The East Carolinian, September 23, 1997






TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 23. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
VOLUME 73. ISSUE 10
Nightclub accused of racial discrimination
Students allege security guards asked them
to enter through side door, avoiding country
section of establishment
ANGELA KOENIG
STFF WKITF.K
Security officials at a local nightclub allegedly denied access to African-
American ECU students through one of its two doors last Tuesday night.
Allegedly only white customers allowed to enter through door on the
country side of Texas Two-Step and other people were told that admittance
could only be gained-through the Top 40 side.
Sophomore Jennifer Loudcrmilk was one of the students
allegedly denied access through the door which she normally
enters.
"My friends and I got there and we just walked over to the
country side. I usually go in on that side Loudermilk said.
"The security officer said we couldn't come in because of man-
agement rules
Sophomore Emonie Whitley, also a patron at the club that
night, was allegedly subjected to this discrimination.
"A security guard told us we couldn't go in because we were
African-American basically Whitley said.
Loudermilk said the security officer then explained that at a
meeting held prior to the opening of the club, a management official said
that non-white customers were only to be admitted through one door.
"He (the security official) said if we wanted to go in we had to go through
the other side Loudermilk said.
Once inside the club, patrons could freely roam between the
sides.
'This is one of those things in life. Life is too hard and school
is too hard and I will move on Whitley said. "I'm a person and
I have feelings and you are a person and you have feelings too
"My parents went through this. I never thought I would have to
thought I would have to deal with this said Loudermilk. "This is a completely differ-
ent generation
Whitley also agreed with Loudcrmilk that it is surprising to wit-
ness something like this.
'This is 1997, not 1955 and people need to think about it
Whitley said.
Loudermilk said she has not encountered such discriminatory behavior at
the club before and had not been denied access in this way. She said she pre-
viously purchased a membership to the club at the country entrance.
Texas Two-Step owner Frank Malaguti was unavailable for comment.
"My parents went
through this. I never
dealwith this
Jennifer Loudermilk
Pirate Underground
warned about skull logo
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Student Union
organization told not
to use logo
J.u. y I ELI M. I), Kb i.i. i M
news eiii rim
The Student Union organization known as
Pirate Underground has been warned by ECU
not to use the skull logo which they devel-
oped.
"We developed our skull from a group of
members brainstorming. We wanted to
change it from the skull
symbol and add our own
touches said Chris
Loga, chair of Ripular
Entertainment
Committee.
The Pirate
Underground was
warned by the
University Attorney's
office soon after they
began using the logo
that their skull logo was
inappropriate.
'There was an indi-
cation in that logo that
SEE LOGO. PAGE 3
Parking problems cause
residents to take stand
r- -1'3
HF .4 4 i �fr � " m.
ms Ubr- &� 9
An upset coach tries to give the ECU Pirates the encouragement that they needed during the disappointing home football game Saturday against the
South Carolina Gamecocks.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Legislative branch elections Wednesday
Brandon Mise
s r u r � KIT I K
The parking lot near Slay and Umstead Residence Halls has now been closed for "Phase II" of the Joyner
Library Project, and has. in the meantime, upset many students.
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
"They didn't give anyone advanced nonce
said Raymond McDill. president of the
SlayUmstead Hall Council.
Although the loss of these parking spaces
may inconvenience these students, there is a
larger issue at play.
"Because of the nature of the
SlayUmstead) dormitories, they're open year
round, bu have a lot of older students�stu-
dents who have full time jobs that sometimes
get off at three and four in the morning said
McDill.
Students who come home late from their
jobs now may have to park at the Allied Health
building, or at another distant lot. because of
the loss of these parking spaces. The transit
SEE PARKING PAGE 3
The library expansion project put students
from Slayl'instead Hall into an uproar, when
construction made it necessary to close the
parking lot behind the library.
When the parking lot was closed last Friday,
approximately 250 parking spaces that the res-
idents of SlayUmstead were using were lost.
On the dav the lots were closed students
immediately started passing around a petition
protesting the loss of these parking spaces.
Over the weekend, more than 100 signa-
tures were collected.
Branch funds
groups, deals with
constitution
AMANDA AUSTIN
VSSISTANT NEWS F.DITOK
The time of year to vote for
the Student Government
Association (SGA) has come
again.
Voting for legislarure of SGA
will take place on Wednesday.
The legislature makes up one-
third of the SGA and consists of
representatives for day stu-
dents, residence halls and class
officers.
This legislative branch is
designed to represent the
entire student body and meets
on a weekly basis.
"These are your student
representatives, just like
national and state representa-
tives said Scott Forbes, SGA
president.
Students who become
involved in the legislature have
many roles and responsibilities
to perform throughout the year.
The student government
legislature has the power to
appropriate money that is
received from a portion of stu-
dent fees. The legislature
appropriates these funds to var-
ious stu-
d e n t
organiza-
tions that
have leg-
islatively
approved
constitu-
t i o n s .
The leg-
islature
a I s o
appropri-
a t e s
funds to the executive branch
of SGA for its own functioning.
The legislative branch also
deals with the constitution.
"They can pass rules and
suggestions to change the con-
stitution said Forbes.
The legislature also has the
power to vote on various resolu-
tions and bills. After these res-
olutions and bills are intro-
duced to legislature they are
assigned to the proper commit-
tee within this body.
Sophmore Warren Sherman
is business major running for
the position of day representa-
tive.
"A lot of people wanted me
to run, and I like people and
want to get to know people and
to get involved with ECU said
Sherman.
According to Sherman, SGA
is the way for him to get
involved.
Voting will take place on
Wednesday, September 24
at the following locations:
�The Wright Place
�The Croatsn
�the bus stop on the bottom
of College Hill Drive
�Speight Building bus stop
�Mendenhall Student Center
�General Classroom Building
�the front entrance of Joyner Library
�Todd Dining Hall
�Jenkins Art Building
�Minges Coliseum
TUESDAY
r
TODAY
partly cloudy
High 80
Low 57
TOMORROW
tain
H'9h?0
Low 63
,�'� V . �
?? I 7
;?
Kmw
Did you know that the
average GPA of ECU
students is 2.72?
opinion.
Students should have a
deeper concern for vot-
ing and the actions of
SGA
lifestyle6
If skating were consid-
ered a sport
sports9
Sales of ECU apparel
has been on the rise
among Pirate fans
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG,
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.siudenimedia.ecu.edu






��
Tu��diy. September 23, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
College organizations seek to register,
inform voters for local election
Student Vote 7, College
Democrats, College
Republicans start drives
for student voter
registration
Dawn Ernteman
STAFF WRITER
Requirements to Register to Vote
You must be 18 years of age by Nov. 4, 1997.
You must have lived at your current address for 30 days prior to Nov. 4,1997.
You must be a U.S. citizen.
You must have not been convicted of a felony.
Currently there are three student groups on campus
working on the voter registration drives.
Student Vote 97, College Democrats and
College Republicans are all involved in an extensive
program to get students registered to vote.
The upcoming city council elections in
Greenville are of immediate concern. There could
be some big changes on the council if students reg-
ister to vote and actually vote on Nov. 4.
Student Vote 97, led by Johnny Rouse, is new to
ECU this fall.
"Our main goals are to try to dissolve the politi-
cal apathy of the students on this campus Rouse
said.
Members of Student Vote 97 are working to get
students registered to vote by handing out voter
registration applications to students and contacting
leaders of student organizations to get their mem-
bers registered.
"The biggest misconception about voter regis-
tration is that people don't realize that they can vote
here, even if they are not from here Rouse added.
Almost anyone is eligible to register to vote. In
order to register, four requirements must be met.
Registering to vote allows students to have a
strong collective voice for this campus on issues that
concern both Greenville and ECU.
"Today's students will represent what we see in
the future. We must be heard said Rouse.
The ECU College Democrats are taking part in
the cause as well. Mike Walker, senior and vice
president, made it very clear.
As far as the voter registration project is con-
cerned, this is explicitly a public service. This is
completely nonideological. We are not just out to
get democrats registered. We want only to inform
the student body of the local elections and the
requirements to register to vote
College Democrats have set up drop boxes and
voter registration applications in the lobbies of all of
the residence hall on campus as well as the lobby of
Joyner library. There are also instructions and a list
of the qualifications at each drop box site. All of the
boxes are kept under lock and key so as to prevent
tampering. College Democrats will drop the boxes
off at the Pitt County Board of Elections to register
the applicants.
The group also has public service announce-
ments on WZMB radio reminding students of how,
when, and where, to register to vote.
"The upcoming city elections arc very important
to studentsthe city council has a lot of impact on
ECU Walker concluded.
College Republicans are also setting up to get
people registered to vote for the November elec-
tions.
"We are going to have tables set up at the Wright
Place, Mendenhall, and College Hillsaid David
Sturm, chairman of College Republicans.
Currently ECU fells into three different voting
districts. The candidates for each district include:
District 1, Mildred Council and Mike Rough;
District 2, Ruffus Huggins; District 3, Inez Fridley
and Steve McLawhorn.
For more information on student voter registra-
tion call:
Johnny Rouse: 321-8993 (Student Vote 97)
Mike Walker 757-3768 (College Democrats)
Dave Sturm: 353-0808 (College Republicans)
The deadline for voter registration is Oct. 10 for
the local elections that will take place Nov. 4, 1997.
Red Cross blood drive Wednesday
JON! SUBETTE
STAFF WRITER
There will soon be blood everywhere at
Mendenhall Student Center. But that's a good
thing
The Red Cross will be taking donations from all
interested students and faculty this Wed. and
Thurs. from 8am-11pm at Mendenhall.
Before giving blood, any interested donor that
weighs at least 110 lbs. and is 17 yrs. of age or older
must first go through a short screening process and
a check of vital signs.
"The annual blood drive at ECU has been an on
going tradition for many years, and it seems as if the
Red Cross as well as the community depends a
great deal on the students at ECU said Judy
Baker, head of the Student VWunteer Program.
It seems as though, over the last few years stu-
dent participation has rapidly declined. Almost
3991 less gave blood in the last collection, than the
amount of donors that contribted ten years ago.
The Red Cross's prime goal is to increase participa-
tion by the end of this year.
"We would like to see things turn around, we
now have chancellors support and are trying to get
the staff involved also said Debbie Page, The Red
Cross donor recruitment representative.
Sonic tend to think that tin: reasons fur the
recent drop in donations is a result of the increas-
ing numbers in students that have tattoos. Under
the Red Cross guidelines for qualified blood donors,
any donor that has had a tattoo within the last year
is uneligable to give.
"Some students tend to give blood because they
receive extra credit, we wish that they would get
involved for other reasons said Heather Zophy,
the Heath Education Coordinator with the
Student Health Services.
Every time a collection is taken just one donor
can help up to 4 people. "We are always looking for
a link between the community and the students
said Baker
The Red Cross would like to let those who are
interested know that the blood types O and B are
greatly needed, but any blood type is always wel-
come.
"The actual process of giving Wood takes only
about ten minutes bur makes you feel good alxmt
yourself all day said Lisa Manez, a freshman biol-
ogy major.
Continuing Education celebrates 50 years
amber Tatum
STAFF WRITER
The Continuing Education division
has come a long way in half a century
and recently celebrated their achieve-
ments with a reception held recently
A project provided to adult stu-
dents from the time of World War II,
Continuing Ed has made a tot of
progress since it began in 1947. Once
known as the East Carolina Bureau of
Field Service, the department did not
adopt its current name until 1967.
The Erwin building has housed this
division for 30 years now.
7 celebration was possible only
because faculty and teachers off cam-
pus are an important counterpart to
adult students said Dr. Diana
Henshaw, director of the Division of
Continuing Studies.
At the reception, junior Alan Buna
presented a pen and ink drawing of
the Erwin building as a gift. Bunai, a
retired Air Force officer who has
served some time in the Gulf, found a
place to go on and earn a degree in art.
The Max Ray Joyner Award for
Faculty Service through Continuing
Education, recently created, will be
inaugurated at the end of the
acadeemic year.
"This award, was created by off-
campus nominations said Henshaw.
Dr. Terrance E. Deal, a professor at
Vanderbiit University, was the guest
speaker at the reception. He special-
izes in organization and leadership
issues and is former co-director of the
National Center for Educational
Dr. AM. Fleming from the University of Strathdyde, Glascow, Scotland presents anniversary pjfl to Chancellor Richard Eakin
while Or. Diana Henshaw, director of continuing studies looks on.
COURTESY OF DEPARTMENT OF C0NT1NUNS ST'3IES
Leadership. He has been a consul-
tant to businesses, hospitals, banks,
schools, colleges, religious orders, and
military organizations.
Music was provided by three stu-
dents form the School of Music. ECU
Chancellor Richard Eakin and Yke-
Chancellor Richard Ringcisen both
strongly support the job that the
Division of Continuing Studies has
done.
"As eastern North Carolina's uni-
versity, we have a special mission and
responsibility to reach out to the
largest possible number of citizens, to
be sure that East Carolina University
and its educational resources benefit
the entire region said Eakin in a
press release earlier this month.
University Printing and Graphics slated to relocate
Natasha Phillips
STAFF WRITER
University Printing and Graphics is scheduled to
relocate later this year.
ITie department's new location will be on the
site of the old Harris Supermarket at 2612 E 10th.
Street, where a nesv building is currently under con-
struction. The new building will be almost three
times larger than their current facility on the first
floor of the Student Publications building.
"Moving to a new location will provide ECU stu-
dents, faculty, staff, and Printing and Graphics
employees with numerous benefits. The depart-
ment will be more efficient and accessible. There
will be more parking spaces and the overall work
environment will be improved said Robert E
Harlow, director of University Printing and
Graphics.
The anticipated moving date is currently under
debate. Changing facilities will result in weeks of
planning and slowly vacating the premises.
"The builder's target date for completion is Nov.
15; however, ECU officials expect to move by
December IS said Harlow.
"The print shop has grown in its functions. The
move will give them the room to grow and expand.
The decision to relocate is being driven by the
needs of the campus said Layton Getsinger, asso-
ciate vice chancellor for Administration and
Finance.
The Harris family has agreed to rebuild their old
building to fit the requirements for the new
University Printing and Graphics location.
ECU will be purchasing a building for less than
it's actually worth. This arrangement will be made
possible by the Harris family's generous business
deal.
"ECU will be involved in a bargain-sale arrange-
ment. The owner of the property will be given a gift
in exchange for their contribution. It's usually the
difference between the purchase price and
appraised value of the property. This benefits
everyone involved said Getsinger.
As for the old building, no plans have yet been
made about renovation.
"The main motivation for our move is for the fac-
ulty, staff and students at ECU. Vfc will be able to
provide faster and more efficient service. We spe-
cialize in trying to take care of our customers and
help them squeeze more mileage out of their limit-
ed printing budgets said Harlow.
"It's indicative of the university's growth.
University Printing and Graphics is driven by cus-
tomer needs said Getsinger.
If you would like more information about
University Printing and Graphics, please call
Harlow and 328-6468.
Ctf trills jyfru itt
Driers
Hatteras Hammocks Photo Competition
enters second year
The Hatteras Hammocks Photo Competition, a cooperative effort between
East Carolina University and the manufacturer, will once again provide the
opportunity for ECU students to win prize money while gaining experience in
commercial product photography.
Hatteras Hammocks, the world's largest manufacturer of hammocks and
hammock accessories, will award $1,000 in prize money to a total of eight award
winning photographers this year. Prize monies will be divided as follows: $300-
lst place, $20O-2nd place, $125-3rd place, $75-to five Honorable Mention win-
ners. The winning photography will be used in marketing and promotions for
Hatteras Hammocks.
For more information about the program, contact: Laurie Rudd at Hatteras
Hammocks, 919-758-0641, Ext. 159.
Human Environmental Sciences
faculty receive awards of
excellence
Five faculty members from the School of Human
Environmental Sciences at East Carolina
University received awards of excellence from
the school for their activities and accomplish-
ments in 1997. Presentations were made by
Dean Helen Grove in a ceremony at the school
Sept. 12.
The honorees were selected by their peers to receive the awards in the
areas of teaching, research,creative activity, advising and service. The teach-
ing and researchcreativity awards include a $1,000 stipend for each recipi-
ent; the advising and service awards come with a $500 stipend.
jit �'P
�r
Dr. House and Dr. Darwick
4� are pleased to announce the relocation of
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of Pitt County
From Greenville Boulevard to our new clinic at 107 TRADE ST.
(between Golden Corral � Parkers Restaurant)
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756-0148 Nights & Emergencies 355-3825
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10 off all
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(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
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123 W.3St.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
Dress To Impress
Safe
� 20 off Bridal Gowns
� 10-50 off Selected
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Sate Ends
September 30,1997
arms & Conditions Apply
Tuxedo � Prom & Special Occasion Formals
Wedding Gown & Bridesmaid Dresses � Pageant Wear
Arlington Village, Greenville, NC 27858
919321-1714 � Fax 9193211719
X
-� iff t .
I1
�i��r
v





M I a
news
The East Carolinian
Helms sounds cooperative tone after Weld, sets
priorities for final term
RALIEGH (AP)�Sen. Jesse Helms says he's planning to build a legacy of getting
things done and not just standing against things he cant abide like pubtic art, gay
rights, liberal judges and William Wild.
North Carolina's Republican senator for 25 years. Helms has built his power by
learning the rule book and acting as a one-man roadblock. He's earned the nick-
name "Senator No" in pan by fighting every president since Richard Nixon.
As the chairman of the Senate Rweign Relations Committee, Helms single-
handedly blocked President Clinton's nomination of fellow Republican Wild to be
ambassador to Mexico. Weld gave up his fight for the post last week.
But with five years left on a six-year Senate term he expects to be his last.
Helms said he plans to forge foreign and domestic policy by making the most of
increasingly friendly relationships with the Clinton administration.
Senate committee reviewing phaseout of
tobacco program
WASHINGTON (AP) �With the big tobacco agreement in limbo, the Senate
Agriculture Committee is working on legislation that would phase out federal
tobacco programs, Chairman Richard Lugar said Sunday
Lugar, R-Ind said his committee will have ready this fell its part of the tobac-
co legislation, including the phaseout, an $8-a-pound buyout of tobacco quotas
and aid to communities whose economics depend on the crop.
President Clinton, in seeking to toughen the tobscco agreement reached this
summer by state attorneys general and cigarette- makers, laid out principles he
wanted to see in final legislation. They included protection for tobacco farmers, as
well as ensuring a drop in teen smoking and full government control over nicotine.
Tobacco is grown in more than 20 states, with two-thirds of the crop from
North Carolina and Kentucky
time later at St. Mary's Hospital in Amsterdam. Investigators are still trying
to determine who piloted the plane, Peters said in Saturday's Times Union
of Albany.
Freshmen enrollment falls short at
University of Rochester
ROCHESTER, NX (AP) The University of Rochester fell 99 students
short of its goal of 900 freshmen this year.
The private university said 9,000 students applied for the freshman class,
a little more than last year. But among those who were accepted, fewer than
expected chose to enroll. The shortfall translates into a $2 million loss. In an
effort to save money, concentrate resources and attract more high-quality
students, the school is in the midst of lowering its undergraduate population
from about 4,400 students to 3,600. Kraus said there was no indication that
UR's tuition, which increased to more than $20,000 for the first time this
year, was a psychological barrier
Students request
more financial aid
grants, not loans
u n d 't h e world
FAA says cracked wing caused ultralight
crash that killed two
AMSTERDAM, N.Y. (AP) A cracked wing caused an ultralight plane crash
thatkilled rwo people aboard? federal Aviation Administration officials said.
The aluminum tube holding the ptane's wing in place buckled and cracked in
flight, causing the ultralight to plummet to the ground about 5 p.m.
Thursday, FAA spokesman James Peters said in Saturday's edition of The Daily
Gazette of Schenectadv.
The plane crashed five mites after takeoff, falling into a wooded area
behind a firehouse in the town of Amsterdam, 29 mites northwest of Albany
Rescuers found Tlwmas Earl, 59, of Scotia wul Miciuei Grcincr, 33 of
Schenectady inside the twisted wreckage. Both were pronounced dead a short
Lightning may have caused helicopter
crash in Thailand
BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) Lightning may have downed a helicopter
transporting a royal entourage over rugged terrain in southern Thailand,
newspapers reported Sunday.
Fourteen people, including Queen Sirikit's private secretary and the two
pilots, died after the helicopter went down in thick jungle during a storm
Friday night. It was returning from a rural development project in the south-
em province of Narathiwat, 680 miles south of Bangkok. Seven passengers
survived.
Air Force Vice Marshal Kathathip Kunchorn na Ayuthaya was quoted by
Bangkok newspapers Sunday as saying lightning may have struck the twin-
engine craft and caused the crash.
Prime Minister Chavalit Yongchaiyudh has ordered the army commander
in chief to lead an investigation.
Taiwanese fishing boat runs aground, spills oil in
norhtern Japan
TOKYO (AP) �A Taiwanese fishing boat ran aground Saturday in northern
Japan, spilling fuel oil in Pacific waters off the island of Hokkaido, coast-
guard officials said.
All 31 crew members of the 869-ton Herhung No. 1 were rescued by
Japanese Maritime Safety .Agency helicopters, an agency official said. There
were no injuries.
The slick left bv the grounded boat stretched to the coastal town of
Erimo, about 500 miles northeast of Tokyo, the agency official said. Kyodo
News agency said the slick was 1 12-miles long, but authorities described
the slick only as "small" and did not estimate how much oil was involved.
Downs of local fisliefincn and their families were undertaking cleanup
efforts to minimize damage to seaweed and other marine life.
RALEIGH (AP) � The federal gov-
ernment can help universities by pro-
viding more financial aid, university
presidents and college students said
at a forum Monday
"What we're talking about today
is how to ensure that the average
working family can afford a college
education said U.S. Rep. David
Price, who organized the meeting to
talk about the federal Higher
Education Act.
The act, which comes up for
renewal this year, governs all federal
students loans, grants and scholar-
ships.
David Longanecker, the U.S.
distant secretary for post-secondary
jducation, said higher education
iame out well in this year's budget
discussions between Congress and
the White House.
"Within a balanced budget, you
can still set priorities Longanecker
said. "Both Congress and the presi-
dent have indicated education will
be one area where there is likely to be
more spending, even in tight budget
times
Mohan Nathan, a student at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, said lie was concerned
about the increasing numbers of stu-
dents borrowing money to attend
college.
"We seem to have made a con-
scious decision as a nation that the
preferred method for financing a col-
lege education is debt Nathan said.
We've seen an increasing trend
away from grants to loans
Logo
continued from page t
Parking
continued from page 1
buses run until 12:30, and anyone
parking at these lots later often have
to walk up to two mites back to their
residence halls.
"It's a safety issue for a lot of
women who have to walk alone said
David Merrill, one of the residents
who started the petition.
"1 believe the school subsidizes a
drunk bus to pick up people coming
from downtown said McDill, "but
at three in the morning when stu-
dents, who support themselves and
put themselves through school, get
off work, have to walk because the
school can't subsidize a satisfactory
escort service
The students also called WNCT-
TV and got a 75-second spot on their
Friday night newscasts.
"(Channel Nine) didn't do exact-
ly what we had expected, but they
still helped us ou: alot said Merrill.
On Monday, the students gath-
ered at a hall council meeting to orga-
nize and come up with an idea for a
solution.
McDill believes if the council
meeting addresses the need for more
adequate transit from Allied Health
and other parking lots, and doesn't
turn into a gripe session about the
loss of 250 parking spaces, they might
make a difference.
This is a safety issue more than
a lack of parking issue said McDill.
"Greenville is not the safest of
places
When the parking lot will reopen
has not been decided yet, McDill
said.
bine's
"Old Fashioned Hamburgers 4 iMdoge'
Monday-Thursday
'Food 101 nightly special at Cubbies'
5-9pni
�2 dogs $1!
?Free fries with any Cubbies size
sandwich! , � w
Only at downtown location with college ID
began using the logo that their skull
logo was inappropriate.
"Inhere was an indication in that
logo that this was East Carolina
University. There was a skull sym-
bol that we do not feel is an appro-
priate representation of ECU said
Ben irons. University Attorney.
The designing of a new logo was
an attempt to avoid a situation like
the Pirate Underground now finds
themselves in.
"When we were designing, we
thought Pee Dee the Pirate was the
University logo said Peyton
Crump, who designed the logo.
The design Pirate Underground
developed was a sketch of a skull
shown in side view and wearing a
bandanna. According to Loga, they
were given no guidance in creating
their new design.
"They never gave us any options.
They never gave us any rules. Never
"More students are having to bor-
row larger amounts of money to
finance rheir educations said
Bernard Franklin, president of St.
Augustine's College in Raleigh.
That leaves students saddled
with debt as they leave college and
begin to build a career, he said. For
students from poor families, that
debt can be overwhelming.
Julius Chambers, the chancellor
of North Carolina Central University
and a longtime civil rights advocate,
said for years he had considered the,
1964 Voting Rights Act the most sig-
nificant law passed under President
Lyndon Johnson.
But he said he had changed his,
mind.
"This act (passed in 1965) has
opened up more opportunities f�
minorities and the poor than any
other legislation of the era
Chambers said.
Universities must control rising
tuition costs, which are putting an
education out of the reach of many
families, Nathan said. j
"Higher education has the worst
of all possible worlds said Duke
University president Nan Keohane.
'Wife are perceived to be too expend
sive, and at the same time, people
don't know how much financial aid is
available
Students said they could use
more grants, not loans, to help pay
their education costs, while universi-
ty officials said they could use more
federal help with technology and
graduate programs.
told us what we could and couldn't
use Loga said. "We weren't told,
that we had to be careful
Following the release of their,
new design, Pirate Underground
received a call from the office of the
university attorney, Ben Irons
telling them that they could not use
the skull logo.
Those involved in the Student
Union and the Pirate Underground
say their organizations are confuse '
about why their logo has caus
such controversy.
"I'm having a hard time under-
standing why they're having a
lun witn it Crump said.
"We planned on using it, and'
don't sec why we shouldn't or win
we can't said Kevin Wing, co-
dinator of the Pirate Underground.
This warning follows a suit
against the owners of Skilly's, a
downtown music store also warned
not to use a pirate skull symbol.
Irons says that the two situations
have little to do with each othet
"It's not related. It's just that the
University would not want to be
represented that way at all Irons
said.
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Where: E.C.U. Belk Health Sciences Building on the corner of Charier
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How much are tickets: Only $3.00 for 10mm. and you can buy up to .v,
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To Purcahse Tickets: Ask any PT student you see! We will also be
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So come on, bring your friends and relax with a
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our Theme Parks and Resorts, mdudmg Attractions, Food & Beverage,
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T






TTT'Tlii Tl iTTi'
4 Tuaiday, September 23. 1997
omnm
The East Carolinian
astarolinian
easD
AMY L.ROYSTF.REditot
CEI.KSTE WILSON MansgMig Editor
MATT HEGE AdvertisingOtrKtor AMANDA BOSS Sports Elfinx
JACOI'EUNE D. KBU.UM HmnEtar TRACY LAIBAGH AtsountSportsEUrtor
AMANDA AUSTIN Asa. News EdrBr DAVID SOITHERLAND Production Mmgr
ANDY TURNER Utatyte Editor CAROLE MKHLF. Hud Copy Elinor
JOHN DAVIS AssistantLirBstylaEditor JOHN MURPHY SaltIhstnw
HEATHER Bl'ROESS Win Editor
Simo� KU otmwoti ta 1825 .ite Em Cmtawn pubkAts O.000 nti�t 4m rtTi��id��.TMlMdrti�rali�Me� ���
Crnkm issmXsaOB � �a Hsn � ���. M tain m � �Mi ran m� t aNna a: gpm ��� � Eh
Cvobw. PuttaMm evbMt. ECU. Gntra. 27ISM353. Fa ariamior. a 9SmKrH
oumew
With the upcoming elections for the SGA Legislative Branch, it's tempting to complain about
liw voter turnout and the general apathy of ECU students. After all, it wasn't until last year's
fiasco with the SGA voting themselves a tuition break with our money that many students even
cared about SGA. Now that everything's peachy again, who's to say that voter turnout won't be
lrw again? ECU students need to take responsibility for their futures and their educations. A
good education is not something that happens on a conveyor belt, it is something which the stu-
dent must be firmly involved.
However, it is noteworthy to point out that a good many students may not even know about
the election, or what the SGA is for. And while students do have a responsibility to get involved,
their involvement is severely limited by the lack of information provided by the SGA and ECU.
Inhere has been little publicity to date concerning this most imminent election, and some stu-
dents don't even know there is a legislative branch or what it does.
! Without this information, students cannot take responsibility, even if they wanted to. It has
been said that no vote is better than an uninformed vote. Which is more reckless: having low
vpter turnout, or having a bunch of students who don't know the candidates or the issues turn
otit and vote? As it stands now, one is likely to find that the average student who votes probably
dpesSn't vote on issues, byt on what fraternity or sorority the candidate is in.
; One realty has to worider-why the student- population is kept more or less in the dark about
how their student government operates and how they can get involved. Most governments who
keep their operating procedures secret are up to something shady.
Certainly, there is information in the undergraduate catalog, but who's going to read the
entire catalog just in case there's a scrap of information that might be useful? How about some-
thing a little more accessible and user friendly? How about the SGA spending a little of our
money to inform incoming freshmen how the SGA works? Perhaps something could be done
during orientation to increase student awareness of the SGAs role in the campus community.
For now, there is an article in this paper concerning the election, which can be helpful for stu-
dents who want to vote. We encourage all students to exercise their rights and make their con-
cerns known by voting.
LETTER
to me EditO!
Student Rec Center should change tune
� Since classes began, my husband
and I have been going to the Student
Recreation Center (SRC) nearly every
morning. On several occasions, the
staff in the weight training area have
played contemporary Christian music,
and it occurred to me that I did not
Have to listen to thb torture. My reli-
gious beliefs (or lack thereof) are well-
protected under the first amendment:
�Congress shall make no law respect-
ing the establishment of religion
"this has been interpreted by the
Supreme Court to mean that state-
funded institutions (i.e. schools) can-
riot be places where people are unwill-
ingly subjected to religious propagan-
da of any kind. In the 1980 Supreme
Court case Stone v. Graham, the
Court ruled that schools could not
post anything that has a "pre-eminent
purpose plainly of religious nature
Playing Christian music certainly
meets this criterion.
On the third offense, I requested
that the music be changed, informing
the attendant that playing religious
music there was against the law. He
seemed dubious. Apparently, the
young lad was absent the day they
taught separation of church and state
in his high school government class. I
don't think I convinced him of his
error, but at least he switched the
music.
Asking the SRC staff to change
their tune may seem to be a violation
of their sight to free speech. This is
clearly not the case; their right to free
speech ends where the Establishment
Clause begins. State-funded schools
are allowed to present a religious me-
LETTER
to the Editor
Too few parking spaces left to fight for
umrusts
AGAINST
Jeff
BERGMAN
On-line crime reporting not a good idea
As long as judicial candi-
dates participate in cam-
paigns, they will not be
objective. They won't
admit this, of course.
Judges don't live in a
Utopian society. Their
upbringing, judgments
and social interactions
will shape their on-the-
bench decisions.
Turn me in to the ECU police depart-
ment. You do not have to give your
name. You can remain anonymous.
You can bust me from afar.
Crime is a problem, not as serious
' as public perception makes it out to
be, but a problem nonetheless. In our
frenzy to reduce crime we are step-
ping on some mighty serious toes.
Anonymous tips have
helped the police in the past. Now
you can give an anonymous tip on-
line without giving your name. The
only information that you will proba-
bly give is that pertaining to the
crime.
The "toes" I was speaking about
earlier is being able to face your
accuser. Certain exceptions are made
when facing your accuser; children in
sexual assault cases are sometimes
allowed to give testimony from
another room via television and cam
corder. Facing the person who wit-
nesses the crime or results in getting
a search warrant issued is vital to our
civil liberties.
People giving information about
the crime give no personal informa-
tion and do not have to face those
they accuse. I am against anonymous
tips for this reason. Yet, I am able to
see where the anonymous tips might
come in handy.
Terrorist bombings, where the
informants have grave reasons to fear
for their iives, are a good use of
anonymous tips, as are a lot of mur-
der, rape, child abuse and other such
high profile cases. In these cases the
informant might have good reason to
fear for their lives.
Anonymous tips in respect to
small quantities of illegal drugs,
underage drinking, illegal parking,
jaywalking, or any other misdemeanor
offenses are not needed.
Sure, you can dial into the ECU
police homepage to report every
crime. You can also be mad at me for
writing that all crimes should not be
reported.
The problem with that thinking is
one of concern to myself. Totalitarian
governments often start with encour-
aging citizens to turn in their neigh-
bors, family members, or friends for
any crime.
Now I am not a member of the
Michigan Militia or other such fringe
anti-government organization. Unless
you count the Libertarian party; of
which I am a card-carrying member.
Or perhaps the American Civil
Liberties Union that I support.
A minute amount of crime being
solved is not a good tradeoff for the
possibilities that could happen. A
Pandora's Box, if you will, could be
opened.
Anonymous tips on small crimes
are not a good idea. Pranks or revenge
tactics through the anonymous on-
line Crime Stoppers are a small possi-
bility, but a possibility that needs to
be addressed.
sage only when consent is obtained
from all participating parties and an
"open forum" of the type discussed in
the 1995 Rosenberger v. University of
Virginia case is established.
The bottom line is that the SRC is
broadcasting religious messages to
anyone (willing or unwilling) who
comes into the weight training area on
certain mornings. I have the well-sup-
ported legal right as a taxpayer and
student to ask that I not be preached
to (or serenaded) in a school that I
help pay for by �meone"who1s wOtk
ing for a salary 1 also provide.
Laura H. Boyd
Senior
Philosophy
FOR
COCHRAN
Use the internet as a deterrent to crime
Once again we have yet another prob-
lem with the ECU Parking and Traffic
Services. This time they decided,
along with Facility Services, to remove
the gravel parking lot between the
ECU police station and the Baptist
Student Union. What an uncaring and
thoughtless decision!
� As a resident of Umstead, I am
now forced to park on a side street
between the Kappa Sigma house and
the Delta Sigma house. This past
Monday I had to park close to
Domino's pizza because all of the
spaces on the side streets were taken
by cars with resident stickers. Last
year, I was a freshman and did not
have a parking sticker for my car. As a
sophomore, I was very happy in
August thinking that finally I too
would be one of the privileged few to
have a resident sticker and park closer
to my residence hall. I stood in line at
Traffic Services, only too willing to
write a $96 check. I have heard people
say that the resident sticker is only a
"hunting license but no one told me
there would be no "game" to hunt.
Somebody do something!
What about security? What about
females (ot males) walking by them-
selves in non-lighted, non-patrolled,
non-escorted areas? As I was walking
from my parking place recently, I saw
many corners and bushes where a
rapist or robber could hide. Will it take
some student getting raped or
mugged to make a difference in the
parking situation? What is the $96 we
pay for parking stickers being used for
if not to provide adequate parking
spaces for all?
I hope that as students, our voice
upon this campus will be heard about
this decision. We cannot be robbed of
privileges we pay for.
Russell Lewis
Sophomore
Decision Sciences
Sure, the internet may deper-
sonalize humanityBut why
not use it in the meantime to
bust a couple of crooks and
thieves? Why not use it to
fight back? We can point-
and-click our way to a crime-
free, better tomorrow.
Hey, I'm all for on-line reporting of
campus crimes. You all know as well as
I do that crime sucks, and that we've
got too much of it in America. If this
internet, e-mail stuff can do some-
thing to bust a couple of criminals
here and there, then I'm for using it.
Sure, some goofballs probably get
on there and say they know who shot
JFKJmu it airft like the ECU police
department can't use a Tittle work
(maybe they can stop handing out so
many parking tickets and check out
these JFK tipsters instead). And who
knows, maybe an ECU undergrad was
there on the grassy knoll in 1963.
Anything's possible.
Furthermore, I'm sure one of you
out there has been in this situation;
you know, wandering home from
downtown good and liquored up, and
one of your goofball buddies decides
he's gonna pull a fire alarm and wake
allbf Bclk or Tyler Hall upat 2:30 a.m.
If you could point-and-click your way
to busting these fire alarm losers,
wouldn't you do it?
And riow many times have you
seen some joker steal a couple of CDs
out of one of your neighbors' rooms?
Well with this internet stuff, it's just a
point-and-click and no more joker.
Sure, the internet may depersonal-
ize humanity to the point where one
day we'll all be anti-social couch pota-
toes who won't leave home for fear of
being robbed or mugged anyway. And
sure crooks and thieves will probably
use this Bill Gates wonder-world to
rob us all from the comfort of their
homes.
But why not use it in the mean-
time to bust a couple of crooks and
thieves? Why not use it to fight back?
We can poirit-and-click our way to a
crime-free, better tomorrow. I can
almost hear the celluloid birds chirp-
ing away.
And I've got to agree with Officer
Jordan of the ECU task force who
said, "If the crime tip page) only
solves one case, it will have served its
purpose Damn straight. Let's oust
those marijuana-smoking neighbors
that smell up the dorm halls with
Glade air freshener and incense. Let's
quiet the halls of that late-night blar-
ing of Grateful Dead and Led
Zeppelin. It's my honest belief that
by pointing-and-clicking, we can
make this campus a safer place for
each and everyone of us. God bless
America. God bless the internet.
ii
Newspapers are where television people
get their information
Garrison Keiller, writer, humorist. 1995
J

��)"





Tuesday, September 23, 1997
The East Carolinian
SPOTLIGHT ON
PROFESSIONAL
OPPORTUNITIES
Thursday, September 25
6:00 - 8:00 pm
Mendenhall, Room 244
Appropriate Business Attire Requested.
Refreshments Will Be Served.
Please Bring Current Resume.
Meet company representatives and learn about the many
professional opportunities at Wachovia. Wachovia will be
meeting with undergraduate and MBA students. Internships
will be discussed at this time. If unable to attend, e-mail your
resume referencing Ad Code 7COLL3408B to:
wachovia@rgadv.com.
Visit our website at www.wachovia.com
As a leader in software consulting,
Keane is positioned
for a powerful future.
Are You?
i
ACROSS
1 Pallndromic
name
5 Tree with edible
pods
10 Nudnik
14 Harvest
15 State a view
16 Fashion maga-
zine
17 Summer
vacation place
18 Snouts
19 Uprising
20 Classify
22 Cost quote
24 Warning sound
26 Poem
27 Factory boss
30 Cardigan
34 Eggs
35 Leftover bit
37 Long shawl
38 Make over
40 Of ocean
movements
42 English school
43 Snares
45 Fragrant wood
47 Fitting
48 Draw out
50 Makes possible
52 Cheering word
53 Moving about
54 Cloth
58 Bring out
62 Help alcng
63 Measuring
device
65 Dun u bird
66 Fasting season
67 Shellfish
68 Increase in size
69 Icelandic tale
70 Hurtful spots
71 Congers
DOWN
1 Whale
2 Afternoon
parties
3 hats
4 Fight against
5 Business
agreement
6 Military address
7 Ascended
8 Singles
9 Give
10 Seep through
11 English essayist
12 Coin opening
13 Head: Fr.
21 Edges
23 March date
25 Make better
27 Citadels
28 Out in the open
29 Tracking device
30 Garden tools
31 Sum
32 Wed In secret
33 Leases
36 Summer drink
39 Musical show
41 Portable lights
44 Heavenly object
46 Train track
49 Simians, briefly
51 Span
53 Mass table
54 Masculine
55 Resting
56 Care for
57 Flying prefix
59 Center
60 Hero
61 Hauls
64 Meadow
creature
1234 I1ss "78116ii1213
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All rights reserved
Inc.
Answers from Thursday
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Established in 1965, Keane is a
nationally recognized leader in
the software services industry and
is positioned for a powerful future. To
position yourself, consider a career with
us. All entry-level consultants receive
company-paid software development
training. Held at our Corporate office
in Boston, Massachusetts, the intensive
team-oriented training includes both
technical and non-technical sections, as
well as instruction in Keane's structured
methodology for project management.
Upon successful completion of the pro-
gram, graduates join one of our 40
branch offices and provide software
consulting support to an area client.
Opportunities are available nation-
wide, including many positions in
Charlotte, Raleigh, and Washington,
D.C.
To be considered for employment, can-
didates must have a Bachelor's degree
and be bright, articulate, and well-
rounded. A G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher is
required. An MIS or Computer Science
degree is preferred but not required.
All majors are welcome to apply. Keane
offers competitive salaries and benefits
including ongoing company-paid techni-
cal training, tuition reimbursement,
paid vacationsholidays, healthdental
insurance, and comprehensive savings
and investment plans � including a
company-matched 401 (k) plan and
stock purchase options. Visit our home
page at www.keane.com to learn more
about us.
Keane will be on campus Wednesday,
September 24, for the career fair and
will be returning October 16-17 to con-
duct interviews. Stop by our booth and
position yourself for a powerful future.
If you miss us, send a resume to our
Corporate office: Keane, Inc Attn:
Dept. 601AD591, Ten City Square,
Boston, MA 02129; Phone: 1-800-
74KEANE, ext. 2813; Fax: 1-800-544-
0157, Attn: Dept. 601AD591.
An equal opportunity employer,
mfdv.
KEANE
Stop by our booth at tomorrow's Career Fair.
�" ' �?�i





mum
6 Tuttday. S�ptemb�r 23. 1997
litestvle
The East Carolinian
Dullard Skaters part of downtown culture
on the � �
Tkt iafarmalio i�wr
is At mad this col�m�
ravels. Bm similar le
circus ebmns, ct'rr Ari-
ving the funny car. Vie '
searra toe tt it
north of oil laiap veirj
andflat oal stmagr.
Come jaw as an liis trip
ieo !mt twritl of sUh
sites ami vorkyset pages
Don't worry, Bm Arthur.
PHOTO COURTESY OF BEA ARTHUR WEB PAGE
Naked on
the net
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Sometimes I'm just sitting around try-
ing to think of an appropriate and useful
way to spend my time. I could read,
maybe get some studying done. Nah, no
good. What to do? And then it comes to
me, Vtk on the net and find some
buck-naked pictures of Bea Arthur
Where to start this search for the
golden girl's glossy goods? Well, I got on
Yahoo and punched in "naked celebri-
ties There are endless sites dedicated
t the pursuit of exposing celebrity
flesh.
The first site that grabbed my atten-
tion was Celebrities Missing Their
Panties (www.naked-celcbs.com).
That's a terrible fate to befall a person.
lfou ever woke up with a can of Colt 45
balanced on your forehead, not knowing
where the hell your draws were?
Terrible, I tell you. This site was non-
impressive. They had pictures of
Pamela Lee and that guy with the tat-
toos in Motley Crue. That's all of 'em,
never mind. There was this one picture
showing up Marian Carey's skirt. They
need to spend their time figuring out
why so many people buy her records.
Linda Blair, star of Ike Exotria and Rotor
Boogie, was also captured in the buff on
the site. Good to see they had her head
on straight.
Through the Ultimate Nude
Celebrity Site (www. csleuth.com), you
can access Scream Queens International, a
magazine dedicated to showing slasher
movie heroines in their birthday suits.
I'm certain oT Joe Bob Briggs would
endorse this site. Screen Queen seemed
to have a better sense of humor rhan a
lot of the sites I pulled up.
There are too marry dirty bastards on
the net; they havesites dedicated to sex
with bucktoothed goats and underaged
cross-eyed cheerieaders and other stuff
they don't need to be showing. Most of
the sites only offered small samplers of
the naked celebs; if you wanted to see
more, you had to fork out the bucks.
They'll try arid fool you too, with guar-
antees of 100 percent free bare-assed
famous people.
A site called 10,000 Naked
Celebrities (www.10000celebs.com)
apparently needs to trim back its offer-
ings. Their frecbie was a picture of
Dana Plato (Kimberry from Dtfferent
.Strokes). My number one rule of naked-
;ness is I don't want to see anybody asso-
- dated with Gary Colcman with their ass
I hanging out. I mean, 1 sec Dana Plato's
! breasts, but with the head of Gary
Cc4eman- Those kinds of visuals can
�scar your eyes.
One of the most interesting sites I
1 encountered was Rob's Relaxing
; Celebrities (httphomepage.enter-
; prise.net). This guy, Rob, said he fig-
ured there were roo many sites on the
� net that only featured Hollywood's
offerings. He wanted to show that good
! old Great Britain had more to offer than
a big-ass clock and some fish wrapped
up in newspapers. But this sire doesn't
� defame Rob's British ladies. Their not
naked at all, jiist laying around not doing
anything - relaxing. 1 don't know who
'he hell any of these women are, but you
know, sometimes I like to look at blurry
pictures of British women reading the
newspaper. I guess you have to do some-
! thing with it after you're finished with
; the fish.
My quest for Bea Arthur was unreal-
ized. I even tried punching up Bea
I Arthur buck-naked. That lead me to the
Bea Arthur web page
(www.softcom.netusersbobdabea).
i No Naked Bea. They teased me by
mentioning a reference to Bea in that
really bad Adam Sandier movie. That's
all of them, never mind. In that movie,
their quest of the naked Bea was real-
ized. I know those pictures arc out
there, and I will find them. Just mc and
� Bea. Forever.
Through broken arms and run-ins
with the cops, skaters still skate!
MlCCAH SMITH
STAFF WHITER
Ever walk past Alfredo's in the after-
noon and wonder, "What are all those
skater dudes doing out here? Who are
they?"
The mini-community which con-
gregates between Chicos and Fifth
Street has been exposed for what it is:
a hotbed of adolescent skater subcul-
ture cleverly disguised as the patron-
age of the business located beside
Alfredo's, known as the Backdoor
Skate Shop.
The dudes outside range in age
from about fifteen to twenty-one, and
most of them live in nearby neighbor-
hoods. Their culture is a mix of the
old and new schools of skate, and
although most of them still cling to
the Beastie Boys, Minor Threat and
Anthrax music of the olden days has
been replaced by Helmet and
straight-edge bands.
They skate in a reckless self-
taught way, ignorant of the dangers
from which most mothers would
cringe in horror. Ir's a good thing their
mothers can't see them, because
they're often either getting in trouble
or busting their butts.
Ryan, 21; Jacob, 15; and Greg. 23,
have all been harassed by the police.
Greg sports an arm cast, as does
Nathan, a 20-year-old ECU student,
but the general consensus is that skat-
ing does not usually involve serious
injury. Go figure. Nathan, the only
ECU student I spoke to, considers
himself an old-schooler. He remem-
bers the old days of Vision Streetwear,
backyard ramps and Converse Hi-
Tops. He even passed my test for
determining if a skater is old-school or
not. "Finish this sentence I said.
fou gotta fight for your right "
lb party he exclaimed, naming the
song that epitomized the '80s skate
culture, when Licensed to HI by the
Beastie Boys was an album every self-
respecting skater owned. Too many
times, the Backdoor dudes flunked
the test, meeting my question with
quizzical stares, not that I much care.
Old or new, skate is skate. Skaters will
always be young, sweaty, sassy and
clad in T-shirts and Air.valks.
The Backdoor offers another
dimension of excitement for those
skaters bold enough to try, ramps and
a bowl. The ramps are just plywood
structures, but the bowl is a different
story. It truly looks intimidating, rem-
iniscent of an empty swimming pool
with sloped sides.
Greg skates it, broken arm and all,
and he's pretty good at it, but he's
been skating for a long time. Some of
the guys have only been skating for a
matter of months. Cassidy, age 8, is
the only female skater I met. She's
not quite ready to tackle even the
ramps yet, and most of the guys out-
side prefer to stay there and do their
tricks on the sidewalk. Some of the
skaters help out in the Backdoor,
which is quite a well-stocked, if out-
of-the-way, shop.
ECU musicians and skaters alike
might be interested to know that the
Backdoor carries a selection of used
amps, guitars, strings, picks, an prints,
stickers, videos, boards, wheels, shoes,
book bags and T-shirts. The atmos-
phere is laid-back, the rapport
between the skaters and the clerks is
brotherly, and all can be found enjoy-
ing a skate video by the dusty, dim
late afternoon light.
When the store closes at eight, the
skaters outside tend to disperse, but
the next day always finds them hang-
ing around downtown again like
there's nothing else worth doing iff.
the world. As Nathan puts it half-seri-
ousry, "It's not a hobby, it's a way of
life
Don't feed the skaters: Shane McDowell of Greenville skates tough.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Bluegrass comes to town
Chad Rodger does a little dance.
PHOTO BY AMAMOA PROCTOR
ALICE E. ZlNCONE
1.1 FST ttkl I KR
As the popularity of blucgrass
and bluegrass influenced
bands rears it long awaited
head here in Greenville, I
thought I would share some
points of interest with
those of you who follow
Bill Monroe's music.
14 Whether it is a festival
you are looking for, a
jam session or a
radio show to hear
old and new music,
it is out there to be
found.
Not only are there a
few regional jam ses-
sions that one can
learn about through word of mouth (check out the guitar
shops that cater to the bluegrassers), but there is a once
a month gathering only 45 minutes from Greenville. The
Eastern North Carolina Bluegrass Association meets
every second Saturday at Ixmior Community College to
warm the hearts of bluegrass fans and bluegrass players.
The night is set up with a schedule of local and regional
bands. Jam sessions can be found in the halls and occa-
sionally the locker rooms surrounding the auditorium.
There is a small admission fee, a mere pittance for any-
one with the bug.
The most authentic experience I can recommend is
for Bluegrass fans to attend a real Bluegrass festival, such
as Bass Mountain, Galax or Butterwood. Butterwood is
the onlv festival of its size held in the eastern part of the
state. This unique cultural experience can be found near
the town of Littleton, N.C. thanks to the Fox family.
Those of vou who are familiar to North Carolina's geogra-
phy know that Littleton is just over yonder (approxi-
mately one and one-half hours).
This year the festival will be held October 2,3, and 4.
SEE BLUEGRASS. PAGE 7
6 String Drag
offers southern soul
Forced sentimentality chokes Meego
tube
" Q Q ��
ft wali-h TV? Of rawfe- yoH ki - yww aii
Amn-avm. uu �atih TV speak TV. Iic TV beraw
TV. Evmim- kmnN thai. What vim Am't kmi is
thai TV n oalrliing y�i
Dale Williamson
senior waiter
Mark Brett
AST WRITM
When The X-Files first invaded
American television in 1993, it
re-opened many paranoid doors
in the mainstream consciousness.
Government conspiracies involving
extraterrestrial life on earth was not
a new concept, especially for
Hollywood, but the craze had died
down a bit by the '80s. Sure, there
was EX and other stragglers craving
attention, but for the most part the
American public simply was not
interested in alien invasions.
Then the '90s mentality eased its
wav into our culture, and the securi-
ty blanket known as the '80s, which
was filled with such solid American
archetypes as Rambo and Reagan,
quickly unraveled. The new decade
decidedly took a more postmodern
view of life and allowed the world's
suppressed paranoia to sink in. Now,
you couldn't trust anyone, especially
those in power, and you have to
acknowledge that the universe is far
too big a place for us earthlings to be
alone.
Yes, the closer the next millenni-
um approaches, the more main-
stream American is willing to at least
consider the possibility of aliens from
outer space. Worse yet, many of
these aliens are not nice and cute
like our friend E.T.
The X-Files, in perfect timing,
SEE TUBE BOOB. PAGE S
Raleigh band
twangs tough at
Peasants
JENNIFER LEOtiETT
staff writer
For those of you who are always whin-
ing about how crappy the music scene
is in Greenville and were not at
Peasant's on Saturday, shame on you.
After a three year wait to hear one of
Raleigh's best, bands grace a
Greenville stage, 6 String Drag finally
made it to the Emerald City.
After an exhausting van ride from
Athens, Ga. Six S-ring Drag managed
to muster up the energy to play two
incredible foot stompin Fabst Blue
Ribbon swiggin' sets. On tour to pro-
mote their new release Higt Hat, this
Raleigh band (via Clcmson, S.C.) may
have roots in punk rock but their soul
is in the roots of rock and roll - blues,
country, bluegrass, Dixieland, you
name it.
The band prefers to play what they
like and let the listeners decide what
they think, instead of trying to dissect
their music and pigeon hole them-
selves into the alternative country,
twang core, whatever genre that has
gained notoriety around this area over
the last couple of years.
There was never any kind of con-
scious plan to play any particular
style recalls lead singer Kenny Roby
(formerly of the Lubricators). .
"It all just kind of grew out of the
influences we were absorbing and the
the songs we were writing. We're still
quite impressionable; we still try to
experience different kinds of musjc,
and different things rub off. We've had
SEE B STRWe DM8. PAGE 7
i�i nMfc i ma ii i �' i ii � '�'�
� ft. . -
� IS ii





7 Tuesday, September 23. 1997
i r
Mi
The East Carolinian
6 String Drag
continued from page 6
so many different members and so
many different kinds of instrumenta-
tion that even when people leave
they always leave a little bit of influ-
ence behind
Maybe this is exactly the reason
that Steve Earle was so interested in
signing 6 String Drag to his new E
Squared label after seeing them per-
form at Bubbapalooza in Atlanta in
1996. Earle was originally supposed to
see fellow Raleigh twangsters
Whiskeytown but was so impressed
with Six String Drag's bewitching
harmonies (reminiscent of the
Louvin Brothers) that he knew he
had to sign them after hearing only
three songs. The result was a near
perfect masterpiece by singer Kenny
Roby, bass player Rob Keller, drum-
mer Ray Duffy, and guitarist William
Tonks that, luckily, escaped overpro-
duction and too much studio magic.
Their CD is much like their live
sets with an abundance of energy that
never seems to stop. Even at the
beginning of the night when there
were no more than 20 people in the
audience, 6 String Drag cranked out
their signature harmonies blended
with traditional country and folk ele-
ments to play some great rock and roll
characteristic of the days when Elvis
got his influences from gospel music.
Playing plenty of good stuff off
their new release such as "Elaine
"Gasoline Maybelline "I Can't
Remember "Bottle of Blues" and
crowd pleaser "Ghost 6String Drag
mixed it up with a few of their
favorite songs by Tom T Hall and
Texas Tornadoes including "VVho
Were You Thinking of When We Were
Making Love Last Night They
added to their honky-tonkness with a
little trash talking and beer can
throwing.
By the end of the night Six String
Drag had Peasants packed with peo-
ple dancing and drinking PBR in the
can. Their last song of the night,
"When the Saints Go Marching In"
was a soulful salute to the influences
of Ray Charles, Elvis Costello, James
Brown and Ralph and Carter Stanley.
"I guess the band's still coming
together Rohv observes. "There's
always little pieces falling into place:
it's been that way since we started. If
that ever stopped, we'd have to quit
Bluegrass
continued from page 6
It will feature bands such as Doyle
Lawson and Quicksilver, Ulrd
(Third) Tyme Out. New Vintage and
Moe and the Grass. These are not
the only bands however, there are fif-
teen hands slated to perform over the
three days. The latter two are local
(Raleigh and New Bern), and both
are excellent performers.
Going to a festival includes more
than the stage, though. Be prepared
to hear lots of pickin' in the camping
area. The long standing tradition of
jammin' at your campsite is still up
held and some folks set up camp and
never leave it to check out the stage.
To get there from Greenville, take
Highway 33 to Tarboro and continue
on Highway 33 until you reach 1-95
just past Whitakers. Proceed North
on 1-95 until exit 160 or State
Highway 561. Travel west towards
Brinkelyville and in Brinkleyville
turn right on State Highway 48. Go
approximately 12 miles and turn left
onto Airlee Road and watch for the
Bluegrass signs. Bring your lawn chair
or blanket and your camping gear.
Food and beverages are available on
site. Admission is $20 a day except
for Thursday which is $10. For more
information, call Gail Fox at 919-586-
2230.
Other sources of information for
the bluegrass fan that needs a fix can
be found in the News anil Observer
entertainment section and the
newsletters of Pinecone, Banjo in the
Hollow organizations.
Banjo in the Hollow is an organi-
zation of mostly pickers or aspiring
pickers and is headquartered out of"
RaleighDurham. They can be con-
tacted at 919-848-0573 or via the net
at http:www.RTPiiet.org-bith.
This is a friendly organization and
welcomes new members from all
over.
Banjo in the Hollow frequently
hosts free concerts that are listed in
the paper and these newsletters.
One such concert is coming up
Sunday, October 12. Banjo in the
Hollow is sponsoring an afternoon
concert in the Fred G. Bond Metro
Park, High House Road, Gary, NC. It
will run from 12:30 p.m. until 7 p.m.
and features local acts such as Al
Batten and Carolina Rose, as well as
nationally known banjoist Murphy
Henry. There will also be banjo and
mandolin workshops that weekend.
Contact Banjo in the Hollow for
information
Pinecone sponsors concerts of all
types of traditionalfolk music and
have an extensive list of happenings
in their newsletter. It can be contact-
ed at 919-990-1900. It also sponsors a
Bluegrass radio show Sunday nights
on WQDR 94.7 that can be heard
here in Greenville. The show runs
from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. and features
old and new Bluegrass and occasion-
ally some newgrass. Other radio
shows can be found on WRMQ 90.9
FM and 1070 AM on your dial. Tune
in Saturday nights at 8:30.
So, if you have the bug, you have
no excuses now. Check out your local
acoustic music store for pickers and
the word on the local jams. Try to fit
Butterwood or one of the other
events into your budget. As a final
note, those of you who have been
around campus for a few years may
remember a Bluegrass Club here on
campus. At the time, there wasn't
enough interest to keep it going, but
if you are interested in seeing that
going again, call the office of Student
Leadership, 328-4796, and put your
two cents in.
Blues singer dead at 74
' Svix i i t �.

Jimmy Witherspoon played the blues like nobody s business
PHOTO COURTS OF JIMMt rtilHEBSPOON AtB PAGE
LOS ANGELES (AP) Blues singer
Jimmy Witherspoon, whose deep,
smoky voicewas the trademark of a
career that spanned six decades, has
died, authorities said Saturday. He
was 74.
Witherspoon died of natural causes
on Thursday in Los Angeles, (Haudine
Ratcliffe, a spokeswoman for the Los
Angeles County coroner's office. No
other details were available, she said.
"He was one of the greatest blues
performers of all rime said Gap.
"Wagman" Wagner, a disc jockey at
KLON-FM in Los Angeles. "In terms
of being a singer, that's where he
would really shine. He was always a
fantastic vocalist
"Spoon as he was known. record-
ed dozens of albums and seemed at
home fronting both small bands and
large orchestras. His career included
tours in Europe, prison performances
and appearances at such influential
venues as the Monterey Jazz Festival.
Some of his hit include "Blues
Around the Clock "Some of My Best
Friends are the Blues and "Blue-
Spoon
"No matter what he was singing,
people would pay attention Wagner
said.
Born Aug. 8. 1923 in Gurdon, Ark
Witherspoon had no formal musical
training. He performed in the gospel
choir at his Baptist church, where he
became the main soloist at age 10.
At 16, Witherspoon left home and
made his wav to California, where he
did odd jobs until joining the
Merchant Marines in World War II.
His travels brought him to
Calcutta, where he sat in with Teddy
Weatherford's big band. Weatherford
encouraged him to pursue a singing
career, which he did in 1944 after his
tour of duty ended.
He appeared in the clubs on Los
Angeles' Central Avenue, then a thriv-
ing music scene, and got a big break
when he was invited to join Jay
McShann's band in Vallejo. He toured
with the band for several years.
In 1949. Witherspoon cut his first
single. 'Ain't Nobody's Business It
reached No. 1 on rhythm and blues
record charts and remained there for
nine months.
He continued to record through
the 1950s with some success and also
began to use a more jazz-inflected
style.
His star dimmed with the advent
of rock 'n' roll but he made a come-
back performance at the 1959
Monterey Jazz Festival.
Over the next decade he recorded
with Karl Hines and other jazz greats,
made European tours and regularlv
visited prisons to perform for inmates.
In the 1970s, Witherspoon
returned to a deeper, blues styles. I le
toured with guitarist Robhen Ford and
produced the single "Love is a Five
Letter Word"in 1975.
He appeared at blues and jazz fes-
tivals both at home and overseas
through the mid-1980s, when a bout
of throat cancer took him off the
scene.
After surgery, the disease went into
remission. Witherspoon returned to
the stage in the late 1980s, but his
damaged vocal chords had lost some
vocal impact.
He rejoined Ford in the early
1990s. Their "Live at the Mint"album
was nominated for the 1995 Grammy
Award for best traditional blues
album.
X
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT L AW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
209-B S.Evans Si
Pittman Building
(near courthouse)
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Services and Peer Counseling
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Appointment Preferred
757-0003
ATTENTION
NEW
Get Your Purple Pirate Pass Now
Sept 22-26
9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
In Front of Student Store Wright Plaza
Immunization Clinic
tk StudMedtk (fatei Retowice mt
INFORMATION
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Oct. 1 - Seniors Get Carded
Nov. 12 - Mugs & Hugs
Available to the first 500 seniors
who show their Purple Pirate Pass
So get yours TODAY!
Sept. 23rd & 24th
1:30 PM - 4:00 PM
For more information
call 328-6841.
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Let us help satisfy your
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it's too late!
The Student Health
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8 Tuesday, September 23 1997
It -style
The East Carolinian
Tube Boob
continued from page 6
,j
tapped into this phcnoi
quickly grew from a cult T scries
into an award-winning, trend-setting
work of cinematic art. The pin- side
to this revolved around the
itself and its outstanding craftsi
ship, acting and plots. The down '
side came in the form of cheap (
copy cat shows that also want-
ed a piece of the paranoia
pie.
The extraterrestrial trend
has not slowed down. More
and more films, books and IA
shows concerning alien life on
earth keep popping up on eve
corner, but the cultural mood i
ing a noticeable shift now. History
tends to repeat itself, and as scarv as
this mas sound, several thil
American society and popular (
indicate that we are getting to wit-
ness the rebirth of the '80s.
The economy is doing well again.
but that is not the most glaring

X
tak-
ot things to come. The latest "hot
- in Vmcrican popular culture no
longei thri' - on the negativity, inse-
cure or aimer, (.one are the days of
Nirvana. Welcome the doo-bobbity
liness of such happy, innocent
groups as Hanson and The Spice
(,irN. Gone are the anti-heroes of
. � ��� foyers.You
once again believe in your lead-
ers, thanks to Harrison Ford's red.
, white and blue president in Air
, One. And. for our purposes.
gone are the evil aliens that
destroved the White House only a
vear ago in Independent? Day. I hose
I beings from outer space are now
our friends and only want to
9& help us.
t least that's what two
n -v. TV shows that premiered last
:u!o wani the public to
embrace, Ueego and The Visitor
necessarily similar in theme.
ey do share the concept of a
kinder, gentler outsider who enters
fragile or broken Iocs onh to restore
idem and rejuvenate hope.
Id not be such a bad idea it
. reative teams behind these
i ts didn't treat their audiences
nthinking lab experiments and
"aws" from its audience. You know
what I mean � little boy says, "I love
you, Meego and the sickening
sounds of "aaawwww" is heard echo-
ing from some soundtrack audience.
As for conflict, the most you'll get
is Meego teaching l.epmcki's older
brother the importance of
teamwork. It's a shameful
exercise in forced sinceri-
ty that may work on a
child audience, but that
also is doubtful.
More substantial conflict
can be found in The Visitor,
but it's still not much ot
an improvement. John
Gorbett (from Northern
Exposure) plays, not an
alien, but a post-World
War 11 alien abductee who
crashes on modern-day
Karth with acquired alien
powers.
No matter, though. The
government knows he's out there,
and they want him. Corbett, howev-
er, happens to be in luck. While run-
ning away from the Feds, he discov-
ers help in the form of � you
lUld have potential it it didn't guessed it -a broken familv in this
depend so much on the teary-eyed -ase a struggling mother .md atmu-
resort to levels of sappiness that even
Webster wouldn't touch.
Meego is by tar the worst of the two
and should be counted as the eighth
wonder of the world if it lasts more
than six episodes. Our alien friend
comes in the form of funny man
Branson Pinchot, who once
again shows his uncanny
ability to conjure up silly.
fake accents. This is basi-
cally a Charles m Charge
comedy, the only differ-
ence being that this
Charles is from another
planet. Meego. out friend-
is neighborhood alien,
finds himself temporarily
stranded on earth, is dis-
covered by a young boy
(played the too-cute-for-
hfs-own-good Jonathan
Lipnicki, who was particu-
larly effective in Jerry
Maguire), and is disguised
as a nannv to fool workaholic father
Ed Beglcv Jr.
Its a basic set-up that requires lit-
tle thought. The ensuing jokes
require even less effort. The show
' if it didn't
bled, wise-mouthed youtl I'l
theii interactions with hii
interactions with them, . h
process begins. Life once
begins to blossom.
Of course, the com ravel-
er who meets new people and helps
them each week is not the mos
inal thing to ever grace television.
We've seen it in The Fugitki and Thi
Incredible Hulk just to name a couple.
ih, Visitor is bv no means nearly as
bad as Meego. There is conflict and
danger, but the end resuli feels more
like an episode of loin hut Us An Angel
than an actual thriller. Overall, The
Visitor is simply mediocre entertain-
ment that depends too heavily i
k and white truths than shade of
grav uncertainties. The good guvs are
good, and the bad guys are too
bad. There are no in-betweens.
There is nothing wrong with
hopeful, feel-good entertainment.
I lev. even Hanson has some ("ine-
qualities about them. However.
wholesome entertainment like Merge
and The Visitor aren't easily swallowed
when their simplistic sentimentali-
ties are forced down your throat.
Give me a heapin' mess of paranoia
and dread found in thought-provok-
ing escapism like The X-Files any
day over the sugar-coated reassur-
ance that rotted the television last
Indus night.
Jonathan Lipnicki's
too cute to care
PHOTO COURTESY Of
TRISTAR
PkwfeOY fflMC
199T
Tonight, Tuesday 23rd
70s and 80s
Disco Retro Party
Ladies free until I 1pm

S Hu.rli l.iulil"
Drull �SI � Iliinu
Wednesday 24th
m t&
3�
winner of
adm. with
ECU 10
9-9:30
Aspen Comedy
Regionals
$1.50 Hi-balls - SI 50 Busch light bottles
Thursday 25th
Jimmi's
Chicken Shack
as seen
an Mtv
& Balance
Friday 26th
Alfl.i9htlJ
Senator
Saturday 27th
Purple
Schoolbus
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9 Tuesday, September 23, 1997
spods
The East Carolinian
Pirates suffer first home shutout since '84
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
A number of records were set this past
Saturday, but none that would make a
team proud.
For the first time since 1984, the
Pirates were shut out in their home sta-
dium 26-0. The last time the Pirates
were shut out at home was against
Temple, and the last time they were
shut out was against Illinois on Sept. 23,
1995, when they suffered a 7-0 loss at
Illinois.
All in all, it was one of the poorest
offensive showings many fans and play-
ers had seen in a long time. For the sec-
ond straight week, the Pirates found
themselves down early, but this week
they couldn't make a remarkable come-
back victory.
For center Danny Moore, getting
down early is something the Pirates are
used to, but don't necessarily care for.
"It's starting to become a habit for us
to come out slowly Moore said. "When
you do that, it makes it hard to come
back no matter how well conditioned
you are
�Many of the ECU players felt they
could come back being down 17-0 at
the half, since they came back from
being 21-0 last week. But that was a dif-
ferent game, and a different week.
"We went out in the second half
with the intention of coming back, but
we stuttered again Moore said.
Split end Troy Smith, who led the
receivers with 31 yards on four catches,
said the offense just couldn't get jump
started.
"We felt we could come back
based on coming back last week
against Wake Forest Smith said.
"They didn't surprise us with any-
thing defensively; we just couldn't get
it going when we had the ball
And getting it going was something the Pirates couldn't do all
day. ECU tied another record set in 1993 against Washington with
the fewest rushing vards � four. The Pirates onlv gained 89 yards
in the air, totalling 93 offensive yards compared to South
Carolina's 349 total yards.
Coach Steve Logan wasn't upset with the way his players per-
formed, but the way rhey executed.
"I'm not down on the kids; I'm down on the execution
Logan said. "It's something we have to continue to coach
Logan noted the penalties early in the game and the inter-
ception by the Gamecocks' Kevin Brooks, which led to an even-
tual touchdown just before the end of the first half, really hurt
the Pirates' chances for a comeback.
'The early penalties kept us from getting any rhythm offen-
sively, and the interception that we threw right before halftimc
really hurt Logan said. "If we had come in 10-0 at halftime I
thought we could have a shot
ECU quarterback Dan Gonzalez, who had hoped to celebrate
a victory on his 23rd birthday on Saturday, said they had some big
plays that could have turned things around, but like Logan said,
penalties hurt.
"We had a couple big plays that maybe would have gotten us
going, but we had some penaltiesyou have to overcome those
things, and we weren't able to do that Gonzalez said.
ECU finished with penalties for 75 yards.
The running game had another disappointing performance, as
Scott Harley ran for just five yards, while Jamie Wilson netted 18.
Marcellus Harris gained a yard, but Gonzalez lost 20 yards rush-
ing, bringing the total rushing effort to four yards.
Harley himself is frustrated about the performance of the
rushing game.
"We just have to go back to the drawing board, see what we
can do Harley said. "Whether it's me not running hard enough
or personnel or something. We just have to go back to the tape
and see where we went wrong. We just got out behinds whooped
� there was nothing we could do
Gonzalez feels the pressure of having to throw the ball more
when the running game isn't working, but said it's something
they need to get better at regardless of how the running game is
doing.
"It's been three weeks now and we haven't been able to run
the ball effectively Gonzalez said. "It puts some pressure on the
4 ��'
4i
The Pirate offense struggled gaining just four yards on the ground and 89 yards in the
Coach Steve Logan
patrols the sidelines and
checks out what his team
is doing during the game.
Logan and the rest of the
team will have to look at
film and find out what
went wrong in Saturday's
26-0 loss to South
Carolina. The Pirates
won't play this Saturday.
and will be matched up
with Syracuse on Oct. 4
in the Carrier Dome.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
PHOTO BY AMAN0A PROCTOR
passing game but it's
something we need to get
better at. If we have to
throw the ball to win the
game, then we have to do
that. We have the players
to do that, we had some
opportunities today to do
that and 1 personally did-
n't take advantage of
some of those things
The passing game also
stalled as Gonzalez went
14-28 for 89 yards and
two interceptions.
"South Carolina
played really well on
defense and we weren't
able to do anything
today Gonzalez said.
"Hopefully we're able to
clear that up in the next couple of
weeks
For Gonzalez, he said this was one of
the poorest offensive showings he has
seen since he has been here.
"It was one of the ugliest days I've
seen around here Gonzalez said. "We
had turnovers; it was ugh
USC Head Coach Brad Scott said his
team was concentrating on the ECU
passing game.
"I was pleased about containing the
passing game Scott said. "We did
exactly what we wanted to do. We kept
their offense off the fieldwe did
everything we could to play a team
game
The Pirates will have two weeks off,
since this a bye week for ECU. Their
next match up will be on Oct. 4 at
Syracuse.
tatistics
c
rst Downs
Net Yards Rushing
Yards
ards
a rets
n Conversions
Fans show Pirate pride in stores

Loss
hard to
swallow
for many
STEVE LOSEY
SENIOR WHITER
It was hard to be in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium on Saturday for the Pirates
and their fans. From the opening
kickoff to the final gun, each and
every play was a struggle to gain
territory in the Pirates first since
1995.
There was an excessive amount
of penalties Saturday. Flags were
flying around the field far too often
for the Pirates to keep any momen-
tum toward the end zone going. It
wasvery difficult for them to make
significant yardage with five and
ten yard penalties holding them
back at just the wrong time.
Problems like that kept the Pirates
from getting a first down in the
first quarter.
Each time the Pirates got a
break, bad luck set them back even
more. In the second quarter,
Tavares Taylor picked off the
Gamecock quarterback's pass
beautifully. Unfortunately, he was
injured during the tackle that fol-
lowed and was unable to return.
The absence of Taylor hurt the
Pirates in the second half.
Early in the second quarter, the
defensive line kept hammering at
South Carolina's line. The Pirates
took advantage of the mistakes the
Gamecocks made, especially a col-
lision in the backfield between
South Carolina's quarterback and
running back that allowed a sack by
Morris McCleary.
When South Carolina was
forced to punt two downs later,
Marcellus Harris was able to return
the punt into South Carolina terri-
tory. Unfortunately, a holding call
forced the punt to be done over.
The next punt was downed at the
ECU 34.
Other members of the Pirates
were also able to contribute on
Saturday. In the second quarter,
Rod Coleman showed the crowd
why he was out on the field. After
South Carolina hiked the ball, the
USC quarterback, Anthony Wright,
faded back while looking for a
receiver. Coleman came right at
him, and as the quarterback
dodged, Coleman snagged one fist
on his shirt for a split second. That
instant was more than enough, and
the quarterback was thrown off bal-
ance and fell to the ground for a
loss of 10 yards.
The offensive line let quarter-
back Dan Gonzalez get sacked
twice. The Pirates lost crucial
yardage and momentum with these
sacks. Sacks can also have a nega-
tive effect psychologically. If a
quarterback gets sacked too often,
he begins looking for potential
sackers instead of open receivers.
The Pirates have an open date
this Saturday. Head Coach Steve
Logan will undoubtedly be looking
for what went wrong Saturday and
how to fix it. Hopefully, they will
be ready for their October 4 game
at Syracuse.
CONFERENCE
Melissa Potter
STAFF WRITER
Have you bought your ECU shirt yet? What about a
cap? Jacket? It would appear as though many of
ECU's students are wearing more and more school
apparel this year than in previous years. With a stu-
dent body nearing 18,000, ECU has picked up on
school spirit and ran with it.
As you walk into the Dowdy Student Store, one
might notice the many new styles of shirts, shorts
and other articles of clothing.
"It's the new designs that make people want to
buy them said Jake Jacobs, sales marketer for the
Student Store.
Many of the employees at the Student Store are
students here on campus. It is their input and ideas
on new trends which help to bring about changes in
styles.
"We want the students to be happy Jacobs said.
"They want new styles, not the same old designs
from last season
Beginning this year, the Student Store has picked
up Reebok, Starter and Logo Athletics. Adding these
brands to their already popular stock has provided an
increase in recent sales. This nukes it possible for
the store to offer such discounts as the Football
Specials. The week before any home game. Dowdy
runs a 20 percent-off sale on all purple and gold
apparel. This sale runs from Monday though game
day. Another discount is gien Monday and Tuesday
after a victory game at an away school. For every
point that ECU scores, up to 30 points, which would
be up to 30 percetn, the Student Store vv ill discount
that much on its apparel.
In comparison
to last year, ECU
has certainly-
shown an
increase in sales
� not just at the
Student Store,
but also at the
University Book
Exchange.
"We're able to
sell more shirts at
lower prices
thanks to our
new vendors
said Sue Stamatz
of UBE.
Over the past
four to five years,
UBE ' has
increased about
15 percent in
their sales. After
remodeling this
summer, more
vendors were
able to share
their stock of
apparel with
UBE, which brought in more students.
"There are more fans than ever at ECU; they
want to wear their school colors for their teams
Stamatz said.
Many of the new styles include baby T's, tank
tops and caps, as vv ell as polos and jackets. The new
designs have made it more interesting on campus as
well. Many students comment on the purple and
Last week's
Conference USA
results

Fans are ready to wear purple and gold to show their Pirate pride. Both the Student Stores and
UBE have noticed an increase in ECU apparel sales.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
gold being more prominent.
Compared to other schools, ECU doesn't quite
have the sales capacity that would make them stand
out.
"Carolina is a much larger school and caters both
to their students as well as the general public. Here
at ECU, we focus on the students and what they
want. It's their store Jacobs said.
Cincinnati 34, Kansas 7
South Carolina 26, East Carolina 0
(1) Penn State 57 Louisville 21
Minnesota 20, Memphis 17
Southern Miss 35, Nevada 19
Syracuse 30, Tulane 19
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Cross country teams compete
in Wolfpack Invitational
ECU's Men's Cross Country team finished seventh, while the Lady Pirates
finished fifth at the N.C. State "Wolfpack" Invitational held Saturday in
Raleigh. Host North Carolina State dominated the raee winning the men's and
women's titles. The Wolfpack's men won the to five places overall, while the
Lady Wolfpack hud seven out of the top-ten finishers.
The Pirate's men's squad ran their "B team as head coach John Welborn
did not run the team's top-five runners. Assistant coach Mike Ford comment-
ed, "We wanted our team to stay as healthy as possible going into the William
and Mary Invitational
The Pirates were led by junior Mike Marini (Wilmington. Del.) who fin-
ished 36th overall. Marini ran the 8,000 meter course in 26:18. Freshman Jeff
Herbert (Herndon, Va.) finished 52nd, while sophomore Carl Robbins
(Manteo, N.C.) finished 54th. Also, freshman Steve Arnold (Woodbridge, Va.)
finished 60th and sophomore David Balon (Hershey. Pa.) placed 61st. Ford
SFF X-COUNTRV PAfiF 11





r
10 TuiSiUy, September 23. 1997
snorts
The East Carolinian
Men's soccer team loses first CM game of season
Paul Kaplan
STFF WRITER
The ECU Men's Soccer team is in
full swing with six games behind
them and a 2-4 record. The two wins
both came in at home, the first
against Elon College and the second
against Appalachian State.
The team's first CAA Conference
game was this past Sunday versus
the sixth ranked James Madison
University. The Pirates held JMU to
only two goals, making the game one
of JMU's closest matches of the sea-
son, but the Dukes still came out on
top, 2-0.
JMU's first goal came off of what
ECU Head Coach Will Wiberg said
was just a matter of "a poor clearing
mistake The Dukes were able to
score the final goal of the game with
shot number two.
"We were caught out of their
defensive shape, leaving us vulnera-
ble Wiberg said. uWe played smart
and put out a good effort
At the half. Senior Jay Davis had
tallied six saves, as the Pirates had
only two shot attempts in the first 45
minutes of play, compared to the
Dukes 14.
ECU shut out the Dukes in the
last 34 minutes of the game, as Davis
anchored the back line for the
Pirates. Defense was strong for ECU
by sophomore Brett Waxer and
junior back Jon Smiley. Offense was
led by forwards Wyatt Panos and
Scott Pokorney.
"JMU demonstrated today why
they are ranked so high nationally
Wiberg said. "We played a smart
game, and Jay Davis played very well
in goal for us
JMU's roster is currently made
up of almost all upperclassmen,
many of whom were named All-
Conference last year. ECU's roster is
made up of only five upperclassmen,
with 22 freshman and sophomore
players.
So far this season, JMU has
scored a total of 28 goals and has
given up only five to the opposition.
The next game on the schedule
for the Pirates will be Sept. 24
against UNC-Wilmington. Coach
Wiberg expects it to be a very close,
physical, and intense game. He said
the fact that UNC-W knocked ECU
out of the tournament last year will
make this game a very heated con-
test.
Wiberg said their schedule is not
expected to get any easier, with five
of the nine teams in the CAA ranked
in the top 25 in the nation. As he put
it, no other sports team on campus
has to go up against that type of gru-
eling conference schedule.
Robert Hyatt shakes and bakes past his defenders. The men's soccer lost their CAA
opener to JMU on Sunday.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
LADY PIRATES WIN IN OVERTIME
t
i

i
i
A
I
Erin O'Neill boots the ball in Sunday's 2-0 ECU win, in overtime agianst UNC-Asheville.
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
Jarvis St.
Laundromat
aaaaac.ociL03
oqaamao
ECU ART SCHOOL
5th .Strppt
rosr
not
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R
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Cheap! Cheap! Cheap!
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GENERATION X-TRA WEEKEND
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 - 27
;
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Beach Party
S
���
as
California's own band, PAPA DOO RUN RUN joins the Parents Weekend
celebration, playing chart-toppers from the '60s, 70s, '80s, and
'90s. Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket Office
for $7. All tickets purchased at the door: $15.
FRIDAY, OCT. 10 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
���
I-
I
K
:
1
�5
K
:
If you have trouble getting where you need to go for weekends or
holidays, check out the RideRider Board at the foot of the stairs in
the basement at Mendenhall Student Center.
f h.ank$givm$ Alternative
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat trip to New York?
The ECU Student Union is sponsoring a trip to New York for as little
as $155.The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for
three nights.To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip,
drop by the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
Generation Xtra Weekend
Mall Rats (R) at 8 p.m. and Clerks (R) at 11 p.m. on Thursday.
Clerks (R) at 8 p.m. and Empire Records (PG-13) at 11 p.m. on Friday.
Empire Records (PG-13) at 8 p.m. and Mall Rats at 11 p.m. on Saturday.
Hendrix Theatre-Mendenhall.
Your student ID gets you and one guest in for free.
Underground Sounds
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free
in The Pirate Underground every THURSDAY AT 8 P.M.
in the MSC Social Room.
This week: Blues Messagers and Junestar
Lane Game
NAME OUR CENTER CONTEST
If you can come up with just the right name
for our bowling center, you will win a free bowling ball and bag and
all the prestige and press that goes along with being a kingpin. Pick
up your entry form at the bowling center.
Deadline for entry is September 30. Call 328-4740.
���
m
m
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:
to
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m
s
���
Mi
5
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Ml
3
Wtm FJseJjfcOidIbu kpect Fromggftregof Of Clette'�
m
" TJhe Comedy Event
of the Year
They r wiling auvic but not Mlling out.
Top0?" I
�retting
BvttRE RECORDS
CRAMERCY
THURS. AT 8 PM
SAT. AT 11 PM
A WvtM IM at � OW � t-CiMM �����
THURS. AT 11 PM
FRI. AT 8 PM
0p�n -til tdnigrit.
FRI. AT 11 PM
SAT. AT 8 PM
ALL FILMS START AT 8 & 11 PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED AND ARE FREE FOR
ALL STUDENTS.FACULTY, AND STAFF. (ONE GUEST ALLOWED) WITH VALID ECU ID.
JMZ
AT NKIT
Carroll Dashiell and Students
from the School or Music
Friday, September 26, 199?
8 - 11 PM � Mendenkall Student Center Great Room
FREEH!
Sponsored by the Student Union
Special Events Committee & ECU School ot Music
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room 8 - 10:45 pm
Thursday, September 25, 1997
Blues Messengers
June Star
SERVICES: Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games � Student Locator Service
� ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board � Art Gallery
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.ml 1 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.ml 1 p.m.
3
�rlVJUKa: MOn - inurs. O a.ml I p.m m. o d.iiiu a.m jai. it p.iMii a.m u . yr j
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS'
The ECU Student Union Board of Directors is now accepting applications for the day-student representative
for the 1997 - 98 term. Qualifications: Full time student, resides off campus, independent
Aj o i n T Responsibilities: Selecting the Student Union President, approving committee chair-
persons, approving the Student Union budget, setting policy for the Student Union.
Applications can be picked up at the Student Union Office - Room 236 in Mendenhall
Student Center. For more info, call the Student Union at 328-4715.
-���
���
�-

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f
11 Tuesday. September 23. 1997
sporb
s
The East Carolinian
REC SERVICES
Get your frisbee golf discs ready for upcoming tourney
The Department of Recreational Services will be
hosting a Frisbee Golf Tournament on Wednesday,
Sept. 24 and Thursday, Sept. 25 from 3 p.m. to 6
p m at the Frisbee Golf Course of of Charles
Boulevard adjacent to the SoftballBaseball
Complex. Registration will be conducted on-site
with a valid ECU identification card and is open to
all currently enrolled students, faculty, and staff.
Each participant will throw one round of 18 holes,
which takes approximately 20 30 minutes, to
determine their final score. Men's and women s
divisions are available. The individuals who record
the lowest score in each division will be awarded an
Intramural Sports Champion T-shirt. Recreational
Services will provide 176 gram discs and scorecards
for competition. There is no cost for participating
in the activity.
Frisbee Golf is a unique activity that combines ele-
ments of two sports (Frisbee and Golf) into a r lax-
ing, low stress, and enjoyable activity. While t is
increasing in popularity, there are many people who
are unfamiliar with how it is played due to the
small number of courses available. The activity
itself is verv simple and consists of throwing a flat
rounded disc toward a specific "hole usually a
pole with a basket and chained net suspended sev-
eral feet above the ground. The object of the game
is to throw the disc into each pole hole in the east
amount of throws possible. Similar to golfeach
hole has a tee off position and a designated "par.
The desirable qualities of this activity over tradi-
tional golf is that it involves no player equipment
other than the frisbee disc, is extremely inexpen-
sive, and the atmosphere is very low key.
ECU is fortunate enough to maintain their own 18
hole course which is heavily used by students, fac-
ulty, staff, and the community. On a bright and
sunny day it is not unusual to see several dozen
players on the course enjoying the weather and the
challenge of the activity: Recreational services also
has Frisbee Discs available on a check-out basis at
the Customer Service desk in the Student
Recreation Center for those individuals who wish
to get some additional practice or simply play for
recreational purposes. For further information, con-
tact David Gaskins or Candice Voigt at
Recreational Services at 328-6387.
X-Country
contimued from page 9
comments, "It was a good workout
for our B Team. This was an excel-
lent Invitational because it gave us a
chance to show our stuff. We will run
aggressively at William and Mary
Due to a scoring error in the
women's race, junior Kerri Hartling
(Baypoint, N.Y.) was accidentally
omitted from the official scoring
results. Hartling led the way for the
Lady Pirates finishing 17th in 19:00.
Sophomore Robin Bates (Winslow,
Maine) finished 24th 19:24. Senior
Karen Reinhard (Burke, fc.) placed
33rd, while freshman Becky Testa
(McDonald, Ohio) and Fran Lattie
(Lumberton, N.C.) finished 45th
and 51st respectively.
"It was a hilly course said ECU
women's head coach Charles "Choo"
Justice. "This week our effort was
much better our No. 4, No. 5, and
No. 6 runners need better perfor-
mances. By gaining experience, they
will make progress
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Committee





Tuesday. September 23. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AWESOME BEDROOM WITH HUGE brick
fireplace only $200 a month at Tar River.
Moving - Need someone to take over lease
ASAP. Male or female. Call Shawn, 830-
FREE UTILITIES, 1 BEDROOM,V2 block
from camps on Holly St Cats allowed with
deposit Rent $305 a month. 757-9387.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED PLAYERS
Club Apts. Split expenses 14. Call Melissa
at 321-7613 for more Information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED, PLAY-
ERS Ciub Apts. Split expenses V4. Call Mel-
issa at 321-7613 for more information.
ONE BEDROOM, PRIVATE BALCONY,
free cable, water, sewage, washerdryer
hookups, only $275 a month. Call 353-5613,
leave your name and number ASAP.
WANTED: FEMALE NEEDED TO share
apartment and take over lease with three
others. Players Club Apts Call 353-1543
ASAP!
NEW TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX. Minutes
from Greenville. $385 a month. Washer, dry-
er hookups. Call day 551-7810; night, 321-
2329.
GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING 1 mala
housemate. S186 00montf. plus 13 utilities.
Located within walking distanca from cam-
pus. Call Kevin at 561-7218, leave a mee-
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
ASAP; just minutes from campus. House lo-
cated or ,1,2 acres of land, 3-tier deck, hot-
tub, and cooitabie. Call 353-4383 for more
Information.
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Apcrtnenb &
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male. 2 bdrm. apt $175 a month plus depos-
it 12 phone and utilities. Needed ASAP. Call
758-4325, ask for Nlkki.
1 BEDROOM APT. ACROSS from ECU.
parking, gas heat completely remodeled
Move in now. Call 355-8731 or (9191 271-
4999.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM apartment ONLY
$235.00 par month, on Cotanche Street di-
rectly across from new ECU Rec Center.
MOVE IN NOW with $100.00 security depos-
it Call 758-1921, ask for Chuck.
For Sale
SAMICK ELECTRIC GUITAR (VALLEY
Arts Custom) Fender Bullet reverb practice
amp. Diamond Back Outlook bicycle. Sony
Discman CD player and accessories. 816-
2149.
AUDIOPHILE ALERT! PAIR OF DQ-30
Datquist speakers in mint condition. These
speaker are exquisite. Excellent for any ap-
plication including large rooms or sound-
Stage. Beat offer over $1200. 321-4046752-
1333.
Rmm
All LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
must be typed. 250 words or
lees, end must include your
name, major, year, and phone .
I the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
THE END OF YOUR SEARCH
FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
RED OAK CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1827 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-3526
Services: Worship 11 a.m
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Vespers 6 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF CHRIST
1706 Greenville Blvd. SE
752-6376
Services: 9 a.m 10:15 a.m.� 6
p.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednes-
day
WE WELCOME YOU? LET US
BE YOUR CHURCH AWAY
FROM HOME
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Comer of Crestline Bivd. &
Greenville Blvd.
756-6545
Services: Bible School 10 a.m
morning worship 11 a.m
evening worship 6 p.m.
REACHING OUT TO
GREENVILLE WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles St. (Hwy. 43)
756-6600
Services: Sunday School 9:45
a.m Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
JOIN OUR COLLEGE SUNDAY
SCHOOL CLASS AT 9:45 AM
EACH SUNDAY
THE MEMORIAL
BAPTIST CHURCH
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
756-5314
Services: Sunday 11 a.m
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (dinner
at 5:45 p.m.)
COME JOIN MANY OTHER
STUDENTS FOR AWESOME
WORSHIP AND A RELEVANT
WORD
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
752-1898
COME JOIN US FOR
WORSHIP & SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENIENT TO
ECU CAMPUS
ST. JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
752-6154
Services: Worship-Sunday
8.30 a.m 11 a.m Sunday
School 9:45 a.m.
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS
ORGANIZATION DRAWING ON
A VARIETY OF TRADITIONS
FOR INSPIRATION
UNITARIAN UNIVER-
SALIST CONGREGA-
TION OF GREENVILLE
131 Oakmont Drive
355-6658
Services: 10:30 a.m. each
Sunday
A CHURCH GROWING IN
CHRIST, CARING FOR PEOPLE,
PROCLAIMING THE WORD
GREENVILLE CHRIS-
TIAN FELLOWSHIP
1411 S. Evans Street
752-2100
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday
SINGLE VISION-PBC'S
EXCITING CAMPUS MINISTRY
ECU STUDENTS B SINGLES
WELCOME
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST
CHURCH
1621 Greenville Blvd. SW
756-2822
Services: Sunday 9:45 a.m
10:45 a.m 6:30 p.m
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
COME AND JOIN US IN
PRAISING THE LORD!
SYCAMORE HILL
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
226 W. 8th Street
758-2281
Services: Every Sunday
SEGA GENESIS WITH 10 games, 2 con-
trollers, $80. Nintendo Qameboy with 11
games, rechargeable battery pack, all in-
struction booklets for games available, $50.
Call 353-2813, leave message.
AQUARIUM FILTER -HAGAN FLUVAL
403. Includes 5 filter carbons, 5 foam
blocks, pra-flltar madia, 4 flitar madia
oags. $108 for everythlngl Call Mark at
830-0722.
NEED A BIKE? PERFECT campus com-
muter. Two month old Mountain bike with
Shimano parts. Brand new condition. $50.
931-0975
SPECIALIZED ROCK HOPPER BICYCLE
for sale. 6 months old. Paid $500, asking
$250. Includes U-iock. Call 353-7162, leave a
Greek Personals
MOVING- WORK OUT AT home with Solo-
flex, $500 firm. Small dresser perfect for
dorm room, $40. Free- 34 lab, 14 husky,
black male dog. 355-3539.
MAGIC THE GATHERING SINGLES- Buy,
sell, or trade game playing m apace allows.
Call 752-1621 after 5:30 p.m.
1995 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2-OOOR, pur-
ple, 5-spd, ac CD player, tinted windows.
Will take bast offer. Must sell. Call 757-2037.
AKC DOBERMAN PUPPIES FOR sale.
830-9078. $200
APPLE POWER MAC 7500100 for sale.
; 4 MB RAM, 500 MB HD, 4X CD ROM. ex-
tended keyboard, 16" Apple monitor, 14.4
loom modem, loaded w graphic design
programs! $1660. Call 321-1440.
!BM THINKPADS AND OTHER laptops.
Student discounts. Finance for less than
$35.00 a month. Free carrying case. Call 355-
7057.
Help Wanted"
SALES OPPORTUNITIES: BRODY'S IS
accepting applications for additional asso-
ciates In: Junior Sportswear and Young
Man's. Flexible schedulesclothing discount
To get a head start on your fall wardrobe or
the holiday shopping seasons, apply at
Customer Service, every Monday-Thursday,
1-5 p.m Brady's, The Ptaza.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON. SPLASH last
Friday was great You sang your way into
our hearts. Can't wait to do it again. Love,
Chi Omega
SIGMA EPSILON, THANKS FOR the
good time we had tallgatirtgl Love, Sigma
Sigma Sigma.
PIKA-MORNING, NOON, AND night
PIKA's and ChiO's know how to party right!
Champagne Brunch was once again a great
time. We can't wait until next year. Love, Chi
Omega.
TO THE SISTERS OF Sigma Sigma Sigma,
we enjoyed Dance Party of the 70's. We
hope to have another great social. Love, the
brothers of Theta Chi.
KAPPA ALPHA, THANKS FOR a great so-
cial Thursday. We will have to do it again
soon. Love, Alpha Phi.
CHI OMEGA WISHES TO thank Dr. Daniels
for agreeing to be our faculty advisor. We
greatly appreciate it and are looking forward
to spending the upcoming year together.
Thanks again. Love, Chi Omega.
CHI OMEGA WISHES TO recognize Pledg-
es of the Weak - Jerma Matyiko and Stacey
Curtis. Super Senior- Courtney Lewis end
Sister of the Week-Jen O'Conner. We love
you!
LAMBDA CHI, THANKS FOR the awe-
some tailgate on Saturday. We can't wait to
have Pref next week and share the fun all
over again! Love, Chi Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SIGMA lit-
t!e sisters. We had fun BigA.il' Sis night!
Simga Rocks!
ORDER OF OMEGA MEETING tonight
Underground of Mendenhall, 6:00 p.m. All
members must attend!
ALPHA PHI NEW MEMBERS, we hope
you girls had a blest on your Big Sis hunt!
Special thanks to Delta Sigma Phi and Kap-
pa Alpha for your help. Love, Alpha Phi.
THANK YO ALPHA PHI for the wonderful
Bid Night We had a great time with you like
always. Love, the brothers of Theta Chi.
"Income, independence,
ar d Impact"
This is wiat you can achieve by
participating in a Northwestern
Mutual internship at ECU.
Contact Jeff Mahoney for information.
355-7700
WAREHOUSE HELP NEEDED. MORN-
ING and afternoons. Apply in person at the
Carpet Bargain Center, 1009 Dickinson Ave.
ANDY'S CHEESESTEAKS ft CHEESE-
BURGERS will be opening 2 new locations
in Greenville. Applications will be taken at
our Plaza Mall location between 2-5 pm M-F.
No phone calls please.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPARTMENT
of Athletics, Office of Student Development
is currently hiring full-time ECU undergrad
and graduate students to tutor student-ath-
tetee in the following subject areas: CHEM
1120, 2750; BIOL 1050. 1051; EXSS 3850;
GEOG 1000, 2200; ECON 3144, 3030, 3980.
Minimum 3.0 GPA required. Call 328-4550.
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS WITH
knowledge of Soccer, will train. Must have
transportation. Work on Saturdays only. Call
Rita at 830-4216.
Roadway Package Symm
Part Time
$7 OtMv. Loading and unloading trailers and v
3AM- BAM, Monday - Friday
Tuition Assistance AvaiaMs
bis at 2410 United Of. in 1
Industrial Park. Greemiss
FREE T-SHIRT
- $1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
whopping S5.00VISA
application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT
For information about being included in our Church Directory call 328-6366.
NEW RIVER GORGE, WV: Join us on the
great adventure trip on Oct. 3-7. Be sure to
register by Sept 27 in the Student Recrea-
tion Canter main office. Dept of Rec. Servie-
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR Socie-
ty is having a meeting on Tuesday, Septem-
ber 23, in the General Classroom Building in
room 1010 at 5:30. We look forward to see-
ing everyone. Please attend and enjoy the
new, exciting agenda for the year.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION WORKSHOP:
WEDNESDAY from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Stress
Management workshop: Thursday from
3:30-500 p.m. Aseertiveness Training work-
shop: Tuesday from 3:30-500 p.m. Tips for
Writing Papers workshop: Tuesday from
11:00-1200 noon. Test Preparation work-
shop: Thursday from 2:30-3:30 p.m. The
Center for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment will be offering these programs the
week of September 22nd. If you are interest-
ed in any of these workshops, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
SUPER BALL DOUBLES GOLF entry
deadline: the golf entries are due by 500
p.m. on Sept 23 in the Student Recreation
Center room 128. Dept of Rec. Services.
WEIGHT TRAINING CLINIC: FOR the
adapted arise program, from 11:00 s.m
rtoon on Sept 27 at the fitness area in the
Student Recreation Center. Dept of Rec
Services
COLLEGE SKI WEEK COLORADO: Join
us for a full week of skiing in Colorado Jan.
4-9. Be sure to register by Sept 25 in the
Student Recreation Center main office.
Dept of Rec. Services
COME JOIN US FOR fun and fellowship at
the Methodist Student Center (across from
Garret Hail on 5th St) Sunday, October 5th.
We will be having Sunday night worship at
7.30 in the Chapel. Wed. Sept 24 we will be
serving dinner at 6O0 p.m. (it's free!) For
more information, call 758-2030.
"Services
Travel
AAAA! SPRING BREAK CANCUN & Ja-
maica S379) Book Early-Save $50! Get A
Group-Go Free! Panama City $129! South
Beach (Bars Close SAM!) $129! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386.
AAAA1 SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Par-
ty Cruise! 6 Days $279! Includes Meals, Free
Parties, Taxes! Get a Group-Go Free! Prices
Increase Soon-Save $50! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
Take 2
Organize Soufl Group! Sell 15 Take 2 Free.
lamia, Oman, Bananas, Honda, Barbados, Pate.
Free Parties, Eats, Drinks,
SunSpUsh Tours - 1-800-426-7710.
Announcements
Is your creative
talent Better than
this
Then you could
Be a (Production
Assistant at
eastcarolinian
flppty "Within.
Things Realty Move
In the Classifieds!
n Mil.
Advertise
with us in
The East
Carolinian.
CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR MY six-year
old daughter. Need energetic, creative per-
son to pick-up at Overton's aftarschool, keep
in my home. Would love experienced, flexi-
ble individual. Call 523-3417 or 527-9199.
ext 105.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today. 747-7688.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS available.
Greenville Recreation & Parks Department
FALL YOUTH SOCCER COACHES.The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the fall youth soccer pro-
gram. Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and have the
ability and patience to work with youth. Ap-
plicants must be able to coach young peo-
ple ages 5-15, In soccer fundamentals.
Hours are from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules.This program will run from Sep-
tember to mid November. Salary rates start
at $5.15 per hour. For more information,
please call Ber. James or Michael Daly at
830-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
NOW HIRING DANCERS FOR new club in
Rocky Mount For info, call 442-7550. leave
message.
20 MILER APPALACHIAN TRAIL: join us
on this intense backpacking trip through the
Appalachian on Oct. 3-7. Be sure to register
by Sept 27 in the Student Recreation Center
main office. Dept of Rec. Services
ABSOLUTELY UNBELIEVABLE FREE
TUTORING sessions offered by ECU pro-
fessors every Monday, Tuesday and Thurs-
day starting at 4 p.m. at the Ledonia Wright
African American Cultural Center. Math tu-
toring on Mon . and Tue. Math and Science
on Thursday.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL meet September
23 at 5:00p.m. in The General Classroom
Building Room 1032.
THE SOCIETY FOR ADVANCEMENT of
Management (SAM) will be meeting Tues-
day at 3:30 in GC1026. Jeff Allen will be
guest speaking about Career Day and how
to conduct yourself during an interview. All
majors are welcome. Refreshments will be
served.
TUES. SEPT. 23-GRADUATE RECITAL,
James Hampton, tenor, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. 7O0 p.m. THURS. SEPT. 25 -SYM-
PHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE AND CONCERT
BAND, Scott Carter and Christopher Knight-
en. Conductors. Wright Auditorium, 8:00
p.m. Sept 26JAZZ AT NIGHT, Carroll V.
Dashiell Jr Director, The Great Room, Men-
denhall Student Center. 8:00 p.m. SUN
SEPT. 28-FALL SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT OF
THE FRIENDS OF THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC.
Lawn concert featuring PANAMA STEEL,
Mark Ford, Director. For ticket information
call 919-32&6851.4O0 p.m. MON SEPT. 29-
FACULTY RECITAL. "Song Cycles of Life and
Love Sharon Murtden, mezzo-soprano and
John B. O'Brien, piano, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. 8.00 pm.
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOP-
MENT PROGRAMS will present "Ready
for the Real World" Monday, September
29th at 4:00 p.m. in Mendenhall 244. Dr. Hel-
en Grove, Dean-School of Human Environ-
mental Science, will demonstrate the pro-
fessional skills needed to survive and suc-
ceed in your career.
FRISBEE GOLF SINGLES: SEPT. 2425 at
the frisbee golf course from 3-6:00 p.m.
Dept. of Rec. Services
CO-REC BASKETBALL REGISTRATION
MEETING: if you are interested in playing
co-rec basketball, you are required to attend
the registration meeting on Sept 23 at 5:00
p.m. at Mendenhall room 244. Dept of Rec.
Services.
GAMMA BETA PHI -There will be a meet-
ing for old members of Gamma Beta Phi on
Tuesday, Sept. 23rd in GCB Room 1032 at
5:00 p.m. Hope to see everyone there. Ques-
tions, call Dawn at 757-3007.
FREE COMPLEMENTARY FACIALS AND
other services available from Mary Kay Cos-
metics. For more information andor appts.
call 328-3817. Free products available.
ADVERTI
Hit year targ
tin
eas
the
I the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
ciassin
OPEN RATE
$3 for 25 or fewer words
STUDENT RATE
$2 for 25 or fewer words
(Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify.)
Additional words over 25 are 5$ each
AD EXTRAS
Bold type is $1 extra
All caps type is $1 extra
(Charges for extras are in addition to the line ad charges
shown above.)
DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY for the TUESDAY issue
4 p.m. MONDAY for the THURSDAY issue
ALL CLASSIFIED ADS MUST BE PREPAID.
Take the Spotlight
ft
and Speak Your Miad
eastcarolinian
Wants Yon? Opinion!
All letters to the Editor must
be typed A 250 words or
less. Moat include your
name, rnajor,year, and
phone. Send to:
V The East Carolinian
ECU
2nd Floor Student.
Pub. Building
Greenville, NC
27858
Your Voice Matters!
he eastcarolinian
Find your pot of gold in
the oast Carolinian, Lads.
To advertise with uil call us at 328-2000
r
I
C j


Title
The East Carolinian, September 23, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 23, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1227
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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