The East Carolinian, September 18, 1997






�"
THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 18,1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Skully
skulls
HITTIN' THE MALL
University sues downtown business for
infringing on trademark
JACQUELINE D. KELLUM
NEWS EDITOR
The skull and crossbones logo of one downtown Greenville business
may be preparing to haunt its owners.
Skully's, a music store in downtown Greenville, uses the skull and cross-
bone; as their logo. The logo is also used by the university.
PHOTO BY JOCEIT FRICOMAN
On Friday, Sept. 12, ECU filed an injunction against Skully's, a music
store in downtown Greenville. The suit stated that tho pirate skull and
crossbones logo of the store, in combination with ECU's purple and gold
colors, infringed on ECU's trademark registration.
"It's not just the colors, though the colors are important. It's the use
of the colors with the pirate design that creates confusion with the
University's mark University Attorney Ben G. Irons said.
The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District
of North Carolina and names the owners of Skully's, Tom and Rebecca
Ives, as defendants.
Tom Ives said that he has retained legal counsel specializing in trade-
mark law and does not believe his store's logo infringes on ECU's logo
in any way.
"Our position is that we have a valid trademark registered with the
state. We are not in violation of any of the trademark rules which they
nave filed Ives said.
The University attempted to warn the owners verbally before taking
legal action.
"I first talked with Tom and Rebecca Ives about their use of the
mark in May of 19. I believe that was some time after they started
using it Irons said.
Skully's did not discontinue their use of the mark, and the
University later decided to take legal action.
I see no evidence that they have altered the way in which they arc
selling their mark Irons said.
The registration mentioned by Ives is with the Department of the
Secretary of State. According to Irons, ECU's trademarks are registered
on the federal level with the VS. 'Patent and Trademark Office, which
undertakes a much more rigorous search to confirm that a new trade-
mark is not copying any other logo already registered.
The University is not attempting to obtain any damages or other
compensation from the suit. They are asking only for the discontinued
use of the logo.
"Part of the University's goal is to have our state trademark rescind-
ed Ives said.
"Our primary objective is to get them to stop. If they would stop
using the mark with the University colors, we would have no reason to
proceexi Irons said.
However, if the University were to win the suit, they would attempt
to regain their court costs.
"If the University is forced to proceed with litigation, it is certainly
going to attempt to receive its costs connected with the litigation
Irons said.
While the University alleges that Skully's logo is an attempt to mar-
ket their merchandise, Ives says that his store's merchandise has very
little to do with their trademark.
"I've got over 3,000 used CD's and over a thousand stickers in the
store, and a big variety of other merchandise. The main business I have
is not evolved around our store's logo Ives said.
Skully's continues to use the skull and crossbones logo and indicates
that they will conduct their business as they have been until the case is
decided.
"As a small business in downtown Greenville, we would like to have
the opportunity to continue to conduct business as we have been Ives
said. "VW: would appreciate any support trie'students can give usv"
Air Force ROTC celebrates 50 years
Range of events slated
during coming months
AMANDA BR1GGS
STAFF WHITE
The Air Force is gearing up to celebrate its
50th anniversary.
Many programs have been set up on cam-
pus to celebrate the Air Force and the Air Force
ROTC program here at ECU. Events sur-
rounding the 50th anniversary arc going to take
place throughout the year. -
September 18,1947 the Air Fbrce won inde-
pendence becoming a full partner with the
Army and the Navy. The importance of air
capabilities was seen through out North Korea,
Vietnam, the "Cold r and the invasion of
Kuwait The Air Force has stood its ground
and shown itself to be a strong American
defense corps. With the primary mission of the
Air Force is fighting and winning wars, span-
SGA President Scon Forbes presents a t-shirt to
outstanding ROTC cadets from left: Nathan Scott,
Cone Bawn and Ray Erieksen.
PHOTO BY JACQUELINE 0. KCUUM
ning the globe as a worldwide force, and
providing a helping hand or a firm fist
when needed.
One year after the Air Force became
a separate service, East Carolina estab-
lished academic studies in Air Force
ROTC. Since 1948, over one thousand
students have gone through this pro-
gram. Public Affairs Officer for Cadet
Corps. Cadet Jeff Bright is presently a
student that is going through the ROTC
program. He is enjoying the respect and
the traditions that are go hand and hand
with the ROTC program and the cele-
bration of their past 50 years.
"The ROTC is continuing with the
tradition of the Air Force. We are fol-
lowing in the footsteps of the Air Force's
fines: leaders. The blue uniform allows
us to maintain and show are respects
and maintain traditions, there is a
tremendous responsibility that comes
with that said Cadet Bright.
In the past 50 years, the Ur ted
States has become an aerospace na ion.
To commorate the 50th anniversary, the
Air Force with highlight the pride with-
in their service. Their objectives
include:
1. Highlight the continuing impor-
tance of air and space power
2. Increase pride in the Air Force
team
3. Thank and honor veterans and
family members
4. Educate public on Air Force con-
tributions to the nation
5. Thank the community and our
citizens
Here on campus the ROTC is trying
to maintain some of these objectives.
Many events have been set up for East
Carolina this year. With these events
the Air Force ROTC is allowing students
and faculty to become involved with the
A student takes advantage of the warm September weather as he spends time on the mad studying
between classes.
� PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Review of Medical
Foundation released
State auditors release
review of medical
foundation following
embezzlement charges
ANGELA KOENIG
STAFF WRITE
Chancellor
� Richard Eakin
Cadets lower the flag near Joyner at the close of the day.
PHOTO BY JACOUElINE 0. KEUUM
SEE ROTC. PAGE Z
A special review of the Medical Foundation of
ECU, Inc released by the state auditor's
office, describes the investigation of embez-
zlement charges against former Medical
Foundation President and Executive Director
Robert K. Adams II.
At a press conference held Wednesday,
State Auditor Ralph Campbell, Jr. discussed
the findings of the 20- month investigation.
"Remember that this actually came from a
tip to the state auditor's hotline. This report
demonstrates clearly that every allegation
must be thoroughly and carefully evaluated
Campbell said.
According to the review, the tip was
received December 4, 1995 with an anony-
mous call stating that the then-President of
the Medical Foundation was being reimbursed
by ECU for travel expenses which were paid
for by the foundation.
According to Campbell, his office met with
the State Bureau of Investigation in February
of the following year and submitted the evi-
dence the state auditor's office had gathered.
At this point the SBI began investigating the
criminal allegations.
"This report illustrates the significance of
the access of our office in providing a means
for people to raise questions about improper
use of state resources Campbell said.
The review describes five main findings
which are related to the former president's
actions.
The first is that the president of the ECU
Medical Foundation operated without suffi-
cient oversight Campbell said.
"Number 2 received payments from the
medical school for travel expenses that were
paid by the medical
foundation. Those
amounts came to
$3607.99 Campbell
said.
According to Campbell,
Adams also purchased
some land for the med-
ical foundation from a
personal business part-
ner and received at least
$169,700 of the profit-
Adams also bought
another piece of land
and sold it to the foundation on the same day,
awarding him a profit of $384,000.
"The medical foundation lost at least
$230,000 waiting to purchase another parcel of
land Campbell said. "The former president of
the medical foundation used medical funds to
purchase two computer systems from his out-
side business partner which resulted in
$14,000
According to Campbell, Adams granted a
consulting contract to an outside business
partner for $15,000 over three months.
The review noted the total financial impact
as being $1,215,645.
"that financial impact could have in result-
ed in every new freshman this year at ECU
having been given $415 and every entering
student in the medical school $72
Campbell said.
A Pitt County Grand Jury issued six indict-
ments containing 16 felony charges against
Adams. Van C. Fleming III, a stockbroker and
business associate of Adams, was given two
felony charges earlier this month.
Chancellor Richard Eakin hopes that other
universities will learn from the error ECU
made.
"One always has to worry about lasting
effects in a matter such as this, I would be very
foolish not to be concerned about that. That is
what has motivated us to communicate with as
many of our donors as we can. Persons who arc
friends of our University, to be straight forward
with them, to let them know these are what
the facts are and aren't and that we are pro-
gressing forward into the future said Eakin.
TODAY
partly sunny
High 88

si Low 66
TOMORROW
partly sunny
High 88
Low 66
ECU quarterback Danny
Gonzalez wears a shoe size
13.
opinion,
Technology course
should be included in
general college
requirements
lifestyle6
Cartoons not just for kids
anymore
sports.
10
Pirates hope for third
win in series with USC
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG,
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across ftom Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
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2 Thursday. Sipttmbtr 18, 1997
news
Career Day fair offers wide range of
choices for students of all majors
Natasha Phillips
STAFF WRITER
Career Services and the School of Business Professional Programs are sponsor-
ing Business Career Day. It's guaranteed to provide abundant information and
potential employment opportunities for all ECU students who attend.
Business Career Day will be held Sept. 24 in the General Classroom
Building. Various employers and a wide-range of businesses, including a law
school, will have displays.
"Most students falsely believe that Business Career Day is a day only for
accounting or management students. In reality, it's very inclusive. There's
something for everone said James R. Wfestmorcland, Director of Career
Services.
BB&T, Champs Sports, Coca Cok Bottling Co Hudson Belk, IBM, Lowes
roods, Target, Disney, Maxim Healthcare, Red Lobster, the U.S. force and the
Winston Sakm Police Department are just a few of the organizations who will
attend Business Career Day
There will be approximately 70 different employers participating in this
function. Representatives will be able to talk to students, answer questions,
and distribute pamphlets and brochures.
Organizations will begin arriving at 9 a.m howevet; officials will not be
immediately accessible to students. Representatives will open their designat-
ed areas at 9-30 a.m. and close at 2:30 p.m.
"I encourage all students to attend and ask various employers about employ-
ment opportunities. An insurance company may have a job opening for some-
one with a psychology or journalism degree. Don't be fooled by a company's
name. Ask questions and gather information. If nothing else, you may become
more accurately i formed about career opportunities said Vfestmoreland.
Students are encouraged to bring resumes and to dress neatly. If you don't
have a resume, don't worry. If you stop by between classes and arc casually
dressed, don't worry.
"Sometimes the best thing to do is to make eye contact, smile, and be con-
fident said Westmoreland.
"Being knowledaglc of an organization, asking persistent questions, express-
ing a sincere interesr, and writing a thank you note to individuals you meet at
Career Day arc helpful ways to make your experience more productive said
Margie Swartout, Assistant Director of Career Services.
Representatives understand that you're busy and they appreciate your
interest. If they like you and arc interested in you as a potential intern or
employee, they may schedule an appointment with you at a later date.
"I encourage all students to participate. Participation shows appreciation
for the organization's attendance. The purpose of this function is to exchange
information said Swartout.
Some companies will participate in both Business Career Day and classroom
speaking engagements. In addition to social interaction and lectures, student
organizations will also be active in this year's Business Career Day.
"There will be a number of companies who will speak to several classrooms
and various student organizations that will help to make it a success. We're
involving Beta Alpha Psi and graduate business students, particularly those in
the Society for the Advancement of Management, to help ensure a more suc-
cessful day for everyone involved said Swartout.
The School of Business Professional Programs offers an unique opportunity
for graduate students to assistant companies on Business Career Day.
Each graduate student is assigned to assist one company Their duties
include running crands and watching over the table, which increases the com-
pany's efficiency and productivity.
"ECU is one of the few university's that has graduate student participation.
We're very proud of it. This is an event to attend said Lisa Geil, Program
Assistant for the School of Business Professional Programs.
"Business Career Day offers numerous opportunities. It was created for
every student's benefit and every student should take advantage of it said
Westmoreland.
If you would like more information about Business Career Day, please call
328-6050, stop by 701 East Ffth Street, or go to the Office of Professional
Programs in the General Classroom Building, room 1200.
ROTC
continual! from page 1
ceremonies. Captain LaPointe, is cur-
rently trying to finalize some events
that have been specially planned for
the anniversary.
"We are having one of the alumni,
General Worthington honored at a
luncheonsaid Captain LaPointe.
Major General Walter T.
Worthington was involved in the
ROTC program here at East Carolina
and graduated in 1963. He was then
commissioned as a Second Lt. and
then continued to work his way to
Major General.
"The big event is going to be on
Homecoming October 25. Vife arc
going to have a fly-by F-15 from
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base will
fry-by during the national anthem in
the prcgamc said LaPointe.
In continuation with the 50 year
celebration the SGA gave three letters
of recognition to Cadets Ray Erickson,
Coretta Bawn, and Nathan Scott.
These cadets were recognized
because of their achievements in
graduating in the top 10 percent of
their Air Force Camp, located at Air
Force Base Tilde Field
Encampment.
The national theme for the Air
Force's celebration is, "Golden
Legacy, Boundless Future Your
Nation's Air Force
Cadet Donald Land stands basdide a T-38 Talon at Reese Air Force Base, Texas.
COURTESY OF MR FORK ROTC
,i1QW6
RESEARCHERS SAY TECHNOLOGY COULD MAKE
COMPUTERS WORK FASTER
CHARLOTTE (AP)�Two researchers from the University of North Carolina-
Charlotte say they've found a way to link electronic and optical technology on the
same silicon chip, a breakthrough that could lead to faster and cheaper comput-
ers in the future. Raphael Tsu, an electrical engineering professor, and Qi Zhang,
a postdoctorate fellow, recently submitted their findings to the journal, Science.
Computers and electronics receive, process and transmit information through
electrical currents, as through wires, or with tiny beams of light, as with fiber
optics. But manufacturers must use different semiconductors for the electronics
and optical technology.
DRIVER GETS PRISON IN CRASH AT PIZZA PLACE
GRANITE FALLS, N.C. (AP) � A man with a history of drunken-driving; con-
victions pleaded guilty Monday to driving a truck into a Caldwell County pizza
restaurant and injuring 10 people in 1995.
Fred Brady, 61, of Granite Falls, was sentenced to between four years and six
years and four months in prison by Judge Claude Sitton. He will be required to
serve five years of probation after he's released and won't be allowed to have a dri-
ver's license during that time.
Brady had been charged with three counts of felony assault with a deadly
weapon, inflicting serious injury and five counts of misdemeanor assault with a
deadly weapon. Investigators said Brady's blood-alcohol level was 0.18 percent
when he plowed his pick-up into the Granite Falls Pizza Hut about 1 p.m. on
Sept. 20,1995.
If
CIS officials say
transition to
Exchange smooth
�� Tift"
Jacqueline D. kellum
M�j KDITDk
Computing Information Systems
(CIS) expected to have a rocky road
to travel when they became the
first university in the U.S. to install
the e-mail system Microsoft
Exchange. However, according to
CIS, the switch frony the old VM
system has been remarkably trou-
ble-free.
"In fact it's gone very smoothly.
We've been pleased at the recep-
tiveity said Earnest Marshburn,
associate director of CIS.
"We really haven't noticed a lot
of problems said Blake Price,
director of CIS.
One of the University's con-
cerns was uncertainty about
whether the University's server
could handle the load of large num-
bers of students, faculty, and staff
logging on simultaneously. CIS pre-
vented that problem by dividing
the load.
"We have it spread across three
different servers. We tried to spread
the load Price said.
There was also some concern
about notifying students that the
old VM system they were used to
had been replaced, and training
them to use the new system.
"Our concern was getting word
out to the students about the
Exchange Price said.
CIS notified students by posting
flyers across campus, taking out
full-page ads in The East
Carolinian, and training computer
lab assistants to assist students in
learning the new system.
?
Come to see the post
game show
smAM
Japanese Steak House
Under New Management
Everyday Special
WaekdayEarly Bird
Steak and Shrimp Dinner- $9.99
Mon-Thura 4:30-6:00
Weekend Early Bird Special
Steak and Shrimp Dinner for 2- $19.99
Frl and Sat 4:30-6:00
Sunday -All Day-
Samurai Dinner (SteakShrimpChicken)-$14.00
Come and try our Original Tempura
We also have a Sushi weekday special
The new system has many more
features than the old VM system,
such as word processing capabilities
and the ability to send attachments
with an e-mail message.
It also has the advantage of
accessibiSry from anywhere a web
browser can be reached. Because it
is accessed through the Internet,
students can enter their e-mail
from home, their dorm room, or an
independent server.
"It doesn't require special soft-
ware or tools, just a web browser
Marshburn said.
There may be additional ways to
use Exchange that have not yet
been implemented, but which CIS
is exploring.
"There's been a committee
formed just to look at the different
ways you can use Exchange for
classes Price said.
There has also been student
feedback on other ways that the
Exchange system could be used.
"What I'm hearing are sugges-
tions for enhancements
Marshburn said. "I'm relaying those
comments to Microsoft
The number of hits on the new
system seem to confirm that
Exchange is popular among stu-
dents, staff, and faculty.
"It's tremendous the number of
people that arc logged on compared
to the old system Price said.
Price and Marshburn both agree
that the risk they took in being the
first to implement the system has
apparently been worth it.
"That gives us all truly a sense of
pride to know that we arc the first
college in the country to employ
this on an enterprise-wide basis
Marshburn said.
The East Carolinian
Contra Dance
Sat. Sept 20
Beginner lessons 7:00 - 7:30
Dance 7:30-10:30
Wills Cantor
Downtown Graanvill
Corner of Reeds 6 Rrst St
ECU Folk and Country Dancers, 830-5403.
Dress To Impress
Safe
� 20 off Bridal Gowns
� 10-50 off Selected
Cocktail and Formals
?.
South Park Shopping
Center
115 Red Banks Rd.
Greenville; NC
(919) 756-8241
Hours:
Sun-Thurs 4:30-10:00
Fri-Sat 4:30-11:00
Sato Ends
September 30,1W7
rerms A Conditions Apply
Tuxedo � Prom & Special Occasion Formals
Wedding Gown & Bridesmaid Dresses � Pageant Wear
Arlington Village, Greenville, NC 27858
919321-1714 � Fax 919321-1719
StrktWhys
Have you received a parking
CITATION which you believe you
received UNJUSTLY7
Students, staff, faculty and visitors to East
Carolina University have the right to appeal
campus parking or traffic citations issued for
violations of ECU parking and traffic regulations.
The appeal must be filed with Parking and
Transportation Services within ten (10) days of
the date of the citation. Appeals which are
incomplete or filed after the ten-day period will
not be considered. Appeal forms are available
from the Department of Parking and Transporta-
tion Services, 305 ETenth Street. If you are
appealing the citation, you are not required to
pay your fine until a decision has been made.
Appeals are reviewed by a Citation Appeal
Board consisting of staff, faculty, and students. If
you wish, you may appear before the Appeal
Board to present your case. Once the appeal has
been heard and a decision made, notice is sent
to the appellant informing him or her of the
decision. Once a decision has been reached, a
f $5.00 late fee will be added to fines not paid
within ten (10) business days of the date of the
action by the Citation Appeal Board. Student
records will be tagged until all citations are
cleared.
'What happens if I DON'T pay my fine?
Students with uncleared parking citations may
experience delays in registering for classes the
following semester.Also, students with out-
standing parking debts will have this amount
added to their next tuition statement Any
vehicle which has received three or more un-
cleared citations may be towed or booted at
the owner's expense whenever found on campus.
How can I AVOID a citation?
The best way to avoid receiving a parking citation 1
is to park only in legal parking spaces authorized
by the type of parking decal on the registered
vehicle. Remember, if you feel you received a
parking citation for parking in a manner you
believe was legal, you have the right to appeal
the citation.
Parking and Traffic Control Officers are on duty
to ensure that our limited amount of campus
parking is utilized properly. By educating students,
staff, faculty and visitors of university parking
regulations, issuing citations, and towing when
necessary, Parking and Transportation Services is
able to manage the utilization of campus parking
areas. Everyone's cooperation is needed.
A message from
Parking and Transportation Services
305 ETenth Street
Greenville
(919)328-6294
www.ecu.eduparkingparking.htm
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
jjwh





3 Thursday. September 18. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Got The Picture,
rioj
y
Get The Job
Photographers Wanted
eastcarolinian
Inquire at the Student
Publication Bldg. (2nd Floor)
FAREWELL OUTING
WITH FRIENDS FOR
COLLEGE-BOUND FIRST
DAUGHTER
WASHINGTON (AP) President
Clinton and the first lady took their
daughter Chelsea out for a three-
hour going-away dinner at an Indian
restaurant two blocks from the
White House.
The Bombay Club is one of
Chelsea's favorite restaurants. She
had been there six times before
Monday night's outing.
It was a farewell dinner for the
first daughter before she departs
Thursday for Stanford University
where she will be a freshman.
The Clintons played host to two
other couples and their children,
who were schoolmates of Chelsea's
at Sidwell Friends School in
Washington.
The dinner was private.
According to a White House press
official, the
selections included a variety of
vegetable, shrimp, chicken and lamb
dishes and everyone shared.
STEALTH FIGHTER THAT
CRASHED IN MARYLAND
FLEW EARLIER IN
SYRACUSE
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) The Fl 17-
A stealth fighter that crashed in
Maryland on display at a weekend air
show in Syracuse.
Although the stealth fighter was
being displayed at Hancock Field in
Syracuse, it was roped off and
guarded, said Sgt. Pete Alberti, pub-
lic
affairs spokesman for the Air
National Guard 174th Fighter Wing.
The fighter did not perform at
the Syracuse air show but it did
make
gentle turns" as it made two
passes above the Syracuse airport
before
heading to its next stop the
Chesapeake Air Show in Middle
River, Md 257 miles south said
Michael Hotaling, a member of the
Syracuse International Air Show's
coordinating committee.
The plane crashed Sunday during
maneuvers at the suburban
Baltimore show.
The Fire
Thursday
We Charge No Application Fee.
; Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � 1.5 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
e Tavern
r
clals
Friday
Trading
Evans
Saturday
Furious
Styles
Tuesday
Jazz Night
Wednesday
Upstairs:
Retro Dance Party
Sunnywheat
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to DJ Will
, upstairs
Greenville's
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
TastingDisplay
Wednesday
1.76 Imports
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri&Sat
Beer Tub Specials
32
Sunday
: ox. Domestic
Draft $1.50
14 oz. Domestic
Draft 75
FREE FOOD
NFL Ticket on DSS
FoofbaH
75 Southpaw
Sports Bar
ECU Ring Event
September 15th � 10am-4pm
September 16th � 10am-4pm
September 17th � 10am-4pm
September 18th � 10am-4pm
September 19th � 10am-4pm
$25 Deposit
OTLLSdE JFWELRV
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
EAST
CAXOLINA
Student Stores
WEMr � Special Payment Plans Available
In
1 A i T
CAKOLIWA
WaVHWTY
J
WITH A WHOLE CAREER AHEAD OF YOU, IT PAYS TO HAVE A GREAT NAME BEHIND YOU.
With a name like Walt Disney World on your resume, your future is
definitely bright. Not only will you earn college recognition or credit,
you'll also be working with one of the most dynamic companies
in the world. And that's experience any college graduate could use.
Representatives will be on campus to answer all your questions about
the Walt Disney World College Program, where you'll work, earn
and learn from some of the top management minds in the industry.
We will be interviewing all majors tor positions available throughout
our Theme Parks and Resorts, including Attractions. Food & Beverage.
Merchandise. Lifeguarding and more. Plus, this summer, those fluent in
Portuguese, should be sure to ask about special opportunities. So plan
ahead for our visit. Discover World of Opportunities at Disney �
ARCHEOLOGISTS FIND
HUGE ANCIENT
CEMETERY UNDER
ALEXANDRIA
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) Archeologists
have found an ancient city of the
dead" with 150 burial chambers
under the Egyptian port of
Alexandria.
The tombs date to 300 B.C. and
hold human remains as well as
"funeral furniture the Tourism
Ministry said. The find was made
earlier this year as construction
workers dug the foundation fot a
bridge.
It was unclear why the govern-
ment announcement was made this
week.
But in the ministry statement,
the French-archaeologist supervis-
ing the excavation, Jean-Yves
Empereur, was quoted as saying his
team need more money and six
months to fully excavate the site.
The statement also said con-
struction had been suspended, and
that an alternate site was being con-
sidered for the bridge.
The ministry said the find
amounted to a "city of the dead
underneath the earth of the city of
Alexandria The earliest tombs are
from 300 B.C, but inscriptions indi-
cate .the cemetery was used
between 500-600 A.D in the
Byzantine era, the statement said.
Egyptologists said the find could
redraw the map of ancient city
founded by Alexander the Great,
and reveal much about the port's
people.
YELTSIN PROCLAIMS
PEACE WITH TOP RUSS-
IAN BANKERS
MOSCOW (AP) A day after
telling Russia's top tycoons to play
nice,
President Boris Yeltsin said
Tuesday he was confident he had
put a stop to
the sniping that threatened to
disrupt his economic reforms.
Yeltsin and Prime Minister
Viktor Chernomyrdin made cleat
that keeping the
leading bankers from feuding
with each other and with the gov-
ernment is a
top priority. The bankers were
instrumental in Yeltsin's re-election
victory
last year and their support for his
economic reforms is considered cru-
cial.
Anatoly Chubais and Boris
Nemtsov, Yeltsin's top policy-mak-
ers, have been
heavily criticized by Russia's
financial groups for the latest round
of government sell-offs.
tOC � Drawing Crtaitvlif from Dirtrlity
)�
PRESENTATION DATE: 92497 TIME: 6:00 PM LOCATION: Menden Hall Student Center - Gret Room FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Mary Cauley - 919-328-6979
www.c4r�ermos!c.comcmwdwwdw.hfml
The Ad Department is now
hiring advertising
executives for end of
summer and fall semester.
Please bring resume to
eastcarolinian
y
BUSINESS CAREER DAY 1997
Wed. Sept. 24,1997 - 9:30-2:30 General Classroom Building
SPONSORED BY ECU CAREER SERVICES AND THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Admin. Office of the Courts �.
Aerotek
Altec Industries, Inc.
Atcom Business Telephone Sys.
BB&T
Brady's
Burlington Industries
Cameron & BarkJey
Campbell Univ. School of Law
Carmax, The Auto Superstore
Carolina Builders Corp.
Cash America International
Champs Sports
Coca Cola Bottling Co.
Dunn Systems, Inc.
E&J Gallo Winery
East Carolina Farm Credit
ECU Indus. & Tech. Grad. Prog.
ECU Career Services
ECU Cooperative Education
ECU Grad. Studies in Business
ECU Graduate Programs
ECU Human Resources
Enterprise Rent- A-Csr
Ferguson Enterprises, Inc.
Fidelity Bank
First Citizens Bank
FootAction USA
Hamlin Companies
Hatteras Hammocks
Home Depot
Household Credit Services
Hubbefl, Inc.
Hudson Belk
IBM
Integon
Jefferson Pilot Life Insurance
Hints to help you make a Career Day more productive include:
: . � unild 'or an interview, but "nice casual" is O.K. too.
an ;� iti i ulariy interested in certain organizations, do some
rch at Career Services. Joyner Library, or the'lnternet
f�: � visiting an organization just because you haven't
h'�si e'p pi �,� � .ith a fipTj handshake, ask pertinent "questions
� jout Interest in their organization.
�SAMPLE QUESTIONS TO ASK AT CAREER DAY;
iiiiri y:ou tell mo mo:o about your organization7
hal posififonis do you expect to have "for someone ot my background9
at skillsquafjie? do you typically seek in candidates for these positions
w might one "progress within your organization? .
you have internship summer job opportunities7 How do I apply for these7
w should I proceed in order to receive consideration for openings7
in a r iirry to employers you are seriously considering �
busn'Cs- i ai itronvevery employer with whom you talk:
� el- ypu letters to employers you met and are interested in pursuing furtf
John Hancock Finaa Services
Keane, Inc.
Lowe's Home Improvement
Lowes Foods
Maxim Healthcare Services
McGladrey & Pullen, LLP
Merisel, Inc.
Metropolitan Life Insurance
MI Schortenstein Homes, Inc.
Microsoft
Moen, Inc.
Naval Ctr. for Acquisition Tmg.
NC Assoc. of Broadcasters
Northwestern Mutual Life
Norwest Corp.
Olde Discount Corp.
Perdue Farms, Inc.
Pleasants Hardware Company
.f Precision Fabrics Group
Prudential Insur. & Finan. Svcs.
Red Lobster
Sherwin Williams Co.
Southern Bank & Trust Co.
Sprint Mid-Atlantic Telecom
State Farm Insurance
Strickland Insurance Group
Target Stores
Tru-GreenChemlawn
U. S. Air Force
U. S. Marine Corps
U. S. Navy
Wachovia Bank
Walt Disney World
Wendy's
Winston Hospitality, Inc.
Winston Salem Police Dept.
i�





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4 Thwsday, Sipttmbir 18, 1997
ogmion
The East Carolinian
eastarolinian
AMY L.ROYSTER Ednot
CELESTE WILSON Mwiajinj Eduw
MATT HEGE AdmrwinsOinctni AMANDA ROSS Sms Editor
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Remember the days when library orientation was a required class? Not all Pirates may, but some
of us who have been around longer than others remember learning the in's and out's of the
library. Now that technology is a top priority for the school, officials should consider replacing
the library credit with a technology class credit.
Technology has become an important part of higher education as well as the workforce in the
last several years as technology has advanced and become more available. ECU is no exception;
reports of some new technology on campus have become a mainstay on the pages of The East
Carolinian. In the last few issues, students have seen full-page advertisements and stories about
Microsoft Exchange, the new e-mail system. Computer Information Services officials have said
the system is running smoothly, yet next to ECU's parking problem, the top question on many
students' minds is "How do you use the new e-mail?"
The transition from the ACMailVM system isn't as smooth for the upperclassmcn. Though
the number of Exchange users has increased since the fall semester began, some 'M users have
not even accessed the account five weeks into the semester, and once they do, they don't know
what to do. There are no directions on what to do after they log onto the syster
While some freshmen are hitting the campus already computer savvy or even with their own
computers, some have never had to use a computer, valuable instruction time is being taken to
teach students how to use this technology before them.
And while everyone knows we're charged to use technology�remember that technology fee
we have to pay every semester? � not everyone knows what is available, where and when it's
available or even how to use it. One session on technology some students may never use does
not even begin to scratch the surface of all the technology available on campus.
More and more professors require students to use computers. Potential employers are look-
ing at computer skills just as much as a student's grade point average and experience.
Having top-notch technology available is important, and even impressive, to current and
prospective students. But what good is having state-of the-art technology if only a few people
on campus can use it to its full capabilities?
Although ECU has not gotten to the point of making a laptop computer a must-have to sur-
vive the college experience like some colleges have, it does have some excellent technology that
makes life easier � once everyone gets used to Exchange, we'll probably wonder what we did
without it� officials should consider requiring us to obtain some computer skills by offering a
technology orientation to replace the library orientation with a technology orientation. Spend
less money getting fancy technology and more on teaching us how to use what we already have.
OPINION
Judges subject to influence, persuasion
As long as judicial candi-
dates participate in cam-
paigns, they will not be
objective. They won't
admit this, of course.
Judges don't live in a
Utopian society. Their
upbringing, judgments
and social interactions
will shape their on-the-
bench decisions.
For innumerable years, district and
superior court judges have refused to
discuss certain political and legal
issues on the campaign trail. This
summer, the state Supreme Court
allowed judicial candidates to discuss
political issues. There seems to be a
debate as to whether judicial candi-
dates should give voters a piece of
their political philosophies to help
voters decide which candidates to
support. Although objectivity, theo-
retically, is a cornerstone of the judi-
ciary, judges (both elected and
appointed) inevitably take their per-
sonal, biased beliefs to the bench.
Such bias is reflected in judicial
upbringing, judgments and off-the-
bench social interactions.
Judicial upbringing limits objec-
tivity on the bench. For example, if a
judge were reared in a family where
the father periodically beat his wife,
the judge will have zero tolerance for
anyone accused of spousal abuse.
Further, if a judge, in his childhood,
were taught that African-Americans
are second-class citizens with violent
propensities, that judge might allow
such lies to contaminate his decisions
involving African-Americans.
A judgment is based upon how a
judge perceives and interprets the
facts. Such perceptions must be
based on something. So, the judge
will reach into his past (i.e. prece-
dent, anticipatory socialization) for
guidance. Therefore, judgments typi-
cally are biased.
Judges interact with their peers on
the golf course, at the hunting club,
Lions Club, Rotary Club and other
community organizations. Often a
person's temperament is shaped
through social interactions.
In the Sept. 15 edition of The
Daily Reflector District Court Judge
Hilbarn said she doesn't wish to dis-
cuss issues during judicial campaigns.
OPINION
Mary
WEBB
Candidates must persuade voters
that they possess rectitude. Thus, a
candidate's position on fundamental
issues must be measured, subjective-
ly, by voters. Otherwise, candidates
will find themselves in popularity
contests; therefore, they won't be
held accountable for their actions.
Furthermore, Hilburn's statement ,
"Judges are supposed to be objective,
and and if you state an opinion on a
position, it may not appear you're
being objective is more theoretical
than realistic. Legislative, presiden-
tial and judicial candidates cater to
interest groups who will elect or
reject candidates.
Judge Leech supports a merit to
select judges and obviate campaigns.
Well, who will decide the member-
ships of such committees? Isn't
"merit" subjective becaus- someone
(who has a political philo ophy) has
to determine what merit is What-will
happen to African-Amerit in judicial
candidates who may have attended
North Carolina Central or Howard
University Schools of Law rather than
Duke or Carolina? Cultural relativity
ultimately will determine the "most
meritorius
As long as judicial candidates par-
ticipate in campaigns, they will not
be objective. They won't admit this,
of course. Judges don't live in a Utopi-
an society. Their upbringing, judg-
ments and social interactions will
shape their on-the-bench decisions.
I'm frightfully prejudiced about the role of a
newspaper I think it is the strongest force in
society- stronger than judges, governors,
doctors, lawyers, Indian chiefs
Thomas Windship, newspaper editor, columnist. 1987
Graduation unorganized, not enjoyable
ECU spends a lot of time and
money advertising its sporting
events. Several people are
available to answer any ques-
tions you might have So
why is graduation, a day cele-
brating academic ability and
attainment, trotted so
m halfheartedly?
Graduation day is anticipated by hun-
dreds of students in their last semes-
ter at ECU. It represents hard work,
dedication and achievement of goals.
So why are many graduating seniors
walking around with disgruntled
looks on their faces?
There are several answers to this
question of which, fortunately 1
know a few. First and foremost, let's
start with the date. The graduation
ceremony is set for Dec. 13, 1997, a
Saturday, which is great. But it's also
a full week before final exams! Who
in their right minds can possibly have
a full fledged, all out, low-down dirty
party if exams are looming straight
ahead? No one, that's who.
Secondly, you get no correspon-
dence of any type at all informing you
that your graduation application is
accepted, that caps and gowns are
available at this particular time and
location or even that your senior sum-
mary has been okayed. Questions
about what to expect on the actual
day itself arc for now, left unan-
swered. What are the seating
arrangements going to be like, how
long will the ceremony be and will
the diploma be mailed soon, you
wonder. Quite frankly, you are in the
dark about all of these aspects and no
one seems to have an inkling of
what's going on.
Well, in order to find the answers
and avoid becoming frustrated, you
have to go back and forth between
several departments including your
major's department, the registrar's
office and the cashier's office.
Apparently there does not seem to be
much communication between them
on this particular issue.
After making a dozen trips around
campus. I learned a few things which
I intend to pass on to you. Here is
the graduation procedure in a nut-
shell: In the last two semesters
before graduating, you should make
an appointment with your adviser
and go over your senior summary.
The senior summary is a list of all the
courses that are required for your
major and minor. It is also a check on
your GPA and credit hours.
After your adviser signs off on the
senior summary, your file is sent to
the Registrar's office where records
are kept. Any changes made later on
in your course schedule must be
noted. If something is wrong with
your senior summary, you will get a
call from the registrar's office�or so
I've been told. My advice is to visit
them yourself and reconfirm your
standing.
You are now free to apply for grad-
uation. Applications are available at
Whichard Building and for this you
pay a $25.00 fee at the cashier's
office. Do not expect any confirma-
tion at this point either because you
will be waiting forever. Instead check
for your name in the file available at
the Student Bookstore You can get
the dates for ordering caps and gowns
here as well.
What happens next? That
remains to be seen � I certainly
don't know and neither do any of my
friends who are graduating as well.
ECU spends a lot of time and
money advertising its sporting
events. Several people are available
to answer any questions you might
have. Communication and organiza-
tion are excellent, paralleled only by
the high interest and commitment
shown by every body concerned. So
why is graduation, a day celebrating
academic ability and attainment,
treated so halfheartedly?
Enforcement of ordinance lawful
Vtfel it is once again that time when
everyone has an opinion about some-
thing, and we think the best way to do
that is through insightful comments
on pressing topics concerning our lit-
tle bit of earth, ECU.
But, of course, since The East
Carolinian only employs two editorial-
ists, the rest of us must use campus
mail to help express our ideas. So here
are my thoughts on recent topics in
your newspaper.
Jeff Bergman's article of the 16th
really did not sit well with me.
Frankly, I could care less about the city
ordinance. But Mr. Bergman uses the
Bill or Rights in a way I don't believe
it was intended. First, he implies that
the 4th Amendment gives property
owners protection against city ordi-
nances. He even quotes the amend-
ment. But I believe that the 4th
Amendment was talking about pro-
tecting property owners from unrea-
sonable search and seizure and unlaw-
ful trespass from the police without a
warrant stating probable cause.
He then says that more than three
persons in a home is a trivial thing for
the police to respond to. Be that as it
may, it is still the law as of right now
that no more than three unrelated
people may reside together.
Therefore, the police have every right
to go to that home and see if a law is
being broken.
It is also the right and duty of
neighbors to notify the police when
they see a law being broken, no mat-
ter how insignificant we think that
law might be. When we begin decid-
ing which laws are too unimportant for
the police to take interest in, our town
will have greater problems than too
many people in the same house.
One other small point: in your edi-
tor's comments about registration,
you say that students should be given
a choice as to how they wish to regis-
ter. Yet in the front-page interview
with the CIS director, he states clear-
ly that students will have the choice
to use phone registration or stand in
line.
Maybe you should read your own
articles before writing an opinion
about them.
Richard White
Sophomore
Communications
PI RATES S)
As the construction
progresses across campus,
what do you think the
university could do
differently to
preserve parking spaces?
e suee
Construction going on could be done during s
or during Christmas break. Alternative parking
places could be provided near campus.
Taylor Leonard
freshman
Social Work
believe that they should complete one construction
project at a time. This would cause only one area to
be closed at a time.
Chandra Grunden
Senior
Elementary Education
1 feel that construction should be mainly done in the
summer, so that people can rely on a safe and reli-
able place to park their car.
Scott BhhI
Junior
Marketing
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5 Thursday, September 18, 1997
Evkrthxy Life
comics
BY MlCHABTi LlTWIH
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Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood FooJ Market
02S-US
Swanson Dinners
E Easy Steps Por A
S�vtot�m Pays in May
by Rich Cokswell
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by John Murphy
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I COULb STE� 4T fl�
F D-WS. SH�'S
aWUCUlOUS.
ACROSS
1 Look intently
5 Wire
10 Pointed end
14 Unemployed
15 Body of water
16 Sailng
17 Tropical tree
18 Turns suddenly
19 Government
drug agent
20 Improved by
editing
22 Long-necked
one
24 Demeanor
25 Sponsorship
26 Fled, in a way
30 Catch sight of
34 Canvas shelter
36 Ceases
37 Fortuneteller's
card
MSflpperyone
39 Tales
41 Little fuss
42 Turn Inside out
44 Vend
45 British gun
46 Curt reply
48Lkesome
plants
50 Trading centers
52 Cow's call
53 Less costly
56 Ruin
60 Antler
61 Started
63 Recording
64 Poem style
65 Jumped
66 Relative of etc.
67 Alcoholic drink
68 Hems
69 Valley
DOWN
1 Calumet
2 Dutch cheese
3 Fashion
magazine
4 Leftover bit
5 Bedspread
6 Made great
grades
7 Honey maker
8 Huge
9 Navy rank
10 Card game
11 Military arm:
abbr.
12 Slave
13 Rate of
movement
21 Accomplished
23 Uprisings
25 Formal speech
26 Beef animal
27 Irritate
28 Bay
29 Son of Seth
31 Angry
32 Secret
languages
33 Short jackets
36 River mouth
deposit
19 Bind up ,
40 Components
43 Love affair
45 Having grooves
47 Increase, In a
way
49 Jan. and Feb
e.g.
51 Cornered
53 Masticate
01997 Tribune M�da Service. Inc.
Al righto mmrita.
54 Arizona Indian
55 Ireland
56 Fool
57 Appraise
58 October gem
59 Shout
62 Joke
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Thanksgiving Dinner!
1. Stop at Harris Teeter and pick up a card
like the one shown below.
2. Shop 10 out of 10 weeks between
September 17 & November 25,1997.
3. Spend $35.00 or more each week on one
visit. (Excludes alcohol and tobacco.)
4. Show your VIC card and have the cashier
validate your Thanksgiving Dinner Card.
5. When 10 out of 13 blocks are validated,
you are eligible to receive a FREE
Thanksgiving Dinner.
It's That Easy!
See Store For
More Details.
64
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Citrus Punch
1012 lb. Grade A Frozen
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6 oz. Stove Top Chicken or Com
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Two 14S oz. Cans Del Monte
Green Beans
16 oz. Can Ocean Spray Jellied
Cranberry Sauce
13 oz. Package Folger's
Automatic Drip Coffee
182S oz. Betty Crocker Super
Moist Yellow Cake Mix
COCOA
JkRISIIES
vich :&
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FR�T
LOSPS t
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IS oa Kellogg' Cocoa Krispies or
vmJ
With VIC Card
DPINK PEPSI
12 pk
12 oceans
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Q
Or Mountain
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Prices Effective Through Sept 23, &97
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday. Sept 17 Thiou Sept 2&B97 In CHirGreenviUe Area Storee
Only. V Reserve The Right lb Limit Quantities. MnmOMmDlmM)tyAm&11rt9K
0m � T"





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7 Thursday. September 18. 1997
The East Carolinian
n

CDreview Book week raises awareness
6 STRING
DRAG
6 String Drag
High Hat
9 12 OUT OF lO
andv Turner
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
� Raleigh-based 6 String Drag's new
album, High Hat, is a celebration of
ffjnerican music, a trip through
America. From the gospel on gas, "Top
if the Mountain to the Louvin
Jkothers-style harmonizing of "I Can't
ffemember listening to the album
raakes you feel as if you've been some-
where, on a trip through memories,
through lives.
� Led by ex-Lubricator Kenny Roby,
p String Drag offers up an incredibly
ifapressive second album, their first
�j) Steve Earle's E-Squared Records.
Sarle and E-Squared co-owner Jack
"Jamerson serve as producers (under
jie alias the twangtrust) for the
album. Earle's ability in his own music
�$ combine the rough and romantic to
great effect is highly evident on High
at. 6 String Drag has a foot in every-
thing on the album: rock, country,
soul, blues, rockabilly, ragtime, you
name it.
Despite an ever-shifting personnel
lineup that reads like a New York
Yankee managerial history, the band
shows a tremendous level of confi-
dence on High Hat. This is mos: evi-
dent in the voice of Roby, best
described as a twangysoulful-Elvis
Costello-meets-Merle Haggard-in-a-
knife-fight type voice. It is a voice
that is convincing, a voice that makes
Roby's love of music evident.
Roby's band mates Rob Keller
(bass), Ray Duffey (drummer) and
Scott Miller (guitarist) are a skillful
band of dust kickers, and they kick it
up on High Hat.
The album begins with "Bottle of
Blues a tough, down-on-your luck
broken-bottle rawker where Roby
laments that he "ain't got no home no
more "Bottle of Blues" exhibits the
energy and soul that makes Roby a
successful and solid songwriter and
that is maintained through the entire-
ty of the album. On the anthemic
"Ghost Roby confronts a past lover
who did him wrong, asking "did you
lie when you said you told the
truthwrap it up and throw it in a
pile
"Over and Over" would fit in a
New Orleans barrel house or an Irish
Pub, offering a sing-a-long chorus and
funny as hell lyrics. The bluesy sassi-
ness of "From Me to Clayton" also
showcases Roby's humorous side. On
"Cold Steel Brace "Guilty" and
"Elaine 6 String Drag delivers near-
perfect blue-eyed soul.
High Hat is a road trip worth taking.
Over 14 songs, 6 String Drag prove
they are a band to be reckoned with.
Editor's Note: Takr a trip down to
Peasant's this .Saturday night emdcheck out
6 String Drag.
JENNIFER TAFE
STAFF WRITER
Reading literature in college is such a common-
place experience that few students question the
factors which help determine which books are read
and studied across the country.
Banned Books Week 1997, which runs Sept. 20-
27, is aimed at drawing attention to ongoing chal-
lenges to the 1st Amendment by attempts to ban
DANGER
The Most Frequently
Challenged Books
of 1996
$
4�
1. Goosebumps Series, R.L. Stine
2. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,
Mark Twain
3. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,
Maya Angelou
4. It's Perfectly Normal, Robie Harris
5. The Chocolate War, Robert Cormier
6. Catcher in the Rye, J. D. Salinger
7. Bridge to Terabithia,
Katherine Paterson
8. Forever, Judy Blume
9. My Brother Sam. is Dead, James
Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier
and censor literature.
In addition to raising awareness,
Banned Books Week also points to
the success that concerned citi-
zens have had in fighting most
attempts to ban or restrict litera-
ture.
A challenge involves restricting
or removing particular books based
upon objections and opinions of a
person or group. A ban is an out-
right restriction of materials. Each
year, school boards across the coun-
try face hundreds of challenges to
the books and materials made
available in libraries and taught in
classrooms.
Students who want to get a look
at some of the "illicit" material can
check out the banned books dis-
play in the front window of Barnes
and Noble. They might not be
expecting some of the selections though.
"Some of the books would surprise you said
Christy Brewer, community relations coordinator
for Barnes and Noble.
Based on the objections and views of particular
interest groups and individuals, the array of books
which have been subject to challenges and ban
attempts is astonishing.
Maya Angelou's Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,
Salinger's Catcher in the Rye, Shel Silverstein's A
Light in the Attic and Hough ton's American Heritage
Dictionary are just a few among the many books
that were challenged in the last five years.
Barnes and Noble's Staff Recs shelf features
books that have been banned throughout history
for various reasons. A 30 percent discount is
Banned Book Week will be held Sept. 20 through Sept. 27. Locally, Barnes
and Noble will have a banned books display in its store window.
ARTWORK BY SHARON WYSOCKI
offered on all staff recommendations.
Many people assume that the only challenges
to literature occur in highly publicized cases such
as the intense media scrutiny that surrounded
Leslea Newman's Heather Has Two Mommies. This,
however, is just the visible aspect of a much deep-
er problem.
Banned Books Week 1997 is sponsored by the
American Booksellers Association, the American
Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, the
American Library Association, the American
Society of Journalists and Authors, Association of
American Publishers and the National Association
of College Stores.
Local poets get in the ring
September
18 Thursday
Anaconda showing at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater (through Sept. 20)
Pirate Underground featuring The
Boy Wonder Jinx and Sky Dive from
8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Underfoot at Rrehouse Tavern
Kuttphatt and Junk Papa at
Peasant's
JGB at The Attic
John Loy at The Percolator
Blue Mountain and Stella at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Zen Tricksters at The Brewery in
Raleigh
19 Friday
A Delicate Balance: Six Israeli
Photographers and North Carolina to
IsrealProject (photography exhibits) at
Gray Gallerv. Exhibits will show until
924
Far Too Jones at The Attic
Day by the River at Peasant's
Treading Evans at Firehouse
Tavern
Poetry Slam (competitive poetry
reading) at Forum and Function in
Raleigh
The Jumpstarts with Tender Idols
at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
Zen Frisbee and Pipe at Local 506
in Chapel Hill
Mexthos and Sea of Souls at The
Brewery in Raleigh
20 Saturday
Furious Styles at Firehouse Tavern
Root Doctors at The .Attic
6 String Drag at Peasant's
Doxy's Kitchen with Ultra Violets
at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
22 Monday
Africa, a Continent Revealed exhibi-
tion at Mendenhall Gallerv (through
Oct. 3)
23 Tuesday
Pat McGee Band at Peasant's
Kim Richev at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
Cigar Night at Firehouse Tavern
24 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our It's
Showtime column? If so, please send
us information (a schedule would be
nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
Greenville poet David Dasher flaunts his skills at a Poetry Slam in Raleigh.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAWN ROCCO
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Imagine you're sitting at your table with your friends, coffee in hand. The MC
calls out a name and suddenly the fellow one table over jumps up and starts
shouting at the top of his lungs. You're not sure for a moment, but it quickly
becomes clear he's ranting maniacally about Waffle House.
This sweaty, drunken reel of a room is the atmosphere of a Poetry Slam.
The techno beats that pound between poets, the trash talking MC, the shout-
ing, the jumping up and down, the thunderous pounding of hands on table
tops, all of this is par for the course in a Slam.
Until this summer, if you wanted to watch or participate in a Slam, you'd
have had to drive to Winston-Salem or Asheville. This past June Raleigh was
endowed with its own Slam, due to the efforts of some local poets headed up
by Jon Williams, a former NC State student. After spending years frustrated at
the dead air feel of local poetry readings Williams, who has participated in
Slams all over the nation, began creating a niche for a Raleigh Slam over a year
ago.
So what exactly is a Slam? Williams defines Poetry Slam as ua brute force
method of handing poetry back to the people, Robin Hood style, I guess
No one is certain where the first Slam actually happened, but everyone
involved in the scene will agree that the first Slam with any clout was the
Uptown Poetry Slam, which was begun by Chicago native Marc Smith. Smith,
then a construction worker and untrained writer, had been involved in various
amateur performance poetry groups before he founded the Uptown Slam. It
was here that the fundamentals of Slam were laid out and cemented.
The Uptown Poetry Slam struggled for its first few years. The focus of
SEE POETRY, PAGE �
Cartoons not just for kids anymore
Dale Williamson
SENIOR WHITER
This is the
column where
we focus on the
stuff we miss and
the stuff we missed. We
will examine the books,
albums, movies and televi-
sion shows that we feel
deserve further explo-
ration. It's the stuff we dug
back in the dav
Raleigh's Six String Drag bring their guns to Peasant's Saturday night.
PHOTO COURTESY OF E SQUARED
Remember when you were a kid and Saturday mornings
were so special, much better than any other day of
the week? All through the week, your mom would
have to practically pull your le:hargic body
from your nice, comfy, warm paradise known
as the bed. However, Saturday mornings
were never a problem. In fact, you were
probably up before your parents on these
special mornings. Why? The answer was
simple and totally logical � this was
when cartoons were on.
Well, your childhood may not have been
as adventurous as mine, but I cherish
those timeless moments lost in a colorful
animated world filled with the likes of
Underdog, Speed Racer, Scooby Doo, Super
Friends, Fat Albert, and the TarzanlBatmanlZorro
Adventure Hour. Mom, please hold all my calls; I'll
be busy until around noon.
My fiance takes jabs at my joyful memories by remind-
ing me how many worthwhile books I could have read as a
child instead of wasting brain cells
watching talking dogs solve creepy
mysteries. My response: "I don't
care how good A Wrinkle In Time may
be, this show's got a talking dog
who also happens to be a super
sleuth Yep, I had witnessed the
zenith of the art world, and it only
took three to four hours worth of
my attention, one day a week, to
fully enjoy.
As the years passed and I grew
older (and slightly more mature),
my Saturday mornings were slowly
taken up with other activities
(mostly sleep). Somewhere along
the way, I lost interest in Saturday
morning cartoons and cartoons in
general. That's kid stuff. I'm an
adult now.
That may be true, but an adult eye
detects subtleties that tend to slip
a child's notice. Looking back at
many of my favorite cartoons, I
realized that a significant number
of cartoons weren't necessarily
made with children in mind. Sure,
they were suitable for kids, and
Mr. Hong Kong Phooey
PHOTO COURTESY OF HAAKA
I tell you what King of
the Hills Boomhauer.
PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX
kids loved them. But a sophisti-
cated level of humor flowed
throughout those Bugs Bunny
and BullwinkJe toons.
The cartoon industry has
blossomed over the past years,
and the popularity of cartoons is
at an all-time high. While the
child market does account for a
good portion of the thirsting
demand for cartoons, they are
not the only thing pushing the
industry. Adults have once again Barbara
embraced animation without
any sign of embarrassment or insecurity, and, as a result,
more cartoons are being released with the adult viewer in
mind.
Shows that, on the surface, may seem to be simply kid's
stuff actually offer much for grown-ups. Tiny Toons and
Animaniacs, both produced by Stephen Spielberg, carry the
same sort of brainless slap-stick comedy one expects from
cartoons, but there is nothing brainless about these shows.
So many historical, mythological and cultural references
are made among the zany antics of our cartoon heroes that
even the stiffest scholar must have difficulty suppressing
a chuckle.
Even if educated references aren't your thing, the
humor in many of the new toons are so bizarre and twist-
ed that you laugh without knowing why. Freakazoid, and
The Tuk, for example, both thrive off the illogical, the irrel-
evant and the plain weird. With these shows, don't ask
questions, just enjoy the ride.
The above shows, as fun as they may be for adults, are,
admittedly, still very much entertainment for kids. The
more glaring examples of animation aimed for an adult
audience include the psychological comedy, Dr. Katz, the
adolescent South Park, the bleak HBO series, Spawn, the
brutally honest animated sitcom, King of the Hill, and, of
course, the show that lifted cartoons from the cradle and
into the loving arms of an accepting adult audience. The
Simpsons.
These toons, more than am others eurrentls placing on
television, boldly use the animated genre to explore more
than a pie in the face or an anvil on the head. These are
groundbreaking series that have basically legitimized car-
toons as a mature genre that television can welcome into
its prime-time line-up.
I may not be a kid anymore (at least physically), but I
take pride in my love for cartoons. I don't hide the fact
that I think Hong Kong Phooey and Yogi Bear illustrate
moments of sheer comic genius. But I also freely admit
that, as much fun as Speed Buggy and Jabber Jaw are, I'm
thrilled to know that cartoons have moved with the times
and grown up a little with me.





8 Thursday. September 18, 1997
i ' 'style
The East Carolinian
Poets
continued from page 7
Slam was to return to a connection
between audience and poet through
a strange mixture of competition and
performance.
"It was the job of the poet to try
to communicate and we fostered
that We wanted to emphasize attis-
tic responsibility. We started with a
focus on community and the audi-
ence, the poet as the servant of the
people Smith says.
In Raleigh, this community is
already developing rapidly. Not long
after the second Slam, in July, three
local poets were invited to read at
Forum and Function, a Raleigh art
gallery and the home of Raleigh's
Slam
Williams is enthusiastic about the
possibilities Slam offers poets
rhink it's a mistake to assume that
Poetrv Slam is where it will all end
though there are all sorts of crazy
ideas out there, poetry bands, three
and four (wo)man poetry teams,
poetry plays (Shakespeare anyone?).
The growing popularity of Poetry
Slam is giving those ideas a enue to
try their wings
One of the drawbacks to Slam has
been the resistance of the academic
world to accepting Slam style poetry
as a legitimate art formlthin the
Slam community there have been a
lot of sucker punches aimed at 'ivory
tower' poetry. Largely this has to do
with Slam's embracing of things that
the academy has only recently been
willing to accept as justifiable litera-
ture Naturally, though most poems
that are performed at Slams are a bit
more blunt and gritty, the fact of the
matter is, there is no Slam style, per
se.
The rules of Slam are complicated
but they serve to make the experi-
ence interesting. Competing poets
must have three poems, one for each
round. No performance may extend
three minutes without penalty.
Judges are selected randomly from
the audience and are given note pads
on which they record the scores they
give each poet.
Audience members who are not
judges can let both the poets and the
judges know their opinions by snap-
ping fingers, stomping feet and slap-
ping tables in disproval. Various cat-
calls, grunts and hissing noises have
special meanings, and if all else fails,
the audience can just groan. At the
end of three rounds, the poet with
the highest score is declared the win-
ner.
Though there is no Slam in
Greenville, poets from Greenville are
welcome to participate in Raleigh's
Slam. Already, several ECU students,
such as alumnus Ryan Cox, have par-
ticipated in tecent Slams.
The next Slam will begin at 9 p.m.
on September 19 at Forum and
Function, in downtown Raleigh. For
more information, contact Corky
Goldsmith at Forum and Function,
(419) 829-0480 or Jonathan Williams
at (919) 510-7597.
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GET TO KROGER

e





r
J. 9 Thursday. September 18. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
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Let's show our purple and sold
Pirate Power when ECU
defeathers the
Oamecocks
of the University
of South Carolina!
Dowdy Student Stores
will help by plucking 20 off the regular price of
solid purple or gold apparel! Plus there are
Pre-Game Specials on t-shiris, sweatshirts, polos
and hats, Thursday, September 18 through
Saturday, September 20
Students! Don't forget your DOUBLE
CHANCE, Bwoti Ami tickets for two
chances to win FREE Textbooks for
Spring Semester '98! Pick up your
entry tickets when you pick up your
gome tickets! Ptoy BEFORE kick-off
end AFTER the final whisac!
90 Discount applies to in-stock store
merchandise only. Discount not valid
with any other offer, sale, or coupon.
Sale prices do not apply to previous
purchases. Sale ends 92097.
W(Ji
Ro n a Id' E v Dowdy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
StorcHwrtt
Monday -Friday: 7.30 am � 7:00 pus
Saturday. 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Centrally located on campus, in the
Wright Building, just off Wright Circle
The Game tops box office
John horn
ENTERTAINMENT WRITER
LOS ANGELES (AP) � After debuting as the nation's
top film over the weekend. The Game could find the going
much tougher when the fall movie season begins with the
release of three big films.
A Thousand Acres, LA. Confidential'and hand Out are due
for wide release on Friday, stepping up the competition for
moviegoer dollars.
Still, The Game � a thriller starring Michael Douglas �
was far and away the cop film over the weekend, taking in
$14.3 million. Demi Moore's G.l. Jane was a distant second
with $3.5 million.
Last week's top film, Steven Seagal's Fire Down Below
dropped a steep 46 percent in finishing third, with $3.3
million.
Meanwhile, the British comedy, The Full Monty, about
laidroffsteelworkers who become strippers, played excep-
tionally well in its first weekend of limited national
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The first release from Polygram Films was fifth w th
$2.9 million.
The top 20 movies at North American theaters Friday
?S
through Sunday, followed by studio, gross, number of the-
ater locations, receipts per location, total gross and num-
ber of weeks in release, as compiled by Entertainment
Data Inc. and Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc
1. The Game, PolyGram, $14.3 million, 2,403 locations,
$5,966 average, $14.3 million, one week.
2. G.I. Jane, Disney, $3.5 million, 2,043 locations,
$1,714 average, $38.9 million, four weeks.
3. Fire Down &oiBW&rner Bros $3.3 million, 2,350
locations, $1,387 average, $11.3 million, two weeks.
4. Money Talks, New Line, $3.2 million, 1,942 locations,
$1,654 average, $34.2 million, four weeks.
5. The Full Monty, Fox, $2.9 million, 387 locations,
$7,530 average, $6 million, five weeks.
6. Air Force One, Columbia, $2.8 million, 2,190 loca
tions, $1,283 average, $163.2 million, eight weeks.
7. Hoodlum, MGM, $2.5 million, 2,020 locations, $1,255
average, $19.8 million, three weeks.
8. Conspiracy Theory, Warner Bros $2.3 million, 1,972
locations, $1,169 average, $70.7 million, six weeks.
9. Excess Baggage, Columbia, $1.9 million, 2,109 loca-
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10. George of the Jungle, Disney, $1.8 million, 2,046 loca-
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10 Thursday. September 18. 1997
The East Carolinian
Pirates hope for third straight win against USC
AVI N DA Rl
s r iii i i
S S
The Crates are looking for another home win this Saturday as the South
Carolina Gamecocks make their way to Greenville.
Last season, in the pouring ram in Columbia, S.( the EC. offense rolled all
over the Gamecock defense in a 23-7 Pirate victory Scott Harley ran tor 291
yards despite the foul weather. Hades said he can do without the rain this week.
"I don't want to see anv raindrops on Saturday Harley said.
The Gamecocks will be led by junior quarterback Anthony Wright, who threw
for just 127 yards in last year's loss. ECU Head Coach Steve Logan said this play-
er is talented and said the weather was a big factor in h.s performance last sea-
son against the Pirates.
"He's as good as there is in the country, in my opinion Logan said. He s got
the best release, one of the greatest throws � almost unsackable. He was caught
in a bad situation last vear. He didn't have enough experience to deal with the
weather we endured last year and Marc Crandell could deal with it. so we ben-
efited from that situation last year .
For the Pirates to benefit this vear. Logan said the running game, which has
stalled the past two games, better improve quickly. The last two games com-
bined IX:l has gained just 150 yards on the ground.
"We still don't have a running game Logan said. "We did some things better.
We've got a couple of little runs we can execute right now, but as far as pulling a
menu of runs out, we're not there vet. We better get better at it. quick.
ECU quarterback Dan Gonzalez feels it's not just the running game that
needs improvement, the passing game could use some adjustments too.
"I'm no sure it's just the running game (ionale, said. They got better last
week I think it needs to improve again. 1 think our passing game needs to get
to a higher level. I think we need to be throwing and catching the hall more
ECU
ISO
M
7�

itsr
How they Compare sC
Rushing Yardaga
Passing Yardaga
Total Oftansa
Average Yards par Play
Panamas-Yards
Third Down Convarsions
Fourth Down Comrarsiona
196
stt
m
14-ltsf

Individual comparisons
i TO L�ns AnglO
Pasting AS-CmpSM frdl
ECU. Dan Goontax 0942-054$
USCAnmonyWrigM 11-44-2541
Rushing
ECU. Scon Hahay
ECU. Jamie Wilson
USC. Troy Hambnck
USC. Scotl mono
A rr -GainA. oss
2S40-971
25-100-3
17-92-12
1.3

80
at
o
i

4.7
2740
2T0JS
Long
MLS
�5
II
Hacahnng No. mrd AvgJPlay 8�
ECU. Troy SmeX U
ectteutc��iir 7
ECV.maodOt�mt
use. Zoox Oert it-
USC KmttrUoott 9
usc. Jarmut farter t
234
75

V3�
123
21.0
10.7
9.0
1t.S
1T
U.4
9
Lonrf
34
AvgJG
4I.S
40.0
llirs. �c 111-i.vj n i�- r a
effectively. 1 think we need to be getting yards alter the
catch. I need to be doing my reads a little sooner
Gonzalez has a number of receivers he can chose from
during the passing attack. Troy Smith has stepped up his
level of plav in place of an injured Larry Shannon catch-
ing 14 balls for 294 yards and two touchdowns. (Jonale
sard he has confidence not just in Smith but all his
receivers.
"1 feel real comfortable with all the receivers � Roy and
Jason Nichols. Lamont Chappell. Buck Collins � all of
them Gonzalez said. "Those guvs are experienced play-
ers and have proven themselves against top teams
The ECU defense will need to contain Wright, who has
thrown for 541 yards this season and five touchdowns.
"We know it's going to be a tough game nose guard
Travis Harden said. "Anthony Wright, their quarterback,
he's an elusive guv. He can run it. throw it. take over the
game by himself. We know we have a big challenge ahead
of us .
Cornerback Tabari "Snoop" Wallace said the defense will
have to fend off many passes in this year's game. some-
Dan Gonzalez hopes to lead the Pirates to a third straight victory over the South Carolina
Gamecocks this weekend
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
thing thev had expected in last vear's match-up.
"We're going to see a lot of passes Wallace said. "We ant.ctpated them com-
ing out with four wides last vear because of Anthony Wright but the rain factor
set in We expect them to leave the running game and just use Anthony Wright
Defensively, the Gamecock's will test Gonzalez, and he expects them to chal-
lenge the passing game.
"What I've seen so far on film is that they re really good on defense, they re
reallv athletic Gonzalez said. They have some really skilled players over there
on the defensive end. which is gong to cause us to get better in the passing
game. We have to improve our running game again this week. Its going to be a
tough challenge. ��
nother record crowd is expected as South Carolina has sold around 6,000
tickets for the game which will be broadcast on Fox Sports Net. Kick-ott time is
set for 5 p.m.
Henry returns strong
STEVE LOSEY
MMill W R I I I- K
Not many college athletes are able to
make a full recovery after a year on
the bench. Senior Dwight Henry has
been able nor only to come back suc-
cessfully, but it's almost as if he was
never gone from the football
scene
F.CU audiences were
deprived of seeing Henry in
action last year, thanks to a
tear of his ACL in his left
knee in preseason drills that
Mdehned him all fall. During
drills, he was backpedalmg
and a misstep left him with
an injured knee.
That didn't stop Henry
who plays both safety and
cornerback. from staying a
part of the Pirates. Instead
of becoming upset at his
inability to play, he turned
it into a positive experi-
ence. He helped analyze the teams
the Pirates played last year and hung
out in the weight room with other
members of the football team.
"I see even.
family moed to Ft. Lauderdale.
where he staved until coming to
ECU. He played football in high
school, but wasn't able to shine there-
due to a lackluster team. However,
he did learn to play several positions
in high school, including safety, run-
ning back and kick return. It gave
him valuable training for what was to
come at ECU
He was a high school star in track,
which was his main sport. Henry won
nthe State 400 and got a track
(scholarship to ECL. His col-
lege football career began as
a walk on. and now, Henry is
one of the most respected
and versatile players on the
team. He recorded 76 tack-
le- in 1994 and 58 in 1995.
Henry's college sports career
has kept him busy. With foot-
ball in the fall and track in
the spring, he hardly has
time for himself.
"It's very tiring Henry
said. "It takes time and
dedication. 1 pretty much
have no social life. It does
teach time management,
though
The other members of the Henry
family are very athletic. His sisters
ran track and in Jamaica he and his
family plaved a
Dwight Henry
PHOTO COURTESY OF
SPORTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
thing as a bless-
ing or a lesson
Henry said.
He character-
izes himself as a
"laid-back per-
son
"Still, it was
like I was looking from a distance
Henry said. "It felt good to be back.
but I just felt out of place in terms of
position
Henry's absence from the team in
no way meant he was in danger ot
being forgotten. Before this season
began. Henry was chosen preseason
All-Conference ISA. even after a
vear spent recuperating.
Henry was born in Jamaica and
spent his childhood there. At 15, his
In Henry's two games back
he has recorded 14 tackles,
third best on the team.
Henry has broken up one pass
and recovered one fumble.
lot of cricket and
soccer. Both
sports, especially
soccer, are very-
popular there.
Henrv's mother
pushed him to
excel in sports.
"She always said to use the talent
God gave me said Henry.
Henrv is majoring in social work
and will pursue something in that
field upon graduation. Before he
starts a career in social work, howev-
er, he would like to try his hand at
coaching. And if the NFL should
come calling?
"That would be nice said Henry
"The money's good
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The !�' I men's basketball program, which has posted four consecutive w in-
ning seasons for the first time since the carry 1960's, will have an opportunity to
lift its stature another level during the 1997-98 season. 'I he test will come this
reason in the form of the school's most challenging schedule in history;
Pirates' head coach Joe Doolev announced the '4798 slate lucsdav. a sched-
ule which includes games against teams from the Southeastern. Big East,
Conference ISA. and tlantic 10 conferences. Dooley expects at least two ot
the opponents, Georgia and St. Joseph's, to be ranked in the preseason top 25
for the upcoming season. The SE( I Bulldogs make their first-ever appearance in
Greenville Saturday. Dec. 13 when thev take on the Pirates in Williams Arena at
Minges Colliseum.
BASKETBALL : 11
Tarheels
spike Pirates
TRAC1 LAI h U H
ISSISTVNI SPORTS F.UITOK
i
II
H
The ECU Volleyball team now holds an 8-4 sea-
son record after suffering a loss to the I nivcrsitv
of North Carolina on Tuesday evening. The
match up, held at Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum, was one that the Lady Pirates can
learn from.
"This was the first game all year that we hit
negative head coach Kim Walker said. "Every
game we have won this year, we have outhit I tr
opponents, and every game we have lost, they
have outhit us. Our hitters need to play smarter
and keep the ball in play
In their 29th meeting since 1977, the Tar
Heels posted a 15-4, 15-8, 15-9 victory to cap-
ture a 28-1 advantage over the Pirates.
With sophomore Kan Koenningon the bench
with a fractured left arm. the girls have had to
step up to replace her talent on the court.
"LeKeva Mason and her sister. LuCinda
Mason, have stepped in with Kan out Walker
said. "But the whole team needs to play harder
with her out
Koenning injured her arm during last week s
tournament in a game against Liberty With a 5-
1 Pirate lead on rhe scoreboard. Koenning and
teammate Liz Hall collided going after a ball.
Koenning is casted and at this point, it is not
known when she will be joining her team again
on the court.
"We need to concentrate on defense.
Walker said. "We need to make sure that we
don't make errors like we did on Tuesday"
The women's next challenge will come about
tomorrow in Memphis. The Pirates will be join-
ing the Memphis Tigers, Missouri. Northeast
Louisiana, and Southern Alabama for the
University of Memphis Invitational. ECL "s first
game for the weekend will be held at 11:30
against Southern Alabama.
�us
i
;
;




Pee Dee ,s always a crowd pleaser at ECU sporting events Tyler Roberts, son of head womens soccer coach
' Neil Roberts, joins Pee Dee to cheer on the volleyball team in Tuesday night s matchup against UNC
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Sarah Kary spikes the ball over a Carolina defender in
Tuesday's loss to the Tar Heels.
The Lady Pirates are now 84 on the season
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
1997-98 ECU Men's Basketball Schedule
Date (Day) Opponent Site
Nov. 5 (Wed.)
Nov. 15 (Sat.)
Nov 18(Tues.)
Nov. 22 (Sat.)
Nov 25 (Tues.)
Nov. 29 (Sat.)
Dec 6 (Sat)
Dec. 8 (Mon )
Dec 13 (Sat i
Dec. 20 (Sat)
Dec. 29 (Mon
NEXT LEVEL SPORTS (Exh.) GREENVILLE
at West Virginia Morgantown, W.Va.
at Saint Louis St Louis, Mo.
at UNC Asheville Asheville, N.C.
at St. Joseph's Philadelphia. Pa
FERRUM GREENVILLE
CAMPBELL GREENVILLE
at Southwestern Louisiana Lafayette, La.
GEORGIA GREENVILLE
UNC ASHEVILLE GREENVILLE
COURT AUTHORITY (Exh) GREENVILLE
The Department ofkccreation.il Services will be
sponsoringa o-Ret Basketball league which will be
cn to all students, faculty, and staff at EC!
Individuals who are interested in entering a team
must attend the registration meeting on Tuesday,
Sept. 25 at 5 p.m. in the Mendenhall Student
Center. Room 244. Registration will take place the
following d.iv on Wednesday Sept. 24 between 10
a.m. and 3:30 p.m. in 128 Student Recreation
(!eliter.
Information relating to playing rules, participa-
tion policies, league guidelines, and entry proce-
dures will be covered. Unaffiliated players who are
seeking to join a team are also encouraged to attend
for placement on a team. Teams will play a round-
robin format which will be followed by a single elim-
ination tournament to determine Ml Campus
t h.impious.
Gold (advanced skill i and Purple (recreational)
leagues will be available provided there is sufficient
interest I he regulai season will begin on the week
on Mondav Sc-pi 2l� and games will be played in the
evenings at Christenbury Gym and rhe Student
Recreation Center.
Co-Rcc Basketball rules follow normal high
school regulations with a few exceptions. A regula-
tion team consists of two men and three women.
The ball to be used (women's or men's) is deter-
mined bv selecting an option for the prc-game toss
either to take tirsi possession ol the ball to start the
game or choose the size of the ball.
The one major difference in the rules is that
male offensive and defensive players may nor enter
the lane area at the offensive end of the court I his
stipulation includes the extension ol the lane in the
out-of-bounds area behind the baseline. Penalties
tor rlus infraction include loss of possession it b the
offensive ot the awarding of points ifbv the defense.
Once again the legendary Vu "Trifector King
Dome is expected to lead "Trifecta State" in their
attempt to recapture the title that thev won in
1995. Dome has recenth been spotted it the prac-
tices of several WNBA teams on a scouting mission
for new talent to upgrade his roster.
However, the preseason favorite to repeat as
defending champions is "Bullets and Butterflies
provided that captain Jason (.crhardt can keep a
consistent lifigup rTOITI gallic W gallic' allu refrain
from trying to officiate while playing. In addition.
Hope Murrav is expected to he found wherever
there is a basketball game. If she assembles some ot
the ladies from her 5-on-5 championship team, the
title picture could prove interesting.
There is no cost for students and Student
Recreation Center member facultystaff. Non-SRC.
member faculty staff will have the option to either
purchase a dailv guest pass tor entry into the facility
oi m.iv purchase a "Limited Pass" for $10 which will
cover facility usage costs tor the entire Co-Rec
Basketball season. For further information on the
Co-Rec Basketball league oi the Intramural Sports
program, contact David (iaskins at 328-6387.




I


i







11 Thursday. September 18, 1997
ENDTBME PROPHECIES
A video Presentation Series
by the author of
Endtime Magazine
7:15pm
ling Septor
Ri'io'm 248
Apostolic Ianipus Ministr
WAREHOUSE
A'
mM
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bw-3 m i
Grill &Pub
1 14 East Fifth Street 758- 9191
I m)L iar XWlgattngi
ifewHrr'V Special
frfV li SOW1"18 Sop 59.97 I
ffSniir ��iL I � "s,r7
Monday NighFootbaf Cluck Off �97
Wing eating Contest!
fir Prtw S200, ZndVrtoa $100, 3rd S5C
chicken Taco Salad & Drink j J Purchase a single order of wings j
e recieve 5 free wings.
3.99 explV15�7j expl(Vi5�7j
L�����J I��J
The East Carolinian
BASKETBALL
continued from page 10
ECU opens its 1997-98 regular
season Saturday, Nov 15 at
Morgantown, WV with a contest
against Big East opponent West
Virginia. Afp- their opener this season
at West Virginia, the Pirates will play
three days later at Conference USA
for Saint Louis.
"We will be playing a very high
level of competition said Dooley,
who will be entering his third season
as ECU's head coach. "We're taking on
some powers in college basketball. St.
Joseph's was an NCAA Sweet 16 team
last year; Georgia was an NCAA team
again and won 24 games. Saint Louis
had one of the top recruiting classes in
the country and opening at West
Virginia presents a great challenge as
well. Without question, this is the
most challenging schedule our pro-
gram has ever faced said Dooley
"But we're excited about it. Our pro-
gram has continued to improve and
make significant strides. We look for-
ward to playing this caliber of compe-
tition
The Pirates' 1997-98 non-confer-
ence schedule includes the following:
at West Virginia (Nov. 15), at Saint
Louis (Nov 18), UNC Asheville
(home Dec. 20 and away Nov. 22), at
Saint Joseph's (Nov. 25), Ferrum
(Nov. 29), Campbell (Dec. 6), at
Southwestern Louisiana (Dec. 8) and
Liberty (Jan 14).
ECU's first three Colonial Athletic
Association contests will be played on
the road, starting Jan. 3 at George
Mason. The Pirates' CAA home open-
er will be Saturday, Jan. 10 versus
William and Mary. The regular season
culminates with the CAA
Tournament, Feb. 27-March 1 at
Richmond, Va.
'We have continued to work hard
to upgrade our basketball schedule
said ECU Director of Athletics Mike
Hamrick and we feel like we have
taken a positive step in that direction
with this year's schedule
INDAY
� COATS �FLANNELS I
�ANORAKS �BOXERS
� BLAZERS -TEE SHIRTS '
�PANTS fDRESSES
� SWEATERS �SKIRTS
�SHOES �FLEECE JACKETS
�JEANS �FLEECE VESTS
atalog
nnection
Division Of fflDJ
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
, Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room 8- 10:45 pm
Thursday, September 18, 1997
The Boy Wonder Jinx
Sky Dive
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MUSICIANS! FREE LIVE MUSIC, PIZZA, & REFRESHMENTS!
m
COMING 19
S5na
M
Msaeeais
ECOMIIIfi REPRESENTATIVE ELfCHONS
IJUBHUI
UtflltlilBtftl
JBHICKll
M
jurat
WAH UNDERGROUMI
imutLSTitfi caws so m mmhi
SPECMLGKSI: THIRD OF NEVER
If
ALL
MQNDArOCTOnZt
H0MEC0NR16 COURT
ANNOUNCEMENT RECEPTION
HnaKuimHrcarTa&Hin�i.7:9i-i:MPH
HOMECOMING COMMITTEE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES
FLOAT, RANNER CONTEST, HOUSEHALL DECORATIONS, KING AND QUEEN CANDIDATE
FAY. OCTOBER 24
PIRATEFEST
Vtmmwm
THEM OCTOBER 21
IGRATO NIGHT
mmmm.im
his maun nee (nuta u ah nm
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR ALL
ACTIVITIES IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 BY 4:00 PM
TURN ALL APPLICATIONS IN TO ROOM 210
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
SATtfROir. OCTOBER 25
PARADE LINEUP
iiSlKiimtlM
HOMECOMING PARAK
win
OE A MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL CONTACT
PERSONS AND HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVES IN HOMECOMING FBOTOALL GAME 3:38PM SATURDAY
THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER ROOM 221 MEMPHIS TIGERS VS. ECU PIRATES
AT 7PM MONDAY, SEPTEMDER 22 HflMECOMINS COORT ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE HALF
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY WINNING OF THE SPIRIT W
INFORMATION. CALL 32S - (711. SCHEDULE OF EVENTS IS SUBJECT TO CHAN6E
HOMECOMING PACKETS ARE TO BE PICKED OP AT THE STUDENT LEADERSHIP OFFICE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, ROOM 10
Mwnraism
RANNER CONTEST JUDGING
KltttUMIlim
Iri
' at
p�"���
'ji





12 Thursday. September 18, 1997
spori
The East Carolinian
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The ECU golf team shot a 293 on
the final 18 holes to finish 13th at
the Palmetto Intercollegiate Classic,
held at Osprey Point Golf Course on
Kiwawah Island, S.C. Pirate sopho-
more Marc Miller finished in a three
way tie for first, but bogeyed the
playoff hole, which allowed Kyle
Thompson of South Carolina to
claim the individual title. Miller shot
a one under 71 on Tuesday for a total
of 209, seven under par for the tour-
nament.
"1 thought I played three solid
rounds Miller said. "Today I
bogeyed both the 18th hole and the
playoff hole, so that was disappoint-
ing. But overall I was pretty happy
ECU placed 13th among the 18-
team field, finishing ahead of CAA
rivals ODU and UNC-VVilmington. A
first round score of 307 was too much
to overcome despite posting scores
in the upper half of the field in the
final two rounds.
"I was pretty pleased today Head
Coach Kevin Williams said. 'That
first round just killed us
ECU sophomore Stephen Satterly
was the next highest individual fin-
isher for the Pirates, carding an even
12 in Tuesday's round and finishing
tied for 50th with a 223. Senior Kevin
Miller tied for 57th, �jHe sopho-
mores Robbie Perry and Brian
Crawford finished 80th and 89th.
In head-to-head competition
against all teams participating in the
first two tournaments this season.
ECU has a 16-14 record. They fin-
ished third out of 14 teams last
weekend at the Seton Hall
Invitational.
The Pirates next complete in the
UNCWBelvedere Intercollegiate,
held at Belvedere Plantation in
Wilmington, N.C. on Sept. 29-30.
TRIVIAtime
. �
Final Team Standings
South Carolina
Clemson
Charleston
(t)Furman
it) East Tennessee St.
(tt Va. Commonwealth
(t) Watford
Maryland
Duke
North Florida
(t) TennChattanoofla
tt) Florida Southern
East Carolina
1
2
3
4
4
6
8
8
9
10
11
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
Top Individuals
1 Kyle Thompson, USC
70-68-71
at) Marc MlHer, ECU 69-69-71 209
2ft) Eric Edar. USC 70-71-68 209
Other ECU Scores
S7(t) Kevm M�er78-73-74 225
SOU) Stephen Satterly 78-73-72 223
SOW Robbie Perry 82-73-76 231
89 Brier Crawford 83-73-82 238
Old Dominion
UWCWaminoon
The Citadel
Virginia Tech
Name the current
ECU offensive line
coach who used to
be the running backs
coach for three years
at the University of
South Carolina?
EL TORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber & Style
Pirate Special
2800 E lOthSt-
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon - Fri. 9-t
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say Pirates &
Get Hair Cut
for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
$7.00
Haircut
AYY f"&
HENDRIX FILMS
Thursday. September 18
Friday. September 19
Saturday. September 20
5 Vlfc0
For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
'All films start at 8:00 pm unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one quest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No Backpacks Bookbags Allowed in Hendnx Theatre
MILLER LITE CONCERTS!
Live
TICKETS STUTUT
faCUe40tV ManBRAK
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PAVILION AT
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CHARGE 6Y PHONE: (919) 834-4000
v4 HonAnt Oicrgti ore odota Dole Subpti to 0anft tfrfhc Model
www.walnuttreek.com
4.25" X 8" THETECHNICIAN, DAILY TARHEEL, EAST CAROLINIAN
Ik
flk Welcome!
jw ySl
Jon Strickland
Sarah Henderson � Kim Batson
Margarett Tyndall
Chuck Damron � April Abair
Laurie Horwitz
Julie Bernocco � Lesley Miller
Justin Bailey
Amy VanVoltenburg � Julie Indicott
Marcie Jernigan
Gretchen Umberger � Elissa Horton
Jeremy Woodard
Jennifer McCloskey � Tiffany Lydon
Angie Lynch
CONGRATULATIONS!
Sponsored by the ECU Office of Alumni Relations
and
the ECU Ambassadors
NURSING B00KFAIR

OFF
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Also Available: Health Science Instruments,
Gifts & Clearance Merchandise
Thursday September 18th, 1997
10am - Noon
Lobby of the Nursing School





r

ARISE
Co-Rec Basketball
Sept. 23 � 5pm MSC 244
Suoerball Golf
Sept. 23 � 5pm SRC 128
Frisbee Golf Singles
Sept. 2425 � 3-6pm
Frisbee Golf Crs.
SoccerPreview Meetin
Oct. 14 � 5pm MSC 244
Soccer Officials Meeting
Oct. 9 � 5pm SRC 202
QuadPgra Sports Da
Oct. 4 � 9am-4pm SRC
.A
3
H
m
Aerobics Reg. Session II
Oct. 13
Ironman Meeting
Oct. 9 � 5:30 pm SRC
Ironman Triathlon
Oct. 13-17 � On going SRC !
Volleyball & Badminton Clinic
Oct. 12 � 2-4pm Sports Forum
Tennis Clinic
Sept. 21 � 2-4pm TBA
Yoga Class
Oct. 13-Nov. 5
MW. 5:15-6:30pm SRC I
Climbing Wall Intro
Sept. 17 7-9pm Climbing wall
Backpacking - App. Trail 20 mile
Oct. 3-7 � Reg. Sept 27 m
New River Gorge � Adventure -g
I Oct. 3-7 � Reg. Sept. 27
! Pilot MT. - Climbing �
I Sept. 27 � Reg. Sept. 19
4
Friday Night Fever
I Sept. 19, Oct. 10 9-11pm SRC
Goose Creek - Sea Kayaking
Sept. 25 � Reg. Sept. 22
Kitty Hawk - Hang Gliding
Oct. 12 � Reg. Sept. 30
Tar River Expedition
Sept. 24 � Oct. 8 � Oct. 22
College Ski Week Colorado
Jan. 4-9 Reg. by Sept. 25 .
&
?-�

� tilti�img�k 'i fim0
� � �� i if
V







classifieds
The East Carolinian
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leas for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-285
1 BEDROOM APT. ACROSS from
ECU, parking, gas heat completely re-
modeled. Move in now. Call 355-8731
or 1919) 271-4999.
MALI ROOMMATE WANTED
PLAYERS Club Apt. Split expenaea
V. Call Melieee at 321-7813 for more
information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
PLAYERS Club Apta. Spirt expeneea
V. Call Melissa at 321-7813 for more
information.
THIRD ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over leaee In 3 bedroom at Wilson
Acre ASAP. Male or female. $230 a
month. Call Tracy, 758-9245.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM apartment
ONLY $235.00 per month, on Cotanche
Street directly across from new ECU
Rec Center. MOVE IN MOW with
$100.00 security deposit. Call 758-
1921, ask for Chuck.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE3
bedroom house: $2004- 14 utilities.
North Harding location 4 blocks from
campus: Includes washerdryer, dish-
washer, fireplace, deck, central ac and
heat Great deal. Cat! ASAP 757-2482.
AWESOME BEDROOM WITH HUGE
brick fireplace only $200 a month at
Tar River. Moving � Need someone to
take over lease ASAP. Male or female.
Call Shawn, 8308882.
ONE BEDROOM DUPLEX WITHIN
walking distance of Campus One
bedroom central heat and window air.
Convenient front door parking for
$250.00. PETS OKI Call 830-9502.
GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING 1
male housemate. SmOWmonth plus
13 utilities. Located within walking
distance from campus. Call Kevin at
581-7218, leave a message.
FTREE UTILITIES, 1 BEDROOM.V2
block from camps on Holly St Cats al-
lowed with deposit. Rent $305 a
month. 757-9387.
DJ'S WANTED FOR ROCK N' ROLL,
Clastic Rock and Alternative Format
Must have outgoing personality. No
experience needed. Apply In person or
call for appointment 757-3881.
PART-TIME GRAPHICSMARKET-
ING ASSISTANT Detail-oriented per-
son with an eye for design needed to
assist campus Marketing Manager.
Job involves computer layout and dis-
tribution of filers, signs, and banners
In addition to general office duties.
PageMaker and FreeHand experience
helpful. Applications available at ARA-
MARK office In Mendenhall Student
Center.
SPRING BREAK) OUTGOING INDI-
V1DUALS - sell 15 and go FREE. Can-
cun. South Padre, Maiatian, Jamaica,
South Beech FL. Guaranteed best pric-
es 1-800-SURFS-UP. www.studentex-
press.com
FULL-TIME TEACHERS TO teach Inf-
ants or Four Year Olds. Must have ex-
perience andor 2-4 year degree In
child development or related field.
Also needing morning substitutes. Call
758229.
FREE'I-SHIHI
-(-$1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
whopping W.OOVISA
application Call
1-800-932-0528 ext 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPART-
MENT of Athletics, Office of Student
Deveicoment Is currently hiring full-
time 0U undergrad and graduate
students to tutor studen' athletes in
the following subject areas: CHEM
1120, 270; BIOL 1050, 1051; EXSS
3850; GEDG 1000, 2200: SCON 3144,
3030, 3980. Minimum GPA re-
quired. Call 328-550.
PI DELTA. THANKS FOR the great
social Friday. Hope to see you again
soon. Love, Tau Kappa Epslion.
Pi KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to
thank Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority for
helping make this fall rush one of our
most successful ever. Your attendance
and help was greatly appreciated.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
GAMMA Beta's of Alpha XI Delta: Ka-
tie Adams. Betsy Bickers, Blair Brlggs,
Lauren Carrier, Lindsay Cranston, Sar-
ah Evans, Amy Flanagan, Amy Frye.
Meridith Galloway, Allison Hardesty,
Stephanie Hernden, Melissa Hollings-
worth, Allison Kester, Kimberly Nou-
cas, Denlse Papa, Denies Reaves, Kelly
Reynolds, Tracy Seme, Jamie Slgisr,
Katie Sweet, Becky Thomas, Ellen Wat-
kins. Love, the sisters of Alpha XI Del-
ta.
PI KAPPA ALPHA. THANKS a lot
for last night We had a blast Love,
Ssgma Sigma Sigma.
CONGRATULATIONS JENNIFER
I OVE AND Meredith Holder on your
i icent pinning! We love you! The sls-
:ers and new members of Alpha Omi-
eronPt.
ZETA TAU ALPHA WOULD Ilka to
Congratulate all Fraternities on a Suc-
cessful Rush.
PI KAPPA PHI. OH my, oh my, how
many shots In one night can we try.
Your dance moves were great Each
new girl had a date. We hated to aee
the night come to an end, PI Kappa
Phi, let's do it again!
PI KAPPA ALPHA, WE had iota of
fun at the Bid Day-Beat Down last Fri-
day night! Cant wait to taiigate with
you on Saturday. Love, Alpha Delta PI.
THETA CHI. THANKSFOR the'invite
to your bid night We had a lot of fun
hanging out with you guys. Love, Al-
pha Phi.
Lost & Pound
PHYSICAL THE51APY MASSAGE
CLINIC ECU FT Program Is holding a
massage dink: Wednesday, Sept 24
from 5-9pm a' the Belk Building on
Charles Blvd. Advanced tickets are
$3.0010 min. Look for us selling tick-
ets on campus.
REWARD-LOST GOLD LADIES
watch, central part of campua by Stud-
ent Health Services. It's very special to
ma. Ptoaae call 561-7700, ask for Kim.
Announcements
FEMALE NEEDED TO SHARE four
bedroom house. ASAP. 12 block from
campus. Call 931-0448.
Greek Personals
E
For Sale
MAGIC THE GATHERING SIN-
GLES- Buy, sell, or trade game playing
as apace allows. Call 752-1821 after
5:30 p.m.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER top-
tops. Student discount. Finance for
less than $35.00 a month. Free carry-
ing case. Call 355-7057.
Help Wanted
BABYSITTER TUfSDAY, THURS-
DAY FROM 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at
my home near campus. Please call
Heather or Andy at 551-3193.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confktantial em-
ployment Call today, 747-7886.
EASY JOB: $2Shr. Must be able to
apeak to groups of H.S. students HOC
people for 10 min), have own trans-
portation, and be responsible. Must
have at least one day M-F wo classes
between 8am and 3pm. Call 1-800-472-
7501.
CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR MY six-
year old daughter. Need energetic,
creative person to pick-up at OvertorCs
afterscbool, keep in my home. Would
love experienced, flexible Individual.
Call 523-3417 or 527-9199, ext 105.
1 CAMPUS
FUNDRAISER
Raise all the money your group
needs by sponsoring a VISA
Fundraieeron your campus.
No Investment & very little time
needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for Information today.
Call 1-800-3234454 x 96.
PART-TIME SALES OPPORTUNI-
TIES: Brady's is accepting applica-
tions for additional associate In: Ju-
nior Sportswear, Ladies CasuatDraaa-
wear, and Young Men's. Flexible hour
to work around most school sched-
ules. Clothing discount included. To
get a head start on your fall wardrobe
or to start saving early for the upcom-
ing holiday seasons, apply at Custom-
er Service, each Monday-Thursday, 1-
5 p.m Brodys, The Plate.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avall-
able. Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department FALL YOUTH SOCCER
COACHES. The Greenville Recreation
ft Parks Department is recruiting for 12
to 16 part-time youth soccer coachee
for the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills aid have the
ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicant must be abie to
coach young people ages 5-15, in soc-
cer fundamentals. Hours are from 3:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m. wSth eome night
and weekend coaching. Flexible with
houra according to claea ached-
ules.This program will run from Sep-
tember to mid November. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. For more Infor-
mation, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550 after 2:00
p.m.
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS
WITH knowledge of Soccer, will train.
Must have transportation. Work on
Saturdays only Call Rita at 830-4216.
CONQRATULATIONS TO ALL THE
new Big and Little Sisters of Zeta Tau
Alpha.
PHI KAPPA TAU. WE bad a great
time at the tailgate Saturday. Let" do It
again sometime. Love, Alpha Phi.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA WOULD eke
tocorHjratulatealtofthefraternltiaaon
a Greet Fall Rush!
KAPPA SIGMA. WE HAD a great
time sweatin' the heat out with you
taikjating on Saturday. We are looking
forward to our next social! Love, Alpha
Delta Pi.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, THANKS for
a great weekend! Bid night and taikjat-
ing wars Iota of fun. Cant wait for the
next Uriel Love. Sigma Sigma Sigma.
HERE'S TO THE KAPPA Alpha Gen-
tiemen for an aweeome tailgate Satur-
day. You guy know how to start off
and end a football game. Cant wait to
sea you again. Love, the sisters and
new members of Deits Zeta.
PI DELTA WANTS TO thanktau Kap-
pa Epslion for the Invitation last Friday
night We had a greet time. Hope to do
It again. Sisters and pledges of Pi Del-
ta.
TO THE BROTHERS AND Pledges of
Data Sigma: We hope you enjoyed
our Bid Night aa much as we did! You
guys are a lot of fun. Aa usual, we en-
joyed breakin' it down with all. Good
luck thl semester guys. Love, the
Sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
TO ALL PI DELTA pledges: Thanks
for the banner that you made for the
football game. We love you, Pi Delta
sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA ON
YOUR victory in Flag Football! Way to
goglrtal
JAMAKIN' ME SICK. DE sand, bam-
boo. Bob Marieywhat a surprise. Sig-
ma Phi Epeilon, a greet bunch of guya.
Oh what a night filled with trips to the
batch. Our pref night dates were a per-
fect match. So aad the celebration had
to and, but hey mon, no worries, we'll
do It agalnl Love. Alpha XI Delta.
THANKS, ALPHA DELTA PI for the
wonderful Bid Night. Even though Fri-
day la "Gone With the Wind we're
looking forward to talfgating next Sat-
urday. PI Kappe Alpha.
LITTLE SIGMA SISTERS-GET ready
for Friday. We cent wait until you
know who we are. Love, your Big
Sisters!
FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER: JOIN us on
Sept 19 from tM1p.m. at the SRC for a
fun-filled Friday night Dept. of Rec.
Services.
STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIA-
TI8N- Join us for our second meeting.
Room 240 Tuesday, September 23 at
5:00. Refreshments will be served!
TENNIS SINGLES ENTRY DEAD-
LINE: Be sure to get your tennis sin-
gles entries In by Sept 16 at 5 p.m. to
the Student Recreation Center room
128. Dept of Rec Services.
ECU LAW SOCIETY WILL have etoc-
tiona for: Prealdent V-PrastdenL Sec-
retary, and Treasurer at our meeting
on Thursday. Sepumber 18th at 7PM �
at the Percolator. IV you are Interested
in law or law school, the meeting Is
beneficial. OPEN TO ALL MAJORS!
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOP-
MENT PROQRAMS W.H present "The
Jam In Your Jelly Roil" Monday, Sep-
tember 22 at 4pm In Mendenhall Mui-
ti-Purpose Room. Jim Storm, Director,
will review necessary techniques to
keep you and others motivated.
QAMMA BETA PHi WILL meet Sep-
tember 23 at 5:00p.m. in The General
Classroom Building Room 1032.
TENNIS CLINIC: THE TENNIS clinic
for the adapted recreation department
will be held on Sept 21 from 2-4 p.m.
The iocstion w to be announced. Dept
of Rec. Services.
SUPER BALL DOUBLES GOLF entry
deadline: the gotf entries are due by
5:00 p.m. on Sept. 23 In the Student
Pecreation Center room 128. Dept of
Rec. Services.
CO-REC BASKETBALL REGISTRA-
TION MEETING: if you are interested
In playing co-rec basketball, you are
required to attend the registration
meeting on Sept 23 at 5:00 p.m. at
Mendenhall room 244. Dept of Rec.
Services.
PILOT MOUNTAIN: THE 1ST trip to
Pilot Mtn. will be on Sept 27. Be aura
to register by Sept 19 in the SRC main
office. Dept of Rec. Services.
TUES SEPT. 16 - SENIOR RECITAL,
Jennifer S. Ucko, soprano, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital Hal 7:00 p.m. Fri. Sept 19 �
GRADUATE RECITAL, Jane Kline, mez-
zo-soprano, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00 p.m. Sun. Sept. 21 - VOCAL
CHAMBER MUSIC, voice students of
Louise Toppin, John B. O'Brien, harp-
sichord. The Music House, 408 West
Fifth Street 3:00 p.m.
SEA KAYAKING: IN GOOSE Creek
State Perk on Sept 25. Be sure to reg-
ister by Sept 22 In the SRC mein of-
fice. Dept of Rec. Services.
YOU CAN
ALSO READ
THE TEC
CLASSIFIEDS
ON THE
WEB.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
$ C A S H -�aGoodi�.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking tot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door fa ring buzzer.
POINT YOUR
BROWSER
TO OUR WEB
SITE.
It's easy to advertise in
i the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
classifieds!
Fill in the blanks and
select a category.
Student ID
Category (check one)
? For Rent D For Sale
? Services D Personals
D Greek Personals0ther
D Help Wanted
? Lost & Found
Write your ad on the
lines.
to
13
14
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Circle the date(s) you
want the ad to run
Bring this form and
your payment before
the deadline to The
East Carolinian office
819 826 828 92 94 99 911 916
918 923 925 930 102 109 1014 10
16 1021 1023 1028 1030 114 116 11
11 1113 1118 1120 1125 124 129 115
120 122 127 129 23 25 210 212
217 219 224 226 33 35 310 312
326 331 42 47 49 414 416 421
423 428 430 55 527 63 610 617
624 71 78 715 722 729
RATES DEADLINES
25 words orfewer 4 jr.hif rSOAVJrtiSA
Students$2 Tifeldays ed'fon
Nonrstudents$3 Cp.fniffillDAYforji�
Each word over 25, add5f TWPfjf $mm
For bold, add$1 2-pm MOBDAY br all Summer
For ALL CAPS, add$1 issues
All ads must be pre-paid. All Greek organizations must be spelled out - no abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to reject any ad lor libel, obscenity andor bad taste.
w
mumrm.


Title
The East Carolinian, September 18, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 18, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1226
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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