitt County
Memorial Hospital and another
from the East Carolina University
School of Nursing have been
named among the best nurses in
the state this year.
Nina Ivey, Cynthia Parks and
Tory Pruitt of PCMH and Dr.
Mary Kirkpatrick of the School of
Nursing were listed in this year's
compilation of the Great 100 reg-
istered nurses.
The Great 100 nurses are cho-
sen each year by a committee of
nurse volunteers who serve on the
Great 100 Foundation.
Approximately 400 nurses arc
nominated each year from across
the state. This year, the recipients
will be honored at a gala Oct. 25 in
Research Triangle Park.
AIDS awareness
On Oct. 9 a campus workshop
on AIDS will be held from 7 to 8
p.m. in room 1031 of the General
Classroom Building. Sponsored by
the office of Health Promotion
and Well-Bcing, the workshop is
among several events planned at
ECU in October to help students
become more aware of the dis-
ease. The workshop will examine
some of the basic information
about AIDS and its effect on the
community.
Last day for Ironman
registration
In just a few short days, East
Carolina's own version of the
Ironman triathalon kicks off at the
Student Recreation Center. The
fitness challenge requires comple-
tion of 26 miles on the track, 2
miles in the pool, and 116 miles
on the tectrix bike. As an extra
incentive, competitors are eligible
for several prizes in addition to
the distinction of conquering the
multi-skill event. For anyone
interested in testing their mettle,
the deadline for registration is
Thursday, Oct.9.
House, Senate pass bill to end
some late-term abortions
crime
WASHINGTON (AP) � Setting
up a showdown with President
Clinton over the abortion issue,
the House approved a Senate-
passed bill banning a procedure
used to end some late-term preg-
nancies.
Clinton vetoed a similar bill last
year and has promised to do so
again.
The 296-132 vote is a margin
more than big enough to override a
presidential veto, but prospects for
enacting the ban over Clinton's
objections hinge on the Senate
where the outcome to an override
is in doubt.
The Senate has passed the bill
twice, but never by the minimum
two-thirds majority required to
override vetoes in the 100-mem-
ber chamber.
Senate Majority Leader Trent
Lott, R-Miss said today he
believed there is a "real opportuni-
ty this year" to overcome the veto.
A White House spokesman said
Clinton's position hadn't changed.
Republicans and Democrats
repeated emotional but familiar
arguments during two hours of
Services
continued from page 2
Services to better track students
that use disability services.
Perhaps one of the most
exciting developments is the pro-
ject most recently completed by
Disability Services Department.
A newer accomplishment is the
addition of Braille signs outside
classroom and office doors.
Oddly enough, a Braille map is
not in the works, but only
because " it is hard to translate
from paper your actual location"
says Rowe. Visually impaired stu-
dents arc however offered the aid
of a mobility specialist to help
them become familiar with the
campus and learn landmarks by
which to navigate. It is also pos-
sible for a student with special
needs to have a class moved from
debate.
Supporters of the measure
described the procedure as "cruel"
and "brutal" and said
there is no medically '
justifiable reason for "Why are we voting
using it. . .
Opponents said on this piece of
brought along graphic charts
depicting the abortion in progress.
Others said it wasn't the role of
Congress to determine
the appropriateness of
medical procedures.
They also said the
Republicans' focus on
majority Republicans 1 again and one prrxcdurc would do
were trying to make a little to reduce abor-
campaign issue out of again The reason tions in this country,
of a woman's j, �-� � ,a, ioos "That is why this bill
again The reason
is clear. In the 1998
elections, the
Republicans think
they can saddle
people with this
Rep. Diana DeGette
Kolo
one ot a woman s
most private deci-
sions.
"Why are we vot-
ing on this piece of
legislation again and
again said Rep.
Diana DeGette, D-
Colo. "The reason is
clear. In the 1998
elections, the
Republicans think
they can saddle people with this
Rep. Charles Canady, R-Fla
the prime sponsor, said the proce-
dure "bears an undeniable resem-
blance to infanticide. The presi-
dent is supporting an indefensible
procedure that should not be
allowed in a civilized society He
a difficult to reach classroom to
one that is more readily accessible
In order to provide a high
level of service, the Disability ser-
vices program also provides for
individuals with other needs such
as attention deficit disorder, learn-
ing disabilities or emotional disor-
ders. Arrangements can be made
with the professors for oral tests,
private tests, or a scribe to take
adequate notes. Schedules and
class loads can be adjusted to more
adhere to personal desires and
might be good politics,
but it won't save one
baby said Rep. Chet
Edwards, D-Texas.
"His veto threat still
stands Gloria Feldt,
president of the
Planned Parenthood
Federation of America,
said of Clinton.
Canady said Tuesday
another veto would pressure the
Senate to come up with the 67
votes needed for the override.
"That's going to be tough he
said in an interview, adding that
the Senate is "the only real hope
SEE ABORTION. PAGE
wishes. However, according to Mr.
Rowe, it should be made clear that
the provisions the university
makes for certain students are not
special treatment.
"We're not here to pro-
vide them with anything different
from the other students" said
Rowe. He insists that the mission
of the program is to insure that the
college experience of students
with disabilities is just like that of
students without a disability.
September 29
Breaking & Entering &
Larceny�A student reported the
breaking and entering of his room
in Garrett Hall and the larceny of
his wallet.
Stalking�A student reported
being stalked by another student.
The victim reported that the
accused has been following her
ever since they met. The victim
told the accused to stop following
her, but he did not. A campus
appearance ticket was issued to
the accused and he was banned
from Clement Hall.
Controlled Substance
Violation�A staff member report-
ed a controlled substance viola-
tion in a room in Tyler Hall. A stu-
dent was issued a citation for pos-
session of marijuana.
September 30
Larceny�A student reported
his wallet was missing from his
book bagin Mendenhall Student
Center. The book bag has been
turned in as missing.
Larceny�A non-student
reported a radar detector was
missing from his vehicle parked in
the commuter lot north of
Kinko's.
Harassing Phone Calls�A stu-
dent reported harassing phone
calls have been made to his phone
in Jones Hall over the past two
weeks.
Alcohol Violation-Two stu-
dents in Scott Hall were issued
CATs for alcohol violation.
October 1
Fireworks Complaint-RA at
Belk Hall reported fireworks
being discharged on the first floor
northwest end- Upon checking
suites in the area, two students
were cited for underage posses-
sion of alcohol, no fireworks were
found.
Harassing Phone Calls�A
Tyler Hall student reported
receiving harassing phone calls.
October 3
Assault on a Female�A stu-
dent reported being pushed by
another student in the Maritime
History Lab.
ArrestFollow up Invest.
B&E�A non-student was arrest-
ed and charged with B&E &
Larceny from room 714 Fletcher
Hall.
Fire Alarm�The fire alarm in
Aycock Hall was activated by dust
burning off the heating coil.
October 4
Controlled Substance
Violation�4 non-students were
passing around what was believed
to be marijuana in the Reade
Street Parking Lot. When con-
fronted, marijuana was found. A
state citation was issued.
$Wty
�i
Tattooing &
Body Piercing
10 off all
Body Piercing
with Student ID
Expires: U3097
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
4685 Suite A US Hwy 13 Greenville NC
J
Free Pregnancy test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
mm h iki b mik-hs zzmuiz mi
w
PARENTS WEEKEND P R E S E
m
����
�iS
IB
m

iS
g
Party for Parent's Weekend
California's own band, PAPA DOO RUN RUN joins the Parents Weekend celebration,
playing chart-toppers from the '60s, 70s, '80s, and '90s. Student tickets are now
available at the Central Ticket Office for $7. All tickets purchased at the door:15.
FRIDAY, OCT. 10 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Make It to Midnight Madness
All dressed up, nowhere to go on Halloween?
Don't miss the Midnight Madness Halloween bash at Mendenhall Student
Center.Free prizes, video karaoke, Laser Storm, pyschics, bingo, dancing, and a
midnight buffet. Horror flicks: Carrie and Scream in Hendrix Theatre
Your ECU ID will get you and a guest in free.
FRIDAY, OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M2 A.M. at Mendenhall Student Center
Hae a Scoop or Two!
Quartette Gelato puts a new twist on the Classics. Four musicians, eight instru-
ments, one fun concert. Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket
Office for $7. All tickets purchased at the door: $15.
Clip out the coupon on page 177 of your Clue Book and get in for just $5.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Hendrix has Fall Flicks
Batman & Robin (PG-13) screens in Hendrix Theatre on OCT. 9-11 AT 8 P.M.
Your student ID gets you and a guest in for free.
FREE IS THE KEY
Use your ECU ID to see a free Travel-Adventure Film. Along the Intracoastal Water-
way MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, AT 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE All-U-Can-Eat
theme dinner is served at 6 p.m. for just $12. Dinner tickets must be reserved by
Wednesday, October 8 with meal cards, cash, check, or credit card.
Give Thanks in NYC
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat trip to New York?
The ECU Student Union is sponsoring a trip to New York for as little as $155.
The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for three nights.
To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip, drop by the Central Ticket Office.
Rock the foundation
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free in The Pirate Underground
every THURSDAY AT 8 P.M. in the MSC Social Room.
This week: Joker and Vibrant Green
:
���
m
m
:
m
13
.sound more like
the Beach Boys than
the Beach Boys do!
PM Magazine
� HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.ml 2 a.m Sun. 1 p.ml 1 p.m. �
k&!?iE: m mi E;r i 5 temuiz wmu 15 unES
W RI
AUDITORIUM
ECU STUDENTSYOUTH 7
PUBLIC $15 � ECU FACULTYSTAFF $12
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR $15
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to C:00pm
919.32R.47Bt or l.ROO.fCU.ARTS; TDD access for deafhearing impaired uU 919.3ZR.473i
Student discount tickets available it the Central Ticket Office up until 6 p tm (he day of
the event providing tickets remain. AU tickets at the docw arc full-price.
�-
�p






4 Thursday, October 9. 1997
news
Tht East Cirolin'nn
Plagairism policy to be
enstated at UT
Sept. 29, 1997�At the
University of Tennessee the
Undergraduate Council proposed a
new policy statement on plagiarism.
The policy is attempting to solve
the common problems and ques-
tions from students regarding the
issue.
The council recognized a need
for detailed guidelines concerning
plagiarism after a series of incidents
occurred in a specific University of
Tennessee course.
A draft statement on plagiarism
was presented to the council last
January. Council members request-
ed an expanded statement from the
draft committee, and the commit-
tee revised the proposal for new
consideration by the council.
The statement says that stu-
dents are responsible for any acts of
plagiarism, which is defined as
across
uih e p
campuses
"using the intellectual property of
someone else without giving proper
credit unless such information is
recognized as common knowledge
"The statement also rules that
"the undocumented use of someone
else's words or ideas in any medium
of communication is a serious
offense, subject to disciplinary
action that may include failure in a
course and or dismissal from the
university
The policy statement must pass
legislative procedure under the
Tennessee Uniform Administration
Procedures Act before it can be
included in the Undergraduate cat-
alog in the Honor Statement sec-
tion. Any provision to university
rules for which punitive action may
occur must be accepted under this
act.
Students return to high
school to recruit students
next four months, more than 20
University of Tennessee students
will be sent back to high school.
They're not in trouble, though.
They don't even have really bad
grades. They're going back to high
school to recruit students for UT.
This fall, the East Tennessee
Outreach Program (ETOP) will
send students back to their former
East Tennessee high schools, and
they will speak to classes about stu-
dent life on the UT campus. The
UT students will set up a meeting
date with a former high school
teacher and "take over" the class-
room for a day by answering stu-
dents' questions and giving a pre-
sentation.
ETOP already has volunteers vis-
iting fourteen Eastern Tennessee
high schools.
Some UT fraternity houses
declared unsafe
tors from the University of
Tennessee's Environmental Health
and Safety Department and the
dean of students have met with
members of fraternities recently to
discuss trier requests for thousands
of dollars worth of renovations.
Problems that inspectors have
found in the fraternity house are:
stairwells that are not protected
Sept. 30, 1997�During the October 2, 1997�Fireinspec-
Fire
continued from page
filing out quickly Crocker said. "I
think that particular residence hall
just had a fire drill last week. A lot of
times people don't take these drills
seriously and don't leave the dorm
Crocker said the room was dam-
aged, but not destroyed.
"It was black from smoke. There
were a lot of things that just needed
to be cleaned Crocker said. "The
only things that were really burned
were the chair and floor
Amaro said the room will need to
be renovated but damage estimates
have not been made vet.
The female students who lived
in the room were moved into a room
in Jarvis.
"We are in the process of bagging
up their belongings and sending
them to the cleaners. The Dean's
office is working on getting them a
new set of books Amaro said.
"We're doing everything we can for
them
Amaro said the university is cov-
ering these expenses until they are
turned over to an insurance compa-
ny.
Crocker hopes that people learn
from this fire and make residence
halls more safe.
"There is the lesson of being in a
building with hundreds of other
people and knowing you're safe and
they're safe too Crocker said. "The
student could have been electrocut-
ed sitting in that chair. Electrical
cords need to be in a place not near
something being sat on or walked
on
Crocker said that had the stu-
dents had an extension cord with a
surge protector the fire could have
been prevented.
"One of the best things people
can do is get a surge protector.
Probably a lot of fires have been pre-
vented by extension cords with
surge protectors Crocker said.
Amaro said the safety policies
and codes will not changed because
of this incident.
The policies are working poli-
cies Amaro said.
Abortion
continued from page 3
we have" of getting the ban enact-
ed.
The House, which oassed the ban
last March, had to agree to changes
adopted by the Senate before the leg-
islation can be sent to Clinton.
Congressional Republicans
revived the measure this year after
learning the procedure they call "par-
tial-birth" abortion was more com-
mon and used earlier in pregnancy
tjuui previously believed.
The bill lacks what Clinton and
abortion rights groups have insisted
upon throughout debate over the ban
� an exception to allow the proce-
dure when continuing a pregnancy
would jeopardize a woman's health.
They say the bill is unconstitutional
without such a provision.
The procedure � which involves
the partial extraction ot a fetus, legs
first, through the birth canal followed
by the drainage of its skull � may be
used only to save a woman's life.
The House passed the bill, 295-
136, in March with enough votes for
an override. The Senate amended
and passed the bill, 64-36, in May but
fell three votes short of the total
needed for an override.
Among the Senate amendments
approved today by the House was a
provision to allow doctors who face
prosecution under the measure to
present evidence from state medical
licensing boards at trial.
The amendments brought an
endorsement f-om the American
Medical Association, which generally
supports abortion rights but had
remained neutral on this issue. But
other professional groups such as the
American College of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists and the American
Medical Women's Association contin-
ue to oppose the ban.
HELPING YOU BUILD A SECURE FINANCIAL
FUTUBE IS AN IMPORTANT JOB.
FORTUNATELY, WE HAVE THE PERFECT RESUME.
With nearly 80 years of leadership experience
in our field, TIAA-CREF is eminently
qualified to help you build a comfortable, worry-
free retirement.
Our references are equally impeccable �
today, nearly two million of the best minds in
America trust us with their financial future.
Allow us to review our qualifications.
Superior strength
With over $200 billion in assets, TIAA-CREF is
the world's largest retirement organization �
and among the most solid. TIAA is one of only
a handful of companies to have earned top rat-
ings for financial strength, and CREF is one of
Wall Street's largest investors
Solid, long-term performance
We seek out long-term opportunities that other
companies, in pursuit of quick gains, often miss.
Though past performance can't guarantee
future results, this patient philosophy has
proven extremely rewarding.
Surprisingly low expenses
TIAA-CREF's operating costs are among the
lowest in the insurance and mutual fund
industries. Therefore, more of your money
goes where it should �towards ensuring
your future?
Easy diversification
We offer a wide variety of expertly managed
investment options to help build your assets.
With stock, bond, money market, and real
estate accounts�as well as a guaranteed
annuity to choose from �TIAA-CREF makes
diversification easy.
Unrivaled service
We believe that our service distinguishes us
from every other retirement company. In the
latest Dalbar Consumer Satisfaction Survey,
a study of 2,000 financial companies, TIAA-
CREF was voted the leading provider of
retirement plans.
If you work in education, research, or relat-
ed fields, why not put TIAA-CREF's experi-
ence to work for you? To find jut more, visit
our Web site at www.tiaa-cref.org or call us
at 1-800-842-2776.
by and enclosed in fire proof materi-
als, no outside exit to the ground
from the second floor and fire safety
systems that do not work properly.
School administrators at the uni-
versity claim to have warned the fra-
ternities about these problems sev-
eral times in the past, but they did
not respond at that time.
The fraternities are saying that
the problems have always been an
issue, but the school administration
has never come forward.
If the university decides not to
pay for the $35,000 in repairs the
fraternity houses may be no more.
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.
'A. (Superior). A.M. Dm Co AAA. Out! ft Phelpa: AaA. Moody'i Investor Services: AAA Standard ana Poor tor stability, sound investments, claims-paying ability, and overall financial
strength. These ratings of TIAA aa an insurance companv do not apply to CREF 'Adit-tin' �'&��' fiywr nWitf .Wu 19: l-ttiper Analytical Services. Inc. ,irr.Am-r.rH�.iryii,i W
' 11 (Quarterly) For more complete information, including charge, and expenses call 1 -S0fco.27J3. extension 5.W). for CREF and TIAA Real Estate prospectuses Read them , aretully before
you invest or send money TIAA-CREF Individual and Institutional Services. distributes CKHr .cmlaaics and the unable xtnponcnl ol TIAA roniract,
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville.NC 27834
(919) 758-6909

COMIC BOOK
4&1 SHOW
SUN. OCT. 19th
RAMADA INN
Greenville. 9AM-5PM
FREE ADMISSION
For More Info, Call 758-6909
Scheduled Events for October's
()( I. l'c 2
Aids JAsrvarjness Iiribfnatiofi
Time- 11-1:30 '
Place; In front of student bookstore
(Kl. x.)
AlDS 101: Workshop focusing on basic
information on Aids & our community
Time: 7-8
ness Program
Preaso Speaker Paraiel
Time: 7-8 Vk
Place: GC 1031
Students $7.00
Faculty $10.00
Public $15.00
AIDS AWARNESS
The ECU Student Union Special Events Committee presents
a Dinner Theatre Presentation of
Murder by th& Book
An Evening of Comedy, Mystery, and Intrigue
Tuesday, October 21, 1997, 7:00pm
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
Tickets available at the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center,
MonFri 8:30 am - 6:00 pm
Murder is on the menu, and the searchlight of suspicion is on you!

iSMMt
Advanced ticket purchase required by Oct. 16. For more information,
call 919-328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. TDD 919-3284736.
MastercardVisa accepted. Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Special Events Committee.
. t
it! ���n' �� ' ' 'm 1
'�"� �"� �





r
'ml
9-11pm Friday Night, Oct 10
Special Appearance:
ECU CheerleadersPEE DEE
at
�u J
Parents Weekend
I'lr, nl
UU
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Parents arc welcome
to use the Student
Recreation Center all
weekend free!
(must be with the student)






The East Carolinian
6 Thursday. October 9. 1997
Everyday Life
BY MlCHAEIi LlTWIN
rlookatus wtmbffl&
com sr&p
Wttm
VISA
U� Tomt VK Card M1 Srtvo
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Starts
Wednesday, Oct. Stn
g-1075 oz. Budget
Gourmet Entrees
HOP-SCOTCH
by Nick holt and Kate Kohn
this is 4 filler
� n� g. Kte comkux, monvxYS C? TATTOO'S
6 pk. 12 oz. cans
president's Choice
Sbft Drinks
Seventeen Days in May
BY RICH CORNWELL
LAKE IMP USA
COOL DfcWlAlft WEE6
by John Murphy
otcfri Fwe. t's t-firtE,
BUT fflJT'S V�V '?f
5-6 oa Bugles
92� sq.ft.
Roll
Crispy Com -�5�lgf3i�
Snacks Paper Towels
We seeEP wnd cf
tl4C0UfcA&�T about
HIS DEAUlrJrj. W
SAS I IUIW� HIM.
Aft "flAWM, SCEHE
IUAS A FRCsMMil-O- I
FELT A TAV STIFLFD
� TH� SUHJ- WM?
BEfclMKtt. COURTST&0.
-TMT' S Cja I MTAaTT.
UWtT T0K6W
1��t TO
fA'DURf
10�S�T-SO
PuFFfD UP
DREW m
YOU'RE" IN
0fXl�6�
TO SE
77�U6rfT.
With
VIC
Card
With
VIC
Card
ACROSS
1 Sharp to the
taste
5 Burning
10 Femme fatale
14 Exchange
premium
15 Large ship
16 Pa. port
17 Departed
18 Bedouins
19 Scotland
Loch �
20 Thinks highly ot
22 Minimally
24 Dry, as ink
25 Tiny
26 Far-roachtng
29 Marina craaturas 11 �
35 Book of debits
and credits
37 56
38 Onassis, to
friends
39 Fourth caliph
40 Uncovers
43 The "it" game
44 Graek letter
45 Machine part
46 Fairy-like
48 Describing
concert hall
music
52 Eagles
53 Attila the �
54 Travolad on
56 Blemish
60 Oriental
64 Diving bird
65 Jots
67 Wooay plant
68 Poker stake
69 Not tense
70 Yalo otudonts
71 Untidy state
72 Rims
73 Car damage
DOWN
1 Narrative
2 Matures
3 Estrangement
' 4 Carryall's cousin
5 Texas landmark
6 Unusual things
7 One � minion
8 Singer McEntirc
9 Former
10 Superficial
appearance
12 Young woman
13 Nuisance
21 Senior
23 Zodiac sign
26 Raucous sounds
27 Kind of race
28 Hatred
00 Tropical resin
31 Actress Gardner
32 A fabric
33 Remove, in a
way
34 Weary sounds
36 Resolve
41 Heflin or Cliburn
42 Toboggans
47 Worried
49 Calls
50 Crude dwelling
51 Wrinkle
55 Tortile spots
56 Hit hard
57 Com bread
58 A great deal
59 Gangster
26 oz. President's Choice
Picante Salsa
WS2S ox. General Mills
Lucky Charms torn
or Cinnamon �
grahams Cereal
Erink Featvire
99
4
12 oz. Chocolate Chip
President's Choice
Decadent Cookies.
In The Deli Barbecue
orHot&Spicy
Chicken Wings
49
i
25!
21iter
Diet Pepsi, Pepsi
Or Mountain Dew
� 1997 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved.
61 A Gardner
62 Control strap
63 Cozy home
66 � out (dress)
v E "IB LAD EWP L OjO
o l l a-Bl i n e nmn U B E
1 A 1 c 1 S A A CE TON
K TTTE L IWl O os E L Y
�HHn a t sBt rue!
C R EJS C E N T1E RN 1 El
"L O X� E R 1 E SBIS T R E W
ASP SB HP A wfl BS 1 R E
W EE P SME R E C TjlSi 1 N
�A L E E AMAJi � ul" E D
CAN ebi. a n tHH
' C TiC K L E �BS A L M O N
O R A LA S S E JJIJO NE
It 1 M eBd E T R eMa V.I S
s L E Dms nee RBR E JjA
64 oz.
presidents Choice
Orange Juice
With
VIC Card
Prices Effective Through Oct. 14,1997
Only. We Reserve The Right Tb Limit Quarrbbes. Nonecld Tb Dealers. V biamy ��
?"





7 Thurstfay. Octebtr 9,1897
(
ast�arolinian
AMY L.ROYSTKR Mm
CBbSSTS WILSON ManagingEdim
MATT HEGE MwwmgDmcm
JACQUELINE D. KF.1.1.UM HwiEM�
AMANDA AUSTIN Am. fan Editor
ANOY TIONKR UtatH�W
JOHN DAVIS Aaasna, Litenyic E�
AMANDA ROSS SoonsEdrra
TRACY l,AIBACII ABiswriSpun EfHlor
Carole Meiile K�d Copy E�w
JOHN MURPHY SuHHwraw
HEATHER BURGESS WnEdin
Sanagn (CU
�& M Eat Cam MttaMi 0.011 oa �wj Uawr � 11m iteM mt n a� �� � t
hUiM aalemiainiiiii ���iaa�2S���waia�M��r�m���ii��rlliaS�
i��a�il�MlBMIio���lw
� Ktt UwwfcSMMSJ. for ilimall(aiX
opinion
The East Carolinian
oumew
The ECU Mice Department is encouraging students to be more aware but not fear-
ful of the recent incidents of rape and sexual assault that have been reported on cam-
pus. But with so many reportings, how is it possible for a student to not be afraid?
White the police do a good job of keeping order throughout campus, there is much
more that needs to be done to assure students that everything is under control. First of
all, ECU is well lit in some areas, but not ail. Sections of campus such as the mall and
the trails surrounding the General Classroom building can be frightening places for a stu-
dent who is walking home atone late at night from the library or the rec center.
Secondly, maybe those who do walk alone would feel a little safer if the blue emer-
gency lights spread throughout campus were more reliable. At-times, some of the lights
arc out of order, defeating the whole purpose of their existence.
'We at TEC feel that with all of the rape and sexual assault incidents that have been
reported, the university needs to hire more patrols and officers to "keep their eyes
open during the night. With more people on guard, students would feel a lot better
about walking through campus after dark, and officers would be able to pick up on more
of what is going on around campus late at night.
The late night escort service that is available is helpful, and allows students to get
from A to B feeling safe, but the service shuts down at 2 a.m. What happens when a stu-
dent needs to get from Jones to Clement at 3 a.mi That student is the one who walks
alone from one end of campus to the other. The service could provide students with
much more comfort if an escort was available at all times.
The only way we will be able to prove to ECU officials that a serious change is need-
ed is if we, as students, can prove that there have been enough incidents to promote
such a request. It is important that all rapes and sexual assault incidents be reported, not
only in an effort to prove the need for a safer campus, but also for the sake of justice.
With enough reportings, it is possible that we may see more lights and more patrols on
duty in ECU's near future.
OPINION
Student votes matter to politicians
Politicians, whether it be
state house, UScongressor
city council realize more and
mart students are �voting. If
this trend continues the politi-
cians will have to address
concerns of the ECU students.
1 could give you numerous reasons
why you should not vote. 1 could tell
you how voting takes too much
time, politicians do not listen, my
one vote doe not count and voting
only encourages them, but I won't.
While leading this paragraph I
want you to imagine, to dream, to
think about a real possibility.
Imagine on election day only 10 per-
cent of the ECU population turned
out to vote (about 1,700 students).
What would happen?
We'l, I will tell you. Politicians
are concerned with getting reelcct-
ed � no matter if it is three days to
the election or three days after.
Based on that tidbit of knowledge,
politicians look who got them elect-
ed and who voted.
Don't believe me? Think
politicians do not care about your
vote? Let me tell you what politi-
cians do after they are elected or
defeated, if they are smart,
ftliticians sit down with their advis-
ers and took at who voted. Say in
precinct three politician Bob won
by a huge margin over political
crony Terri. Bob now looks at who
voted. Bob finds that 70 percent of
voters in precinct three are between
age 18 and 25. Now precinct three is
very important to Bob for him to
keep his position in the next elec-
tion. Bob will want to appease the
people who voted in precinct three,
why took it is the 18- to 25-year old
voters.
Since 1992 the number of ECU
students registering to vote has
increased. Politicians, whether it be
state house, US congress or city
council realize more and more stu-
dents are voting. If this trend con-
tinues the politicians will have to
address concerns of the ECU stu-
dents.
Teaching assistants, tired of
being at the bottom of the barrel
when it comes to receiving money?
Vote! City Council might not set
your wages. I will guarantee you
this, though, the more people who
vote and who are like you, the more
politicians will try to appease you.
Don't believe me? Let us took at
Florida. Huge retirement villa,
right? Well, the older the folks in
Florida vote and look at what they
get in return. In Florida, to renew a
drivers license, one only needs send
in a renewal by mail. People with
declining eyesight who might not
be able to pass the eye test can have
their drivers license renewed. Now
which part of the populace has
declining eyesight? If you do not
know, then wipe the drool off your
face and ask a friend.
I will give you the best reason in
the worldto vote. The right to com-
plain. In my opinion if you do not
vote, you have no right to complain.
Tired of potholes, no parking, occu-
pancy ordinances, or anything that
bothers you in the city? Vote. Voting
is the one outlet in which politicians
will be sure to hear your voice.
Unlike what a certain incumbent
counciiwomen says, you do not
need to change your drivers license
or pay a tax. Registering to vote is
easy. If you do not know now to reg-
ister, have questions, do not know
where to vote or have any problems
call the Board of Elections at 830-
4121. Remember that Friday is the
last day to register. If you send the
voter registration form in by mail, it
has to be postmarked by Friday
LETTER
to the Editor
Student supports question of SRC music selection
Although not personally offended by
Christian music, I question the con-
stitutionality of the practice of the
staff of the Student Recreation
Center of playing religious music in
a stare school. Therefore, I am in
total agreement with the excellent
letter to the editor presented in
TEC by Laura Boyd on Sept. 23.
What is c en more flagrantly
unconstitutional is the unmitigated
gall of an individual in possession of
a remote control exercising what he
thinks is his right of censorship over
what somebody else is watching on
television. Some weeks ago, a pro-
gram appeared on the center televi-
sion of three that arc located in the
weight room area that featured a
parade of young ladies in bikinis at a
spring break-type of beach party I
was on an exercise bike, watching
this program which happened to be
on at that time � not that the pro-
gram was awfully important one way
or the other. A young man dressed in
SRC staff uniform, very neat in
appearance, marched up behind my
back and proceeded to flip the chan-
nels with a remote control. Perhaps I
wanted to say "Hey, I was watching
that program" � but 1 said nothing.
Ironically, that guy with the
remote selected a channel that fea-
tured in largs, clear letters the exact
quote that Laura Boyd cites in her
letter: "Congress shall make no law
respecting the establishing of reli-
gion, or the free exercise thereof I
then read the word that appeared
onscreen loud enough for others to
heat There were a few puzzled
looks. The apathy and lack of com-
prehension was stifling.
What docs this fellow's right to
censor, for whatever reason, what
others watch on television begin?
Where do the rights of others to
watch what happens to be on televi-
sion end?
The action mentioned above has
nothing to do with the policyrules of
the SRC, or its policymakers or rule-
book. It had to do with the censor-
ship by one individual. It has even-
thing to do with the sanctimonious
and arrogant attit de of one individ-
ual walking around the place with a
remote control.
My question about this is, how
much censorship and promotion of
popular religion should be allowed in
a state university under the authori-
ty of student employees, staff mem-
bers, administrators or professors?
Richard E Becker
Senior
Political Science
OPINION
Columnist
Keith
COOPER
Young women should take breast cancer seriously
Women truly deserve
the pest possible
information and advice
as ammunition to be used
in their war against
breast cancer.
(Editor's note: This is Breast Cancer
Awareness Month.)
For too many years, breast cancer
has robbed thousands of women of
their precious lives. The most com-
mon type of cancer among women
(American), breast cancer appears
in more than 140,000 women in the
United States each year. Although
breast cancer occurs in younger
women (and in about 900 men each
year), two-thirds of the more than
140,000 cases involve women more
than 50 years old. Moreover, during
her lifetime, the average woman has
roughly a 10 percent chance of
developing breast cancer.
LETTER
Therefore, early detection is key to
saving thousands of lives each year.
As a matter of fact, most women
treated for earty breast cancer will
be breast cancer-free for the remain-
ing years of their lives. The National
Cancer Institute (NCI) recom-
mends a three-point breast cancer
detection plan for women to follow.
The plan includes the following:
mammography, examination by a
doctor or health professional and a
I to t sorVuir.inatiim (BMj.
Although only about 20 percent
of breast lumps are cancerous,
women at least 40 years old need
mammograms every one to two
years until age 50. Mammography
should be done annually after age
50. Why is a mammogram important
for women? A mammogram, an x-ray
of the breast, can show breast
changes which may suggest cancer.
Also, mammograms may reveal
tumors too small to be felt. During
mammography, pressure is applied
to the breast as it is pressed
between two plates. Normally, each
breast is x-rayed twice (from the
side and then the top). In any
event, mammography practice in
conjunction with a breast exam by a
health professional can reduce
breast cancer deaths among women
age 40 or older substantially.
During routine check-ups,
women should request breast exam-
inations. There the health profes-
sional practices palpation, the
process of feeling the breast and
underarm with the fingers to check
for lumps. The health professional
also examines the breasts for puck-
ering of the skin, dimpling, scaling
and a discharge from the nipples.
Further, women should ask the doc-
tor or health professional any ques-
tions relating to the changes in their
breasts.
Breast self-exams should be done
monthly The BSE allows women to
become very familiar with the usual
appearance and feel of their breasts.
Therefore, women find it easier to
notice any unusual changes in their
breasts. .Some health professionals
n.vomnvnd that women u a BSK
each day for a month. Again the
main reason for the BSE is to allow
women to make an carry discovery
of any breast changes from what is
normal. Furthermore, many gyne-
cologists suggest that women take a
BSE two or three days after the end
of a period, because the breasts are
least likely to be swollen or tender
at that time. However, women with-
out periods should select a certain
day of the month as a reminder of
the BSE.
In conclusion, the breast cancer
detection plan provides earty detec-
tion and symptoms of breast cancer.
Indeed, regular mammograms, rou-
tine breast exams by a health pro-
fessional and BSEs are key to earty
detection. These methods collec-
tively have proven to be more effec-
tive than ultrasounds (detect breast
changes by using sound waves),
thermography (measures heat pat-
terns of the skin) and diaphonogra-
phy or transillumination (a bright
light is shone through the breasts).
Women truly deserve the best possi-
ble information and advice as
ammunition to be used in their war
against breast cancer.
Protecting constitution provides for religious freedom
Quite frankly I am concerned about
the reading comprehension skills at
ECU after reading the responses to
my letter about the SRC. It seems
that very few have grasped the issue.
If it were just a matter of not liking
Christian music, I could take a walk-
man to the SRC. The real issue, as
expressed in my first letter, is one of.
religious freedom and state inter-
vention.
Many people have claimed a right
to have the SRC play religious music
while they work out. What people
don't seem to understand is that
there is a very important reason why
they cannot have this. The first sen-
tence of the first amendment reads,
"Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of reli-
gion, or prohibiting the free exercise
thereof Any attack to the first half
of that statement puts the second
half in jeopardy. The very right you
exercise everyday in your private
religious practices is the one which
prohibits religious music to be
played by the SRC. Perhaps it upsets
you that the SRC cannot play reli-
gious music, but how upset would
you be if you lived in a country with-
out any religious tolerance, a country
where you would have to fear for
your life if your beliefs differed from
those dictated by the state? This is
what you are asking for! Our country
was founded by people seeking free-
dom from state religion. Not only
was it important for them to assert
the right of freedom to practice any
religion privately, but it was neces-
sary to add that the state should not
be involved in any way. If you violate
the separation of church and state,
you put your right to private reli-
gious practice at risk. This is why
the Supreme Court has ruled so
strongly against any and all religion
in the schools, and it is also why the
SRC must not play religious musk.
If you REALLY love Jesus, Allah,
Zeus or the Church of Elvis, you dd
not want the state interfering with
your private religious practices. You
do not want state-supported schools
to violate the first amendment's pro-
vision for separation of church and
state. You do not want the SRC to;
broadcast Christian music.
Laura H. Boyd
Senior
Philosophy
LETTER
to the Editor
General Classroom Building docks always wrong
�According to the clocks in the
General Classroom Building, my
classes start at 4:15 in one classroom
and 7:20 in the other. That's funny,
mv schedule says that I have class at
8:00 and 9:00 on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays. Is it me or
am I in a Twilight Zone episode
every time I go to class? Can some-
one please tell me why this fine
institution that is one of the top 100
most-wired colleges in the country,
has a new state-of-the-art e-mail
sysetm can't set the clocks in our
beloved GCB?
If you don't have a watch, you
have no idea when class starts or
ends. I am surprised tardiness and
absenteeism isn't worse than it is.
The thing that gets me is that it has
been going on since at least second
summer session. What kind of
impression are we making on our
freshmen? East Carolina is the
third-largest school in the state and
we are always trying to gain respect
t
from our brethren in the UNC-sys-
tcm, but we cannot do a simple task
such as setting the clocks in the
classrooms. What a joke.
I love East Carolina just as much,
if not more, than anyone, but things
tike this just bum me up. Please,
Mr. Chancellor, Dr. Bass, Steve
Logan or even the poor little lady
who sweeps the stairs in GCB, do
something!
Mickey Crawford
Accounting
5
jUJij,Uii�Jfc'





r
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
8 Thursday. October 2. 1997
MM
MM
one
MICCMI
Smith
" TFgx know him, or maybe it's
� M Wxx. They're sitting next to you
in class with a ring protruding from
his or her nose, eyebrow, lip or navel,
and all vou can do is stare at it. Or
maybe one of your friends proudly walks
, up to you one day and sticks his or her
tongue out, revealing a new, painful-looking
steel barbell. .
What's the world coming to? Why is every-
suddenly sprouting metal accessories in
strange places?
The trend of body piercing is sweeping
America, and it's already started on college cam-
puses like ours. This is no surprise, since one of the
great things about going away to college is the tact
that students tend to loosen up and try new things.
More and more students are taking the plunge and
getting a piercing, and few of them regret their deci-
sions. , .
Sara, 19, has five holes in each ear, which is not
unusual, but she also sports a nose ring. Hers was a
split decision. .
"One of the reasons (I) did it was cause it only
cost five bucks she said, and added she hopes to
get her tongue and evebrow pierced sometime.
Drew, a freshman, recently got his tongue
pierced with a barbell. .
"I'd been waiting to do it for
almost a year he said. "The
adrenaline rushjfrom the
piercing) is cool
Drew likes the way pierc-
ings look, and he got the
barbell as an adornment
more than anything else.
Tony, 19, agrees with him.
"I just think it's sexy he
said, adding he would like to
get his eyebrow pierced but
he fears the wrath of his par-
OK, so you want to get a
piercing. Before you go for it,
be sure of the following:
�The piercing will not violate personal
appearance codes at your job or any job
you wish to apply for
�Your piercer is legitimate (Energy is
Ihe only legitimate business in
Greenville which offers piercing)
�Your piercer uses adequate
(sterilization methods, fresh latex
;loves, and a new needle every time
�Your piercer instructs you on proper
care of the piercing
ents.
Kelli, 18. got her
tongue pierced for
However,
she has something to say about
the way the trend appears to be growing.
"I think other people get it done just to do some-
thing crazy, which is uncool she said. I mean, think
about it! Youjre putting a big chunk of metal through
your tongue . ,
Apparently, thinking about it hardly encourages
some of the more fainthearted students to try it.
Courtney, 20, would like to get a piercing, but admit-
ted "I'm a wimp when it comes to pain.
central figure in Greenville's piercing revolution
is Kristen, who runs her own piercing business out ot
the newly opened tobacco shop, Energy, in down-
town Greenville. She has been piercing since 198V
and now, at age 25, she knows all there is to know
about the art. Unfortunately, in the emerging pierc-
ing culture, any needle-happy man, woman or child
can claim to be a body piercer.
"There is no such thing as a certification tor pierc-
ing" she said. "What you need to look for in a good
piercer is someone who knows what they re doing,
has a lot of experience, knowledge of the anatomy
being pierced, the tools to be used, the procedure to
be followed, the correct jewelry gauge and diameter
for each individual piercing andmost importantly,
has sterilized everything properly
Kristen uses a douolc sterilization process herselt:
a soak in a cold sterilizing solution followed by an
autoclave procedure, both of which ensure that her
forceps and other tools are entirely free of any bacte-
ria and pathogens which could be transferred from
one piercee to another.
Her needles, which are hollow, come in onetime
use only packets which she opens in front of piercees.
Kristen uses hollow needles (called conng needles)
because they "take out where the needles are actual-
ly going in
She explained this is to prevent pressure and ten-
sion in the body tissues" caused by gun piercing, in
which bodv tissue is merely displaced, instead ot
removed, to make room for the stud.
"(In) doing the procedure properly, 1 m helping
(customers) bv keeping them from going to a fly-by-
night person or trying it themselves, she said sin-
cerely. "Piercing is very personal for me.
Kristen hopes her customers leave with more than
a piercing. She wants them to take with them a sense
of her professionalism and genuine care tor her
clients' well-leing. - .
The process works like this: F-st, the piercee,
who has made a prior appointmenr. selects the gauge
of ring or barbell that he or she desires, depending on
the location of the piercing and the advice offered by
Kristen. She then explains about the piercing process
and asks her client to sign a waiver before she begins
the procedure. In her office, she soaks the jewelry in
sterile solution while going over aftercare
t i o n s
with the
client. Then,
wearing new latex
surgical gloves, she
marks the area to be
pierced, sterilizes it then
darkens the mark. With forceps,
she pinches the flesh to be
pierced, then has the client lie down
on a sterile doctor's bench, where the
actual piercing, which takes only a cou-
ple of seconds, occurs. The jewelry direct-
ly follows the needle through the flesh, then
needle and gloves are disposed of. The
piercee receives a packet of antibacterial oint-
ment and aftercare instruction sheet to make
caring for the piercing easier.
The pain of piercing is not as intense as might
be expected; on the contrary, many piercees enjoy
the rush of endorphins that a piercing can cause. A
new piercing is ornamental, fun, relatively easy to
care for and a great way to get attention.
Besides, if you don't like it, you can always let the
hole heal. Unlike a tattoo, you don't have to be
"stuck with it forever If done properly and with
sterile instruments, piercing can be a cool expen-
ence.
Portishead
Portishead
9 OUT OF lO
John Davis
ikf.stvlb bditoi
Under the needle: A piercee gets her belly done.
PHOTO BY MICCAH SMITH
rYour piercing does not get infected or
torn
�Your Mom and Dad either won see it
or won't kill you if they do
You're not getting a piercing "just to
do something crazy" without thinking it
over first.
SSIST Wl
One of the drawbacks to the receni
trend in electronic music is the factJ
that far too many bands with no
composing ability or elegance ha
flooded the scene in the past ye
Because of the very versatile and
malleable nature of the instruments
used in Electronica, such as synthe-
sizers, drum machines and sam-
plers, the opportunities for makinL
modern pop music have expanded
exponentially. No longer confined
to the basic four piece set of two
guitars, bass and drums, rock musi-
cians now have nearly unlimited
resources of sound at their disposal.
Unfortunately, the majority of
popular musicians settle for far less
than what they could be accom-
plishing. Though the technology is
far far advanced and the boundaries;
limitless, most composers today
barely achieve beyond what Brian
Wilson and George Martin were
able to achieve with the Beach Boys
and the Beatles back in the days of
mono, four track, reel to reel tape.
Now, like newer before, opportu-
nities for subtlety, grace and expres-
sion exist and yet the average elec-
tronic band settles for nothing more
than sampled, played out beats and
commonplace vocal arrangements.
To sa that John lennon did much
more V.I. much less would be an
understatement.
There are those few artists that
do make up for the sloth of the rest
of the industry. Bjork, Tricky and DJ
Shadow have all released stellar,
magnificent albums in the past year
and at long last, Portishead have
released a follow-up to their 1994
debut, Dummy.
Like Dummy, Portishead works as
a unit, rather than a collection of
singles. The transitions between
songs resemble the smooth transi-
tions between movements of a sym-
phony. In fact, only classical com-
posers ever had this much versatili-
ty at their fingertips. Just as good
symphonic music is filled with
shades and colors of sound,
Portishead is a work of subtlety and
SEE POHTISHEAD. PAGE 11
II
Dog Eat Dog
LA. Confidential boasts strong story, cast digs deeperthan dirt
mOViereview
ANDY TlRNER
I.IKESTVI.K KBIT OK
9 OUT OF lO
American Movie Classics emptied out a gat-full of film noir this past week-
SdEL, Walk Alone andHis Kind of Woman were among the dirty and
dark flicks AMC showcased during the marathon. These movies (and a
number of others shown during the marathon) the��
devious dames, tough-talking guys on the edge with soft �"����
most importantly, plenty of darkness. Besides their adherence to those styl-
Telcnents most of these films had something else going for them that
iJS Srempts at noir lack (thinkMuholland Falls): good stones
liken from the novel of the same name written by crime write James
mm LA- Confidential tells a good story and teUs it very well. Ellroy s novel
was Adapted for the screen by director Curtis Hanson and Bnan Hcgand,
and theduo have done a nice enough job here that they shouldn-be for-
amen come Oscar time. Hanson's success with film is made all the more
Srprising bv some of his less than noble past efforts, including Losm It and
The Hand That Rocks the Cradle. . . .
The movie is set in Los Angeles circa 1933. The city is promoted as a
sunny paradise on Earth. But beneath the shine and stars, scum and scuzz
luTlV of course, isn't news to anyone. The dirty side of LA was thor-
oughly explored more than 50 years by the likes of Raymond Chandler and
Sell Hammett and continues to be a favorite setting for mystery wnt-
eTtoday. LA. Confidential, however, goes deeper into the dirt than any past
eff�7nhthe movie, the City of Angels finds ���g5
world devils. It is the job of the police department, therefore, to, ndI he city
of this corrupt element. But the police department has its own problems. It
hJ to SeXth problems stemming from the BloodyChnstmas (a near not
bSween Mexican prisoners and drunk, racist cops). The department has o
ataS adeadline-searching celebrity sergeant, Jack V.ncennes (played to
Section by Kevin Spacey), a shoot now, ask questions later cannon
officer Bud White (Russell Crowe) and a young wonder-boy cop who will
sell out his mother for a promotion, Ed Exley (Guy PearceK
The cops have to all come together to solve the mass murder that goes
down atThe Nite Owl Coffee Shop, which leaves six people dead, including
Sigot cop Dick Stensland (Graham Beckel). They waste several black
youths who they think committed the enme (despite lit le evidence),
before reaUzingYhe case has some connection to the prostitution nng run by
Pierce Patchetc (David Strathairn). " �
More than a deceptively twisting yam, LA. Confident! is full of fine per-
formances Spacey, as previously mentioned, does an outstanding job as
SnTennes He isihe picture of cool as he sets up an aspiring actor and his
female compan on in a pot bust, rigging it so it will all be captured by the
aSoid came'ras of Sid Hudgeons (Danny Devito) "Jg-gS
V.ncennes has to overcome his concerns with fame and his role as technical
aavSto the fictional television show, Badge of Honor, before he can seek
bomber) also do great jobs. Crowe, particularly, is fun to watch. He captures
Si the ed glness and hotheadedness of Bud White. Despite at times
KingTike a constipated Val Kilmer, Pearce is very good as snitcher cop Ed
KXhLs Crowell .ddi-htt ,IK devi us a, Captain Dudley Smith. I li !rh
accent works well in the role. You believe him when he says, "We must act
EmssTngeS'an OK job as Lynn Bracken. She has the tookut
something about her performance is less than authentic Bassinger doesn t
suSstJhe adequate toughness needed for this kind of femme fatale role
Tf Confident! is unpredictable and entertaining to watch. Sure, this
kind of mX has been done many times before. But when it s done well
hke itis done here, you're happy to a have a good story; with interesting
ctracters and you can begin to forgive Hollywood for Pauly Shore and Tom
Arnold movies.
Kevin Spacey plays it cool in LA. Confidential.
PHOTO COURTESY OF REGENCY ENTERTAINMENT
ANDY Tl RNKR
i.i11:stm.f. tni i �
8 OUT OF 10
Where LA. Confidential explores corruption in Los Angeles in the '50s
Edward Bunker's new novel, Dog Eat Dog, sets its sights on the criminal ele
mentin modern day Southern California, and it does so with compelling,
results.
Bunker is perhaps best remem-
bered as Mr. Blue in Quentin
Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs. He is the
author of three other books (No Beast
So Fierce, Animal Factory and Little Boy
Blue).
Bunker certainly knows about
crime. He has spent a good portion of
his life incarcerated. From age 11 to
40, he was almost constantly in trou-
ble with the law for a variety of offens-
es including bank robbery and extort-
ing money from pimps and madams.
Bunker was released from prison in
1975, and has since concentrated his
efforts on writing fiction (he started
writing in prison) and being a "good"
citizen.
Dog Eat Dog is as raw and tough as
its title implies. It focuses on three
ex-cons (Trov Cameron, Mad Dog
McCain and Diesel Carson) and their
recftodSST have maintained a friendship mainly
becTsofT oy Mad Dog is a crazy S.O.B. who will kill you for looking a
torn wrong Dfesel. so named because of his large stature, doesn,trust or
hke Mad Dog The feeling is shared. Troy is the mastermmd ot their van-
out crime endeavors, w h.ch arc targeted at other criminals because cnmi-
'WiTroy Is an inreresgand well-developed character. Unlike Mad Dog and
DkShcSS wealthy family and commits crime- ma.nl bccauM
he want to be an outlaw (and because h, wants money). Troy attributes Ins
art tuTto his perception of the American, pubhc as bypocn He, how-
ever, has to confront his own hypocrisy at the end of theraweL
Bunker uses Trov to make most of his indictments of the California
orison system specifically the 'Three Strikes and You're Out law. The law,
Trov reonproduces a fatalistic "dog eat dog" attitude among convicts
deermfned not to be sent to prison for life. Bunker certainly makes some
good Though sometimes generalized, statements about the modem
"throwawav The kev" attitude of many Americans towards criminals.
Bunker's tight and tough style is somewhat reminiscent of Jim
Thompson's, but Bunker doesn't have the demented dreamhke qual.ty that
nervades many of Thompson s novels. c,iw
PTvS enjoyed LA Confident you will most likely enjoy Dog Eat&og
But where that .ovie showed the dirt beneath the shine. Dog Et Dog
� 7 .
jit1 4
�f' m iaL.
���
mm-
ML �





r
9 Thursday. October 2. 1997
i1'ostyle
The East Carolinian
Newman Catholic Student Center
Would Like To
WELCOME PARENTS
& V
to Join Us. For Sunday Mass
11:30 AM & 8:30 PM
Stop B the Newman Center antime
Paul 'aeth aiut the Newman CentcrComhuihitv (757-1991
lti! MOlis-
e liom Fletcher Music Bid1

1997
! rew ijopi citij trif
Tuesday, Nov. 25 -
! Sunday, Nov. 30
Cost per person
$165 quad occupancy
$170 triple occupancy
$210 twin occupancy
$316 single occupancy
I Call the Central Ticket
Office at 328-4788 to
reserve your seat on a
bus to the big dtylU
' LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE
JiBBassigBgiBPBiiHBgma
Tickets Are on Sale Now
Peasants & The
10 bands on two stages intwo Clubs
for two nights for ONE ticket
Or you may purchase one tioket at the door of either
Peasants or the Attic
for each night
Friday
Acoustic Ous
thio pondering
Disco Biscuits
Post Junction
hipbone
Saturday
Moon Boot
Lover
Schleigho
The Recipe
Karmic
Advance Tickets on sale at CD alley.skullysthe attic & peasants
Tickets are $15 in adv. and that gets you in both nights, both clubs
The Festival would lke to thank our all to kind sponsors
Marathon & Chcos
msmMMmmrnmmmmmmMmimjmmmMmii
Quartetto Gelato performs Oct. 15
Ron Ciikribim Jr.
SKNKIR WRI'IKR
TORONTO � In a small restau-
rant called the Mono Cliffs Inn,
an hour north of Toronto, Canada,
four noted classical musicians got
together for an inpromptu perfor-
mance at a friend's request. At the
time, it was an opportunity for the
four to cut loose a bit and have
some fun. Fot the audience at that
small restaurant, it was amazing.
So much so, that some 10 years
later, those same four musicians
are now in such demand that they
had to "quit (their) day jobs" in
order to keep up.
Quartetto Gclato's happy-
chance beginnings are part of
what drives this unique group
which takes their music seriously,
but not themselves.
"We all had met one another at
some time or other before
George Meanwell said. "Peter De
Sotto had a connection to every-
one in the group. In the late '80s,
we got together to play chamber
music for our own amusementor
amazement. We were invited to
play for our suppers at a friend's
restaurant and had such a good
time that we were asked to return.
Then we began to get invitations
to play on concert tout"
Meanwell described the ascent
to world-wide status as being
more than he or the other band
members could have ever imag-
ined.
"What we arc doing is any
musician's dream he said. "To be
able to play what you want to
play
Quartetto's dichomety is that
the group is made up of virtuoso
musicians, well-schooled in the
art of classic presentation, but the
group is equally adept at enjoying
themselves and unstuffing an
entire genre of music. Their
shows arc informal and engaging
"We try to bring the audience
into the show Meai.well said.
"We invite the audience to come
and enjoy the music we enjoy to
be carried on a musical journey.
Our concerts are really informal,
like being in a living room.
"We take the music seriously,
but we enjoy ourselves
The band, and that's what they
call themselves, is the bringing
together of musicians that have
backgrounds both similar and
diverse. Each brings the ability to
play multiple musical instruments
at a level that others could only
dream of mastering.
"We are a Classical band
Meanwell said. "Without the
(sheet) music
Meanwell, who is a master cel-
list as well as a guitar and man-
dolin player, credits the individual
members' diversity as one of the
vehicles for mass appeal.
"We all listen to different
music he said. "We play tangos,
SEE ECU. PAGE 11
You're Invited to Lunch!
at' Sweei�earPs in Docfdr Dining Jfaff
Enjoy a delicious buffet lunch prepared by East Carolina University's Executive Catering Chefs.
For only $6.95 you can feast on salads, carved meats, fresh vegetables, homemade breads, and
sumptuous desserts.
Oktoberfest
Tuesday, October 14 � 11:30 aon. - 2:00 pan.
Menu includes: Carved Roast Sauerbraten � Roast Chicken w
Apple Stuffing � Pork Chops w Knockwurst � German Potato
Salad � Green Bean Slaw � Red Cabbage w Apples � Cucumber &
Tomato Skillet � Little German Noodle Dumplings � Dark
Pumpemickle Bread � Dessert
Upcoming Buffets?
Fall Harvest - Thursday, November 6
Thanksgiving - Monday, November 24 & Tuesday, November 25
Christmas - December 9,10,15,16
All ECU students, faculty, staff and guests are invited.
Sweetheart's is Todd Dining Hall's private dining room located on
College Hill. Reservations are prefered, but not necessary.
Call 328-4756 or 328-4772 for more details.
Stressed?
Sponsored By
Student Leadership
Development Programs
and the
Division of
Student Life
We can help!
"Humor and stress Management:
Tackling Stress Before it Tackles You"
featuring Marie Ingram from The HUMOR Project
Wednesday, October 22, 1997
2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Tickets now on sale at the Mendenhall Student Center Central Ticket office
$15.00 admision includes the book
Laffirmations: 1,001 Ways to Add Humor to Your Life and Work
and Refreshments
'1 � �t'Mll'i' 11





10 Thursday, October 2, 1997
shle
'he East Carolinian
October
9 THURSDAY
Batman and Robin at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theaterruns through
Oct.ll)
Faculty Recital: Three Centuries of
Musk for Trumpet, Yoke and Keyboard
at 8 p.m. in Fletcher Recital Hall
Pirate I'nderground featuring
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Treading Evans at Firehouse
Tavern
Davroom at Peasant's
Drivin' and Cryin' at The Attic
John Cale at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
Valentine 6 at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Suingin' Ncckbreakers, White
Hassle Smooch at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
11 SATURDAY
Baaba Seth at Peasant's
Jupiter Coyote at The Attic
Fiona Apple at The Hit in
Raleigh
The Burnlev Bros, at Local 506
in Chapel Hill '
12 SUNDAY
Open mike at Peasant's
The Fleshtones. Rubbermaid.
The Slobs at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Primus at the Ritz in Raleigh
13 MONDAY
Travel-Adventure Film: Along tit
Intraroastal Waterway at Hendrix
Theater
Faculty Recital: Charles Bath,
piano at 8 p.m. in Fletcher Recital
Hall
14 TUESDAY
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
Blues Traveler at Raleigh
Memorial Auditorium
Tanya Donelly at Cat's Cradle
Immigrant Sons at Peasant's
15 WEDNESDAY
Comedy Zone featuring AJtyn
Ball and Troy Hammond at The
Attic
Adam Sandier at the Dunn
Center for Performing Arts at N.
Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount
Son Volt at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
ONGOING
"Cajun Music and Zydeco" exhi-
bition at Mendenhall (iallcry
through Nov. 10
10 FRIDAY
PAPA DOO RLN RLN at
Wright Auditorium
Hipbone at Peasant's
Mishap at Firehouse Tavern
Poetry Slam at Forum and
Function in Raleigh
Pavement at Ziggy's in Winston-
Salem
Elton John at LVM Coliseum in
Winton-Salem
e Rolling Stone at Ericsson
Stadium in Charlotte
Jupiter Covote at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
CHARADES
jLte from Infants to adults
Costumes &- Accessories
NOW OPEN! 10:00-9:00 Mon-Sat, 1:30-5:30 Sun
Carolina East Mall
355-3752
SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SELECTION!
HAHt. H UP
BABV!
FOR A LIMITID TIMI
AVAILABLE IN rOUR
DELICIOUS FLAVORS
(CHOCOLATE, VANILLA,
STRAWBERRY, BANANA)
OR GO WILD AND
CREATE YOUR OWN
(BANANA -CHOCOLATE
STRAWBERRY-BANANA ETC.)
Checkers
snxutzED
-��V
70S fl aRMNVIUI M.VD,
ACROSS FROM THI KAZA MAIL
Contra Dance
Sat. Oct. 11
Beginner lessons 7:00 - 7:30
Dance 7:30- 10 30
Students $3
Willis Canter
Downtown Greenville
Corner of Reade 6 First St.
ECU Folk and Country Dancers, 830-5403
What is contra dancing like????? It combines the fun of
swing dancing, the sociability of barn dances, and the
satisfaction of moving in perfect time with the music.
No special outfits, just clothes comfortable to dance in.
ECU COMMONS
1 �o1 I$
d
vi z&m
MmilSK
Unique student Condos
Don't make the mistake
of not discussing this
with your parents
�L �JIvI�JkiW
unit plan -1230 sq. ft.
LJeU�L
JOKLJ
i r
a '���
353 jo !
directions to site
.3 BATHROOMS
.3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
�PREWIRED FOR SECURITY SYSTEM
.CABLE TV TO EACH BEDROOM
�2 PHONE JACKS IN EACH BEDROOM
(PHONE & COMPUTER)
. WASHERDRYERMICROWAVE (OPTIONAL)
. CHOOSE YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
. PRIVATE STUDY AREAS
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1998
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICES
SPECIAL FINANCING
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1 -800-440-5378
CONSIDER THIS OPTION BEFORE SIGNING DORM CONTRACT OR APARTMENT LEASE





11 Thursday. October 2, 1997
style
The Eas' '
Gelato
continued Irutn page 6
operatic arias, classics. Wc have had
people say that they have never
experienced such a range of emo-
tions. And that is the greatest com-
pliment we can receive
Meanwell credits Peter De Sotto,
the band's violinist and main vocal-
ist for pulling together the group
that includes Cynthia Steljes and
Claudio Vena. DeSotto is a tenor
hose voice is exceptional, accord-
ing to Meanwell.
"Cynthia is the most classically
trained of us all. She went through
schools from an early age
Meanwell said. "Claudio. 1'ctcr and
I played pop which is an unusual
background for a classical musician
Though VfeanwelTs demeanor is
laid back and conversational, his
abilities, as well as those of his part-
ners, are exceptional. When they
refer to "quitting their day jobs" to
keep up with demand for Quartetto
Gelato, they aren't talking about
their days flipping burgers at a fast-
food joint.
Meanwell had been touring with
the Royal Winnipeg Ballet as well as
working with a production of
Phantom of the Opera in Canada.
Vena was conducting the Miss
Saigon orchestra in Toronto. Steljes
was working with the National
Ballet of Canada as well as Robert
Aitken's New Music Concerts. De
Sotto was with the Toronto
Symphony.
Now, they are simply Quartetto
Gelato, the ice cream quartet.
"The name was Peter's idea
Meanwell said. "We were looking for
a name that would fit. He came up
with Quartetto Gelato, gelato being
Italian for ice cream, because we
take oursdves lightlywe offer a
variety of musical treats
The are definitely musically
eccentric, which makes for a fantas-
tic show. The group introduces each
piece they perform with a light-
hearted explanation as to why thev
play the selection, how it came
about, and a bit of the history of the
piece. Each show is a new experi-
ence to this energetic group.
"We were all pretty experienced
at (touring) Meanwell said. "But
this is better than anything I've had.
It's an amazing experience, touring.
I always thought (each show) would
be just a place on a map, but it's
been more. Touring is a way to
check other places out
And they have been touring
extensively, just returning from a
stint in Puerto Rico. Earlier this year,
the group had its European debut
tour in Sweden, and will be heading
to Japan early next year.
While their show in Greenville
next Wednesday will be their first
visit to North Carolina, it probably
won't be their last as the group's
popularity continues to grow.
"We have another CD in the
works Meanwell said, referring to
the group's third. "Anyone who lis-
tens to our CDs will be completely
convinced about Quartetto
Gelatoit's a really good time
For a light-hearted approach to
serious music, two scoops, make
that four scoops, of Quartetto
Gelato might be just the confection
your looking for. And if the music
isn't enough, Meanwell said the
group also has something else going
for it.
"We all have really good hair
Portishead
commued trum pay:
poise.
Rather than making tl
the centerpiece of tin
Portishead have instead created
fied compositions in v.
lyrics are not the main wei
music but rather an intregal �
carefully constructed whole
away from too many samj !
easy loops, Portishead inste
composed original music and
needed for emotional qualii
modified the sound to c
same texture that sampled .
often carry.
Everything about this all
breathtaking, from the first i
notes of "Cowboys" to the la I
breath of "Western Eyes Tl
vocals are superbly expressh
"All Mine and "Seven Month
the whole album rings like
ed castle on the verge of a met i i
phosis. Otherworldly and strik
its intensity, Portishead r.
beyond categories, beyond i!
tion, beyond mere words at all.
There is no doubt that Portl
is a work of art. Portishead have not
only fulfilled their potential I
they have surpassed themselvi
Their second album is awash
with the stain of beauty, leaking i
fearful symmetry that shows sue i
pretenders as Prodigy to be the u
gods they are.
Electronica may never take I
place of good old rock'n're
indeed, I don't want it to. Bui I ai
like Portishead will ensure that
does take its rightful place in mu ;i:
history.
vote:
Steve
McLawhorn
Greenville
City Council
Register ByrOctober 10:
Vote Nov 4th
Mil for by lh Stevf l. Unborn I
1
752-7303
"The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
legandaty Nightdub,
Vfefcwof i�U and
Top 100 �olfag� Bar in the
Nation by Pfeyboy magazine
0cefer 1997
TONIGHT Thursday Oct. 9
Drivin'
n' Cryin'
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKULLYS
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
:
Doors open at 9 pm
WITH SPECIAL GUEST
Treadmill Trackstar
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Jusi show your ECU siudent ID at the
DamIs across from campus and get a 25
discount on your enure dinner check. Try our
farnous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs, Award Winning Fajitas
Grande, New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks, Fresh Vegetable Pasta.
nvRRYis
RESTAURANT & BAR
� I I I f I I E 1 Oil
800 East IOthStre� 71
Roadside Chicken Sandwich. Steak and Cheese
Sandwich. Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
telicious Dessens. It's all specially priced for
ECU stud- :nts So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
; for I xxl and fun'
Friday 10th
admission
for members
WITH SPECIAL GUEST
llobex
$1.50 MGD DOOR PRIZES
Saturday 11 th
Former members cf
Dillon Fence and
Johnny Quest
admission
for members
Win tickets
to see
Widespread
Panic
Coming Oct. 30
Edwin McCain
s





12 Thursday. October 9.1997
The East Carolinian
Pirates seek grudge match revenge
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS EDITOR
For the first time in ECU his-
tory, the Pirates will play their
first Conference USA game in
Dowdy-Rcklert Stadium.
After coming off a 56-0
defeat against Syracuse, the
Pirates are looking to turn their
season around with the confer-
ence games, beginning with
Southern Miss. Last season
ECU was handed a 28-7 loss in
Greenville from the Golden
Eagles, who lead the overall
scries 16-6. USM won its 97
C-USA opener last week beat-
ing Louisville, 42-24.
Head Coach Steve Logan is
still trying to get his players to
gel as a unit after four games.
He says he has seen
some individ-
ual efforts
that have
caught his
eye, but as
a team,
they are
has allowed
game while
coming up just short.
"We've got some talent, and
it expresses itself from time to
time individually Logan said.
"We're just not doing it as a
collective unit just yet
That collective unit netted
just 168 total yards against the
Orangemen last week. ECU
will have a tougher time this
week, against a Southern Miss
defense that is ranked second
in total defense in the confer-
ence, compared to ECU who is
ranked fifth.
Logan knows this defense
will pressure his troops
throughout the game.
"They're just a pressure
unit Logan said. "That's
what they do from the start of
the game the end of the game.
That's what they believe in
and they do a good job of it and
you're just going to have to find
put who's going to stand up
under the pressure and who's
going to make a play
Southern Miss s defense
304.8 yards per
the Pirates have
given up an
average of
376.3 yards per
game. On the
other side of
the ball, the
Golden
Eagles
rank
fifth,
puttin
up 314
yards per
fame, while
ICU ranks
last averaging
249.8 yards per
game.
Part of the offensive slump
has come due to injuries.
Fullback Scott Harley is still
nagged by an ankle injury he
suffered against West Virginia,
while split end I-arty Shannon
is still out with an ankle injury.
Shannon dressed out for the
Syracuse game but did not see
any action. Logan doesn't
expect Shannon will see any
action again this week.
don't think he's going to
play Logan said. "He just
can't push off it yet, 1 don't
know. If I'm betting, I'm say-
ing he's not going to play
These two teams will be
playing for the 12th time in
Greenville, with Southern
Miss invading Dowdy-Ficklcn
for the second straight year.
Both of these programs are
rivals and Logan said the two
teams deserve a lot more cred-
it than they get.
"They've been two of the
most under appreciated pro-
grams in the country Logan
said. "Both schools have put
players in the NFL; both
schools have the reputation
within the collegiate coaching
ranks
Logan said because of the
success of the programs, that
many opponents don't want
them on their schedule.
"I don't think anyone wants
to schedule East Carolina or
Southern Miss Logan si.il.
"They're are other people in
Conference USA that I don't
think anyone enjoys ptay-
ingbecause they are capable
of having a really good football
team
According to Logan, he
thinks Southern Miss s Head
Coach Jeff Bower has one of
the best teams his Pirates have
faced.
"Jeff's got his best team
right now Logan said. "I
think he's got his best overall
football team
The heated rivalry begins at
3:30 p.m. on Saturday and the
game will be televised on Fox
Sports Net.
Conference USA
ECU vs. Southern
Miss Comparisons
Southern Miss
ECU
Southern Miss
ECU
3rd
7th
Southern Miss
ECU
4th
6th
Jason Nichols returns the ball again Southern Mis test fear. ECU is anting their first i
ECU 3rd
Southern Miss 5th
Southern Miss 1st
ECU 4th
Southern Miss 4th
ECU 6th
flUPKSTD
Location
Southern'Miss Seneiat Intormatiun
Hattiesburg, Mississippi
TICKET REMINDER
As the ECU Football team looks to get back on track and pick up a home win. it is important
;that loyal Pirate fans fill the stands to show their support. Don't forget to pick up your student
I tickets at one of the designated ticket booths on campus, and as usual, tickets are going fast.
I as Dowdy-Ficklen will host Southern Miss for this weekend's Parent's Weekend game. Tickets
are available for student pick up at the Athletic Ticket Office and also at the ECU Student Store,
Founded1910
Enrollment14,000
NicknameGolden Eagles
ColorsBlack and Gold
StadiumM.M. Roberts (33,000)
SurfaceNatural Grass
1996 Record8-34
Conference Record4-1-0
Series Record vs. ECU-USM leads.16-6-4
Last game vs. ECU-USM 28. ECU 71996 at Greenville
Southern Miss
ECU
Southern Miss
ECU
Southern Miss
ECU
2nd
5th
5th
7th
2nd
5th
Liberty Bowl adds corporate sponsor
ECU alumni helps secure
multi-million dollar deal
Gavin P. smith
st.U'F wine
' As each Saturday passes, as the best of the
best rise to the top, we draw closer and closer to
bowl time.
When Christmas and New Year's roll around,
football fans arc given the perfect present �
bowl games galore.
If success hands ECU a bowl bid, then it will
be to the Liberty Bowl, or the newly named
AXAEquitablc St. Jude Liberty Bowl. It may be
4 mouthful to say, but it constitutes an important
Change in the Liberty Bowl that not only affects
ECU football, but also involves an ECU alum.
That alum is Terry Little (76), a native of
Saratoga, North Carolina and a vice president of
The Equitable, a member of the global AXA
group and provider of financial services.
Within the past couple of weeks, the
AXAEquitablc group worked out a three-year,
multi-million dollar deal with the Liberty Bowl
to become its new corporate sponsor.
In addition to his daily responsibilities at The
Equitable, which includes all financial and inter-
national communications, advertising and travel,
Little has just been named to the Board of
Directors and to the learn Selection Committee
for the bowl game.
According to Little, this new sponsorship of
the Liberty Bowl is just what AXAEquitablc
needed.
' "We were essentially looking for something to
be the cornerstone of our new ad campaign
Little said. "We decided that collegiate athletics
Offered the energy we were looking for
Another benefactor of this new partnership is
St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital.
"In addition to supporting St. Jude's through
the Liberty Bowl, we have also made a100,000
rnnrrirwirion from The Equitable Foundation ro
St. Jude's Hospital Little said.
"St. Jude has a renowned, international repu-
tation in the fight against kid's cancer and it cer-
tainly fits with The Equitable and AXA's long
traditions of supporting worthy causes
Coordinators of the Liberty Bowl couldn't be
happier as well.
"We are really pleased and excited to have
companies of AXA and Equitable's stature and
reputation as our first-ever corporate-title spon-
sor said Steve Ehrhart, executive director of
the Liberty Bowl Festival Committee.
Ehrhart also expressed his approval in work-
ing with Terry Little.
� "We are extremely lucky to have someone
Smith makes it one
for record books
First snjdertt to call
ftwtbalionWZMB
STEVE L.OSEY
�iKVIOR WtlTEt
Terry little. � 1976 graduate of ECU. has joined forces with the Liberty Bowl. As Viee-President of The Equitable, be
has helped to bring together a new corporate sponsor to the newly named AXAEquittble Liberty BowL
PHOTO C0URTSST0F THE EOUITABlt
with Terry's knowledge, experience and energy
joining the Board Ehrhart said.
As well, more publicity will be brought to the
table. The AXAEquitablc corporation plans to
promote the Liberty Bowl
through more advertising and
through a package deal with
ESPN.
The Liberty Bowl will fea-
ture competition from the top
teams or both Conference-
USA and the Big East.
"We like the idea of being
affiliated with a bowl that fea-
tures an up-and-coming
Conference-USA � with inno-
vative and exciting teams such
as East Carolina, Southern
Mississippi, and Memphis �
playing against a more estab-
lished league such as the Big
East Little said.
"This mix makes it a great
combination
Little also feels that this new partnership
with the Liberty Bowl will help bring more noto-
riety to many of the schools in both the Big East
and Conference-USA (of which ECU is a mem-
ber).
"Anytime you have organizations such as AXA
and The Equitable backing the event, it adds
attention and prestige
"We were essentially
looking for something to
be the cornerstone of our
new ad campaign. We
decided that collegiate
athletics offered the
energy we were
looking for
Terry little
w�;ii prusiJiiii! u! The Eguiliible
As a member of the Selection Committee for
the bowl, Little has to maintain a sense of neu-
trality when it comes to talking about East
Carolina football. However, Little.offered his-
view on his alma mater's tough
season.
"Most of the guys are big and
young, but by the time they grad-
uate, I think they will leave a fine
legacy behind them they need
to gel a litdc more and they will be
fine Little said.
Although his professional life
keeps him on the go, Little plans
to be here for the home game
against Cincinnati in a few weeks
to cheer on the Pirates.
The Liberty Bowl is now in its
39th year and is held in Memphis,
Tennessee. During bowl week,
many activities are held, including
a rodeo, a black-tie ball, and vari-
ous other parties.
The last bowl game ECU played was
the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tennessee
against Stanford University in 1995.
This year's bowl game will be broadcast on
ESPN at 3:30pm on New Year's Eve.
Just a reminder, the Conference USA season
kicks off for ECU (1-4) this coming weekend
when Southern Mississippi (3-2) comes to town.

In his first season as commentator
for ECU's campus station, WZMB,
Bob Smith has already made a mark
on the airwaves. He has found the
winning combination for successful
play-by-play: A loose, relaxed man-
ner on the air, and the willingness to
say what he thinks.
"Nobody at WZMB has ever
done play-by-play for the football
team, Smith said. "The Sports
Director has called games in the
past for baseball and Lady Pirate
basketball, but this is a first for the
Pirate football team
Even more remarkable is the fact
that Smith is also a student at ECU.
He began working in radio in his
native Greensboro, Smith hosted a
sports call-in show at a small station.
Along with his play-by-play. Smith
also hosts Pirate Talk, his own call-in
program. Pirate Talk is heard on
WZMB every Wednesday, from 7-8
p.m.
"I've never done engineering
work, or other stuff like that Smith
said. "It's basically all voice work for
me
Smith is a sophomore working
toward a BA in Communications.
He started working for WZMB the
spring semester of his freshman
year. During that time, he became
friends with Dill Dillard. Dillard was
the sports director, but he graduated
in June. He encouraged Smith to
apply for his job, and Smith took his
advice.
The reactions Smith has been
getting have all been positive. Smith
and his color commentator will
engage in off-the-cuff conversation
between plays, peppered with
Smith's wry humor and observa-
tions.
"It would be boring to have big
gaps while the play is being set up,
Smith said.
Bob Smith
Smith's
play-by-play is
so successful
that Jeff
Charles, head
of electronic
media and
Voice of the
Pirates, has
reportedly
been advised
to listen to
Smith's show.
Students have
been enjoying the alternative to
Charles that Smith provides.
"I speak my mind Smith said.
"I don't try to sugar coat anything. If
I think that Logan made a mistake,
like, say, he went for a running play
on a third and 20, I'll say, 'What was
Logan thinking?' It pretty much
sounds like two guys in the bleach-
ers talking �
Smith's previous experience on
the air prepared him well for calling
play-by-play. Many people would be
uncomfortable in a situation like
that, but Smith thrives in radio.
However, he was concerned with
the reaction students would have.
"For some reason, I will not get
nervous when I do something like
this Smith said. "But I was unsure
of how it would go. I wasn't expect-
ing a large audience, though, so that
took some of the pressure off
Smith hopes to get a job in the
broadcasting area after graduation.
"This is something I have want-
ed to do all my life, Smith said.
"This is a way for me to put a foot in
the door. It doesn't matter if I'm in
TV or radio. If I did TV, I would
have to dress up in a shirt in tie, the
way I do when I go to games. But in
radio, I can come in dressed like a
slouch
When Smith does his show from
the games, he broadcasts from on
top of the press box with all the
cameras.
"I've been told that you can sec
mc standing up on top of the press
box. It's no fun up there. I would
love some air conditioning Smith
said.

. -
'����1
.� V - r-v.
i
m m:
�W"





The East Carolinian
sports
Thursday, October 9. 19S7 13
Intramural soccer season kicks off soon
Look at yourself before -
criticizing athletes
David Gaskins
REC SERVICES
The 1997 Intramural Soccer season is
set to kick off on October 14 with a reg-
istration meeting, followed by team
sign-ups, and leading to the opening of
the season on Wednesday, October 23.
The registration meeting will be
conducted on Tuesday, October 14 at 5
pm in Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 244. All team captains should
plan on attending this meeting in order
to obtain necessary information and
paperwork for participation in the
league. Unaffiiiated players seeking a
team should also attend the meeting
for assistance in placement on a team.
Team sign-ups will be conducted the
following day on Vfedncsday, October
15 in 128 Student Recreation Center
from 10:00 am - 3:30 pm. Leagues will
be offered in Mcns Independent Gold
and Purple, Fraternity Gold and Purple,
Mens Residence Hall, Vvbmens
IndependentResidence Hall, and
Sorority. The Gold level is designed for
experienced players who wish to partic-
ipate in a highly competitive atmos-
phere whereas Purple leagues are
V
designed for teams who are recreation-
al or somewhat competitive but less
advanced in skills and experience. The
various leagues offered are intended to
provide a level of skill and competitive-
ness appropriate for anyone desiring to
play. League times are available on a
variety of days and times in order to
accommodate the schedules of partici-
pating teams. The Soccer Preview is an
additional program which will provide
extra pre-season play opportunities for
a limited number of teams in a jam-
boree format on Monday, October 20
and Tuesday, October 21. More
detailed information and sign-up guide-
lines for this program will be discussed
at the Soccer registration meeting.
Regular season play will begin on
Wednesday; October 22. All teams will
play a four game regular season fol-
lowed by a single elimination playoff
within each of the respective divisions.
Games will be held at the North
Ficklen Stadium Intramural Fields. In
order to participate, teams should send
a representative to the registration
meeting, complete a rosterparticipa-
tion contract, and sign-up for a league
the following day. Regulation teams are
composed of a minimum of nine players
but there is no roster limit. The offside
rule is not in effect and slide tackles are
not permitted. Participation is open to
currently enrolled students and facul-
tystaff of East Carolina University. All
participants will need to present a valid
ECU Identification card prior to each
and every game in order to participate.
The 19 program was composed of 72
teams with Captain Crunch capturing
the All-Campus Gold title. However,
Crunch captain Steve Parker has
remained silent regarding plans to reor-
ganize the team in an attempt to
defend the title. Regardless of the sta-
tus of last years champions, a host of
challengers arc expected to arise
including a team assembled by feisty
Clint Knox. Among the women,
Christy Hamilton is expected to bring
The Krush dynasty back for at least one
more year. Last year proved to be one
of their most difficult seasons as The
Cheese Nips lead by Candice Voigt,
Ellen Day, and Meghann Vitt fought
them to a standstill in the rain and mud
of the 19 championship. In the
Purple, LCH has several players includ-
ing captain Brian Cote returning from
their Cinderella championship team of
19. In one of the greatest comebacks
in recent memory, LCH won their only
regular season contest on the last day of
the regular season and then swept
through everyone in the playoffs to win
the All-Campus Purple title. Despite
the momentum built from the previous
season, the challenges are expected to
be many in this division as Michael
Bcacham, Chris Margeson, and Pete
Brotherton are expected to assemble
teams of high-octane offense. Another
highlight of the Purple division will be
spirited play of the Knuckleheadz who
will once again feature unique uniforms
in order to hide their skills. Brent
Smoothy Anderson and Jeremy All
Flash, No Substance Howard are pre-
pared the status as best-dressed players
in the league. The Sororities return
Alpha Omicron Pi as the defending
champion and will feature speedy
Michelle Gottschalk to lead the attack.
While the Intramural Soccer league has
been known for many skilled players
each year, the legendary Vu Radar Foot
Donie is once again expected to attract
the majority of recruiting attention as
he lobbies for a lifetime intramural con-
tract. For more information on the soc-
cer program, please contact David
Gaskins at Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
SPORTS
gossip


NFERENCE
This week's
g9mes
CONFERENCE
USA
Last week's
results
Southern Miss at ECU 3:30 p.m.
Tulane at Louisville 3 p.m.
UAB at Cincinnati 7 p.m.
Arkansas State at Memphis 6 p.m.

Syracuse 56, ECU 0
Cincinnati 20, Memphis 17
UCLA 66, Houston 10
Southern Miss 42, Louisville 24
Tulane 41, Army 0
"EC takes
The Oct. 11 football game between ECU and
Southern Mississippi will be televised nationally by
FOX Sports Net as part of Conference USA's
Game of the Week package.
Game time for the contest in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium will be 3:30 p.m. EDT.
ECU and Southern Miss were chosen to finish first
and second, respectively, in the C-USA coaches
preseason poll. The Pirates will be making
their third national television appearance in
their first five games this season.
JKREMY ANDERSON
STAFF WRITER
Last week, Kevin Garnett re-
signed a contract to play basketball
for the NBA's Minnesota
Timberwolves. At the lowest esti
mate, his new contract would pay .
him $120 million dollars over the j
next six years. "s
What is so bizarre about
Garnett's new deal with the u
Timberwolves is that he turned"
down a reportedly six-year, $106 ,
million contract a few weeks ago. ,
At the press conference following -
the agreement made by Garnett �
and Timberwolves management�
Garnett said, "It's not about the
money"
Who is he trying to fool? Of i
course it was about the money
The whole realm of professional
sports is about the money. You
probably expect me to rant and
rave on and on about how much ,
money pro athletes make. Well
your wrong. u
After the announcement, I
heard several people around cam-
pus talking about how ridiculous it
was for someone to be paid that
much money to play basketball. If u
you were one of these people or
just think the same way, I have one
question. Would you turn it down?
Garnett, who will be playing his
third year for the Timberwolves,
entered the NBA draft right out of
high school and became an instant
millionaire. He didn't have the
grades or the SAT score to get into
a big time basketball school, so he
opted for the NBA.
How many of you out there will
be making twenty million per year
three years after your college grad-
uation? Better yet, how many of
you will make twenty million in
your lifetime?
Before we start to criticize oth-
ers for their actions, maybe we
should take a look at ourselves and
see if we can match the standards
we set for �thcrs. 1 would take the
monev an I think vou would too.
Greenville Student 111 - Composite
CwwKmiW7-TJ�KregirCa.ttNnta fikmgeoanOemH�m�mm�OmtWttoWmmmmmmmUtaimi0n.
kmm� w��ecwiTi�iaet.ni9�7 iwni nwr.il molntti I
FOGDftDKUG
Always Good.
Always Fresh.
Always Kroger.
YourTotal
Value leader.
Mountain Dew, Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi,
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
Four 2-Ltrs. per customer
at this price please.
Eastern Grown
fled, &s?y �r
Some Apples
Mb. tag
$�9
Family Size
Red Baron
Pizzas
2t.8-24.2-oz.
2$7
Assorted Varieties
Home Cooking or
Campbell's
Chunky Soup
19-oz.
2$
3
Assorted Varieties
Hungry Man
Swanson
Dinners
14.1-18-oz,
2$A
Kroger
Seedless
Raisins
15-oz. Box
9
All Varieties Sliced
Lunchmeats
5 12-7-oz. Pg.
8 Varieties From Which
To Choose
Kroger
Cereal
13.75-20-oz.
Compart to Httiorm Bnmdf t Save.
$5
Say NO to the politics of HATE
Last Thursday, October 2, thousands of voter registration forms were inserted into The East
Carolinian. In The Dally Reflector's coverage of this unprecedented act, everyone interviewed
had something positive to say about it except Steve McLawhorn's opponent, Inez Fridley. In
addition to calling it a "tactic she said:
When-students legister here instead of their home-
towns, they also"should change their driver s license
reflect the local addresses and pay focal taxes, she said.
'Nobody's telling students that piece, :and that real!
bothers me Ms. Fridley said. "As long as people under-
stand the ramifications of what they are doing, that's fine.
�The Daily Reflector, 10397
laming: Fridley Statement is False!
ACCORDING TO STATE AND FEDERAL LAW, ALL members of the Greenvie community are welcome to and encouraged to
register to vote or update their voter registration to be abie to vote m Greerwie if n rr the reerrerto on the repstra-
tionform. No one in the tinted States has io pay a TAX to vote!
Stew McLawhorn's opponent, Ms. Fridley, should be reminded that, IN FAQ, IT IS A FELONY FOR HER OR ANY PERSON,
DIRECTLY or indirecdy, to misrepresent the law to the pubik through any meam of comm
the effect is to intimidate or dkourages potential voters from excersizmg the lawful right to vote (NCGS163-275).
THE FOLLOWING LETTER ILLUSTRATES THE MENTALITY STEVE IS FIGHTING AGAINSI

Students need lesson
To the editor
Regarding Lucy Goodwin's letter
Sept. 5, I would like to point out the
other side of the strict occupancy
laws in Greenville.
Consider all of us who have pur-
chased homes in single family, resi-
dential neighborhoods to raise our
children only to have greedy realtors
sell a home to be rented to students.
When students move in. Hie realtor
tells them how to avoid being caught
so that four or more students can
share the house. Then their girl-
friends or boyfriends begin to stay
jver every night until they eventu-
ally move in too. Suddenly, there
are six or seven students living in a
in good citizenship, responsibility
three bedroom house.
Where arc all of their cars parked?
Not in the driveway, but in the yard
and on the street. Parties begin to be
thrown quite often, loud music is
played constantly, there is continuous
coming and going and traffic in-
creases.
Suddenly, the single family neigh-
borhood is not quiet and safe for small
children to play and ride their bikes.
The language spoken by the college
students and their behavior is often
not what parents whant their children
hearing and observing. Trash (beer
cans and bottles mostly) often litters
I lie yard after games and parties.
Wc arc a diverse community of
taxpayers. Why should temporary
residents (non-taxpayers) be
accomodatcd in single family neigh-
borhoods? There arc numerous
appartment complexes that cater to
students. Shouldn't the city
accoinodatc the families who arc the
backbone of the community?
The strict occupancy laws need to
remain in force. If students do not
wish to abide by a community's laws,
they need be better educated in citi-
zenship and responsibility.
Theresa Hcwctl
Greenville
The Daily Reflector,
September 12, 1997
Assorted Varieties
Kroger Canned
Vegetables
14.25-15.25-oz.
29
All Varieties fit Sizes Lunchable
Sandwiches or
Oscar Mayer
Fun Pack Umchables
18-oz.
Assorted Varieties
Kroger Deluxe
IceCream
12-Gal.
2$C
$199
Please Register to vote or update your voter registration iiiediately!
You must register or have your form in the mail before 5pm, tomorrow, October 10.
�eci Steve 4
McLawhorn
City Council-District 3, November 4, 1997. Paid for and Authorized by the Steve McLawhorn Campaign.
j
ii�

jfr Mi
ifM
� xm
�.





14 Thursday. October 9. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
ORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Sports statistics in brief: Volleyball, soccer, tennis post wins
ECU junior forward Wyatt Panos
Aansbon, NC) scored a pair of
oals, and the Pirate defense played
si lidry as ECU cruised to a 3-1 non-
. itcrence victory over Campbell
here Saturday. With the victory, the
Pirates improved to 4-5, 1-1 in the
.A. The 4-5 mark ties ECU's best
start in 11 seasons, dating back to
l'86 when the Pirates began with a
4-4-1 record in their first nine
matches. With the loss, the fighting
(imels fell to 5-6 overall and 0-6 in
matches outside the Trans America
Athletic Conference (TAAC). For
1.(IU, the victory was just its second
over Campbell in 23 tries, and its
fust ever in Buies Creek, NC.
The Pirates got on the score-
board first at the 21:14 mark when
sophomore forward A.J. Gray
(Jacksonville, NC) scored on a left-
fi tcr from 20 yards out off an assist
'Vim freshman midfielder Nick
Iiirato (Cary, NC). For Gray, the
;al was his fifth of'97.
At 36:11, Panos drilled in the
;i t of his two goals. Playing a pass
t"r:m sophomore defender Sean
1 Lwlcy (Hubert, NC), Panos hit a
half volley from 25 yards out that
iipped into the back of the net.
Hie score remained 2-0 until the
u ftime intermission.
In the second half, Campbell
v( uld get to within one goal when
Yi shman forward Peter Barany fired
3 Miot into the top left corner of the
net at the 72:02 mark. Panos and
ECU answered just minutes later
h ugh to give the Pirates another
two-goal advantage. After ECU
freshman Scott Pokorney
(Charlotte, NC) was fouled from
behind on a breakaway, Panos blast-
ed a direct kick over Cambell's wall
of defenders and into the goal for
the 3-1 lead. For Panos, his two
goals Saturday marked his third and
fourth of the season.
ECU finished the match with
nine shot attempts, led by Gray who
tallied four; while Campbell
notched 15 shots. Pirate senior
keeper Jay Davis (Wilson, NC) reg-
istered five saves, anchoring the
back line for ECU for the entire 90
minutes. Junior keeper Will Poe
recorded two saves for the Fighting
Camels.
"We were able to make the most
of our opportunities todav said
ECU head coach Will Wiberg. "It
was a total team effort. Defensively,
Brett Waxer, Jon Smiley, and Sean
Hawley played very smart. Jay Davis
had some big saves at crucial times
and our midfielders played well.
When Campbell made it 2-1, we
were able to keep our poise and
composure to get the win
ECU will return to CAA play on
Sunday, Oct. 12, when it hosts the
Richmond Spiders in a 3 p.m.
match at Bunting Field.

The ECU Pirates utilized two
key second-half goals to break open
a 1-1 match and coast to a 3-1 non-
conference victory over Wofford
College here Saturday at Bunting
Field in women's soccer action.
With the win ECU improved to 7-5,
2-1 in the CAA, and have won two-
in-a-row and six of its last seven
matches. The seven wins in '97 ties
an ECU single-season record for vic-
tories. The Lady Terriers fell to 4-5-
1, 1-1 in the Southern Conference,
with the defeat.
The Pirates opened the scoring
at the 12:53 mark when sophomore
defender Chrisy Bernabe (Burke,
Va.) lofted a shot over the Wofford
defense which deflected off the top
of the post and into the back of the
net for a 1-0 advantage. Bernabe's
goal was her second of the season.
Wofford would tie the contest min-
utes later when sophomore mid-
fielder Amber Cagle played a cross
from midfielder Lindsey Freeman
and fired one in from six vards out
at 18:21.
The match remained tied until
the halftime intermission. After 45
minutes, the Pirates had registered
14 shots on goal to seven for the
Lady Terriers. Sophomore keeper
Amy Horton (Raleigh, NC) had two
saves in the nets for ECU; while
senior Deana Moschos notched
three first-half saves for Wofford.
In the second half, the Pirates
were able to strike quickly when
sophomore defender Erin O'Neill
(Elkton, Md.) provided as assist to
freshman forward Jennifer Bush
(Havelock, NC) who scored on a
header into the near post from
inside the goal box at 55:09. Nine
minutes later sophomore midfielder
Melissa Rucker (Port Huron, Mich.)
drilled in a second-chance shot
attempt after a Moschos' deflection
on her first attempt. Freshman for-
ward Kim Sandhoff (Waipahu,
Hawaii) recorded an assist on the
play. For Rucker, it was her first
career goal.
The Pirates finished the match
with 30 shots on goal; while Wofford
tallied just 12. Horton notched five
saves, anchoring the back line for
the Pirates for the entire 90 min-
utes. With her performance
Saturday, Horton's goals against
average now stands at 1.40.
Moschos recorded eight saves for
the Lady Terriers and freshman
keeper Premiss Counts had two.
The victory improved the Pirates to
4-1 at home this season.
I'm extremely pleased with the
way we played today said ECU
head coach Neil Roberts. "In the
past two weeks we have been
pleased with our second-half play,
but today we were able to put
together two quality halves. I felt
Courtney Jurcich and Erin Cann
played well in the midfield and gave
good balls to the people up front.
Also, all of out forwards played out-
standing, getting through their
defense on several occasions. We're
very excited about the way we are
playing right now

The UNC-Wilmington Fall
Tennis Invitational concluded on
Saturday, with the ECU Lady
Pirates gathering one flight champi-
onship and three third-place finishes.
Freshman Maggie Meginnis won
the Flight Three championship, by
first defeating Kacy Gibson of
Coastal Carolina in the semifinals, 6-
3, 6-1. In the finals, she won in three
sets over Christy Kauffman of
Charleston, 6-1,4-6, 6-0.
In the Flight One singles, Asa
Ellbring finished in third place after
losing her semifinal match 6-1,6-0 to
Paige Resha of Charleston. She then
defeated Katie Brinkman of UNCW
7-6,6-2. Lady Pirate Mona Eek, com-
peting in the consolation bracket,
won two matches to take fifth place.
Eek defeated Megan Romine of
Coastal Carolina 6-2, 6-0, then won
over Jenny Clack of Coastal Carolina
in three sets, 2-6, 6-2, 6-2.
In Flight Two singles, both
Michelle Martin and Jennie Ward
were competing in the consolation
bracket. Martin defeated Erin
Whitlock of Coastal Carolina 6-1,6-1,
while Ward defeated Samantha
Thompson of UNCW, 6-2, 6-2.
Martin and Ward then had to play
each other for fifth place, with
Martin winning in three sets, 6-1, 4-
6,6-3.
Catherine Morgan was ECU's
SEE SI0. PAGE tS
Open 7 Days a Week � Mon-Sat 11 -10 � Sun 12 - 9
Across from Carolina East
Mall in Pier One Shopping
Center, Hwy 11 South,
Greenville '355-7168
BUY 1 GET 7 FREE
So Sa Me Chicken $4.50 I
�must present coupon expires 101497 I
We steam & use less oil � Lower Fat Cooking
EC takes
With record crowds expected this year at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, the ECU Athletic Department, the ECU Transit and the City of Greenville
will provide shuttle service for each home football game.
The shuttle wili originate from the future site of the GreenvillePitt Convention Center parking lot, located on Alternate 264Greenville Blvd.
adjacent to the Hilton and Ramada Inns.
The shuttle will begin two (2) hours prior to each kickoff, with three buses running until the end of the first quarter. One bus will run contin
uously during the game with all three buses returning service at the beginning of the fourth quarter and running one hour after the game.
Rates for this service will be $5 per vehicle for the park and ride, $2 for walk-up aatrons. The shuttle drop :f and post-game departure area
will be on Berkley Road, directly across from the scoreboard located at the east end of Dowdy-FickleR Stadium.
Beta Beta Beta
ECU Biological Honor Society
Presents
James G. Peden, Jr. M.D.
Asst. Dean of Admissions ECU Medical
School
October 9 1997
9:00 P.M. Howell Science Complex Room N109
Anyone Interested in Medical School is encouraged to attend
Everyone Welcome
NEW! little Caesars
BIGiBIG?
THE NEW
LARGE!
WITH 1 TOPPINC
EACH
(AIIYOUT
nut TAX
little Caesars
Ora Msl ft Pried FhtalPtazaT
Sfc ttl �ty � pNp� ImNb b I MM m t i-xfm mirmi
I
IP
If

�i
I
I
Little Caesars
FAMILY PACK!
NEW!
1 BIGIBIG!
MEDIUM PIZZA
16" with 1 topping
CRAZY BREAD & COKE�
8 piece 2 liter bottle
THE NEW
MEDIUM!
WITH 1 TOPPINC
EACH
CAIIYOUT
nut TAX
GREENVILLE
LANDMARK
(Across from Wal-Mart)
321-8100
3120 E. 10TH ST.
(Next to Food Lion)
757-1212
BELLS FORK
(Tumbury Square)
756-6776
little Caesars
THE NEW
SMALL
WITH 1 TOPPINC
� � �
EACH
camyout! filoo,
nu-TAXVr
NEW!
BIGIBIG!
�11.
felWUltfe (mm uitapiMi, Inc.
F-1H
Valid only at participating locations for a
limited time. No coupon neccessary.
Delivery where available. Charges and
restrictions may apply.
Pricing may vary. Excludes extra cheese.
"Where available.1997 L.C.E Inc.
YES
BIGGER
IS BETTER!
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Velij lot I fenilw) linn gt pMtoiprfm kxolwm. �1W B lw� blBpiKti, Int.

PIZZA
TWO of OUR NEW
SMALL PIZZAS
14" with 1 topping
Crazy Bread & Sauce
8 Piece order
I
I
I
I
$
12.

-j-
-m. -
�"�





r
I
i
Thi Esit Carolinian
O
Thuridiy, Odofctr 8. 1987 15
New coach may be key to Philly success
SKUIXY'S
Thanks
for your support
Downtown GftanUe 798-4298
"Greiiville's best
Pizza once again'
(iri'tiiviilc Times
Reader's poll
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �The
Philadelphia 76ers left town last
week sounding like a dysfunctional
family. Clarence Weatherspoon
griped about not getting any
respect from the front office.
Derrick Colcman complained about
still being with the team.
But in Chapel Hill for preseason
workouts, the Sixers are bonding�
happily � with a new coach.
"I think God sent me Larry
Brown point guard Allen Iverson
said Tuesday "I think we've got the
best coach for me. Everybody told
me I wouldn't be able to deal with
Larry Brown, that he's too hard on
point guards and we wouldn't mix.
SID
cotuimued from page 14
IMZLim
fetsS
Chicago Style Pizza
� Subs �� Strom noli
� 'l.asasjna
5;?Vs
lU'tovios
i t,l HI k l-� l V
j Buy Large Pizza, Get 1J
12 Price j
Dtec la or Pkk Up. Discount applies to equal
I or lesser value pizza. Valid Sunday-Thursday
only. Not valid with other specials.
dSfc E�pl&3V97.
$9.95
2 Lasagna Dinners
Includes Garden Salad
& Dinner Bread
Disc In Only. Valid Monday-Thursday only.
Dine-in Only. Not Valid with other specials.
Ezp. 10317.
other representative in Flight
Three, along with Meginnis.
Morgan lost her semifinal match
to Christy Kauffman, 7-5,6-2. She
then defeated Kacy Gibson of
Coastal Carolina 6-0, 6-2 to take
third place.
Sophomore Kersten
Schachinger, the lone Pirate in
Flight Four lost in consolation to
Charicnne Rggins of UNCW (7-
5, 6-2) and defeated Ashleigh
Parker of Charleston (6-2, 6-3) to
finish seventh.
In Flight One doubles, the
ECU duos of MorganMartin and
EllbringMcginnis both lost their
semifinal matches.
MorganMartin fell to
WilliamsResha of Charleston, 8-
1, while EllbringMcginnis lost to
LevinHamilton of Charleston, 9-
7. The two ECU teams played
each other for third place, with
EllbringMcginnis winning 8-5.
The tandem of
" @Htttt4tt'HwHmHwH� �
� DWf Assessments, Evaluations And Treatment Programs
�Counseling services include
Individual, Family, and Group Therapy
.Your assessment & treatment (if required) will
ie done in a professional yet laid back manner in
�a private, comfortable setting for less money
than you would spend with some larger agencies.
Appointments Scheduled Around YOUR Work or School
Schedule
All services Are Fully Licensed & Credentialized By The State
of North Carolina
Fees based upon income
Loeatod on Evans Straot Mall
Within Walking Ditance of Campus
Michael G. Morris, CDWIE, CRT, CSAC
315 S. Evans Street; Suite B; Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: (919) 752-1333 Fax: (919) 757-3995
Experience
Elegance & Fine
Chinese Cuisine
7 Days a Week
Serving Lunch & Dinner
GllNAlO
CHINESE
QE6TAUQANT
2516 East I Oth Street
Graamilta.NC 27858
Phone 830-2238 Fax: 830 1735
Join us (Or dinner
before or after the game.
Reservations Welcome!
95 Lunch
Specials!
SAMQRIAS $1.75
BLOODY MARY'S $2.25
12 PRICE PITCHERS
OF DRAFT
$.95 MUQS OF DRAFT
LIME MARGARITAS $2.50
MEXICAN IMPORTS $1.75
PINK MARGARITAS $2.75
HI-BALLS $1.99
2Price
Appetizer
Specials
Sun. - Thurs. After 9 PM - Dine In Only
No Fiesta Could Be Better Than Chico's!
Downtown Greenville � 757-1666 � All ABC Permits
?
V
in
"I have no problem doing what
coach asks me to do he said.
Iverson, in turn, has been a par-
ticular favorite of Brown's.
"He's treated me with respect
from the first meeting Brown said.
"He looks me in the eyes and tries
to do what 1 ask him to do. And 1
ask him to do a lot. It'll only help
our team. Every day I look at him, it
makes me feel like he's a lot better
than he was the day before
Brown started teaching the
moment he stepped onto the court
at training camp. And he hasn't
stopped in a week of two-a-days.
The Sixers � tired of losing and
aware that Brown has coached 23 of
EekSchachinger, competing in
Flight Two doubles, finished fifth
after defeating GibsonPitman of
Coastal Carolina (8-2) and
ParkerLynch of Charleston (8-3).
The Lady Pirates take a week off,
competing next at the Charleston
Southern Invitational on Oct. 17-19.

ECU's women's cross country
team finished second, while the
men's squad placed third on
Saturday at the Campbell
Invitational. Host Campbell
University won the men's team title,
while Duke took the women's team
title.
The Lady Pirates were led by
junior Kcrri Harding (Baypoint, NY)
who finished third overall in 18:54.
Sophomore Robin Bates (Winslow,
Maine) placed ninth in 19:24.
Becky Testa (McDonald, Ohio)
made the biggest improvement on
the squad as the freshman finished
10th in 19:29. Abo, senior Karen
Reinhard (Burke, fc.) placed 12th
and freshman Fran Lattie
(Lumbcrton, NC) finished 16th.
Today's meet was a confidence
booster commented ECU women's
head coach Charles uChooJustice.
"Ran Lattie and Emily Linnemeier
dropped 20 to 30 seconds off their
normal times. The gap is closing
between our No. 1 and our No. 5
runners
The men's team was led by
sophomores Justin England's
(Raleigh, NC) third place finish in
25:46 and Brian Beil's (Stafford, Va.)
fourth place finish in 25:51. Junior
Mike Marini (Wilmington, Del.)
placed 11th in 26:38. Freshman
Steve Arnold (Woodbridge, Va.) and
junior Jeremy Coleman
his 25 teams to .500 records or bet-
ter � are listening And they're not
talking back to the man with the
five-year, $25 million contract.
"He keeps it simple said Billy
King, the team's vice president of
basketball administration. "He
understands human beings and
demands a lot. He tells them when
they do something wrong, but also
tells them when they do it right. All
he wants them to do is try
He spent part of the second day
of camp working on inbounds plays.
"We would've won three more
games last year if we could've just
inbounded the ball owner Rat
Croce said. Three times the Sixers
(Williamsburg, Va.) finished 19th
and 22nd respectively.
Also, junior Jamie Mancc
(Wilmington, Del.) suffered a
sprained ankle and was unable to
finish the race. The extent of the
injury is not known at this time.
"Unfortunately, our No. 1 runner
Jamie Mance tripped commented
ECU assistant men's cross country
coach Mike Ford. "Also, we held our
No. 2 runner Stuart Will out of
today's competition. Otherwise wc
would have easily won this meet

Looking to get back on track, the
ECU volleyball team found itself on
the end of a losing cause as it
dropped a five-game heartbrcakcr
(5-15, 17-15, 15-11, 6-15, 8-15) at
UNC-Grecnsboro Tuesday. After
losing the game, the Pirates (12-10)
regrouped to take games two and
three before being downed by the
Spartans, winners of eight of their
last 10.
Trailing one game to nothing, the
Pirates got right back in contention
as freshman Cinta Claro started to
warm up. Claro, who is ranked
fourth in the CAA for kills per game
at 3.40, burnt the Spartans (10-9) as
she collected a match-high 26 kills,
while recording just 11 errors on 58
attempts for a .259 hitting percent-
age. She also added 16 digs and one
block assist, while the 26 kills ties
her season-best and ranks as a team
high this season.
"Cinta did start hitting better
(Tuesday) said head coach Kim
Walker. "She actually hit a ball that
knocked a g rl down and after that, I
think she started to get a little con-
fidence back. That, together with
working on a couple of technical
were unable to get the ball in play
with only seconds left last season.
"Number one, I want them to
know they have to defend and
rebound Brown said. "I'm more
concerned with the halfcourt stuff
right now. We'll do a lot of scrim-
maging. I think it's important we
spend time teaching
Rookie Tim Thomas said, "He
does seem like a college coach. He's
a teacher and a motivator at the
same time. He takes time out to
teach us what we're doing wrong
Brown's efforts even include try-
ing to reach the disgruntled
Coleman, who showed up 15
pounds overweight.
aspects, put her back into a better
hitting mode
Along with Claro, freshman Liz
Hall continued her fine play, record-
ing her 10th double-double of the
season with 19 kills and 14 digs,
while Sarah Kary added nine kills
and eight total blocks. Kary also led
the team with a .273 hitting per-
centage as she committed just three
errors on 22 attempts.
As a team, the Pirates were outhit
.186 155 for the match but record-
ed 14 team blocks to eight for
UNCG. ECU currently leads the
CAA in team block average, with a
2.47 average. Also defensively, the
Pirates recorded 85 digs on the night
with six players reaching double dig-
its, including Claro, Hall, Kary (11),
Shannon Kacss (12), LaKeya Mason
(16) and Kristin Warner (12).
Though Claro and Hall kept
ECU in the match, the Pirates' trou-
bles started to multiply in the fourth
game as the Spartans outhit ECU
.447 102 to tie the match at two
games apiece and force a decisive
fifth game. In the fifth, the Pirates
were unable to stop UNCG before
losing 15-8 in rally scoring.
"We're still young and at points
we had four non-starters on the floor,
so we still have a long way to go, but
it looks promising. Walker said.
"Our defense was much better, we
dug 85 balls. And we outblocked
them pretty bad too. Wc just need to
work on delivering the ball to the
hitters better and wc could increase
our hitting percentage
The Pirates will be in action this
weekend as they travel to
Har. iNonburji, Va. to take on James
Madison Friday at 7 p.m.
frOTCHENI CUPBOARD!


Tasteful
Tailgating
Tired of Typical
Picnic fare?
Try Imported and Domestic Cheeses, Pates and
Delectable Spreadables like Smoked Mozzarella
with Sun Dried Tomato or Black Bean and
Roasted Corn Hummus.
Try Blue Cheese Straws and NC Roasted Peanuts
Also Available Chilled Microbrews and
Wines( 60 selections under $10)
Corner of East Arlington Blvd and Red Banks Road. Adjacent to
A Matter of Taste � Bar and Bistro
756-1310 � Mon - Sat 10-6
The Fire
Thursday
Trading
Evans
Friday
Tree
Huggers
Saturday
Cjtsi&issd
cials
Sunday
Pizza
Free
all day Sunday
4pm P-nther
Game
Live Remote with
99X. 1 st drawing
for Superbowl Tix
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to DJ Will
upstairs ,
Greenville's
e Tavern
Thursdays
�i.oo r
Fri&Sat
Bear Tub Specials
Sunday
32 ox. Domestic
Draft tl.50
14 oz. Domestic
Draft 78
FREE FOOD
NFL Ticket
on DSS
Monday
Night
Football
7S� Southpaw
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
TastingDisplay
L Sports Bar
ff&
t�
' 'V.�
?






I
I
I
4
I-
16 Thursday. October 9. 1997
spork
The East Carolinian
SEVERAL STARS TO
SHOW FOR BARESI'S
FAREWELL MATCH
MILAN, Italy (AP) Several world
soccer greats recently retired or
still
active will play in Milan in a
rarewel! match for former AC Milan
and
national team captain Franco
Barest.
Officials of the Milan team said
Tuesday that Argentine star Diego
Armando Maradona, Brazilians
Antonio Careca, Romario and Zico,
Germany's Andreas Sammct,
Mexican striker Hugo Sanchez and
Spain's Emilio Butragueno and
Michel agreed to start on the
'Rest of the World" squad which
will play an AC Milan selection at
Sen Siro stadium on Oct. 28.
Baresi will lead a Milan team
which will field the mythical Dutch
trio of
Marco Van Basten, Ruud Gullit
and Frank Rijkaard.
Gullit is the current player-coach
of Chelsea. Van Basten and Rijkaard
h have retired.
Baresi, one of the best ever world
defenders, retired at the end of the
last
season to join AC Milan manage-
ment.
Ticket revenues from the exhibi-
tion, expected to draw a huge
crowd, will go to UNICEF, the
United Nations International
Children's Emergency Fund.
WORLD LEAGUE TEAM
CHANGES NAME
LONDON (AP) Goodbye
London Monarchs. Hello England
Monarchs.
The Monarchs, one of six fran-
chises in the World League of
American
Football, were renamed Tuesday
as England's team.
for the first time, the club will
play two home games outside
London during the 1998 season, in
addition to three games at Crystal
Palace in the capital. The cities and
venues outside London will be
named later.
'The Monarchs want to take
the team to a wider audience and
we fully
support them World League
president Oliver Luck said. 'This
will help
develop the sport in other parts
of the country
"It is only right that the
Monarchs should now carry the
name England as
they represent the country
against teams from around Europe.
The league's other teams are the
Scottish Claymores, Barcelona
Dragons,
Amsterdam Admirals, Frankfurt
Galaxy and Rhcin Fire of
Duessekiorf, Germany.
WHILE CARLSON MEETS
WITH SELIG, GRIFFITH
READIES TWINS BID
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) Major
league baseball's acting commission-
er gave Got. Arne Carlson no reason
to believe baseball owners would
prevent the
Minnesota Twins from becoming
die North Carolina Triplets.
Carlson and a group of legislators
flew to Milwaukee on Monday to
ask Bud
Selig how Twins owner Carl
Pohkd's deal to sell the team to
North Carolina businessman Don
Beaver would fare with team own-
ers. Beaver wants to move the team
tc the Triad area of North Carolina,
which includes Winston-Salem,
Greensboro, and High Point.
"There will be permission for
Carl Pohiad to leave if a stadium is
not
built Carison said after a meet-
ing with Selig, owner of the
Milwaukee
Brewers.
Senate Majority Leader Roger
Moe, who took part in the meeting
in Milwaukee, said Selig's response
to the possible move seemed
"choreographed" to put pressure
on legislators to approve a new sta-
dium.
Three-fourths of the American
League's owners and half the own-
ers in the
National League must approve a
team sale and relocation.
"For anybody to think in this
day and age you can consign an
owner to
either uncompetitiveness or
bankruptcy is sheer folly Selig said
at a
Milwaukee news conference.
Seiig also urged a quick resolu-
tion, saying "further delay is just
patently
unfair to the Twins. That's who
gets hurt
Pohiad has said he can't afford to
lose any more money in the
Metrodome, and that the team
must have a baseball-only stadium
with revenue from suites, club seat-
ing and other amenities.
TROPHY TOURNAMENT
DIRECTOR WANTS
SANCTIONS FOR AGASSI,
BECKER
VIENNA, Austria (AP) CA Trophy
tournament director Leo Gunther
Huemer said today that he will seek
ATP sanctions against Andre Agassi
and Boris Becker for their late with-
drawals from this week's event.
Huemer said he will ask for the
sanctions on Friday, when the ATP
board
convenes in Vienna, the Austria
Press Agency reported.
Fearing that a fine won't have any
impact and barring players from a
tournament will only hurt the
competition, Huemer suggested
that players be docked points for
late cancellations.
Even before Huemer's sugges-
tion the topic was under considera-
tion by the
ATP, following a similar incident
in Basel, where Pete Sampras,
Patrick
Rafter and Gustavo Kuerten
withdrew on short notice.
Agassi gave no explanation for
cutting out of the $800,000 CA
Trophy
tournament, while Becker said
without elaboration that he was
injured.
Vienna was Becker's 10th cancel-
lation this year.
TALK OF REJUVENATION
FOLLOWS BYE WEEK FOR
PANTHERS
CHARLOTTE (AP) The
Carolina Panthers arc hoping some
lineup changes and a long weekend
will put them back on track after a
2-3 start in which they allowed more
than 20 points and 2 yards per
game.
Coach Bom Capers announced a
number of lineup changes late last
week in an attempt to boost the
Panthers as they prepare for
Sunday's road game against
Minnesota (4-2).
Quarterback Kerry Collins, who
looked uncomfortable and was
hounded by
turnovers in his three games after
returning from a broken jaw, was
benched in favor of Steve Bcuerlein.
Capers said the move is a temporary
THE PLACE
FOR ALL YOUR
PET'S NEEDS
3140A Mosetey Dr.
f Behind Parker's BBQ on
Greenville Btvd J
758-6603
o
one, but he refused to assign a
timetable to Collins' return.
The Panthers also have shuffled
a number of spots on their offensive
line,
which has looked spotty on pass
coverage and has cleared the way
for just
one 100-yard rushing perfor-
mance so far by Carolina's backs.
The Panthers gave up a fran-
chise-record 35 points two games
ago in a loss to Kansas City, and
they followed it by surrendering 34
points and a
franchise-record 219 rushing
yards in a loss to San Francisco.
CHARGERS PULL TO .500
GOING INTO BYE
SAN DIEGO (AP) For the most
part, the San Diego Chargers are
starting to
grasp Kevin Gilbride's multiple
offense.
After alt, they went from Tony
Martin catching four passes for 155
yards and three touchdowns in one
game to Gary Brown rushing for 181
yards and one touchdown in the
next.
"They're playing the game
very, very passionately and we are
getting
better Gilbridc said following
Sunday's 25-10 upset win over the
Oakland Raiders. "The last few
weeks we've moved the ball very,
yery well, so it's an entertaining
brand of football, as well
There arc still problems,
though. San Diego continues to
sputter inside the
opponent's 20-yard line. Greg
Davis, filling in for John Carney,
kicked six
field goals to tic Carney's club
record. Carney, out with a sprained
right
knee, could be back for the
Chiefs game.
The Chargers are off this
Sunday, and will spend a fair
amount of their
practice time this week working
on plays that might work inside the
so-called "RedZone
"Each week it's been some-
thing different Gilbride said
Monday. The coach
said defenses are limited in what
they can do inside the 20 and we
should have our two or three plays
that attack each concept, and be
pretty good at it. But we re still very
much awkward with it right now
and not as good as we need to be,
and that's an area we're going to
focus on this week
The Chargers (3-3) won't be
away from action that long, travel-
ing to face
another AFC West rival, the
Kansas City Chiefs, a week from
Thursday.
Aquariums & Supplies
Saltwater and Freshwater fish
Reptiles, Small Animals, and Supplies
Live and Frozen Food
FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF
College Night Donife!
All fiCU Students admitted for
$2.00 with a valid student ID
Ladies And Metis
FAMOUS MAKER JEANS
At Discount Prices
atalog
Connection
"Division Of P3
EL TORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe .
Barber & Style
ISOOEKMiSt.
Easfste Shoppfe Cem-
Acran From HigFwra)' Patrol
Behind Sain Gtut
MonFri.9-i
Wifc-im Anytime
ni-jjie
Say Pirates &
Get Hair Cut
for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
Pirate Special
$7.00
Haircut;
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � 1.5 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
1
: v
1- i
Expi
W Only 3 days Left
Come Experience the BJEGTOB SEAT
Pill County Pair
LARGEST Fair this side jt'jf Raleigh
264 East
sessions
Pick us up three times during the
Fall and Spring terms for discus-
sion of the problems and issues
facing ECU'S minorities.
TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thurs-
days for news and information
about campus issues and activi-
ties,
LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE STUDENT RADIO STATION
Rebel WZMB 913 FM
Pick us up annually in the Spring Pick us up 24-hours a day for a
to view a showcase of campus wide variety of music including
literary and artistic creations. alternative, jazz, metal, rap and
more.
EAST CARQLINAUNIVERSITY
mmnzQ
MEDIA3aa 600�
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL �O-0 WIT
Watch for our web site debut next week!
�-J

�.
r
m
rtr
11
Wg"W
I






;
17 Thursday, Octobsr 9. 1997
For Rent

RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
-FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
� JASAP to share great 3 bedroom town-
tiouse. Rent $205.00month plus 13
Utilities. Call Apple or Jenl at 754-8157.
v please leave message.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share 3 bedroom duplex on
Meade St. 4 blocks from campus. Rent
$191.6613 utilities. Call Leah or Erik.
�"830-2636 evenings.
: TO TAKE OVER LEASE, one bed-
room spacious apartment extra nice,
washer and dryer hook up, basic cable,
water and sewage included. Call for
more information, 752-8085.
FEMALE NEEDED ASAP TO sub-
lease 2 bedroom apt $22.50mo 12
utilities. Call Amy, 752-7838.
ROOMMATE NEEDED MALEFE-
MALE TO share 3BR duplex on Lewis
st 12 block from campus. Own room
and bath. $230month plus 13 utilities.
752-8188.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, FE-
MALE to share 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, 12 rent and 12 utilities.
'Nice and quiet area. Call 758-5593.
:i BEDROOM APARTMENT 4 blocks
'from campus. Stove, fridge, water,
�sewer, basic cable, washer, dryer in-
cluded. Call Woodcliff Rentals at 758-
-5005 for more info. No pets.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED-
LAYERS Club Apts. 14 of rent and
expenses. Call today, 321-7613.
iAPT. FOR RENT: TWO bedroom, one
bath, dose to campus. Pets allowed.
$350 rent. Call 752-3333.
STANCILL DRIVE 2 BEDROOM. 1
;bath duplex, cable TV, washerdryer
hook-up, refrigerator with ice maker,
$400month, pet fee, $500 deposit. Call
830-1491.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
PLAYERS Club Apts. 14 of rent and
expenses. Call today. 321-7613.
AVAILABLE NOW SPACIOUS 2
bedroom , 1 bath apartment, stove,
fridge, water, sewer, basic cable in-
cluded. 2 blocks from ECU campus. No
pats. Call Dogwood Hollow Apts. at
752-8900 for more info.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE a
Mo bedroom apartment 1 12 bath,
partially furnished, $200 month, 12
Utilities. 3 blocks from ECU. Call Ryan
at 758-5756.
TWO BEDROOM. OCTOBER-JULY.
Washerdryer, hook-up, ceiling fans,
pets allowed with fee. Very close to
campus, only $325 a month. Call 752-
0277 or 413-0978.
TWO OR THREE FEMALES needed
to take over lease ASAP. $220 per
month, 14 utilities. Please contact
Sheila, Yuka, or Lauren at 353-2471 or
leave a message.
ASAP FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED, $220 a month. 14 utilities. Call
Deanne, 355-2285.
For Sale
1992 TOYOTA CAMRY, EXCEL-
LENT Condition. 77.000 miles. 919-
946-4419.
CANNONDALE DELTA V500
MOUNTAIN bike. Front end suspen-
sion. Hardly used. Paid $1000. asking
$700 OBO. Includes Rhode Gear rack.
Trek helmet 757-3475.
APPLE POWER MAC 7500100 for
sale 24 MB RAM, 500 MB HD. 4X CD
ROM. extended keyboard, 16" Apple
monitor, 14.4 Zoom modem, loaded w
graphic design programs! $1650. Call
321-1440.
RED 1988 SUBARU DL. great get-
around car for student. 95K miles.
Good condition. Must nell. $750 or will
take best offer. Call 75R-8458.
MONGOOSE VILLAIN FREESTYLE,
FRONT and back pegs, brand new, im-
maculate condition, chrome, paid
$310, asking $250 OBO. Call Parks,
754-2632.
GE WASHER AND DRYER, 1 year
old. excellent condition, $680. Futon,
$50. Call 353-7196
STUN GUNSI SAFE AND easy to
use. 919-946-6830.
FUJI TAHOE MT. BIKE, all Shimano
components, Onza bar ends. Call Fred,
353-6228.
NISSAN ALTIMA 1095 GXE, au-
tomatic, air, cruise, AMFM cassette,
power windows and locks. $10,995
OBO. 757-3475.
Help Wanted 1
FREE T-SHIRT
$1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00V!S.A
application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHiRT
Part-Time Jobs
Earn Money Arjg
Retarrse Expedience
Wofktna Fw
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
Earn Up Ts
$
Mon-Fri i to pnv
Sa! � �m to Noon
ONLINE Collections is looking
for the 0 most aggressive
people en ECU s campus to wor'
as telephone roiieclors The
perfect part-time job Excellent
pay Ourgraos get ;red based en
en Iheff experience working, for
us We afso nave a tew day scts
oper you av�f�rrvcrnmQS or
afternoons to work Contact Chn�
Murphy at 7S4-i65 o Fat
Mu! :Vrs at ?57-?'3C
BABY UTTER NEEDED FOR
TWELVE month old boy. One or two
afternoons a week, preferably Tues
Wed. or Thurs. References please. 752-
8408.
Little Caesars
is now taking applications for
Assistant management posi-
tions. A fun place to work.
Pick up applications at
3120 E. 10 th Street
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7886.
6 TELEMARKETERS NEEDED. DO
you like talking on the phone? If so. we
have the job for you. Hours: 5:30-
9p.m Monday-Thursday; 4:30-8p.m.
Sunday. Hourly pay plus bonuses. Ap-
ply in person. 4:30-8p.m Energy Sav-
ers Windows and Siding. Inc Winter-
green Commercial Park, Suite 0, Fire-
tower Road, Greenville.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seek-
ing qualified individuals to teach aero-
bic classes through its Employee Re-
creation and Weiiness Department.
Persons will contract to teach on a
part-time basis. Interested candidates
should contact Rose Anne between
8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. at (9I9) 816-6501.
Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
THE CATERING DEPARTMENT AT
ECU is now taking applications for
Banquet attendants. We offer flexible
work schedules and competitive pay.
Please pick up applications at the Cam-
pus Dining Office, Mendenhall Student
Center. EOE.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON TO WORK
part time or full time 2-3 days per week
10-30 hours a week. $10 per hour.
Must pass credit check, criminal and
drug test. Send resume to PO Box 493,
Tarboro, NC 27886.
PAID MARKETINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS. THE ColorWorks is
currently recruiting on campus for a
limited number of summer '98 man-
agement positions. Gain Hands-on ex-
perience and build your resume. Last
summers average earnings $7,223. For
more information and to schedule an
interview call 1-800-477-1001.
PART-TIME OPPORTUNITIES: BRO-
DY'S is accepting applications for ad-
ditional associates in: Junior Sports-
wear, Young Men's, and Customer
Service. Flexible schedulesclothing
discount. To get a head start on your
fall wardrobe, apply at Customer Serv-
ice, Monday-Thursday, 1-5p.m Bro-
ds. The Plaza.
earn
$750-$1500 WEEK
Raise all the money your group
needs by sponsoring a VISA
fundraiser on your campus.
No Investment & very little time
needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for information today.
Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
LOCAL LAW FIRM HAS (2) part-time
mail room positions available. Duties
include general office support, er-
rands, and filing. Own transportation a
must. Hours 9-2, M-F or 1-6, M-F. Send
resume to: Legal Administrator, 1698
E. Arlington Blvd Greenville, NC
27858. (919)321-2020
HELP WANTED: GRADUATE
STUDENT with physical disabilities
seeking administrative assistant for
the month of October. 16 hourweek,
flexible hours. Call Kevin at 561-7218,
leave a message.
Services
TUTORING AVAILABLE FOR EMST.
ENGL, PHIL, PSYC, SOC, GEOL 1500,
FREN l&ll, LOGIC and various elec-
tees For info, call 355-6753, leave
message.
Aked help?
"Rttitmu � Zmfyni � tUnutcttftt
S�llwi CkUs � StmrAMtM � Altmtlntrtt
Prtfurionsl nd Intxpntiv
Muviketin$ p'OU
(919) 931-0022
TYPING AVAILABLE- REASON-
ABLE RATES. For info, call 355-6753.
leave message.
COSTUMESI WIDE SELECTION OF
rentals and custom-made. Many ac-
cessories available. Frani Boberg,
Farmvllle, 753-4009.
SPANISH TUTOR AVAILABLE TO
help you in Spanish. No failure in
Spanish guaranteed if student is con-
sistent in tutoring sessions and study-
ing! Call Annie. 756-4248.
Greek Personals
WAY TO GO GAMMA Epsiions! You
girls dominated at Rookie of the Year!
Becky, Jenn, Andrea, and Angie- you
were all awesome. Congratulations to
Beck and Jenn for first and third place,
we are so proud of you. Love, Alpha
Phi!
SIGMA HOPES EVERYONE HAD a
great Fall Break!
THANK YOU. ALPHA DELTA PI, Chi
Omega, and Delta Chi for coming over
on Thursday. We hope all of you can
come back the next time we have
something. Sincerely, Theta Chi broth-
THE GOOD OLE BOYS of Sigma Pi
would like to thank those fun-loving
Sigmas for the swell time last week.
Let's do it again.
THE SISTERS OF EPSILON Sigma
Alpha would like to welcome the Fall
Pledge Class of 1997: Amy Milton, Jes-
sica Capps, Victoria Steiger, Missy Mc-
Clenny, Mandy Buy, Lisa Ganoung,
Keiley Kaczorowski, Heather Natalie,
Edwina McKoy, Katie McBride, Mela-
nie Elliot, Julie Womble, April Castle,
Zai McCallum, Anna Asbell, Michelle
Bernett, Tanya Johnson, Suzanne
Brlnkley, Leanne Griffin, Marcie Jerni-
gan, Paige Cureton, Heather Rink, and
Keilee Ritter. We love you all!
WORD UP THETA CHII Who's your
daddy was bumpin G Way to get
down with Alpha Phi! Later.
THE XI PLEDGE CLASS of Sigma Pi
are Ritchie, Rodney, Danny, Joey, Kit,
Lee, Tommy, Steve and Ul' Danny. Go
getem boys.
CONGRATULATIONS TO LYNNE
MODLIN and Jennifer Whitlow on
winning your tennis matches.
TO ALL THOSE WHO attended Sig-
ma Bring-a-Date, we hope you had a
great time.
CONGRATULATIONS TO KRISTY
SHALLES AND Kristina Lacy for be-
ing accepted into Nursing School.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA PHI
ON 125 years of sisterhood. Tomor-
row we will celebrate our friendships
that have grown stronger with time
like the ivy that twines.
Travel
���EARN FREE TRIPSftCASHI
CLASS TRAVEL needs students to
promote Spring Break 19981 Sell 15
trips and travel free! Highly motivated
students can earn a free trip and over
$10,000! Choose Cancun. Bahamas,
Mazatlan, Jamaica or Florida! North
America's largest student tour opera-
tor! Call Now! 1-800-838-6411.
AAAAI SPRING BREAK CANCUN
& Jamaica $3791 Book Early-Save $50!
Get A Group-Go Free! Panama City
$129! South Beach (Bars Close 5AM!)
$129! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386.
AAAAI SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS Party Cruise! 6 Days $279! In-
cludes Meals, Free Parties, Taxes! Get
a Group-Go Free! Prices Increase
Soon-Save $50! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
Other
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your Area. Toll Free
(1)800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for current
listings.
CREATING CONNECTIONS: CA-
REERS IN Student Affairs. National
Careers in Student Affairs Week - Oc-
tober 15, 1997, 5:30 p.m6:30 p.m.
MSC Room 221. Be Introduced to the
Student Affairs profession, hear a pan-
el of professionals discuss their ex-
periences, get tips on getting through
the application process, and meet
many great people who can help you!
For more information and directions,
contact a Student Life Professional on
our campus or the Student Develop-
ment office at (919)328-4223. Spon-
sored by: The Division of Student Life
ABANDONED PUPPY NEEDS LOV-
ING home. Ginger is a sweet-tem-
pered Shepherd mix, approx. 6
months old. Since found she's been
spayed, wormed, and received shots.
If interested, 919-638-6517.
ATTENTION MEMBERS OF ORDER
of Omega! Initiation is next Tuesday,
so don't forget to dress appropriately.
Underground of Mendenhall, 6:00
p.m Members to be initiated must
bring $25.
$1000S POSSIBLE TYPING PART-
time. At Home. Toll Free (1)800-218-
9000 Ext T-3726 for Listings.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY. RACHEL VIDU-
NAS. As days go by I remember the
times we hugged, laughed and even
cried. I will always remember our
friendship and cherish it always. Even
though things may change, the past
can never be erased. Good luck al-
ways. Love, Paige Cureton
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free (1)800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
Announcements
VOLLEYBALLBADMINTON CLI-
NIC: SUN. OCT. 12. 2-4 p.m. Sports
Forum. Oept. of Rec. Services, 328-
6387
IRONMAN: REMINDER: GENERAL
INFO Meeting tonight at 5:30 In the
SRC classroom. Triathlon to begin Oct.
13. Dept of Rec. Services, 328-6387
CAVE AND CLIMB: WEEKEND trip
to Virginia Mtns. (Oct. 24-26). $75 stud-
ent cost includes equipment trans-
port meals. Beginners welcome!
Deadline for registration is Fri. Oct. 10.
Dept. of Rec Services, 328-6387
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUD-
ENT Center welcomes parents and
friends and invites you to visit and
worship with us in our new addition.
Sunday Mass schedule: 11:30 a.m. and
8:30 p.m. Location: 953 East 10th St -
2 houses from Fletcher Music Build-
ing.
RCLS STUDENT SOCIETY UP-
DATE: We plan to cook supper for the
Ronald McDonald House on Thurs.
Oct. 9th at 4:30. Plan to meet over at
the house and prepare their dinner.
Don't forget about the NCRTA Confer-
ence coming up on Oct. 21 & 22, get
your registration in soon!
EAT FOR FREEI TRADE your ideals
for food. Come to the next Student
Foodservice Advisory Committee
meeting on Tuesday, October 14 and
you can do just that. We want your
ideas and opinions about how to im-
prove campus restaurants, meal plans,
menus, and anything else that has to
do with food at ECU. The meeting Is
held around a scrumptious dinner pro-
vided by ECU Catering that's absolute-
ly FREE! It's a win-win situation. Call
328-2337 by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, Oct.
13 to reserve your space, and meet us
at Sweetheart's (Todd Dining Hall's pri-
vate dining room) at 5:00 p.m. on
Tuesday.
FACULTY RECITAL OCT. 9. 8:00
p.m. "Three Centuries of Music for
Trumpet Voice and Keyboard Tho-
mas Huener, trumpet Sharon Mu-
nden, mezzo-soprano and John B.
O'Brien, keyboards, A.J. Fletcher Reci-
tal Hall, 8:00 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10 - SEN-
IOR RECITAL, Tripp Aldredge, percus-
sion, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00
p.m. Sun. Oct 12, GRADUATE RECI-
TAL, Dana L. Eckensburg, horn. A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. 3:00 p.m. Sun.
Oct. 12. GUEST RECITAL. Glenn Calu-
da, guitar, Elizabeth Caiuda, piano,
from Shenandoah University,
Winchester. Virginia, A.J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 8:00 p.m. Mon, Oct. 13,
FACULTY RECITAL, Charles Bath, pia-
no, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
INTRAMURAL SOCCER 5ffT
CIALS; REMINDER: meeting for all
soccer officials tonight at 5 p. m. in SRC
202.
YOGA CLASS: BEGINS MON. Oct.
13, SRC Rm. 238, 5:15 p.m. Continues
on Mon. and Wed. evenings thru Nov.
11. Dept of RecServices. 328-6387
SCHEDULED EVENTS FOR 0C-
TOBER'S AIDS Awareness informa-
tion Booth. Oct. 1 and 2: Time: 11-1:30
Place: In front of Student Bookstore.
Oct. 9: AIDS 101: Workshop focusing
on basic information on AIDS & our
community. Time: 7-8 Place GC1031.
Oct. 13-17 AIDS & Alcohol Awareness
Program Time and Place TBA. Oct 23
PICASO Speaker Panne! Time: 7-8
Place: GC1031. In addition: Boxes will
be placed around campus for canned
food drive in support of PICASO. Loca-
tions: all month. 1. Mendenhall-next to
Student Organizations Booth 2. Stud-
ent Health Center 3. GC-front and back
entrances 4. Hearth Promotion & Well
Being Office-Whichard 210
The East Carolinian
SOCCER PREVIEWREGISTRA-
TION: MEETING TUES. Oct. 14, 5
p.m. Mendenhall Room 244. Dept. of
Rec. Services, 328-6387
TRI-BETA ECU BIOLOGICAL Honor
Society will meet on Thurs, 5:00 p.m.
in room BN109 Howeii Science Com-
plex. Current events and topics wilt be
discussed. Biology students are wel-
come to attend. Come and check us
out and get involved.
INTERESTED IN HIGH SCHOOL
Ministry? Come to Young Life Leader-
ship Training, Monday Oct 13, 6-7
p.m. GC1025. For more Information
call Jeff at 756-2435.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet Oc-
tober 14 at 5 p.m. in Ward Sports Med-
icine Building in Rooms 237D and
236C Ward Sports Medicine Building
is located between Minges and the
stadium.
CREATING CONNECTIONS: CA-
REERS IN STUDENT AFFAIRS. Na-
tional Careers in Student Affairs Week.
October 15, 1997, 5:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m.
MSC Room 221. Be introduced to the
Student Affairs profession, hear a pan-
el of professionals discuss their ex-
periences, get tips on getting through
the application process, and meet
many great people who can help you!
For more information and directions,
contact a Student Life Professional on
our campus or the Student Develop-
ment office at 328-4223. Sponsored
by: The Division of Student Life
BACKPACKING WEEKEND: INTERS
MEDIATE ADVANCED Packers to
cover 10-12 miles of beautiful West VA.
(Oct. 17-19). $48 student cost covers
equipment transport meals. Deadline
for registration Is Fri. Oct 10. Dept. of
Rec. Services. 328-6387
BEGINNING TENNIS LESSONS:
REGISTRATION is taking place now
until Fri. Oct. 10 In the SRC Main office;
Dept. of Rec. Services, 328-6387
CLIMBING WEEKEND AT LINVILLE
Gorge: advanced climbers to conquer
Table Rock (Oct. 17-19). $55 student
cost covers equipment, transport,
meals. Deadline for registration Is Fri.
Oct 10. Dept. of Rec. Services, 328-
6387
AEROBICSSESSION II: REGISTRA-
TION BEGINS Oct 13 at SRC Main of-
fice. Dept. of Rec. Services, 328-6387
DIVE-IN MOVIE: STUDENT Rec
Center's Indoor Pool, Fri. Oct. 10 at
9:00 p.m. Floats and towels provided
(or bring your own). T-shirts and priz-
es. Admission is FREE to students and
parents. Dept. of Rec. Services, 328-
6387.
COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS
WITH YOUR boyfriendgirlfriend? We
have the answers! Student Leadership
Development Programs will present
"He SaidShe Said" Monday. October
13 at 4:00 p.m. in Mendenhall Multi-
purpose Room. Beth Ann Pretty - Di-
rector of Orientation & First Year Ex-
perience will help you improve com-
munication across gender lines.
ADVERT!
Hit y�MMr
eastcaroli
ADVERTISE 111
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Wc Need TimberUnd boots
and shoes! Good Jean.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking tot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
'
, ,
With the help of everyone who plans and schedules activities on campus,
were compiling the most complete calendar of campus events available.
IF you're planning an event, go to our web site and submit it to our calendar,
If you're wondering what's happening, go to our web site to find out.
Campus Calendar - it's just another service of eastcarolinian
-7







3WM�
i
ftfc,
pBl�
sKSS
�SSISSS�22
STUOB
ECU Parents' Day
October 11,1997
Guide your parents to the newly remodeled UBE Sportswear Center for
the world's biggest and best selection of ECU gear.
516 S. Cotanche St. � Upt0wn Greenville � www.ubeinc.com � 758-2616 � Open 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Every Football Saturday
t
Mtf �


Title
The East Carolinian, October 9, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 09, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2807
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy