The East Carolinian, September 16, 1997






r-
TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 16.1997
EASTCAROUNAUNWERSTTY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROUNA
Phone registration may
become available next spring
Computer Information
Services in final stages for
phone registration
A. BRANDON MISE
STAFF REROUTE
ECU students may finally get their chance to
register over the phone next semester.
Computer Information Services (CIS) is in
the process of completing an interactive voice
response system in which a student may call
in and register for their classes.
"Every year the senior surveys have indi-
cated that this is something that the students
would like to see go into effect said Amy
Bissetce, assistant registrar.
"The reason it took so long is that we had
to get the network finished on campus, as
well as installing telephone switches that
would be able to handle all of the calls com-
ing in said Blake Price, director of CIS.
Blake Price
DIRECTS OF CIS
The voice response sys-
tem has been on the
drawing board for well
over a year now.
After talking to several
large companies such as
IBM about a potential
phone registration, CIS
found that these sys-
tems' price ranges were
financially impossible
for the campus. CIS
decided to take bids,
and Frank Solutions of
Denver, Colo, offered a system at a very rea-
sonable cost, according to Price.
"The system will be advantageous to those
students who commute or live off campus
said Bissette.
Students who find it a hassle to come to
campus to register or who have other obliga-
tions registration day may find the new phone
system worthwhile. Of course students can
still register the old-fashioned way.
"We're not going to replace anything, well
have all the options said Price, "You can still
register in the office, or.over the phone, and as
soon as we're done with the phone systems,
we arc going to try to put it bn the web as
well
The voice response system not only
allows the student to register, they will also be
able to check their grades, schedules and
information on admissions, housing and finan-
cial aid.
There are problems that the phone system
won't solve, however, such as closed classes
and long waits.
"One thing people need to remember is
when you start dialing in, you're going to get a
lot of busy signals, and you'll be waiting at
home on the phone just as you would coming
in and standing in line said Price.
The plan is to test this system with the
graduate students for spring registration this
coming November, in order to workout any
bugs in the voice interactive system.
If things go as planned, the phone system
will be accessible in January, said Price.
"We're working hard on it, and hopefully in
November our tests will be successful Price
added.
Parking lot near Umstead Hall closes
Phase II of Joyner
library project
temporarily closes
parking lot
AMANDA AI'STIN
ASSISTANT NF.WS EDITOR
The parking lot on Wendall Smiley Way, near
Umstead Hall, has been closed until future
notice.
On Monday, the small grass parking lot
positioned on 9th and Lawrence Street closed.
The parking spaces are closed due to what
is called "Phase 11" of the Joyner Dbrary con-
struction project.
"The closing is being requested by facility
80065 said Jim Midgette, director of trans-
portation services.
When these parking spaces will again be
available for use is unknown at this time.
"They (Facility Services) haven't told me.
My understanding is eariy December said
Midgette.
"Usually, as soon as they can allow parking
in an area, they open it back up again said
Leslie Craigle, director of marketing for
Business Services.
There will be approximately 200 to 225
spaces lost during the time construction is tak-
ing place in this lot.
"With the construction project we arc try-
ing to be as accommodating as possible; we are
changing designation to accommodate said
Midgette.
The first lot on Reade Street is designated
for resident parking, the second lot is universi-
ty registered. The lot where SubStation was
previously located wilt also be available to stu-
dents with resident stickers.
"We realize that it is not convenient, but
we are doing what we can said Midgette.
A similar loss of spaces took place during
"Phase I" of the Joyner Library Construction
project when the other half of the lot, located
behind Joyner Library and Mendenhall, was
closed for construction.
Convenience and location of parking for
students is an issue that Parking and Traffic
Services is trying to deal with as things begin
to change with construction.
"Wfe are trying to be sensitive to the stu-
dents' needs said Midgette.
ECU RECEIVES AWARD FOR BEAUTIFICATION
The perking lot en 9th and Lawrence Street is
closed due to
construction on Joyner Library.
MAP DEPARTMENT OF PMKINS AHD TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Parking is available to students in the lots
adjacent to Reade Street, and commuter park-
ing is available on College Hill, south of.Belk
Hall and Minges.
"PURPLE HAZE"
� � mF0FWn
� � �i'��F
t rn

A "purple haze" clouded the field at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium during ECU's 25-24 win over Wake Forest this pest weekend.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
(Top) Or. George Harrell. Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs (left), presents a City Council award to
the ECU grounds crew which recognizes their efforts to improve the appearance of the campus.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
The renovations at Wright Plaza provided outdoor seating and a bricked walkway, as well as a trellis for climbing vines. PHOTO AMANDA PROCTOR The Rivers Building shows off its colors with a new landscaping job. PHOTO BT AMANDA PROCTOR Significant landscaping work was done to the comer of Fifth Street and Reade Circle. g PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTORWPVz- "jiiterarffl
� � �X -� VVSlS Jf "v
Alcohol 101 interactive;
educational party
'�
ECU selected as one of
31 campuses to test
Alcohol 101
AMBER TATUM
STAFF WRITER
As if downtown were not enough, the Dean of
Students Office encourages students to visit vir-
tual bars through a state-of-the-art program
called Alcohol 101.
"W; were selected as one of 31 campuses to
use this program stated Donna J. Vfolsh of the
Health Promotion and Weil-Being Resource
Center.
Alcohol 101 is an interactive computer pro-
gram that will be used in projects with
University Housing, Judicial Affairs and the
Resource Center to educate students about the
various issues concerning alcohol usage. ECU
applied to the University of Illinois Urbana-
Champaign to try their new technology;
"It's only basic alcohol facts and how it inter-
acts with the person using it. It is not primarily
discipline-focused said Karen Boyd, associate
dean of students.
The program is three hours long. As a judi-
cial sanction, students may be required to
review certain parts of the program again. When
used for educational purposes, one can use any
part of it.
"We require (students who are found drink-
ing underage to undergo an hour and a halt" ses-
sion said Boyd.
"(In Alcohol 101, you actually go to a parrs'
where there is a bar that allows you to choose
Karen Boyd
ASSOCIATE DEAN Of
STUDENTS
what you want to drink,
and they take the statis-
tics of your body weight
and all to determine
how this impacts you
said Boyd.
When the program first
begins, one must enter
their first name. It is
kept anonymous. The
student will also be
asked to enter their
weight, height and age.
Computer-simulated people talk to the par-
ticipant about their lives and ;tsk what they
should do. It has been described as "amazing
role playing
"You get to go through the party and people
talk to you about their livesyou get to watch
them do things at this party and then they turn
to you and say what do I do now? You get to
watch it turn out any way you want said Walsh.
Boyd described the program as being, "kinda
like fkt Brady Bunch, but more sarcastic" The
host of the program, a talking lava lamp named
Norm, asks questions and gives students multi-
ple choice answers. If the correct answer has
been chosen. Norm will congratulate the stu-
dent user with a humorous "righty-o It is sim-
ilar to another program titled You Don't Knots
Jack.
Sophomore Laura Hinesley, who tried the
program, said she enjoyed it.
"I thought it was cool Hinesley said.
"Norm was funny, and it was actually a lot of
fun
Alcohol 101 will be available soon at various
locations on campus. Minor bugs are being cur-
rently worked out by lsh and a small group
from her staff.
TODAY
partly sunny
High 87
Low 68
TOMORROW
panly sunny
High 88
Low 67
?????????
In 1907 Elizabeth City,
Washington, Kinston, New
Bern, Edenton, Rocky Mount
and Tarboro all sought to be
the site for East Carolina
Teacher's Training School,
which later became ECU.
opinion4
Students should be
given a choice whether
to register over the
phone or in person.
lifestyle6
Biology professor
recognized with
Distinguished Professor
Award.
sports.
Pirates steal victory in
last minutes of game.
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
�hone
28-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studentmedia.8cu.edu
iy ii � 'mi m
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2 Tuesday. September 16. 1997
W
ECU staff members receive
awards for excellence
VMANDA AUSTIN
S SIS T A N1 l� 1 i i! I ! � H
Recently six staff members at E I
were presented the award for excel-
lence by Chancellor Richard Kakin.
The awards were presented in a
ceremony, held in Mendenhall
Student Center, on Wednesday. Sept.
10.
Recipients of the award were Jesse
Battle. (Ihris Stallings, Sue Stoneham.
LaFrance Davis, Virgil Leggect and
kandis Hill.
Battle, an employee at Mendenhall
Student Center, and Stallings. a
mechanic with the maintenance staff,
received the award which honored
ihem for their devotion to dutv
Battle, the housekeeping supervi-
sor at Mendenhall, was recognized for
the way he has pride in his work and
for the way he assists staff, faculty; stu-
dents and community groups.
"I feel good: words can not explain
it said Battle upon receiving the
award.
Battle knows a good staff is always
important in getting the job done to
benefit the students when they use
the facilities.
"Having good employees, that
helps us carrv out the best work possi-
ble said Battle. "It is making sure
your job comes first, i always give God
the glorv for everything good in my
life
Stoneham. an accounting clerk
wirh the ECU Student Stores, won
the award for innovation. Her award
was based on her innovative way ot
processing veteran administration
charge accounts, resulting in more
efficiency and financial savings.
"I feel great like 1 am on cloud nine
and it was a great experience to have
won it said Stoneham.
Being nominated for the award was
a great shock to Stoneham.
"I didn't realize I was going to be
nominated said Stoneham. "I would
like to thank my co-workers for their
help in making this possible. I could
not have done this without their sup-
port
Stallings. ECU'S garage supervisor
was recognized for going txryond the
call of d'urv after Hurricanes Bertha
and Fran last year. He worked long
hours cleaning the debris from cam-
pus.
Davis, a sergeant on the police
force, won the award for alcohol and
awareness programs at campus resi-
dence halls and also for providing rapt-
defense training to the staff members
at University Home Care. She also
created a Police Athletic League to
promote camaraderie amongst fellow
police officers.
Leggett, also an ECU police offi-
cer, won an award for safety and hero-
ism after assisting in the arrest of an
individual who was suspected for
armed robberx last April.
Kandis Hill, a nurse at the School
of Medicine, was recognized as the
human relations recipient. Her award
was based upon a letter that was
received from the daughter of a
patient who was diagnosed with can-
cer.
The letter read that she and her
family "feel so luckx that this incredi-
ble person has touched our lives in
such a profound manner
The awards of excellence are given
annually and recipients are nominated
by fellow co-workers and are then
voted on bv a selected committee.
Accounting firm visits ECU to
aid accounting students
J'JWi
Natasha philips
s:tl WRITE
The accounting firroof McGladrey &
Pullen visited ECU's campus to pro-
vide funds and professional represen-
tatives to assist and advise accounting
students.
On Sept. 8-9 these profcssionais
offered their time and knowledge to
help ECU students practice and per-
fect their interviewing techniques.
'The goal was to help these stu-
dents improve their interviewing
skills and touch up problem areas
said James R. Westmoreland, director
of Career Services.
McGladrey & Pullen also provided
seminars on the proper way to con-
verse and dress for an interview.
()n Tuesday afternoon, a picnic was
held for invited professionals and
accounting students. The picnic's
purpose was to provide a relaxed envi-
ronment for students to meet with
and realistically discuss career plans,
expectations and professional goals
with knowledgeable individuals.
"The picnic wasn't just for fun. I
got the opportunity to meet with peo-
ple from various accounting offices.
We discussed what it's really like to
work for a business said Sun Song, an
accounting graduate student at ECl .
The picnic provided the opportu-
nity to casually mingle with potential
employers, but the interview practice
sessions were more formal. 1 hey
allowed for one-on-one discussions,
stressing the significance of appropri-
ate interviewing techniques and
effective presentation strategies.
The interviewing process was con-
ducted in a very business-like manner.
It involved filling out a short ques-
� . � � � ,
Employees of McGladrey & Pullen talk with accounting students during a
picnic at Elm Street Park
PHOTO BV J0CE1YN FRIEDMAN
tionnaire. engaging in social interac-
tion, filming the practice interview.
and watching and critiquing the inter-
view. The entire process took approx-
imately 30 minutes
McGladrey & Pullen generously
donated their time and financial
means to make this program possible;
however. Career Services also con-
tributed to the function's success.
"The interviews were held in the
Career Services Building. This
allowed the students to remain in a
familiar setting, which reduced anxi-
etv and nervousness. 1 he offices arc-
also comfortable, homey and non-
threatening. They too help the stu-
dent feel more at case said
Westmoreland.
Career Services assists numerous
companies with interviewing seminars
several times a vear. They work in
conjunction with the company tor the
student's benefit, however. Career
Services is able to help any student
with questions about potential intern-
ships, scholarships, graduate schools
and career opportunities. I hese ser-
ies are available year-round to all
students, not just to students who arc-
affiliated with a companv
"We provide general interviewing
practice programs throughout the
vear, which includes filming an inter-
viewed individual. We offer both gen-
eral interviewing advice and appropri-
ate interviewing techniques;
However, that's not all we do. Career
Services also provides abundant infor-
mation about career placement and
opportunities. If a student is interest-
ed, all thev have to do is call us and
make an appointment said
Westmoreland.
Those close to graduation arc-
encouraged to stop bv or call Career
Serv ices before their last semester. For
more information abourCareer
Services, please call 328-6050 or stop
bv 701 Kast Fifth Street.
The world is like a book, and those that
never leave home read but one page
- St. Augustine
Start a new chapter in your life with
PEACE CORPS
Find out more about our volunteer
opportunities overseas!
Thursday, September i8
2 P.M. to 3 p-m.
Career Services Building
Room 103
For more information, call Peace Corps at 800-424-8580 Ocl).
http:www.peacecorps.gov
758-4591 -752-4715 For more info visit our website at, netmar.comuserselbo
TUESDAY NIGHT LIVE
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Sept 23rd Surreal
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ASU sex case fuels criticism of student courts
B( K )NE (AP) - Back in January a freshman woman had sex with six members of the Appalachian State University
�gnt months, three lawsuits and several protest demonstrations later the university is still trying to close the hooks
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State team to search for toxic organism's link to human ailments
(AF, -North Carol in issembl.ng team ol expert, ro dercrm.nc it a rox. tish killer threatens nun in
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jBijrarWW il ibmii.
3 Tuesday, September 16. 1997
IH ws
The East Carolinian
q
!� i i i p i is -�� s o r i) k !�: r i k h ,i ��; i i n v h s 1.1 c;
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Poli Sci profs slated to
present program on
racial attitudes
Three political science profes-
sors will present a public program at
3:30 p.m. this afternoon in room C-
104 of the Brewster Building about
racial attitudes in eastern North
Carolina. The speakers are Dr.
Bonnie G. Mani, Dr. Thomas E
Eamon and Dr. Carl McCurley.
Their address is titled "Changing
Racial Attitudes in Eastern North
Carolina: How, When, Or is it
Passible?" The program is spon-
sored by the ECU Department of
Political Science and is part of the
department's Research Seminar
Series. The public is invited.
Contact Department of Political
Science, 919 328-6030.
Phi Kappa Phi
represented at Centennial
Celebration
The East Carolina University
Chapter of the Honor Society of Phi
Kappa Phi was recently represented
at the Phi Kappa Phi Centennial
Celebration by W. Keats Sparrow,
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences. Delegates representing
276 chapters attended the New
Orleans, La gala event which fea-
tured presentations by Jazz great
Ellis Marsalis, novelist Ernest
Gaines, and Phi Kappa Phi fellow-
ship recipients, to name but a few.
The East Carolina University
Chapter of the Honor Society of Phi
Kappa Phi received national awards
at the Centennial Celebration.
Sparrow accepted the national first
place trophy and check for "Best
Entry Involving Alumni or
Community Members" for its inau-
guration of the fall semester
Distinguished Alumni Lecture
Series. The chapter was also recog-
nized for "Excellence in Phi Kappa
Phi Week Activities and Fund-
Raising Activities
Travel-Adventure film
series opens
ECU's Travel-Adventure Film
Series opens tonight with a flower
auction in Holland, a tour of the
oldest city in Belgium, and a visit to
the world center of diamond pro-
cessing. The program narrated by
filmmaker Jim Cole, is The
Benelux Countries � Netheriands
(Holland). Belgium, Grand Duchy
of Luxembourg Showtimes arc at
4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center. For more informa-
tion about ticket prices and the
optional 6 p.m. theme dinner, call
the Central Ticket Office at 919
328-4788 or 1-800-ECU.ARTS.
T SI! -�rvi �i .33 vr�i !f1
THURSDAY-SATURDAY
ALL FILMS START-AT 8PM -
UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED AND
ARE FREE FOR ALL STUDENTS,
FACULTY. AND STAFF MEMBERS
(ONE GUEST ALLOWED) WITH
VALID ECU ID.
"You can't be too young
to be a Pirate Fan"
says Lindsy Robinson.
"Get Your Pirate charms
where I got mine
at
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers Inc.
608 E. Arlington Blvd. Arlington Village � 321-7000
� Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm � Sunday 1 - 5pm
YOU CAN'T SCREAM
A N A C O N D A
PG 13 � 'T W'UL T&E Y�UR B'REA� AWAY COLUMBIA �
i V PICTURES JL
AFRICA: A Continent Revealed
Mapping the Continent to the 21st Century
A Central Intelligence Agency Exhibit
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Visual Arts Committee
Mendenhall Gallery, ECU
September 15-October 13, 1997
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The Boy Wonder Jinx
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Free live music! Free pizza and refreshments!
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HMr 0
CHECK OUT OUR WEB PACE!
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Presented by the ECU Student Union
For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
E-mail: uuunion@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
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r
Tuesday. SspttmNr 16. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
easttarolinian
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ECU is in the process of expanding its services to allow students to register for classes over
the phone in the future. While the idea of eliminating those much dreaded 5 a.m. lines may
sound like one for grabs at first glance, there are other factors to consider other than how early
your alarm will he set for that morning.
First of all, ihe new system will give students an opportunity to register for classes through a
computera computer that can only give so many answers. So where do students with specific
questions or problems go? Probably to the lines that will forming" of other students who need
more assistance than the recording can provide.
What about those those who have a roommate? How will students decide which person gets
tt call in first? With 18,000 students all registering, classes will be filling up quickly, so having
tso wait a few minutes could make a big difference in the luck you will have getting the classes
you want.
And what about the ruined tradition all of the early birds out there actually look forward6 to
�each semester? Students who have waited in line over and over asin have grown accustomed to
the routine and look at registration day as a memorable one.
It is also importanttolrecognize that having a telephone registration system will not change
the number of seats that will be available in eaeh.dass. Students will still need co'chdaae'dec-
rives, and many will still have to settle for classes other than their first choice.
To keep the registration tradition alive and also sheet the needs of students who would rather
jsjeep in than get out of bed to stand in line, the university should develop u system that would
allow students to choose. If a telephone registration system was available and students could
jaiso register in person, everyone's needs could be met. If both systems were used, the regis-
tration process would run smoothly. Not as many people would be waiting in line, and not as
many people would be using the phone, so the wait would be cut down regardless of which sys-
tem students used.
OPINION
Bottom line, ordinance violates constitution.
Go outside, walk to your
neighbor's house and intro-
dua yourselfI Talk to your
neighbors tell them you do not
Me the 4 a.m. hud music and
drunk students "watering"
your azaleas. Once you have
an open line of communica-
tion, life just might get easier.
The time has come to put an end to
the three-person occupancy ordi-
nance law. Those in favor of the
three-person occupancy ordinance
cite numerous reasons for their
approval of the law, house upkeep,
parking, and property values.
To me, property value is a lame
excuse. The homeowners of the col-
lege district do not like to see
numerous individuals living next
door, the fear being chat college-age
students do not do a very good job of
keeping up the dwelling.
On this issue 1 have two exam-
ples. I have friends who live in a
house and keep the place clean, the
lawn well-managed and, in general,
keep the house looking good. I also
have friends who make Sanford and
Son look like Martha Stewart.
Of note here is the friends I have
who keep their dwelling in good con-
dition are in serious violation of the
occupancy ordinance (four to five
people in the house). Based upon
what I know of these people, it is so
they have enough people to divvy up
the chores.
College students are hard pressed
for time. Working, guing to school,
and yes, socializing, along with every-
day tasks of studying and running
errands eat up a good deal of time.
With more people to do the house
and yardwork, the residence is in
better shape.
Having noisy neighbors is a pain;
trust me, I have been on both sides
of the coin. Like life, the problem
has been made bigger than the
answer. The answer to the problem is
so simple it has been overlooked.
Stop watching television, playing on
the internet, or anything that kills
time.
Go outside, walk to your neigh-
bor's house and introduce yourself.
Talk to your neighbors tell them you
do not like the 4 a.m. loud music and
drunk students "watering" your aza-
leas. Once you have an open line of
communication, life just might get
easier.
Sure reaching over to cat! the
police when you are awakened at
night is easy. Would it not be just as
easy to call the neighbors and ask
them to keep the noise down? If the
neighbors persist, then call the
police.
I will say this, having lived in
Greenville for a few years the worst
problem I had with noise was not a
big parrier who lived next to me.
There were two problems: one was a
baby, the kid cried insistently at the
crack of dawn; the other was a bark-
ing dog. The baby I could do nothing
about; kids are kids, they cry.
The dog was another matter. I
talked to my neighbors, I did not
threaten to call the city about the
dog, nor did I talk to my neighbor
with a chip on my shoulder. I did
what I was taught by my parents,
talked through a problem. Guess
what? Being nice works, the dog
rarely awoke me from my slumber.
As for the car issue I have no idea
what the answer might be. Evidently
no one else does either, aside from
evicting otherwise law-abiding stu-
dents. Maybe a parking deck. No
wait, according to the administration
ECU does not have a parking prob-
lem.
Lower rent is often stated as a
reason for the three-person occupan-
cy ordinance. The idea does not float
well with me. If only three people
live in a house, rent can only be so
high. College students are not
known for their exorbitant wealth.
If rent is decreased because of
greater enforcement of the law, as
the Tar River Neighborhood
Association (TRNA) wishes, the
TRNA might just see a few more
slums than they want. With rent
being so low, landlords cannot afford
to keep up the house. The paint job,
or replacement of the rotting wood
on the porch might just have to wait
until next year.
The biggest reason I am against
the three-person occupancy ordi-
nance is one of civil liberties. The
fourth amendment is an amendment
I cherish, "The right of the people to
be secure in their persons, houses,
papers, and effects against unreason-
able searches and seizure, shall not
be violated, and no Wtrrants shall
issue, but upon probable cause, sup-
ported by Oath or affirmation, and
particularly describing the place to
be searched, and the persons or
things to be seized �
How can anyone call an anony-
mous, unfounded complaint proba-
ble cause? Sometimes an anonymous
complaint is needed, but those kind
of complaints are only useful in
extreme situations. I define extreme
situations as murder, child abuse,
kidnapping�you get the idea. Four
unrelated people living in a house is'
NOT a reasonable cause to get a war-
rant.
LETTER
to the Fditoi
Less popular sports deserve coverage
Your "Fall Sports Preview" insert in
the Sept. 11 East Carolinian has a
cover which features nine pictures:
five relating to football, three to men's
basketball and one to cheerleading.
When readers look inside, they see
seven sports covered: cheerleading,
football, volleyball, swimming, soccer,
cross country and golf. It would have
been a better visual representation of
"fall sports" had you included some of
these sports on your cover. This "front
page" coverage could have been easily
achieved by dropping a few of the
football and basketball photos (save
the stadium photo for the "Fall Sports
Blunders" insert). While these other
sports might not be as "popular" or
"sell more papers" than ECU football
and ECU men's basketball (which
wasn't even covered inside the issue),
you should remember two things: I)
popular or not, these sports deserve
just as much attention; and 2) your
paper is free!
John Hobgood
Geography
Senior
OPINION
William S.
COCHRAN
Columnist
No matter how you feel, graduation's cool.
If you ain 7 in class, how are
you gonna make good grades?
One of the principles college
fosters is responsibility. Mom
and Dad aren 't there to pull
the blankets off your bed
You've got to do it all
yourself You've got to
nurture your
own motivation.
Well, you've made it this fat. Today is
Sept. 16, and it's been nearly one
month since classes began. You've
probably made it through the first
barrage of tests and papers, and let's
hope you've done well (and not
already exceeded the three absences
policy most profs deploy against
you).
It's time to retrench, to regroup,
to focus on the next phase of Fall
'97's battle of academia (and battle
with hangovers). A buddy of mine
dropped an aphorism on me the
other day, which I hadn't thought
about in quite a while: 99 percent of
life is just showing up.
There's some truth to this. If you
ain't in class, how are you gonna
make good grades? One of the princi-
ples college fosters is responsibility;
Mom and Dad aren't there to pull
the bjgnkcts off your bed or (my dad
actually did this once) pour cold
water on you.
You've got to do it all yourself.
You've got to nurture your own moti-
vation. You've got to say, "Damn it, I
know I fee! like crappola because of
that twelve-pack of Busch Lite last
night, but I gotta make it to Math
1065 and get on with my life
In many respects, that's what col-
lege is al! about. Let's face it; when
we graduate and we get a job in real
estate or insurance sales or in high
school English departments or in
restaurant businesses or what have
you, we are going to have to be
responsible.
If we drink and smoke weed, like
many of us do now, we're gonna be
considered tushes and probably end
up in unemployment lines. Adult
society frowns on alcoholic behavior
(no matter what the advertisers
make it look like and chose thirty-
year-old rednecks who show up at
our football games whoopin' and hol-
lerin' about how the Pirates are gonna
"kick dair asses all duh way back to
Winston-Salem"). Think about it.
Now, I'm not saying not to enjoy
the more raffish side of college life
that is down-town, that are keg
stands, that are bong hits, that are
Firehouse Taverns, Peasant's, BWs
and PB's. Al! this is very much a part
of college life. Just don't let it
become the only part of college life.
To those few of you who will grad-
uate Cumma Sum Laude, obviously
this message is not for you. You've
already figured out the intricate bal-
ance that will help make you very
successful in life; and a hearty Con-
grats and a keep on keepin' on to you.
To the rest of you who will be
happy to make a 2.5 this semester,
make sure your focus is cleat Think
about that five-chapter test next
week, or that analytical paper that's
due on Friday. Drag your butt over to
Joyner (they've done some really
nice interior decorating this sum-
mer) and get your work done. You
know you gotta do it. Hey, socializing
is cool, but so is graduating.
Onward and upward, I say. Be
cool, be smart, stay focused, study,
and succeed. C'est fa vie.
jCfT'Cl'P
to the Edi
MTV Music Awards unjustified criticism
I am writing in response to the article
titled "MTV loses; Jewel, Apple win
written by the assistant lifestyle edi-
tor, John Davis. I, along with many
other students on the ECU campus,
am angered by Mr. Davis' comments
on the MTV Video Music Awards.
His remarks were very judgmental
and critical to the extent that he gave
credit only to those "artists" with no
talent whatsoever, such as the
unskilled Beck.
Mr. Davis stated that "MTV actu-
ally managed to pull the music indus-
try lower than it ever has been before
by allowing hacks like Manson and
Puff Daddy to appear on the show
Manson, I would agree, is not the best
role modei for young children. He is a
talentless man with no direction and
satanic beliefs. Puff Daddy, on the
other hand, is a good man with a heart.
Yeah, maybe some of his songs are
remixes of ones previously produced,
but have you ever walked down
College Hill? You would notice that
nearly every car rolling down the hill is
paying tribute to Biggie by playing
Puff Daddy's CD, as with nearly any
fraterinity or sorority party.
The Video Music Awards is an
awards show to honor thoese artists
that have shown talent and popularity
among the nation. It is an awards
show, not a concert. How could one
expect to hear all music? If you were
that interested in hearing kinds of
music, play your favorites in the priva-
cy of your own home or watch one of
the other three music channels.
Mr. Davis also stated, "For exam-
ple, when Biggie Frie's mother came
up on the stage to thank all
involved�she forgot to mention all
the kids who bought crack from Biggie
in the early days of his career. All I
have to ask you, Mr, Davis, is have you
ever done drugs or do you know any-
one who has? Even the President of
the United States has gotten involved
with drugs. Lighten up.
Mr. Davis gave a lot of credit to
Beck. I find no talent in Beck's songs.
His videos consist of constant repeti-
tion and the only interesting part of
his videos are the visual aspects; in no
way does the man have actual singing
talent. Isn't that what musk is all
about?
Remember, for the future, that we
all have different intere .ts in music. I
do believe, however, that criticizing
MTV for talentless groups is com-
pletely uncalled for.
Kristen Meyer
Criminal Justice
Freshman
Ordinance irrelevant, responsibility at issue.
My husband and I recently moved to
the College View area. We own a beau-
tiful old home with renters living on
both sides of us. We moved to this
neighborhood for its diversity and
charm. One would expect to find dif-
fering opinions among this diverse
group of people. However think it's
a shame we cannot have opposing
view points on an issue withe ut mak-
ing personal slanderous about i person
or a group we know little about. Many-
young people who were students not
that long ago live in the College View
area and are a part of the TRNA
What is the real issue here? True
concern for students or an election? If
landlords rented the houses they
owned responsibly, there would never
have been a need for the ordinance
limiting those living in a house to
three unrelated people. Many of the
streets in our neighborhood predomi-
nately inhabited by students look like
slums. The yards aren't mowed and
look like trash dumps. Dogs are
chained outside and left to bark. Is
this responsible living? Is this the
fault of the renters, the landlords or
both? If landlords respected the
neighborhood and the students they
rent houses to, they wouldn't rent
substandard housing to pc He who
feel no responsibility to their neigh-
bors or the community. We welcome
responsible students into our neigh-
borhood, despite the misconceptions
about the role of the TRNA, which
has acted in the best interest of the
neighborhood � not particularly
homeowners, renters or students.
There are actually homeowners in this
neighborhood who like their next door
neighbors, who are student renters.
Some even help each other out by-
mowing yards (at no charge) for those
who have no lawnmowcrs � that is
those of us who are not too old, fanat-
ical or coldhearted to do so.
Ordinance or no ordinance, the
real issue here should be responsible
caretaking of a nice neighborhood
with beautiful old homes and a diver-
sitv of people that cannot be found
anywhere else in Gfccro ille. Those of
us who own homes and those who
want to raise families in this neighbor-
hood will still be here trying ro keep
our neighborhood safe and desirable
when this year's freshmen are long
gone. The TRNA will continue to try
to improve the neighborhood for all
who live here, even in a non-election
year. We could use some help!
Beverly Harris
Greenville
it
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5 Tuesday. September 16. 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
Wacked-Odt Sam
Gebe-H-er vie
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SnA Wing plctce So
I'll 9cv a KicKn view'
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fibdy-ToldMe4eyf�r�.
I WANT YOU
FOR ECU
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Are you weary of being surrounded by
the persuasive liberal atmosphere on
campus and having to live as
a "closer conservative?
Join us for a little relief and
some much needed political fellowship.
Meetings Every Wednesday 7:00 PM
Mendenhall Underground
The Firehalise Tavern
Tuesday
Jazz Night
Wednesday
Sunnywheat
Thursday
Friday
Trading
Evans
Saturday
Furious
Styles
Every
Thursday, Friday,
SaturdayE
Dance to DJ Will
upstairs
Greenville's
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
�nix Cigar
TastingDisplay
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
32 oz. Domestic
Draft $1.50
14 oz. Domestic
Draft 75
FREE FOOD
NFL Ticket on DSS
Football
75 Southpaw
Sports Bar
ACROSS
1 Blockhead
5 Obnoxious
children
10 Attempt
14 Perforation
15 Hold tightly
16 Rent
17 Termini
18 Dress style
19 Part of a.m.
20 Sign on a cafe
table
22 Most uncommon
24 Tule or cattail
25 Single
26 Lunar feature
29 Careless
33 Tag
34 Necklace
components
35 Unrefined metal
36 Retired
37 Prunes
38 Brlc-a�
39 Chum
40 Some cereals
41 Spanish
American
blanket
42 Cheapest ship
accommodations
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45 Protracted
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47 Sipping aids
50 Fit together
54 Snare
55 "That's �
(Dean Martin hit)
57 Aware of
58 Aspirations
59 Antic
60 Lyric poems
61 Lasso
62 Lock of hair
63 Metallic cloth
DOWN
1 Sonny's ex
2 Solitary
3 Auto pioneer
4 Abandoned
5 More valiant
6 Chafed
7 Greedy
8 Gymnast's goal
9 Muscle builders
01997 Tribune Media Services. Inc.
All nghtj reserved
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speaking
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vengeance
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27 Morocco's
capital
28 White poplar
29 French river
30 Trumpets
31 Speechify
32 Transfer design
34 Confederate
general
37 Do business
38 Pub seat
40 Ridge over the
eyes
41 Be sullen
43 Slip away
44 Van occupants
46 Small openings
47 Luminary
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6 TuBiday, September 16. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
ff CDreviews Artists overcome difficulties
SHANNON MEEK
STAFF WHITER
Squirrel Nut Zippers
Sold Out
Sportsguitar
Married, 3 Kids
9 OUT OF 10
JOHN "DAVIS
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITO
8 OUT OF 10
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
� �
For all the hoopla and fanfare that
proclaims Chapel Hill to be some
great artistic mecca, very few bands
actually make it big out of Chapel
Hill. Its been a long time since Sonic
Youth and Superchunk emerged as
leaders in the alternative scene, and
since their day, only two bands have
been strong contenders in the nation-
al music scene. One is Ben folds Five
who, since their success, have aban-
doned Chapel Hill for Nashville. The
other is The Squirrel Nut Zippers,
who recently hit the national scene
with their hit song, "Hell from last
year's album, Hot.
The Zippers, a bunch of old punk
rockers turned swing kids, lit up the
charts this summer with their quirky
combination of pop music and big
band jazz. With oddly metaphysical
lyrics in the vein ofTalking Heads or
Oingo Boingo and a gaggle of die-hard
fans who dress up in thirties garb at
their live performances, the Zippers
have put North Carolina's name back
in the music industry's geography
lessons.
Sold Out is not the Zippers highlv
anticipated third album. Rather it is a
collection of outtakes from that
upcoming project and from the previ-
ous two. Since the Zippers are
already more otherworldly than most
bands' outtake albums this offering is
joyfully silly and odd.
The Zippers arc well known for
their outstanding, eclectic live shows
filled with moonshine antics and gar-
goyles of the night. One of the high-
lights of the e.p. is a sizzling live
recording of "La Grippe a song from
the Zippers first album. Recorded in
Atlanta earlier this year, it features
the Virgina salsa band, Bio Ritmo. In
a perfect New Orleans melting-pot
stew of style, the two bands cook up
a spicy dish.
Every other track on the e.p. is an
outtake from one of the albums. "St
Louis Cemctaty Blues" is a spunky
bluegrass gospel drinking song;
"Bedlam Ballroom" is a swing band in
a mosh pit. "Pallin' with Al" is a rats
Waller tribute with spicy guitar
pickin by Tom Maxwell. "1 Raise
Hell" sounds more like a threat from
sultry vocalist Katherine Whalen than
a party anthem. "Fell to Pieces" is a
campfire waltz from the band's sec-
ond rehearsal ever.
Sold Out comes with many little
goodies such as old radio jingles from
the Squirrel Brand Company in
between the songs and not one, but
three songs in a hidden track at the
end of the disc. The cover art is espe-
cially nostalgic for the band's home-
town fans, as it features posters from
the Zippers' local concerts at the
Cat's Cradle and the Rialto from the
past few years. UsuaHy when a band
releases an album of outtakes, it's
mostly filler and mistakes. The
Squirrel Nut Zippers have proven
that they are worthy of their new
fame by making Sold Out a delightful,
clever extravaganza.
I figure Switzerland owes us. They
give us pocket knives and Swatches
and think we should be content.
Everyone knows, however, that a
country is only as good as its rock-n-
roll bands. How many bands can you
name in the Switzerland Rock-n-
Roll Hall of Fame? But wait, here
comes Sportsguitar, a Swiss export
that should gamer Most Favored
Nation Status for our snowy friends.
Matador brings Sportsgui tar's
sweet noise to the States with its
re-release of the band's second
European album, Married 3 Kuls,
which will have to tide listeners
over until next spring when a brand
spanking new Sportsguitar album is
slated for release.
Sportsguitar's fuzzy pop ditties
owe much to the music of its label
mates. Guided by Voices and
Pavement. The lyrics, however, bear
no resemblance to the clever
abstractness of those two US pop-
pers. They arc closer in spirit lyri-
cally to early Teenage Fancluh
(before the Scots suffered an identi-
ty crisis).
The band has earned its reputa-
tion with songs that mix dreamy
melodies and irresistibly romantic
lyrics mixed with a naughty, go-sit-
in-the-corner rambunctiousness
that has led them to pen lyrics such
as "Let me suck your tits1 really
like that1 love you" on its previous
releases.
Lead singer Oliver Obert's lazy,
blissful vocals blend perfectly with
the whirling feedback of Roland
Saum's guitar work. In "Very
Weird Obert's repeated claims of
being "very very much in love" float
over Saum's twister-like guitar. It
should be noted that Sportguitar
claims to have used ACDC's
"Touch Too Much" as its standard
sound reference during the record-
ing of Married, 3 Kids. Next album
maybe they'll cover" You Shook Me
All Night Long
Sportsguitar's star shines bright-
est on tracks such as "Chords "So
Shy" and "Never Waste "So Shy
in fact, comes off like a shooting star
with wonderfully shiny-eyed lyrics
and screeching guitars. "Reliable" is
the band at its fastest with Obert
informing us "he gets very disap-
pointed when people don't show up
on time" as if tardiness is the only
thing that gets him riled up.
Sportsguitar bemoans a woman
they can't get out of their heads on
"Get You Out This perhaps the
most appropriate way to describe
Sportsguitar. You won't be able to
get them out of your head, trust me.
Married, 3 Kids offers 14 near-per-
fect chewy little pop songs. And
Sportsguitar are a hell a lot more fun
than one of those Swiss Army knives
that have a bunch of stuff on 'um
that you can't figure out what in the
hell to do with so you just use it to
clean your fingernails or teeth with.
Know what I mean?
It has been said the true definition of in artist is that there is no barrier between
the artist's soul and the an. The only barrier for artists from Signature Home is
the outside world. .
These artists were honored at a reception last Thursday in Mcndenhall.
Signature Home is the first of its kind that sponsors people who exemplify artis-
tic ability but are challenged by developmental disabilities. They are currently
touring around the nation, with their exhibit entitled "Complex Gifts
Introducing the Artists of Signature Home Studio XI They stopped first at
ECU. They were all self-taught, kind and spoke with energy about their an.
They communicated through the canvas. The act of an gave them breath.
Brooks Yeoman paints his memories. It is as if his paintings arc photographs
of events that have happened to him. As he walked from painting to painting
his life unfolded in his an. He sopke about details in each piece, at times
sketching out the scene. He would point and say, "That is when my friend was
in the hospital. That is when we took a walk down the lake
His painitngs are like walking through his life. He was able to talk in such
detail about his paintings, such as one that depicts his dream house, comP1�e
with horses gallivanting freely in the pastures. His eyes sparkled as he talked
about art. . .
Harold Crowell, 45, a native of Salisbury, was loquacious and smiling as he
showed his bright, vivid paintings. His father was a Methodist Minister and
Harold's artwork reflected a spiritual side, with his colorful Adam and Eve and
flamboyant portrayal of Jesus on the crucifix. Mr. Crowell's paintings and color
choices were imaginative and happy:
He recently entered an Elvis Presley painting contest in Scotland, and he
seems excited about the rest of the tour.
Ricky Needham, 41, a Winston-Salem native, loves to paint things that are
fun and peaceful. His surreal Utopian visions of the modern world arc reflected
with his fast jet -fueled car and vivid imaginative colors. He told me that he
often paints his dreams. His canvas is full of a fantasy world which he envisions
to be one dav loving and jovial. This is reflected through the mult racial peo-
ple holding hands and wrapping their arms around each other. His artwork is
Harold Crowell showed off his art work last Thursday during a reception for artists from
Signature Home.
PHOTO BY SHANNON MEEK
creative and innovative, reflecting his soul's innermost desire to have a peaceful
and fun world. n
Doing artwork, Needham said, "Makes me feel good.
These artists are amazing. Their fingers oozed with talent and ability. Even
though they had mental disabilities, they were able to overcome and challenge
the stereotypes and views commonly held about them. The souls were awak-
ened as they spoke through the canvas. They told the world about their spm-
tuality, dreams and visions.
Perhaps Lynn Caverly, assistant director of student activities, summed it up
best: "We just wanted to show that the spirit of the artist is in everyone
Charlie Daniels won't be labeled
Charlie Daniels is still going strong.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JIM MCBUIHE
Pat RRH
SKNRMUIMTM
After 26 years of making albums, Charlie Daniels has
truly become a country legend. He has worked with
countless artists and broken ground in a variety of gen-
res and musical areas. After winning various Grammies
and CMA awards, the Wilmington native was honored
this past July with his induction into tlu; N.C. Music
and Entertainment Hall of Fame. When the Country
Comfort tour hit Virginia Beach this past weekend I
took the opportunity to sit down with Daniels for a few
words on music, responsibility and friends past and
present.
Pat Reid: You're currently wrapping up the Country
Comfort Tour (with JoDee Messina, Travis Tritt and
Hank Williams Jr.). How has the tour been?
Charlie Daniels: It's been going great. It's been a
great tour.
PR: One thing that surprised me is that you re play-
ing second of the four artists. How-was the line-up
decided? .
CD: Well, I think that's the way it should be actual-
ly. I think Hank Jr. should close it and Travis should
come on after us, and I think it works out as it should.
And besides, it's a great spot. People are still(clears
throat)thcy're stilL.they ain't got wore out yet!
PR: Where did the idea behind your new album Blues
Hat come from? .
CD: I've always wanted to do a blues album and I just
figured it was an idea whose time had come and I
hopped on it.
PR: Have the fans seemed pleased with it?
CD: Oh yeah, yeah. We've always done some blues
from time to time, just we've never done a whole blues
album. I've always loved the blues and I just wanted to
do a whole album of it, so that's basically where the idea
of it came from.
PR: How did it get to become a Wal-Mart exclusive?
CD: Well, we did this on our own label. At the time
we did it, we were going to release it to a record compa-
ny but my manager said let's try this. fc had toyed with
the idea of having our own record label and so we decid-
ed to give it a shot, and one of the things that going with
Wal-Mart gave us was instantaneous national distribu-
tion. And it also limited our financial exposure (because)
it is vciy expensive to record and put a record out there
and we're not like Sony or somebody like that. So it was
for a number of reasons.
PR: Have any fans in rural areas complained about
the lack of availability?
CD: We've had some, a little bit of that, but also it s
available on the internet
(http:www.charliedaniels.com) and it will be available
in otherplaces, eventually. It's just, right now, it's avail-
able in Wal-Mart because we were able to get it out
there right away.
PR: This is just a project idea that you were interest-
ed in 2nd with your own label you had the freedom to do
it. Are there any other ideas you're bouncing around?
CD: I would like to do a jazz album. I don't know, I
"ustthe reason for this label is so 1 can do what I want
to do. I don't fit anybody's particular mold right now and
I just feel like I'm better off trying to do the things that
I do best. That's what I'm interested in doing. That's
why we started this record label. I've also got a family
album out right now (By The light of the Moon) that just
came out by the Sony folks. I'm a project-by-project
thinker. I would seriously consider doing a jazz album or
maybe a bluegrass album, I don't know because 1 do so
many different kinds of music. I'd enjoy doing them all.
PR: What do you listen to a lot of?
SEE CHARLIE. PAGE 7
ECU honors biology professor
MlCCAH SMITH
STAFF WRITF.R
In August, the ECU College of Arts and Sciences
presented the prestigious award of Distinguished
Professor to Dr. Mark Brinson, a faculty member and
wetlands biologist for 24 years.
Brinson's research of North Carolina's swamps
and saltwater marshes has resulted in findings that
are essential to the understanding of how these
unique ecosystems relate to the ecology of North
Carolina and of how restoration efforts for the wet-
lands can be made more effective.
Dr. Brinson attributes his interest in ecology to
his childhood experiences of "growing up on a farm
and liking to spend time outsidebeing curious
about how things work in nature
At one time he had been interested in forestry,
but as his interests changed, he realized that
research was what he wanted to do.
"Contributing to the knowledge base of how
nature works and how we can better manage our
ecosystems is the most rewarding thing about
research according to Brinson.
The goal is to understand them, how they
work he added.
Brinson is recognized as a prominent expert in
his field and has been called to testify before various
committees in the U.S. Congress. His expertise has
enabled him to consult for agencies on both state
and national levels and has also led to his involve-
ment with the National Science Foundation.
More than $1 million in research grants have
been awarded to him over the years. Earlier this
year he received a Lifetime Achievement and
Research Award from the ECU Board of Trustees.
With the help of numerous students and col-
leagues, Dr. Brinson developed a system for classify-
ing wetlands based on their
functions in ecology. He then
used the classifications to
develop a method for deter-
mining the impact that
humans have had, and will
continue to have, on the eco-
logical balance of the wet-
lands.
Although he finds field
research exciting and reward-
ing, Brinson knows it can nev-
ertheless be maddeningly
expensive and difficult to
fund. To pay for the costs of
equipment, transportation, food and the like he has
had to campaign tirelessly for funds from various
bureaucratic organizations.
SEE BRINSON. PAGE 8
MinM!)�KIMw
concertr
Star Wars craze carries over to video
m
JLG pumps Peasant's
MlCCAH SMITH
STUF WRITFR
On Friday night, I went to Peasant's to
review Jump, Littie Children, and
nearly had a conniption when a friend
informed me that the popular South
Carolina-based band had not only
played hooky from the soundcheck
but had also not shown up to perform.
Well, I got crackin' on a review of
their opening act. Mishap, just so I'd
have something to hand in to my edi-
tor, but, to my relief. Jump, Little
Children showed up at last, proving
true the old axiom "better late than
never
Frontman Matt Bivens took the
stage dressed like a half-hearted KISS
reject in black shirt and pants with a
glittery white David Bowie-inspired
SE.E JIC. PAGE �
Di.f. Williamson
SI'S I OK WklTKK
Retro is hot. You can watch it in the
best reruns on cable, you can hear it in
the newest pop and rock musical acts,
and you can wear it in the trendy
clothing fashions. Yes. goin? back to
the past is the way of the future.
Retro hi: an unheard climax earlier
this year when wrirerdirecrorvision-
arv George Lucas re-released three
films that almost define an entire gen-
eration. This "special edition" of the
Star Wan trilogy (which includes Star
Wars, The Empire Strikes Rait and
Return oftheJedi) proved to be almost
every bit as popular in the late '90s as
it was in the late 70s and early '80s,
racking in well over 5200 million at
the domestic box office alone. Not
Ivad for a group of films that are any-
where from 14 to 20 years old and
have been available on video for at
least ten years.
While watching these
films on the big screen
with nostalgic glee was
enough to attract most
audiences, lAicas refused
to simply re-release his old
films. Instead, he decided
to make his already won-
derful trilogy better (or at
least that was the inten-
tion) by touching up the
prints, improving the m. . f�� � k�.
sound quality, fine tuning ws��rin�i.ncu�"�
certain special effects, and
adding entirely new footage
to the old ones.
Lucas did this partly with an artis-
tic desire to improve his art and part-
ly with a business mind that wanted
to make sure there was sonic sort of
incentive for any skeptics out there
who felt that paying 6 to 8
dollars simply to watch a
20-year-old movie on the
big screen was silly.
Regardless of his inten-
tions, lAicas allowed an
old generation to relive its
past and a newer, younger
generation to get a small
taste of the past.
The hoopla is, and has
been, over for several
months now. The big
screens are currently busy
with fresher sci-fi epics,
such as Men In Blak and
Event Horizon. But the video market is
now being infected with Star Wars
fever.
While one would expect the re-
relcasc of Star liiirs on video, even a
"special edition" video release, to be
less than explosive, such has not been
the case. So far, the new Star Han
videos have been outselling every
other video in the country by almost
double the amount.
As a die-hard A'H'fan. I'm thrilled
that the craze has carried over even
into the video market. Obviously,
Lucas knew, at least from a marketing
aspect, what he was doing when he
"touched up" the original films.
But, alas, as a die-hard SW fan, I
have mixed feelings about Lucas' final
vision of his tpace opera. Star Wars
exhibits the most significant changes,
notablv a scene featuring Han Solo
(Harrison Ford) and the sluggish alien
SEE STAR WARS PAGE 7
�-����






7 Tuesday, September 16. 1997
iiir style
The East Carolinian
Charlie
continued Itom page 6
CD: AhhVharever I feel in the
mood for. I may listen to anything
from Stevie Ray Vaughn to the "1812
Overture It just depends on what
mood I'm in at the time. I don't really
listen to that much music.
PR: Speaking of Stevie Ray, you
dedicated Blurs Hat to him. I know
you two played together at the
Volunteer Jams, but did you have any
kind of relationship or friendship with
him?
CD: Yeah, I knew Stevie. We didn't
spend an awful amount of time
together, but I considered him to be a
friend. I don't know anybody that
tried as hard as he did to make blues
happen, and unfortunately, I think
Stevie's bigger now than he was when
he was alive.
PR: What was Ronnie VanZant
(former Lvnvrd Skvnrd lead singer)
like?
CD: Ronnie was a good ol' boy in
every sense of the word. He was
Southern to the core, loyal friend,
good sense of humor, loved bass fish-
ing. Just a good ol' boy is the best way
I know to describe him. Ronnie was a
friend of mine, and I still think about
him from time to time.
PR: Do you think Free Bird the
Movie helped sum up Ronnie?
CD: I think it helped. There's an
intangible thing with a band like
Lynyrd Skvnrd, people have a feeling
about that band that they don't have
about a lot of bands. The old Allman
Brothers Band when Duanne Allman
was alive -people felt that way about
it. People have a very deep feeling
about that band, and I don't think
there's any way to adequately sum
that up.
PR: There are a lot of people who
feel that way about your hand. How
does it feel to be on the receiving end
of that devotion?
CD: Well, I, if that is true, I think
it's probably about the highest com-
pliment that a band could have.
Ronnie's been dead for 20 years, it'll
be 20 years this 20th of October, and
he's still very much a viable topic right
now and the music's very much so.
Duanne Allman has been dead longer
than that and everybody still knows
who he is and respects his guitar play-
ing. There's a lot of bands that have
risen and fell and people have forgot-
ten their names, but a band that peo-
ple feel that way about they take with
them through the years.
PR: One thing I think a lot of peo-
ple admire about you, you stand up for
what vou believe in.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
ALLIED HEALTH

OFF
featured publishers,
including
Mosby
W.B. Saunders
Springhouse
FA. Davis
Lippincott-Raven
Williams & Wilkins
Monday, September 15
10am - 1pm
Lobby of the Belk Building
CD: 1 think everybody should. I
think our opinions in this country,
unfortunately, are molded too much
by television, by what we see on the
evening news. I don't think people
think for themselves enough. They
hear about the results of a pollI
don't think human behavior should be
able to be predicted by a poll. I think
people need to start thinking for
themselves. I think people need to
start waking up and realizing that
they have a stake in everything that
goes on in this country. We can't leave
everything to somebody else.
PR: The original version of "The
Devil Went Down to Georgia" had the
line "son-of-a-bitch and this was
later changed to "son-of-a-gun
including live performances. Why?
CD: The reason I changed it is
that the profanity doesn't mean that
much, to me. We have a lot of small
children that come to our shows and
II mean it don't mean that much to
me to say it that way.
PR: What does the future hold for
you and for the CDB? Any changes or
slow ing down in the future?
CD: No, not really. I haven't
planned my life past this band really.
Touring and making records. One of
these days I'll have to quit for no
other reason than because I'll die, but
I haven't made plans for that contin-
gency.
PR: Happy with what you're
doing?
CD: I love it, I love it, yeah. I am
verv blessed.
Star Wars
continued from page 6
godfather of slime and filth known as
Jabba the Hutt which was shot for
the '77 release but was edited out.
The scene is fun and goofy, but,
admittedly, not necessary to the
major plot. Even if the trilogy as a
whole is taken into consideration, it
works better without the restored
scene.
Another change that proves not
only unnecessary but also insulting to
any fan involves a confrontation
between Solo and the alien bounty
hunter, Greedo. The change, which
only lasts a second, looks glaringly
awful and distorts the entire concept
behind the character of Han Solo.
But there's no need to dwell on
tlie negatives. Overall, the special
edition Star Wars looks and sounds
great, and that's what matters here.
The images are about as crisp as
video will aii w, and the THX sound
makes for a pulsating experience,
especially if viewed on a suitable sys-
tem. Empire (arguably the best film
of the series) has fewer, less signifi-
cant changes but is still very much
worth taking a glance at, particularly
for the Cloud City sequence. Finally,
Jedi (arguably the vvorsr of the series)
should be seen simply for the painful,
yet humorous, updated pop musical
number at Jabba's palace.
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
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8 Tuesday. September 16. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Brinson
continued from page 6
Trying to maintain research fund-
ing is a never-ending process which
he tries not to let distract him from
his goals, but he loves his work in the
North Carolina wetlands, especially
those around the Outer Banks and
the Pamlico Sound where the
swamps and marshes are not tidal yet
are still controlled by sea level, a fea-
ture unique to North Carolina.
Brinson is proud of the series of
publications his findings have made
possible over the years and ao to
have contributed to the growing
knowledge base in the field of ecolo-
gy, which he sees as "the main goal
It gives htm the greatest sense of
accomplishment "to sec somebody
actually utilize and practice some of
what you've been able to develop
Brinson remains concerned by
human impact on wetlands. He notes
that even if efforts are made to
restore some of the damage that has
been done to these ecosystems, the
delicate balance necessary to the
ecology of true wetlands may not be
right.
His plans for future research
include continued efforts to develop
standards for wetland ecosystems, in
terms of how they should be restored,
so that if, or when, restoration is
made the wetlands will be as close as
possible to their original conditions.
Brinson also hopes to gain an
understanding of how the coastal
wetlands respond to the rising sea
level. His vision of properly restored
wetlands and his search for their full
ecological significance will keep him
busy, and muddy, in the swamps of
North Carolina for years to come.
JLC
continued from page 6
wig and provided plenty of high-ener-
gy antics, accordion squeezing and
electric mandolin rifts throughout the
short (1 hour and 15 minute) set.
Jay Clifford, lead singer and gui-
tarist, was skilled but not the center
of attention at this gig. Neither was
Evan Bivens, Jump's tight, together
drummer. Ward Williams, the player
of the cello and electric guitar, was
cool as a cucumber, while the upright
bassist, Jonothan Gray, continually
bobbed up and down throughout the
show, grinning in a locally unsuave
and disarming way.
The show opened with an unbal-
anced sound and was plagued
throughout the first two songs by
feedback from the mikes, but
nobody's fun was spoiled. The sound
became more balanced but some of
the songs were still a bit guitar-heavy,
not allowing the varied other instru-
ments a chance to shine.
Jump's musical style eluded
description and was a constant sur-
prise. The occasional slow or rootsy
songs were improved by truly original
and metal-inspired choruses, into
which the band seemed to have put a
lot of thought and effort, but some-
times an insipid and predictable
chord progression kept an all right
song from being realty good.
At one point, Ward Williams
wailed on the electric guitar at the
opening of a number called "Don't
Take My Advice" in what seemed like
open defiance of roots rock, but as
the song progressed, Matt tempered
the attack with the harmonica, an
instrument that could turn any song
into roots rock.
"Pink Lemonade a white-boy
rap anthem about summertime, was
not too impressive (boring) musically,
but Mart's vocal stylings made it fun
to listen to. " 6 a jumpin' square-
dance on speed meets a jugband on
acid, was sung by Jonothan, who
made the most of his bass and deliv-
ered a killer kazoo solo.
Jump, Little Children gave a high-
energy performance but did not real-
ly break any new ground. I'm glad 1
don't have to call them "folksy but
they could have been a bit more lib-
eral with the new chord progressions
and a bit less liberal with the har-
monica. The bassoon and mandolin
made the boring songs more enjoy-
able and added an unpredictable ele-
ment to songs that needed it, but the
blending could have been smoother.
All things considered, I liked what
I heard and was impressed with the
abilities of the individual members of
the group, and, as a whole, the show
was verv listenable and fun.
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You're invited to join a new group now forming!
Presbyterian Campus Ministry at ECl
Join us for great food, fellowship and interesting programs.
Weekly dinner fellowship meetings Kick-off Cook out
Tuesdays 6-8pm Sept. 16 6-8pm
At First Presbyterian Church
On the corner of 14th and Elm St.
Nancy Huslage, intern campus minister
Phone: 758-1901 email: nhuslage@catalogue.com
In addition:
Presbytery-wide retreat at Montreat
Sept. 26-28
Mission trip to Haiti May 18-27


��.
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M"
t ,tat.
A ri





9 Tuesday. September 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
Pirates come from behind
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
Any ordinary team would give up after being down 21-0,
but the Pirates are anything but ordinary-
Wake Forest jumped out to a 14-0 lead after the Deacs'
Brian Kuklick hooked up with Jamie Deese for a 13-yard
touchdown with 6:17 left in the first quarter. Then, with
just 24 seconds left, Morgan Cane ran in another Wake
Forest touchdown from the 1-yard line, so the Deacs lead
14-0 after one quarter.
Penalties hurt the Pirates in the first quarter both
defensively and offensively. Two of the penalties were on
defense and one was on offense, and totaled, the penalties
cost the Pirates 41 yards.
The second quarter showed signs of a Wake Forest
blowout after Kuklick ran in a two yard score to put the
Deacs ahead 21-0. But the Pirate offense began to show
signs of life after a Wake Forest fumble was recovered by
Kendrick Phillips, who took it down to the 11-yard line.
That recovery set up a Ramondo North 11-yard touchdown
run to cut the Deacs lead to 21-7.
But ECU still had some ground to make up, so the call
was an on-side kick by Andrew Bayes, who kicked it to near
perfection to allow Perez Mattison to recover and keep
another ECU drive alive.
Just five plays and 47 yards later, ECU was on the board
again. Jamie Wilson ran in for a 9-yard score. Brantley Rivers
missed the point after attempt, but the Pirates were gain-
ing ground just eight points behind, 21-13.
"The onside conversion was really big and then that we
converted on it Head Coach Steve Logan said. "Had we
muffed that and ended that little series 21-7,1 don't know
if we would have been able to close that
Logan said he knew what had to be done after looking
at his team that was down by 14 points.
"You look at the scoreboard and nothing's going right and
you're down 21-7, and you have a bullet in your gun; you
just shoot it Logan said. 'That's what we did and it
worked
That's how the half would end. Dan Gonzalez threw for
just 53 yards, while Scott Harley ran for 45 yards, Jamie
Wilson gained 38. Bayes had another good half, averaging
45.3 yards for each punt, including a 63-yard punt right
before the half ended.
The second half was a complete turn around for both
the defense and offense. After giving up 21 points in the
first half, the Pirate defense only allowed three more points
in the second half after a Matthew Burdick field goal in the
fourth quarter. But six minutes before that play. Gonzalez
found an open Troy Smith for a 33-yard touchdown pass.
The game was coming down to the wire, it was 24-19 in
favor of Wake Forest. The Pirates were still down by five
and the offense was looking solid. But did they have one
more play to put the Pirates ahead?
With 3:44 left in the game, Gonzalez found Scott Harley
in the end zone for a 6-yard touchdown pass and the per-
manent ECU lead. The two point conversion failed and the
Pirates were ahead 24-25.
Logan said all season that he wants to get Harley on the
receiving end of passes, and Harley said the catch wasn't as
easy as it looked.
"Dan's throw was a little wobbly, so I concentrated on
SEE FOOTBALL PAGE 10
��
���
Final Individual Statistics
ECU
Rushing
Scott Hartey
JamitWtfcsrt
Ramondo North
Passing
DanGofK�!ez
Receiving
Troy Smith
Unworn! OeBrew
Buck Coffins
Scott Hartey
Punting
Andrew Bayes
Att.
M
Gain
68
38
11
Net
67
36
11
70
0
1
1
ton�
31
Att.4&RMirt.Yafds
269
41-234
No.
7
4
4
3
No.
7
yards
168
39
31
16
Yds.
313
TO
2
TD
t
0
0
1
Avg.
44.7
Long
45
long
45
fdi
3
12
Long
63
Win was shaky,
but still a win
STEVE LOSEY
SENIOR WRITKK
The Pirates played their 1997 home
opener in sweltering heat, but that
didn't stop them from taking a nail-
biting victory from the Wake Forest
Deacons. Their determination and
attitude helped get the Pirates
through the game.
Mental errors cost the Pirates
yardage in the first quarter. They
were penalized 15 yards for having
too many men on the field. It was a
third and five play on the Wake
Forest 28-yard line, and Wake's quar-
terback Brian Kuklick threw an
incomplete pass. Had the Pirates
not been penalized, the Deacons
would have been forced to punt the
ball on the fourth down. Instead, the
Pirates received the ball on their
own 33-yard line after a missed field
goal. Mistakes like that and an off-
sides penalty might be the deciding
factor in close games.
The Pirates started playing smart
football by the second quarter.
Kendrick Phillips recovered a fum-
ble on the first play by the Deacs
after ECU punted. The next play
resulted in a touchdown. Instead of
kicking the ball downfield to the
Deacons, Andrew Bayes executed a
brilliant onside kick. Perez Mattison
skillfully recovered the ball just
before it rolled out of bounds. The
Pirates scored another touchdown
on that drive.
The decision to attempt the
onside kick was a good one, if rather
risky. An onside kick can yield
superb results, as it did Saturday,
but it can also end in disaster. If rhe
Deacons had recovered the ball,
they would have had a considerable
advantage in terms of yardage.
Those types of gutsy plays are
becoming what Head Coach Steve
Logan is known for.
The Pirates offensive line let
down quarterback Dan Gonzalez
Saturday. In the third quarter, he
was sacked three times. Each of
them was in a third down situation.
The Pirates were forced to punt
after each sack.
It was also gut wrenching to
watch the Pirates' last offensive
drive in the third quarter.
Gonzalez made a great pass to
Troy Smith, who ran it for a 45 yard
gain and was tackled at the 1-yard
line. The Pirates were unable to
score a touchdown in the next four
plays. They tried two passing plays
and two running plays, one to the
side and one up the middle.
ECU's defensive line had no
problem finding holes in Wake
Forest's line. The Deacons' quarter-
back was sacked seven times. Travis
Darden sacked him three times and
Rod Coleman got four sacks under
his belt.
Gonzalez had a fine game. His
passes kept the Pirates offensive dri-
ves going when it was sorely needed.
He threw for 269 yards and two
touchdown passes.
The Pirates are out in full force,
and this season should be a great
one. But as with any team, there are
always errors to be smoothed over.
The Pirates will most likely be in
great form next Saturday when
South Carolina comes to Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
Last Week's
Conference USA Results
ECUS, Wake Forest 24
Pittsburgh 35, Houston 24
Louisville 26, Illinois 14
(21) Michigan State 51, Memphis 21
Rice 30, Tulane 24
This Week's Games
Penn State at Louisville
South Carolina at ECU
Kansas at Cincinnati
Nevada at Southern Miss
Minnesota at Memphis
Tulane at Syracuse
Final Team Stats
First Downs
Net Yards Rushing
Net Yards Passing
Total Net Yards
Penalties:Number-Yards
Number of Punts-Yards
Average Per Punt
Third-Down Conversions
Sacks By:Number-Yards
ECU and Wake Forest went head to head on Saturday. The Pirates were down 21-0 but
came back to beat the Demon Deacs 24-25.
PHOTO BY J0NATH0N GREEN
SCENES FROM SATURDAY'S VICTORY
(Clockwise L-R) Linebacker Jeff Kerr makes a tackle on Kito Gary. Fans tailgate and show their Pirate pride before the game. For
every point the Pirates score, the ECU cheerleaders run to the endzone and do pushups.
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN GREEN AN0 AMANDA PROCTOR
Thank you fans for staying
Amanda Ross
,1 ,i mar
(.fimmutiittinons titlur
ittiuiiliti� in l)n rmtrr.
flr is purSKUH ft o' t tl
fntittii xporrvtistrr
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
For the first time in three football sea-
sons of sports editor, I saw something I
have never seen before. And let me tell
you. I like it!
I saw the ECU fans stay for an
entire football game and not leave until
the game was completely over. I am
shocked. Sure, there were a few strag-
glers who left, but for the most part. !
looked across the way and saw the stu-
dent section nearly full by games end.
A record crowd of 38,031 fans
watched ECU's come from behind vic-
tory over Wake Forest, and only a hand-
ful of those fans were from Wake-
Forest.
And let me tell you, I wasn't the
only one who noticeu. Coach Logan
and the rest of the plavers noticed the
stands were packed. Logan was espe-
cially touched by the fans staving.
"If you would be so kind to print for
me a gut level thanks to all the people
that came to this football game to sup-
port us Logan said. It was big. 1 took
it personal and will take it personal.
That was really big�they came out in
those numbers. I really appreciate it
Scott Harley said he hopes that's
not a one time deal.
"We need that everv time at home
Women
record
shutout
TRACY LAUBACH
SSISTANT SPORTS K.DITOK
The ECU's Women's Soccer team had
its ups and downs last week as it lost
to William and Mary on the road and
shut out Appalacian State 1-0 on
home field on Sunday.
The winning goal was sent in by
sophomore Chrisy Bernabe in the
87th minute of play, to give the Lady
Pirates a non-conference victory and
an improved record to 2-4 on the sea-
son.
"The Appalacian game was a very
big win for us Head coach Neil
Roberts said. "We fought Teally hard
and played well from start to finish
The win was the road to recovery
for the girls after suffering a 4-0 loss to
the Tribe of William and Mary.
"We played really well, but William
and Mary just had too many guns
Roberts said. "We brought a lot of pos-
itive things away from that game
The girls will take on Davidson
away on Wednesday and will take
their places on Bunting Field again on
Sunday for a matchup against UNC-
Asheville.
"To pick up wins in our upcoming
games, we are looking to improve the
quality of our shots and refine techni-
cally Roberts said. "The girls have
really pulled together and have
already learned a lot about eachother,
so we are on the right track from
here
��� ����'�
Harley said.
South Carolina has already sold
6,000 tickets for this weekend's game
and officials expect another record-
breaking crowd on Saturday. Whether
vou know it or not, but with fans like
you at the game, it helped to seal
ECU's first victory of the year. Tabari
"Snoop" Wallace said it was so loud the
players couldn't hear the signals. In his
four years here, he's never seen such a
crowd.
"I've never seen Ficklen rock like
that Wallce said. "I've never seen
Ficklen as loud as it was. We couldn't
even hear our own signals on defense,
but that's good because we have our
own hand signals; we can talk without
words
Wallace hopes to have a crowd that
into the entire game for the rest of the
season.
"If Ficklen can get loud like that
even, time, we'll always win Wallace
said. "We can't lose, because thev
(opposing offense) can't concentrate
on the other side. You saw them jump-
ing off-sides. We love it when it's rock-
ing like that
So again I challenge all fans to stay
for the entire game this Saturday
against South Carolina. Whether you
know it or not, your presence does
make a difference to the players and
coaches and even the outcome of the
game.
Don't forget!
Starting today you can pick
up your tickets for this
Saturday's home game
against South Carolina
with your current student
ID. Game time is set for 3
. p.m.
A limited number of
tickets are till available for
the public through the
ECU xthletics Ticket
Office. Tickets are priced
at $22.00 each and can be
purchased through the
ticket office by stopping by
or calling 919-328-4500.
Reminder
The ECU volleyball team will
host UNC-Chapel Hill tonight
at 7 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum. Everyone is urged
to support the Lady Pirates.





10 Tuesday, September 16. 1997
si

C
Ths East Carolinian
Football
continued from page 9
the ball Harley said. 'You dream of making catches like
that
The Deacs had one more drive left. Just needing to get
within field goal range, the Deacs kept heading down the
field, but then with :56 left and Wake Forest on the ECU
42-yard line, Kuklick's pass was intercepted by Tabari
"Snoop" Wiliace. That scaled ECU's first win of the year
and made for a captivating come from behind victory.
Defensively the Pirates turned up the intensity. Rod
Coleman and Travis Darden each ended the game with
seven tackles, while Dwayne Ledford contributed six of his
own. Coleman had four sacks on the day for minus 35 yards,
including a 10-yard loss when Wake Rarest Was trying to get
down the field on their last possession to get within field
goal range. Darden sacked Kuklick three times for a total
loss of 17 yards.
"We had better attitude, we had better intensity on
defense Logan said. "Coleman and Darden decided they
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMEN"
weren't going to be blocked today and they seldom were
The second half stats by the Pi rates were the turn-
around of the game. Gonzalez finished the game with 269
yards and two touchdowns. Harley, still not 100 percent
from his ankle injury, ran for 67 yards, and also caught three
passes for 16 yards including the last touchdown pass of the
game. Punter Andrew Bayes had another remarkable day,
averaging 44.7 yards on seven punts.
Smith, who is still starting in place of an injured Larry
Shannon, had a stellar performance catching seven passes
for 168 yards. Logan said Smith is a big time player.
"When a guy turns down Tennessee and Notre Dame to
become an Ail-American, I've said it before he can do it
Logan said. "He's big time
Gonzalez found Smith to be his go-to guy all day.
"I just threw the ball up and he was there Gonzalez
said. Troy went out and made the plays
Logan said this win was the start of the ECU team com-
ing alive.
"I told the kids that only in the coming weeks would we
find out that we may have the start of a little heartbeat
today in this team, which believe me, we haven't had a
heartbeat on this team yet Logan said. "Everything we
did today was hard against a good football team
mil Ml miI5 M!E!f I fi MVKHf 5 Ml Ef f S M.
Ililil
m
ECU forwards Wvatt Panos (Swansboro, NC) Scott Pokorney (Charlotte, NC), and AJ. Gray (Jacksonville, NC) all scored
two goals apiece as the Pirates defeated Appalachian State, 6-3, here at Bunting Field on Sunday. The six goals were the
most ECU has registered in a single match in four seasons, dating back to the 1993 campaign.
The Men's Cross Country team finished second and the Lady Pirates finished third at the UNC-Invitational held
Friday in Chapel Hill. Host North Carolina dominated the race winning both the men's and women's title. UNCs men
had four of the top seven individual finishers while the Tarheel women had six out of the top eight finishers.
The volleyball team hosted the Pirate Invitational this weekend. The girls picked up a wins Friday evening in
matchups against Drcxel 3-1, and Southern Alabama 3-2. The tournament was closed for the Pirates with a loss to Liberty
1-3. Sophomore Kerri Hartling, a valuable team leader, fractured her arm during the tournament is will be off the coun
for at least a month.
,
K
���
0

Parents Weekend Around the Corner
California's own band, PAPA DOO RUN RUN joins the Parents Weekend
celebration. Playing chart-toppers from the '60s, 70s, '80s, and '90s.
Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket Office for $7.
All tickets purchased at the door: $15.
FRIDAY, OCT. 10 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
rXiiXnrR
Use your ECU ID to take a free travel-adventure
to the Benelux Countries?Netherlands, Belgium, Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg, TODAY AT 4 AND 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE.
Hew York, Hew York
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat trip to New York?
The ECU Student Union is sponsoring a trip to New York for as little
as $155. The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for three
nights. To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip,
drop by the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
tHcndripc Htt
The men's soccer team kicked their way to a 6-3 victory at Bunting Field on Sunday. Their six goals were the most m
a single match since 1993.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
� ��
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-�� HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.mll p.m. ���
vz&mw 5 mi mim mi :W5 sai:W5i mir-
ks
;
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Anaconda (PG-13) screens in Hendrix Theatre on SEPT. 18-20 AT 8 P.M.
Your student ID gets you and one guest in for free.
MUSICAL CELLAR DWELLARS
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free
in The Pirate Underground every THURSDAY AT 8 P.M.
in the MSC Social Room.
This week: Sky Dive andWonder Boy Jinks
African Art
Check out the Art Exhibition: Africa, a Continent Revealed
in the MSC Gallery. On display SEPT. 15-OCT. 13
Lane Games
Name Our Center Contest?lf you can come up with just the right name
for our bowling center, you will win a free bowling ball and bag and
all the prestige and press that goes along with being a kingpin. Pick
up your entry form at the bowling center.
Deadline for entry is September 30. Call 328-4740.
All the Best
DON'T WASTE ANOTHER MINUTE.
CUNIQUE BONUS WEEK IS HERE.
RIGHT NOW AT BELK.
Bring out your best. With Clinique's collection of all-time-
greats. Skin care specialists. Makeup marvels. Spirit-
lifting scent. Plus a handy fold-up mirror for good-looks-
to-go. All, boxed up and travel-ready. All The best. Your
special bonus at no extra charge with any Clinique
purchase of 15.00 or more.
You get:
Deep Cleansing Emergency Mask, grime-fighter for oil-
troubled skin. Helps control shine, shrink pores.
Dramaticallv Different Moisturizing Lotion, skin's best-
loved moisture "drink
All About Lips, targeted treatment for lip-area skin.
Smooths, softens, de-flakes lips.
Transparency 3 Biended face powder and Brush, sheer,
subtle face-finisher. Sorts and perfects any look.
Jet Black Naturally Glossy Mascara, lengthens, adds
lustre. Dresses lashes individually.
Berry Freeze Long Last Soft Shine Lipstick, lip-loving
shine that stays and stays.
Aromatics Elixir Perfume Spray. Clinique's classic non-
conformist fragrance.
Folding Mirror, a Clinique special extra.
CLINIQUE Allergy tested. 100 Fragrance free,
(with the exception of Aromatics Elixir products.)
The expert is in 24 hours a day: www.clinique.com
m 11 nii
����"






0
isi Cdrolinian
EEC SBW1CES
Sport
Ba
rnunicnt to
Scpi I icr 24
S pi mbci 27 at the
�k Gold dub m
cnt is open
; i illed I I I stu-
md staff. current
� for eligibil-
� �istct in the
cices main office in
Recreation lenter
idline on luesday.
23 ai 5 p.m. Each team
i ided i omplcte informa-
i including full
i! security number, phone
. tee time
. s;jster. Tee times will
nute inter-
en 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. on
Wednesday. September 24 and
betweenp.m. and 5 p.m. on
Saturday, September 27.
petition is offered in Mens.
Women's, and Co-Rcc divisions.
Participant - max play in both (!o-
Rei and Men's or Women's but must
pla within each division on a sepa-
rate day. Each ream will be paired
with another team to pla in four-
somes. Green fees will be s per
plaver for walking and $15 to ride a
eart.
The "Super Ball" format is
unique in that it allows both players
tu participate together in obtaining a
single score. Each golfer will tee off
at each hole. The best shot from the
tee as well as each successive shut is
then played b each linkstet from
the best lie. Putting will require
y(: ji iltei to pui he best lie
on the green. Prizes will be awarded
for the lowest team score in each
divisi : I i ed. score-
Is for a . i Is holes
should be turned in to the ls
Student Recreation Center I
latei than 5 p.m. on Mi i
September 19 Participants mav use
their own clubs
set from the (Customer Sen ice I csl
in the Student Recreation (ent
EarK rumors indicate that ei
"All Flash, No dame" Howard and.
Tomrm "qua (iolf" Johnson have
laid claim to the men's title bui J
host of other golfers are e. cted i
avoid the perils on Brad) I I
and capture titles 1 ur 1
mation. please contact Rt i
Services at 328-o s7
TRIVIAt
Name the
longest Division-I
winning streak in
college football,
including bowl
games.
� hi �
'
wfPRO
e've Got Your Ticket
I to Pirate Football.
DOUBLE CHANCE
Play the Before & After contest for
a chance to win Free Textbooks for
spring '98 semester, sponsored by
Dowdy Student Stores and ECU
Vending Services. Entry forms avail-
able when you pick up your student1
football tickets. See entry
form for details.
Student and Student Guest tickets for the
South Carolina Game may be picked up
Tuesday through Thursday, 9:00 aim to
7:00 p.m. at Dowdy Student Stores.
Ronald I Dowc!
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Hours: Monday -Friday: 7:30 am � 7:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am � 3:00 pm
Wrisht Buildins328-6731www.stud0ntstores.ecu.ecJu
Congratulations to the first two winners of our Double Chance, Before & After Textbook Giveaway! Stephanie Kilson
and Sarah Stafavich will receive FREE required textbooks for Sprins 1998 semester. Their names were drawn at the
ECU vs. Wake Forest football game on Saturday, Sept. 13. Two lucky Pirate fans will win at each home game!
Pick up YOUR Double Chance, Before & After Contest entry forms when you pick up your football tickets.
not "banking
WACHOVIA
Keldorf, Davenport downplay talk of QB controversy
11 l'l I. I III I .l') � :hris Keldorf has not returned to form. (scar
ttion has opened up North Carolina's undefeat-
j jr Heels ti . ahout who their quarterback should be.
ntered some tough times in two starts this season after
i I quarterback in the .lantic Coast Conference last year.
I j, led the Tar Heels to a pail ol victories after Keldorf went
Mill i season-ending ankle injury last November, has been nearly flaw-
less � ' role in 1997
V- -d seventh-ranked North Carol ii in a 28-17 victors over No.
� avcnport insisted that a system of alternat-
ing! rk just fine for the Par Heels.
Cowboys' Accuser Pleads Innocent
I )I.I.S I l'r - 24-year-old woman pleaded innocent today to charges
she � issault allegations against two I allus (lowboys players.
t her arraignment. Nina Shahravan also told County Criminal Court
it she wanted to have a jury determine her punishment if she
is found guilty
SI ihravan recanted allegations that spawned two lawsuits
and i in Dalits police policy regarding naming suspects.
ur selection began tor a six-member panel.
The former topless dancer faces a year in jail and a 54,000 fine if convict-
ed of the l llass misdemeanor.
"What do viu rhmk is appropriate punishment foi something that could
hae resulted in an innocent man going to prison for lifer" ssistant District
Attorney Clark Birdsall said last week when asked about the punishment he-
would seek against Shahravan.
209-B S Evans St.
Prttman Buikfcng
(ftear courthouse)
Greenvtfte. HC
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
,quaiit Justice
123 Yi St.
Greem ill-
'Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
� All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
Go ECU!
Beat USC
Laserv. asn

sptimi tance
� fi � ie ai
� .� . � perfect tl�; i i -
� -
Double Wash Spot Free Rinse
$4.00 6 Days Only
Tuesdav Sept 16 Sunday Sept 21
20"c Discount

20
DISCOI

$
'
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at its Best
High-performance
banking underscored by
integrity and service
excellence�
ifs the foundation
for success at BB&T.
If you are a highly
motivated professional
who would thrive in an
environment when
initiative is recognized
and achievement is
rewarded, then consider
joining BB&T in the
Management
Development Program.
The BB&T Management Development Program DP' is a
- Future managers of BRiT
the basic fundamentals ofbanking The
r areas: commercial lending, retail
concentrations
� curriculum including classroom
5 w npl asis in providing excellent
to out clients
� The Commercial Concentration prepares individuals
ommercial lending, financial services and
business development responsibilities as well as
financial analyst roles
� The Retail Concentration prepares individuals in retail
lending and financial services, operations, small
business banking, and brancb management.
� The Trust Concentration prepares individuals in trust
product knowledge and investments, portfolio
management anif estate and financial planning.
� The Insurance concentration prepares individuals in
insurance product knowledge, management, sales.
and support functions while honing skills and
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andidates must have a Bachelor's
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focal to bank
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INFORMATION SESSIONS
Wednesday � September 24, 1997
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
ruesdaj � October 21, 1997
BB&T
i Employer M I WV





�N-
12 Tuitdiy. September 16. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Talcing Leases for
t bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-285
AWESOME BEDROOM WITH
HUGE brick fireplace only $200 a
month at Tar River. Moving - Need
someone to take over lease ASAP.
Mala or female. Call Shawn. 830-
6882.
THIRD ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease in 3 bedroom at Wil-
son Acres ASAP. Male or female.
$230 a month. CaM Tracy. 758-9245.
free umrriES, i bedroom, 12
block from camps on Holly St. Cais
allowed with deposit. Rent $305 a
month. 757-9387.
FEMALE NEEDED TO SHARE four
bedroom house. ASAP. 12 block
from campus. Call 931-0448.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
PLAVEBS Club Apts. Split expenses
14. Call Melissa at 321-7613 for
more information.
3RD ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP.
MF. must be decent. 13 rentutili-
ties, washerdryer, cable, all the
good tilings. Hurry and call for an ap-
pointment, 830-1531.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM apartment
ONLY $235.00 per month, on Co-
tanche Street directly across from
new ECU Rec Center. MOVE IN NOW
with $100.00 security deposit. Call
758-1921. ask for Chuck.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom house 1 mile from
campus. 13 rent, utilities and cable.
Nice neighborhood. Call Kim, 758-
2800, after 6PM, 830-9036.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
PLAYERS Club Apts. Split expenses
14. Coll Melissa at 321-7613 for
more information
ONE BEDROOM WITH PRIVATE
balcony, free cable, water, sewage,
washerdryer hookups. Only $275 a
month. Call 353-5613, leave your
name, number
CARWATCH AUTOCASSETTE
ALARM, THE autocassette alarm is
an effective deterrent against theft of
your cars' stereo system and your
car. This cassette shaped alarm locks
into your cassette player with a dead-
bolt. It can only be removed with the
key. Anyone attempting to enter your
locked car will be greeted by a loud
shrill alarm sending him on to the
next car that is not as protected. This
is the Hottest, no installation car
ale rm to ever come out. Only
$29.95. For a free brochure on the
CarWatch AutoCassette alarm and
other fine Security Products email fir-
HnSec�aol.com or call 919-717-2453.
LARGE SAVANNAH MONITOR
WITH cage, stand, lighting, and all
accessories. $300. Call Paul at 355-
2372.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. Student discounts. Finance for
less than $35.00 a month. Free car-
rying case. Call 355-7057
TREK ROADRACING-TRIATHLON
BICYCLE, bright red. 47CM frame
(for riders up to 5'6" tall), excellent
condition, "loaded" with extras, must
see to appreaciate. $300. NIKON
"FE" CAMERA body, black, excellent
condition, strap and case. $200.
28MM NIKON lens. $100. others
available. Call Kip at 355-3180.
MONGOOSE COMP MOUNTAIN
GJKE. Rockshock Mag21 Shimanc
XT Shimarto Chipless Fliteseat con
uoltech stem Nukeproof bar matrix
rims $575. Call Sean. 752-8965
MAGIC THE GATHERING fit
GLES- Buy. sell, or trade game play-
ing as space allows. Call 752-1621 af-
ter 5:30 p.m.
trl HOTLINE THRUSTER
SQUASHTAIL 18 12 width. 2 12
thick. 10 months old. no dings. Astro-
deck $250. 9697 Morrow 3-0 Re-
vert 151 without bindings $250. Call
Sean. 752-8965.
"Help Wanted
" NEED SOMEONE ASAP to take
over lease at Player's Club. Call Mel-
issa Jones (Mgmt.) at 321-7613 or
call Derek at 413-0744.
ONE BEDROOM DUPLEX WITHIN
walking distance of Campus One
bedroom central heat and window
air. Convenient front door pat-king for
$250.00. PETS OK! Call 830-9502.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
3 bedroom house: $200 14 utili-
ties. North Harding location 4 blocks
from campus: Includes washerdryer,
dishwasher, fireplace, deck, central
ac and heat. Great deal. Call A3AP
757-2482.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP for Players Club Apartments.
Rent is $220 monthly 14 utilities.
Includes pool, tennis, washerdryer.
Please contact Jessica at 756-7539.
For Sale
FREESTYLE BICYCLE FOR SALE,
Haro Shredder Super Deluxe, with
knee saver handlebars. Perfect con-
dition. $300. Call Paul at 365 2372.
NEED A JOB? PLAY at day and
make money at night! Work nights
andor weekends and have your
days free with The ECU Telefund.
Make your own schedule! $5.50hr.
plus bonuses! Stop by the Rawl An-
nex, Room 5 between 3-6PM for
more info.
rTCFTCHTHT
$1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
- whopping $5.00VISA
application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS
WITH knowledge of Soccer, will
train. Must have transportation. Work
on Saturdays only. Call Rita at 330-
4216.
WANTED: INTRAMURAL COOrV
DINATOR. ROSE H.S. - 20 hrs.
weekly. $8.00hr. Organization, in-
terpersonal skills, maturity, experi-
ence essential. Flexible hours. School
year commitment. Call Roseanna.
413-1950.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR
Pitt County Memorial Hospital is
seeking qualified individuals to teach
aerobic classes through its Employee
Recreation and Wellness Depart-
ment. Persons will contract to teach
on a part-time basis. Interested can-
didates should contact Rose Anne
between 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. at
(919) 816-6501.
PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPI-
TAL
BABYSITTER TUESDAY, THURS
DAY FROM 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
at my home near campus. Please call
Heather or Andy at 551-3193.
PART-TIME SALES OPPORTUNE
TIES: Brody's is accepting applica-
tions for additional associates in. Ju-
nior Sportswear. Ladies Ca-
sualDresswear. and Young Men's.
. Flexible hours to work around most
school schedules. Clothing discount
included. To get a head start on your
fall wardrobe or to start saving early
for the upcoming holiday seasons,
apply at Customer Service, each
Monday-Thursday, 1-5 p.m Brody's,
The Plaza.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confidential
employment. Call today. 747-7686.
PART-TIME GRAPHICSMARKET-
ING ASSISTANT Detail-oriented
person with an eye for design need-
ed to assist campus Marketing Man-
ager. Job involves computer layout
and distribution of fliers, signs, and
banners in addition to general office
duties. PageMaker and FreeHand ex-
perience helpful. Applications avail-
able at ARAMARK office in Menden-
hall Student Center.
SPRING BREAK! C UTGOING INDI-
VIDUALS - sell 15 and go FREE.
Cancun, South Padre. Mazatlan. Ja-
maica. South Beach FL Guaranteed
best prices 1-800-SURFS-UP.
www.studentexpress .com
FULL-TIME TEACHERS TO teach
Infants or Four Year Olds. Must have
experience andor 2-4 year degree in
child development or related field.
Also needing morning substitutes.
Call 756-6229.
EASY JOB: STARTING 9897:
$25hr. Must be able to speak to
groups of H.S. students (10G people
for 10 min.), have own transporta-
tion, and be responsible. Must have
at least one day M-F wo classes bet-
ween 8am and 3pm. Call 1-800-472-
7501.
Services
PHYSICAL THERAPY MASSAGE
CLINIC ECU PT Program is holding a
massage clinic Wednesday. Sept. 24
from 5-9pm at the Belk Building on
Charles Blvd. Advanced tickets are
$30010 min. Look for us selling
tickets on campus.
CONGRATULATIONS GAMMA
EPSILON OFFICERS: President. Lisa
Landis; Vice-President, Becky Gunn;
Scholarship. Lisa Pearson; Tres. An-
drea Gillispie: Recording Secretary.
Angie Greene; Social Chair. Angie
Stender; Panhellenic delegate. Jelly
Orta; Panhallenig Representative.
Mary Williford: Alternate. Julie Guy:
Philanthropy. Melanie Warren; Histor-
ian. Katie Muench; Assistant. Brianne
Faircloth; Scrapbook. Kendra Latham;
Assistant. Amanda Roberts: Sisters'
Party . Julie Lowe: Assistant. Ginny
Stanley; Fundraisers, Corie Norton;
Assistant. Jenn Cole; Gamma. Tiffany
Person; Assistant. Jelly Orta. Love. Al-
pha Phi!
TO THE LADIES OF Zeta Tau Alpha.
Thanks a lot for coming out and tail-
gating with us. We can't wait to see
you all again. The brothers of Delta
Sigma Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA
OMICRON PI on your first flag foot-
ball victory! You guys are great! Keep
up the good work! Love, your sisters
and new members.
TO THE LADIES OF Delta Zeta: We
all had a great time at the Bid Party.
Thanks for coming out. Can't wait to
see you again. The brothers of Delta
Sigma Phi.
ORDER OF OMEGA MEETING in
the Underground Room in Menden-
hall at 6:00 p.m. tonight! All mem-
bers must attend.
PIKA - THANKS FOR THE tailgate
on Saturday. We had a great time
and cant wait to do it again. Love, Chi
Omega.
ALPHA PHI, WE HAD a great time
last Friday at our Pref Party. As al-
ways we can't wait until the next
time. Thanx. Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
RUGBY TEAM - THANK YOU for
the great time at the Elbo last Thurs-
day. It was a night we will always re-
member. Love. Chi Omega.
CHI OMEGA CONGRATULATES
PLEDGES of the week. Angie Win-
free. Kelly Worsley. and Rashanna
Wadded. Super Senior Emma Tho-
mas and Sisters Pam Godfrey and
Caroline Pisani. We love you. Chi
Omega.
CHI OMEGA WOULD LIKE to rec-
ognize our professors of the month.
Dr. Gabbard and Dr. Hagan. You are
both great. Keep up the good work.
Love. Chi Omega.
KAPPA SIGMA - THANKS FOR let-
ting us share your Bid Night with you.
We all had a great tie and loved your
new group of guys. Love, Chi Omega.
Lost & Found
f Greek Personals"
t KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like to
thank Alpha Xi Delta for the social
last Saturday night. We had a fun
time introducing ourselves to your
fall pledge class.
REWARD-LOST GOLD LADIES
watch, central part of campus by
Student Health Services, it's very
special to me. Please call 561-7700.
ask for Kim.
Announcements
ADVERTI
Hit ywr taj
eastcaroli
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVEL-
OPMENT PROGRAMS will present
"The Jam in Your Jelly Roll" Monday.
September 22 at 4pm in Menden-
hall Multi-Purpose Room. Jim Sturm.
Director, will review necessary tech-
niques to keep you and others moti-
vated.
STUDENTS. LEARN TO SCUBA
DIVE during Fall Break. Classes start
Friday evening October 3rd. For infor-
mation contact Tom Younce at 328-
4390.
TENNIS CUNIC: THE TENNIS cli-
nic for the adapted recreation depart-
ment will be held on Sept. 21 from 2-
4 p.m. The location is to be an-
nounced. Dept. of Rec. Services.
CONTRA DANCE. MUSIC BY Rob-
in and the Pickups. Tim Grant calling.
Sat. Sept. 20th, 7:30-10:30. Begin-
ner's instruction 7:00-7:30. Held at
the Willis Center, corner of Reade
and 1st St. in downtown Greenville.
Come aione or bring a friend. For
more information, 830-5403.
ECU LAW SOCIETY WILL have
elections for President. V-President.
Secretary, and Treasurer at our meet-
ing on Thursday, September 18th at
7PM at the Percolator. If you are in-
terested in law or law school, the
meeting is beneficial. OPEN TO ALL'
MAJORS!
PILOT MOUNTAIN: THE 1ST trip to
Pilot Mtn. will be on Sept. 27. Be sure
to register by Sept. 19 in the SRC
main office. Dept. of Rec. Services.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SEMINAR-
GRIFTON Police Department.
Place: Grrfton Town Hall
Date: Sept. 19. 1997
Time: 7:00-9:00 p.m.
This is to educate the public on why
abusers abuse and steps you could
take to protect yourself, also to be
aware of Grifton Police Domestic
Violence Program. If questions,
please call 5244161 or 524-4208.
Domestic Violence Hotline.
FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER: JOIN us on
Sept. 19 from 9-11 p.m. at the SRC
for a fun-filled Friday night. Dept. of
Rec. Services.
FIRST MEETING, AMERICAN
MARKETING Association. FREE PIZ-
ZA) Wednesday, September 17th.
GCB 1007. 2:00 p.m. All majors wel-
come! Find out what's going on this
semester!
TENNIS SINGLES ENTRY DEAD-
LINE: Be sure to get your tennis sin-
gles entries in by Sept. 16 at 5 p.m.
to the Student Recreation Center
room 128. Dept. of Rec. Services.
TUES SEPT. 16 - SENIOR RECI-
TAL. Jennifer S. Licko, soprano, AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 p.m. Fri.
Sept 19 - GRADUATE RECITAL. Jane
Kline, mezzo-soprano, AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hatl. 7:00 p.m. Sun. Sept. 21
- VOCAL CHAMBER MUSIC, voice
students of Louise Toppin, John B.
O'Brien, harpsichord. The Music
House. 408 West Fifth Street. 3:00
p.m.
SEA KAYAKING: IN GOOSE Creek
State Park on Sept. 25. Be sure to
register by Sept. 22 in the SRC main
office. Dept. of Rec. Services.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY from 3:30-5:00
p.m. Assertiveness Training work-
shop Tuesday from 3:30-5:00 p.m.
"Personality-What Type are You?"
Wed. from 11:30-12:30 p.m. Note-
Taking workshop: Tuesday from
11:00-12:00 noon. Tips for Writing
Papers workshop: Thursday from
2:30-3:30 p.m. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development will
be offering these programs the week
of September 15th. W you are inter-
ested in any of these workshops,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
NOON TRACK ATTACK: FROM
Sept 15-Oct. 31 on (MWF) from
12:10-12:50 p.m. on the Student Re-
creation Center track. Dept of Rec
Services.
STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIA-
TION- Join us for our second meet-
ing. Room 240 Tuesday. September
23 at 5:00. Refreshments will be
served!
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSO-
CIATION SOCIAL Don't miss all the
fun! Make sure you're at Cheap
Shot O'Malley's! Thurs Sept. 18th.
9-11PM! Free beverages! Free admis-
sion! All majors welcome. Find out
what all the hype's about!
THE SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT of Management (SAM) will
have a general meeting Tuesday at
3:30 in GC1026. The meeting is
open to all majors. Refreshments will
be served.
SQUASH: JOIN US ON Sept. 15-
Sept. 24 on Mon. and Wed. from 8-
9:00 p.m. at the Student Rec Center
court 8. Dept of Rec Services.
i the i � �
eastcaroliman
classified
ad info
OPEN RATE-$3 for25 or
fewer words
STUDENT RATE-$2 for 25
or fewer words
(Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify.)
Additional words over 25 are
5t each
AD EXTRAS-Bold type is $1
extra & All caps type is $1
extra
(Charges for extras are in addition to the
line ad charges shown above.)
DEADLINE:
4 p.m. FRIDAY for the next
TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY for the next
THURSDAY'S issue
All CLASSIFIED ADS MUST
BE PREPAID.
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLEGE STUDENT
Doctors Vision Center is currently seeking a PART-TIME front
deskreceptionist for our GreenviHe office. Individual must be professional,
outgoing, and have excellent people skills.
Must have computer skills, be able to assist in patient needs, and have
strong multiple line telephone skills. Billing and insurance experience a plus.
Must be motivated and team oriented. Willing to train.
Send resume with salary requirements to:
DoctorsVisionCenter
499 E. GreenviHe Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need Timberland boots
and shoes! Good Jean.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD Sc SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURFRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM l(fc00-l:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door tc ring buzzer.
eastcarolinian
writers
wanted
Apply at our
office on the
second floor of
the Student Pub
Building


Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1225
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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