The East Carolinian, September 25, 1997






I
THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 25.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVIUE, NORTH CAROUNA
Incomplete campaign filings make for light ballot
mJian �J but also the fact that candidates did not follow InnrH�fnrrhmi�i.�r. .�� �j
Candidates neglecting
expense reports forced to
add names to ballot
AMANDA AUSTIN
ASSISTANT NKWS KOI Till
Students who voted Wednesday for the candi-
dates running for the Student Government
Association (SGA) Legislature should have
made a startling discovery: only three candi-
dates s names appeared on the ballot.
This figure is much lower than the amount
of students needed to fill positions. There are
11 class officer positions to fill, 37 day rep posi-
tions and two hall reps for every residence hall
housing over 350 students and one for every
residence hall housing under 350 students.
The fact there are only three candidates is
not only due to a low turnout for the positions,
but also the fact that candidates did not follow
the rules and meet three requirements.
"According to the constitution you have to
do three things, you have to file (for the posi-
tion), then they have to attend a mandatory
meeting, then they have to file an expense
report said Scott Forbes, SGA president.
Expense reports must be filed and turned
in whether a candidate has spent any money
on their campaign.
Out of all the students running for legisla-
ture a total of three students turned in their
expense reports.
"At the meeting it was announced to turn in
expense reports. Only three day reps did, that
is why there are only three on the ballot said
Forbes. "People just did not understand.
Everyone did their job except for the candi-
dates
Now that this problem has been estab-
lished in this year's election, there must be a
resolution to prevent it from happening again
in future elections.
"The biggest improvement is going to have
to come from the student population said
Forbes.
In order for there to be a better turn out for
future elections students are going to have to
become more involved.
"I wish all the people (from various organi-
zations) who were complaining last year would
stop talking and start acting said Forbes.
"Active participation is what we need
The legislative branch of SGA is a very sig-
nificant pan of SGA.
"The legislative branch is the largest and
supposed to be the most diverse branch of the
SGA. It is their job to represent the needs of
all students. The problem is the students are
not coming forward, the problem is they won't
make a difference said Forbes.
Those students who applied for candidacy
and did not turn in their expense reports were
still able to run for a position as a write-in can-
didate, which many of these students have
chosen to do.
Many of the students who showed up to
vote for write-in candidates were turned away
because those running the polls did not know
how to do so.
This problem was solved approximately an
hour and a half into the elections.
"I wish poll workers had been a little more
educated about write-in candidates from the
beginning said Forbes.
As a result of having so few candidates run-
ning for legislature, SGA must concern itself
with the quality of students they receive.
"My personal goal was to have more stu-
dents running than there are positions, by
virtue of competition the legislature would
have the better candidates Forbes added.
Election Results
Freshman Class President� Derek Anderson Stone104 votes
Sophmore Class President� Dana Menture82 votes
Junior Class President� Michael Papera70 votes
Junior Class Vice President�Timothy Muller69 votes
Senior Class President� Carlton Blanton68 votes
Senior Class Vice President�Jonathan Huggins72 votes
Day Reps
Eddie Ledford50 votes
Adam Hofheimer54 votes
Courtney Snapp51 votes
Hall Reps
Fleming Hall-Alan Stancil13 votes
Slay Hall�James Sturdibant13 votes
Cliff Webster, who ran for SGA President last semester, voted as Dean of Students Ronald Speier assisted pollsters.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Financial aid
changes
may benefit
students
jACyiKUNK D. KKI.I.l M
NEWS Kill I'OI
Federal financial aid is up for reevaluation
this year and may possibly be adjusted in
favor of the students.
"The House has recommended one set of
numbers (for financial aid), the Senate has
recommended another set of numbers said
Emmett Floyd, assistant to the chancellor
for constituent relations.
The House of Representatives' recom-
mendations for the financial aid bill are more
favorable to students than are the Senate's
recommendations.
"The House of Representatives in US
Congress raises (the Pell Grant) to $3,000
Floyd said.
The maximum Pell Grant a student was
previously eligible to receive was $2,700.
The House is recommending that the maxi-
mum be raised to $3,000.
The House also recommends raising the
income threshold. The income threshold
determines the cut-off point at which a stu-
dent's income makes them ineligible for aid.
"The House version has a higher income
threshold, and we have supported that
Floyd said.
Raising the threshold would probably
have the effect of making more middle-class
students eligible, although not necessarily
for the maximum.
"More people may qualify for Pell Grants,
but they may not qualify for the maximum
said Karen Barbie, associate director of
financial aid.
Although there is no guarantee that the
financial aid portion of the bill will be
SEE AID. PAGE 3
East Carolina University
1 Board of
Directors must
approve all land purchases
2 Medical Foundation comptroller
and school of medicine business
office use automated accounting
system to detect duplicate
reimbursement requests and
prevent payments
3 Four signatures required for
Medical Foundation checks
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
1 No individual may
make investment
decisions
2 Only bill expenses
to medical foundation
2 Two signatures on any
payment request
ECU student runs
for city council
Steve McLawhorn
addresses issues
important to students
UNG Medical Foundation
undergoes review
In response to ECU scandal, other organizations
prepare to safeguard against similar occurrence
Dawn Er.vikman
STAFF WRIT Kit
C.VROI.K MKill.K
IIKAI) OOP EDITOR
Steven McLawhorn
CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE
Angela Kokxig
STIFF WRI'I KR
Since the former ECU Medical Foundation
president's indictment earlier this month,
other medical schools have reviewed there
policies to ensure the safety of their organi-
zations.
Jim Copeland, president of of the
Medical Foundation of North Carolina,
Incorporated, said that since the indictment
was made, he has reviewed the procedures
and runnings at UN'C.
"I did, after reading the articles, sit down
and rethink things at our foundation to
determine if any areas were at risk for misus-
es Copeland said.
"I think whenever something like this
happens all nonprofits (organizations) take
stock in operations and control in use of
funds Copeland said.
One of the concerns for Copeland was the
handling of gifts received. After reviewing
the procedures there, he feels their proce-
dures are solid.
Copeland said that at UNC's medical
foundation, funds are kept separate from
medical school funds. Also, two signatures
are required for any payment to be made and
original receipts are required for reimburse-
ments.
"We write no checks ourselves. We sub-
mit a check request and the university sends
out the check with the money coming from
medical foundation funds Copeland said.
The foundation at UNC also uses outside
audits to regulate expenses and operations
there.
No individual there has the power to
make investment decisions. This is one area
which was a problem for the medical founda-
tion at ECU. Another problem at ECU
which UNC wants to avoid is multiple
SEE MEDICAL PAGE 2
THURSDAY
Steve McLawhorn is busy, but he hopes voters
will make him busier after the Nov. 4 city
council election.
McLawhorn, a 25-year-old physics major
who will graduate in May, is seeking the
District 3 seat on the City Council.
He faces a race against Inez Fridley, an
ECU employee who has served on the council
for 12 years. McLawhorn said a student ran
against his opponent last time and lost by only
38 votes.
"That kind of response from the college
students would be a sign that some things
need to be down or at least looked in to and
she has never made any effort to do that
McLawhorn became interested in running
for city council when there were problems
with rental property near his home that was
being neglected. Because the property was
really not maintained, McLawhorn said, it was
eventually condemned.
McLawhorn, a full-time student, says that
balancing school and the city council (if elect-
ed) will be tough but possible.
"Essentially the way my courses are going
to run, from here on out, because most of my
courses are mathematical I will not have to
take more than three classes each semester.
So that leaves me with a lot more time
McLawhorn said he wants to be the stu-
dents' representative on the council and some
of his top causes � the occupancy law, crimes
against students and
Greenville's parking sit-
uation � are of con-
cern to the students at
ECU.
Greenville's occupancy
law � created by
Fridley, McLawhorn
said � allows for only
three unrelated people
to share a dwelling.
"What it (the law) does,
essentially, is it makes it
financially impossible
for students to rent some of the larger nicer
houses around campus McLawhorn said.
"Most of the homes around there (campus)
are for rent and if you can have only two other
roommates, they're not going to be able to
come up with the money to pay for a four-bed-
room home
Crime is another target of McLawhorn's
platform� especially unresolved crimes
against students.
"Unfortunately the percentage of unre-
solved crimes against college students is way
too high as far as the petty larcenies and things
like that. I would really like to see a little bit
of a push from the city council to straighten
that out and get a little more attention paid to
it he said. "Eventually I would like to see
some sort of Community Watch program set
up. It's a little difficult because since stu-
dents are so transient, they don't really get to
know their neighbors very well. If we could
get it set up it would be of enormous benefit
Also a concern for McLawhorn is
Greenville's parking situation, especially areas
in which parking is not allowed 1-6 a.m.
"While they (ciry council) may have a good
reason to get those cars out of there, I can't
find one. All it does is encourage people to
drive home drunk
McLawhorn feels his down-to-earth per-
sonality and his good sense of right from wrong
will prepare him for the position on the city
council if he is elected.
TODAY
rain
High 74
Low 58
WEEKEND
cloudy
High 82
Low 62
??vp?;flr??"???9?7i
ECU spent $74,340
on toilet tissue
from July 1 1996 to
June 30 1997.
opinion4
ECU needs to back off
on area businesses
using school colors
or symbols
lifestyle6
Gen-X flicks hit Hendrix
sports9
Pirates taking week off
to recover from stinging
loss
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BlDG.
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across trom Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studenrniedia.ecu.edu
-
"�- �
�i m m






-i
2 Thursday, September 25. 1997
WW�
The East Carolinian
Cardiologist's work recognized
AMANDA BRH.f.S
STU'I- W�ITK�
A member of the ECU medical school has been featured
in two magazines for his extensive research and hard
work in the field of cardiology.
Dr. Randolph Chitwood, chair of the department of
surgery, and chief of cardiothoracic surgery is being rec-
ognized for inventing and perfecting techniques for min-
inalry-invasive mitral valve surgery. Chitwood will be fea-
tured in the October issue of Southern Living as one of
"America's 100 Best Doctor's He will also be featured
in Tern and Country's "Guide to the Best Doctors in
America
Dr. James A. Haliock, dean of the School of
Medkinc, believes that Chitwood is deserving of all the
recognition he is receiving.
"Dr. Chirwood is a pioneer in his field. He has revo-
lutionalized and leads the way in this new surgery. Dr.
Chitwood is an international leader in this field said
Oc3n Hail lock.
Chitwood has a family history in the medical field.
Both his father and his grandfather were doctors before
him. Much of what he knows was learned from watching
their bedside manner. Chitwood's father used to tell him
he had to make house calls with him after school.
Chitwood remembers opening the gate to the farm while
his father went in so that the cows would not get out of
the yard.
"Then making house calls was a nuisance, but now it
has led to fond memories and a romantic story. It was
also the beginning of my interest in medicine said
Chitwood.
After attending medical school at the University of
Virginia, Chitwood entered into a ten-year academic
surgery residency at Duke University. Chitwood has
been at Pitt Memorial since 1984, and started the heart
surgerv program.
"I feel like I make a difference at Pitt Memorial
Hospital. We have formed a team approach to build new
programs to introduce the new technologies. We want to
become a nationally known center. A goal of a school is
to gain prestige. I can see our acomplishments being fin-
ished here. You can go outside and feel the building
said Chitwood.
The Southern Living article focuses on Chitwood's
minimal evasive heart surgery and his development of
SEE SUflSSOB PAGE 3
Students question computer
lab legitimacy
Federal program looking for tutors
AMBKS T.Ti:M
STAFF W�ITE
The federal government is looking for
a few good readers.
A new program called America
Readers is looking for tutors.
"(This isj the federal govern-
ment's initiative to place tutors in ele-
mentary classrooms said Rose Mary
Stelma, director of Student Financial
Aid.
The goal of America Reads is a
simple one: "Every American child
should be able to read on his or her
own by the end of third grade said
President Clinton in his radio address
to the nation.
The federal Work Study Program
encourages education majors who
qualify for the appropriate financial
aid to fill in these tutoring pesrions.
Students majoring in other concentra-
tions are also welcomes Sharon
Roberts, assistant director of Student
Financial Aid, went to 14 elementary
schools in the Pitt County area to
meet with the principals. The result
was a request for 159 tutors.
At feast forty percent of all chil-
dren are now reading below the
accepted level on national reading
assessments. The government plans
to increase spending for national ser-
vice by $200 million a year for the
next five years above current funding
levels. This will begin in the fiscal
year 1998.
"We (Student Financial Aid) have
sent letters out to education majors
concerning America Reads Stelma
said.
President Clinton hopes that at
least half of the increase in Federal
Wwk Study funds will be used for
community service, and especially for
tutoring America's children in read-
ing. Studies show that children who
are qot able to read efficiently by the
end of third grade are less likely to
succeed in school and are more apt to
dropout.
Training will be provided to all
tutors. The student tutor should work
in coordination with the child's pri-
mary reading teachei:
For those who are interested, get-
ting involved in the America Reads
Challenge requires stopping by the
Financial Aid Office which is located
in the Old Cafeteria Complex Also,
one can call 1-800-USA-LEARN for
more information.
, -
1
S31ftSU-
Many students who patronize ECU'S computer labs, such as these in Austin, feel that the lab assistants need to
be better trained to answer questions about the new Exchange system.
PHOTO BY JOCEIVN FRIEDMAN
Many feel extra
lab assistant training,
extra computers
needed
JOM Si RKTTK
STU'I' WHITKR
Some students have had discouraging
experiences at the computer labs on
campus recently. Many complaints
seem to be centered around receiving
inadequate instruction from lab assis-
tants. Although complaints from the
student body arc frequent, the lab
assistants seem to disagree.
"We are all doing our best said
Steve Radabiugh, an assistant at the
Aycock computer lab.
In order to become a computer lab
assistant you must submit an applica-
tion and attend a one day, eight hour
training session. Some students feel
that the training of these individuals
is not up to par.
" I have gone to the computer lab
numerous times and have found that
either what 1 need is unavailable, not
in working order, or my questions go
unanswered by the assistants on
staff said Megan McLaughlin, a
freshman in elementary education.
The e-mail systems in the labs
sometimes go off-line.
"The first day of class was the day
this new system was opened for stu-
dent use. This v�r'� ww� is brand
new, so it has been a learning experi-
ence for us all said Radabaugh.
Many students at ECU see prob-
lems in the service provided by the on
campus labs, but not all of them spur
from the alleged lack of computer
knowledge retained by the lab assis-
tants.
"The number of computers is
inadequate when compared to the
increasing need of the students said
Joe Marconyak, a freshman biology
major.
There are plans in the near future
to build a new computer lab in White
Hall, located on West campus. This
will help to provide students with
more widespread access to comput-
ers.
Not all students agree with the
complaints of their fellow students.
"Some times it can be crowded
and that's a problem, but the assis-
tants have always been more than
willing to attend to my needs said
sophomore nursing major Tonya
Dean. "I once had a problem getting
on-line and they were right there to
show me what to do
Antidepressant effective in treating
severe PMS, study finds
Free concert fulfilled community service
CARRBORO, N.C. (AP) � When the Squirrel Nut Zippers did a hometown concert here last week, drummer Chris
Phillips said the band wanted to "give something back to the community"
As it turns out, the two-hour concert iso fulfilled Phillips' 24-hour community service obligation for a charge of dit-
whiie impaired.
hillips and Carrboro's mayor, Mike Nebon, said Tuesday that the concert was planned for months before anyone
knew it would provide a convenient way for Phillips to complete his sentence.
Phillips is the band member who approached Nelson about doing the shov. The band had achieved national acclaim
with its most recent CD, "Hot and the members said they wanted to do something for the town where they began.
Phillips said the band usually would command $25,000 or more for such a concert.
Phillips was charged with driving while impaired May 18 after a Chapel Hill police officer saw Zippers producer
Michael Napolitano mooning through a car window about 4 a.m.
Stenographer agrees to turn over trial tapes
DURHAM (AP) � The court stenographer who had been refusing to provide a transcript of a murder trial said she will
turn over her tapes to the court.
Patty McMann-Byrd said Tuesday that she will to obey a judge's order to hand over her notes and tat es of one of
Durham's longest murder trials.
McMann-Byrd was contracted to produce the transcript in the murder trial of Todd Boggess, who was sentenced to
death earlier this year for the 1995 killing of Danny Pence. Boggess stole the Wilmington youth's car and beat him to
death on a Durham County back road.
McMann-Byrd had said she would defy a court order to complete the trial transcript by Jan. 3 unless the court sys-
tem paid her what she says the work is worth � $58,000. The state fee was $28,500.
Last Friday, Superior Court Judge Oriando Hudson issued an order directing her to turn over the tapes for copying.
UNC Board of Governors won't vote on bible colleges
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �The policyooard that oversees the University of North Carolina system says it no longer
wants to vote on exempting bible colleges from state licensing rules.
Members of the Board of Governors and the former UNC system president have said their votes imply that the board
approves the schools' programs. Some board members say the law should be changed.
"It implies that the University of North Carolina board approves said former system president CD. Spangler Jr. dur-
ing a discussion at a June board meeting. The board voted in September to eliminate the exemption chore, which is
required by law, to its staff. . .
But one bible college administrator, Tamra Wood of Vintage Bible College in Winston-Salem, said it s clearly under-
stood that the exemption isn't an approval of the college's curriculum quality
CHICAGO (AP) � Some women
with a severe form of premenstrual
syndrome that cripples them emo-
tionally can be helped by the anti-
depressant Zoloft, a new study
showed.
The drug's maker, Pfizer Inc
funded the study of 200 sufferers at
a dozen medical centers nationwide.
About 62 percent of the women
given Zoloft showed "much or very
much improvement" compared
with 34 percent of women given a
placebo, the researchers reported in
today's issue of The Journal of the
American Medical Association.
Previous research has found
other antidepressants � Anafranil,
Prozac and Paxil � effective in
crime
treating severe menstrual symp-
toms, the researchers noted.
The Zoloft group improved in
psychological and social functioning
in a way similar to patients with
major depression, the researchers
said.
Premenstrual complaints are
common among women of child-
bearing age, ranging from breast
tenderness and bloating to anxiety
and mood swings, but the most
severe symptoms afflict only 3 per-
cent to 5 percent of menstruating
women, researchers said.
The severe form of PMS can sig-
nificantly impair the ability to work
and to relate to others, with symp-
toms that may include poor concen-
tration, depression and anger.
Federal regulators last year
warned Pfizer against promoting the
drug for uses that had not passed
federal review and been approved
by the Food and Drug
Administration, including treat-
ment of PMS. But doctors are not
barred from prescribing a drug that
has been approved for one purpose
for another purpose.
A call to the FDA for comment
Tuesday was not returned.
An editorial accompanying the
study said that, besides contributing
to knowledge about effective treat-
ments for premenstrual dysphoric
disorder, or severe PMS, the
research may help scientists find its
Medical
coniinupd from page 1
billings of expenses.
"We don't bill any expenses to
anything other than the medical
foundation Copeland said.
According to Chancellor
Richard Eakin, the changes which
have been made at ECU were
based on ideas made bv other ECU
officials rather than by drawing
from practices of other medical
foundations.
"We benefited greatly from the
knowledge of Terry Carter, who has
been involved with a number of
foundations Eakin said. "We also
relied on the expertise of Jim
Lanier
Caner is the vice president and
executive director of the Medical
Foundation and Lanier is the vice
chancellor for institutional
advancement.
Other key people in deciding
which changes should be made
were Brenda Mills, internal auditor,
and State Auditor Ralph Campbell.
"We worked very closely with
the state auditor throughout the
entire investigation and the state
auditor was extremely helpful to
us Eakin said.
According to Eakin, the state
auditor made several recommenda-
tions for new procedures at the
medical foundation which have
been implemented.
Got The Picture,
Get The Job
Photographers Wanted
jj by
eastcarolinian
Inquire at the Student
Publication Bldg. (2nd Floor)
September 20
Harassment�A resident of Tyler
Hall reported having an argument
with a non-student who refused to
leave her room. The non-student
left the room, but took an item
belonging to the resident.
September 21
AssaultCheck on Student�A resi-
dent of Aycock Hall reported that a
non-student had assaulted him in
the stairwell of Aycock Hall. The
victim refused to press charges.
September 23
Simple Assault & Communicating
Threats�A resident of Jarvis Hall
reported that a resident of Fletcher
Hall verbally threatened and physi-
cally assaulted her. The incident
occurred in Jarvis Hall and both
students were referred to Student
Life.
Hit & Run�A student was struck
at the intersection of Ormond Way
and 10th Street while attempting
to cross at the crosswalk. The stu-
dent was struck by an unidentified
white late model Chevrolet
Cavalier. The student sustained a
bruise to her leg.
Disorderly Conduct�A student
reported that objects were thrown
at his vehicle while he was driving
on Fifth Street north of Fletcher
Hall. The person throwing the
objects was identified and was
issued a campus appearance ticket.
Dr. ricuse and Dr. Darwick
� are pleased to announce the relocation of
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Animal Hospital
of Pitt County
From Greenville Boulevard to our new clinic at 107 TRADE ST.
(between Golden Corral dr Parkers Restaurant)
�Medicine & Surgery Small Animals � Farm Animals & Horses
� Boarding - Air Conditioned
756-0148 Niahts & Emeraencies 355-38
Nights & Emergencies
rifi
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ll





3 Thursday. September 25. 1997
The East Carolinian
the nation
Congress expected to approve funding for 30 helicopters
STRATFORD, Conn. (AP) Congress is expected to approve a defense package that includes funding for 30 heli-
copters and will help head off layoffs at Sikorsky Aircraft, Connecticut lawmakers say.
A compromise defense appropriations bill is expected be brought to the House and Senate on Thursday. That
bill will include funding for 28 Sikorsky Black Hawk and two Seahawk helicopters, members of the state's
Congressional delegation said Monday.
President Clinton's 1998 budget had included funding for only 18 Black Hawk helicopters, which threatened to
force up to 1,000 layoffs at Sikorsky's plant. Rep. Christopher Shays, R-Conn, said it is vital that Sikorsky get the
additional Black Hawk order.
General Electric expects to acquire
Houston-based competitor
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (AP) General Electric Co. has signed an agreement to buy a Houston-based gas turbine
competitor for S600 million in cash, according to a newspaper report today GE said buying Stewart & Stevenson
Services Inc. gas turbine division will give GE new reach into the oil and gas business, the Times Union of Albany
reported.
Stewart converts GE aircraft engine turbines into power sources for small electrical generation plants. The Texas
company, which employs 1,400 people, also serves and operates power plants and off-shore oil platforms.
It reported sales of $198 million in 1996, down 48 percent from $381 million in 1995, although the company
expects sales to rise this year.
The proposed acquisition is the largest for the Schenectady-bascd Power
Systems since it bought Nuovo Ptgnone of hah for $665 million in 1994.
11 is subject to regulatory approval.
Q
y
aro'u n d t. h
32 killed in fire in South China
BEIJING (AP) A fire swept through a shoe factory dormitory in southeast
China, killing 32 workers who were locked inside, a government official said today.
Four others were injured in the blaze early Sunday at the lihua factory in
Jinjiang. Fujian province, newspaper reports in Hong Kong said.
Among the injured was the wife of a Hong Kong businessman who owned the factory with two Chinese partners,
said a Jinjiang government spokesman who gave only his last name, Su.
WAT DOES A PIRAT6
LOOK LIKE ANYWAY?
Submit your artwork for the
new ECU logo contest!
Submit oil onJnoT
artworklogos to The
lEas' tinier Located,
second floor,
Publications BuWng
Deadline for entries is
October 12th. judging
w be done by

The owners fled after the fire, Su said. He said the dormitory was locked to prevent workers from stealing at
night.
Ming Pao Daily said neighbors broke the doors and windows, which were locked by steel bars, and freed 54 work-
ers.
Officials said the factory plant burned down four years ago but the owners did not improve fire precuations in the
new plant, the daily reported.
Huge World War II bomb found in Russian City
MOSCOW (AP) A man preparing to build a new house for himself unearthed a 550-pound aerial bomb from World
War II on Monday in the central Russian city of Voronezh.
Bomb experts had to blow up the explosive on site because its detonator was rusted almost ail the way through
and it could not be moved, said Alexander Svistovtsev, an Emergency Situations Ministry official in Voronezh.
The ITAR-Tass news agency said the bomb, buried 8 feet underground, was the largest of seven Wbrld War II aer-
ial bombs found and deactivated in Russia this year.
Voronezh is about 300 miles south of Moscow.
NASA astronaut to possibly go on dangerous mission
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) � NASA's chief reviewed two final safety reports Wednesday before deciding
whether to send astronaut David Wolf on a long and possibly perilous mission aboard Mil
Daniel Goldin was expected to make his decision late Wednesday, but not make it public until Thursday morn-
ing, just hours before space shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to leave for the decrepit Russian station on a night flight.
President Clinton was expected to support whatever decision NASA makes.
The space agency has never waited so close to a launch to make such a major announcement regarding an astro-
naut and his flight.
Wolf seemed unfazed by the rumors and speculation. He joked with his crewmates and gave a thumbs-up during
a gathering of friends and family at the launch pad.
"See you in four to five months he said.
Journalists address ethics
ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) � Now
here's a man-bites-dog story: A jour-
nalist who turns the recording
equipment off when the person
she's interviewing starts to cry.
"I am very unorthodox
National Public Radio's Susan
Stamberg told an audience at the
Newseum, the new museum of jour-
nalism. "I have no right making a liv-
ing off another person's misery
Where is the line between tenac-
ity and invasiveness? Between the
moving and the maudlin? Not all
reporters hound a princess, stir cyn-
icism or get things wrong, but that's
often the perception.
With its Journalist of the Day
program, the Newseum tries to nar-
row the divide between those who
report the news and those who con-
sume it.
Visitors file into the museum's
broadcast studio several times a
week to meet the press and "ask the
classical ethical questions of journal-
ism said Eric Newton, the
Newseum's "managing editor
People want to know about the
line between journalism and enter-
tainment, he said. They ask if
there's a little paparazzi in all jour-
nalists.
"They want to know quite a bit
about why journalists are pushy
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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 309 AM - 4 PM
T-ShirtsSweatshirtsPoloGolf Shirts fHatsv BooksComputer ItemsArt SuppliesGifts Posters
Student Stores
328-6731http:www.studentstores.ecu.edu
Sale held on the Student Plaza,
just outside the Store entrance
FREE Pumpkin Decorating Competition for first 30 Contestants!
FREE pumpkin for first 30 entrants No purchase necessary Many decorating materials supplied. Pumpkins must remain at table and will be
judged at 3:00 p.m. frizes for top 3 pumpkins Winning pumpkins mil he showcased at Dowdy Student Stores Others may be taken by "artists.
Congratulations to Anna Hayes
and Karen Morning! These two lucky Pirate fans won
the Double-Chance, Before & After Textbook Giveaway at the last ECl
Football game! They receive FREE required textbooks from Dowdy
Student Stores and ECU Vending, for their Spring 1998 ECU classes.
Pick up entry forms when you pick up student
tickets to the next home football game!
Aid
continued from page 1
approved by a certain date, the
federal fiscal year begins on Oct. 1
and the budget is supposed to be
approved by that time.
"I would think that with the
Oct.l budget deadline, there will
probably be action on it this week
or next Floyd said.
Floyd has written letters to the
North Carolina senators on behalf
of the Chancellor and the Board of
Trustees, asking them to support
the House of Representatives'
more favorable recommendations.
"We're trying to get our
Senators. Helms and Faircloth, to
support the House version of their
budget Floyd said. "We asked
our senators to support the House
version, because it's better for our
students
Surgeon
continued from page 2
his surgical tools. This new
surgery is conducted with video
cameras and is outside of the body.
These new tools allow surgeons to
make a small incision on the side of
the chest instead of opening up
the whole chest bone, as open
heart surgery would need. The
surgery allows for people to have an
in hospital stay of only three days,
compared to seven. The minimal-
ly-invasive surgery also decreases
the risk of infection, since the
opening of the body would be con-
siderably smaller.
"Many surgeons are calling me
to learn about these new tech-
niques Chitwood said. "I will be
traveling to Vienna to teach some
of these techniques.
"Right now the main thing I
am doing is teaching and adminis-
trating, but the most gratifying
part of my job is working with my
patients he added. "I also enjoy
teaching and working with the res-
idents of the Hospital
Chitwood formed the ideas for
new tools because there was a basic
need.
"One day, I was sitting around
and just started doodling. If you
have an idea for something, there is
always someone that can create a
prototype. If there is a need, there
is an idea, and a person that can
put it into reality said Chitwood.
It has been two years since
Chitwood has revolutionized the
minimally-invasive heart surgery.
Currently there have been 1,200
open heart surgeries at the hospi-
tal, 100 minimally invasive coro-
nary, and 45 minimally invasive
valve surgeries.
"I am not letting all this go to
my head. We earn our wings every
day. It is not what you are in life, it
is what you do and what you do
with your life. People say you are a
great guy, is that the worst thing
that you could believe?" said
Chitwood.
"Dr. Chitwood is finally seing
the fruits of his labor. He deserves
the recognition. He will be able to
serve his parients better through
his new developed techniques
said Dean Hallock.
In the end, Dr. Chitwood
seems very modest about his
surgery.
"Much help has come from my
friends and family, institutions and
early successes. We obtain our
goals by standing on the shoulders
of giants said Chitwood.
Correction
In Tuesday's edition the time listed
for the Red Cross blood drive was
listed incorrectly, the correct time
and date is Wednesday and Thursday
from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
I





mm
4 Thursday, Septimber 25. 1997
The East Carolinian
eastcearolinian
AMY L.ROYSTER Editor
CF.LKSTE WILSON MMagingEditor
MATT HMiF. MvWsflJUirwot AMANDA ROSS SportsEditor
JACQUELINE D. KELI.I'M KtwiEdnor TRACY LAI'RAOIl AomwtSporttEmt
AMANDA AUSTIN Aw.ltewEftW DAVID SOUTIIERLAND PrataMri Itaragw
ANDY TURNER Ota. Editor CAROLE MF.IU.E HndCeayEta
JOHN DAVIS AiwuaUfwyle Editor JOHN MURPHY Stiff IHosrrmor
HEATHER BURGESS Wir�Editor
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oumew
Who does the ECU administration think they are, anyway? Do they think they can play king
of the mountain in the surrounding Greenville community as well as here on campus?
When it was announced earlier this month that ECU was seeking an injunction against down-
town music store Skuliy's to force them to stop using their skull and crossbones logo with ECU's
purple and gold colors, many students were confused, to say the least. Businesses and organi-
zations all over town use purple and gold or various pirate or sea motifs in their decorating and
advertising. This is a college town, after all. What is so different about Skuliy's using these same
devices?
ECU's official position is that it is Skuliy's combination of school colors, along with the skull
and crossbones, that they are seeking to put a stop to. They also point out the skull and cross-
bones symbol is one used by ECU in the past as an official symbol, adding to their proof that
Skuliy's is trying to represent itself as affiliated with ECU and, in so doing, hop on the market-
ing bandwagon (although, of course, they don't admit to money being the primary motivation
for their actions).
To that reasoning we give the following responses: first of all, no one should be able to copy-
right colors. Secondly, the skull and crossbones logo is such an often-used, generic symbol we
don't believe ECU has the right to lay claim to that either, and they can hardly expect that no
one else in town is ever going to use it again. As for the school's assertion that "we were using
it first what are they, a bunch of preschoolers in the sandbox? Even if they were playing with
it first, they aren't anymore. Pee Dee the Pirate is now the university's official, recognized mas-
cot and symbol, and ECU needs to give up the ghost on the skull and crossbones logo.
Another, perhaps even more absurd development followed in the week after ECU's official
suit against the Skuliy's store. Pirate Underground, a part of ECU's Student Union, began using
a logo they had developed, a kind of school seal with a skull in the middle. They were told bv
ECU's powers-that-be they would have to discontinue use of the symbol.
Our first reaction to that was, why? They're not hurting anything. They're not trying to make
money off the logo.
ECU's official reason was that the seal said "East Carolina University" on the perimeter of the
seal, which was an obvious attempt to identify themselves with the University. Well, duh,
they're an University organization�who else are they supposed to affiliate themselves with?
They also said that they did not believe the skull symbol was an appropriate way for the
University to be represented. Apparently they're concerned that someone will take offense.
Get over it, ECU. That symbol has been used as a warning of poison, it has been used as a
pirate's flag, as a symbol of death, which we admit are all negative associations. But the symbol
has become so commonplace, so trite, that it really doesn't have those connotations anymore.
And, finally the money issue. Skuliy's has made a lot of money from their stickers and other
paraphenalia which show their skull and crossbones logo. Could it be that ECU is miffed that
they didn't think of marketing that symbol themselves? Could it be they are disappointed in the
marketability of Pee Dee the Pirate, and that is why there have been reports of new trademarks
being developed?
Whatever their official explanations for their actions in this situation, the majority of students
don't seem to get it. We at The East Carolinian agree. The University is being petty and selfish
in its claim that there aren't enough purple and gold colors or skull and crossbones symbols to
go around. And they may want to consider if they strike out at the businesses of this town, they
may regret it. Because while it is true this is a college town, and the businesses here make a lot
of profit from the business that ECU brings to Greenville, it is also true that those same busi-
nesses contribute to this school and its students. It's a partnership of sorts between the school
and the community in this town, and we don't understand why ECU is trying to spoil it just so
they can have it all.
OPINION
Mary
WEBB
Columnist
Opinion column writing not easy
k SUBPOOM F�OM
TUEl'a settle our or
COUZT If UE Write
OAV. fjAMES,
LETTER
to the Editor
Skuliy's lawsuit unjustified
Recently an article appeared in your
paper concerning the business located
in downtown Greenville called
Skuliy's. I want to add a few thoughts
to your article and perhaps raise a few
questions with the students and staff
at ECU.
The primary question I would like
to know is, is there a better way for
ECU funds and resources to be spent?
Do the students of ECU support this
kind of action against a local business
that has provided valuable and desired
services to the community for many
years?
It is, after all, your interest as stu-
dents that they (the ECU legal
department and the North Carolina
Board of Governors are claiming to
protect. I say claiming because I, for
one, take issue against any large cor-
poration that tries to squash other
businesses through insurmountable
legal action. It appears to many of us
in the community that ECU thinks
that when Skuliy's is faced with a bot-
tomless pit of legal action they will
have to discontinue doing business.
The owners of Skuliy's are named
Tom and Rebecca. They are a married
couple who have run a business in
downtown Greenville for 17 years.
They arc, for lack of a better term,
good people. They not only presently
hire ECU students, they have done so
for all those years mentioned before-
hand.
Of course the issue here is not
whether Tom and Rebecca are nice,
the issue is what, if anything, can be
done to bring this action by the unac-
countable powers at ECU to an imme-
diate halt? Fat chance, but here goes
some thoughts. If you think that ECU
should not be taking this action, then
it is your responsibility to take action
and make some phone calls. Please
call the Chancellor and Ben Irons at
328-6940 and tell them that you are a
student and you don't want your
money spent this way.
Paul Edwards
President,
Sunshine Management Group
LETTER
to the Editor
Space craft dangerous to mankind
The Russian Mars space probe
crashed to earth carrying plutonium
batteries. Initially, it was said to have
fallen into the Pacific Ocean. Later, it
was revealed to have scattered debris
over the Atacama desert in Chile and
Bolivia.
Now, in October there is the
scheduled Cassini probe will orbit
Venus twice and come hurtling back
at Earth to get the gravitational boost
to get to Saturn. What if something
goes wrong and it vaporizes in the
earth's atmosphere? What if the Titan
rocket carrying the Cassini probe
explodes on the launch pad spreading
radioactive dust over much of Florida?
Plutonium is one of the most dan-
gerous substances known. Dr. Helen
Caldicott, founder of Physicians for
Social Responsibility, has stated that
one pound of plutonium if evenly dis-
tributed among the Earth's popula-
tion would be enough to give every-
one lung cancer.
None of this is considered serious
enough by our free, independent,
objective and piercingly investigative
media to make the evening news.
They would rather talk about Tiger or
some other celebrity. I fear that this
may be just the prelude to nuclear
weapons in space and nuclear-pow-
ered rockets. Some very rich and pow-
erful men arc playing Russian roulette
with life on Earth and it is occurring in
absolute media silence. What an
Orwellian world it is becoming!
Gary Sudborough
Bellflower, Calf.
LETTER
to the Editor
SRC patron right to religious music
TEC has other regular
opinion colutnnistswe have
covered various topics like
parking problems, ordinance
regulations wedding dilem-
mas Taken together, these
columns paint a somewhat
accurate picture of the
columnists themselves.
If you are strongly opinionated, love
talking about anything and every-
thing and have lots of spare time,
then you too can be an opinion
columnist!
Well, this may come as a surprise
to some (especially my friends) but
there really is a bit more to the pic-
ture. Let me try and explain.
Media expert and author, Dough
Newsom, says that writing a column
is the "ultimate in journalistic free-
dom It lets the writer indulge in
creative expression and personal
opinion that would not be appropri-
ate in any other kind of story.
Rules can be broken and more
often than not, they are. Opinion
columnists talk about themselves and
others; they pass judgment and fre-
quently ask readers for their com-
ments and recommendations. As
Newsom says, "Columnists violate
most the accepted tenets of news
writing
TEC has other regular opinion
columnists besides myself. During
the last three semesters, we have cov-
ered various topics like parking prob-
lems, ordinance regulations, students
fees, wedding dilemmas, drug testing
and xenophobia.
As you can see, topics range from
the obscure and philosophical to sub-
ject-specific. And let's not leave out
the humorous as well as whimsical
pieces. Taken together, these
columns paint a somewhat accurate
picture of the columnists themselves.
To be honest, it's not easy finding
a subject to write about every week,
let alone one that will interest a read-
er. I usually take several informal
polls of my classmates which is very
helpful. Their input, opinions and
experiences are important as are the
two to three hours of research and
interviews I do for every column. Of
course, each columnist has hisher
own method and personal style.
Because of the sheer generality
and personal nature of opinion
columns, libel laws and factuality do
not figure very prominently. It's very
seldom that a column is not run. The
worst case scenario is if you have an
editor who is overly sensitive or just
plain afraid of going against the status
quo. A few editors don't fully under-
stand the role of opinion columnists
and are basically offended by the lati-
tude offered them. Sometimes, the
column is not printed if it contains a
racist attitude or language or if the
tone of the column is mean-spirited
and the view is skewered.
Either way, you are most likely to
step on some one's toes, bring a smile
to another's face, cause anger or even
elicit a response of "I can relate to
that
TEC's opinion columns were
recently discussed in one of my class-
es. The reviews were mixed�as
expected. Our pieces were described
as boring, okay, funny, really interest-
ing, informative and cynical. Some
were also said to be "totally sappy, too
personal and repetitive
Well, we try. The fact that stu-
dents are actually reading our
columns is wonderful. And that, in
my opinion, is the best part of all.
I would like to respond to the opinion
of Laura H. Boyd in the Tuesday,
Sept. 23 issue of TEC. I also work out
frequently at the Student Recreation
Center during the mornings. I am also
a taxpayer and a portion of my tuition
helped to fund the SRC and the
salaries of the employees, and I am
also a saint of God. I have heard on
one occasion a contemporary
Christian song. You felt that you had
to suffer through this preaching while
you and your spouse worked out.
Imagine how others feel as we work
out in the facilities that we helped to
fund. Where arc my rights to receive
the benefits of my hard-earned money
from the SRC? Vfe have to suffer
through the various secular music
artists who arc sending all kinds of
messages while we try to enjoy our
work out. Since you have brought it
up, let us sit down and reason togeth-
er. The song I heard did not favor one
religious faith over the other, it told a
testimony of how good God is and has
been to the artist. God is a universal
God and if you are serving anything
else, then you are serving an idol. I
want more Christian music to be play-
ing in the SRC so that I can enjoy my
work out as you want to enjoy yours.
To whom it may concern at the
SRC, we, the saints of God, are part of
ECU's srudent body. We have to
endure more than our share of the sec-
ular spirits on the campus every day,
so do not take the little things that we
have on this campus outside of the
organized groups. "Give in the name
of a prophet and receive a prophet
reward (Matthew 10:41). You do
not know how you may bless, encour-
age or inspire someone who may toe
down or need a little boost to get tjieir
day started right.
To all the other saints, Christians
and organizational leaders, let us take
a stand before it is too late. If we let
them take the small things that we
have gained, how long will it be before
they come after the bigthings? Look
out, ECU gospel choir, New
Generation and all other university
Christian fellowships of any denomi-
nations or non-denominations that are
designed to be a positive light to this
campus may soon be next on the
chopping block.
Gregory Monroe
Senior
Elem. Ed.
LETTER
to the Editor
Student petitions campus parking
In the last week, many of you have
heard my name andor have seen me
on the news. My name is David
Merrill. I am the person who has come
to many of your doors, asking for your
signatures on a petition that started
Friday, Sept. 12. The first results were
not visible until I appeared on the
news this past Friday night. Although
I did start the petition, it was not
entirely my idea. Jon Tinnirello sug-
gested the idea jokingly and we decid-
ed together to take this petition
around to be signed. He accompanied
me to every door. This will be the first
time his name has appeared in the
media.
If you park on campus, you pur-
chased a $96 parking permit. You also
know how hard it is to find a parking
space if you are a resident, let alone if
you are a freshman. You know that it is
not safe to walk alone on campus at 3
a.m. after getting off work. Now I ask
you, the student, where did your
money go? There is poor lighting, dis-
tant parking lots and buses that stop
running at midnight (I have been
told). Have you ever seen a police offi-
cer standing guard in an unsafe park-
ing lot at 3 in the morning with the
intent to protect your from that lurk-
ing assailant hiding behind a full-sized
truck or van? Have you ever noticed
how quicklv the commuter lot at the
bottom of College Hill floods after a
heavy rain? How about the ever-pre-
sent 520,000 luxury cars circling the
parking lots only giving parking tick-
ets so you, the consumer, can pay
more money to Parking Services? Now
I ask you again: where did you $96 go?
At the time of publishing this letter,
almost two weeks will have elapsed
since the gravel parking lot behind the
library was closed and there has been
no improvement or construction done
to the lot. Have any of you seen a
blueprint of this rumored parking
deck? I doubt it will ever come during
our stay at the university. I have news
for vou: The rich (the University and
Parking Services) keep getting richer
and the poor (students) keep getting
poorct
I might suggest that you do one or
more of the following: sign a petition;
attend vour hall counsel meetings,
contact the SGA; go straight to the
man. Call Dr. George Harrcll at 328-
6858. Rest assured you will never
reach him. His secretary has hung up
on me manv a time. As a joke, you can
always call I960. This is a real number.
They are offering to pay YOU $5.15 an
hour to work for Parking Services and
issue parking citations. The only catch
is that you must have experience.
David Merrill
Pre-medBiology
�Tfc"
�. '
WfJr. v-





5 Thursday. September 25. 1997
The East Carolinian
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DOWN
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sound
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01997 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
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46 Goes beyond
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6 Thursday. September 25. 1997

The East Carolinian

Abra Moore
Strangest Places
7 OUT OF 10
PAT Rl-ll)
S K ICI R W R I I I R
When I first arrived at Lilith Fair this
past summer I went to the area des-
ignated for the press conference and
one artist was already there mingling
with the reporters. At the time l did-
n't know who she was, in fact I only
knew she was an artist by her artist
pass. By the end of the conference
though, I knew she was Abra Moore
and knew that she seemed one of the
most carefree people I had ever seen.
This attitude carried over into her
ecletic live set on the second stage,
where she interacted with the crowd
and immediately won people over
with her disarming grin.
As it turns out Moore is no inno-
cent little girl standing on stage try-
ing to make friends. After being born
in California, Moore moved to New
York and, eventually, to Europe. After
playing clubs along England's coast,
Moore ended up at the University of
Hawaii. There she found herself in
the band Poi Dog Pondering, but she
left just before they signed a record
deal with Columbia.
After moving to Austin, Texas,
Moore ended up releasing an inde-
pendent CD produced by Iconard
Cohen's former guitarist, Mitch
Watkins. Finally getting signed to a
major label herself, Moore and
Watkins went back into the studio
and came on with the alternative-
popful album. Strangest Places.
The CD starts off with rhc first
single, "Four Lcai Clovei 'I lover"
has a pop lcat that buries itself ill
your head so that you'll find yourself
singing it weeks later. The lyrics,
however, are a lot deeper than most
pop songs with lines like, "You see
SEE ARBRA. PACE 7
Bjork
Homogenic
9 OUT OF TO
Generation X flicks hit Hendrix
Clerks, Mallrats and Empire Records are
showing as part of Mendenhall's Gen-
Xtra weekend
John I) win
nvh I s I LIKF.S I ll.t IIUMll
If life were a video game, if love songs
were the sounds you heard as your jet-
streamed along in a faster than light
spaceship, if the afterlife were an
amalgam of Nordic ice castles and
web pages, then Homgenic would be
your folk music.
Ever since her first solo album
Debut, Icelander Bjork has been push-
ing the envelope of modern pop
music with a force unrivaled since
David Bowie in the 70s. Allying her-
self with pop sculptors like Nelle
Hooper (U2, Madonna) and avant-
garde trip-hop artists like Tricky.
Bjork has in the past produced highly
original and ground breaking music.
She is, for example, the only musician
to date to have released � remix
album (Telegram) filled with songs
remixed toward more artistic ends
racher than a bunch of stale dance
remixes.
On Homogenic, Bjork is at her best
ever. Building on the momentum of
1995's Post, she has written an album
that reflects the touch of a master
craftswoman. rather than a rebellious
explosive experimentalist. Not to say-
that she isn't still pushing those
boundaries. Nearly every song
stretches on the combination of clas-
sical music and techno-pop. Like a
hybrid of Wagnerian opera and a video
game soundtrack, the passionate love-
songs burst static flowers of jarring
but somehow very real images.
Trapped in some deep violet
underworld, Bjork seems to li.iv�.
wrestled these disturbing ballads
from a sticky, scan, place inside her
heart, where love is not just a sweet
cotton candy feeling, but a matter of
blood, philosophy and rebirth. Not
that the songs are disturbing to listen
to. Quite the contrary, they are
achingly beautiful.
"Hunter" is a sharp manifesto
SEE BJORK. PAGE 8
AM)V Tl RXER
LIFEST1 I.I. EDI I OK
So, you're sitting there thinking, "Man, I'd like to go somewhere
this weekend where I'll be wrongly stereotyped and labeled like a
can of generic pea soup Hot diggity, you are in luck. Mendenhall
is hosting a Gen-Xtra weekend with three films that will appeal to
each and every one of us because we are all exactly the same. We
are as indistinguishable as a band of beige Buicks. We a
Generation .
I got you. I was just illustrating Gen X characteristic number
one: be as cynical and overly paranoid as possible. Really, there's a
decent lineup of movies coming to Hendrix Theatre that all the
cool cats have found to be super-keen-peachy-swell (you have to
forgive me I'm still trying to get the Gen-hipster lingo down).
Kevin Smith's Clerks and Mallrats, along with Empire Records are
the three pics chosen to represent what (Jen X cinema is all
about.
Of the three. Clerks received the best critical reaction and was
the biggest box office success. It tells the story of Dante Hicks
(Brian VI lolloran), a guy who has the misfortune of working at a
convenience store on his day off. His friend Randal (Jeff
Anderson) works at the video store next door and specializes in
being public-smart-ass number-one. Dante, meanwhile, is having
trouble with his girlfriend partly due to her fondness for fellatio,
but mainly because his ex is getting married. Crudeness. zaniness
and Silent Bob and Jay follow, and you the viewer are left without
an ass, because vou have proceeded to laugh it off during the
course of the film.
Mallrats was Smith's second effort. It was met with critical
panning and with Shannon Doherty's trip back to movies on the
USA network starring Judd Nelson or one of the Coreys. It was
pretty much exactly like Clerks except it was set in a mall and it
was in color. Guy (T.S.) screw up with girl (Rene). Guy (Brodie)
act crude. Guys (Silent Bob and Jay) serve no purpose but be
funny. I thought Mallrats was very funny, but it was not an "unam-
bitious, run-of-the-mill, student film" as the Slacker Movie Guide
called Clerks. It wasn't nearly that good.
I've never seen Empire Records all the way through. I just j
remember lots of pretty people whining. Not necessarily from
that movie, I just remember that image from somewhere. Hell, it
has Liv 'Tyler, some guy named Coyote Shivers and music by Evan
Dando. That's a big, stinking chalupa of Gen X goodness. Open
up.
Mallrats shows 'Thursday at 8 p.m and Saturday at 11 p.m;
Clerks plays Thursday at 11 p.m. and Friday at 8 p.m; Empire
Records shows Friday at 11 p.m. and Saturday at 8 p.m.
silent Bob
Veronica
Dante
Bike tour benefits
MS Society
The Cletks gang is coming to get you.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MIRAMAX PICTURES
WZMB revamps lineup
Campus station adds specialty
shows to attract more listeners
Ml CCA II SMITH
STAFF W R I I h R
Cyclists from all over Eastern North
Carolina will participate in a fund-
raising event that will bring hope to
some 2.100 families in the area whose
members are affected by multiple-
sclerosis and who are in serious need
of financial assistance this Saturday
and Sundav.
The Ninth Annual MS 150 Bike-
Tour is sponsored by the National MS
Society, an organizanon dedicated to
raising funds for research to find a
cure for MS and to provide services
for MS patients.
About 200 people, mostly between
the ages of 20 and 40, are diagnosed
with MS each week, keeping the toll
at one third of a million patients in
the I nited States alone.
A chronic disorder of the central
nervous svstem. MS causes such
symptoms as numbness, slurred
speech, impaired vision, loss of bal-
anee .tiid coordination aiul, in some
cases, paralysis.
The cyclists must pay a registra-
tion fee of $30 in order ro participate
in raising at least 5150 to aid the
National MS Society
The 150-mile bike tour will take
them from CM. Eppes Middle-
School in Greenville to ("amp Sea
Gull at the Pamlico Sound, where
they will spend the night, and back to
Greenville the following day.
Sixty percent of the funds raised
by the tour will help MS families in
Eastern North Carolina, and 40 per-
cent will go towards general research
on MS.
This year, six ECU students are-
making the trek in honor of their pro-
fessor. Dr. Heininger of the
Recreation and Leisure Studies
Department, who has been diagnosed
with multiple sclerosis.
Five of the cyclists are therapeutic-
recreation majors and none have any
previous experience in bike touring.
Amy Moore, Shelley Teachey .u.i
Larocca, Brooke Lane. Mickey
Crawford and Sheri Burnett have
teamed up to tackle the journey as a
group, although each of them are
required to raise SI 50 individually
Although the money totaling S900
for the entire group, does not need to
be turned in until October 2S, the
students .ne already hard at Aork
scouring the ECU campus for anyone
with a giving heart and an extra dollai
or two.
A carwash might become an option
later, but for now these students arc
simply asking others to give.
A BKlio Mi si
S I V I I VI k I I I H
Xtra low prices
1 � 2
X-Men
6 - 7
X-Files
8 9 10
This fall WZMB has come back better than ever and is
more in tune to what the students love to hear.
The station has revamped its lineup and changed its
slogan from "East Carolina's Alternative" to
"East Carolina's
College Radio
because alternative-
music is just a small
part of what the station
is broadcasting.
"Since we're here to
cater to ECU and there's
so many different types of y
people, it's like a giant melt-
ing pot said Dave Hennessy, the new Program
1 )irector of WZMB. "So instead of playing all these genres
here and there, w Inch wouldn't flow very well, we give each
type of music its ow n time slot in the evening, so those tans
of that type of music can tune in and listen to three hours
straight of metal or three hours straight of rap. and so on
In addition to specialty show favorites that students
have grown t love, such as tli- Roots Rock show. Club 91
Rap Attack, the Retro Show, the Greatful Dead Show, and
Irie FM, the radio station also carries the Ska Show, the
Super Funk and Soul Show, the Women's Only Hour and
Now Sounds.
Listenership is already up since the semester has start-
ed, and is looking to grow even larger. And as the audience
grows MB grows with it.
"('hib 91 is starting to take it to the next level, they're
getting some live interviews with such acts as Ilia
Mcoholiks. Were working really close with Walnut Creek
mphitheater, the Ritz in Raleigh, the BlockBuster
Pavillion in Charlotte, House of Blues in Mvrtle Beach.
Boat House in NorfolkJust about any show that comes
through there, we usually get ten to a dozen tickets to give
away said Hennessy.
The station has also increased the amount of live
remotes and free prize giveaways, and for the first time
ever they are broadcasting entire sporting events.
The faculty has been included in the ZMB equation as ,
well. :
"We have a real high faculrv listenership for the Blue
Note Cafe , from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday,
as well as the jazz show on the weekends Hennessy said.
Now Sounds is a three hour show dedicated to inde-
pendent music, namely good bands that aren't signed on to
big labels. The ska show plays ska dating from the roots of
Motown to the present, but tends to stay away from main-
stream ska such as No Doubt or the brand new Boss Tones.
Crossover is Christian oriented music. But it doesn't
play gospel type music,
the format tends to go
from rock to rap to
metal reggae chat ha'e
Christian influenced
themes and lyrics.
The- Super Funk and
Soul show features
funk sounds from the
seventies on back and blends them into a mix with the
smoother Motown sounds.
The World Music Show offers eclectic sounds from
across the globe, and the Farrot Head Show is strictly a
Jimmy Buffet Bonanza. The RFM show features a big
name DJ each week, miir. it up live with techno, rave
beats, trip-hop and electronica sounds.
WZMB also uITcrs news everyday on the hour, as well as
comedian interviews, sports ralk and campus news talk
shows every Wednesday.
The future for "ZMB looks large. They hope to one day-
be the billing station in all the ECL facilities that use
radio, such as rransit buses, Mendenhall and the Wright
Place, and perhaps even farther into the future, to be able
to hold a WZMB sponsored outdoor concert.
But the most important thing to the station, Hennessy
said, is you, the listeners.
We'd like ro lie rhe radio station that everyone on cam-
pus listens to





7 Thursday. Ssptsmbsr 25. 199?
id-style
The East Carolinian
- � fc-
Widespread tickets
go on sale today
mOViereview
Bandwagon finally takes the stage
ABRA
continued from page 6
7 OUT OF 10
JKNSIKKR LKGOETT
ST.UF WHITE
Widespread Panic will peform Oct. 24 at Minges.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CAPICORH RECORDS
Widespread tickets go on sale
today
Staff reports
Wake up now. Widespread Panic
tickets are going on sale this morning
to students at 8:30 a.m. at the Central
Ticket Office.
Widespread Panic will perform
Oct. 24 as part of Homecoming 97 in
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum.
Students can receive a reduced
"carry-bird" price of $16.50 a ticket
through Oct. 3. There is a limit of two
tickets per valid ECU ID. A floor-scat
wristband will be given to the first
1,300 carry-birders upon presentation
of their ticket on the day of show
between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Tickets will be available to the
general public through Ticketmaster
and the Central Ticket Office begin-
ning Oct. 6. Ticket prices will increase
to $18.50 at that time. All tickets will
be $20 on the day of the show.
The Central Ticket Office is locat-
ed inside of Mendenhall Student
Center. Its hours are 8:30 a.m to 6:30
p.m. Monday through Friday. Visa and
Mastercard are accepted. �
As far as movie genre goes, flicks about bands have never
fared well. Remember Spinal Tap How about Tie
Commitments Or even Satisfaction starring the oh-so-con-
vincing Justine Bateman? It's time for the genre of fiction-
al rock band docudramas to include a film that is not quite
so laughable.
Raleigh filmmaker John Schultz just might be the sav-
ing grace with his recently released film Bandwagon.
Bandwagon is Raleigh native Schultz's feature debut.
Schultz, who has worked on projects with Steven
Speilberg, co-produced the film with fellow UNC grad
Aryson Poole and put it into works with only $350,000. The
film wrapped over two years ago only to be screened once
in Raleigh and to make the rounds in various film festivals,
waiting in limbo for a distributor.
Bandwagon fellows the fictional band Circus Monkey,
tracing its origins in the garage and tentative first steps into
the cutthroat world of touring rock bands.
All four members of Circus Monkey are stereotypes but
well drawn ones. There's Kevin Corrigan as Wynn, the per-
petually stoned but incredibly talented guitarist; Matthew
Hennessey as Charlie, the drummer who talks incessantly
and always has something "deep" to say, Steve
Parlavecchjo as Eric, the bass player and tough guy who is
always the first to start a fight; and Lee Holmes as Tony,
the self conscious band leader who writes songs about "the
girl"
Circus Monkey plays fairly agreeable music compared to
their local competitors Spittle, a wretched metal band
played by the real life local group Tinsel. Bandwagon shows
Circus Monkey start out in
Charlie's mom's garage,
have their first disastrous
gig at a frat party and open
for a well known group at
the Cat's Cradle, attracting
the attention of Linus Tate.
Tate, played by Connells
lead singer Doug
MacMillan, is an under-
ground legend in the music
community who takes
bands under his wing and
leads them to a record con-
tract.
He signs on to be Circus
Monkey's road manager
and, as the mishaps accu-
mulate, he sits in the back
of the band's van with a Zen
like calm as he reads a thick
mysterious book.
MacMillan plays this part
like a pro and is definitely
one of the most interesting
aspects of Bandwagon.
Providing added interest
is the setting. Shot in
Connells lead singer Doug
MacMiliian jumped on
Bandwagon.
PHOTO COURTESY OF C0MNEUS
HOME PAEE
Raleigh and Chapel Hill in the late fall of 1994, local famil-
iarities such as The Brewery, Krispy Kreme, The Cat's
Cradle, the Rialto Theatre and Schoolkids Records are
found in almost every scene.
Bandwagon is a solid story about a group of musicians try-
ing to make it, but the heart of the movie lies in the ques-
tion of motivations. Why is Circus Monkey a band? Is it for
fame, money, girls or is it really for the music?
the girl in the pretty white picture
Well it's never what it really seems
The lighthearted pop sound con-
tinues throughout the CD on songs
like "Don't Feel Like Cryin and "All
I Want The main draw of Moore's
talent is her light, easy voice. She has
this impish sound that glides over the
music in a way that she could sing
about Dr. Kevorkian and make it seem
happy. For example, on the funk-blues
mix that make up the title track,
Moore weaves her voice around the
song giving, it a style that is truly
unique.
Probably the best thing about
Strangest Places is the fact that after
radio plays a song like "Four Leaf
Clover" 10 million times, it's still
good. And even if you do get sick of it,
there are plenty more songs to love.
For example, one definite highlight is
"Say It Like That A simple, sub-
dued guitar progression jn the back-
ground gives Moore just the right
forum in which to work her magic.
Another advantage for Moore is,
that her album is catching on slowly.
Instead of the meteoric rise experi-
enced by bands like Hootie and the
Blowfish, Moore's music and genre
are spreading slowly as her talent fil-
ters down from critics to radio. This is
allowing her to experience success
without being overwhelmed. Still,
Moore needs to be prepared because-
if her album ever gets the recognition-
it deserves, there won't be anymore
writers in press conferences wondet
ing who she is.
Pentecostal Tent Revival!
(in a real tent)
Inspired musk!
Annointed Preaching!
An Awesome Move of The Spirit!
come worship with us
and receive what god has for you
The tent is set up on Memorial Blvd. S. near Parkers Barbecue
but on the opposite side of Memorial.
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday ; Sept 24-28
Every evening at 7:30 pm except Sunday, 4 pm
For rides or questions contact: APOSTOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY
Go ahead and
Private rooms available

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8 Thursday
�ll
II
1
Shack iii !
September
15 Thursda
Mall Rut
Theatre
Pirate I nderj
10:45 p.m. in Mend i
Greenville Soi rs (i
Barnes and Nobli
t 'nderfw
s p m I lei drix
26 Friday
K, � � . show in
.ii
p.m. in
I lendrix I heater
I lie Umighrv Senators with Vlnce at The Vitk
Bakei .it Peasant's
I he Skellingtons m I irehouse Tavern
Mr. I. Kxpericnce at ,u - radle inhapel I lill
11 Saturday
Enipiri Reconl Mali Rah showing at 8 p.m. in
I lendris I heater
Level .ir Hrehouse Taven
Purple Sehoolbus at I he iru
Kuttphat ai Peasant's
Superchunk at (lat's radle in (lhapel I lill
29 Mondav
fria, a Continent Ritra , il l� -
� (through ' Kr. ; I
� ' � Facultv recital at H p.m.
in VI Fletcher Musk Hall
30 Tuesday
Liveja.ai llrehouse lavern
October
1 Wednesday
( lomcth Zone featuring Dave Parker and Mike-
West at The Attic
SEND 1 S INFO!
Bjork

filled with marching and searching, a
clash between the Oddeseyian search
for home and the Hindu searcl
release. "State of Emergency
original metaphor for the giddin
love, features Bjork showcasing her
expressive voice to i techno-ch
orchestra.
Ml of the orchestratioi s ai
svthesized though. I he I
Do you have an upcoming event that you'd like
listed m our It's Showtime column? If so. please String Octet provides the stirring
semi us information (a schedule would be nice) at: backdrops on several songs.
"Bachelorette" is hands-down the
Ir's Showtime best song on the album. Coming
co Lifestyle Editor like a Broadway show tune fed
The East Carolinian through a satellite on the fritz, the
East Carolina University song features some of Bjork's
.Student Publication Bldg. solid vocalizing to date. The music, all
Greenville, NC 27858
I
I
Illle I it
'
I
I �
I
NOWsounds
Tuesdays Q .3
12-3 AM on yu,7ua
WZMB
DRESS TO IMPRESS
Safe
off Brid.il Gowns
50 off Selected
:ktail and Formals
Sale Ends
September 30, 1997
rerms & Conditions Apply
Tuxedo � Prom & Spe ial I lecasion Formals
Wedding v Bridesmaid Dresses � Pageant Wen
Arlington Village, Greenville, Ni 27858
919 -M 171 1 � Fax 919 321-1719
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
Thursday, September 25, 1997
Blues Messengers
June Star
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
752-7303
"The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
NC's Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 1 at ECU and
Top 100 College Bars in the
Nation by Playboy magazine
October 1997
As Sc-
on MTV
TONIGHT Thursday Sept. 25
Jimmi's Chicken Shack
Balance
WITH SPECIAL
$1.50 domestics � $1.50 hi-balls
Friday 26
l
Almighty Senator
2 DdnClS Almighty Senators at Attic
2 ClllbS Baker at Peasants
adm.fo
both
Attic &
Peasants
Saturday 27

CiAST SHOWJVER1
Purple School Bus
$ .50 Busch Light bottles
ADVAr. : . � WA11AE

AST i - T MUSIC & VIDEO
� PUB � ATIIC
Thursday Oct. 9
DriviiV
n'Cry in'
EASl � '�' �� � ;
,
Treadmill Trackstar
???????????????????????�
GENERATION X-TRA WEEKEND
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 - 27
Vijt F!se B Did You Fxpect From The Director Of'Clerks
A GMMtKT nCTUKES REUftSt
Telling1-
Bunny
Bashing
And Morel
EJ� �HBO GRAMERCY
THURSDAY AT 8 PM
SATURDAY AT 11PM
Feared by Customen!
BOi .INGSTONE
The Comedy Event of the Year
.OS ANGHFl TIMES
"Irreverently Funny
and Boisterous
A Hilarious Look at th Over � the-Countr Culture 3
THURSDAY AT 11 PM
FRIDAY AT 8 PM
rhey ' but not selling out.
HR� QECOBi
I e" . Widn io ht
FRIDAY AT 11PM
SATURDAY AT 8 PM
OOt,
sjk For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted and are FREE to
"S�$$' Students, Faculty, and Staff (one guest allowed) withsvalid ECU ID.





9 Thursday. September 25, 1997
The East Carolinian
Pirates hope to get
on the right track
AM l) Ross
sI'iik I s KDITUR
This week the Pirates will take a break from game
dav on Saturday in preparation for Syracuse on Oct.
4
.After losing to South Carolina 26-0, the open
week will allow ECU to reevaluate what went
wrong in the loss and give them a chance to polish
up their game before they head to the Carrier
Dome.
Head Coach Steve Logan feels this team has to
get back into practice and work as a whole group.
He compared their feat to what they experienced
in spring practice.
"We need to continue to have basically spring
practice � just get the kids fundamentally sound
and get them to where they work as a unit Logan
said.
The ECL" running game has been an area of con-
cern, gaining just 154 yards on the grounds for three
games. Last year Scott Harley averaged 158.6 yards
per game.
This season Harley has been hampered by a sore
ankle that was sprained in the West Virginia loss.
Logan said Harley will take these r r weeks to heal
up his ankle and hopefully get it back to 100 per-
cent before they head up to New York.
The young offensive lines' performance has
been significant because with just one returning
starter, they are essentially learning their assign-
ments as each game goes by.
Logan said in Saturday's loss the offensive may
have looked worse than they were because when
one person performs badly, it reflects on the whole
line.
"Each play we would have an effort by four of
them, and then one young man would break down
and consequently it looked like we had a poor effort
all around Logan said.
But right now all Logan can do is coach their
mistakes and hopefully iron out all the kinks before
the start of the next game.
"It's just the nature of dealing with a bunch of
youngsters right now and we're going to have to grit
our teeth and hold on and we'll get it eventually
Logan said.
sjsaf.
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After suffering a disappointing 26-0 loss to South Carolina, the Pirates have an open
taking on the Syracuse Orangemen next weekend.
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
weekend to recover before

CONFERENCE
USA
This week's
Conference USA
games
Southern Miss at (19) Alabama
Cincinnati at Boston College
(ESPN2) 7 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota
Louisville at Oklahoma
(Fox Sports Net) 7 p.m.
D-FENCE
This weekend's home sports
schedule
The volleyball team will be in action on Friday, Sept. 26 at 7 p.m.
against William & Mary and on Saturday, Sept. 27 at 2 p.m. against
Virginia Commonwealth in Minges Coliseum.
The women's tennis team will host the Lady Pirate Invitational Friday,
Saturday and Sunday all day at tennis courts adjacent to Minges.
The men's soccer team will host Georgia Southern on Sunday, Sept.
28, at 2 p.m. at the field in Bunting Track.
The ECU Cheerleaders show their spirit by leading dedicated fans in a defense cheer.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Women's Soccer on a three game winning streak
S TEVE LOS K V
SENIOR WllTER
The ECU women's soccer team won their third
victory in a row on Sunday against the INC.
Asheville Bulldogs. For most of the game, ECU
was behind, but a last minute shot saved them
and they got the winning goal in sudden death
overtime.
"We played well against .Asheville said
women's soccer Head Coach Neil Roberts. "We
outshot them 25-12. We're starting to play bet-
ter soccer
Each game in the women's soccer team's win-
ning streak has been won by a shot late in the
game. Last Sunday, against Appalachian State,
sophomore Chrisy Bernabe shot the game win-
ning goal with three and a half minutes left.
Forward Jennifer Bush won the game last
Wednesday with a shot with two and a half min-
utes left.
Asheville was the first to get on the board on
Sunday. They scored a goal after eight minutes
of play The Bulldogs kept the Pirates from mak-
ing a goal in the first half, even though the
Pirates attempted ten shots, as opposed to the
Bulldogs' six. ECT"s goalkeeper, Amy Horton.
got three saves. At the half, the score was 1-0,
Asheville's lead.
Throughout most of the second half, neither
team scored. The Bulldogs had an aggressive
offense, but Horton's tight coverage of the goal
kept them from scoring. .Asheville far outshot
ECU until the last few minutes of regulation,
when ECU's offense exploded.
The tying shot was scored by freshman mid-
fielder Erin Cann. With two minutes left, she
made a beautiful shot, thanks to midfielder
Stephanie Wrass' assist. The ball flew from at
least twenty yards out, over the head of the div-
ing Bulldog goalkeeper. It was the first goal of
Cann's college career and Wrass' third assist this
year.
The teams went into sudden death with a
score of 1-1. Both teams went back and forth
without a goal on either side. The stalemate was
broken after almost seven minutes when Wrass
scored the winning goal. Horton finished the
game with nine saves.
"UNC .Asheville was a good opponent
Roberts said. "Beating them did a lot fot our con-
fidence. They're a top ten team in the South
.Atlantic region. They're a new team for us to
play this year
The women's soccer team played CAA oppo-
nent Old Dominion Wednesday.
"It certainly will be a big test Roberts said
on Tuesday. "Old Dominion was a tough match
last year. We took a 1-0 loss then. But the team
is feeling good and we're ready to play them.
Golf team struggles against
inconsistent play this season
JhKKMV ADKKSOS
mu �mitR
ECU's (iolf team looks to march a step closer to postsea-
son p!a l�nd.i as thev travel to Wilminurnn for the
IWBclvedcrc Intercollegiate Tournament.
The College of Charleston will be tlw Pirates main
competition in rhc tournament which begins on Monday
"They (Coll of harlcstont are what i would call a bub-
ble team. We need to beat them to put us in a position to
be invited to the NCAA rcmonals Williams said.
The Pirates hae not been playing well together as a
team of late. However; Head Coach Kevin Williams is opti-
mistic about the upcoming tournament.
"I fed confident we wUI play well Williams said.
In their last tournament, the Palmetto Intercollegiate
(ilassic. the Pirates had trouble gaining consistent scores
The team shot a horrible opening round 307, but followed
up with rounds of 288 and 2"J. respectively.
"We either play really good or really bad. We don't have
an in-between.We need to turn our bad round into an aver-
age round to be competitive Williams said.
Although the team is suffering from inconsistent play,
several team members are providing strong individual per-
formances Marc Miller. ,i sophomore from Dunn. N.C
played cspeci.iiK strong in the Palmetto (.lassie. He fin-
ished in a tic for first with rounds of 60-69-71 to to finish
seven under for the tournament. The tournament field
included three top twenty-five schools and last year's
( V Individual Champion ChariesWarren.
"That was huge He put himself in an excellent posi-
tion to make the N( AYs as an individual Warren said.
Williams was also quick to sing the praises of Miller's
leadership abiliry.
"Marc is a quiet guy that leads by example. He has a
super demeanor on the course. You can't tell bv his actions
whether he is hav in� a round of four under or five over
TRIVIAtime
Name the last time ECU
started off the season 1-2.
�JSlJPjfy OJJSOf
pan 'qfu&i tmq 'Aynq oj jsoj tOij
'P66l'gSTavjS ojjsofpua 'jduux
imq 'xftiq oj jso Lm t?66l
Mason
leads
determined
Lady
Pirates
LaKeya Mason
MIDDLE HITTER FOR LADY
PIRATES
Gavin p. smith
STFF WRI IKK
Are you a die-hard fan of some hard-
hitting volleyball? Perhaps you ven-
ture out to
find a sand pit
or a court and
assemble with
your afternoon
cohorts for a
not-so-friendly
spike match of
your own.
Disappointed
that sand and
summer are
fading? Then
you should put
on something
purple and
gold and catch
a Lady Pirate Volleyball game. With
this year's schedule, you'll be
exposed to some heavy-hitters of the
college volleyball circuit. The Lady
Pirate team faces a tough schedule
this year, including many ACC and
CAA rivals.
While you're at one of the home
games, keep your eye on LaKeya
Mason. Mason, a junior transfer from
North Carolina A&T, has earned a
starting position as middle hitter for
the Lady Pirates.
Mason started her college career
at NC A&T as an industrial engi-
neering major. But when transferring
to ECU, some changes had to be
made.
"I had to start all over Mason
said. "I was an industrial engineering
major at A&T but ECU didn't have
that as a majot here. I am now a
BiologyMath major
When asked about life here at
ECL Mason said, "Last semester
was completely different from what
I experienced at A&T. I like it a lot
better this semester definitely
feel more at home
Not only does Mason feel at
home at ECU, but she also feels at
home on the team as well. On Friday,
the Lady Pirates will face William &
Mary at home. "I think if we pull
together we'll be just fine Mason
said.
"We have a lot of talent, and a lot
of good personalities on the team.
We are all out on the court to per-
form as a team
Mason also had her thoughts
about the upcoming home game on
Saturday against Virginia
Commonwealth, as well as the test
of the season. "I've never seen them
(VCU) play before, but I expect
every team that we would play from
then on are on our level or above
Mason said. "We will have to step up
for them
One team they will definitely
have to step up for is George Mason
University. The coach and return-
ing players have said that George
Mason will be a tough team to face
Mason said. The first meeting is
October 4th at George Mason, but
you can catch this showdown at
home October 31st.
Mason intends to graduate this
vear. As far as her academic work is
concerned, she is doing fine. .As far as
business on the volleyball court is
concerned. Mason said. "I just want
to win





10 Thursday. September 25. 1997
0
The East Carolinian
Syracuse reviews spitting
incident
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) Neither
Syracuse senior linebacker Antwaune
fends nor university athletic officials
would comment today about a spit-
ting incident involving Ponds and a
Tulane coach.
The incident occurred right after
Syracuse's 30-19 victory Saturday
night at the Carrier Dome and was
captured on videotape by a television
news crew. "We could not or would
not make a statement until we have
talked to allparties involved coach
Paul Pasqualoni said in a statement
released by the athletic department.
Ponds could not be reached for
comment and the university did not
make himavailable.
The incident took place after the
game ended with a 98-yard intercep-
tion return by Syracuse's Tebucky
Jones. On the play, Syracuse defen-
sive back Rod Gadson was cut down
from behind by Tulane's John Wilson.
The play drew a penalty flag for clip-
ping and resulted in a knee injury to
Gadson.
While most Syracuse players
rushed to the end zone to congratu-
late Jones, some rushed to attend
Gadson, including Ponds. Pasqualoni
also stormed the field to argue with
game officials about the play.
A shouting match broke out
between the two teams and soon
threatening gestures followed before
the sides were separated. Ponds is
shown on the videotape spitting on
Tulane strength and conditioning
coach Mike losia.
Possible pairings for the
U.S. Ryder cup team
SOTOGRANDE, Spain (AP) U.S.
captain Tom Kite, who has been very
tight-lipped about the pairings for his
team, gave his first glimpse into pos-
sible teams.
One tipoff was who teamed up in
the money matches. Davis Love 111
and Fred Couples, a very successful
pairing in both the Ryder Cup and the
Presidents Cup, were in the same
foursome. Love and Justin Leonard
piavcd Couples and Brad Faxon.
Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara
played Scott Uoch and Lee Janzen,
and the third group had Tom Lehman
and Phil Mickelson playing with Jim
Furyk and Jeff Maggert.
Kite insists he still might change
his mind about some pairings. Kite
also said he'll likely switch off teams
for alternate-shot and better-ball.
Meanwhile, Woods said his father's
anger over not being allowed on the
team plane has passed and that Earl
Woods will be watching the Ryder
Cup on TV
Monty moves well clear
after runner up finish
VIRGINIA WATER, England (AP)
Colin Montgomerie's second place
finish in the British Masters on
Sunday opened up a huge lead for the
Scot on the European PGA Tour
money list.
Montgomerie, one of Europe's
Ryder Cup stars defending the trophy
against the United States at
Valderrama Friday through Sunday,
collected dlrs 133,312 after a course
record final round 63 at the Forest of
Arden and tops the list with 849,003.
Darren Clarke's 12th place finish
moved the Northern Irishman above
two more Ryder Cup colleagues,
Bernhard Langer and Ian Woosnam,
to second. The dlrs 19.433 Clarke
gave him a total of 719,137 from 23
European Tour events. Langer, who
has dlrs 709,916, dropped to third and
Woosnam, who totals 708,366, is
fourth.
New Zealander Greg Turner, who
won the tournament and collected
dlrs 200,000, jumped 56 places to
19th on the list with a cumulative
total of 329,760.
Leading American is Jay
Townsend, who places 86th with dlrs
110.596
Three Arizona State foot-
ball players have been
cited for underage drinking
TEMPE, -Viz. (AP) Three Arizona
State football players have been cited
for underage possession and con-
sumption of alcohol.
Campus police responding to a
disturbance at a party cited freshman
tailback Larry Montgomery, sopho-
more cornerback Andre Smith and
sophomore safety-
Phillip Brown, all 19, after
smelling alcohol on their breath and
finding an open bottle of gin in
their car.
The police report said
Montgomery, of Diamond Bar,
Calif, also was cited for an out-
standing warrant for possession of
alcohol and that a fictitious license
in his possession was impounded.
Smith, of Mesa, and Brown, of
Bakersfield, Calif are reserves;
Montgomery has been sidelined
following surgery for removal of a
bone chip from one leg.
Coach Bruce Snyder has yet to
decide whether the arrests will
affect their team status, said
spokesman Mark Brand.
The New York Rangers
considering making offer
for Buffalo
BUFFALO, N.Y (AP) The New
York Rangers are considering a deal
to acquire Buffalo Sabres captain
Pat LaFontaine, who is trying to
come back from a serious head
injury.
Rangers' officials have examined
the structure of LaFontaine's con-
tract and the possibility of insur-
ance coverage. The Buffalo News
reported. Trie newspaper, quoting
an unidentified source close to the
Rangers operation, said New York
president and general manager Neil
Smith was " 'exploring the options
on LaFontaine
Smith, who was with the
Rangers for an exhibition game in
Calgary, Alberta, on Monday night,
declined comment, according to
New York City area newspapers,
but he was pictured as being very
interested by Newsday, which
reported today that the Sabres had
contacted the Rangers about
LaFontaine.
The Rangers want to fill the ros-
ter spot left by center Mark
Messier, who left for the Vancouver
Canucks as a free agent. Sabres
general manager Darcy Regier said
he had been contacted by a number
of teams about the 14-vear veteran.
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Competition fierce for Ryder Cup title
'7- match play it doesn V
really matter how strong a
team it is or how weak a
team it is, believe that if
Seve (Ballesteros) gets his
pairings right then any
team ran xcin this
Ian Woosnam
SOTOGRANDE, Spain (AP) �
Three of the tour major champi-
onships this year were won by mem-
bers of the l.S. Ryder Cup team.
None were won by European team
members.
Eight of the top 13 players in the
world rankings are on the l.S. team.
One member of
the F.uropean
team is ranked
that high.
The U.S. team
has hot players in
Jim Furyk, Justin
Leonard and
Davis Love III.
It has an
intimidating play-
er in Tiger Woods.
And it has
unflappable vet-
erans in Fred
Couples, Mark
O'Meara and Tom
Lehman.
Europe's high-
est-ranked player, Colin
Montgomerie, once again disappoint-
ed in the major championships when
he finished second in the U.S. Open,
then played poorly in the British
Open at Royal Troon. the course on
which he was raised.
Europe's most intimidating player,
Nick Faldo, is coming off his worst
year ever in the major championships.
.nd Europe's squad was rattled by
the removal of Miguel Angel Martin
from the team, a situation just settled
Tuesday when he agreed to return as
a non-playing member.
So how could Europe possibly
keep the Ryder Cup?
"In match play it doesn't really
matter how strong a team it is or how
weak a team it is Ian Woosnam said
Tuesday. "I believe that if Seve
(Ballesteros) gets his pairings right,
then any team can win this
Woosnam, playing in his eighth
Rder Cup, is a perfect example of
the beauty of team play and the
unpredictable nature of match play in
this competition.
Woosnam has never won a singles
match in the Ryder Cup � losing five
and halving two. Yci he has four wins
and two halves in nine alternate-shot
matches and has won
nine better-ball match-
es and halved another,
losing only once.
"It's all about getting
players to play together
who can flow together
and score well togeth-
er Woosnam said.
"That's the secret. I
think
In no other golf event
do so many great play-
ers hit so many bad
shots. In no other golf
event is the pressure as
intense. And in no
other golf event is as
much dependent on
team play as it is in the Ryder Cup.
It is truly an event where the sum
of the parts can be greater rhan the
individual components.
"I think on paper we are the
underdogs, and although we are the
defending champions, they look
stronger than us Bernhard Langer
said Tuesday. "But in match play, any-
thing can happen
Throw in the quirkiness of the
Valderrama course � which the
Europeans know much better than
the Americans � and the pro-
European gallery and this Ryder Cup
has all the makings of an upset.
There is one other factor that
could help the European team
squeeze out the 14 points it would
need to retain the Ryder Cup on a tie
or the 14 12 needed to win it out-
right � Ballesteros, the F.uropean
captain.
If any captain could be worth the
extra point that could decide the
(!up. it is Ballesteros.
"Seve is very emotional and very
excitable. Woosnam said. "He'll be
running around like a headless chick-
en. 1 think. That's good, and for the
young guys to see someone so excited
like that just might give them a buz.
as well
And if that happens, the
Europeans just might give the United
States a surprise.
If Tuesday's practice pairings were
anv indication. Ballesteros will try to
use his veteran players to ease his five-
rookies through the pressures of
Ryderup play
Montgomerie, playing in his
fourth competition, played with new-
comer Darren Clarke. Faldo. compet-
ing for a record 11th time, played
with rookie Ignacio Garrido.
Woosnam and Langer both also
went around with rookies, the
Welshman playing with Lee
Wcstwood and the German paired
w ith Thomas Bjorn.
The two Swedes � Jesper
Parnevik and Per-1 Irik Johansson �
played together, despite the fact that
Johanssons appearance in 1W5 is
their only Ryder Cup experience.
Jose Maria Olazabal and
Costantino Rocca. two veterans,
rounded out the F.uropean practice
pairings.
"The experience of the seven
players, plus the new energy of the
other five players makes it very posi-
tive Ballesteros said. "I don't think
I could have a better team
There is that word again � Team.
On paper, the I nited States looks
much stronger. But match play and
the cooperative efforts of alternate-
shot and better-ball can hide a lot of
weaknesses.
The Americans must remember
that the Ryder up is played on grass
� not on paper.
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11 Thursday. September 25, 1997
SUflTlS
The East Carolinian
Hurricanes hand over 3-0 loss to slow-starting Red Wings
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) � After
four days of practice and individual
work, coach Paul Maurice expected
his Carolina Hurricanes to start slow
against the Detroit Red Wings.
He was right on the money.
Kris Draper scored 57 seconds into
the game on a breakaway and Chris
Osgood stopped 34 shots � including
18 in the third period � as the Red
Wings beat the Hurricanes 3-0 in an
exhibition game Tuesday night.
"We got out of the gate slow
Maurice said. "When you take four
days and do some teaching we're not
at game speed because you can't
teach at game speed, you've to slow it
down and walk through things
The pace picks up a bit now for
the Hurricanes, who play four games
in five days, including a rematch with
the Red Wings in Detroit tonight.
"After 10 minutes of the first peri-
od I actually was pleased with the
game Maurice said. "It's a horrible
thing to say when you lose that you
were pleased with the game, but from
what I was watching there was a lot of
things in the neutral zone that is
starting to get a little clearer in our
player's minds
Osgood's shutout was preserved
when Steve Rice's power-play goal in
the third period was disallowed
because of a Carolina player in the
crease.
"Chris Osgood was outstanding
said assistant coach Barry Smith, who
minded the bench while veteran
coach Scottv Bowman roamed the
stands. "He made saves when we
needed them and he kept us in the
game.
"I think he was the difference.
They had some good heat on us and
they pressured us pretty good, they
were forechecking and rolling around
pretty good. They just didn't get the
puck by us
Draper and Osgood were two of
just a handful of Detroit's top players
who made the trip, but the defending
Stanley Cup champions (3-2-0) were
still able to dominate the Hurricanes
(2-2-1) with their tough forechecking.
"I'm way ahead of where I'm usu-
ally at at this time Osgood said.
"Just the way I feel on the ice com-
pared to years' past. A shutout is more
for the mind going into the regular
The Firehottse Tavern
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Some good
forechecking
near center ice
led to Draper's
opening goal.
Anders Eriksson
fed the center
near the blue
line and he
broke in alone
on Sean Burke,
beating him
between the
legs for his first
goal of the pre-
season.
Carolina's
Steve Chiasson
hit the crossbar with a shot late in
the second period, but by that time
"I think he was the differ-
ence. They had some good
heat on us and they pressured
us pretty good, they were
forechecking and rolling
around pretty good. They
just di. in't get the puck by
us
Coach Barry Smith
it was 2-0. Darryl Laplante capital-
ized on a 2-on-l
break, keeping the
puck despite Steve
Halko's tight
defense and flip-
ping his first goal of
the preseason over
Burke's right
shoulder. Tim
Taylor and Jamie
Pushor assisted on
Laplante's goal.
Geoff Sanderson
also had a pair of
scoring changes
seconds apart early
in the third period,
but one of his
close-in shots was
deflected over the
net and he partially fanned on
another shot just a few feet in front
ater
envillv
Friday, October 3rd, 19977:00pm
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum
ECU Campus, Greenville, NC
iAmmmmjcK
with Special Guest Evangelist
RANDY HOGUE
Randy has preached in over 750 different churches in 43
stiles throughout North America, as well as China,
Russia. India and several other foreign countries. Being a
victim of drug abuse and saved after attempting suicide
with a drug overdose. Randy knows how to deal with (he
many problems facing today's generation. Over 1000
public high schools have allowed him to speak on drug
abuse and suicide. His two books, Dmm The One Way
Street, and Preventing Youth Suicide, have been effective
in his outreach.
Special Prelude
Mini Concert by
Movin' Up Quartet
6:30pm
Mas Choir of Area
Churehes
of Osgood, who was able to kick it
away.
Syivain Cloutier's wrap-around goal
with 13 12 minutes left closed the
scoring for the Red Wings.
The Red Wings didn't get out of
Carolina without a pair of injuries, one
of which could be serious. Thomas
Holmstrom left in the first period with
a foot injury, while Kirk Maltby injured
his left shoulder in the third period.
The team is hoping Maltby's injury
isn't a separated shoulder.
"Hopefully he heals fast Smith
said of Maltby, one of the team's gritty
left wingers. "He's one of our bettet
forwards with the things that we do
with him. You don't hear his name
much but he reallv helps our team
The crowd of 7.079 in the 21,000-
seat Greensboro Coliseum was the
largest of the preseason for the
Hurricanes after three games.
The Hurricanes' mascot had a
seizure inside an ice-resurfacing
machine moments before his sched-
uled debut.
Phil Madren, 32, dressed in a hog
costume, had the seizure while laying
inside the Zamboni machine waiting
for his big entrance before the NHL
team's exhibition game against
Detroit, team spokesman Chris Brown
said.
-Z Video
i
i
Carolina East Centre 5"3l
Greenville, NC 27834 � j
(across from Ryan's Steak House)
756 -2324
.990 Rentals
This Event Is Proudly Sponsered By The Following Churches
� Unity � Trinity � Emmanuel
� Temple � Grace � Faith, Goldsboro
� Parkers Chapel � People's � Bethel, Kinston
� Belvoir
Copyright 1997- The kroaer Co. Items Prices good in CreenvSe. We
items & PrtaMGood
Brass Praise Band
Bring in this ad and
Rent 1 getl free
(of equal or lesser value)
THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE AND
THE WALLACE BARR ENTERTAINMENT GROUP PRESENT
WIDESPREAD
reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to dealers.
�thru SWt 27.1997 wM Tttuf.K l frUe I Srt.27 I
FOOD & DRUG
Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi, Mountain Dew,
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
2-Uter Bottle
Always Good. Always Fresh.
Always Kroger.
YourTctiValueLeadek
Four 2-Ltrs. per customer
at this pnee please.
IK CONCERT, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24 AT 8:00 PM
WILLIAMS ARENA - MINGES COLISEUM
As an extra Homecoming present, only ECU students will have a
full week to purchase reduced price "early-bird" tickets for $16.50
each (limit 2 per valid ECU ID). Plus, a floor-seat wristband will be
given to the first 1300 early-bird ticket holders upon presentation
of their ticket on the day of the show from 3:00 - 7:00 pm at
Minges Coliseum.
The early-bird tickets go on sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall on Thursday, September 25 at 8:30 am and will
remain on sale only to ECU students until the start of Fall Break
on Friday, October 3.
On Monday, October 6, the student price of the ticket increases
to $18.50 and tickets will be available to the general public
through Ticketmaster outlets and the Central Ticket Office. All
tickets on the day of the show will be $20.00.
Assorted Variftia Frozen
kffcj j $��-$�
FamFtesh TwtmRich
Chens Sticks -
Buy One Get One
TwanRSh
Piilsbury Hungry Jack
Cinnamon &
Sugar Biscuits
10-oz.
Ground Fresh Daily
Ground
Chuck
Pound
All Varieties & Sizes Oscar Mayer
Fun Pack Lunchables
or lunchabte Sandwiches
In The DeliPastry Shoppe
Single Topping
Panavino
12" Pixxas
Assorted Varieties
Wishbone Dressing
Buy One Get OneII j Buy One Get One
Lays
Potato Chips
6-oz. i
�"v
Dote
Golden Ripe 21
Bananas '
.lbs.
v PRESENTED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 328-6004 OR 1 800 ECU-ARTS
OR VISIT OUR HOME PAGE AT: www.ci5.ecu.eduStdd.ntUaioiiTHEHOMEPftGE.btiiil.
Feed your brain
GET TO KROGER
-
pfif �






12 Thursday. September 25, 1997
classifieds
For Rent
R1NGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ASAP FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED, S220 a month, 14 utilities. Call
Deanne, 355-2285.
AWESOME BEDROOM WITH HUGE
brick fireplace only $200 a month at
Tar River. Moving - Need someone to
take over lease ASAP. Male or female.
Call Shawn, 830-6882.
Security Deposit
with pftMwnUMoR of this coupon, oftar �atpko�
SOCW7 not vrj with My other coupon
WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 10f 8 QedroorTW. I
� 1 bath, range, refrigerator, tree wateffsewer, i
washerrjryer hoekups. free basic cstbfe in'
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from;
�campus, ECU bus services.
-LANGSTON PARK: 2 tWdfOOdU, 1 tWthi
irange, refrigerator, dishwasher, freei
iwalersewer, and baste eaWe, appro. 9001
sq : ft washerdryer hookup, central'
heatair, 6 blocks from campus.
COMPLETELY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
�AM Properties have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
rroperty
4
west
GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING 1
male housemate. S186.00month plus
13 utilities. Located within walking
distance from campus. Call Kevin at
561-7218, leave a message.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
PLAYERS Club Apts. Split expenses
14. Call Melissa at 321-7613 for more
information.
NEW TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX.
Minutes from Greenville. $385 a
month. Washer, dryer hookups. Call
day 551-7810; night 321-2329.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
PLAYERS Club Apts. Split expenses
14. Call Melissa at 321-7613 for more
information.
GREAT DEALI ONE BEDROOM effi-
ciency for rent at Ringgold Towers,
S275month. Fully furnished. No secur-
ity deposit. Free water and sewer. For
more Info, call 758-3635.
ROOMMATE WANTED: MALE OR
female. 2 bdrm. apt. $175 a month plus
deposit 12 phone and utilities. Need-
ed ASAP. Call 758-4325. ask for Nikki.
6 ROOM HOUSE, $400 monthly.
Perfect for college men. Call 746-7538.
onogoment
Aootnorc 4 Kortot Houas
For Sale
�i
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM apartment
ONLY $235.00 per month, on Cotanche
Street directly across from new ECU
Rec Center. MOVE IN NOW with
$100.00 security deposit. Call 758-
1921. ask for Chuck.
FREE UTILITIES. 1 BEDROOM.12
block from camps on Holly St. Cats al-
lowed with deposit. Rent $305 a
month. 757-9387.
ONE BEDROOM DUPLEX WITHIN
walking distance of Campus One
bedroom central heat and window air.
Convenient front door parking for
$250.00. PETS OK! Call 830-9502.
ADVERT.
Hit y��rt
tin
castcaroli
APPLE POWER MAC 7500100 for
sale. 24 MB RAM, 500 MB HD, 4X CD
ROM, extended keyboard, 16" Apple
monitor, 14.4 Zoom modem, loaded w
graphic design programs! $1650. Call
321-1440.
SAMICK ELECTRIC GUITAR (VAL-
LEY Arts Custom) Fender Bullet re-
verb practice amp. Diamond Back Out-
look bicycle. Sony Discman CD player
and accessories. 756-9283.
SPECIALIZED ROCK HOPPER Bl-
CYCLE for sale. 6 months old. Paid
$500. asking $250. Includes U-lock.
Call 393-7162, leave a message.
1995 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2-DOOR,
purple, 5-spd, ac, CD player, tinted
windows. Will take best offer. Must
sell. Call 757-2037.
i the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1827 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-3526
Services: Worship 11 a.m
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED 8
FRIENDS ARE MADE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF CHRIST
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE
752-6376
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m 6
p.m. Sunday: 7 p.m. Wednes-
day
WE WELCOME YOU! LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAY
FROM HOME
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Corner of Crestline Blvd. &
Greenville Blvd.
756-6545
Services: Bible School 10 a.m
morning worship 11 a.m
evening worship 6 p.m.
REACHING OUT TO
GREENVILLE WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)
756-6600
Services: Sunday School 9:45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAY
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 A.M.
EACH SUNDAY
THE MEMORIAL
BAPTIST CHURCH
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
756-5314
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinner
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHER
STUDENTS FOR AWESOME
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANT
WORD
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
752-1898
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP & SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
ECU CAMPUS
ST. JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
752-6154
Services: Worship-Sunday
8:30 a.m 11 a.m Sunday
School 9:45 a.m.
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS
ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
A VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FOR INSPIRATION
UNITARIAN UNIVER-
SALIST CONGREGA-
TION OF GREENVILLE
131 Oakmont Drive
355-6658
Services: 10:30 a.m. each
Sunday
A CHURCH GROWING IN
CHRIST. CARING FOR PEOPLE.
PROCLAIMING THE WORD
GREENVILLE CHRIS-
TIAN FELLOWSHIP
1411 S. Evans Street
752-2100
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
SINGLE VISION-PBCS
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY;
ECU STUDENTS B SINGLES
WELCOME
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST
CHURCH
1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-2822
Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
10:45 a.m 6:30 p.m
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
COME AND JOIN US IN
PRAISING THE LORD!
SYCAMORE HILL
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
226 W. 8th Street
758-2281
Services: Every Sunday
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. Student discounts. Finance for
less than $35.00 a month. Free carry-
ing case. Call 355-7057.
MOVING- WORK OUT AT home with
Soloflex, $500 firm. Small dresser per-
fect for dorm room, $40. Free- 34 lab,
14 dusky, black male dog. 355-3539.
MAGIC THE GATHERING SIN-
GLES-Buy, sell, or trade game playing
as space allows. Call 752-1621 after
5:30 p.m.
AKC DOBERMAN PUPPIES FOR
sale. 830-9078. $200
NEED A BIKE? PERFECT campus
commuter. Two month old Mountain
bike with Shimano parts. Brand new
condition. $50. 931-0975
MUST SELL) COUCH, $75. Moun-
taln bike, $275. Men's 10-speed bicy-
cle, $50. Please call 355-4149 or 756-
5332.
1987 CHRYSLER LEBARON SPORT
car, 84,000 miles, good condition.
$2200. Call 746-7538.
12 INCH RECORDS FOR sale. Hip-
Hop, Rap, R&B Reggae. Perfect for
D.Js. Call John at 752-4715 and leave
message. Serious Inquiries Only! Also
have house.
Help Wanted"
ANDY'S CHEESESTEAKS &
CHEESEBURGERS will be opening 2
new locations in Greenville. Applica-
tions will be taken at our Plaza Mall lo-
cation between 2-5 pm M-F. No phone
calls please.
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS
WITH knowledge of Soccer, wilt train.
Must have transportation. Work on
Saturdays only. Call Rita at 830-4216.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics, Office of Student
Development is currently hiring full-
time ECU undergrad and graduate
students to tutor student-athletes in
the following subject areas: CHEM
1120, 2750; BIOL 1050, 1051; EXSS
3850; GEOG 1000, 2200; ECON 3144,
3030, 3960. Minimum 3.0 GPA re-
quired. Call 328-4550.
CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR MY six-
year old daughter. Need energetic,
creative person to pick-up at Overton's
afterschool, keep in my home. Would
love experienced, flexible Individual.
Call 523-3417 or 627-9199, ext. 105.
SALES OPPORTUNITIES: BRO-
DY'S IS accepting applications for ad-
ditional associates in: Junior Sports-
wear and Young Men's. Flexible sched-
ulesclothing discount. To get a head
start on your fall wardrobe or the holi-
day shopping seasons, apply at Cus-
tomer Service, every Monday-Thurs-
day, 1-5 p.m Brady's, The Plaza.
WAREHOUSE HELP NEEDED.
MORNING and afternoons. Apply in
person at the Carpet Bargain Center,
1009 Dickinson Ave.
Roadway Package Syctam
Part Time
$7 00hr. Loading and unloading trailers and vans
3AM- 8AM. Monday - Friday
Tuition Assistance Ava�0le
Applications Available at 2410 United Dr in the
Industrial Park, Greenville
�1 CAMPUS
FUNDRAISER
Raise all the money your group
needs by sponsoring a VISA
Fundraiseron your campus.
No investment & very little time
needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for information today.
' Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
rnr�
nss Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertise
with us in
The East
Carolinian.
THANKS TO THE T-BIRDS of EN for
showing us Pink Ladies how to have a
great time. We enjoyed dancing and
laughing at "The one who would not
sit down Who says holey jeans
aren't in style? Until next time, the sis-
ters and new members of Delta Zeta.
DEAR ZETA SISTERS, THANKS for
the wonderful time Friday night. The
Brothers of Phi Kappa Psi.
SIGMA NU: CONGRATULATIONS
TO the Chi Class: Adam Harris, Will
Mclntosh, Jay Miller, Chad Suygs. and
Rob Williams. Your journey has just
begun.
DELTA ZETA. THANKS FOR chlliin'
at the Tau Kappa Epsilon house on
Thursday. We had a blast! The Tau
Kappa Epsilons.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON BROTHERS
and pledges, Thursday night was a
blast, you always know how to show
our new members a great tie. Hope to
see you guys again soon. Thanks, the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
DELTA ZETA, THANKS FOR the
great social Friday night. Hope to do It
again soon. Love, the Brothers of Sig-
ma Nu.
HEY GAMMA SIGMASI WE had a
blast at Pledge Retreat From leapfrog
to shoot the moon we had fun. Love,
the pledges.
SISTER OF THE WEEK -Alpha Delta
Pi-Becky Lockeman, Cameron Ward.
Alpha 0 micron Pi-Theresa Donovan,
Mindy Schaefer. Alpha Phi-Laurie God-
frey, Jen Mock. Alpha XI Detta-Tricia
Mallory, Alicia Walden. Chi Omega-
Emma Thomas, Leslie Pulley, Shan-
non Wallace. Delta Zeta-Shannor
Meek. Sigma Sigma Sigma-Debbie
Sheets, Valerie Springle. Zeta Tau Al-
pha-Carrie Rogers, Wendy Melton. PI
Delta-Leslie Garrls, Kelly Goodman.
HOPE EVERYONE HAD FUN at the
Alpha Phi grab a date! ft was a nice lit-
tle surprise to start the week. Thanks
to everyone who put ft together!
TO THE BROTHERS AND pledges of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Thank you guys
for the tailgate on Saturday. I believe
we had the best spot on the whole
fieldour own little island! Looking
forward to our next social. Love, the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
PI DELTA: DESPITE THE roasting
heat and the missing hamburger buns,
tailgating was a blast! A big thanks to
all who came and participated.
Greek Personals-
For information about being included in our Church Directory call 328-6366.
CONGRATULATIONS NEW MEM-
BERS ON your offices: President:
Dana Pate, Vice President: Jennifer
Gibson Secretary: Jessica Smith,
Treasurer: Erin McCraken, Fundralsing
Chair: Leslie King, Chaplain: Amber
Foushee, Historian: Christina Yar-
brough. Big Sister Chair: Tiffany How-
ard, Intramural8: Lisa Warfle, Jr. Pan-
hellenic: Wendy Boulanger and Aman-
da Smith, and Gamma Representative:
Marvelle Sullivan. Love, your Delta
Zeta sisters.
THE SISTERS OF PI DELTA would
like to welcome the Mu Pledge Class
for Fall '97! Our newest members are
Tyler Blackwelder, Heather Connelly,
Ashley Dix, Dawn Flowers, Terrell
Floyd, Beth Hall, Jeanna Hooks Julie
Jackson, Rachel Kirk, Christi Klaamey-
er, Jennifer Kwaitkowski, Anne Lucus,
Jamie Meleo, LeAnne McMillan, Tina
Overbee, Tabitha Redding, Lara Skitt,
Jessica Sweat Melissa Thomas, and
Linda Wong. Congratulations! Love,
the Sisters.
Travel
AAAAI SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS Party Cruise! 6 Days $279! In-
cludes Meals, Free Parties, Taxes! Get
a Group-Go Free! Prices Increase
Soon-Save $50! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
Spring Break 'Take 2"
Organize Small Croup! Sell 15 Take 2 Free.
Jamaica, Carom, Bahamas, Florida, Barbados, Padre.
Free Parties, Eats, Drinks,
SunSpUsh Tours � 1-800426-7710.
AAAAI SPRING BREAK CANCUN
& Jamaica $379! Book Early-Save $50!
Get A Group-Go Free! Panama City
$129! South Beach (Bars Close 5AM!)
$129! springbreaktrave! com 1-800-
678-6386.
T5tfie7
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
Repo's. REO's. Your Area. Toll Free
(1J800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for current
listings.
$1000'S POSSIBLE TYPING PART-
time. At Home. Toll Free (1)800-218-
9000 Ext T-3726 for Listings.
SEIZFD CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your Area.
Toll Free (1)800-218-9000 Ext. A-3726
for current listings.
Announcements
WEIGHT TRAINING CLINIC: FOR
the adapted arise program, from 11:00
a.mnoon on Sept 27 at the fitness
area in the Student Recreation Center.
Dept of Rec. Services
20 MILER APPALACHIAN TRAIL:
join us on this intense backpacking trip
through the Appalachian on Oct. 3-7.
Be sure to register by Sept 27 in the
Student Recreation Center main office.
Dept. of Rec. Services
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
NOW HIRING DANCERS FOR new
club in Rocky Mount. For info, call 442-
7550, leave message.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment Call today, 747-7686.
Services
DO YOU LIKE TO learn French, Ara-
bic, or German. Call Mohammad,
(919)754-2487.
FREE COMPLEMENTARY FACIALS
AND other services available from
Mary Kay Cosmetics. For more infor-
mation andor appts. call 328-3817
Free products available.
Personals
LADIES: GIVE ME YOUR sore, ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur would
like to practice on your back. 1-800-
484-8546 (code 2465) or Brian, POB
8663, Greenville 27835.
We Need Timberland boots
and shoes! Good Jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) - TV's, VCR's, CD PlayeTS � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI lfc00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIED AD FORM
Name
Address
Phone
Student ID
Category (check one)
? For Rent For Sale Help Wanted
? Services D Personals D Lost & Found
? Other
The East Carolinian
10
12
15
16
17
18
20
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
FRISBEE GOLF SINGLES: SEPT.
2425 at the frisbee golf course from 3-
6:00 p.m. Dept. of Rec. Services
MUSLIM STUDENTS ASSOCIA-
TION WILL be holding its meeting on
Friday, Sept. 26, 1997 at 6:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Room 212.
TUES. SEPT. 23-GRADUATE RECI-
TAL, James Hampton, tenor, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 p.m. THURS.
SEPT. 25 -SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEM-
BLE AND CONCERT BAND, Scott Cart-
er and Christopher Knighten, Conduc-
tors, Wright Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Sept. 26-JAZZ AT NIGHT, Carroll V.
Dashiell Jr Director, The Great Room,
Mendenhall Student Center, 8:00 p.m.
SUN SEPT. 28-FALL SCHOLARSHIP
BENEFIT OF THE FRIENDS OF THE
SCHOOL OF MUSIC, Lawn concert fea-
turing PANAMA STEEL Mark Ford, Di-
rector. For ticket information call 919-
328-6851. 4:00 p.m. MON SEPT. 29-
FACULTY RECITAL. "Song Cycles of
Life and Love Sharon Munden, mez-
zo-soprano and John B. O'Brien, pia-
no, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
NEW RIVER GORGE. WV: Join us on
the great adventure trip on Oct. 3-7. Be
sure to register by Sept. 27 in the Stud-
ent Recreation Center main office.
Dept of Rec. Services
COLLEGE SKI WEEK COLORADO:
Join us for a full week of skiing in Col-
orado Jan. 4-9. Be sure to register by
Sept. 25 in the Student Recreation
Center main office. Dept. of Rec. Serv-
ices
ABSOLUTELY UNBELIEVABLEI
FREE TUTORING sessions available
for ail ECU students offered by ECU
Professors every Monday, Tuesday,
and Thursday starting at 4:00 p.m. at
tire Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center. Math tutoring on Mon-
day and Tuesday, Math and Science
tutoring on Thursday.
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOP-
MENT PROGRAMS will present
"Ready for the Real World" Monday,
September 29th at 4:00 p.m. in Men-
denhall 244. Dr. Helen Grove, Dean-
School of Human Environmental Sci-
ence, will demonstrate the profession-
al skills needed to survive and succeed
in your career.
COME JOIN US FOR fun and fetlow-
ship at the Methodist Student Center
(across from Garret Hail on 5th St)
Sunday, October 5th. We will be hav-
ing Sunday night worship at 7:30 in
the Chapel. Wed. Sept. 24 we will be
serving dinner at 6:00 p.m. (ifs free!)
For more information, call 758-2030.
ABSOLUTELY UNBELIEVABLEI I
FREE TUTORING sessions offered by
ECU professors every Monday, Tues-
day and Thursday starting at 4 p.m. at
the Ledonia Wright African American
Cultural Center. Math tutoring on Mon
. and Tue. Math and Science on Thurs-
day.
KITTY HAWK KITES: JOIN us for
hang gliding on Oct. 12 in Kitty Hawk.
Be sure to register by Sept. 30 in the
Student Recreation Center main office.
Dept. of Rec. Services
RATES
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over 25, add5$
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS, add$1
All ads must be pre-paid
DEADLINES
4 p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4 p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
2 p.m. MONDAY for all Summer
issues
All Greek organizations must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad for libel, obscenity andor
bad taste.
Circle date(s) ad is to run
819 826 6728 92 94
99 911 916 918 W23
925 930 102 1079 1014
1016 10721 10723 1028 10730
114 116 1111 1113 1118
1120 1125 124 129 115
120 122 127 129 23
215 210 212 217 219
224 226 33 35 310
312 326 331 42 47
49 414 416 421 423
428 430 55
527 673 610 6717 624
71 78 715 722 729
ADVERTISE IN
I tile 1 � �
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
now accepting applications for
Production Assistants
- Macintosh Experience a Must -
Bring Resume to
eastcarolinian
2nd Floor in the Student Pub. Building
ii
. �
-w
-


Title
The East Carolinian, September 25, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 25, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1228
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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