The East Carolinian, September 11, 1997






THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 11. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
VOLUME 73, ISSUE 06
ECU receives additional $3.1 million in equity funding
Allocation of equity funding
Additional funds
paying for technology,
operating costs
Jacqueline d. kellum
NEWS EDITOR
Included in ECU's budget plan this year is an addi-
tional J.V1 million that the university traditionally
has not received.
Last year, the results of a study were released
which showed that ECU, along with four other
UNC institutions, were not receiving as much
funding as they should have been. The General
Assembly then made plans to supply those schools
with additional funds in the future.
"It (equity funding) recognized that we were
underfunded compared to our peer institutions
said Richard Brown, Vice Chancellor of
Administration and
Finance. "It will
become a part of our
continuation budget
The additional money
will be allocated for
new computers and
other equipment
(such as fax machines
or copiers), salaries for
new positions, and
operating expenses.
"A great portion of it is
going to technology
Brown said.
That portion will pav
" (equity funding)
recognized that we
were underfunded
compared to our peer
institutions
Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor of Advimsuation and
Finance
for new computers for facultv
and administration, and for
new staff to facilitate their
use.
"There are ten computer
consultant positions that are
being created to assist facul-
ty in incorporating this tech-
nology Brown said.
In addition to the new
computers, faculty will also
be receiving upgrades on
existing computers.
"They're going to try to
upgrade all the faculty com-
puters across campus, and
then, every two to three years, there'll be another
upgrade said Jim Plummer, Director of University
SEE FUND. PAGE 4
Richard Brown
VICE CHANCELLOR OF
ADMINISTRATION ANO
FINANCE
ECU Mice
creates net site
for crime tips
Officer Virgil Leggett (left) and Captain Johnnie
Umphlett discuss the new web page, on which
students and faculty can report crimes
anonymously.
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
Students can report
crimes anonymously
B M NO N M I S F.
si vF f W K I T t K
The ECU Police Department has a new tool
in crime control: the World Wide Web. The
ECU PD's website now offers an area where
students, faculty or anyone can report a crime
anonymously.
.After view ing a number of university police
departments' websites and learning about
their crime tip pages, the ECU PD initiated
their own page in June.
"We've only had one
crime reported so far
said ECU PD Detective
Mike Jordan.
.Although the tip was
not information the
police department could
act on. Jordan said the
information was useful,
in that it is something
they could look out for in
the future.
The witness is not
required to give a name.
"If a student doesn't
feel like they are being
put under the spotlight,
they might feel more apt
to report something,
without them feeling
like it will come back to
haunt them Jordan
said.
Those who have
reported incidents can
check up on the police's progress on solving
the crime. "When you send the message, a
number will be given, and those who want to
check on the certain incident can be updat-
ed said Jordan.
There is also a chance for a reward for any-
valuable clues provided.
"It is possible that if there is some good
information that helped solve the crime, and
an arrest is made, we can bring in Crime
Stoppers to reward the witness for their infor-
mation said Jordan.
The web page also offers, among
other things, campus crime stanstics for the
last tour years, campus crime prevention tips
and an "Alert" page, used to notify web
SEE CRIME PAGE 4
"It is possible
that if there is
some good
information
that helped
solve the crime
and an arrest is
made, we can
bring in Crime
Stoppers to
reward the wit-
ness for their
information
Mike Jordan
ECU PO detective
TODAY
Rain
High 84
Low 68
A
4 WEEKEND
J Partly Cloudy
$w High 83
' low 63
� � - �
$400,000 -
10 Computer
Consultant Salaries
$200,000 -
4 more
librarian salaries
$135,000-
new equipment
$75,000 -
Administrative
Computers
THE WRIGHT STUFF
Memberr of Alpha Kappa Alpha smile dflei their step show performance at Wright Plaza Monday.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
New plastic
surgery facility
allows expansion
A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Tuesday
afternoon to officially open the new plastic and
reconstructive surgery office of ffte
medical school
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
Outlying offices opened
to avoid space crunch
Angela Koenig
STAFF W KIT K K
Enrollment reaches highest point in school's history
Freshman class has
highest GPA ever
.VKfife
Angela Koen ig
sun vvhi rm
Although the final tally is not yet complete,
enrollment this semester has continued to
increase. The preliminary total of students on
campus is 17, 851.
"This is the largest enrollment ever here at
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin said. "The
average high school grade point average (for
incoming freshmen) is 3.25, which is an all-
time record for ECU
"The increase is due to mostly freshmen.
but also slightly ro the number of graduate
students said Robert Thompson, director of
Planning and Institutional Research.
According to Thompson it is estimated
that 100-125 people will withdraw between
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
More and more students crowd Wright Plaza every day at
lunchtime. just one sign of ECU s increased enrollment
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
now and when the
final figure is taken
in November.
Estimates tor
future populations
are being made now.
"We're making
the decision now for
the next two years.
This year we did bet-
ter than we had
guessed Thompson
said.
The figure for
future years remains
steady.
"There is a model
to make projections
based on the market,
potential transfers
and growth Thompson added.
There are several factors which can
increase tuition that are unpredictable. "The
addition of the rec center certainly helped
bring in new people. A good football
season never hurts and the aggres-
siveness of admissions when
recruiting are all factors
Thompson said.
'The total number of students last
fall was 17,47�- which was an
increase from 17,445 in 1995.
The spring semester total will not
be quite as high due in part to grad-
uation. "Spring is always lower and
usually about 95 percent of the fall
total Thompson said.
The increase in students is evident
in several vvavs. Mich as parking, but
one thing that will not change is
the facultv to student ratio or addi-
tion of large classes. The current
ratio is 16:1.
fljn"7r?mH
17400 17500 17600 17700 17800 17900
East Carolina University Enrollment Numbers
"Technology has
changed so much
years that we
really needed to
expand more so
that we could
expand or ser-
vices, "
Or. William Wooden
chief ot the division of
plastic and reconstructive
surgery
"We have made a con-
scientious decision not
to do that (increase
class size) Thompson
said. "It will mean that
we will have to sched-
ule mote classes and
stretch the classroom
day out longer. Our aim
is not to fundamentally
alter the campus
Thompson expects the
university will contin-
ue to grow in students
and sen ices. "We have
asked (ieneral Administration for a reclassifi-
cation of our type of university. We are cur-
rently a Masters 1 classification. 'That means
that we have x number of positions and x
number of dollars to pay them Thompson
said. "We have asked to Ik- a Doctor ' level.
SEE ENROLLMENT PAGE 3
Robert Thompson
DIRECTOR OF PLANNING
AND INSTITUTIONAL
RESEARCH
Officials from the ECU School of Medicine
and Pitt County cut the ribbon on the new
plastic and reconstructive surgery facility- on
Tuesday
As Dr. William
Wooden, chief of the
division of plastic and
reconstructive surgerx
for the school of medi-
cine and Pitt County over the last few
Memorial Hospital
said, the building is
"the culmination of
many years of hard
work
Other officials
attending the ceremo-
ny agreed.
"Today is certainly a
day to celebrate and a
dav to anticipate other
changes to the medical
school Mayor Nancy
Jenkins said.
The medical school
has turned to building outlying clinics as a
way to deal with decreasing space in the hos-
pital building. Recently a women's facility
was opened as was a new building on
Fire tower Rd.
Plastic and reconstructive surgery were
formerly housed in the Leo Jenkins Cancer
Center for more than 15 years, but because
of space limitations needed to move to a dif-
ferent location so services could be expanded.
" lechnologv has changed so much over
the last few years that we really needed to
expand more so that we could expand our ser-
vices Wooden said.
Wooden hopes that the new facility will
allow the medical school to trv new proce-
dures and methods of treating patients. The
center is a Beta-site for a PC based Medvision
and telemedicine program.
According to Wooden this could allow
medical workers to document, interview and
transmit patient information from out in the
field to doctors in hospitals.
"Tor example an EMS worker in Dare
County can call us up and sa what does this
look like to you Wooden said. "It will mean
a dramatic change to rural and housebound
patients and emergency medical systems. We
MEDICAL PAH 4
THURSDAY
m
The Austin Cupola, which
sits on the mall, is actually a
replica of the cupola on the
old Austin building, which
was torn down in 1968.
Students protested the
original cupola's demolition.
opinion
i Online tip-offs good
idea if not used for
pranks
I lifestyle7
in
Travel Adventure film
series kicks off
sports10
Deacs better pray;
ECU picked as winner
at home
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOG.
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328 2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www studentmedia.ecu edu





r
2 Thursday. September 11, 1997
iiews
The East Carolinian
4
a
i
K
��

H
m
m
a
Video interviewing available to students
Senate committee recommends confirmation of
Sheltort as JCS chief
WASHINGTON AP) � The Senate Armed Services Committee recom-
mended Senate confirmation of Gen. Henry H. Shelton today as chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
A vote by the fuH Senate could come as carry as tonight. The committee
voted 11-0 to endorse the four-star Army general and current chief of the U.S.
Special Operations Command.
The 55-year-old native of Speed, N.C would be the first member of the
elite Green Beret to rise to the nation's top military post. Shelton is a deco-
rated combat veteran of the Vietnam War.
The committee vote came a day after Shelton appeared- before the panel
and pledged his support for continued high combat readiness of front-line
troops, for increasing weapons spending and for bringing U.S. troops home
from Bosnia by next June.
Female cadet mum on suspension; father backs VMi
LEXINGTON, Va. (AP) � Angelica Garza was a gung-ho Virginia Military
Institute recruit. Of 30 women in the inaugural coed class, she was first to
attend an open house last fall, weaving around TV cameras to get a barracks
tour.
The prospective students were told about the physical and mental rigors
cadets experience and even watched an upperclassman harass a freshman in
a tradition known as the rat line, similar to boot camp.
On Tuesday, Miss Garza became the first woman to leave VMI involun-
tarily, suspended for two semesters for striking an upperclassman who was
disciplining her.
She declined to talk about the incident or her suspension wher, reached
at let Fbtt Belvoir, Va home.
Her father, Army Chief Warrant Officer Pete Garza, said VMI handled the
situation appropriately but would not say what caused thst suspension.
Technology brings
interviewers to
ECU
JONI SURETTE
STAFF WRITER
Striving to remain on the cutting edge
of technology, East Carolina
University is one of the first colleges
to offer video conference interviews
to potential graduating students and
alumni.
While there are only ten other
North Carolina universities participat-
ing thus far, ECU had video confer-
encing available during the spring
semester of last year.
This new method of interviewing
offers students an easy alternative to
long flights and sweaty palms.
Students can interview with clients
across the United States and interna-
tionally and never leave campus.
While making an appointment
through Career Services is currently
the only available method of access for
students, in the future, Career
Services hopes to allow students to
have personal computer access from
their residence hall room.
"With the year 2000 quickly
approaching our goal is to keep stu-
dents with the latest technology at
their fingertips said Jill Nowicki,
university accountant manager for
View Net in Madison, Wisconsin.
This new service offers a wider
applicant pool for major corporations
as well as job-hungry grads. Major
companies, such as IBM, Proctor and
Gamble, Exxon, Citibank, as well as
achovia, have joined the video con-
ference bandwagon.
"fiw ECU students to have this
service available is a wonderful thing
said Debra Baker, assistant director of
Career Services, acting also as video
conference administrator.
Thh's service is free for students
who are interested. Prior to the actual
interview, the applicant must first
submit a resume to the Career
Services, then to the actual company
to initiate an interview. Once an affir-
mative response is received from the
potential employer, the student must
first participate in a 30-45 minute
training session on how to use the new
video conferencing tool prbfessjonalry.
Several companies are accepting
applications for interviews in the
upcoming months. WalMart's session
is Oct. 27 and Scars' session is Nov.
17-19.
Career Services plans to hold a
workshop for students to introduce
interviewing assignment conferenc-
ing.
"The bottom line is, this is avail-
able for students and we want them to
take advantage of it said Baker.
For more information on video
conferencing contact Career Services
or try the View Net web page at
www.netviewnetinc.com.
Lawyers for Paufa Jones allowed to quit
harassment lawsuit
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) � Paula Jones's new legal team will receive no
extra time to prepare for her sexual harassment lawsuit against President
Clinton even though her two top lawyers quit and a third said he planned to
do the same.
VS. District Judge Susan Webber Wright directed that the case cay on
course for trial beginning May 27.
Attorneys Gilbert Davis and Joseph Cammarata were allowed to withdraw
Tuesday from Mrs. Jones's lawsuit because of "fundamental differences of
opinion" with her about how the case should proceed. They promoted a set
tlement she had rejected, her spokeswoman said.
Mrs. Jones has yet to announce new lawyers.
Clinton's attorneys, led by Robert S. Bennett, said they were ready to
move toward a trial.
Mrs. Jones claims that Clinton asked her to perform oral sex on him when
they attended a conference together at a Little Rock hotel in May 1991. He
was governor and she was a state employee. Clinton denies the allegations
and has said he docs not recall meeting Mrs. Jones.
Mrs. Jones's lawyers requested permission to leave after she rejected set-
tlement terms that her spokeswoman, Susan Carpenter McMillan, said the
lawyers had pushed: $700,000 and a vague statement of regret from the pres-
ident for any damage to her reputation.
California Senate sends governor bill to curb junk guns
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) � The sure Legislature has sent the governor
a bill aimed at halting the manufacture and sale of cheap handguns in
California, which produces most of the "Saturdav night specials" sold in the
United States.
The measure would apply the same standards the federal government has
applied to imported handguns since 1968.
Five Los Angeles-area manufacturers produce 80 percent of the so-called
"junk guns" sold in the United States, according to the federal Justice
Department.
Gov. Pete Wilson has not taken a position on the bill, passed Tuesday by
the state Senate on a vote of 22-15. The Assempry passed it last month, 42-
The bill by state Sen. Richard Poianco would ban the manufacture and
sale of "nonsporting handguns" after Jan. 1,1999. It defines them as weapons
that fail to meet the federal standards for imports, which include restrictions
on the size of the barrel and frame and safety features.
!Tl,llll'ilil11Iil
Albright says she hopes Israel trip will
make difference
JERUSALEM (AP) � Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Wednesday
extended her support to Israel in its straggle against terrorism but also urged
a resumption of land-for-peace negotiations with Arabs.
Hoping to salvage the peace process amid an ebb in Israeli-Palestinian
relations , Albright said, "We are with you in the battle against terror, we are
with you in the struggle for security
Calling on Israeli President Ezer Weizman, she hailed Israel's resilient
past, and said it had U.S. support in insisting that Palestinian leader Yasser
Ararat implement his commitments to counter terrorism.
But Albright also told Israel that security is inseparable from peace, a gen-
tle way of reminding Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that the Clinton
administration wants Israel to get back to the table and swap territory for
Arab recognition. She was scheduled to meet with Netanyahu later in the day
across
1 o c h o
campuses
Students vote for 24 hour visitation.
Appalachian State University�On campus residents were asked to vote
on a new visitation policy for their residence halls. 95 percent of the on-
campus population turned out to vote in favor of 24 hour visitation. The
decision was unanimous when 93 percent of students voted in fevor of 24
hour visitation. The students chose from three different options: A-visita-
tion from noon to midnight Sunday through Thursday and from noon to 2
a.m. Friday and Saturday. Option B-Visitaion hours noon to 2 a.m. Sunday
through Saturday, and option C-24 hour visitation.
UNC drops two spots in
US. News and World Report rankings
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill�UNC dropped two spots in
this year's "America's Best Colleges" rankings from US. News and World
Report. This year the magazine ranked UNC 27th amongnational universi-
ties. The University of California at Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon
University surpassed UNC and were pan of a four way tie for 23rd. UNC
ranked fourth oveiall in a separate survey for public universities behind
Berkeley, the University of Virginia and the University of Michigan at Ann
Arbor.
University of Tennessee works to prevent
scholarship fraud
The University of Tennessee�September 2, 1997�The UT Book and
Supply store attempted to increase awareness of scholarship fraud with stu-
dents. The FTC estimated that the typical scam rakes moncv from (S.000
victims each year. These fraudulent companies advertise in campus news
' papers, flyers, poMcards and on the Internet. The FTC launched project
$seho!arcam in September of 19 by filing charges in federal district court
against five companies alleging that they took advantage of finance frames
to exploit college-bound student and their families. Project SscholarScam
also included a campaign to help consumers identify fraudulent scholarship
V services.
2800 E. 10th St.
Eittpte Shopping Center
Acros� From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Giass
Hon Fri.9-
Vfrjfc-in Anytime
752-3318
EL TORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber & Style
Pirate Special
Say Pirates & tf'Tf sfts
Get Hair Cut jfcAjlJ
'or $7 Every time. X . V T
Regular $10 HailTUt
Mandatory HIV
reports encouraged
BOSTON (AP) � The distin-
guished Nm England Journal of
Mediant is urging mandatory
reporting of HIV infections to
state health departments to
increase the chances people will
get carry treatment.
More than half of all states now
require that the names of infected
people be reported to confidential
registries. However, New York and
California, the two with the most
cases by far, dc not require this.
Early in the epidemic, the need
to keep AIDS infections private
was often considered to be more
important than any public health
benefits of turning names over to
health agencies.
Opinion has shifted, and
mandatory reporting has grown
less controversial in recent years,
especially with the advent of treat-
ments for people who arc infected
but not yet sick.
In Thursday's issue of the jour-
nal, Or. Robert Steinbrook, a
deputy editor, said in an editorial
that infection with the AIDS virus
should be a reportable disease at
the federal level, just like tubercu-
losis and many sexually transmit-
ted illnesses, such as syphilis and
gonorrhea.
The editorial noted that this
would allow health agencies to
track down partners of infected
people so they could be warned of
their risk and get counseling and
treatment.
Protease inhibitors and other
AIDS drugs, used together, dra-
matically slow the progression of
an infection to full-blown AIDS.
Many doctors believe patients
should start treatment as soon as
possible after infection to improve
their chances of survival.
The same issue of the journal
published a study, directed by Dr.
Scott M. Hammer of Beth Israei
Deaconess Medical Center in
Boston, showing that AIDS
patients getting a combination of
the protease inhibitor indinavir,
plus the drugs AZT and lamivu-
dinc, had half the death rate of
those getting two drugs when fol-
lowed for nine months.
That study received wide
attention after the results were
released by the National Institutes
of Health, its sponsor, in February.
States with laws requiring HIV
reporting by name are Alabama,
Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho,
Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan,
Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey,
New Mexico, North Carolina,
North Dakota, Ohio, Okalahoma,
South Carolina, South Dakota,
Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, West
Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
Connecticut, Oregon and Texas
require that only HlV-infected chil-
dren be reported by name.
SOWings tor $19.97
Monday Night Football Chick Off '97
Wing eating Contest!
Rrw; Prize $200, 2nd Pri� 8100, 3rd $50
I
Thursday 911 8:00 p.m.
See Velvet Jones Live on the Patio
No cover charge!
1
I
h
i
���afMMi
The Firehose Tavern
Thursday
Friday
National
Healing
Tribe
Saturday
Kernal Goat
Tuesdays
Jazz Night
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dense to DJ Will
upstairs
Greenville's
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
32 oz. Domestic
Draft�1,50
14 oz. Domestic
Draft 75
FREE FOOD
NFL Ticket on DSS
'Mr
Football
75 Southpaw
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
TastingDisplay
L Sports Bar

mM i
r ,





u
s
i
I
i'
i
i
i
-
? .

3 Thursday. September 11. 1997
news �
The East Carolinian
Enrollment
continued from page !
which should increse the number of
positions we can offer
The number of incoming stu-
dents depends heavily on the num-
ber of students graduating from
high school each year. Thompson
said the number of high school grad-
uates is not as high as in the past,
but is slowly inching its way up.
"Next year we may be not as
high from new students due to the
number of graduates, which will also
cause a lag in the transfer popula-
tion because there will be fewer
community college people to trans-
fer in Thompson said.
Late births affect
biological clock
September 2
Damage to Property�A student
reported that the rear windshield
wiper on her vehicle was broken
while parked in the College Hill
Drive commuter lot.
Larceny�A student reported
the larceny of the back tire from his
bicycle while parked in the bike
rack at Garret Hall.
Larceny�A staff member
reported the larceny of a money
Friends of Sheppard Memorial library
BOOK SALE
Thursday, Sept. 11, 6-8 p.m.
(Preview sale for friends only; 140 or 20-book limit)
Friday, Sept. 12, 9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 13, 9 a.m6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 14, 1-5 p.m.
(Bog Day� IA per grocery bag of books)
Willis Bldg 1st & Reade Sts.
StmitWhys
What you Need to Know about
TAILGATING and GENERAL
PARKING for Home Football
Games
General public parking areas are opened four
hours prior to kick-off of home games. Thus,
for a 3:30 p.m. kick-off, vehicles will be
permitted in parking areas beginning at
11:30 a.m. No vehicles are permitted to enter
these parking areas until game da.
Several areas surrounding Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium are for reserved parking. General park-
ing is permitted off of Charles Boulevard at the
School of Allied Health Sciences and on the
Frisbee Golf Course on the northeast corner
of Greenville Boulevard and Charles Boulevard.
The College Hil! Drive area is also available for
public parking.
Vehicles are to be parked one vehicle per space.
Under University policy, kegs, mixed drinks,
spirited liquor, or fortified wine ore not permittedj
on university property. Also, please do not bring
glass into the parking areas. Once the game has
begun, persons still in the parking areas will be
asked to move into the stadium. ECU Police
monitor all university property, with zero
f tolerance for underage drinking and alcohol
violations.
Please help to keep our university clean.Trash
containers are provided in all university-
operated lots. Please bag all trash and deposit it
in containers provided in the parking lots.
Teams take the field for pre-game warm ups
approximately one hour prior to game time.The
festive entrance of the Marching Pirates band and
j Pirate Football Team begin approximately 20
minutes prior to kick-off. Fans are encouraged to
be in their seats prior to the team entrance.
A.D.A. REQUESTS
I Requests for accommodations related to disabili-
ties need o be made to the Athletic Ticket
Office, 328-4500 at least 48 hours prior to the
game.
VISITOR PARKING
If guests are visiting you on campus, please be
aware that all vehicles parked on campus must
display a valid parking permit. However, visitor
permits are not required on Saturday and Sunday 1
of a home game weekend. If parking on campus at
any other time, visitors should obtain a visitor
permit from Parking and Transportation Services,
305 E.Tenth Street, between the hours of 7:30
a.m. and 5:00 p.m Monday through Friday.After
5:00 p.m visit the ECU Police Dept609 E.Tenth StJ
A message from
Parking and Transportation Services
305 E.Tenth Street
Greenville
(919)328-6294
vfww.ecu.eduparkingparking.htm
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
order from her purse in an office in
Mendenhall.
Assist Rescue�A staff member
requested medical assistance after
experiencing abdominal pain.
Greenville Rescue transported the
staff member from Speight to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital.
September 3
Larceny�A staff member report-
ed the larceny of a laptop computer
from a room in Speight.
Suspicious Activity�A resident
of Cotten Hal! Reported that a male
banged on her room window at 12:30
p.m. The student did not know the
male. The male headed west.
September 4
Traffic & Alcohol Violations�A
non-student was arrested for under-
age possession of alcohol, driving on
a sidewalk and driving after consum-
ing alcohol. The incident occurred
in the parking lot on Fifth and Reade
Streets.
September 5
Communicating Threats�A stu-
dent reported that she had received
three telephone calls from a subject
who has threatened to harm her
while she is on campus. The case is
being handled h) the Sheriff's
Department.
Drver Fire�A staff member
reported that a few mops caught on
fire while they were lying on a d'yer
in the Old Cafeteria. Officers con-
tained the fire and the fire depart-
ment extinguished it and cleared
the building.
September 6
Damage to Property�A student
reported the passenger window in
her vehicle was broken out while
parked in the Third and Reade
Street parking lot.
Harassing Phone Calls�An
employee of Todd Dining Hall
reported receiving harassing phone
calls at his residence. Greenville PD
was contacted and is handling the
case.
Service of Rslony Warrant�
Greenville Police officers requested
assistance in serving a felony warrant
for breaking and entering on resi-
dent of White Hall. The arrest was
conducted without incident.
Concealed Weapon�A non-stu-
dent was arrested for carrying a con-
cealed weapon (knife) after being
stopped for public consumption on
Reade Street. Ai other non- student
was also issued a state citation for
possession of drug paraphernalia.
September 7
.Assist RescuePossible Hit &
Run: Pedestrian�A student was
treated tor head injuries, possibly
caused by a hit and run in the Reade
Street Lot.
NEW YORK (AP) � Women who
give birth in their 40s might have
an especially good chance of living
to 100, perhaps because those who
manage to get pregnant so late in
life have biological clocks that run
slow.
When researchers compared a
group of female centenarians to
women who had died at 73, they
found that the older women were
much more likely to have had a
baby after their 40th birthday.
That does not mean that having
a baby so late will make a woman
live longer, said researcher Dr.
Thomas Perls. Instead, the late
birth indicates that a woman's body
may be aging slowly, he said.
"If your reproductive system is
aging slowly enough that you can
have a child in your 40s, it probably
bodes well for the fact that the rest
of you is aging very slowly too he
said.
Peris, a geriatrician at the Beth
Israel-Deaconess Medical Center
in Boston, and two colleagues there
present their findings in
Thursday's issue of the journal
Nature. The results do not apply to
women who have had kids with the
help of fertility experts, he said.
Childbearing rates drop sharply
after age 40, although menopause
typically doesn't arrive until around
50. About 70,000 babies were born
to women in their 40s in the
United States during 1995, the lat-
est year for which complete figures
are available. That's a tiny fraction
of the 3.9 million babies bom that
year.
The new study included 78
women in suburban Boston who had
lived to be at least 100 and were
bom around 1896. They were com-
pared with 54 women who were
bom in 1896 and died in 1969, the
earliest year for which researchers
could get computerized death
records. Information on these
women came from next-of-kin,
located through old newspaper obit-
uaries. The study excluded women
who had never married.
About 19 percent of the cente-
narians had given birth after their
40th birthdays, vs. just 5.5 percent
of the other group. The women with
the late births were found to be four
times more likelv to live to 100 than
73.
One reason might be estrogen,
the researchers sad. The late births
suggest these women delayed
menopause, which might mean their
bodies produced estrogen for a
longer time and so got extra protec-
tion from heart disease and
Alzheimer's, researchers said
Dr. Ruth Fretts, an obstetrician-
gynecologist and an author of the
study, said women who have been
unable to have children past age 40
should not be discouraged about
their longevity. The problem could
be something that has nothing to do
with their aging rate, she said.
Caleb Finch, a professor of neuro
biology and gerontology at the
University of South California who
didn't participate in the study, said
the proposed link between late
childbearing and slower aging is
plausible.
Perls has a personal interest in his
study results: His wife just gave
birth at 40. "I have no doubt she's
going to go on to be 100 he said.
12 PRICE 3
PITCHERS of DRAFT!
Every Monday! 3
WATCH THE BIG GAME OH OUR 5 T.Vs!
(HFL) a)
12 PRICE
APPETIZER SlVX 12
SPECIALS
SUN-THURS 'AFTER 9PM
DINE IN ONLY
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
�tiip
eastcarolinian
Apply at our office on the
second floor of the
Student Pub Building
757-1666 S
Support
student-run media
To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired,
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept.
TEC.
Student Pubs Bldg
ECU
Greenville, NC 27858
J First class mail$40
LI Second class mail$110.00
SuUdriptiont bagm with Ihe tint papa, aant and run
1 for one (1) yaa ,i �. .
'astcarolinian
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee presents
Free live musi! Free pizza and refreshments!
8-10:45 pm, Mendenhall Student Center's Social Room (Across from WZMB)
Thursday, September 11,1997
�Masons
�Russell Henderson
�����! �� .1 ��� lll-W. ��1 IT .1 �� �!� I.I.HII
it






jBWW�i"iii'i'i I
bi i 'in r-
4 Thursday. September 11, 1997
now
Fund
continued (fom page I
Budgets.
Another large allotment will be
used for day to day operating
expenses and supplies. Plummet
said that operating expenses are one
of the areas most in need of addi-
tional funding, because of the con-
sistent price increases for everyday
items such as paper.
"As a general rule, we don't get
money to cover those (incteases). In
the five years I've been here, we
have gotten wry little money for
operating increases from year to
ear Rummer said. "That's why
that latge portion of that $3.1 mil-
lion is going to operating expenses
.According to Brown, the discrep-
ancy in funding occurred because
ECl experienced significant enroll-
ment increase in the 80's and carry
90s, a time period when the state
was not able to match the school's
growth with comparable funding.
The other schools which were
previously underfunded are UNC-
Charlotte. Appalachian State
University, UNC-Greensboro and
FNCAVilmington.
No funding was taken from ether
schools to provide the equity fund-
ing to the five previously under-
funded schools.
The East Carolinian
Medical
continued from page 1
� can greatly expand the care and give
i educational support as well
�1 According to Wooden, this would
'be accomplished using a laptop
1; computer and a cam corder, and if
� ECU gets this program in place it
J would be the first in the country.
i The new facility will be used for
i clinical and research purposes. In
addition to these it will provide
! learning experiences for medical
�� students as well as students in nurs-
i ing and physicians assistant pro-
grams and continuing education for
physicians.
According to Wooden medical
students will learn what can realisti-
cally be done to treat patients and
�.when referrals to plastic surgeons
should be made. "This will show
them to much more detail the care
open to patients Wooden said.
The facility contains 12 examina-
tion rooms, patient conference
rooms, eight offices, two outpatient
rooms and state of the art mirror
video-imaging equipment.
"This medical facility is certainlv
the crown jewel of not only-
Greenville and Pitt County but also
eastern N'C said Michael
Colombo, chairman of the executive
committee of the Greenville-Pitt
County Chamber of Commerce.
Dr. Joseph Benacci and Dr.
Janice Lalikos will be working with
Dr. Wooden in the new building.
The doctors began seeing patients
June 25 at the new building.
Crime
continued from page 1
browsers of a recent crime on cam-
pus.
"If we had a crime that occurred
on campus, and we were lacking in
information, we can post the crime
on the Alert page, and hopefully
someone who saw the specific inci-
dent can help us in our investiga-
tion said Jordan.
As anyone with a computer can
access this site anonymously, there
is always the possibility of false
reports or pranks.
'There's always an opportunity
for a prank said Jordan. "We just
get the information and follow up on
it, and if we find out that it's not
truthful, then we just let it go
The police department normally
receives reports from students or
faculty who happen to be victims
rather than witnesses of a crime,
such as theft, and so the department
is often left wirh nothing to go on.
"Chances are, when a crime occurs,
there is somebody there who will
witness it, and the crime tip page
can be to our benefit and help us
solve these crimes said Jordan.
"If (the crime tip page only
solves one case it will have served its
purpose said Jordan.
HOT TUB
RENTALS
2 - 4 AND 6 PERSON
SPAS AVAILABLE BY
THE DAY, THE WEEK
OR WEEKEND.
All prices include
delivery , setup and pickup.
(all 5S-04S(
YOU DEMAND POWER,
SPEED, AND MOBILITY.
� it
cash back
Power Macintosh"6500225
323GB12XCD33.6 Modem
MultiDle Scar, isAVL2Kbd
Now $V77 (or $�taonth)
$200
t
cash back
Macintosh 7300200
322G8i2XCDMult'ple Scan isAV(not as pictured)
LzEthemetfKbd
NoK�$2�Jofcr$55Mionlrir
cash back
Power Macintosh 5400200
32i.6GBi2XCDBuilt-in displayEthemetKbd
Now $1,717 (or $33month)
Save another
$50
cash back
Color StyteWriter 4500
Now $317
WANT SOME CASH
TO GO WITH THAT?
Now is the right time to get an Apple Power Macintosh or PowerBook.
Because in addition to getting the computer that lets you do more than
you can imagine, you can save big time. For a limited time, students are
eligible for special cash rebates.
This is a limited time rebate coupon offer. See your Apple campus
reseller today for complete details.
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Hours: 7:3oam-5:oopm
(919) 328-6731 � www3tudentsteres.ecu.e-lu
"Offer extras October o, 1997 Ho payment of Interest win be required for 90 dart. Interest accruing during the oodav period will be added to the principal and will bear interest,
which wiV be included in the repayment schedule. For eumpre, the month of May c, 1997, had an interest rate of 1240 with an Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of 13.82V A month-
ly payment of S�2 58 for the Powe Macintosh 6�,oot2s system is an estt-nsie based on a total loan amount of S2.a46.81. whkh Includes a sample purchase price of $2,277 and a
6 loan origination fee. Interest is variable based on (he Prime Rate as taporied on the 5th business day of the month in The Wall Street Journal phis a spread of 3.9. The Apple
Computer Loan rtas an 8-year loan term with no prepayment penalty and is subject to credit approval. Mouthty payments may vary depending on actual computer system prices, total
nts, state and local sales Uaifs and a chance in the monthly variable interest rate. 61997 Apple Computer, inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo. Mac, Macintosh,
J, Power Macintosh and StvteWrfter are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. OneScanner and Quick Take are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Apple mail-in rebate
i from July 12, 1997 through October 10, 1997, while supplies last and subject to availability. Void where pohbir.cd by taw. Sac participating reseller for further rules and
details All Macintosh ton-outers are designed to be accessible to Individuals with disability. To learn more (U.S. only). UK 800000-7808 or TTY 800-755-0601-
m
Average annual compound t
YOU'RE LOOKING AT TWO COMPLETELY
OPPOSITE, FUNDAMENTALLY DIFFERENT WAYS TO
INVEST IN STOCKS. WE RECOMMEND BOTH.
Whether you want a lurid that selects
specific stocks, or one that covers the
market, we're on the same page. Our CREF
Growth and CREF Equity Index Accounts
use two distinct strategies lor investing in the
stock market, but both aim to provide what
every smart investor looks tor: long-term
growth that outpaces inflation0
The CREF Growth Account searches
for individual companies that we believe
are poised lor superior growth, it- i ontrast,
the Equity Index Account looks loi more
MMnmmnnnBm
with
a portfolio that
seeks lo muror the
experient e ol the
MMW
W W M
diversification
U.S. stock market as a whole.
Like our CREF Stock Account, the largest
singly managed equity kind in America?00 and
our Global Equities Account, which actively
seeks opportunities
worldwide, our
accounts are managed
by experienced
investment professionals. They're the same
experts who have helped make II A-CREF
ihe largest pension system in the world, with
Sl'H) billion in assets under management.
To find out more about building your
portfolio �and your future � with 1 1AA-
CREF just call 1 800 8-12-2776. And take
your pick.
Visit us on the Internet at www.tiaa-cref.org
V
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.
"Thrmi.il return, hown lo, I HI I
ihr acoountr. mil limn i.
nveatnaeni ' -
Retm .11- i snnun �
aaactl under negeraei i I
inilmliiu chargi
nun- in.I thl I








f
�M
�l
5 Thursday, September 11. 1997
eastcearolinian
AMV L.ROYSTRR Editor
CKI.KSTK Wll.SON Managing Eduor
MATT HkCJK ArtonrsmjOiiKtor AMANDA Ross SportsEdirar
jACgi'KI.INK D. KKl.LI'M taw Editor TRACT l-MBACH Assistant Sports Editor
AMANDA AUSTIN felt Han Hit DAVID SOI"l'HKRI.AND ftctfeaion Maftetjtr
ANDY Tl'RNKR lrha�l�Editor CAROLE MKHI.K HtadCopyEditor
John Davis Assistant utastyli Editor John murphy Staff illustrator
HKATHER Bl'RGKSS Wire Editor
Sanrai At ECU aamntri wra 825. so En bmimn fiitatm C OT ctipiB w�( fceiir, ml lWi)�r Tt� iwi e4iw� it i� Kimor a ��
raw�ottaEaraiagrtfrEaiCinliMialnmitnisBriha.ta
Crtmni newt e niM �tdn or njn Mb lor intfcma � fans mw to 7�l Lrni stagM � hMmim � atawn rtw. Ai Eat
Can. PutHciron tuUai. ECU. Grew. 2B684353 For nhraaun. can 98.321.5386.
opinion
The Eett Carolinian
oumew
The ECU Police Department is looking to the World Wide Web as a way of getting additional
information about crimes and perpetrators of crime. The department hopes students and oth-
ers who are hesitant to report crimes over the telephone or in person will be more likely to pro-
vide information anonymously over the internet. But will this new tool be a benefit to scared
victims of crimes or will result in unnecessary harassment of innocent citizens?
The Web has a tremendous wealth of information. Unfortunately, it is often abused by people
who find satisfaction in posting inaccurate information. When this inaccurate information is
about a movie or a music group, for instance, it is likely only to be a mere nuisance to those
involved. But when inaccurate information is posted about a person's alleged criminal actions,
much more is at stake. Their life, as they know it, is at stake. Their credibility is at stake. If an
innocent suspect is arrested at their place of employment, they may be cleared by authorities,
but their employers and co-workers will remain suspicious regardless.
Reporting crimes over the Web is incredibly convenient. Convenience often leads carelessness.
It's easy, little to do, little to think about. Practical jokers have it right there at their fingertips
� and college students are apt to pull a prank if it's so easy. There's very little risk involved for
them. You'll get caught if you file a false report in person. Over the telephone, it could be traced
back to you. But on the information highway, there's no trail. It's easy. No risk. The only risk is
for the person whose life will be interrupted by someone else's idea of a joke.
Computer technology has been beneficial in innumerable ways. The world's right there on the
screen. But it also has made it easy for us to not be accountable for our actions. In the end, will
justice be served?
OPINION
Mary
.AEBB
Columnist
Journalist, paparazzi not one in same
A reputable newspaper like
the Los Angeles Times is
quite different from a tabloid
like The Enquirer, yet
both are within the same con-
text of print journalism. And
both are being blamed
for the tragic events leading
up to the death of Princess
Diana.
My significant other called me from
Japan, which is where he lives.
"Journalists are the scum of the
earth he bellowed into the phone.
He was, of course, reacting to the
death of Princess Diana and had, like
everyone else, painted the entire
media population with the same
brush.
"Do you really have to make this
disgusting stuff your career?" he
pleaded, forgetting that I'm graduat-
ing this fail and that journalism is my
passion. It took some time to con-
vince him that the media is a huge
entity with different components and
that it should be treated as such.
First and foremost, there are vari-
ous fields of media, starting with elec-
tronic media which covers television,
radio and the internet. Print journal-
ism and public relations are the other
two aspects. Within these divisions
are intricate distinctions themselves.
A reputable newspaper like the Los
Angeles Tunes is quite different from a
tabloid like The Enamrer, yet both are
within the same context of print jour-
nalism. And both are being blamed�
directly as well as indirectly�for the
tragic events leading up to the death
of Princess Diana.
What explains the extreme anger
and deep resentment people all over
the world have developed toward any-
one remotely connected to the
media? Some of it is definitely war-
ranted, because just like any other
profession, the media also has its
share of unethical employees.
However, obvious facts connected to
the accident are being pushed aside.
Not enough people are paying atten-
tion to evidence that the driver was
allegedly drunk, that he was speeding
and that Diana and Dodi were not
wearing their seatbelts.
Politicians and entertainment
stars are now ranting and raving about
their own loss of privacy. They conve-
niently forget that they manipulate
the press for their personal agendas
when it suits them. Every person
cherishes the basic right of privacy,
but the fact remains that the media
fulfills a service that is demanded and
dictated by the public. If the public
was not interested in Princess Diana,
believe me, no journalist or photogra-
pher would have bothered following
her around. They would not have
hidden in bushes, ready to jump out
the moment she appeared; they
would not have followed her to chari-
ties and functions and, above every-
thing else, they would not have tail-
gated her car, causing the fatal crash.
The world has lost a beautiful
princess and the media has tost a
superstar. It is not a time to point fin-
gers. It's a time to reflectand to
learn.
ft
uke
a�tfff
LETTER
�to the Editor
City Council candidate expresses view s
I am writing in response to Jason
Williams' recent letter to the editor in
which he discusses one of
Counci (woman Inez Fridley's many
conflicts of interest. Yes, there is merit
to the argument that she has a finan-
cial conflict with the horrid parking
situation at ECU. And it is also true
that she recently appointed her boss
(the Chancellor) to the Community
Appearance Commission. Why do I
say this? Because I am the former
member and current City Council
candidate which she dropped in order
to increase the board to five ECU
cniploycc-incmljers � including the
chairperson and council liaison. It's
not illegal�just unethical, since our
boards and commissions are supposed
to be representative of the population
� not one group.
So what was lost with my replacement
Chancellor Eakin? For starters, the
$60,000 Department of
Transportation grant completion of
Purple and Gold on Highway 11 from
Carolina East Mall to the airporr in
honor of Dr. Leo Jenkins. This has
been my main goal on the commis-
sion. We began this project in front of
Pitt Community College two years
ago and 1 do not feel the city will com-
plete it now.
Secondly, while I was chairman of the
Landscape Committee, wc propped
a giant Greenville and ECU Pirates
logo on the overpass entering
Greenville. This was planned to be
ready by the ECU-Carolina football
game here. The DOT agreed to fund
this, but the project is in hiatus
because certain city officials don't
want to take care of it. The irony of all
this is that the football field is being
named after my college roommate in
two weeks. It proves bureaucrats want
your money, not your input.
So, now you have a few reasons why I
Ma
am a candidate for City Council $g
District 4 (College Hill Brivfi
District). Obviously, your vote on
4 will determine the quality of yoiS
life the next two years. I question wSJJ
ECU needs five employees on a ciJJ
goverment commission. By the wag
the Chancellor didn't even show u
for his first meeting. We have reaches
gridlock in the government by artotgg
er special interest group tod by Mop
Fridtey! She has tied up this commit
sion for nine months, worried abojg
whether property owners should ha�
the right to cut down a tree on thew
own land. When Mrs. Fridlcy said slS
represented the students and homtS
owners of ECU, you can believe that J
you also believe a warden represent
inmates. S
��
m
Van Brown
City Council Candidate, Distrk
ECU alumnus
LETTER
to the Editor
Student opposes TRNA, ordinance
I am writing in defense of your cov-
erage of Greenville's harsh occupan-
cy law. Please keep up the good
work! Every citizen and student has a
right to know and to act in this year's
elections to have this law changed. I
found the recent letter to the editor
by Cheryl Ridder, the president of
the Tar River Neighborhood
Association, both misleading and dis-
turbing.
In her letter she claims, "this type of
ordinance is routine in other cities I
think that she is misleading because
only a handful of cities in North
Carolina have such an ordinance and
Greenville and New Bern have the
lowest in the state by evicting more
than three unrelated people.
Secondly, does the Tar River
Neighborhood Association really
expect us to believe that their orga-
nization wants to make things better
for renters? They should explain that
to all of the people who have been
evicted over the years. Tell them that
you are acting in their best interest.
TEC should not let people like
Ridder try to intimidate them
because this is not an issue to "polar-
ize the neighborhood I believe that
the people who support Greenville's
three-person occupancy law as it
stands, which allows anonymous
phone calls to put inspectors in your
house, are a small minority. My opin-
ion is that you can probably find this
small group of fanatics in the TRNA
or on Inez Fridley's campaign. But,
no younger person in their right mind
would support rhc TRNA or
Fridley's campaign and I believe it
would take an older person with a
very cruel and bitter heart to support
either as long as this law remains. If
either one wanted our support, they
should have changed this law to four
people a long time ago. I'm for Steve
McLawhorn for City Council and I
encourage your readers to register to
vote now and for everyone with a
heart to show up on election day this !
year. �
t
Joy Williamson
Sophomore, Professional Acting
PI RATES a
e stree
a
Those who experience battle and death
inevitably learn to speak
plainly. If you don't tell the truth,
you can end up with a pile of
bodies in a sea of blood
Alexander Lebed, Russian politician, 1995
How do you feel about
giving the ECU police
crime tips via
the internet?
I think it is good because I would want to
be anonymous.
Jaimia Barron
Nursing
Freshman
Great idea. Gives students direct link with
campus police.
Uw Denning
Construction Management
Senior
I don't feel that it would be safe because you could be
easily exposed off of the internet.
Padej Yakamna
International Business
Junior
If it is anonymous I really don't see a problem with it,
expecially jf it is something that could help solve a
crime.
Windy Best
Psychology
Freshman
����"�
1





f
6 Thursday. September 11, 1997
comics
LAKE IMP USA
IMIE HOT tiWOet. WtZL
SARA U.A?
AS A "PAKTRlPe Hsue.
Ear tone Mote
cteArtf
ex.mm mar can &
iwwe m ALeetfw teen
uo none ozibML idcas,
�'a� NEU AV.T ueNce,
tlO H�Bt FOB. MkliOki.
by John Murphy
6��to TS� SUMP THAT I
AM I SHOULD eeHi-i
084T4W F60AI
TH� STUFF.
w " i
MasterCard
��
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
across .
1 Warsaw resident
5 Writing
instruments
9 Ms. Hatcher of
TV
13 Bard's river
14 Neighborhood
15 Martini garnish
17 Remitted
18 "High Noon'star
20 Sternutation
22 Grease
23 Monster's loch
24 Highway
26 Sharp taste
28 Private
32 Play
35 Pie � mode
36 Senator �
Thurmond
38 Bikini
40 Peel
42�throat
44 Toledo's
waterfront
45 Forum wear
47 Side dish
49 Perform
50 Musical time
52 Famous people
54 Desert tree
56 Verne's captain
57 Kitchen or cigar
end
60 Obtain
62 Think through
66 Base
69 Capital of Italia
70 Photographer's
solution
71 Poet Miflay
i2iriHIr1r' I1Iftit" �
1314is16
1718
20 I2122�23
242627n
313234
353637j3839
464142�44
is474840
50515253
mm"5556
57591 67�6162636465
6616869
7017172
I"r75
9 Also
10 Lengthen
11 Mature
12 Currier and �
16 Hesitation
sounds .
19 Attired
21 Menageries
25 Cupid's missiles
27 New Deal initials
28 Play role
29PoetT.S.
30 Stove
31 Navigation
equipment
33 Ethical
34 Wonderland girt
37 Casaba
39 Allows
41 Wet down
43 Fatherly
46 Health farm
48 Titled woman
Answers from Tuesday
I. R THA LD A9JD AD A
72 rlumDing -py. E bHR �o oB 1 DO L
problem A w �� c aHc 0IG sJV Oli
73 Woman s y i: 6 P HA NTp'P O RE S
74 Stagger ���N E BOMINUREsj
75 Gels �lcf� O T Cj
A LJcUppiTE T T E R O ElfT Asli
kjikb�en0 L 1 H T H 3tIsI
���aIs tar
� M A T E7jANjE a rTdJgo
BsPINE T I
C H1 H AMQ ?Til H 1 ST S
T oL AIBA R AtWa m 0R E
E VE ill 1 VeIt e pE E
W Eo ;ac ede s sE N
DOWN
1 Goby
2 Kiln
3 The � Ranger
4 Comes In
5 Showy displays
6 Historic time
7 Pianist Peter
8 "� With Music"
01807 Tribuna Media Service. Inc.
All rights retarvad.
Moss.
Honey Nut
5 Easy Steps f at A
12 gallon
Harris Teeter
Skim Milk
M
I Dinner!
1. Stop at Harris Teeter and pick up a card
like the one shown at the bottom.
2. Shop 10 out of 11 weeks between
Sept. 10 & November 25,1997.
3. Spend $35.00 or more each week on one
visit. (Excludes alcohol and tobacco.)
4. Show your VIC card and have the cashier
validate your Thanksgiving Dinner Card.
5. When 10 out of 13 blocks are validated,
you are eligible to receive a FREE
Thanksgiving Dinner.
Ifs That Easy!
See Store For
More Details.
92-100 o& Dry Or Liquid
Tide
1012 lb. Grade A Frozen
Butterball Turkey
6 oz. Stove Top Chicken or Corn
Bread Stuffing
Two 14S oz. Cans Del Monte
Green Beans .
16 ozCan Ocean Spray Jellied
Cranberry Sauce
� 13 oz. Package Folger's
Automatic Drip Coffee
� X52S oz. Betty Crocker Sbper
Moist Yellow Cake Mix
Pringies
potato Chips
DELUXE
Deluxe,
Light Deluxe
OVeheeta j
Shells .
DELUXE,
VZ'Vloz.
Kraft
Macaroni & Cheese
2Ur.
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola
�32
Prices Effective Through Sept 16,1997
Prices In This Ad Effective Vvednesday. Sept K) Through Sept 16.1997 In Our RaWgh Am 9bc��
Orty.VveReaerve The Right To Urn Quarts
Jmi.ii)M i" if





lifestyle
The East Carolinian
T
?Dreviews Travel with adventure film series
Dar Wililiams
r:jEnd of the Summer
�V
� �
-
� i
EIGHT OF TEN
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Too bad all pop musicians don't do
pop as well as Massachusetts foikie
Dar Williams.
Her latest, End of the Summer, is a
beautiful, highly enjoyable listening
experience that maintains the integri-
ty and independent spirit of her cof-
feehouse beginnings, yet suggests an
assessability that will go a long way in
increasing Williams fan base.
Often those of the singersong-
writer ilk embarrass themselves with
overly introspective lyrics that sound
like little more than a pity party: I'm a
big drunk and pink flowers make me
cry. Williams' introspection offers
much more than shallow whining; her
lyrics are honest, human and pretty
damn humorous. In "What do bu
.Hear in These Sounds Williams' tale
Mrom the quack couch, she sings, "I
riSon't go to therapy to find out if I'm a
� 3 freak! go and I find the one and only
answer every weekAnd it's just me
and all the memories to followDown
any course that fits within in a fifty
minute hourand we fathom all the
mysteries, explicit and inherent
when I hit a rut, she says try the other
parent Through her humor she
reveals a lot about her self, without it
generating into pathetic psycho- bab-
ble.
Williams also gets at your funny
bone on the ultra-catchy "Party
Generation The song tells the story
of a 34-ycar-old party boy who can't
find anyone to play reindeer games
with anymore. A clap-your-hands-
like-you-just-don't-care dance beat is
accompanied by a chorus that's about
as silly as its over-the-hill party boy:
"Tonight we're going to the partyWe
will parry all night longWe are the
party generationSo have a seat,
what's in the bagParty on At first I
thought Wayne and Garth should sue
for copyright infringement, but I
swear I can't get "Party Generation"
out of my head.
Williams dedicates "If I Wrote You"
to the late Texas singersongwriter
Townes Van Zandt. Beauty invades
this song, its haunting melody, cour-
tesy of guitarist Larry Campbell, and
Williams gorgeous vocals nearly over-
come you. The lyrics would make Van
Zandc proud: "And when the spring
came and flooded all the streams, it's
like how you got the night you told me
all your dreamsAnd when the barn
roof sagged after an icy bout, it's like
how you shrugged when you knew the
truth was the only way out, but not
the only way Call them gulp-in-the-
rhroat lyrics, that's the only way to
describe them.
There are plenty more good songs
on this one, including the ode ro
teenage rebellion, "Teenagers, Kick
Our Butts "Better Things a Kinks
cover for shiny happy people and
"Bought and Sold a look at modern
culture that Williams calls her
attempt to get banned from Wal-
Mart.
Discover Dar Williams' End of
Summer and discover great music and,
perhaps just as important, a pure
I love my job
Shannon meek
STAFF WHITE
I am the camp counselor. I heal bee
stings. 1 tell children the heat isn't
all that bad (though I feel faint). I
explain, with bravado, that spiders
actually are our friends. I say "No"
to a thousand things. I make witty
remarks to campers about their
lacking canoe skills and splash
around with them in nasty lake
water that I secretly fear is snake
filled. I keep the peace among gos-
siping girls whose stinging words
s
Ufa as a camp counselor.
FILE PHOTO
fly around the cabin. I love my job.
There is something about being
trapped in the wilderness away
from the complexities of the mod-
ern world. In my dreams I am a
wild and fearless Amazon woman,
able to repel hoards of skirmishing
kids. But there is one thing I dread
from the minute its name is spoken
during Counselors' Orientation to
the day the buses arrii'e on the
campground: Operation run Week.
Operation Fun Week is a project
created in the sixties by several
philosophers who thought,
"Wouldn't it be groow to send
underprivileged children to a
church camp?" This is
a noble idea that, for
over thirty years, has
brought camp coun-
selors face to face with
a range of unsettling
experiences. I thought
back to the Operation
Fun Week the previ-
ous year when two
kids were caught with
marijuana' and when
the thriteen year old
girls in my cabin com-
pared their methods
of birth control. I was
less 'han thrilled to
"E JOB WGE I
RON CHERUBIM JR.
STAFF WRITES
The 1997-98 Travel-Adventure
Film and Theme Dinner Series
gets under way this fall with the
first two of eight scheduled exotic
trips to lands far and neat Some of
the nation's top independent film-
makers will guide you through the
famous and lesser-known areas of
the world's most interesting
places.
The films will screen at 4:00
p.m. and 7:30 pan. in Hendrix
Theatre at Mendenhall Student
Center. The dinners, always keep-
ing in theme with the films, will
be served at 6:00 p.m. in the Great
Room of Mendenhall Student Center. Your ECU
ID books you free passage for the film. Use your
meal card, declining balance, check, cash or credit
card to grab a seat at the all-you-can-eat theme din-
ner.
Three Countries in One Day
imagine taking a trip to not one but three coun-
tries in one day.
The 1997-98 Travel-Adventure Film and
Theme Dinner Series takes off on its first excur-
sion of the year on Tuesday, Sept. 16 in Hendrix
Theatre when Jim Cole visits East Carolina
University with his film. The Benelux Countries �
Netherlands (Holland), Belgium, and Luxembourg.
Leave campus behind with Travel Adventure Series.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARKETING 0EPT.
Cole will take you to a region of the world that is renowned for its beautiful
landscapes, vivid colors and hospitable citizens. You'll behold the beautiful
tulips in the Kukhenoff gardens of the Netherlands, the historic Battle of the
Bulge battlefield in Belgium and the charming little towns in the Grand-Duchy
of Luxembourg.
Cole, a producer of corporate training films and adventure travelogues, has
had his films warmly received all across the country
from The National Geographic in Washington, DC to
The Sunday Matinee Series in Sacramento, CA His
love for adventure and travci is evident in his work.
The theme-related menu for the
evening includes Dutch split pea
soup, Belgian beef and beer stew,
chicken with apricots and almonds,
steamed zucchini and yellow
squash, gouda cheese and egg casse-
role, dark pumpernickel bread and
three-layer chocolate forever cake.
Meal reservations must be made no
later than Thursday, September 11,
1997.
Navigating the Intracoasta!
Waterway
On Monday, October 13, S997, you
can experience the Intracoasta!
Waterway as you never have before.
You'll climb aboard filmmaker Ken Creed's thirty-two-foot
sailboat and cruise the nearby waterway from Norfolk, VA
to Key West, FL to experience his film. Along the
Intracoastal Waterway as part of the ECU Travel-Adventure
Film and Theme Dinner Series.
Creed, who has made travel-adventure films since 1982r
SEE TRAVEL. PAGE S
ECU poetry group celebrates 30th
John Davis
ASSISTANT I.IKKSTH E EDITOR
When he was an undergraduate, Professor Peter
Makuck had no outlet for his interest in writing
poetry. Now, over twenty years later, he is the staff
advisor for ECU's student-run Poetry Forum.
The program was begun by Professor Vernon
Ward thiny years ago in order to provide students
and community members an opportunity to read
and workshop original poems without having to
endure the rigors and academic atmosphere of a
poetry class. After Ward retired, Makuck replaced
him. It was Makuck who first convinced the SGA to
provide funding for the Forum, which has allowed
the Forum to bring in visiting poets to read and give
advice.
Some of the past poets who have graced the
Forum include Pulitzer Prize winners such as Lewis
Simpson and Carolyn ki.er. Most of the poets who
are guests of the Forum arc published writers. This
semester, for the first time, a graduate of ECU will
be returning to read at the Poetry Forum. Al
Maginnes, who has recently published his first vol-
ume of poetry, was a graduate of ECU's well-known
writing program. Other poets featured this year will
include Michael Chitwood and Harry Maxon.
The Poetry Fonim is a poetry workshop, which
means that aspiring poets bring their work in and
read it, as well as providing copies for the other
members of the Forum to look over. A short oral cri-
tique follows, during which fellow writers offer crit-
icism, advice and encouragement. Usually the group
numbers about twenty people and the sessions last
between one and two hours. A wide variety of peo-
ple attend the Forum, from students to professors to
members of rhe Greenville community. Makuck
acts as an organizer and general mediator at the
workshops.
Although there has, in the past, been an idea that
the Forum is stuffy, academic and filled with sleepy
poetry, Makuck strongly maintains this is net the
case. He feels confident that some exciting and
interesting poetry graces the Forum and, as a pub-
lished poet, is quite pleased with the amount of
improvement in many attendees of the Fonim.
Poets who are interested are encouraged to
attend this semester's first meeting which will be
this Wednesday. Officers for the Forum will be elect-
ed. The ECU Poetry Forum meets the first and
third Wednesday of each month. Meetings begin at
8 p.m. in Mendenhall 248.
CIA to display maps in Mendenhall
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
There's potential to get a big case of the "so
whats" at the first thought of Africa, A Continent
Revealed in the Mendenhall gallery. Maps? Why
should an ECU student care about some dusty old
maps from the vaults of the CIA?
"I think the interest h Africa is three-
Rwanda is one of the places that will be examined in
Africa, A Continent Revealed.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CIA
fold says Michael Toth of the CIA. "Firstly, ECU
has a respected Geography department. The his-
tory of mapping the African continent is also the
history of European understanding of Africa.
Secondly, any student with interest in geopolitics
would find the information on the continent valu-
able in light of recent world events such as the
crises in Rwanda and Barundi. Finally, in looking at
the lack of relationship between origins; tribal
boundaries and national boundaries imposed by
colonizing Europeans, one can see the sources of a
lot of these conflicts
Apparently these aren't Rand McNally
road maps here. Although these maps are on loan
from the CIA, they are also not "war maps
Instead, the maps include information on such
diverse subjects as agriculture, cities, climate, eth-
nicity, geology and population. The maps range
from antique maps from the colonial period to
recent digital maps. Some of the maps come from
the private collection of Toth himself.
Many of the maps from Toth's collection
couldn't be displayed here however. "The exhibit,
had the potential to be much larger, but due to
security reasons we couldn't display some of the
maps Lynn Caverly, assistant director of student
activities said. ECU did manage to get a sizable
amount though, including some very interesting
antique maps and a conflict zone map of Rwanda.
One of the most interesting aspects of
this particular exhibit is the fact that a former East
Carolina student is responsible for it. Stacy Russ
graduated last May with a geography degree and
was an intern at the CIA when she found out about
Explore Africa with new exhibit.
PN0T0 COURTESY OF CIA
the exhibit. "Stacy just came into my office and
gave us this opportunity to bring in something real-
ly unique and different and we jumped all over it
says Caverly.
The exhibit is part of the CIA's celebra-
tion of its fiftieth anniversary. The antique maps
came, for the most part, from Toth's private collec-
tion while the more recent maps were produced by
the CIA or acquired during World War II. The
maps arc part of the CIA's Map Library.
Africa, A Continent Revealed will be on dis-
play in the Mendenhall Gailery from September 15
to October 3. The gallery is accessible during
Mendenhall's regular operating hours.
September
1 Thursday
Con Air showing at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theater (through Sept. 6)
Pirate Underground featuring Masons and Russell Henderson from 8-10:45
p.m. in Mendenhall
1 - Underfoot at Firehouse Tavern
. Doxy's Kitchen at Peasant's
J, Screamin' Cheetah Wheelics with Hazies and House of Dreams at The Attic
John Lay at the Percolator
The Neilds and Micheilc Malbne at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
Family Dollar Pharohs and Satan's Pilgrim's at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Innocent Nixon with Pushwater and Nuazz Band at The Brewery in Raleigh
12 Friday
A Delitate Balance: Six Israeli Photographers and North Carolina to IsraelProject
(photography exhibits) at Gray Gallery. Exhibits will show until 924.
Count Basie Orchestra at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
Greenville Musicians Guild showcase at The Attic
Jump Little Children at Peasant's
National Healing Tribe at Firehouse Tavern
Athenaeum, Underwater, Eight Eves and Happy Annies at Cat's Cradle in
Chapel Hill
Angry Johnny & the Killbillies at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
The Chickens, Gumption, Friend Monkey at The Brewery in Raleigh
13 Saturday
Kemal Goat at Firehouse Tavern
Everything at The Attic
Hobex at Peasant's
Cole, Analogue and Bo Wonder Jinx at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Six String Drag, the Tonebenders, the Chickens, the Drovers and Tony
Tidwel! at the Brewery in Raleigh
14 Sunday
Bosco, the Slobs and The Scrapers at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Hobex, Kickball, insurgence and Kid Sister at The Brewery in Raleigh
15 Monday
Africa, a Continent Revealed exhibition at Mendenhall Gallery (through Oct. 3)
Writers Reading Series: Francisco Goldman at the Greenville Museum of An
at 3 p.m. and at Willis Auditorium at 7 p.m.
16 Tuesday
Travel-Adventure Film: The Benelux Countries at 4 and 7:30 pm in the
Great Room in Mendenhall
Dayroom at Peasant's
Zen Tricksters at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
Glory Fountain and Old Pike at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
17 Tuesday
Cigar Night at Firehouse Tavern
18 Wednesday
Jump Little Children at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill
Comedv Zone at The Attic
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event that you'd like listed in our It's Showtime
column? If so, please send us information (a schedule would be nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
J2

���.
�f
rr
r





8 Thursday. September 11. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Job
Travel
continued from page 7
takes you on a magnificent journey
right here in our own back yard. There
is so much to discover that you'll just
have to make a few stops along the
way. first, check out the Great Dismal
Swamp in Virginia. Then visit the
Wright Brothers Memorial in Kitty
Hawk, where you can see a replica of
the Wright Brother's plane taking off
from Jockey's Ridge on Kill Devil Hill
just as it did so long ago. Around
Wilmington you'll take the time to
tour the World War II battleship, USS
North Carolina. Next, there's South
Carolina's Myrtle Beach, and then
over to historic Charleston to take a
horse-drawn carriage ride through
downtown, where you can see the old
markets and Rainbow Row.
In Georgia, stop in Savannah and
see the Scottish Games and tour the
historic Tybee Lighthouse. In Miami,
play limbo and watch the bathtub
regatta. Finally, relax in Key West after
touring Ernest Hemingvay's home.
These are just a few o. the small
adventures you will have while boat-
ing down the Intracoastal Waterway.
Featured on the gourmet buffet
menu will be fried oysters atop mixed
greens with Remoulade sauce, stuffed
flounder, steak au poivre, broccoli
with cheese, creme rolls, and keylime
pie. All meal reservations must be
made by Wednesday, October 8,1997.
Theme dinners will be served at
6:00 p.m. between the first show,
which is at 4:00 p.m and the second
show, scheduled for 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are available on subscrip-
tion and for $4 each at the Central
Ticket Office located at Mendenhall
Student Center. Drop by the CTO to
pick up your tickets.
continued from page 7
13-year-old girls in my cabin com-
pared their methods of birth con-
trol. I was less than thrilled to live
through the heinous nightmare of
Operation Fun Week again.
My co-counselor, Tanya, and I
already had a preconceived notion
of what this week was going to be
like. I tried my best to look stern ,
baleful and to give off an aura of
pure meanness as the children,
accompanied by volunteers, clam-
bored off the buses. The children
collected their luggage, then stood
shyly in my shadow darkening the
grass. What I did not know at the
time, as I tried to imitate Hagar the
Horrible, was that these children
were going to teach me more than I
could ever teach them.
My first lesson was one in humil-
ity. It happened after they were
handed over to me with their
sheepish, curious faces. I looked at
their shabby, small suitcases and
asked, "Were is the rest of your
stuff?" Because of other campers
who were not part of Operation Fun
week, I was use'd to cutesy notes
stuffed in luggage, mounds of fans,
tons of bathing suits, smuggled
candy and radios.
Clearly this week was gt ing to
be different. These children had
nothing. I would soon discover they
would be grateful for everything
they had. Other lessons would fol-
low as each camper that week did
something or shared a tiny piece of
their lives disguised as a story that
touched me.
One day I was walking with this
small, emaciaced girl when I finally
questioned her about the huge scar
that ran snake-like down her neck.
"My brother shot me she said
simply, as if it were as natural as
breathing. "He in a gang, I spent
Christmas in a hospital, but I
strong Stunned, I took her hand
in mine. She seemed to not know
how to respond. The more her life
unfolded in her words, the more
grateful I became for mine.
Another girl swept constantly.
She would sweep and sweep and
sweep, as if possessed. I kept
demanding that she not do it and
she told me that her mama beat her
if she didn't sweep in her house. I
wrapped my arms around her and
prayed that God would never send
her back to that place.
I can't express how much the lit-
tle things they did meant, the small
victories. Children who had never
seen a lake before canoed like
pro's. Campers who were afraid of
horses grinned brightly as they
came in from their ride. The kids
even cleaned up the cabin as a sur-
prise for me.
Their childhoods were tainted.
Many did not have the warmth and
security of a loving milieu like I
experienced at that age. A child's
life should be light, airy and care-
free, but these children never felt
free to dance in the wind. Soon
they would be home. They would
worry again about where their next
meal would come from. They
would worry again about whether
their family would have enough
money to pay the rent. They would
worry again about having warm
clothes for the winter. But they
taught me that possessions don't
count. What you carry in your heart
can make you wealthy. I am the
camp counselor. I love my job.
Is your creative
taCent better than
this
Then you couid
be a Production
Assistant at
eastcarolinian
Jppy Within.
Welcome Back �
Members ofOmicron Delta Kappa
You are Cordially Invited to attend the
Fall Welcome Reception
Tuesday, September 16,1997
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Sweethearts, Todd Dining Hall
Dress: Casual
Please call student Leadership Development Programs
(328-4796) if you are UNABLE to attend,
so that we may update our ODK mailing list.
GET INVOLVED
THE ECU STUDENT UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE
DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE 1997-1998 TERM
QUALIFICATIONS:
Full-Time Student
Resides Off Campus
Independent
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Deadline to apply is Friday, September 12, 1997
Applications can be picked up at the Student Union
Office � Room 236 in Mendenhall Student Center.
For more info, call the Student Union at 328-4715
ECU
No matter what the season,
you'll be a winner at
iastbrook & Vi llage Green
Apartments!
Score a touchdown with our
roomy 1,2 & 3 bedrooms!
Hit a homerun with amenities like
FREE cable TV & ECU bus service!
Dribble over to visit us today!
WeVe serving up an ace of a
SEPTEMBER DEPOSIT DEAL!
Go Pirates!
Score the ulnnlns
tewhdewn with
Tar Qfrer Estates!
Cur same plan Includes
spacious 1,2 or 3- bedroom
ants, 24- hour maintenance,
fitness center, and clubhouse.
Come Join our team for a
winning combination
evervtlme!
214 Elm St ms
Greenville, NC 27S5S
(919) 752-4221
��V
Eastbrook & Village Green
Apartmente
204 Ea&tbrook Or.
Greenvie,NC27d5a
(919) 752-5100
J- ��;
ifis
iA&-

lii j, �!���! llll
rv,





r�
9 Thursday, September 11, 1997
ilestyle
The East Carolinian
Dr. fricuse and Dr. Earwick
are pleased to announce the relocation of
Animal Hospital
of Pitt County
CS9
From Greenville Boulevard to our new clinic at 107 TRADE ST.
(between Golden Corral &� Parkers Restaurant)
�Medicine & Surgery Small Animals � Farm Animals & Horses
� Boarding - Air Conditioned
6-0148 Niqhts & Emergencies 355-385
Nights & Emergencies
Forks names top paid entertainers

m m � ��. ll���???
CLAUDIA COATES
ASSOCIATE!) PRKSS WRITER
NEW YORK (AP) � In the paycheck race, Oprah Winfrey and her TV
parade of human triumphs and foibles has lost to Steven Spielberg and his com-
puter-generated dinosaurs. �
Spielberg, producer and director of The Lost World: Jurassic Plant, returns to
the top spot on Forbes magazine's list of the 40 best-paid entertainers � he
made $313 million in 19 and 1997. Winfrey is a distant third with $201 mil-
lion. � ,
Times have changed. So has Oprah. Her daily rare is much more tame, the
magazine noted in its Sept. 21 issue.
Special effects also brought George Lucas $241 million and a No. 2 ranking
� his debut on the list � after the re-release of his Star Wars trilogy.
And the author of Spielberg's Jurassic Park sequel, Michael Crichton, earned
$102 million and a No. 4 ranking, the highest any writer has reached.
"He's making more from the movie than he ever would from the book the
magazine said.
The rewards for star power are rising as the entertainment market becomes
more worldwide, Rwbes said in releasing its list Monday. Last year, Winfrey was
No. 1 with an income of only $171 million.
She and Spielberg had been trading first and second place since 1993.
Spielberg was previously No. 1 in 1995.
The magazine combined entertainers's two-year esti-
mated gross earnings to try to get a more accurate picture
of income.
The Beatles came in at fifth with $98 million, even
though they haven't recorded in more than a quarter cen-
tury, and Jerry Seinfeld was sixth with $94 million.
Magician David Gopperfield earned $85 million and a
No. 7 ranking. Tom Cruise was the highest-earning dra-
matic actor, with $82 million from Jerry Afaptirr and
Mission Impossible.
Some of the entertainers who fell off the Top 40 this
year were Sandra Bullock, Tom Hanks, David Letterman,
Luciano Pavarotti and Denzel Washington.
They helped make way for first-timers, including
comedian Tim Allen (No. 13), winner of a fat contract to
stay with ABC and "Home Improvement singer Celine
Dion (No. 15), who sold 30 million records in two years;
and the movie directing-producing team of Ron Howard
and Brian Grazer (No. 24), responsible tor Apollo 13, Liar, Liarand Ransom.
Other newcomers were pop group Spice Girls (No. 32); Michael Fbtley (No.
25), the Irish-step-dancing star of the movie Lonlofthr Dantr, and the writer-
producers of TVs Friends � Kevin Bright, Marta Kauffman and David Crane
(No. 39).
The payscale for
free speech violat-
ing hacks it $66
million.
PHOTO COORTEST Of MS.
SM0WMZ
WSFL Listener Appreciation Concert
screaming Cheetah Wheelies
Early Show - Doors Open at 7p.m.
also Hazies and House of �reams
$ 1.50 Busch Light Bottles
Friday 12th
reenville Musicians Guild
with Nameless
KosntoKve
Tfcree Foot Margin $2�� 32 oz Draft
Saturday 13th
Everything
With Special Guest
$2.�� 32 oz Draft
Thursday, September 11
Friday, September 12
Saturday, September 13
WfiSTi R i�QF

&��r,A
For more information, call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to students, faculty, and staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
WYDEIR LIFE!
CASE CL1SAE54 SWAIKQWIC
ALLIED HEALTH
B00KFAIR
T
Health Screenings
9:00am Til 5:00pm

OFF
featured publishers,
including
Mosby
W.B. Saunders
Springhouse
FA. Davis
Calendar:
Lippincott-Raven
Williams & Wilkitis
Monday, September 15
10am - 1pm
Lobby of the Belk Building
� 3040 Evans St.
Greenville, NC
Tuesday, Sept. 30th
919-756-7393
�jam. fcin i i !� �� i ��" � i





Ill' I ill III HI �
��
10 Thursday, September 11. 1997
The East Carolinian
Pirates hope to get on winning track
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
When Wtke Forest comes to town this Saturday don't
expect the players or coaches to be all giggly just because
it's an ACC team.
These players and coaches have seen all sorts of teams
come to town from all kinds of conferences.
7ust another team to me fullback Scott Harley said.
"It doesn't matter what conference they're in. It's just
another chance for us to go out there and possibly win a
game
Flanker Jason Nichols said the Pirates need to be roar-
ing to go against any opponent they face.
"It's just a game we have to show up for and be ready to
play, no matter what Nichols said.
Nonetheless, Wake Forest is a formidable opponent, as
they proved last week beating Northwestern, who was
ranked 21st. Logan said he's seen a lot of changes from
this season to last.
"The receivers are top notch Logan said. The quar-
terback has thrown for a jillion yards over there. The offen-
sive line will protect him. They ran the football against
Northwestern. That's the biggest difference between last
year and this year
The Demon Deacs quarterback Brian Kuklick was the
ACC total offensive leader in 19, averaging 223.1 yards
per game. He started all 11 games last year, completed 52
percent of his passes and threw for a season total 2,526
yards with 11 touchdowns. Last week, Kuklick finished
with 273 yards and two touchdowns against the Wildcats.
In comparison, ECU quarterback Dan Gonzalez started
1997 Comparison
DEFENSE
Rushing Yards Allowed
Average Yards Per Rush
Passing Yards Allowed
Opponent Kckoff Return
1997 Comperison
OFFENSE
Average Points Per Game
Rushing Yards
Average Yards Per Rush
Passing Yards
Average Yards Per Completion
Average Kickoff Return
four games last season, also completed 52 percent of his
passes for 1,222 yards and seven touchdowns. Against Sfest
Virginia he threw for 279 yards and one touchdown.
Logan said he is glad the Deacs beat Northwestern
because it is an eye opener for the players and fans.
"I'm glad they won last week because it got our player's
attention Logan said. "I know it's going to get our fans
attention and, like I said, I think it will be a very hard
fought footbaii game
The Pirates will tell you they need
this win, not just for a "w" in the victo-
ry column but a boost for the morale.
"It's going to be a big game for us emo-
tionally Nichols said. "It's going to
mean a lot to us to go ahead and get
this win under our belt so we don't
feel the pressure of starting our season
off 0-2
Gonzalez agrees with his teammate
and said he's seen this before.
"We're ready to get back on the win-
ning track Gonzalez said. "Starting
off 0-1 is something we've done quite
a few times since I've been here. A lot
of guys are really upset and are ready
to make amends for what happened
last week. We just want to give a good
Wide receiver Thabrti Davis ami the rest of the Wake Forest foot-
ball team will invade Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium this Saturday at
3:30 p.m.
PHOTO COURTESY Of WAKE FOREST MEDIA GUIDE
performance this weekend
Since Gonzalez's arrival in 1993, the Pirates lost the sea-
son opener in "93, "94, "95 and last weekend.
The Pirates will hit the field at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday
and will be televised on Fox Sports South regionally.
Pregpme tradition continues
JEREMY ANDERSON-
STAFF WRITER
: return of another college football
xn to Greenville brings another
fall tradition - tailgaring. It is a tradi-
tion as old as football itself, which
gives students, alumni, and other fans
a chance to relax and talk football.
While tailgating can be fun, there
arc also rules that must be followed to
ensure the safety of all the fans piling
into Dowdy-fickkn Stadium this fall.
"There will be a zero tolerance for
uncage drinking said Captain
Johnnie Umphlet of the ECU Police
Department. "You will be cited
ECU Police officials will not only
on the lookout for underage
drinkers.
"There can be no kegs or liquor,
regardless of age. We will enforce all
violations on these lots Umphlet
said.
The only lots that will be available
for tailgaters arc the Harrington Reld
Lot and the freshman lot at the Allied
Health Building.
The Athletic Department has cut
back on general parking this year, We
want the public to k ,ow that parking
will be very limited, Umphlet said.
The lots will be open later this sea-
son.
"The parking areas will only open
four hours prior to the game as
opposed to five hours last year
Umphlet sai .
Additional parking can be found
behind the stadium at Elmhurst
Elementary and transit buses will run
from the old Nichols parking lot on
Greenville Boulevard adjacent to the
Sheraton. However, parking in these
areas is not free and tailgacing is pro-
hibited.
The ECU Police is also asking for
vour help ro make sure everyone has a
good time.
"It would help us out a lot if fans
would not bring glass bottles to the
parking areas. While this is not
mandatory, it would help decrease
incidents such as flat tires Umphlet
said.
Time to pack stands, fans
Amanda Ross
A Srmiur
CoMMiHtiraffHrs mttjur
grdltifiir!Z It Dfitntkef.
skr is puriniifji a oA m u
Irlrtisiot sfiortsrtKfrr
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
They say hree's a charm. So I'm trying again.
For the past two football seasons I have begged, plead-
ed and gotten down on my knees to get students to stay for
an entire home football game. Since this is my final football
season as a student and as sports editor before I graduate,
I am trying this groveling thing one last time.
It is so important that students like you pack the stands
for the entire football game. That means getting to the
game alxiut 20 minutes early and staying to the very end,
ves, the end of the game, not the end of the first half.
Obviously, I'm not a football player, but it breaks my
heart when 1 see the stands virtually empty at the half on
the student side. Most games are won or lost in the second
half and most of the student body is gone before the team
goes back onto the field for the third quarter.
I know rnilgaring is a rirual before fnorball games, but I
have a challenge for all of you. Try not to get so drunk and
obiterated that you pass out before you even enter the
gates to Dowdy-Ficklen. Wait until after the game, after we
win, until you go back for more beer.
'hie Pirates need to hear your enthusiasm throughout
the entire game. As many fans know, ECU games often
come down to the wire, sometimes to the last play or last
second on the clock. That's what college football is all ;
about. The thrill of victory in the remaining seconds of the !
game. I just can't understand why anyone would want to
miss out on a game like that.
Those football players work their, for lack of a better
term, asses off during the week in the hot sun. They work
for hours, not just on the field but in the weight room,
watching films, and homework. The very least we can do as
fans is to support them for three to four hours on a
Saturday afternoon.
Now many people say, "Amanda, when it rains we don't
want to get wet They have this channel called the weath-
er channel, watch it. If it looks like it might rain, bring a .
poncho or a raincoat. And for you all you ladies, maybe less
hair spray and make-up on game day if it's going to rain, or
even a bonnet to deal with nature's furry. I'd hate for you
to go to a football game and not look your Sunday best.
If the players and coaches have to be in the rain, why
can't we? Rain, shine or "sleeting sideways" as Logan once
said � rhe fans should be in rhe stands.
I'm not one to beg, but I'll make an exception in this
case. Those football players need to hear the roar of the
crowd for four straight quarters.
So now it's all up to you. See you at the game.
R0CKIN' TIME IN THE EN0Z0NE
Tennis teams seek ace of a season
Melissa potter
STAFF WRITER
With a winning season behind them,
the men's and women's tennis teams
are pushing for the top of the confer-
ence.
Key returners for the Lady Pirates,
including Mona Eek and Anne-
Brigitte Svae, have built a strong foun-
dation for the newcomers. Welcoming
two freshmen and two transfers, these
ladies are going to put up a fight.
They're probably the best we've
ever had" Assistant Coach Brian
Jackson said.
Joining the team this season,
Jackson is haying to adjust to the team
just as the new girls have. By working
together, Jackson and Head Coach Bill
Moore hope to come out on top of the
other teams.
Physical fitness has been an impor-
tant concept for the ladies in promot-
ing a confident team. Their talent,
combined with strength, has given
them a season to took forward to. The
coaches expect the team to be com-
petitive in every match and have a
better chance of victory.
Placing fifth in the conference last
year, their goal for this season is a spot
in the top three.
"We just wipe the board clean and
go for it Jackson said.
With UNC-Wiimington, Davidson,
and Charleston breathing down their
neck, the Lady Pirates are going to
have to use their strength and deter-
mination to overcome their oppo-
nents. It's going to take more than a
few swings to win the ;e matches.
The men's team has several return-
ing players back
"Everybody's back Moore said.
SEE TENNIS. PAGE tl
EASTQUlOUMUMVERSnY �&
203 W.r4 Sp�tt. M�lic,�� B�,Ui�j � C��vilU. N.r.k CrolU. 27R5S4353 � Pko� �l�32� �7I
Dear ECU Student
USA.
Due to the stadium construction, the number of gates for fans to enter the stadium has been reduced
will List you to have a rod time and will be appreciated by those who will be work.ng the gates at
the game.
You fillina the stands at every home game is extremely important to your football team. WiflVyou
filfeg the8studemtion on" your feefmaking as much noise beginning with the fcn entrance to
the final horn is a big home field advantage for the Pirates.
There are a few times during the games where you can make a big impact. When your Pirates are on
defend hV 3rd down or ifVn opposing team gets to our twenty yarf line or closer to the
��. your defense know you aKind them by sianding and mrfmg so much no you en
beheard in Charlotte. Also, special teams will be a key factor to me success of the Pirates tfns fall,
eWryttii? meWrates kickoffor receive a kickoff. sttnd and get loud to support the special teuns.
We will be seen on television on more than one occasion this fall and have visiting fans atevery
game InTing lots and in the stands 1 encourage you to represent yourselves, your fbettaU
team, and ECU in a first class manner and with enthusiasm.
We are looking forward to playing at home in front of the greatest fans in college football. See you
in the stadium early. Go Pirates!
Sincerely, f
eve Loean '
Steve Logan
Head Football Coach
Fans will sit in each endzone in temporary bleachers until
the upperdeck is finished. Students should also enter through
gate 1 on the scoreboatd side with student IDs in hand.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
�i lfctiWw.l��.�'Ji�W.A�K�'lM"1 AnU�t�i
PIRATE
PREDICTONS
What do you think the
outcome of Saturday's
football game will be?
Richard Fikin � Chtmrfllnr
28-13 ECU.
"Pirate offensr gets on tract
Tracy Ijiubach � Assistant Sports FJitor of TEC
31-H ECU.
"The team is ready now more than ever to take on
Wake Forest for a home victory
Amanda Ross � Sports Editor of TEC
31-20 ECU.
"Offensive line does better job blocking for running
game
Celeste Wilson � Managing Editor of TEC
27-21 ECU.
"Cheering fans in a packed Doady-Firklen Stadium
help Pirates rin first game
Mike Hamrick � Athletic Dim tor
34-11 ECU.
"Pirate passing game comes alive as defense lines
to expectations
��.
� �� JJUtM � �if i ijw





yii A�
11 Thursday, September 11. 1997
The East Carolinian
Stadium makes progress
slowly but surely
Tracy Laubach
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Qowdy-Hcklen Stadium's new upper level is well on its
way to being complete as 85 percent of the addition has
been finished.
Henry YanSani, assistant athletic director of ECU, said
that at last, Dowdy-Ficklen is starting to look like a stadi-
um again.
fost of the precast is finished, as tremendous
progress has been made in the past few weeks, " VanSant
said. An exact finish date has not been set at this point,
tever, 1 assume that construction will not be finished
il the later part of the season
'Installing railings and lighting is next on the list of
things to do for construction workers. Once that is done,
the seats can be installed and Pirate fans will have an addi-
tional 8,000 seats to cheer from.
The new level, when complete, will have men's and
women's restrooms, four concession stands, and a souvenir
shop.
For this weekend's home opener against Wake Forest,
5.1)00 temporary seats have been set up in the end zones to
accommodate all who will be in search of seats come 3:30
Saturday afternoon. 3,500 seats are in the west end zone,
while 1,500 have been set up in the east end zone and are
designated for students.
Students are encouraged to enter the stadium through
The upperdeck. which will add 8,000 seats is 85 percent com-
pleted and will be finished towards the end of the season.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN GREEN
gate one, on the scoreboard side of the field. Gates five and
six will also be open.
"We can avoid lines if students will cooperate and enter
the stadium through gate one VanSant said. "We are also
encouraging students to get in early to avoid big crowds at
the start of the game
Tennis
continued from page 10
They've put themselves in a
position to take the second or third
spot in the conference. Placing
fifth with last year's lineup of fresh-
men and sophomores, the strength
of the team has increased with
their returning experience. Good
athletics, a drive to win and a famil-
iarity with the conference are cer-
tainly this team's assets.
The main competition for the
men is going to be coming from
Virginia. William and Mary, Old
Dominion and Richmond will be
their top contenders, while VCU
remains number one.
Returner and captain Brett
Rowley leads the team.
While both teams are looking
very strong, they would like to gain
another player for both the men
and women.
The tennis team is also
announcing its ECU Tennis
Tournament, to be held September
26-28. Six schools have been invit-
ed including UNC-Wilmington,
UNC-Ashville, Appalachian, Elon,
Charleston Southern and Coastal
Carolina. This lineup includes
some of the toughest competition
in the conference. There's no
doubt the Pirates will put up a
fight.
TRIVIAtime
Name the 1996 NL
pitcher with the
lowest ERA
(earned run average).
68seay$jstfj Dpuofjijmmsuuqupiy
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
A Home Away From Home
Inquiry Classes - Confirmation Classes
First Communion Classes - Spirituality Classes
Interested? Come Monday, Sept 15th at 7:30 pm or Wednesday, Sept 17, at 8 pm
Place: The Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street
( 2 Houses from the Fletcher Music Building )
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
PIRATE
POWER
Show your Pirate Power! Turn Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium into a sea of purple and gold for the home
opener between the ECU Pirates and Wake Forest!
Dowdy Student Stores will help by SLASHING prices
20 on regular price solid purple or sold apparel for
the FIRST HOME GAME!
Take 20 OFF all regular price solid purple or solid
gold t-shirts, sweatshirts, and golf shirts,
Thursday, September 11 through Saturday,
September 13.
Students! Don't forget your DOUBLE
CHANCE, Bitom & Am tickets for two
chances to win FREE Textbooks for
Spring Semester '98! Pick up your
entry tickets when you pick up your
game tickets! Play BEFORE kick-off
and AFTER the final whistle!
THREE DAYS ONLY
90 Off
All Regular Price Solid Purpk & OoM Apparel!
No coupon necessary. Discount applies to In-stock store merchandise
only. Discount not vaUd wrth any other offer or coupon. Sale prices -
do not apply to previous purchases. Sale ends 91397.
?��tpt.it.
Sept II
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Store Hour?;
Monday -Friday: 7:30 am � 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am � 3:00 pm
Centrally located on campus, in the
Wrisht Buildins, just off Wrisht Circle
328-6731www.studentstores.ecu.edu
Purpleville, NC
gOOKSIGNfffe
Backyard Brawl
The ICU vs. NC State Rrvarty
DavM StasletM S Christopher KkM
Saturday, Sept. 13
12 noon - 2:00 pm
Books Salt Priced for Sijninml





��
12 Thurtdgy, Septamber 11. 1397
Qnnrts
The East Carolinian
Soccer off to slow start as injuries plague team
STEVE LOSEY
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's men's and women's soccer teams have begun
their season plagued by injuries and troubled with losses
in their first few games. As of Sept. 9, the women's team
is 1-3 and the men's team is 1-2. m
"We're going through a iittle bit of a tough time, said
women's Head Coach Neil Roberts.
The women's team is suffering from injuries that have
disrupted their game. To compensate for the loss,
Roberts has shifted the positions of many of the players.
The season opened on Aug. 30 with a 1-0 loss against
Liberty. In their next game, the Pirates defeated Barton
in a 5-0 blowout. The next two games were tough losses
for the Pirates. On the sixth, they lost to Radford 2-1 and
the next day lost to Virginia 4-1.
"We're in a bit of a slump Roberts said. "We're not
playing terribly, but we're just not getting all the breaks
we could be
The women's team plays William & Mary on
Wednesday. It will be the CAA opener for the Pirates and
a game phat is traditionally won by ECU.
"We will have our work cut out for us against William
and Mary on Wednesday, but our team is certainly look-
ing forward to the challenge Roberts said. "We've
always played very well against William & Mary
After the William & Mary game, the women's team
will play Appalachian State on Sunday.
"The home rrwtch on Sunday versus Appalachian will
be nice since it will be (Women's Soccer) Parents Day.
Everyone will be glad to get back in front of the home
crowd Roberts said.
The women's team has more than enough talent to
cause other teams to worry. Since the season began,
many players have proven themselves to be aggressive
members ot the team. Forward Jennifer Riley leads the
team in scoring with three goals. Center midfielder
Courtney Jurcich has helped the team with assists. The
team's goalkeeper, Amy Horton, has immensely helped
the defense.
The men's team started the season off on the 31st
with a 2-1 virrory over Elon. Their next games were
Sept. 4 and Sept. 6 against the Citadel and Charleston
Southern. They were beaten 3-1 by the Citadel and 4-0
by Charleston Southern.
Next, the Rrates will play Virginia Tech on Thursday.
After that game, they will return to ECU Sunday to play
the Appalachian men's team. They are both games the
Pirates are looking forward to.
"We need to really have a good week of practice to
prepare for Virginia Tech and Appalachian said men's
Head Coach Will Wiberg. "We are going to get down to
the basics. We will take it one game at a time and focus
all of our attention at the beginning of the week on
Virginia Tech. Tech will be iooking to even things up
after last year, and we can't afford to have any mental
mistakes
The leading scorer on the men's team is Scott
Pokomey. The freshman forward has scored two goals so
far, including a last minute, game winning shot against
Elon. Also making contributions arc midfielder Brian
Denoo and sweeper Brett Waxer, who has started and
played every minuie of every game.
Both teams play their next home game Sunday, the
Sept. 14th against Appalachian. The men's team will play
at noon and the women's team will play at 2 p.m.
KINGS FARM MARKET
��wn.
"Come SeeUs for ?
Your Fresh Fruit and
Vegetables"
Open 10AM-6PM
7 Days a Week
Free
uv.Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE'
DC COMICS ANO MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 758-6909
MM
i
.�M,
You're invited to join a new group now forming!
Prcsbvteridia Campus Ministry at ECU
'CsM
Join us for great food, fellowship and interesting programs.
Weekly dinner fellowship meetings Kick-off Cook out
Tuesdays 6-8pm Sept. 16 6-8pm
At First Presbyterian Church
On the comer of 14th and Elm St.
Nancy Huslage, intern campus minister
Phone: 758-1901 email: nhuslage@catalogue.com
In addition:
Presbytery-wide retreat at Montreat
Sept 26-28
Mission trip to Haiti May 18-27
:
?
M
MING 1
OUNA
I
I
ii
man. kiwis
lEUNDERGROyi
wmmum
mamthird of nm
ALL DECKED OUT
FORTHESOIH
H
I
I
&
�HKllMIIORHIMia-HIM
THE HOMECOMING COMMUTE!1$ NON ACCEPTING APPLICITI9NS FOR THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES
FLOAT. BANNED CONTEST HOUSEHALL DECORATIONS. RING Aft QOEEN CANDIPTE
,Kim?t
FHWEKST
MStttHYARNI-WM-M
I1
II I I
IUES0AY 0CIQB�B 21
wmwum
MStam�WIIK
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR ALL
ACTIVITIES IS FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 19 BY 4:00 FM
TURN ALL APPLICATIONS IN TO ROOM 210
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
JB
SMNMUCniKRZ.
PABADE UNEUP
BINE! Ill U�
H0MEC0RRIN6PARMK
mm
�.
A MANDATORY MEETING FOR AIL CHWCT mm. mmmm
PERSONS AID HOMECOMING .fPHESINTATIVtS IN HMtt0"IMF00�U2f!�
THE MENDENHALL STODENT CENTER ROOM 221 "P"1HB1J-tcy mv
AT 7PM MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 22 HOMteOMIHB CWSIAMMBUSCEMENT M THE HALF
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSE ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY WHICH SHIM
INFORMATION. CALL 320 � 4711. SCHEDUU OF EVENTS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
HOMECOMING PACKETS ARE TO RE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT LEADERSHIP OFFICE. MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, ROOM IIS.
wmaicmn
BANNER CONTEST JUDGING
.�.ii. � 'u
� ihim
ftgm





.
13 Thursday. September 11. 1997
b)Of
The East Carolinian
tA ted te� tat AM All ttf ttb M Art All All
� Been Missing Your Comics? �
X Then Come To $&-�
�inAiT� ARF HCREt 1
t
f
HEROES ABE HERE!
10 off New Comics
Subscription
Service Available
Magic Cards 4&
Comic & Card Supplies
Large Selection of f
Back Issues
757-0948 $
R tAA A � W iH j 4A� ��
fPp fPH f f f ffrf
There isn't just football on the menu for this
weekend, many ECU teams aie hitting the
fields this weekend.
Volleyball - Friday, Sept. 12. ECU vs. Brexel (Pirate Invitational)
4 puro. anil ECU vs. South Alabama 8 p.m.
� COMICS � MAGIC CARDS
116 E. 5th Street, Downtown Greenville
Vblteyfealf- Friday $$pt 12. ECU vs. Libert
rrv noon.
i:

I
RetiaioTt zvitfi Power
Does it Exist?
�Is Anything Worth Dying For?
�Is God Knowable?
� Religion: Fantasy or Reality
�Can God Affect My Personal Life?
Dates September 1 1 t3i
Times 7:00 pm
Places OCe 10S8
Sponsored by - New
Life Christian Fellowship
Sieve HoH.itulcr travel
kh-vn AiiuiK.t to ftJle�rs
,u ul iiiiivi-rii!tij. He
11 illicit MitJi-iic ti i V a A
H � )� C -lir !i ami Hb tile
ilv.inmiii; p�wef U ilwir
All the Best
DON'T WASTE ANOTHER MINUTE.
CLINIQUE BONUS WEEK IS HERE.
RIGHT NOW AT BELK.
Bring out your best. With Clinique's collection of all-time-
greats. Skin care specialists. Makeup marvels. Spirit-
lifting scent. Plus a handy fold-up mirror for good-looks-
to-go. All, boxed up and travel-ready. An The best. Your
special bonus at no extra charge with any Clinique
purchase of 15.00 or more.
You get:
Deep Cleansing Emergency Mask, grime-fighter for oil-
troubled skin. Helps control shine, shrink pores.
Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion, skin's best-
loved moisture "drink
All About Lips, targeted treatment for lip-area skin.
Smooths, softens, de-flakes lips.
Transparency 3 Blended face powder and Brush, sheer,
subtle face-finisher. Sets and perfects any look.
Jet Black Naturally Glossy Mascara, lengthens, adds
lustre. Dresses lashes individually.
Berry Freeze Long Last Soft Shine Lipstick, lip-loving
shine that stays and stays.
Aromatics Elixir Perfume Spray. Clinique's classic non-
conformist fragrance.
Folding Mirror, a Clinique special extra.
CLINIQUE Allergy tested. 100 Fragrance free,
(with the exception of Aromatics Elixir products.)
The expert is in 24 hours a day: www.clinique.com
Men's Soccer - Sunday, Sept, 14. ECU vs. Appalachian State,
noon
Women's Soccer - Sunday, Sept. 14. ECU vs. Appalachian State,
�. UirtK.
I STREET III i
Professionally managed by
Pro Management of
Greenville
� 3 bedroom2 hath units
� watersewerbasic
cable included
� all major kitchen
appliances
� cable hookups in all
rooms
� phone jacks in all
rooms
� washerdryer hookups
� central heat and air
conditioning
Insert Local Tagline Here
CLINIQUE
Allergy Tested.
100 Fragrance Free.
��I�ft����!�� I
�� v
� V � �H
J





r
,
. - � � .i.
14 Thursday. SssttwBer 11. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL7S2-286S
AWESOME BEDROOM WITH
HUGE brick fireplace only $200 a
month at Tar River. Moving - Need
someone to take over lease ASAP.
Male or female. Call Shawn. 830-
6882.
For Sale
3
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM apartment
PNLY $235.00 per month, on Co-
tanche Street directly across from
hew ECU Rec Center. MOVE IN NOW
with $100.00 security deposit. Call
758-1921. ask for Chuck.
NEAT. CLEAN. MOM-SMOKER.
mf roommate needed. 3 blocks
from campus, unique 2-bedroom du-
plex. $232 plus 12 utilities. Wash-
erdryer, dishwasher. 112 bath,
central heatac. Available now. 758-
9672, Jennifer.
FEMALE NEEDED TO SHARE four
bedroom house. ASAP. 12 block
from campus. Call 931-0448.
HOOMMATE WANTED
for Players Club Apartments,
is $220 monthly 14 utilities.
Includes pool, tennis, washerdryer.
Please contact Jessica at 756-7539.
FREE UTKjmES, 1 BEDROOM. 12
block from camps on Holly St. Cats
allowed with deposit. Rent $306 a
month. 757-9387.
ROOMMATE WANTEDTO'SHARE
2 bedroom townhouse Grad student
preferred. Non-smoker. $250 plus
12 utilities. 353-6190.
TO
take over lease in 3 bedroom at Wil-
son Acres ASAP. Male or female.
$230 a month. Call Tracy. 758-9245.
. to take
over lease at Player's Club. CaR Mel-
issa Jones (Mgmt.) at 321-7613 or
call Derek at 413-0744.
ONE BLOCK TO CAMPUS AND
NEW REC CENTER! ART-STUDrO-
APARTMENT. -KITCHENETTE BATH
AREA. HIGH CEILINGS- $500 a
month! One 2 bedroom apartment
above Percolator Coffeehouse, $450
a month! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share 3 8R apt. at
Eastbrook. $160mo. plus 13 utili-
ties. Bus route available. Ask for
Shawn at 758-4385.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom house 1 mile from
campus. 13 rent, utilities and cable.
Nice neighborhood. Call Kim. 758-
2800. after 6PM. 830-9036.
ONE BEDROOM DUPLEX WfTKM
walking distance of Campus)! One
bedroom central heat and window
air. Convenient front door parking for
$250.00. PETS OK! Call 830-9502.
6'8 HOTLINE THRUSTER
SOJUASHTAH. 18 12 width. 2 12
thick, 10 months old. no dings. Astro-
deck $250. 9697 Morrow 3-D Re-
vert 151 without bindings $250. Call
Sean. 752-8965.
MAGIC THE GATHERING SIN-
GLES- Buy, sell, or trade game play-
ing as space allows. Call 752-1621 af-
ter 5:30 p.m.
LARGE SAVANNAH MONITOR
WITH cage, stand, lighting, and ail
accessories. $300. Call Paul at 355-
2372.
CARWATCH AUTOCASSETTE
ALARM, THE autocassette alarm is
an effective deterrent against theft of
your cars' stereo system and your
car. This cassette shaped alarm locks
into your cassette player with a dead-
- bolt. It can only be removed with the
key. Anyone attempting to enter your
locked car will be greeted by a loud
shrill alarm sending him on to the
next car that is not as protected. This
is the Hottest, no installation car
alarm to ever come out. Only
$29.95. For a free brochure on the
CarWatch AutoCassette alarm and
other fine Secjrity Products email fir-
iinSecOaoi.com or call 919-717-2453.
TREK ROADRACING-TRIATHLON
BICYCLE, bright red. 47CM frame
(for riders up to 5'6" tall), excellent
condition, 'loaded with extras, must
see to appreaciate. $300. NIKON
TE' CAMERA body, black, excellent
condition, strap and case. $200.
28MM NIKON lens. $100. others
available. Call Kip at 355-3180.
FREESTYLE BICYCLE FOR SALE.
Haro St.redder Super Deluxe, with
knee saver handlebars. Perfect con-
dition. $300. Call Paul at 355-2372.
COMIC BOOK AND SPORTS card
collection for sale, below book price.
Will sell entire collection or individu-
ally. No reasonable offer refused. Call
751-9072.
TVVCR CABINET PERFECT FOR
apartment or house, $20. Kenwood
KT-594 tuner. Kenwood KA-894 am-
plifier. 10- band equalizer, 2 Har-
monKardon 4-way speakers, all for
$200. Call 758-1686.
FOR SALE: COUCH, LOVESEAT,
and table for $100 OBO. Entertain-
ment center for $75. Chandelier for
$50 OBO. Please call Tammy or Cha-
rles at 353-2413.
MONGOOSE COMP MOUNTAIN
BIKE, Rockshock Mag21 Shimano
XT Shimano Chipless Fliteseat con-
trottech stem Nukeproof bar matrix
rims $575. Call Sean. 752-8965
CANNONDALE M8M MOUNTAIN
BIKE with JudyXC shocks XT V-
brakes and Shimanoe 535 pedals.
Also too many extras to list, worth
$1200. asking $900 OBO. Call Jeff
at 752-7109.
FULL SIZE MATTRESS. BOX
spring and frame. Perfect condition.
Price negotiable. Call Mel at 758-
5593.
Help Wanted
PART-TIME GRAPHICSMARKET-
ING ASSISTANT Detail-oriented
person with an eye for design need-
ed to assist campus Marketing Man-
ager. Job involves computer layout
and distribution of fliers, signs, and
banners in addition to general office
duties. PageMaker and FreeHand ex-
perience helpful. Applications avail-
able at ARAMARK office in Menden-
hall Student Center.
DJ'S WANTED FOR ROCK N'
ROLL Classic Rock and Alternative
Format. Must have outgoing person-
ality. No experience needed. Apply in
person or call for appointment, 757-
3881.
PAHT-TIMTMAINTENANCE HELP
needed to clean office furniture
showroom. Some lifting may be re-
quired. Call 931-6904 and leave a
message.
TEMPORARY JOBS AVAILABLE:
BRODY'S is accepting application
for saleswarehouse positions. All
hours needed up to 40 hours per
week. Ideal for students sitting out of
school, or for individuals presently
between jobs. Positions could lead to
long term employment. Warehouse
areas require some lifting. Applica-
tions accepted at Customer Service.
Brody's. The Plaza.
PART-TIME CHILDCARE NEEDED
two days per week for my 3 and 8-
year old sons. Need experienced,
fun-loving, energetic student with re-
liable transportation. Please call 353-
7446.
THE WINTERVIULE RECREATION
DEPARTMENT needs Soccer
CoachesReferees for the upcoming
soccer season. The games will be
played on Tuesday and Thursday
evenings and practices will be deter-
mined by the Coaches. For more in-
formation, contact Jay Johnson at
the Winterville Recreation Depart-
ment. 756-2221.
LIBRARY PAGE: PART-TIME. East
Branch Library. Weekday afternoons.
Up to 12 hours per week. Some fa-
miliarity with library preferred. Apply
at the East Branch Library, 200 Cedar
Lane (Library is located at Jaycee
Park). Greenville. NC. 830-4582.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department. FALL YOUTH SOCCER
COACHES. The Greenville Recrea-
tion & Parks Department is recruiting
for 12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the fall youth soccer pro-
gram. Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-15, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with some
night and waekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hour according to class
schedules.This program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please calf Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550
after 2:00 p.m.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S MEN'S
Stores are accepting applications for
additional Part-Time associates.
Work with-the new fall season's
styles in your favorite departments:
Juniors. Young Men's, and customer
Service. Flexible morning, afternoon,
or evening hours. All positions in-
clude weekend hours. Applications
accepted at customer Service. Bro-
dy's. The Plaza.
NEED A JOB? PLAY at day and
make money at night! Work nights
andor weekends and have your
days free with The ECU Teiefund.
Make your own schedule! $5.50hr.
plus bonuses! Stop by the Rawl An-
nex. Room 5 between 3-6PM for
more info.
SPRING BREAK! OUTGOING INDI-
VHH1ALS - sell 15 and go FREE
Cancun. South Padre. Mazatlan. Ja-
maica. South Beach Fl Guaranteed
best prices 1-800-SURFS-UP.
www-studentexpress .com
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS
WITH knowledge of Soccer, will
train. Must have transportation. Work
on Saturdays only. Call Rita at 830-
4216.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE aam great money. Confi-
dential employment. Call today,
747-7686.
1 CAMPUS
FUNDRAISER
Raise al! the money your group
needs by sponsoring a VISA
Fumtralseiron your campus.
No investment & very little time
needed. There's no obligation, so
why not call for information today.
Call 1-800-323-8454 x 95.
RUSH ALPHA OMICRON PI! Cele-
brating 100 years of Greek life! Join
us September 14-21. For more infor-
mation, call 757-0769. Ask for Jessi-
ca or Holly.
THANKS MAYA FOR A great party!
Love, your Sigma Sisters.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON AND
Alpha Phi broke it down Friday night.
With serenades, wine, and hors
doeuvres. you guys did it right. New
members, we hope you had fun.
Thanks Sigma Alpha Epsilon for all of
your work. Love. Alpha Phi.
THANKS. KAPPA ALPHA FOR last
Friday's Social! We had a great time!
Love. Sigma Sigma Sigma.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSU.ON. HAR-
RY'S was happening Thursday night.
Thanks for a great time. Good luck
with rush. Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS KAKI ON
MAKING your debut. Love, your sis-
ters and the new members of ALPHA
PHI!
SHANNON MEEK. CONGRATULA-
TIONS ON your new job at the East
Carolinian. We're so proud of you.
Love, your Delta Zeta sisters.
WAY TO GO BECKY and Julie! You
girls were awesome at Theta Chi's
bikini contest! We are proud of both
of you! Congratulations Beck on third
place! Love, the sisters and new
members of ALPHA PHI.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA WANTS to
thank Theta Chi for a great 70s So-
cial. We had a blast!
Other
THANKS. MAYA, FOR A greet par-
ty! Love, your Sigma Sisters.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH IS hir-
ing for the nurseries on Sundays
from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. Look-
ing for dependable and nurturing in-
dividuals. Child care experience a
plus. Please call Lori at 321-0299.
PIANIST AND BASS PLAYER
needed for Rock Band. Call Johnny
at 321-8993 for details. Serious inqui-
ries only.
Announcements
Greek Personals"
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLEGE STUDENT I
e
Doctors Vision Center is currently seeking a PART-TIME front
deskreceptionist for our Greenville office. Individual must Le professional,
outgoing, and have excellent people skills.
Must have computer skills, be able to assist in patient needs, and have
strong multiple line telephone skills. Billing and insurance experience a plus.
Must be motivated and team oriented. Willing to train.
Send resume with salary requirements to:
THANKS ALPHA XI DELTA for the
marriage social. We had a great time.
Hope to see you again soon. Love,
the TEKEs.
GAMMA GAMMAS: FRIDAY WAS
when you got your first clue, but did
you really think any were true? To-
night will be filled with lots of fun,
have you figured out which Big Sis
you've won? Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Omicron Pi.
THANK YOU NEW MEMBERS for
the roses. Love, your Sigma Big Bud-
dies! Sigma New Members Rock!
ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY, Inc.
Fall Social. Come out and socialize
with the ladies of Zeta Phi Beta
Thursday. September 11. 1997. 1012
GC. 7:00 p.m.
NOON TRACK ATTACK: FROM
Sept 15-Oct. 31 on (MWF) from
12:10-12:50 p.m. on the Student Re-
creation Center track. Dept of Rec
Services.
WATER SKI CLINIC: IN the Adapt-
ed Recreation, if you enjoy water ski-
ing, then you should enjoy this all
day outing to Washington. NC on
Sept. 13. Dept. of Rec Services.
GAULEY RIVER EXPERIENCE:
JOIN us on Sept. 26&27 for some
rafting at Gauley River. Be sure to
register by Sept. 12 at the Student
Recreation Center main office. Dept.
of Rec Services.
DodorsVisionCenter
L
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU MI .
$ � n TT �ti We Need Timbetland boob
C A S H and �ho�a Good J��.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Eraksffi Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking tot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door k ring buzzer
THANKS FOR ALL OF those who
came out to the first RCLS Society
meeting. It was a GREAT success!
The next meeting will be on Monday.
September 15 at 4:30 in Minges
Room 100 (The Developmental Mo-
tor Lab)
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMU-
NICATION Sciences and Disorders
will be providing the speech, lan-
guage and hearing screening for
students who are fulfilling require-
ments for admission to Upper Divi-
sion on September 15 and 16 for
students in the College of Arts and
Sciences. General College, and the
School of Art. Health and Human
Performance. Human Environmental
Sciences and Music. Screenings for
students in the School of Education
will be held Wednesday. September
17. 1997 and Thursday. September
18. 1997 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. These
are the only screening dates during
the Fall Semester. The screening will
be conducted in the Balk Annex
(ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic) lo-
cated next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Hearth Sciences),
near the intersection of Charles
Street and the 264 Bypass. No ap-
pointment is needed-piease do not
call their office for an appointment.
Waiting is outside the clinic waiting
room. Sign in begins at 4:50 p.m.
Screenings are conducted on a first
come, first serve basis.
HAW RIVER WHITE WATER: Join
us on Sept. 21 to go canoeing at
Haw River. Be sure to register by
Sept 13 at the Student Recreation
Center main office. Dept. of Rec
Services.
SQUASH: JOIN US ON Sept. 15-
Sept. 24 on Mon. and Wed. from 8-
9:00 p.m. at the Student Rec Center
court 8. Dept of Rec Services.
NORTH CAROLINA ZOO: AN-
YONE interested in taking a trip to
the North Carolina Zoo on Sept. 21.
needs to be sure to register by Sept.
13 in the Student Recreation Center
main office. Dept. of Rec Services
BIKE MAINTENANCE: SEPT W
from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the Brickyard
of the Student Rec Center. Dept of
Rec Services
eastcarolinian
classified
ad info
OPEN RATE-$3 for 25 or
fewer words
STUDENT RATE-$2 for 25
or fewer words
Must present a valid ECU i.O. to qualify.)
Additional words over 25 are
5Ceach
AD EXTRAS -Bold type is $1
extra 6 All caps type is $1
extra
Charges for extras are in addition to the
line ad charges shown above.)
DEADLINE:
4 p.m. FRIDAY for the next
TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY for the next
THURSDAY'S issue
ALL CLASSIFIED ADS MUST
BEPREPAID.
APPLY IN PERSON
2 ND FLOOR STUDENT PUB BUILDING
ithe 1 � �
eastcarolinian
;i
�iii.l .I m� , pi � i fi I -
'











r
Contents
Marching Band, Cheeiieading,
and Pee Dee the Pirate 3
Footbanpage 4
Volleyballpage 7
Swimmingpage 9
Soccerpage 4&7
Cross-countrypage 8&10
Golfpage 11
east(!arolinian
Amy L.Royster Editor
Celeste Wilson Managing Editor
Tracy Laubach Asat Sports Editor
David Southerland Production Minagsr
Carole Mehle Head Copy Editor
Van Naffer Cover Qastgntr
Matt Kece Advertising. Director
Amanda Ross Sports Editor
John murphy Staff I
Sanaa Dm ecu aaaaastli sksa ins. ttw isst CaaMsn seMskei IWisfgtoaBsvlBMfasvseiViaMtwSai
hMteatai Msfsa, ECU. GfMiMtt, 27S5K3H Far rtornuson. c� ttSJJUm
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
203 Wird Sporci Medicine Building � CumlWl, No.th C.rol.na 271)8-43)3 � Mum: 919.US-4570
Pirate
Football
Dear ECU Students:
This Saturday is your Pirates First home game of 1997. We will host Wake Forest from the ACC
(the only ACC team to play in Greenville since 1963), temporary bleachers have been added in both
endzones, and the game will be televised to over 8 million homes on Fox Sports South. All that's left
is the stands full with great ECU students to make Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium the loudest stadium in C-
USA.
Due to the stadium construction, the number of gates for fans to enter the stadium has been reduced
for 1997. This means it will take longer for you to get into the stadium and to your seats. To make
sure you are in your seats in time for a smoke filled team entrance, you are encouraged to arrive at
the stadium gates at 300 pm. The gates that students should use for 1997 are Gates I and 6 located
at the scoreboard end of the stadium. Your patience and cooperation during this time of construction
will assist you to have a good time and will be appreciated by those who will be working the gates at
the game.
You filling the stands at every home game is extremely important to your football team. With you
filling the student section on your feet making as much noise beginning with the team entrance to
the final horn is a big home field advantage for the Pirates.
There are a few times during the games where you can make a big impact When your Pirates are on
defense and it's 3rd down or if an opposing team gets to our twenty yard line or closer to the
endzone, let your defense know you are behind them by standing and making so much noise you can
be heard in Charlotte. Also, special teams will be a key factor to the success of the Pirates this fall,
every time the Pirates kkkoff or receive a kickoff, stand and get loud to support the special teams.
We will be seen on television on more than one occasion this fall and have visiting fans at every
game. In the parking lots and in the stands I encourage you to represent yourselves, your football
team, and ECU in a first class manner and with enthusiasm.
We are looking forward to playing at home in front of the greatest fans in college football. See you
in (he stadium early. Go Pirates!
Steve Logan
Head Football Coach
USA
Fjbi Can Wu Umwismy
m cam Ummmy tCjAMBOn-armtmmfAammM
got fall sports covered.
student Stores Is Your Headquarters for Official
ite Licensed Products, Apparel, Gifts, and More!
We've sot your ticket to Pirate Football.
This fall, Dowdy Student Stores Is a student ticket
pick-up location formate Football.
��
When you pick up football tickets, pick up a Pirate
Pride Textbook Giveaway entry form for two chances
to jmih-FREE required texlbooks for Spring. A winner's
ECU
:f�otbhLl
Ke Forest
namervill be drawn before and after each home
fo?3al, Same. Sponsored by Dowdy Student Stores
Centrally Located in the Wright Building
Mione: (�1�) 333t wwisvstittJMitstorcav.ccH.cdu
� trUtrt- 30 am - 7:00 twn Saturday 940 am . 300 pm
A Division of ECU Business Services
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
The East Carolinian
0 Wm
-

JayfeTtkyST' � � ,�

U U. !





Sunday
All day
NFL Ticket
On DSS
Free Food
32 oz Domestic
Draft $1.50
16 oz Domestic
Draft $.75
Monday
Monday Night Football
$.75 Southpaw
Tuesday
Live Jazz Night
ONIX Cigar Tasting
Wine Tasting
Wednesday
70's and 80's
retro Dance Party
Upstairs
$1.75 Imports
over 50 to
Choose from
Thursday
Live Music
$1 Domestic Bottles
Friday and
Saturday
Beer Tub Specials
Thursday,
FridayT
and Saturday
Dance to DJ
Will upstairs j
Marching band, mascot
brings magic to games
J E H S I N A STUDZ
TA8101Q WRITER
It takes more than a mean football team and screaming fans to
make the magic which occurs regularly in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. It takes a marching band, cheerleaders and mascots
to generate the spirit which leads the Pirates to victory.
As all Pirate fans know, at the beginning of every home foot-
ball game, football players come charging through two lines of
Marching Pirates to appear intimidating to the opposing team.
Immediately after the line-up, the band performs their pre-
game show. This year's pre-game show will include music from
the Star Wars trilogy.
"The pre-game show is a four minute segment that is
designed to get everyone in stadium involved in making alot of
noise, and to create intimidation for the opposing team said
Chris Knighten, director of the Marching Pirates.
The Marching Pirates worked during the summer on two
half-time shows for this season's fans . The first one includes a
wide range of music. The second one includes music from the
Star if'ars trilogy.
Throughout the musical performance, the band maneuvers
in and out of 20-30 formations during every show. Knighten
said ihe Marching Pirates goal was the same this year as in the
past: to play music which entertains and creates an atmosphere
of spirit for the crowd.
During football games, the Marching Pirates work closely
with the ECU cheerleaders to keep the level of spirit in the
stands high.
With cheers like "Hey, Hey, Hey EC you look so good to
me cheerleaders engage the crowds.
The cheerleading squad has added a new "mike" man for
tlie season. The new squad member is responsible for yelling
into the mike to let crowds know, line by line, what the cheer-
leaders are saying. The squad hopes the addition of the "mike
man" will help with crowd involvement in chants and cheers.
Cheerleading Coach Paula Corbel! feels this new addition
will help the crowd get more involved with the cheerleaders
and, in return, lend support to the football team.
Corhett said cheerleading has evolved over the years and
that being a cheerleader is a tough job. Not only does the squad
have to keep everyone in the stands enthusiastic, they also have
to prepare for various cheerleading compelions. This year the
squad is traveling to Florida to compete in the National
Cheerleading Association competition.
While the Marching Pirates and the ECU cheerleading
squad work hard a! generating spirit, no football game would be
complete without an appearance by PeeDee the Pirate. In the
midst of large purple-shirted players, sideline staff, over 20
cheerleaders and countless photographers, PeeDee the Pirate
manages to entertain crowds and support his team too.
A mascot may be the heart and soui of team spirit, but
being a mascot is less glamorous. CorbetL, who is also in charge
of coordinating the mascots, said the costume mascots wear can
be overwhelmingly hoi, especially during the first hot weather
games of the season.
To meet the challenging iob, there are four ECU students
playing the role of PeeDee this season. Two people are needed
for eaeh game to divide the job of playing PeeDee.
While not busy al games or in school all of the FVeDees
travel across Greenville, making appearances al birthday par-
ties, health benefits and events such as Rotary Club meetings.
PeeDee also works with various organizations raising money for
different charities.
Chant along with the Marching Pirates on game day Cheer for East Car'lina, Cheer for ol E.C We know we're the finest, Onward to victory! Go Pirates Cheer for East Car'lina, Cheer on for old E.C Loyal and bold, we're the purple and gold, We are the pirates of E.C.UVGfi 1 4 "Ml1
V
I 9H Hip ili�
(at toplPee Dee, East Caroline, s mas-
cot is trying to intimidate the other
team by showing some sword
(at leftlThe Marching Pirates show
their musical talent to pump up the
crowd during and East Carolina foot-
ball game
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ECU SID
The East Carolinian
A

�I Ulp
a�
i
� Ji�a
H�Ofl J�li'l'WWiu 'in' linn mmp�m
' t �'
' -l" �"�'Wq'WI'BP�� . i 111 �' ��-B���-�.





r

�1MII 1 I
Football tr
A M A N 0 A ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
This season, the Pirates are vviwvdering whether the
offensive liiie will survive with only one reluming
starter, whether quarterback Dan Gonzalez can pick up
where he left off last season and whether Scott Hariey
will better his stellar 1996 performance.
Head Coach Steve Logan knows this year could be
a struggle. With only nine reluming starters, he is con-
cerned.
This year. Logan feels his defense will really have to
step up and rise to the occasion.
Very pointedly, we're going to have to count on our
defense to win early Logan said at a recent media
conference. "Things are going to start out a little slow
is what my gut feeling is, and we're going to have to do
some defensive work and special teams work
It was that defense which ranked 37th in the nation
in total defense and led the nation in takeaways last
season. In 1992, ECU's defense was ranked 105th in
the nation, so in just four years the defense moved up
68 places in their rankings.
Due to graduation, three of the linebackers who
accounted for 321 tackles on the defensive end are
gone. But Junior Rod Coleman, who accounted for 52
tackles last season, says this year's defense is roaring
logo.
"We're up lo the chaUengeCnleman said. "We're
not scared�we're jus ready, ready to get the season
started
The offensive line has been a concern with only one
returning starter, and that is junior center Danny
Moore.
Moore says since everyone seems to doubt the job
the offensive line can do, it isn't hard for them to get
pumped up.
"It's not hard to get motivated when everybody tells
� III
delivers confident answers
you that you can't do it, you can't get the job done; it
makes you wanl lo go out ihere and prove yourself and
makes vnu chomp at the bit to gel out there and show
everybody lhal you can get it done Moore said. "It
makes you want lo work that much harder
The offensive players have confidence in their line,
and say they have the talent. Last Saturday's West
Virginia game was their first chance lo play together.
"I think they are a good group of players senior
quarterback Dan Gonzalez said, "They are really tal-
ented, but, of course, it's going to be the first time they
are playing together. I'm not expecting them to do
everything perfect
Gonzalez added lhal if they try their hardest, he
can't ask for anything more.
"Eventually, I want them to build some consistency
down the road, and it might not be there for the first
me but as long as they are trying their hardest,
there's nothing more I can ask of them Gonazlez said.
With the start of this season, Gonzalez, who filled in
nicely for an injured Marcus Crandell last season for
the remaining four games, says the rest of the offense
has worked hard for the anticipation of this season.
"We've put it in a lot of hard work this off-season
Gonzalez said. "I've done a lot of things personally to
make sure I'm as ready as I possibly can be, and I think
the offense in general has done that"
Logan is confident Gonzalez, who threw for 1322
yards last year on 90 completions, will steadily improve
throughout the season.
"I talked to Danny, and what I'd like to see him do
is get better each game throughout the 11 -game sched-
ule we have ahead of us, and if he does that then he'll
be the kind of quarterback who can win for us Logan
said.
One player who has proven he can help win is Scott
Hariey, who rushed 1,745 yards and is the nation's
leading returning rusher That figure set the single sea-
1997 ECU FOOTBALL SCHEDULEi
DATEOPPONENTSITETIME
Sept. 6at West VirginiaMorgantown, W.Va.L, 24-17 3:30 P.M.
Sept. 13WAKE FORESTGREENVILLE, N.C.
Sept. 20SOUTH CAROLINAGREENVILLE, N.C.3 P.M.
Oct. 4at SyracuseSyracuse, N.Y.NOON
Oct. 11SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPIGREENVILLE, N.C.3:30 P.M.
Oct. 18at TulaneNew Orleans, La.8 P.M.
Oct. 25MEMPHISGREENVILLE, N.C.3:30 P.M.
Nov. 1at LouisvilleLouisville, Ky.3 P.M.
Nov. 8at HoustonHouston, Texas3:30 P.M.
Nov. 13CINCINNATIGREENVILLE, N.C.8 P.M.
Nov. 22at North Carolina StateRaieigh, N.C.TBA
son record by nearly 400 yards established here at
ECU. N.C State experienced Hariey first-hand last
season as they watched him roll to 351 yards, which is
the ninth-best single game effort in NCAA history and
best ever by a sophomore. He averaged 158.6 per
game.
When asked what he will have to do to have the
kind of season he had last year, Hariey simply put it in
two wonis: same thing
Hariey said while he'd like to rack up just as many
yards, us long as he can help the team to victory, the
yards come second.
"I'm just going to go out there and play as hard as I
can Hariey said. 'Td rather have wins that a hun-
dred-some yards a game. What's the use of running for
those yards and not even winning, so I'd rather win
first, then the yards can come
Logan notes that it's not just Hariey's ability to run
the ball that makes him so good, but the way he pro-
tects the ball
"The main thing he did last year that no one really
talks about is the way he took care of the football
Logan said. "I think he had two turnovers all year
long
For Logan, he is interested in seeing how Hariey
will handle the title of nation's leading returning rush-
er;
"We're going lo see, now, how Scott handles this
leading rusher in the nation, and all this stuff Logan
said. "He's put in a lot of hard work last year. He's put
in a lot of hard work this summer, so we'll see
This year marks the inaugural season for
Conference USA, and the players know tkey now have
a conference championship they can compete for
"It's very exciting Jason Nichols, senior flanker,
said. "Now we have something real lo shoot for We
have a conference championship we can go out Cot, and
if we play right and win the right games, we can win.
So, it's not so much of the pressure of the years before
as having to go out and win every game lo get into a
bowl game. I'm not saying we're not trying to win more
games but now that we have the right games, that we
have to win, if we take care of that we can still get in
Women's soccer returns with experience
JENSINA StUKZ
TABLOID WRITER
With 17 reluming players, the ECU women's soc-
cer leam is expecting a good season.
Not only does the women's soccer team have
17 players reluming, but il also has five new
freshmen joining the squad�Leanne Mclnnis,
Erin Cann, Katie Moran, Kim Sandehoff and
Jennifer Bush. Mclnnis, Cann and Moran will be
posted as midfielders; SamlholT and Bush will
join as forwards.
"I fully expect these five girls lo present the
team with losts of energy and enthusiasm lhal will
push those returning said Coach Neil Roberts.
Of the 17 reluming players, senior captains
Stacie Cause and Sheila Best will lead the team.
"The girls are reluming ihis lime with their
feel wet said Coach Roberts. "They know what
lo expect and they know what is expelled of (hem.
which makes them stronger
The hardest learns will be William and Mary.
James Madison and George Mason University�
teams Roberts calls the "kingpins of the CAA
"Having an upgraded schedule is good for
us Roberts said. "The girls seemed lo give their
liest efforts last year when they were playing the
For the
women's soccer
schedule look
on page 7.
p
Bring in this ad to receive a free
Herbal Teas,
Detox Products
Herbal Smoking
Blends
l qrafiix &
m Tobacco
! chill hp$
I
I
I ec$tacy
I
I
I
L
"a revolutionary alternative
that is taking the nation by storm"
-CNN Nightly News
Energy
429 S. Evans St.
919-561-PIPE(7473)
.on the bustling Evans St. Mail
Bring in this ad to
We also carry
blackliehts,
posters, decals,
tapestries,
beaded curtains,
incense,
hemp jewelry.
I
The East Carolinian
Monday Night Football
95B
$2.50
25 Wings
$2 dollar tue
$2 dollar imports
$2 hi balls
$ 1.50 Duttjygpjtipples
d & Miller Lite
JHTHI
cs draft
Red draft
s Ale draft
$1.50 fireballs
.�rx�; :��.���
ss $1.75 mugs
F5.95 pitchers
Killians night1.75 mugs $5.95 pitchers
752-BOLI � WE DELIVER
.
JZ
'��' mi mi.in
rftnmii iwi. i
UiM"1' JIILHPtfULM j I jiLiHWW�i � I ' JUU'ILJ






pm

Carolina East Mall will be
giving away two free ECU
game tickets for each of
the following borne games:
Sept 13Wake Forest
Sept. 20South Carolina
Qct uSouthern Miss
Oct.25 Memphis
Nov.13 Cincinnati
Watch the Daily Reflector for registration information
���e����m6 CAROLINA
t08rVB�L-J MALL
Belk, Brady's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria & 50 shops
Open M-Sat. 10-9, Sun. 1-6
Located on Highway 11, just 2 blocks south of Greenville Blvd.
.
a
� �mf'm
-??
�-weqB i' v x. t.ji-i'i . � -
�jjw-a��Mi � j in -�"m
-11. �1 �� � �"
yt )





RodCoteman
Travis Dar den
Kelvin Suggs
e
Watch
Defense
Rod Coleman�The Pirates leading returning tackier wilh 52
slops in , the junior linebacker also led the team in eight sacks. This proven pass
rusher is a preseason AU-Conierence USA candidate. With Coleman's size and speed,
opposing quarterbacks better learn to dump the ball early and not take a sack for a loss.
TraviS Dardeil�A preseason .All-Coiiference USA candidate,
this junior nose guard has started all 23 games at ECU since enrolling. Da.den finished
last year with 37 tackles and is a main threat on the defensive front Carden knuws the
position well and will bring leadership to the defensive line. He had five tackles for
loss and 3.5 sacks in 19. Last season he led the team wilh QB pressures wilh 11.
KeWin SllggS�This junior started every game at left comerback
last season and registeredtackles. This season the Pirates will look to use Suggs at
free safely. Suggs brings speed and quick hands wilh two pass breakups last year a
recovery fumble, and two irteceptions for the season.
Offense
ScOtt H a rley�He rdums as (he ration's leading rrtuming rush-
er after gaining 1,745 vards last season. Hartey broke several school records includ-
ing rushing for 351 yards against N.C. State. That effort represents the niruh best sin-
gle game performance in NCAA history and best ever by a sophomore. The junior
fullback has been tabbed the preseason Conference USA Offensive Player of the year
and is an All-American candidate this season. Harley will be vital lo the success of
Ihe Pirates and if he can better or equal the last year's performance, the Pirates
should be hard lo beat.
DannV M00re�Look lor this jiiniwcerter to be a vocal leader
among the offensive line. Moore is the only returning starter on the u0" line, and
already has teammates looking up to him for direction this season. He � also a pre-
season All-Conference USA choice.
Danny Moore
Dan Gonzalez
Dwisht Henry-AlthoughthUcorrerbackseniormiss.4alloflast
season with preseason knee injury, the Omference USA coaches name him to the pre-
season All-Conference USA team. Also a track team member, Henry has speed and is
capable of playing anv position in secondary. In 1995, Henry recorded 58 tackles and
10 tackles against Tennessee and Cincinnati. Henry's full recovery will allow him lo
chase down opponents.
Dwight Henry
1
ik
Larry Shannon
�3
Dan GonZaleZ�Afler getting the starting nod for the final four
games last season, Gonzalez has starling experience that should cam him through
this season. Gonzalez, a senior quarterback, rose to the occasion last year and threw
for 122 yards. As long as the offensive line can provide the protection. Gonzalez
should continue his success through the year.
Larry Shannon�True, rie'llniiss the first couple of games with
a seven sprained ankle and broken fibula, but the senior split end should still
make an'impact once he is healthy. A preseason All-Conference ISA selection.
Shannon, 6-5, will give Gonzalez a sizable target lo throw lo. Shannon finished to
year as the national leader in yards per reception last year (21.4). Once back in ttV
lineup. Shannon will prove why be is a Bilelnikoff Candidate for the second straight
Touchdown at
a Price
of Draft,
Every Monday!
Chico'
Mexican Restaurant
Catch the game
on our 5 TV's
Downtown Greenville 757-1666 jAjAlmits
The East Carolinian
i
�-fkv"
s
0M�
�U
ti!L�r '���' ����
"�





Experienced players key to volleyball wins
EllED Waike II
STAFF WHITER
Returning players, senior Kari Koenning, Kristin
Earner, and Shannon Kaess will lead the Lady Pirate
Volleyball team into a new season coached by third-
year Kim Walker.
Junior transfers LaKeya Mason from North
Carolina A&T, Toni Ninni from Western Carolina and
Shannon Ownens will also help out the team with
experience and skill. These upper classmen will help
in motivation and teamwork.
Half of the team consists of freshmen this year.
Although inexperienced, the new players will provide
upcoming talent and will also allow for a deep bench.
Although the team has many freshmen, Walker still
cannot assess who the strongest ones are�only time
will tell.
This is a solid group of athletes who have good
attitudes Walker said.
They are all really solid athletes
Only being at East Carolina for three years.
Walker is still trying to build up the strength of her
team.
"We're still melding, because we are such a young
team, but we will do well this year Walker said
about her young but very athletic team.
Walker has faith and confidence in the team this
year
They are fun to watch; they hil the ball hard, play
good defense and enjoy playing together Walker
said.
Main competitors North Carolina and North
Carolina Slate will be the ultimate test to finishing out
on top.
"We will do well, we get better every time, we
leam from previous games and, of course, from prac-
tice Walker said.
This young team will lake the time to get to know
each other In order to be successful, they have to be
close like a family is. The team attended a retreat also
gave the players and opportunity to get to know one
another's playing style in a more intimate way
According to Walker, these girls are a good group
who, most of all, enjoy playing together.
flif � A
lJL, - T
�K$Mfa�a?
(U Senior captain Kari
Koenning goes to pass
the ball to her team-
mates.
(R)ECU's volleyball team
discussing strategy.
PHOTOS COURTESY Of
ECU SID
VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE
AUGUST
29-30 ECU CLASSIC
SEPTEMBER
5-6 Coastal Carolina Tournament
9 Hampton University
12-13 PIRATE INVITATIONAL
16 UNC-CHAPEL HILL
19-20 Memphis Tournament
26 WILLIAM AND MARY
27 VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY
30 UNC-Wilmington
OCTOBER
3 American University
George Mason University
7 UNC-Greensboro
10 James Madison University
15 Elon College
17 NC STATE
24 Virginia Commonwealth University
25 William and Mary
31 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY
NOVEMBER
1 AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
7 ELON COLLEGE
B JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY
10 UNC-WILMINGTON
12 Campbell University
15 WOFFORD COLLEGE
20-23 CAA Championships
at George Mason University
HOME
Away
Away
HOME
HOME
Away
HOME
HOME
Away
Away
Away
Away
Away
Away
HOME
Away
Away
HOME
HOME
HOME
HOME
HOME
Away
HOME
Away
ECU men's soccer remains on the rise
'
TBA
TBA
6 P.M.
TBA
7 P.M.
TBA
7 P.M.
2 P.M.
7 P.M.
7 P.M.
2 P.M.
7 P.M.
7 P.M.
7 P.M.
6 P.M.
7 P.M.
5 P.M.
7 P.M.
1P.M.
7 P.M.
2 P.M.
7 P.M.
7 P.M.
2 P.M.
TBA
Jems in a S tuhz
TABLOID WHITER
If you are not interested in football, but you still want to watch
an agressive sport, come and walch the men's soccer leam.
The team's foundalion is based on one word, "Team This
word was chosen, "Because we lose, win, and lie together
said Coach Will Wiberg.
The leam this year consists of 20 new players who were
brought in last year.
Even though the) are still a young team they have set real-
istic goals for themselves. "Our goal is lo start (he season out
on the right foot by picking up some wins at the lop of our
schedule said Coach Wiberg. "I'd love lo see us go into a
game as the underdogs and come out with a win. Thai could do
a lot for the program as a whole.ln achieving these goals, the
leam will be ted by ils three captains: Jay Davis, John Smiley
and Bret! Water.
Other strong players lo walch are Wyatt Panos, Josh Sklat
and Mike Hoilowav.
William and Mary and James Madison are (he team's
toughest challenges this year.
Assistanl coach Chris Padgett and JelTOberg will also plav
integral roles in the Pirates' season. Oberg. a 1995 gradualale
of Virginia Commonwealth University, played four years as
goalkeeper of the Rams and was a member of VCl's 1993
team, which finished 15-3 and was ranked 23rd by the
National Soccer Association of America.
WUMEN'S SOCCER . �
AUGUST
20 University of Oklahoma (Scrimmage) HOME4 p.m.
30 Liberty UniversityHOME2 p.m.
SEPTEMBER
3 Barton CollegeAway4 p.m.
5 Radford UniversityAway2 p.m.
7 Virginia TechAway2 p.m.
10 College of William & MaryAway7:30 p.m
14 APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITYHOMENOON
17 Davidson UniversityAway7 p.m.
21 UNC-ASHEVILLEHOMENOON
24 OLD DOMINIONHOME4 p.m.
27 North CarolinaState UniversityAway2 p.m.
30 UNC-WilmingtonAway7 p.m.
OCTOBER
3 WOFFORD UNIVERSITYHOME4 p.m.
3 UNIVERSITY OF RICHMONDHOME4 p.m.
14 Virginia Commonwealth UniversityAway7 p.m.
19 James Madison UniversityAway1 p.m.
22 CAMPBELL UNIVERSITYHOME4 p.m.
26 AMERICAN UNIVERSITYHOMENOON
31 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITYHOME3 p.m.
NOVEMBER
2 ELON COLLEGEHOME2 p.m.
5-9 CAA TournamentTBATBA
'DENOTES CAA MATCH
(top) Stacie Gause looks to score for ECU'S women's soccer.
(r)Men's soccer warming up before a game.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ECU SID
-
MfJVS SOCCER �
AUGUST
31ELON COLLEGEGREENVILLE2 P.M.
SEPTEMBER
4CitadelCharleston, SC7 P.M.
5Charleston SouthernCharleston, SC2 P.M.
11Virginia TechBlacksburg, VA3 PM.
14APPALACHIAN STATEGREENVILLE2 P.M.
21JAMES MADISONGREENVILLE2 P.M.
24UNC-WilmingtonWilmington, NC7 P.M.
28GEORGIA SOUTHERNGREENVILLE2 P.M.
OCTOBER
4Campbell UniversityBuies Creek. NC3 P.M.
BNC. StateRaleigh, NC3:30 P.M.
12UNIVERSITY OF RICHMONDGREENVILLE4 P.M.
18U-Maryland Eastern ShorePrincess Anne, MD 2 P.M.
21Old Dominion UniversityNorfolk, VA7:30 P.M.
24GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITYGREENVILLE3 P.M.
26HIGH POINT UNIVERSITYGREENVILLE2 P.M.
29UNC-ASHEVILLEGREENVILLE3 P.M.
NOVEMBER
1American UniversityWashington DC1 P.M.
5COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARYGREENVILLE3 P.M.
BVirginia CommonwealthRichmond, VA7 P.M.
12-16CAA TournamentTBATBA
The East Carolinian
ii f ! � m





Girls run toward
conference wins
JSNSN4 STURZ
I4810ID WRITER
T� Ir successful in cress counlr; mie lu 1" have excessive endurence,
-heer moluation. and total I onceiilralion.
Having these qualities down pal �ill help the Lady Pirates achieve the
goals the) mat. Especial!) since thej waniliMlL.il.il Irtler lhan lhr did
last �ear. "We are coining off nur �orst car ever said (.oach Charlie
"Choo" Justice.
The cross country learn has a certain goal set for themselves fur the
upcoming ear. "I wanl us to finish at th- lop half "f the conference tht-
ear Jllstlre said .
Last tear, the learn finished seventh out of nine teams.
Freshman Iran Laltie. from Lumherttm. was state champion last war in
the one mile and Beck; Testa, a freshman from McDonald, Ohio, was a lop
runner in different events. "I'm entiled about ihe new girls coming in and
I'm anxious In rebound form last peat and put the team hack up.
S,me of ihe relumer- include (Captain kern Hartlinfi and co-captain
Erin Cottas. The other two lop stayers are Karen Reinlunl and Robin
Hah "We'll need five strong runners, and the kc is who that fifth runner
will je -aid Justice.
Ibp eompelilors for the war. national!) ranked Hillijm and Man am
Jamei Madison lnc.ep.il. mil reaH) test their skills to show if the; will
make it I" ihe tup or rail.
The ke to success, according !i Justice, is that. "Vie have to run (aster
and the girls have to have more confidem e in themselves lhat thc can run
758-4591 � 752-4715
For more info visit our website at,
netmar.comuserselbo
WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY
SEPTEMBER
Virginia Commonwealth
12 UNC Cross Country Challenge
21 NSCU Wolfpack Invitational
28 Virginia Tech Invitational
Captain Kerri Hartling is running hard for
the cross-country team
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SID
Richmond, Va.
Chapel Hill
Raleigh
Blacksburg, Va.
OCTOBER
4
i�
19
26
Campbell University
Open
North Carolina Collegiate Championships
Open
NOVEMBER
1 Colonial Athletic Association Championships
B Open
15 NCAA District III Championships
24 NCAA Championships
Buies Creek, NC
Charlotte
Williamsburg, Va.
Thirsty Thurs.
LADIES NIGHT
$1.25
Many, Many Shot
ShotGir
Plus the B
ETal's 3
�qit� the a
Long
usic Mix
New
RUSH HOUR FRIDAYS
Best in Classic Rock & Hot New Rock
from 8:3Q Til 11:30 Every Frida&j!
Bottle Beer & Drink ScialEveryweek
FREE Admission for'embffe until 10:30
Plus twice monthly Ho?New Live Local Acts
Play The Best Party Music
to Kick Off yourweejen$f
SATURDAY
DANCE FACTORY
$2.50 Teas & x. on tftTBeach
and $2.006TitAfWti
PlusAAl
The East Carolinian






mmm
WK&m&m
Get Ready for a
PIRATE INVASION!
beat Wake &
crush Memphis
It's That Time of Year
Again! Get everything
you need from the party
professionals at
STOP SHOP!
STOP SHOP features one of
Greenville's widest variety & largest
supplies of ice-cold kegs and
STOP SHOP also has all the setups.
Ice, cups & munchies, too!
STOP
SHOP
ECU'S Party People
connect at
STOP SHOP!
CALL TODAY
752-6366
Swimmers hoping for
successful season
J ENSl Stukz
TABLOIO WHITER
Trie lop goal for the men's swimming team is a sim-
ple one, but one that will lake hard work: to go
undefeated this season.
This hardworking and very talented team is
striving to go undefeated this year" said, Coach
Rick Kobe.
If they do not go undefeated, they want to at
least place in the lop three of the Colonial Athletic
Association. Kobe said his team set this goal for
iheoiselves�especially since last year they only
had one loss, at the hands of rival UNC-
Wiunington.
Kobe said this year's seniors�fttrick Keskt;
Brandon TiUey, Jim Broughal, Mike Donavon and
Lee Hutches�are the best seniors with whom he
has worked.
Having aim of older; skilled swimmers encour-
ages the ones who are younger to strive to become
better. This encouragement has heiped the whole
team to be hardworking and accomplish what the
team needs to be successful. -r .
Jensina Sruaz
TA8L0I5 WMTEI
This year's girls swim team will be an exciting
team to watch. After winning several CAA champi-
onships, with strong leadership and coaching, the
learn is beginning to work to repeat their success
this year.
They are the first team ever to win the Colonial Athletic
Association Championship three limes in East Carolina's his-
tory. They also lied with one other school for their record of
winning three in the CAA. These girls are not stopping there;
theyhave a vision to winlheir fourth title this year. If they win
a fourth championship they will be the only team to hold that
distinction in the history of the CAA.
MEN'S & WOMEN'S SWI
A swimmer swims hard to boost team over the edge.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ECU SID
The team is led by three seniors: Amanda Atkinson, Kim
Field and Sandra Ossman. Not only has this team been great-
ly influenced by these three seniors but also by their coach,
Rick Kobe.
Working so hard really shows the lean sticks by thier
motto: "Champtoris train like champions said Kobe.
Thur. Oct. 16
Sat. Oct 25
Sun. Oct 26
Sat. Nov. 1
Sat. Nov. 8
Sun. Nov. 9
Sat. Nov. 15
Thur. Nov. 20-
Sat. Nov. 22
Sat. Dec. 6
Wed. Jan. 7
Sat. Jan. 17
Sat. Jan. 24
Sat. Jan. 31
1:00PM Away
Wed. Feb. 18-
Sat. Feb. 21
Feb. 25-28
March 19-
March 21
IMarch 26- NCAA
March 28
PurpleGold
College of Charleston
Georgia Southern
American University
Old Dominion
(Parents Weekend)
William and Mary
Davidson
Nike Cup
Duke
Palm Beach Relays
Richmond
UNC-Wilmington
Virginia Tech
CAA Championship
ECAC Championship
NCAA
M&W
M&W
Maw
M&W
M&W
M&W
M&W
M&W
(Chapel Hill)
M&W
M&W
M&W
M&W
M&W
3:00PM
10:00AM
1:00PM
12 Noon
2:00 PM
1:00 PM
12 Noon
All Day
2:00PM
10.00AM W.
2:00PM
2:00PM
M&W
HOME
Away
Away
HOME
HOME
HOME
HOME
Away
Away
Palm Beach
Away
Away
M&W
W only
M only
All Day Chatham, VA
All Day Sewell, NJ
All Day Minnapolis, MN
All Day Alburn, AL
Corner of 5th and Reade Streets in Downtown Greenville
iSOWs�UND5
Tuesdays vfLSfin
12-3 AM en vmzmb
ADVERT.
Hityvurt
astearoli
The East Carolinian 7
0 x� '
�; jiiiM m j lilt � "
N.J ��
mmummm





� wmm
Cross country seeks leadership from entire team
,i,��KM.IKl;i�MMI
Jcnsina Srunz
TABLOID WRITER
The aw HHIUlll men"s team this year is quite unusual from
other sporting teams, because ihey did not choose captains
this year.
You would think that this would hinder the team but. the
decision of not is not hindering them in the least. In fact, the
team has a solid rock foundation based on Jamie Mance,
Jeremv Coleman. Michael Marini, Justin England and Brian
Beil.
Mance gave his team a strong showing last vear by mak-
ing all slate and all conference,
"Jamie gets every ounce he has out of his talent said
Coach John Welbom. "He is one of the team's most motivated
and dedicated members
Bv the team being so spread out in strength, it actually
enhances the team by making them rely on the whole team to
do well.
The men's cross country team ha- one goal thi- rar: "V
are going to lake our best shot at taking the Colonial Athletic
Association conference championship said assistant coach
Mike Km).
"We are really going to have to hustle lo have the success
that we saw last season, bul 1 am confident that the guys will
pull through Welborn said. "We have lots of talent coming
back from last year plus we have some addilons lo our rosier
help the team out
These new addtions are Steve Arnold and Stuart Will.
"We are really aiming lo close thai gap between ftilliam
and Mary. James Madison and ourselves Uelborn said.
"George Mason and I NC-Wilmington have also challenged us
in the past, so our conference is packed with lough teams lo
beat
Their season has already started; the next meel this week-
end in Chapel Hill.
SEPTEMBER
UNC-Wilmington "Seahawk" Invitational
12 or 13 UNC-Chapel Hill Invitational
20 NC State "Wolfpack" Invitational
27 William and Mary Invitational
OCTOBER
4
11
18
25
Campbell Invitational
Methodist Invitational
North Carolina State Championships at Charlotte
Open
NOVEMBER
1 CAA Championship at William and Mary
B Open
15 NCAA Regionals at Furman
NCAA National Championships
Wilmington, NC
Chapel Hill, NC
Williamsburg, VA
Williamsburg, VA
Buies Creek, NC
Fayetteville, NC
Charlotte, NC
Williamsburg, VA
Greenville, SC
TBA
UUftitfe J Jim sjAticte foi
�astcarolinian
And .gel wr( (of it.J.lwtf hbbm u. .oii.iij.
Tii'f rut fui 4i
IfnAs d �A�t P�(c't'tr. TjW'r
ECl RING EVEN!
September 11 � 10a.m4p.m.
September 12 � 10a.m4p.m.
September 13 � I0a.m3p.m.
$25 Deposit
Student Stores
geaCt Bv � Special Payment Plans Available
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
10 The East Carolinian
��
mmmti" wi'g1 .��e11





I
Golf team hopeful for NCAA bid, successful season
J E M SIM A STUKZ
TABLOID WHITE
Golfs object is to make a liny ball go into a liny hole with as few tries as possible.
.And this year's golf team has done nail) well in doing just that
The team has 10 players and the four lowest scoring players add their score
together for the average of what the team's competing level is. Coach Kevin Williams
teds quite confident of their schedule this year and hopes they will only have a one-
loss season.
"The key to our success will be determined by having a strong schedule and by
having only a one-loss record said Williams.
The schedule has already been determined to be strong, so now all the team hat
to do is play their best and end tne season with a one-loss record. And by doing so,
this will get them into the NCAA tournament.
Leading the team in conference play will be two captains, Kevin Miller and Daniel
Criflk Othei top players include Mark Millet, who made second team all-conference
Kevin Mflter attempts to sir a putt
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ECU SO
l997FALtGOLFSGHEDUt!E
SEPTEMBER
15-16 LibertySea Trail Fail Classic
29-30 UNCWBehedere Plantation Inv.
OCTOBER
13-14 State FarmRail Classic
27-28 ODUSeascape intercollegiate
Sunset Beach, NC
Wilmington, NC
Chattanooga, TN
Kitty Hawk, NC
NOVEMBER
3-4 Davidson College Fall Intercollegiate Davidson, NC
Daniel Griffe, one erf two captains, trying to score tow so he car, help push
his team over the top.
PHOTOS COURTESY Of ECU SIO

MAKE YOUR NEXT PARTY HOT
SAY ABOUT 104�F
ADD $25 to fill HOTDAILYWEEKEND FRI-MON.WEEKLY WED-TUE.
SMALL 2 PERSONS$75.00$150.00$250.00
MEDIUM 4 PERSONS$100.00$200.00$300.00
LARGE 6 PERSONS$125.00$250.00$350.00
V yd BkkA .aaW dnftli
HOT TUB
RENTALS
758-0486
ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY, SETUP & PICKUP.
The East Carolinian 11
'V
-JU�IM ��-
H-C
l





25 Off Your Enti
Is
mRRYI�
RESTAURANT &
W08DMREB t I


Title
The East Carolinian, September 11, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 11, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1224
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy