The East Carolinian, September 9, 1997







i
TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 1!
Carolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
voaimi$5ft
Former ECU Medical Foundation president indicted
Ri!x n K Vl.uns II. formci presideni
! ,1 foundation was indii ted M id ,
Following 20 months of hoi I
state investigations
The annountci
conference held by ("ha R
M iv, V pi H
'In Deceml f 1W5. B rt K dams
11 i h Ii I la . .idem and a
as the univei n ion 4
foundation s.ml Hu I Kakn
ofE
thai there were several problems with the I niversii
es in the Medical foundai
"It is very importani
point out thai it was noi moncv
thai was Ins but rather money jf ven important
thai was claimed to have been
ed " said Eakin. 1 ui initial tlmt I point OUt that it
mvcsl ' iled evidence oi as not money that
irregularities, uuludum double
, � � . nscs and evw lost, butrather
� h M ' nounthatvas
i i � lation ol equipmeni m i
iwned in pan bv uni aimedto halt been
received
know
' I i, ,
n internal gested process and
policv revisions, and
evict figures sweeping changes
have been implement-
rities .ire not ed in the Medical
Foundation's structure
gure is not known and operations as a
preciselv at this moment:
I believe that the results
� Stai ' tors will be
announced at .i Liter
date said Kakin.
I he ofl � tl State
uditoi I ted .i
Chancellor Richard Eakin
a rhat this .ill cai
ion w.is thai thei
inonvmous confident ial
� the State vudi
()fftce. said I ikin "That call resulted in the taking plat
result s.ud Eakin.
We deeply regret the
situation that devel-
oped ai the Medical
Foundation, but we Chancellor
believe that the Richard Eakin
irms will ensure the file photo
review ol the Medical continued success ot
: lation's operations that organization
.it the same time that an " well-run, principled Medical
internal investigation was Foundation is essential to the success ot the
he universitv investigation showed state auditors calling I j Carolina "An extensive internal investigation suj
MEDICAL
Halogen lamps
recalled due to
potential fire risk
University taking action to
ensure safety
Halogen la
dents, are
after being
i .i Bi
I Busir
the l 'I campus
'Students we

S( � ii
v the '
hi.
has ! i
in the ele-
HAtOGIN
Haloq
i
THREE IN A ROW!
Residents of Scott Hall celebrate winning the male residence hall division of the King and Queen
of the Halls contest for the third year Tyler Hall won for women's residence halls and Aycock Hall won for coed
Survev reveals truth about ECU's drinking
urvey Says,
111
� iin rh
� ECU students' drinking behaviors not different
ftom students nationwide
� Students perceive peers ate drinking mote than
they actually are
� Drinking does not play a significant roie in most
students' lives.
� Bmye drinking is a problem for some ECU
students.
� Alcohol continues to be the drug of choice
at ECU
� Most ECU students who drink established
patterns of use during junior high and high
school.
In fight of investigation:
� Number of Board of Directors members
increased from eight to 16.
� Members limited to two three-year terms,
rather than an unlimited number of one-year
terms.
� Formal committee structure established
requiring full board approval of all committee
recommendations.
� Board meetings held quarterly rather than
annually.
ECU to receive
new area code
s7 �i C- c y,
This map section shows the area of Eastern North Carolina, including ECU.
that will receive a new area code early next year
All university
documents
slated for
reprinting
DRINK
J A C 0 I' E L I N E I) K M I I M
�.
ECU is included in the arc
eastern North Carolina that will
vhaniic its area code earls next
vear. The State I'tilities
Commission is still
finalizing their plans
and deciding what
new area code num-
bers to jssiijn.
"Yes, vou w ill get a
new area code, said
Marx Si el, .1
telecommunications
analyst with the State
I ; 1 I 1 t 1 e s
(lommission. "We
don't know what the
new area codes will
he. Each of the cur-
rent numbers w ill be
split in half We have
three now. we will have si.
Sreele said.
ccording to Steel.
Piedmont area will have
numbers that will he affected b
the change, but ai area eha
its area code will ha ' �
ments in make.
For E( I . one of tl
consuming aspects ot the el
m.i be the reprini
pus station.in. business 1 j I
other official documents
show the old area cod
Tie office which will be
responsible tor the reprinting
process is I niversin Printing and
hies, formerly known as-
Central Printing. The director.
Robert Harlow. sas that his office
has been through this before.
"We kind of went through it a
couple of years back when we
changed the prefix Harlow said.
That change was caused b
H 's change of three digit prefix
1 '757' to ' ;
Harlow said thai 1
stationary was gradua Most
departments order 500�1000 let-
terheads ar i time.
As departments
used up their old
� �, ' , stationary
Wedontknox, chat uhcn thcN
the neve area 1 odd - u ill I Hai
be. Each oftht cum
numbers .
half. Hi hart thret
noxc. sr . e six
Mary Steel.
H rl
'
I ni. � Printing
d (iraphics. accordn ' I I
iould prettx much be busi-
II W said. "I
I .
I I I
trjMfJRHlJW
9
DidUKnovv
In 1961, Chancellor Leo W
Jenkins encouraged the
Boattl of Trustees to adopt a
policy of admil ting any
qualified applicant,
regardless of ra e
opinion.
33
H "N I
lifestyle.
.7
a sports.
10
Pirates lose first game
of season





2 Tuesday. September 9. 1997
jews
The East Carolinian
Thousands pay respect
to Mother Teresa
CALCUTTA, India
(CNN) - Mother Teresa,
who retained her simplic-
ity and humility despite
an avalanche of interna-
tional fame, died Friday
night of a heart attack.
A line of mourners that
bepn forming in front of
St. Thomas before dawn
Sunday was half a mile
long by 9 a.m. Admirers of
different nationalities and
religions, including
Hindus, Christians and
Muslims, were in the line.
They carried wreaths of
flowers and handmade posters, tokens of their love and respect for the nun.
Mother Teresa's body will be buried Saturday in a state funeral ceremony, an
honor usually accorded only to senior politicians and heads of state.
Mother Theresa died Friday night of a heart attack. She
will be buried Saturday in a state funeral ceremony
PHOTO COURTESY OF CRN INTERACTIVE
ECU endowment gains from investments
across the state
ECU doctors experiment with new breast
cancer surgery
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) � Doctors at East Carolina University are experi-
menting with a new technique that could replace the pain of breast cancer
surgery with a simple incision and series of stitches.
To check for the disease, doctors routinely remove dozens of Ivmph nodes
near a woman's armpit, then examine a select few to determine if the cancer has
moved beyond the breast. The surgery involves cutting around muscle and major
arteries. .
The new process, reported in the Journal of the American Medical
Association in December, is intended to simplify the process in a way that
improves a doctor's ability to detect cancerous ceils while speeding a patient s
recovery. t c
The procedure uses a combination of dyes and radioactive tracers to identify
a single lymph node � the "sentinel node" � that is most likeK to contain can-
cer cells. Then doctors subject that node to a battery of tests to jud�c the am-
eer's possible spread.
Pilot was giving mechanic ride before crash
CAMDEN, S.C. (AP) � The pilot of a World War H-vintage plane had been giv-
ing a friendly mechanic a ride when the aircraft went down, killing Ixith men,
officials said Sunday '
Luke Eller, U, of Camden. and pilot Steve Burlcson of Wavnesville, N.C
died Saturday evening when the antique T-6 single-propeller plane trashed into
some trees in the Lake Elliott area northeast of Camden.
National Transportation Safety Board investigators said Sunday that the
plane went into a nose dive before crashing, with the nose buried about a foot
into the ground.
The plane was owned by the Western North Carolina Air Museum, a non-
profit organization. A board member there said the aircraft, built in 1942, Mas
inspected every 30 flight hours, which occurred about twice a year.
across the nation
Airline price hike to hit business travelers hardest
NEWYORK (AP) �With a healthy economy fueling strong fall travel Ixxikings,
the nation's major airlines have raised already record-high ticket prices by S per-
cent, The Wall Street Journal reported today
Business travelers will take the brunt of the increases. But the newspaper also
said many advance-purchase fares were raised over the weekend. Northwest
Airlines initiated the industrv-wide price hike when it raised its unrestricted
coach fares by 5 percent Thursday. American .Airlines and United Airlines quick-
ly followed suit, as did several other major carriers, including Delta Air Lines on
Airline passenger traffic hit record highs over the summer and early fall book-
ings have remained strong.
Candy, carnivals and sex offenders on computer
POMONA, Calif. (AP) � The Los Angeles County Fair will offer cotton candy,
carnival rides and a chance to check out the names of the state's 64.000 regis-
tered sex offenders.
The state Justice Department will set up eight computers in an exhibition
hall that can display offenders' names, pictures, zip codes and crimes. A similar
exhibit at the state fair in Sacramento last month drew 4.000 inquiries.
Critics say the fair, which opens Thursday is an inappropriate place for the
information.
The information was made available under the state's Megans Low, which
requires police to release information on known sex offenders. The law was
named after a 7-year-old New Jersey girl. Megan Kanka, who was killed by a
paroled child molester.
around the world
ferry sinks; officials say hundreds
feared drowned
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) � A fern sank north of the capital today, and
Haitian officials said as man as 400 people were missing and feared drowned.
First radio reports said about 25 bodies washed ashore.
Haiti's coast guard reported at least 700 people were on the tern, and that
MW to 400 people drowned, said VS. Coast Guard IVtt Officer Veronica
Bandrowsky in Miami.
The number of missing couldn't Ik independent confirmed.
The Rerte Gonaiviene sank at dawn Monday between Montrouis. about 50
in'ites'nortnviest of the capital, and Gonavc Island in Port-au-Prince Bay. Radio
Metropole and Haiti-Inter reported.
Panama opens conference to reassure
users of its canal
PANAMA CITY. Panama (AP) � Panama is trying to coin nice the shipping
industry that the Panama Canal will be in good hands after the I niteel Stales
pulls out in 1999. Mostlv. it is preaching to the converted.
Shipping executives gathering for the (.anal Congress, which opened Sunday
night, said they were confident that Panama is ready to take over the canal with
minimal disruption.
Diplomatic problems have overshadowed the conference.
Panama is one of 30 countries that recognizes Taiwan as the legitimate ruler
of China and Taiwan saw the invitation ol'Taivuincse President I -ee reng-hui to
the congress � encouraged bv a H�0,000 contribution � as a diplomatic coup.
I
AMANDA AlSTIN
SS1STNT Nf.WS KDITOR
Riding along with the rise and the
falls of the stock market, ECU's
investments reflect the market at
large.
ECU, along with many other
LNC-system Universities, is invest-
ing their money in a variety of stocks
and bonds. These investments have
prospered over time and the result
has been a generous amount of
monev building up in endowment
funds.
'An endowment fund is made up
of gifts and donations of which the
principle can not be spent, it must
be invested said Richard Brown,
vice chancellor for business affairs.
The endowments ECU has
invested come from a variety of
sources. Many donations arc made
by ECU alumni, businesses and cor-
porations. UNC President CD
Spangler has recently set up many
endowments over the UNC
University system.
Endowment funds at ECU are
divide into two separate funds.
"The bulk of our endowment
funds are in a combined investment
pool of the ECU endowment fund
and the ECU foundation sad
Brown. "In addition is a separate
investment pool for the ECU
Educational Foundation
These endowment funds are
invested in seven different types of
investment firms. The seven firms
are: growth portfolio, value portfolio,
two aggressive small company port-
folios, international portfolio,
emerging markets portfolio and a
fixed income portfolio.
The fixed income portfolios that
arc invested in arc primarily bonds.
The National Association of
College and University Business
Affairs (NACUBO) conducted a
survey that has showed the majority
of Universities invest half of their
endowments in U.S.
NACUBO shows that for the
past three years universities have
been showing significant gains.
With the use of strategic place-
ments of funds ECU has seen a sig-
nificant increase in their funds .
"The total of all our portfolios as
of June 30 is the market value of
$21.9 million said Brown. "That is
the total value of all the stocks,
bonds and everything. The endow-
ment fund portion of the
market value is $4.6 mil-
lion and the foundation
portion is $17.3 million.
Funding has actually
increased to where the
rate of return for funds has
been higher than the
index for that particular
period.
"We had a rate of
return in the past six
months of 10.67 percent.
The index to that period
was 9.2 percent said
Brown.
In order to have such
luck in the stock market
funds must be placed by
masterminds in the area of
Richard Brown, vice
chancellor of
business affairs.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU
NEWS BUREAU
investing. ECU
investments
are controlled
by the ECU
Investment
Committee.
"You have an
investment
board, the
investment
board engages
an investment
adviser,
we call a
ager of
agers
Brown,
provides
what
man-
man-
said
"He
us
advice on how we should invest the
funds of the foundation and endow-
ment
This past year the process which
has been used by the investment
adviser to place funds in investing
firms is strategic asset allocation.
"We follow what is called strate-
gic asset allocation, which is a finan-
cial model that maximizes the
return on investments, while reduc-
ing risk said Brown.
This process involves placing
funds where hopefully there will be
a decline and increase on opposite
equities.
"Certain types of investments
move opposite directions to one
another, such as domestic equities
often moves opposite foreign equi-
ties. As the stock market is going up
the foreign equities often are going
down. Likewise, in the way you have
invested both, you have limited your
risks and stabilized your rate of
return said Brown.
Strategic asset allocation involves
different types of investments that
I Large Comany Growth Stocks
Large Company Valua Slocks
@ Small Company Slocks
? Foreign Stocks
I Enlarging Markets Stocks
Hoovarmants Bonds
Rush
Sigma Pi
Friends of Sheppard Memorial Library
BOOK SALE
Thursday, Sept. 11, 6-8 p.m.
(Preview sale for Friends only; $40 or 20 book limit)
Friday, Sept. 12, 9 a.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 13, 9 a.m6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 14,1-5 p.m.
(Bog Day�14 per grocery bag of books)
Willis Bldg 1st fr Reade Sts.
The World Famous � �
COUNT BASIE
ORCHESTRA
directed by Grover Mitchell
The Count
may be gone,
but his legendary
group plays on.
Advance Student Tickets $10
Tickets at the door $20
MY SISTER'S CLOSET
631A Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27858
$2
Friday, September 12, 1997 8:00 pm Wright Auditorium
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE M0USS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
�19 328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.AMS: Dtaf�wecti-impair�d acrtM 419.32S.4736
Student discount ticket, available �i� ECU ID at the Central Ticket Office until 6 pm
on the day of the event, provkhn? tickets remain. All tickets at the door are fuU-pnce.
r
I
i
i
i
i
I
i
i
i
I
i
i
i
i
i
L
off a purchase of
$10 or more
wvalid ECU ID
Discover Greenville's newest, unique
shopping experience!
My Sister's Closet is a subsidiary of New
Directions Family Violence Center.
My Sister's Closet is a thrift boutique
featuring new and slightly used women's and
children's clothing and accessories.
Not redeemable for cash. Coupon must accompany purchase.
We need VOLUNTEERS If you are interested,
please call 754-2495
Rush
Alpha Phi Omega
National Co-Ed Service Fraternity
Informational Meetings:
Tuesday, September 9,1997
Methodist Center on 5th
Street
8:00 PM
Wednesday, September 10,1997
Methodist Center on 5th Street
7:30 pm
A spaghetti dinner will be
served after the meeting.
Leadership, Friendship, And Service
Winner of the 1996 Governors Award
For more information, please call Cindy Lawrence at, 355-3452
in aam � n i aay i
��. � ,�L � a- U





3 Tuesday, September 9. 1997
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Phone 758-0204
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Sat 9am - 2pm
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The East Carolinian
Dodi's bodyguard wakes up, cannot speak
PARIS (AP) � The bodyguard uh
was the sole survivor of the ear crash
that killed Princess Diana has
regained consciousness after surgery
to repair his severely injured face, a
Pjris hospital reported todav.
The Iwxlyguard's parents said,
however, that it would be "some
time" before their son could speak
with police.
Trevor Rees-Jones remains in the
intensive care unit, the Pitie-
Salpetriere hospital said in a state-
ment. It indicated his condition was
improving.
Rees-Jones, 29. was hospitalised
with severe jaw and facial injuries, as
well as bruises to his lungs and head
after the Aug. 31 crash.
1
Jill and Krnic Rees-Jones aid
their son underwent a 10-hour oper-
ation on Thursday
" 1 he operation was a success
and he has started on a long road to
what we expect to be a full recov-
ery, rhe parents said in a statement
released by the British Embassy.
They added, however, that "It
will be some time before he will be
able to speak to investigators
"He is currently in a state of
avvakeness the hospital statement
said.
Police are eager to question Rees-
Jones about the crash that killed the
Princess of Wales, her Unfriend
Dodi Fayed and driver Henri Paul.
Rees-Jones. I'aved's bodyguard,
may have answers as to how the
Mercedes went out of control in a
tunnel at the Pont de I'Alma bridge.
Attention is increasingly focusing
on Paul, assistant security chief at
the Ritz hotel that is owned by
Dodi's father. Mohamed al Fayed.
Two blood tests have shown Paul
was legally drunk. And officials said
from the start the Mercedes was
traveling at an apparently excessive
speed, which numerous accounts bv
eye witnesses have corroborated.
In the first davs of the investiga-
tion, atten-
tion had
Focused on
the role of
paparazzi
trailing
Diana and
Dodi.
Nine pho-
tographic rs
and a photo
courier have
been placed
under formal
investigation
that could
lead ' to
charges of
manslaugh-
ter and fail-
ure to assist
persons in
danger.
According
to judicial
sources, evi-
dence in the
manslaugh-
ter count is
thin and con-
tradictory.
Evidence the
photographers
Princess Diana was buried Saturday after the funeral procession traveled throughout
much of London for the mourners who lined the streets.
FILE PHOTO
Honoring You Today For a Better Tomorrow
Congratulations! If you have at least a 3.30 Cumulative
Grade Point Average and between 32 and 96 credits, you are
cordially invited to become a member of
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity. Come meet other
students, see how you can become involved in a variety of
activities, and learn about how membership in Phi Sigma Pi
can open doors for your future.
Reward yourself for your academic achievements by
becoming involved with Phi Sigma Pi. Established on the
ideals of scholarship, leadership, and fellowship. Phi Sigma
Pi is made for today's college student YOl!
If vou have any questions or cannot attend the
meeting, but are interested in finding out more about
Phi Sigma Pi, please call West Taylor at 931-0960.
I'hi Sigma Pi
National Honor FraW-rnitv
Established 1016
Sept. 9, 6:00pm, GCB
with
not banking.
If you've got better things to do at night than wrestle with
our checking account, the College Account from Wachovia
is for you. We make it easy, with free checking and a
Wachovia Check Card, for free transactions at any
Wachovia ATM. Your card is also accepted anywhere
they take Visa - so you can pay for everything from
pizza to car repairs right from your checking
account, but with credit card convenience. And when
you need help balancing your checkbook, Wachovia's
toll-free telephone banking lines are just a phone call away.You
can get your balance or find out if a check cleared with our
automated Phone Access service. Or call
l-800-WACHOVIA (1-800-922-4684) to reach
a real Wachovia banker anytime. 24 hours a
day. Plus, you may qualify for special student
overdraft protection, credit card and savings
accounts. It's easy' �'�' tl point in your life,
shouldn't someth i
ttttU!
a
WACHOVIA
tailed to aid the victims, snapping pic-
tures instead, appears more substan-
tial.
Police were checking the photogra-
phers' mobile phones to see if calls
had been placed to police or rescue-
teams. According to Sunday's Journal
du Dimanche, there wji no indication
any had, although it was not clear
whether the checks were finished.
It is a crime in France not to help
victims, punishable by a fine and up to
five years in prison.
Britain's Observer newspaper tuot-
ed Rees-Jones' grandmother as saving
he spoke with his visiting mother and
stepfather, telling them he felt partlv
responsible for the accident because
he was in charge, even though he
could do nothing to prevent it.
Hospital spokeswoman Henrietta
Chaibriant quoted doctors, respond-
ing to the article, as saving "it seems
surprising he could have talked to his
family
She has denied previous reports his
tongue was cut out in the accident.
209-B S Evans St
Pittman.Building .
(near courthouse)
Greenville. NC.
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
1
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SEPT. 8-117PM
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4 Tuesday. September 9, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
1 1
Leadership retreat
Many of ECU's top student scholars will be attending a Leadership Retreat
at Camp Sea Gull at Arapahoe. NC, this weekend. The retreat, a corporate
style leadership development program, will be led by Dr. John Grinnell, the
president of PETRA Learning Corporation of Greensboro. Over the week-
end, the students will analyze their personality traits and relationship kills
and work through projects to help them communicate more effectively. The
schedule includes the camp's "tower course at 2 p.m. today. The partici-
pating students are the recipients of ECU scholarships ranging from SI 2.000
to 520,000. The retreat according to James L. Iinier. vice chancellor for
Institutional Advancement, was developed to create additional enrichment
programs for the scholars. He said the ECU Foundation, which awards schol-
arships, is working to add corporate internships, mentors and foreign travel
to the scholarship benefits.
AMA president-elect to speak
at ECU forum
The first woman to head the American Medical Association will visit
Greenville as the keynote speaker of the 19th Health Law Forum Wednesday.
Sept. 10.
Dr. Nancy W Dickey, a family practitioner from College Station, Texas,
was elected president-elect of the AMA in June. She begins her year-long
presidency next summer. Until June she served as chair of the 150-year-old
organization's board of trustees.
Dickey will deliver the H. Honon Rountree Distinguished Lecture in
Health Law at the forum, which is hosted each vear bv the East Carolina
I'niversiry School of Medicine. The title of her speech is "From Basement to
Roofline: Building or Remodeling a Healthcare Stem.
Division of general internal
medicine presents Perspectives
The I)i ision of General Internal Medicine. (Center for Medical Ethics is pre-
senting "Back to the Future: New Wavs to Procure Organs and Their Ethical
Implications This will take place from 12:30-1:30at Brody 2S-12.The pub-
lic is invited to attend.
Center Court receives national recognition
Center Court. ECU Dining Services' juice bar located in the Student
Recreation Center, has received national recognition. The restaurant
received a third place ribbon in the "Specialty Restaurant or Shop" category
in the National Association of College and I'niversiry Food Services
(NACIFS) Dining Awards Contest. Center Court competed against 17
other colleges and universities in the large school division. An entry was sub-
mitted in April that featured photos of Center Court as well as menus,
recipes, sales performance data and a complete description of the restuarant.
Drink
continued from page 1
with the national average.
Nationally, 16 percent of college stu-
dents did not drink in the past year,
21 percent only drank on six or fewer
occasions during the last year and 38
percent reported binge drinking "in
the last two weeks 17 percent of
ECU students did not drink in the
past year, 20 percent have drank six
or fewer occasions in the past year,
and 39 percent of ECU students
have reported binge drinking "in the
past two weeks
"Students perceive students
drink more than they do in reality
said Speier.
-95 percent of students don't
drink from Sunday to Thursday
-84 percent of students drink
once a week or less
-66 percent said no to an offer to
use alcohol or other drugs
-69 percent didn't use marijuana
in the past year
-Myth: 74 percent of ECU stu-
dents believe their peers drink three
times a week.
Fact: Only 17 percent of ECU
students report drinking this often
Surveys are given to find out
where problems are and figure out
possible solutions to them.
"The purpose of this survey was
to find out how much consumption
is going on and when are they con-
suming said Speier. "We wanted to
find out perception verses reality
Now that the survey has been
completed administrators are able to
decide on their greatest points of
concerns and what they plan to do
about them.
'Two things are of concern to us,
we have reduced the perception of
ECU students, and have a concern
for binge drinking said Speier.
This university is planning an
abundance f awareness and preven-
tion programs to take place through-
out the school year.
"We will have more programming
during the weekend when the
majority of students
drink said Speier.
With the release of this survey,
students should be more accurately
informed about the actual drinking
habits of their peers.
"To help people understand the
results of this survey and to portray a
more realistic view of our campus,
we will be involved in a media cam-
paign this semester to help our cam-
pus and community understand the
truth about student involvement
with alcohol said Dr. Donna Walsh,
health promotion and well being.
Organizers of the media cam-
paign are interested in recruiting
new members. Representatives of
clubs and organizations are also wel-
come. If interested stop by 210
Whichard and ask for Dr. Walsh.
Drinking Facts Reveal Several Surprises
95 percent of students don't drink from Sunday to Thursday
84 percent of students drink once a week or less
66 percent said no to an offer to use alcohol or other drugs
69 percent didn't use marijuana in the past year
ECU students' drinking behaviors are comparable to their peers nationally.
ECU students perceive that their ECU peers are drinking considerably
more than they actually are.
Drinking does not play a significant role in most students' lives.
I (
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Nigh
Tuesday
Stogies
Wednesday
Velvet Jones
Thursday
Friday
National
Healing
Tribe
Saturday
Kernal Goat
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to DJ Will
upstairs
Greenville's
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
TastingDisplay
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday
32 oz. Domestic
Draft $1.50
14 oz. Domestic
Draft 75
FREE FOOD
NFL Ticket on DSS
Football
75 Southpaw
L Sports Bar
HENDRIX
FILMSH
THURSSAT SEPT. 11-13
ALL FILMS START AT 8PM UNLESS OTHER-
WISE NOTED AND ARE FREE FOR ALL
STUDENTS,FACULTY, AND STAFF MEMBERS.
(ONE GUEST ALLOWED) WITH VALID ECU ID.
Complex Gifts: Introducing the Artists of Signature Home
August 18 - September 12
Artist Reception: Thursday, Sept. 11, 7-9 pm
See the art and meet the artists behind
Signature, the country's only home for
artistically gifted adults who are challenged by
disabilities. The four artists featured in this
exhibit are painters Harold Crowell, Brooks
Yeoman, and Ricky Needham, and vocalist
Charlene Sawyer. Come and support these
artists in SignatureStudio XI's first ever tour.
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee presents
i.HAH lac 199SCRFF certificates ait'diHliibulrd by
ffefnd above Head it caietuHy befole ynu
Free live music! Free pizza and refreshments!
8-10:45 pm, Mendenhall Student Center Social Room (Across from WZMB)
Thursday,September 11,1997
Masons Russell Henderson
GET INVOLVED!
The ECU Student Union Board of Directors is now accepting applications for the day-student representative
for the 1997 - 98 term. Qualifications: Full time student, resides off campus, independent
E Responsibilities: Selecting the Student Union President, approving committee chair
s �- V persons, approving the Student Union budget, setting policy for the Student Union.
V
u' Deadline to apply is Friday, September 12,1997. Applications can be picked up at
S the Student Union Office - Room 236 in Mendenhall Student Center. For more info,
L call the Student Union at 3�4715.





rm
5 Tuesday. September 9. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Halogen
continued from page 1
ments. If a poster or a curtain touch
the bulbs it starts a fire within sec-
onds, even bugs that hit the buibs
can start a flame said Manny
Amaro.
The lamp is a free standing lamp
that has a shallow bowl-shaped fix-
ture set on top of a 6-foot pole.
Now, you can get a similiar style
lamp with the bowl facing down to
prevent objects getting stuck in the
bowl, which can be highly flamma-
ble.
"The housing department will
be doing their routine fire inspec-
tions, we have sent out brochures to
all students about these lamps.
Housing has ban all tocheire style
(iamma
lamps. The only halogen lamps that
we will allow are 150 watts or lower
and they should have the guard.
During this inspection students
with these lamps will not have any
disciplinary action held against
them. To fix some of these lamps it
is as easy as changing the bulbs
said Amoro.
As of February 5,1997 the
tocheire lamps have had an
improved level of safety because
they already had the guard in
placed. Consumers with these
lamps that do not have the wire
guards can receive a free one with
instructions at the following stores:
Ames, B.Js Wholesale Club,
HechingersHome Quarters, Home
Base, Home Depot. Ikea, Kmart,
Lowes,Montgomery Ward, Office
Depot, Target, and Walmart. The
guards will be availible in stores by
August 25.
"Housing has moved quickly, but
mainly we are following the guid-
lines from the CPSC said Koch.
Halogen Light Safety
1. Never place the lamp near curtains or other cloth
window treatments.
2. Never drape clothes over the lamp.
3. Keep lamp away from bedding.
4. Never leave the lamp on when you leave the room or you
are not at home.
5. To reduce the chances of the lamp tipping over, keep
children and pets away from the lamp.
tBt t�t
Eh What's that Peg?
Advertising in The
East Carolinian got
you quick results. Well
sounds like a sure bet to me.
Guess you better let me go
then, Peg. I've got to make a
call to The East Carolinian.
I lay be now I can finally get
rid of that old - -
hound dog of Ed's. 3r P
The East
Carolinian
Call a
advertising
rep @
328-2000
Medical
continued from page
ECU Health Sciences Division
said Eakin.
Since December of 1995 gifs
and donations to the Medical
Foundation have decreased a signif-
icant amount.
"Although the Medical
Foundation is chartered as an inde-
pendent organization, the universi-
ty administration is ultimately
responsible for its proper conduct.
The reforms that the administra-
tion has implemented, in concert
with the Medical Foundation board
of directors will help assure that the
Medical Foundation's reputation
will be restored and that it will oper-
ate with the utmost integrity. The
benefactors who entrust their assets
to the stewardship of the Medical
Foundation, for the good works it
has a supported in the past and
those it will embrace in the future,
deserve no less said Eakin.
The Medical Foundation is a
very important part of ECU and
several schools with which is
involved.
"We deeply regret the situation
that developed at the Medical
Foundation, but we believe that the
reforms will ensure the continued
success of that organization. The
medical Foundation plays a vital role
in the success of the ECU Schools
of Medicine. Nursing and .Allied
All members will meet on
Tuesday, September 9th at 5:00
in General Classroom
Building Room 1032
Additional reactions to investigation
"��� : '� tWi:
Operations
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Can God Affect My Personal Life?
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iUMci.tiiKiHiiif-
.U.miMim j�owrr fur their
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September 10 10a.m4p.m.
September 11 � 10a.m4p.m.
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meetings on September 9th
at 3:00pm or September
10th at 6:00pm in Brewster
D 305. For More
information call 328-8777
S
r





8 Tstsdty, Sspttmbsr 9. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastf!arolinian
AMY IROYSTKR Editor
CELESTE Wll.SON Matugmg Editor
Matt Hege UnmBrent
JACQI'IMNE D. KeI.U M Hun ton
AMANDA AI'STIN AM. Km Etor
ANDY Tl'KNRR UwyKEAor
John Davis kanum LiteWt Ww
AMANDA Ross Spun Editor
TRACY A1ACH Awjbw Spora Editor
David Soiithf.ri.and fntta
Carole mkhi.e MCopvEftw
John mcrphy Sun Murom
Heather Ri'Rgess WmE�m
t M UN � HH � V0Q MHR W (iMUMR- M Mnpi MM tM IQRIB- UMfl ffMH M HMM IK flJOOB ML M CIS
i ECU. CimiiH 3KM3S3 Fit mNrawnn. al M ElOM
oumew

WWiTOtt
AWE-WPPiS?
KIDS
fin; i x
ECU is hoping to put four consecutive winning seasons together this year for football and they
need your help. That's right, the football team is calling you.
The home opener against Write Forest is this Saturday at 3:30 p.m. in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium and officials are expecting the biggest crowd ever for a Pirate game. True, the upper
deck is not completed yet, but they have already constructed temporary bleachers in each end
zone until the deck is complete. There are 5,000 extra seats with 1,500 seats in the scoreboard
end zone and 3,500 in the Minges Coloseum end Zone. The 3300 seats are for reserved ticket
holders, while the other 1,500 will be used for student overflow.
It is vital that each and every student and fan pack the stadium and cheer on the Pirates. We
need to prove that we will be able to fill that upper deck when it is completed.
Football players know when they have the support of the fans in the stands. It gives them a
boost. They want nothing more than to hear the roar of the crowd supporting their hard work
on the field.
Student tickets are still free, so take advantage of that and travel to the game with your bud-
dies. All of us here at TEC will be at the game wearing our purple and gold and cheering for the
Pirates.
This is only the third time in history these two teams have met with each other as ECU took
a 20-10 win in 1963 and Wake Forest took the last meeting in 1979, 23-20. Ironically enough,
the 1963 meeting in then, Rcklen Stadium was the dedication game for the stadium. Officials
had hoped that this weekend's game would be the dedication for the new upper deck but con-
struction problems have pushed that back.
ECU students need to support their Pirates. The football team practices very hard through-
out the week, and it is a real let down for them to look up in the stand and not see the students
supporting them is a real let down.
So let's all join together as a student body and cheer on the Pirates as they compete for their
first win of the season.
OPINION
Everafter, china patterns not every student's cup of tea
I will find the time to say 7
loveyou even ifthe tie
that binds my brother and his
future wife seems to be lacing
its subtle and strangling wires
around me.
My brother is getting married next
month, the day after my birthday,
October 25. I think he loves her and
she maybe loves him, and I want to be
happy for them.
She graduated from ECUs school
of nursing this past spring, really
smart young lady, good grades, never
been in trouble with the law, doesn't
drink, abhors smoking.
I graduated from ECU's liberal arts
program this past spring, think some-
times I see genius in my work, make
respectable grades, been in trouble
with the law countless times, prefer
bourbon to vodka, and smoke Winston
regulars.
My girlfriend went to JC Renneys
and picked up their wedding registra-
tion gift list. She enthusiastically (too
enthusiastically for me) went through
the list suggesting items we should
buy for the bridal shower china pat-
terns, color coordinated bath towels
(colors like berry stain and magenta
sunrise), electric can openers, five-
piece place settings, etc. All the while,
I studied Richard ford's Women With
Men , half-pretending to be interest-
ed in china patterns and autumn sun-
rise draperies.
I suppose I should be more happy
for them. After all, it is my brother's
wedding, a once-in-a-lifetime ceremo-
ny, a formal union, the amalgam to
beat all amalgams. Only I don't feel
happy for them. At least, not to the
point of dancing around in autumn
sunshine curtains and lavender tea
cup decor.
I'm more like, "Honey, why dont
we wait till were like 50 to tie the
knot?"
I guess in some rudimentary way,
this marriage that he's so happy about
and she's so happy about is creating
some sort of midlifc crisis in me; and
I'm only 23.
It's just that right now I don't even
want to think about lifelong commit-
ments, mortgage values, diapers, and
the seeming black-holish absorption
of time that is having a family.
As it is, I sleep an average of about
six hours per night, t work three writ-
ing- oriented jobs: editing a national
academic publication, tutoring in the
writing center, and my love, The East
Carolinian.
On top of which, I'm about 20,000
words into my first novel, 2,000 words
into my 100th or so short story, and
somewhere in the middle of a stormy
sea called 12 graduate hours.
I'm also working with four profes-
sors and one wonderful editor in com-
piling a portfolio for a doctoral pro-
gram and am considering an intern-
ship with the swanky Manhattan mag-
azine Harpers.
I hardly have time to even breathe
the words "I love you" between sips of
highly caffeinated drinks and lyrical
passages of prose. How am I supposed
to get married? Why should I get mar-
ried?
I made a promise to myself several
years ago: I will not get married until 1
publish my first novel. As it is, it looks
like III be at least 26 and the ominous
year 2000 will be upon us.
I told her we could do it in the rec-
tory of Saint Patricks Cathedral, just
like Fitzgerald and Zelda. And we may
very well do that.
Until that time, I will enjoy the
productivity that has become my life.
I will try to smile encouragingly at tea
cup decor. I will wish my brother all
the best. I will find the time to say "I
love you" to my girlfriend, even if the
tie that binds my brother and his
future wife seems to be lacing its sub-
tle and strangling wires around me.
to the Editor
Student unsatisfied with ECU's final exam policy
I had this wonderful vision about grad-
uating in December. After I finished
my exams, I would rush to join my
family and friends to begin celehrat-
�� ingour accomplishment of graduating
college. They would come down the
day before the ceremony and we
would celebrate the entire night. The
next morning I would walk across the
stage, get my diploma, and go home to
celebrate Christmas with my family.
But then I remembered. I go to ECU,
and nothing is simple and pretty here!
This school has the great idea that
everyone should go through the cere-
mony first, and then take the finals.
That's right! Just as if the Green Bay
Packers were given the World
Championship and then played the
Super Bowl. My family and I arc most
displeased with the apparent lack of
organization of the administration at
this school. For some crazy reason, 1
don't believe I'm the only person that
feels this way.
Bryan Edge
Communications Major
Senior
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
Columnist
Fear of crime ruins good neighbors
lam sorry our society is the
way it is. Sorry that our
doors need to be locked and
sorry for the way our
neighbors are regarded with
suspicion. Even people we do
not know anything about are
� watched with a wary eye.
This is a column written to one
man. Yet, at one time or another we
have ail experienced what I felt. The
feeling is fear of a crime.
To the man who came to my door,
it is not your fault. The fault lays upon
me. I am sorry. Ail you did was ask for
a pen. 1 could not even help you.
It was not you; it was the time you
came. You awakened me from a good
slumber on my couch. I did not stop
to look at the clock on my way to the
door. The only reference point I had
for the time was the darkness. I knew
it was well past sunset, yet still hours
before dawn.
Most likely daylight would have
made a difference. I "nder the watch-
ful eye of the sun 1 would have helped
you. I do not know whv the light
would have made a difference. Some
psychological mumbo-jumho proba-
bly
If you were bleeding, yes, the door
would have been open. I just found
the tact thit you walked up a flight of
stairs, down to the end apartment, to
ask for a pen suspicious. Perhaps 1 am
a tittle too suspicious.
Had I known you, my door would
have been open. For all I know you
might be a neighbor of mine. I have
recently moved; maybe you Jive near
me. Perhaps you are also new to the
neighborhood.
According to the Greenville Police
Department, crime is down. Even
when crime is down public opinion
polls constantly rank crime as a top
concern of the public. Is the fear jus-
tified? On a logical evaluation the
answer is no. Yet. in the back of my
head a little voice keeps saying, "it is
better to be safe than sorry
A fear rests in society. A fear of
crime, especially violent crime. I have
friends who were just being nice.
They opened their doors to people
they thought were in need The need
they had was one of greed. They
wanted what my friends had: jewelry;
money, anything of value.
I even know people who did not
open their dixirs, but had their doors
opened for them. Some ww home-
some were not. An unlocked front
door while watching television turns
into a rude awakening for some col-
lege students.
I am sbrrv our socierv is the way ir
is. Sorry that our doors need to be
locked and sorry for the way our
neighbors are regarded with suspi-
cion. Even people we do not know
anything about are watched with a
wary eye.
Mavbe one day the experience will
come back to haunt me. One day 1
might need a door opened to me.
That door might sta locked. 1 hope
our neighbors can once again be our
friends, stranger will Ix; greeted with
open arms and the only thing to fear is
fear itself. I hope this day is soon,
because I do not like hiding behind a
door.
Oh yeah, 1 hope you got her phone
number.
LETTER
TRNA disagrees with student housing coverage
Recently, The East Carolinian has fea-
tured several letters to the editor
about issues related to the upcoming
city council election. Your Sept. 4th
edition featured an editorial con-
demning the city ordinancelimiting
the number of non-related persons in
a home of three. You cite a four bed-
room home in the College View area
as "typical However, the "typical"
home in the College View area resides
on a small lot (about 5000 square
feet) with only two or three bed-
rooms, one bathroom, a small yard and
little space for parking. This area was
established as a residential communi-
ty at a time when families generally
had only one car and walked to the
local grocery store, movie theatre, etc.
The Tar River Neighborhood
Association (TRNA) has been
opposed to slums and has promoted
the quality of life for students, fami-
lies and senior citizens since its incep-
tion in the late 1970's. In 1981, the
neighborhood contained seven con-
demned houses and was classified as a
transitional neighborhood by the city
of Greenville, meaning that it had the
potential to either improve or decline.
The TRNA worked with city officials
to place ordinances, which over a peri-
od of time could improve the quality
of living for everyone in the neighbor-
hood.
One of the problems you describe
is the exorbitant rent of $1000 for a
two or three bedroom home, when in
fact, if a reasonable rent was charged,
two or three persons could live com-
fortably in a house. In our mind, the
issue here is financial exploitation of
students, not the occupancy ordi-
nance. With the abundance of rental
property in Greenville now, the mar-
ket in this area is beginning to reflect
the desire of students to live in a�:as
where the apartments or homes are
clean, well-maintained, and afford-
able.
It is important to note that this
type of ordinance is routine in other
cities. Its sole purpose is to ensure a
standard of living that can lie enjoyed
by homeowners and renters alike.
This is not a "student district
Over 50 percent of the residences are
homeowner occupied, which include
young professionals, families and
medical residents, many of whom are
ECU graduates.
Finally, why is The East Carolinian
selecting an issue to polarize the
neighborhood? The Hast Carolinian
has never dealt with issues of stu-
dents living in slum housing or sub-
standard housing, not to mention the
victimized students of university
housing. When you discuss the need
for reform, what about these issues
which have been the concern of the
TRNA for almost 20 years:
Chen 1 Walker-Ridder
President, TRNA
LETTER
to the Editor
Logan brings success to university, not just athletics
As a senior, 1 find myself looking back
over my college years and thinking
how dramatically the school has
changed. Heck, even Greenville itself
has come a long way in supplying the
demand of a college town. I cannot
think of but one reason whv most of
the growth and beautitication of our
university is happening�our football
program, and more specifically. Coach
Steve Logan. Yes, I know all about the
Shared Visions campaign, and
Chancellor Eakin does deserve some
credit for his contributions. However,
most out-of-state students don't come
to ECU because of the new toilets in
Umstead. I will never understand
why all of our previous head coaches
and atheletic directors were such big
sellouts. Mavbe one dav ECU will
have the last word.
After being unsuccessful, many of
our previous coaches probably wish
they had stayed right here at ECU.
Now I think I will get straight to the
point: Steve Logan has had several
opportunities to move on to other pro-
grams, and yet he chose to stay for
whatever reason. I can remember the
day when 1 heard the news, it felt as
though he shook my hand personally
and said, "We are going to buy the AP
poll and put our name at 1 for every
preseason I had never seen or heard
of anyone who had as much loyalty to
the school as I had. Now 1 want to say
thanks to Steve Logan for staying at
ECU, and give him my support. It has
been a long time coming; however, 1
still want to sav that vou are one of the
top coaches in the country, as far as 1
see. This becomes vcrv obi bus at the
end of every year when ESPN and
other sports giants try to pull our
coach from us. No positive things ate
ever said about you during the vear. at
least not until vour name comes up as
a candidate to other positions. I he
sports gods make out like they knew
vour abilities and did not want to say
anything If the football team loses
every game this year. I will still Nip-
pon: you as head coach. Thanks tor all
your loyalty to ECU - it means a lot to
all of us. Go Pirates!
Jonathan L. Hoggins
Nutrition major
Senior
i
1
� JJ '��'
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� , �,i-
8 Tuesday, September 9. 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
Wackbd-Out Sam
by Wally Lamb
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Princess Starbrioht
lpEsT TEES
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!ASHE
"EAL
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ACROSS
1 Intelligent
6 Robert or Alan
10 Baby's first
word?
14 Chalkier
15 Crucifix
16 Object of
devotion
17 Tropical palm
18 Gear teeth
19 Animal
resembling a rat
20 Toady
22 Skin openings
23 Desideratum
24 Habituates
26 Follows A
15
29 Last lettor
30 Military org.
31 Wonderland girl
33 Mail
36 Colorer of truth
37 Crumble
39 Road sign
41 Pedestal slabs
43"� Is Bom"
44 Spouse
45 Basker's hope
47 T strain?
48 Piano
50 Like the Gobi
52 Dresden or
Spode
53 Hope addicts
58 Dancer Falana
59 "I smell �
60 Love, in Milan
61 Daredevil
Knievel
62 Hang out
63 Indian abode
64 Marries
65 Passed with
flying colors
66 German city
DOWN
1 Vacation spots
2 Mother of Jesus
3 Guinness
4 Scouts Job,
briefly
5 Circus swing
6 Roofed-in
gallery
7 Nut
8 Pooped
9 Paid notices
10 Certain women
11 Love greatly
12 Dispenses
charity
,13 Malt beverages
21 "� Haw
22 Golf stroke
25 Musical unit
26 Poise: abbr.
27 Desk Hern
28 Watch face
32 They're fit to be
tried!
33 � Alamos
34 Value
35 Male party
37 Luncheon
ending
38 Bombast
40 Theater sign
42 "Peter Pan" dog
43 Give zest to
45 Made lace
46 Onassis
48 Push roughly
49 Amassed
51 Coins
52 Ball of yam
54 Fix a street
55 Douses
56 Bring to bay
57 Glimpsed
59 � mode
O 1907 Tribune Madia S�rvioM. Inc.
All rights m��rved.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
A
0&i
A Home Away From Home
:h3C.C;i'iry.Clci-s-shs- -� Confirmation Class
Comnmtuorr ClassesSpirituality Ci ��� '
eUgZU7S7-t99t
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
I A I A r ITCH � FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS .k.a. Freshmen
WAIN tU. (who live off campus)
Once a month get together with other first year students who commute!
Eat lunch with new friends!
Talk about issues that interest you!
When: 12:30 to 2:00 p.m Tuesday, September 9
(and every second Tuesday of every month)
Where: The Underground in Mendenhall Student Center.
(Bring your Lunch or pick up something on the way.)
TUff Mimtt�'� �� Sneaker:
Jim Sturm, a great guy and
Director of Student Leadership Development
He'll tell you about all kinds of fun things to db at ECU!
FiwDr.4iksll :
It's Social, It's Fun, and It's FREE! Tf
For more information about the First-Year Brown Bug lit h Series
or if you need disability support call 328-4173
IFC Fall 1997 Fraternity
Rush
Sept. 8-11 8-11pm
bids extended at 12 midnight Sept. 11th
OKF Phi Kappa Psi-909 Forbes St
OKT Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St
I1KA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
nKO Pi Kappa Phi- 803 Hooker Rd.
IIAO Pi Lambda Phi-410 Elizabeth St.
�AE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - ALpha Phi House
IOE Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E. 5th St.
ITT Sigma Tau Gamma - 203 Oak St. 8
0X Theta Chi - 312 E. 11th St
AZO Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
AX Delta Chi - AAEi House
AXD Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
KA Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
K2 Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Elizabeth
IN Sigma Nu - 501 E. 11th St.
in Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E. 10th St.
Friendships are common, but J
Brotherhood lasts a lifetime.
ij
.�V
Go Greek

9
4fr
C H
'J





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Thursday. S�pt�m��r 4, 1997
reviews
The Simpsons
Songs in the Key of
Springfield
tlOHT OUT OF TIN
John Davis
ASSISTANT UFF.STYI.lt HOITO
In case you've been locked in one of Houdini's escape-proof boxes at the bot-
tom of the Pacific Ocean for the past eight years, TheSimpsons is the longest run-
ning animated sitcom in television's short history. Like any good art, it was once
blasted and lambasted by conservatives with too much time and not enough
drugs on their hands. That was back in Bart's famous underachkver days. Now
the Simpsons have proven they are anything but underachievers, delivering
witty, timely and very human comedy Simpsons quotes, mannerisms and per-
sonalities have worked their way into everyday American culture to the point
that high school students learn about Homer Simpson long before they team
about that Greek guy who wrote the Odyssey.
One of the most important, but often overlooked, aspects of the show's suc-
cess is the soundtrack. Just as often as one might overhear someone quote
Homer or Mr. Burns, one might also hear the "Itchy and Scratchy" theme song,
for a long time, the only Simpsons music anyone could get their hands on was
the badly made and out of print The Simpsons Sing the Blues, which was really just
a marketing trick and didn't feature any musk from the show, though it did have
the minor hit "Do the Bartman" on it.
Finally, producer Matt Omening and composer Alf Clausen have collaborat-
ed and compiled Songs m the Key ofSprmgMi. a "best of" collection of songs,
culled from the 150 episodes of the first seven seasons. All of the best songs are
not featured on the disc, but they did manage to cram over sixty of the funni-
est, most emotional and most memorable musical moments on this disc.
There are five different versions of the opening theme, including the
Australian version, the Hill Street Blues version, and the Halloween version.
There are just as many versions of the dosing theme, such as the parody of the
Addams Family theme.
But that's really just the bookends of the goldmine in this disc. Remember
the "Monorail Song?" The parody of "Rock Me Amadeus" combined with
Planet of the Apes(rock me Dr Zaius!)? "Who needs the Kwik-E-Manr
Reverend Lovejoy singing "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vidda" to an organ?He thought it
was In the Garden of Eden Ay caramba, indeed.)
The disc also includes memorable quotes from the cast of the Simpsons,
such as Homer complaining, "They lied to us through song! I hate that Bart
selling hymns, "Hymns here, get 'em while they're holy, fresh from God's brain
to your mouth Abraham Simpson wooing Mrs. Bouvier, "You remind me of a
poem I can't remember in a song that may never have existed about a place I've
never been to
One of the best aspects Of The Simpsons is the fact that the characters not only
have silly, comedk. moments, but they also have emotional, heartbreaking
moments. They're very human for animated characters. The songs in which
these moments occur are the best on the collection; Bart and Michael Jackson
singing "Happy Birthday Lisa Krusty and Sideshow Mel singing a heart
wrenching "Send in The Clowns Apu lamenting at the end of "Who Needs the
Kwik-E-Mart the entire cast performing "A Streetcar Named Desire Even
Mr. Bums lets some of his (albeit evil) emotions show in his dastardly giggly par-
ody of Disney's "Be Our Guest
The most amazing thing about this disc, though, is the fact that it remains
just as good after repeated listens. Most compilations of this kind get old quick-
ly, like, after the first run through. This collection stands apart from that crowd.
The intriguing, honest intelligence of rhis soundtrack makes it more fun and
man timeless than, say, the overplayed soundtrack to Nip Ftrikm. Not only that,
but there's so much more Simpsons musk out there. Enough for a Volume 2.
Which they might make for us if you go out now and buy yourself a copy. Be the
first kid on your block to own one. Be the envy of your neighbors. Be the first
person you know to learn the words to the parody of the Freemasons (who are
in league with the llluminati), "We Do (the Stonecutters Song) Offer ends
soon. Act Now.
CO 0 Cert r ey i e w
McClinton gives Hard
Times the blues
ANDY TURNER
UFRJTYIF. F.DITOR
to
That music was about pokin I know
it was.
Rhythm and bluescountry leg-
end Delbert McClinton delivered a
sex-driven set to the
Hard Times II crowd
Friday night. The crowd
responded in turn, grind-
ing and groping on the
dance floor to McClinton
and his band of coitus
cohorts' musical aphro-
disiac.
McClinton has long
been respected for his
blending of musical gen-
res. Friday night he
showed he was equally
adept at rhythm and
blues, blues, country and
even (gasp) beach music.
His seven-piece band was
equally impressive.
McClinton and company
rolled through songs like
Olympic gymnasts for close
hour and a half.
McClinton and his hand com-
bined good songs with accomplished
musicianship. His horn section was
particularly impressive. McClinton's
cigarette-stained vocals and virtuosi-
ty on the harp make him the perfect
bluesman.
They did it slow, and they did it
fast. McClinton started the show
with the grindy, swampy "Take Me
to the River Other songs such as "I
Wanna Thank You Baby" offered the
same groove-driven approach.
Dtlbart McClinton
cimt to Hard
Timts II Friday
night.
photo ccwrtiY �
OtllEST NOMf MSt
hornv
to an
However, the band knew the hard
stuff too. "Never Been Rocked
Enough" was sweaty, dirty rock and
roil that not too many groups of
McClinton and his band's age are
capable of doing. A cover of El more
James "Dust My Broom" likewise
ignored any limitations expected as
a result of the aging process.
McClinton left the stage
briefly to allow different
band members the oppor-
tunity to show off their
stuff. It is perhaps appro-
priate to consult the spirit
of the famous music critic,
Frankenstein's monster,
who offered the definitive
guidelines for music criti-
cism. In the words of
Frank, some of the solo
efforts were "goooood"
(keyboard player) while
others were very "baaaad"
(guitar player).
It was a night of explosive
libidos. I would say the
crowd were happy recipi-
ents of the band's penetrat-
ing performance, but I'd prefer not
to do it like that.
Hard Times II should be com-
mended for landing McClinton and
bringing him to Greenville.
McClinton's music certainly is
diverse, a welcome addition to local
music offerings. Fans of mainstream
country also have something to look
forward to this fall and winter thanks
to Hard Times II. As part of its
FallWinter concert series, well-
known country artists such as David
Lee Murphy, Rick Trevino and Lone
Star will be coming to town.
Impressive.
Legendary orchestra
promises smashing show at
Wright Auditorium
RON CHERliBINI JR
STAFF WHITE
NEW YORK � From the moment you first speak with Grover Mitchell, two
things are clear: He's blunt and, man, is he cool.
The longtime friend of William "Count" Basic and a legendary trombone
player in his own right, Mitchell now conducts the only band from the Big
Band era with continued success and mass appeal. To Mitchell, the success
of The Count Bask Orchestra boils down to a simple formula.
"One of the things about the Bask band Mitchell said, it's always
managed to be so good because of its high standards. We've pulled in great
musician over the years. You know, a lot of good musicians want to play with
Bask, but it's very hard to come in and stay. They kind of just melt away.
Ninety-nine percent of them could never make it. never reach the high level
of artistry
The level of artistry to which Mitchell refers is not easily attainable if yea
consider the kge ids the Alabama-bom, Pittsburgh-honed muakkn has
worked with in the Bask band. Consider that while the likes of Quirky Jones,
Thad Jones, Neal Hefty, Ernie Wilkens, Frank roster, and Frank Wes were
writing musk for Bask, the likes of Jimmy Rushing, Big Joe Williams, Helen
Humes and Bilik Holiday were bringing the blues to life on the mike.
Throw in musicians like saxophone players Herschel Evans, Eric Dixon
and Lester Young, trumpeter Buck Clayton, trombonist Dkkk Wells, drum-
mer Jo Jones, bassist Walter Page, and rhythm guitarist Freddk Green, and
it's easy to see why so many young musicians are banging on the door to fol-
low in the footsteps of these legends.
Count Bams music �ves m through Mastti
photo cownsT or mmkthw xn.
"I've been in some big bands. I played with Ellington Mitchell said. "But
this band is the most-imitated band. It is ensemble excellence
The Count Bask Orchestra has been together since 1935 in some form or
another, but it is the years from 1952 to the present that truly define the
band. The band refers to these years as the "comeback era For much of the
past 45 years the physical make-up of the band has changed, but rhe music
has remained the same.
"Man, there's not a lot of improving you can do or. the music Mitchell
said. "That's how things become classics, because you keep playing them. It's
like this, say you have the Mona Lisa in front of you and you paint a different
girl over it. You didn't just make it a better paintingnoyou just fucked up
the Mona Lisa
Prior to Mitchell's turn as conductor, the Bask band had started to stray a
bit from its roots. Prior to Basic's death in 1984, the band was limited in what
S��
PAGEtl
Pirate Underground gets students involved
JF.NNIFF.R Lf.bliKT I
�TPF WHITES
As it has been expressed frequently by the Lifestyle
writers of this paper, Greenville has a less than
diverse musk scene. More than a handful of stu-
dents complain that live musk in Grecnvilk's clubs
is often the same week after week and lacks origi-
nality.
For any of you rhat are aho frustrated wirh rhe
lack of diverse live musk shows around town, a new
program presented by the Student Union Popular
Entertainment Committee may prove to be an
exciting opportunity to catch fresh new acts on their
way up. The Pirate Underground is a new scries put
together by the Popular Entertainment Committee.
"This is for students as well as musicians says
Pirate Underground Chair C.W Jamescn. This is a
good piace for bands that play around but aren't well
known to get some exposure. It's for whoever wants
to come
Last week Duality and Peenuckk played to a
good size crowd in the Mendenhal! Social Room.
Duality, an acoustic female duo and ECU Musk
School students, mainly played songs by Indigo
Girts, Meredith Brooks, Janis Joplin and jewel.
They harmonized wonderfully and carried off
Joplin's "Bobby McGce" without a hitch. They did
play one original song and it would have been great
to hear more since chat was the best pan of their set.
Peenuckk played after Duality and really stirred
things up with their loud guitars, heavy bass and var-
ious horns. These five guys from Wilson try hard for
variety and pride themselves on sounding different
from anything heard before. They definitely
achieved their goal. Each song v as cclccrically dif-
ferent, original, and their set was filled with variety
galore.
"We wanted to play Pirate Underground for fun
and exposure said Peenuckk lead singer Gray
Tyson. "I guarantee that even if you hate our music
and think we suck you will laugh at least once dur-
ing our set Well, the man is definitely as good as his
word. They were a crazy band-no one could help but
laugh at their antics.
The Pirate Underground happens ever
Thursday night from 8:00-10:45 in the Mendcnhall
Social Room (right underneath the cafeteria). The
ftjpular Entertainment Commtttu; serves free pizz:
and drinks and plans to do more run stuff dependin
on the amount of interest shown. The Pirate
Underground could be great for the students of
ECU. If you are in a band and want to plav, all you
have to do is sign up for a date. The Student Union
tech staff provides a stage, sound and lights. Plus,
they raiie your band's performance for ynu ro use as
a demo�all for free. The Popular Entertainment
Committee will also publicize the event and give
the band a fifteen minute interview on WZMB
before the show.
Since this is a trial semester for the Pirate
Underground, participation is extremely important.
Anyone in a band is welcome to sign up to play and
all students are encouraged to come down to the
Mendenhal! Social room on Thursday nights to
catch a band that just might be the next big thing.
Hollywood burns on the net
aTlrr.FWW
andy Turner
I.IFF.STYI.F. P.DITOK
Dullard
nSt
I like peopk who like to make
Hollywood mad. That's pretty vindk-
tive, you may think. Well, after many
hours of extensive and exhaustive
research, I have developed the follow-
ing formula: Vindictiveness Fun
squared.
The threat whkh I am referring to
is the new legion of internet warriors
who spend their time spreading news
about things Hollywood doesn't want
you to know. Certainly, that is a worth-
whik pursuit, Hollywood often takes a
"no-vaseline" approach (what else can
you can call taking review blurbs out
of context and putting them on movie
posters) to the marketing of its
movies, making the most wretched of
movies appear to be fun, fun, fun for
the whole family, when, in fact, the
movie is the "feel-nauseous" film of
the year.
The leader of the pack is Harry
Knowies. Knowles has received a
tremendous amount of media atten-
tion for his "Ain't it Cool News" web-
(www.aint-it-cool-news.com).
site
Articles on the Austin internet movie
king have appeared in Variety and
Fjtiertamment Weekh, and Rolling Stone
named "Ain't it Cool" as a hot website.
Knowles has developed a good foUow-
ing with lots of insider information
about the movie business, leading him
to be proclaimed by some as "the most
hated man in Tinseltown His spe-
cialty is making it into movie screen-
ings and reporting on the internet
whether the movie was any good or
not. Knowles also does stuff about
television and other entertainment
matters, and he delivers the truly
SEE UNDERGROUND PAGE tt
"� V
Tie information nvbway
is rtt mod tku column
Iraveis. Hn similar m
firms rlovns, we're tin-
vine mefnnny car. We
hoUey searri ike net in
searrn nfallinings weird
ana1 flat oni strange.
Come join at on Ink trip
into tin world of silly
sites ami warty web pages
fit M '� t r � V i t 1 : ' '
IIAKK.kM)M.IS
I)Y WkROiD
Till FQRtM BROTHERS
Ain't It Cool?
Harry Knowta is on a mission from God to ksop Hollywood straight.
PHOTO COURTESY OF AIM T IT COOL HEWS
MTV loses; Jewel, Apple win
Vim lwli-h TV? (X rMMVP mm ik � mhi'it m
VnTtofi. Iiki walcli TV N)�'iil IA. liw TV limmir
TV F.Mrvmr kmms (lt.il. VM ii (kill kwr i
llul TV i- u.iii'hiii �im
John Davis
ASSISTANT I.IFF.STYI.F. F.OITOR
After the sixth time through the 1997
Video Music Awards, I've about decid-
ed that MTV is luore Satanic than
Marilyn Manson. Granted, both
have been courted by the llluminati,
but I have to say that Lucifer probably
gets more mileage for his evil deeds
out of MTV than out of Manson.
Example: whik all Manson could
do that approached evil nn last
Thursday's awards show was to bare
his buttocks and call Christians nasty
names, MTV actually managed to pull
the music industry lower than it ever
has before by allowing hacks like
Manson and Puff Daddy to appear on
the show. Any and all of the good
moments on the show were due to
luck and not MTV planning.
Firstly, the sound mix of the show
was pretty darn rotten. You'd expect a
music channel to have high-tech-
fancy-schmancy-sound gear in place
so that viewers could actually hear
their favorite bands. As it is, the mix
was crappier than any I've ever
encountered. Granted, it was the
Video Music Awards, and there was a
lot of nice video. No music though.
Fortunately, some musicians pay
attention, and MTVs penchant for
bad mixes must have been in the
minds of Jewel, Beck and U2(whose
stripped down version of "Please" was
a welcome change). They all managed
to have great sounding songs in spite
of the bad mix.
Sec, there's this whole PutTDaddv
thing. Though Chris Rock successful-
ly slammed on the notorious thief of
pop songs several times during the
evening, it was clear that much more
slamming was required. For example,
when Biggie Fries's mother came up
on stage to thank all involved with his
career, she forgot to thank all the kids
who bought crack from Biggie in the
early days of his career. Surely Rock
could have mentioned that.
There was also that horrible perfor-
Beck is best.
PHOTO COURTESY OF GEFFEN RECORDS
mance of "Every Song I Steal where
Puffy managed to bring a very lifelike
android of Sting on stage to lip-sync
the song without any copyright
infringement repercussions. Chris
SEE TUBE. PAGE 12
'� ii'lW �int ���-
r-
-?rz
� �





� p
11 Tuesday, September 9, 1997
We
The East Carolinian
Truth,Equality,Justice
123 WSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
Count Basie
continued from page 10
it could play. Basie, who was in poor
health, couldn't produce his full
repertoire. Then, after his death,
some of the new band ieaders started
to tinker with the music.
"I was very unhappy with what
this band was all about at the time
Mitchell said of. his first taste of
being the leader. "It had to change.
So, basically, I cleaned house. A lot of
musicians that shouldn't have been
here, had crept inI call them Postal
Workers. On many occasions, 1 had to
let musicians go
What Mitchell has today is a fan-
tastic mix of veteran Basie perform-
ers like popular drummer Butch
Miles, sax men John C. Williams and
Kenny Hing, and trombonist William
Hughes along with up-i.J-coming
musicians like trumpeter Shawn C.
Edmunds, trombonist David Kcim,
and alto saxophonist Brad Leali.
"I try to reassure the young musi-
cians that they are good players. I
don't want them to imitate the guy
whose seat they're inthey're not
going to be another Joe Newman or
Frank Foster Mitchell said. "I tell
them, 'Play what you arethat's what
got you here
Of course, Mitchell has no prob-
lem showing them what he's talking
about.
"Man, it's always fun he said. "I
love to just pick up that horn and
blow
So, what can you expect from The
Count Basie Orchestra on Friday
night in Wright Auditorium?
"I guarantee they'll have a good
time Mitchell promised.
But don't expect to see a playiist
on your playbill because even
Mitchell won't know what they're
going to play until he gets on stage.
"I just sniff the air he said. "I get
a feel for the crowd and then we lay
them in the aisles
A limited number of tickets are
still available to the general public
for $20, ECU facultystaff for $15,
and ECU studentsyouth for $10.
Call the ECU Central Ticket Office
at 919-328-4788. Dcafspeech-
impaired call 919-328-4736.
Showtime is at 8 p.m.
Dullard
continued from page 10
funny and perhaps pathetic "Harry's
World What makes his site good,
however, is Knowies' obvious love for
movies. He's not out there just trying
to screw Hollywood; movies are his
passion.
Another interesting source for
movie gossip is the "Coming
Attractions" website
(http:corona.bc.cafilms). Its infor-
mation is slightly more reliable than
other sites. "Coming Attractions" gets
a lot of its information from movie
extras and underlings. It lacks the
sense of humor that "Ain't it Cool" has,
but it's still a fun site. It contains
information about all kinds of movies
in the can, in "development hell" and
even just rumors of possible movies.
Whether it's true or not, it's still fun to
read about the possibility of Prrtty in
Pint 2 or an A-Ttam movie.
"Drew's Script-O-Rama"
(www.script-o-rama.com) can keep
you entertained for days, weeks, eter-
nity. Drew has a ton of movie screen-
plays, movie transcripts, television
scripts and even screenplays from
aspiring screenwriters. You can find
Quentin Tarantino's original screen-
play for Trur Ronumre, which contains
lots of stuff that didn't make it to the
movie's final version. You can pull up
an unmade David Lynch screenplay. It
would take you a very, very long time
to read all the stuff this guy has for you
at the click of a mouse.
There are two other movie sites I
find quite enjoyable. For basic movie
information and great links, there is
the Internet Movie Database
(http:us.imdb.com). Be forewarned,
however, the IMDB allows anyone to
post information about movies, often
leading to incredibly false information.
"Screen It" (www.screcnit.com) is
supposed to be a tool for parents to
know if a movie is OK for their kids to
see. It is also often downright hilarious
as it counts (very specifically) the
number of curse words, sex scenes,
etc. in a movie. Entire plots of movies
are often revealed through "Screen It"
analysis. So don't read it if don't want
to know.
There's lots and lots of other cool
movie sites on the webs, giving
Hollywood the stinky-fits. Gotta love
-n
Welcome Back
Members of Omicron Delta Kappa
You are Cordially Invited to attend the
Fall Welcome Reception
Tuesday, September 16,1997
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Sweethearts, Todd Dining Hall
Dress: Casual
Please call student Leadership Development Programs
(328-4796) if you are UNABLE to attend,
so that we may update our ODK mailing list.
.trry?.
14K GOLD COLLEGIATE
JEWELRY COLLECTION
FEATURING:
PEE DEE JEWELRY
& WATCHES
AVAILABLE AT:
Floyd G.
fRo&ittsen ewe&eH&, inc.
Jndep&ident Diamond JeutdetA " v
608 E ARLINGTON BLVD.
ARLINGTON VILLAGE
321-7000
MONSAT.9A.M7P.M.
SUNDAY 1 P.M5 P.M.
B
��
HB 2VK:f IB IB 2IE:f FB Kf EUfB !�
iiiAT'o iiannrniMP3
3
��ei)MiyiyntKmi
GET A CLUE
� ��
Find out what's available for you at the annual GET A CLUE ON STUDENT LIFE fair.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10,10:30AM-1PM, WRIGHT CIRCLE,
STUDENT PLAZA. FREE PRIZES!
(ftang with thm �ount
The World Famous Count Basie Orchestra jazzes up the weekend. Student tickets
are now available at the Central Ticket Office for $10. All tickets $20 at the door.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 12 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM.
tSSee"a ttrSp
Use your ECU ID to see a free travel-adventure.
The Benelux Countries:Netherlands, Belgium, Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg, TUESDAY, SEPT. 16 AT 4 OR 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE.
An all-u-can-eat theme dinner is served at 6 p.m. for just $12. Dinner
tickets must be reserved by Thursday, September 11 with meal cards,
cash, check, or credit card.
ira'TOmAir
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat trip to New York?
The ECU Student Union is sponsoring a trip to New York for as little
as155. The price includes round-trip transportation and lodging for three
nights.To reserve a spot for this steal of a trip,
drop by the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
IS
���
a
SPORTS
���
5
Sneak Preview: The Game airs Wednesday night in Hendrix Theatre at 8
p.m. (Pick up your free screening pass at the CTO on day of the show.
Limit two per ECU ID).
Main Event: Nicholas Cage in Con Air (R) screens in Hendrix on Sept.
11 -13 at 8 p.m. Your student ID gets you and one guest in for free.
Git lAxdtrrrvHHctfir Sound
Catch the latest up-and-comingbands for free in The Pirate Underground
EVERY THURSDAY AT 8 P.M. IN THE MSC SOCIAL ROOM.
This week: Masons and Russell Henderson
Meet the Maker
Check out the Art Exhibition: Complex Gifts in the MSC Gallery
Artist Reception on Thursday, Sept. 11 from 7-9 p.m.
���
Ml
s
Mi
5
���
Mi
s
���
Mi
Student Health
Staffed by �Qi4 Student Health Service (phusicans � physical
therapistiathletic trainer) fi �eu Dept. of Jamlhj Medicine
Mondays, Tuesdays,
Thursdays
1:30 PM - 4:0� PM
HOURS- Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.ml 2 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m. ����
! fc:tf B M� IB M! fcH B Kf E!f f B Wtoi
9 acute injuries exercise-
� overuse injuries induced illnesses
� proper training - physical therapy
techniques - education
rehabilitation
Call Student Heatth Service @ 328-631? or 68�f for more Information!
Student Heatth Service Sports Medicine etink is free of charge- Costs
will varu for x-rau. labatom. end ohusical theraou services rendered.
s ��





iw-aat
The East Carolinian
Tube
Continued from paga 10
Rock should have, at that point, shot
the android of Sting, thus revealing
Puffy's horrible deception.
Why is it that every R&B per-
former seemed to be unable to just
play a song rather than pretending to
be some grandiose comic character?
Da Brat dressed up as a Roman
Centurion? Come on. Tle only R&B
performers with any dignity were the
old school boys, Will Smith and LL
Cool J, and why weren't they perform-
ing?
As for the awards themselves, they
went, as usual, to those performers
who least deserved them (such as Puff
Daddy and No Doubt), with the
exception of Beck, who won Best
Direction and technical things hke
that, but I still say he was robbed.
Countless other video works of
genius went completely unmentioned
in the show, such as Guided By
Voices' outstanding "Bulldog Skin
Radiohead's "Paranoid Android and
any videos by any member of the Wu
Tang Clan.
So, I humbly offer these awards to
the real winners of Saturday night's
contest. Best at singing longing lulla-
bies about God while stili looking
sexy: Jewel. Best at telling it like it is:
Fiona Apple, who declared on live
television that "this entertainmentl
world is bullshit
Best cowboy hat with antlers: John
Popper. Best hip-hop mythology: Wu
Tang Clan. Best Comeback: Will
Smith. Best: Beck.
The evening's overall losers were
Jennv McCarthy, Mariah Carey and
Puff Daddy. The Top Position for
Loser is a tie between Marilyn
Manson, who is a dumbass and could
stand to think of a more clever rebel-
lion, and MTV who has forgotten
what the "M" means.
The Video Music Awards will
probably be rerun to death for the
next month at least once a day That's
30 more chances for you to avoid it at
all costs, unless you're like me and you
need an excuse to be GenerationX-ish
and complain.
Got The Picture,
Get The Job
Photographers Wanted
by
eastcarolinian
Inquire at the Student
Publication Blelg. (2nd Floor)
I'm a loser, baby.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MTV
�Mr
METHERUMOS BELGIUM GRAND-DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG
Locates Free until Upm
. $, tottto Butch lit �
ONE STEP BEYOND
80's Retro
Music
he eastcarolinian
Find your pot of gold in
the �oet coroHnion, Lode.
To advoreo wUh uel coil u� ot 328-3000
Diamonds, tulips, and
much, much more.
All-you-can-eat dinner menu: Dutch spBt pea
soup, Belgian beef and beer stew, chicken
with apricots and almonds, Gouda cheese and
egg casserole, steamed zucchini and yaUow
squash, dark pumpemidM bread, and three-
layer chocolate cake.
$50 Hi-balls
$1.50 Busch light botdes
Tuesday, September 16,1997 Hendrix Theatre, 4 pm & 7:30 pm
t anrru'T nmmint.hhmmm.�mkua.�t�ii�rtitfim����.
I iHJtjN I Ii�hi nm ttdt tw.1. B� CIO to mim S�M c�w
TTrB llfUU ,nantrSntmtml.nfffm,mlia.Mwmcit.iYKK�m
MAIIcK HUw m�� m��������fc�p��tt�(M�.
YOU 6tl THtKt �t�.2S.47M or 1.808.KU.Afrs; 0��D��t-ii�a�ti�d uaa M�.Ht.?3�
A0WNCE TB MMMtt AT
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EAST COAST MUSE 4, VC ?
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KappaAlpM-Qlder
aajL BUtiaai a etaM lib
The Motive:
LEARN ABOUT
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND
STUDENT SERVICES
and
GET A CLUE ON LIFE
The Scene
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10,1997
10:30 am to 1:00pm
Wright Plaza
RAIN DATE: September 17,1997
The Suspects:
Sponsored by the division of student life
Gamma Rho Chapter
East Carolina's Oldest Fraternity
Chartered September 26, 1958
500 East 11th Street
Rides: 757-0128
THE HOME OF SOUTHERN
GENTLEMEN
Dear Rushee
As a fraternity rushee at East Carolina University, you will have an impor-
tant decision to make. You must choose the organization which you wish to join. A
fraternity of men with whom you will live for the next four years, and whom you
will call your brothers for the rest of your life. We at Kappa Alpha are sure that
you will make a careful evaluation of various aspects of fraternity life. And further
more we believe that you will agree that KA is the most unique and traditional of
any college fraternity. We are looking forward to meeting you during rush, and
wish you the best of luck in deciding on a fraternity and in your college career.
The brothers of Gamma Rho
Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order
� � .4w. Wu 4�w� '�'��





13 Tuesday. September 9. 1997
snorts
The East Carolinian
First game comes up short for football team
web
iTrifTfn � hr.uK-iiii nl:i n h,ii,tii nwl ii k v.j. .
AMUIM Ross
tttttn i in iiik
ECU had hoped to go into Mountaineer Held at West
Virginia and tome awav with a win. but instead thev came
up short for the second straight vcar.
The Pirate offense started off slowlv but the momen-
tum swung their way toward the end of the first quarter.
WVt got on the board first with a Jav Taylor 42-yand field
gOal to put the Mountaineers ahead 3-0 with 4:47 left in
the first.
$ECU
56
1319
375
7-60
$6-267
133:51
i81840S
112-50
Net Yards Rushing
Net Yards Passing
Total Net Yards
Penatties:Number-Ysrds
Number of Punts-Yards
Possession Time
Third Down Conversions
Fourth Down Conversions
BBBWBBB MMni
i �
hcads-up plav on fourth and 14 bv punter Andrew
Styes allowed the Pirates to keep their drive alive with less
than lour minutes left in the first quarter. From the ECU
7-vard line. Haves received the ball and saw two defenders
coming toward him but saw a huge opening to his left.
Instead of risking a blocked punt. Haves ran for 23 vards and
the EC! first down. In the process, he fumbled'the bali.
but fortunately the ball bounced right back up into his
hands and he continued on to the VVVU 40-vard line.
Hayes noted that this wasn't a planned plav. he just took
the initiative to get the first down. He also talked about the
near disaster of losing the ball.
"I took it up and thought about punting it. but then I
saw the opening and just tried to get the first down for the
team Bases said. "I'm not a run-
VI71 71 T mnR 'XK;k' so tnaCs re:il,v tn- first
WVU timc ' Ci'rritd 't and I think I was
carrying it like a loaf of bread or
something. It just slipped out of
my hand and thank someone
because it bounced right back up to
me
That effort, along with six punts
that averaged 44.5 vards, including
two kicks that rolled dead inside
the drive yard-line, and a 46-yard
field goal earned Hayes the
Conference ISA Special teams
player of the week.
1 he Pirates scored on the next plav
as Jason Nichols rook a pitch from
quarterback Dan Gonzalez, who
258
127
385
849
4-172
26:09
510-50
000
found a wide open Trov Smith in the end one for the 40-
yard score. ECU had the lead at 7-3.
fullback Scott Harley had a tough dav, onlv rushing for
12 yards and falling prey to an injured ankle in the second
quarter. At first glance .ogan thought the ankle was possi-
bly broken, but trainers assessed it was just badlv sprained.
He didn't return for the second half.
ECU took a 10-3 lead after Baves nailed a 46-vard field
goal with seven seconds left. At the half, ECU had only
completed 33 yards on the ground, and Head Coach Steve
Logan attributed the low yardage to an ECU offensive line
that couldn't effectively block on the run.
"Pass protection is decent but we can't run block
Logan said.
Gonzalez thought for the first game the offensive line
held rheir ground as best they could.
" I here were a couple of missed assignments and sure it
was a combination of missing assignments and missing of
couple of blocks, but our offensive line showed up todav
and played well Gonzalez said.
West Virginia's first possession in the second half proved
profitable for the Mountaineers as Amos Zereoue ran in a
seven yard touchdown for the 10-10 tie. Zereoue finished
with 199 yards on the day.
Logan knew going into the match up that Zereoue
would be the player to watch, and saw a lot of improvement
from last year's 111 yard performance against ECU to this
year's performance.
"He's special I.ogan said. "He's better than he was last
vear
SEE FOOTBALL PAGE 14
it
I Conference USA Results
from last weekend
Tulane 31, Cincinnati 17
West Virginia 24, East Carolina 17
California 35, Houston 3
Utah 27, Louisville 21
Memphis 28, UAB 7
Southern Miss 24, Illinois 7
C-USA
ALL GAMES
m
TUIANE
JJL
MEMPHIS
m
SOUTHERN MISS Ml
EAST CAROLINA Ml
�1
HOUSTON
JHL
LQUISjflliL
CINCINNATI
JHL
ifc2
JL2
JLL
J�
Tavares Taylor (no. 11) and Larry Shannon (right) look on as the
Pirates fall to the Mountaineers, 24-17.
PHOTO BY AMANDA ROSS
CHECK ME OUT
Teams run near
top during meets
JR. Chojnacki. a mathematics major, doesn't need to know any numbers to play a
relaxing game of frisbee on the mall during some free time from school.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
JKREMV ANDERSON
ST FI VI R I I F�
ECU's Cross Country Program got
out of the blocks well over the week-
end as both women's and men's
teams placed highly in their first
n.xtsof the season.
The Lady Pirates, under the
direction of Couch "Choo" Justice,
placed second at the VCU
Invitational held in Richmond, Va
This meet varied slightly from the
original cross-country format. The
women were placed in teams of two
and their times were added together
for a total score.
"It (the meet) was more of a high-
powered practice � that allowed us
to get our feet wet Justice said.
Several Lady Pirates finished
within seconds of one another.
'We have good depth which will
lead to good cross-country scores later
on Justice said.
The duo of senior Karen Reinhard
and sophomore Robin Bates finished
third overall, highest of any of the
Pirate runners.
"Everyone really ran well
Reinhard aid.
Hates attributes her success to her
teammates.
"We all push each other pretty
hard at practice Bates said.
The men were also in action as
they plac first in the at the I C-
WilmiiiL .n "Scahawk" Invitational
on liidav.
Sophomore Justin England was
the top Pirate finisher. He placed
fourth overall.
Freshman Stuart Will was the sec-
ond Pirate to cross the line. Will
placed sixth in the meet which was
the first of his collegiate career.
ECU Assistant Coach Mike Ford
was pleased with the team's overall
performance.
"VVe did very well. 1 was pleased
we ran 14 guvs. Many freshman met
personal goals.
Both teams return to action Friday
in Chapel Hill at the University of
North Carolina.
NICE MOVES
Jack Tyson catches some air and skateboards down the steps at Mendenhall
on Sunday Mendenhall is a popular place for skateboarders and rollerbladers
PHOTO BY AMANOA PR0C10R
Preparation begins for home opener
Am m) Ross
M'llR I s I HI ,ik
ECU will have to put the West Virginia loss behind
them and prepare for a Wake Forest team that
knocked off Northwestern, 27-20 on Saturday
The Demon Deacs will be the home opener for
the Iirates this Saturday at 3:36 p.m. and the game
will be televised regionally on Fox Sports South.
A sting of injuries from the Mountaineers has left
the Pirates banged up. Kendrick Phillips, Rod
Coleman, Norris McClcary and Scott Harley all suf-
fered ankle injuries on the astroturf of Mountaineer
Held. Ixgan didn't know if Harley would be back for
this weekend's game, but said on a positive note
that his injury isn't as bad as initially thought.
"It's not as severe as we thought Logan said. "I
really thought it was broken. Everybody responds
differently to those things. Some kids will roll an
ankle and come back. 1 think Scott will be a quick
healer, but we'll just have to see
Logan is grateful that the injuries are not to the
knees, which usually take longer to heal and many
are season ending.
"I'm thankful they're not knees Logan said.
"That's the way I look at it. As long as it's not a knee
injury or a shoulder displacement, you can kind of
get a kid back
Many fans may not see Wake Forest as a tough
match up but Logan says beware because they are a
good football team.
"Wake Forest is a good football team that's going
to be hard for a lot of people to digest given their
recent history Logan said. "They have a lot of kids
back who have played a lot of football from last
year
This will be the third meeting in the two schools'
historv with ECL' taking a 1963. 20-13 decision in
Greenville and the Deacs snagging the last meeting
23-20 in 1979 at Wmston-Salem.
This is the first of two ACC schools ECU will
play this season, and while many fans feel this is an
important match up because they are ACC, Logan
sees it as just another team.
"To me, I've been here nine years and we've had
Big East, we've had SEC. you name it. we've had it
in here Logan said. "But I do understand the
meaning of it
Since this is the first home game, Logan hopes to
see the stands packed with cheering fans.
"I hope everybody will come and fire things up
and we can set a new record for a home attendance
Logan said. "That will be fun. The players are
counting on it, the coaches are counting on it. We
get that thing rocking out there maybe we can put a
victorv out there
ECU Football student ticket information
Ticket Pick Up
Begins Today:
Athletics Ticket Office (located
behind Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium Press Box)
9 a.m. 5 p.m.
Mendenhall Ticket Office
11 a.m6 p.m.
ECU Student Store Ticket Office
inew location)
9 a.m1 p.m.
'Valid ECU 10 must be presented to pick up
tickets and to be admitted in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium on urne day.
'Group tickets available at the Athletics
Ticket Ofke ONLY Monday 9 a.m. 5 p m.
the week of each home game. Please call
3284500 for more information.
"Limited number of student tickets avail-
able on first-come, first-serve basis.
"Limited number of guest tickets available.
All student seating is General Admission by
Section designation.
"Limited number of student and student
guest tickets available for the South
Carolina game. All guest tickets are
$22.00.
"Students enter on the scoreboard side
through gates 1 and 6.
TICKET PICK-UP DATES:
ECU vs. Wake Forest Sept. 9-11
ECU vs. South Carolina Sept. 16-19
ECU vs. Southern Mississippi Oct. 7-9
ECU vs. Memphis Oct. 21-23
ECUvs. Cincinnati Nov. 11-13
m





��
14 Tuesday. September 9. 1997
soon
The East Caraliman
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Golf team finishes third
The ECU golf team captured a third-place finish at the
Seton Hall Pirate Invitational on Sunday. Although they
held an 11-stroke lead after the first round, the Pirates shot
a 314 on the final 18 holes for a two-day total of 608.
Georgetown won the tournament with a score of 602, while
Penn State finished second (606).
"I'm disappointed said head coach Kevin Williams.
'This is similar to last season, when we would play well in
the first or second rounds, get in good position, and not do
well in the final round
Sophomore Robbie Perry had a career-best finish as he
placed second (tied) with a score of 147. He shot a four-
over par 76 on Sunday, and was just one stroke away from
first place finisher Matt Finger of Georgetown. Perry, along
with teammate Stephen Satteriy. led the tournament going
into the final round. Satteriy finished the tournament tied
for seventh with a score of 152.
Other ECU scores include Matt Riggs' 153 (tl4th
Marc Miller's 156 (t31st), and Brian Crawford's 164
(t49th).
The next stop for the golf team is the Palmetto
Intercollegiate, held at Osprey Point Golf Course on
Kiawah Island, S.C. The tournament takes place
September 15-16.
Women's soccer drops game
Virginia Tech sophomore forward Shannon Otto
(Midlothian. Va.) scored a pair of goals as the Hokies
defeated the ECU Pirates, 4-1, here Sunday at the Tech
Soccer Field. With the win. Virginia Tech evened its mark
at 2-2; while the Pirates dropped to 1-3 on the season.
Junior midfielder Katie Irish (Clifton, Va.) opened the
game's scoring for the Hokies at the 18:01 mark when she
knocked one in off the crossbar from 14 yards out. Otto
would get on, the scoreboard at 32:31 in the first half when
she played a pass from senior defender Monica Maxwell
(Germantown, Md.) and fired a shot into the back of the
net past ECU keeper Amy Horton (Raleigh).
At the 39:24 mark. Otto would add her second goal from
17 vards out for a 3-0 Hokie advantage at the half. For the
first 45 minutes, Virginia Tech registered nine shots on
goal: while the Pirates had three. Both goalkeepers, Dani
DeSerio (Springfield, Va.) of Tech, and ECU's Horton tal-
lied one save in the first half.
Just three minutes into the second half, Virginia Tech
widened its lead to 4-0 when Irish offered up a pass to
senior forward Heidi Skinner (Alexandria, Va.) who scored
from 15 vards out.
Sophomore forward Jennifer Reiley (Alexandria, Va.)
would record the Pirates' goal when she blasted one in
from 18 vards. ECU midfielder Courtney Jurcich
(Springfield, Va.) and freshman forward Kim Sandhoff
(Waipahu, .Hawaii) combined to assist on the play. The
score was Reiley's third goal of the season, having regis-
tered her first two goals in ECU's 5-0 shutout victory over
Barton College last Wednesday.
ECU finished with 12 shots on goal; Virginia Tech tal-
lied 17. Cara Morgridge (Burke, Va.) anchored the back
line for the Pirates in the second half, recording two saves.
DeSerio notched a total of six saves in goal for the Hokies.
"I thought we started the match well today said ECU
head coach Neil Roberts. "We were playing solid defen-
sively, but when Virginia Tech scored its first goal, it hurt
our attack. We were unable to sustain an attacking style
and get back into the game after that goal. In the second
half our plav was much improved, and we hope we can
build on the last 20 minutes we played today as we prepare
for our CAA opener
The Pirates will return to action on Wednesday, Sept.
10, when they make their final stop on their three-game
road swing through Virginia at CAA-foc William & Mary.
The match will be the conference opener for ECl :
William and Mary is 3-0 overall and 1-0 in the CAA, win-
ning its conference opener 7-1 over Old Dominion last
Wednesday. First touch is scheduled for 7:30 p.m
Men's Soccer
Freshman forward Paul Leese (Chesire, England) regis-
tered three goals and the Buccaneers of Charleston
Southern would go on to defeat the Pirates, 4-0, Saturday
at the CSU Soccer Complex. With the loss, ECU's record
now stands at 1-2.
1 eese scored his firsr two gnnls off of penalrv kicks. His
nrstcameat the 8:15 mark for a 1-0 Buccaneer advantage.
In the 39th minute. Pirate forward Iinnv Vitale (Raleigh)
narrowlv missed a score which would have tied the contest
when he hit the post with a shot attempt. The 1-0 margin
would stand until the half.
At the 52:00 mark. ECl' sophomore midfielder Robert
Hvatt (Jacksonville) was recorded for a hard tackle; there-
by, forcing the Pirates to play a man down for the remain-
der of the match.
At the 56:33 mark, Leese added his second penalty-
kick score when when he blasted one into the right side of
the net past ECU keeper Jay Davis (Wilson).
The freshman leese tallied his third goal at 63:04
when he knocked one in off an ECU defender for a 3-0
lead. At 67:28 Charleston Southern senior Sheron
Simmons (Charlesron. S.C.) recorded rhe .crime's final
score off an assist from Wbjciech Cwik (Ontario, Canada).
ECU recorded three shots on goal in today's contest,
plaving the match without its best scorer junior forward
Wyatt Panos (Swansboro, N.C.) who was recorded in the
Pirates' lust contest on Thursday versus The Citadel.
ECU will return to action on Thursday when it travels
to Blacksburg, Va. to face the Hokies of Virginia Tech. First
touch is set for 4:00 p.m.
Football
continued trom page 13
ECU battled back and took the
lead with 2:51 left in the third when
Jamie Wlson took a four yard pass
from Gonzalez. The Pirates took the
17-10 lead and looked to be on their
way to a possible victory.
But the next play would prove to
be the thorn in the Pirates side as
Bayes punted one down field to Nate
Terry, who then proceeded to tear
down the field for the 100-yard kickoff
return for the 17-17 tic. After that, the
momentum was in favor of West
Virginia.
Logan said they had worked on
special teams for a situation like that.
"That kickoff return, that's just a
shame Logan said. "I can't tell you
how hard we've worked on special
teams for that to happen but a kid
made a play
Smith, who finished with 126
yards, agrees.
"We were high before that and the
kick return just pushed it down a bit
Smith said. "We thought the offense
would come back and try to make a
play but they didn't
WVU would score one final time
with 13:15 left in the game as Zereoue
had a nine-yard run to put the
Mountaineers up for good, 17-24, as
they went on for their second straight
win against ECU in Mountaineer
Field.
Gonzalez threw for 279 yards and
one touchdown with no interceptions
and felt the timing on the passing
game was on cue.
"For the first game, our timing on
the passing game was pretty good
Gonzalez said. "It's always tough to go
out for your first game against an
opponent like that
Logan was impressed with the
effort.
"He was under tremendous stress
and he continued to throw strikes
Logan said. "He's a big time guy
The Pirates will look for their first
win this Saturday as they host Wake
Forest in the home opener at 3:30
p.m. in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT L AW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
WEDNESDAY CLASSICS NIGHT
The Best in Classic Roj
ills
fsO's and all the
Thirsty Thurs. LADIES NIGHT
Many, Many Sh
Snot
Plus the
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Plus All Pitelirs Onlf io
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DOUBLE CHANCE
Play the Beiore & Amu contest for
a chance to win FREE Textbooks for
spring '98 semester, sponsored by
Dowdy Student Stores and ECU
Vending Services. Entry forms avail-
able when you pick up your student
football tickets. See entry
form for details.
Store How?
Monday -Friday. 7:30 am � 7:00 pm
Saturday. 9:00 am-3:00 pm
Student and Student Guest tickets for the Wake Forest
Game may be picked up Tuesday through Thursday,
9:00 a.m. to 7:00 pm at Dowdy Student Stores.
PurpleGold Prc-gamc Sale this Thursday, Friday & Saturday!
Take it AWAY, Pirates! Sale Today?
On Monday & Tuesday followins every
AWAY same WON by the pirates, we'll take
1 off resular price apparel for each point
scored by ECU, up to 30.
Ronald E. Dowdy
Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Building, just off Wright Circle
328-6731www.studehtstores.ecu.edu
Purpleville, NC
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
�H" �
"if m �





15 TiesJdy. Septembei 9. 1397
0
Duchossois made a similar threat to close the ir.nA
concessions from the state government, lie said ri
other competition tor the entertainment dollars ot
into profits.
Duchossois relented in 1995 onh after Illinois (�a.
torm a task force to stud the racing situation, rlincton
ieepK
i i ii.ir agreed to
.pokesman lon k.iu
said Duchossois was not immediatcK available for comment.
"Soccer City, USA" is back
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) � A couple of decades ago. when the North
American Soccer League was m its short-lived prime, Fbrtland was known as
"Soccer ('irv I SA
I -or a few spirited hours on Nunda afternoon, it was Soccer Cirv aijain.
I he I nited States, responding to its most wildly partisan home crowd
since the 1994 World (up. beat (losta Rica 1 -0 on a riveting goal by Tab Ramos
in the 7'rh minute of the match, lifting the Americans into prime position to
qualify for World Cup "98.
Ramos u is a fining hero. veteran of the last two World Cups, he was side-
lined with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee 10 months ago in
a first-round qualifying; match at Trinidad and Tobago.
After grueling rehabilitation, he resumed play in Major League Soccer in
early JuK and came back to the national team in an exhibition loss to Ecuador
on Aug. 7. But this was his first World ("up qualifier since the injury
Arlington racetrack to close
i
CHICAGO (AP) � rlmgton International Racecourse plans to close after
this season, contending it has lost money for eight years because of competi-
tion from riverboat gambling casinos and other kinds of entertainment.
A spokesman for the track, one of the more prominent tracks in the coun-
try, said it w ill finish out this season and then start "to explore alternative uses
for our property
The announcement was made by racecourse owner Richard Duchossois on
V( , radios "The Boh (:ollms Show
Maple Leaf Gardens employee
pleads guilty to sex assaults
TORONTO (AP) �A former equipment manager at Maple l.c.i! Gardens
pleaded guilty today to sexually assaulting boys whom he-enticed with hock-
ey tickets and other favors.
Gordon Stuckless. 47. faced 22 indecent assault charges and two counts of
sexual assault. He is to be sentenced Oct. 10.
In court. Stuckless admitted to luring boys to Maple Leaf Gardens b
promising free admission to "Toronto Maple Leafs games, wrestling mate lies
and concerts.
He said he abused 24 boss between the aucs of 1 I and 1 from 1969 to
1988.
Other assaults took place in the offices and locker room of a public school
where he was an assistant gym teacher.
In one case. Stuckless befriended the parents of a bov Thev invited him to
stay the night, and he then indecently assaulted three voung brothers.
Sunday with a 6-0, o-4 drubbing of Venus Williams, who entered the years
final Grand Slam tournament ranked 66th in the world, she spoke of the
future.
"I think you don't always have to taik about the past Hingis said, "but
about the future new generation like Venus Williams, nna koumikova and
Miljana I .ucic
Williams, at I 7 vears. 3 months, is the oldest. Zimbabwe-ar.i Black, who
won the Junior Girls championship Sunday, is older than the entire roup.
Hingis and Williams together are the youngest finalists in a Grand S
final in Open era history 'The previous youngest pair were Steffi Graf, at 18
years, II months, and Natasha Zvereva, who was 16 vears. 2 months old, at the
Trench Open in 1WJS.
TRIVIAtime
Hingis looks to the future
NEW YORK (AP) � Call it the new IS. Open.
With the new Arthur Athe Stadium the centerpiece of a new National
Tennis Center, the 1997 IS. Open came up a couple of new champions.
Martina Hingis won her third Grand Slam tournament title of the ear:
Patrick Rafter won the second title of his career. And thev basically, repre-
sented the tennis establishment.
After the top-seeded and No. 1-ranked Hingis captured the women's title
Name this year's first lIL
20-game winner.
�vjiwjyfo dfik&fl kuiUQ
ZOE
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Sig Ep, founded in Richmond,
VA in 1 901, is the fastest grow-
ing and is one of the two largest
fraternities in the world. Here at
ECU Sig Ep is one of the largest
fraternities on campus.
Academically, socially and athletically,
Sig Ep has been awrded the honor of
"Most Outstanding Frat and has won
the coveted "Chancellor's Cup" for
athletics 8 out of the past 1 1 years. Most
recently last year.
Rush Dates
Sept. 8-11
Rides: 757-0487
Sig Ep, founded in Richmond,
VAin 1901, is the fastest
growing and is one of the two
largest fraternities in the world.
Here at ECU Sig Ep is one of
the largest fraternities on
campus. Sig Ep represents the
balanced man by striving acade-
mically, socially, and athletically.
Sig Ep has been awarded the
honor of "Most Outstanding
Fraternity" four out of the past
seven years and has won the
coveted "Chancellor's Cup" for
athletics eight of the past eleven
years. Sig Ep has the best
location of any fraternity on
campus, at 505 E. 5th Street, we
are two blocks from downtown
and right across the street from
campus. We have two houses
and a party room for band
parties. Rush ECU's best
Fraternity. Friendship's are
common but Brotherhood is
sacred and lasts a lifetime.
Sigma Alpha Epsilonthe house
with the heart.
vV
SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING
FROM THE
RECTOR OF "SEVEN
MICHAEL DOUGLAS
SHAN PENN
PaVCRAM FILMED ENTERTAINMENT �. � rWAC.ANDft FILMS r '�: DA, :D iN&Ef�: MICHAEL DOUGLAS SUN �EN 'THE GAME"
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��'����.�- STEVEGOtlN .CEANCHAFFIN . JOHN8RANCATC,MICHAELFERRIS DVfF!NCHES '
www.the-ganie.com
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
C ourtesy of
Wednesday Sept 10
8:00 PM n
Hendrix Theatre
Kxnega
Pick Up Free Passes at the
Central Ticket Office
Day of Show
Presented By
The Student Union
Films Committee
Available at Student Stores
hogmH
ll
'US O
You're invited to join a new group now forming!
Presbyterian Campus Ministry at ECU
Join us for great food, fellowship and interesting programs.
Weekly dinner fellowship meetings
Tuesdays 6-8pm
At First Presbyterian Church
On the corner of 14th and Elm St.
Kick-off Cook out
Sept. 16 6-8pm
Nancy Huslage, intern campus minister
Phone: 758-1901 email: nhuslage@catalogue.30m
In addition:
Presbytery-wide retreat at Montreat
Sept. 26-28
Mission trip to Haiti May 18-27





r
1 6 Tusstsy, Stptember 9. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ONE BEDROOM DUPLEX WITH-
IN walking distance of Campus!)
One bedroom central heat and wind-
ow air. Convenient front door parking
for $250.00. PETS OK! Call 830-
9502
THIRD ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease in 3 bedroom at Wil-
son Acres ASAP. Male or female.
$230 a month. Call Tracy. 758-9245.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP for Players Club Apartments.
Rent is $220 monthly 14 utilities.
Includes pool, tennis, washerdryer.
Please contact Jessica at 756-7539.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom townhouse. Grad student
preferred. Non-smoker. $250 plus
12 utilities. 363-6190.
EEMAU ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom house 1 mile from
campus. 13 rent, utilities and cable.
Nice neighborhood. Call Kim. 758-
2800. after 6PM. 830-9036.
IGUANA AND SAIL-FIN DRAGON.
both 1 12 years old. Separately
$40 apiece, both for $70. Includes
water bowl, heat rock and other ac-
cessories. Cage not included. Call
Scott 353-2466. leave message.
TREK ROADRACING-TRIATHLON
BICYCLE, bright red. 47CM frame
(for riders uo to 5 6' tall), excellent
condition, 'loaded with extras, must
see to appreaciate. $300. NIKON
fT CAMERA body, black, excellent
condition, strap and case. $200.
28MM NIKON lens. $100. others
available. Call Kip at 355-3180.
COMIC BOOK AND SPORTS card
collection for sale, below book price.
Will sell entire collection or individu-
ally. No reasonable offer refused. Call
751-9072.
FEWER SPRAY STUN GUNS AND
ALARMS. Take responsibility for
your security. For a free brochure e-
mail RrlinsecSaol.com or write First
Line Security. PO Box 287. Greenville.
NC 27835.
UTILITIES, 1 SEOROOM.12
block from camps on Holly St. Cats
allowed with deposit. Rent $305 a
month. 757-9387.
RENT S2S0mo,
ia
bath. Clean, �Hone
student
maroon
to take
over lease at Players Club. Call Mel-
issa Jor.es (Mgmt.) at 321-7613 or
call Derek at 413-0744.
CHEVY CAVALIER IN great
condition. Call Nikki at 353-7462.
Help Wanted
STUDENT MARKETING ASSO-
CIATE. COLLEGE Park Communi-
ties, the nations largest private own-
er of off campus student housing
properties, has an entrepreneurial
employment opportunity available for
an ECU student, as a Marketing As-
sociate in Greenville. NC. Responsi-
bilities include assisting in the devel-
opment of a database of local hous-
ing and commercial properties, and
assisting in uncovering opportunities
for now property acquisitions. Aver-
age of 10-15 hours per week. $500
par month phis BONUS potential.
based upon performance. Interested
candidates may call Mr. John Deflig-
gi at (610)687-6321 extension 141, or
fax resume to Mr. OeRiggi at
(610)687-3595.
PART-TIME GRAPHICSMARKET-
ING ASSISTANT Detail-oriented
person with an eye for design need-
ed to assist campus Marketing Man-
ager. Job involves computer layout
and distribution of fliers, signs, and
banners in addition to general office
duties. PageMaker and FreeHand ex-
perience helpful. Applications avail-
able at ARAMARK office in Menden-
hall Student Center.
THE WINTERVILLE RECREATION
DEPARTMENT needs Soccer
CoachesReferees for the upcoming
soccer season. The games will be
played on Tuesday and Thursday
evenings and practices will be deter-
mined by the Coaches. For more in-
formation, contact Jay Johnson at
the Winterville Recreation Depart-
ment. 756-2221.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation 3- Parks
Department. FALL YOUTH SOCCER
COACHES. The Greenville Recrea-
tion & Parks Department is recruiting
for 12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the fall youth soccer pro-
gram. Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-15, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to claaa
schedules.Ths program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550
after 2:00 p.m.
LIBRARY PAGE: PART-TIME. East
Branch Library. Weekday afternoons.
Up to 12 hours per week. Some fa-
miliarity with library preferred. Apply
at the East Branch Library. 200 Cedar
Lane (Library is located at Jaycee
Park). Greenville. NC. 830-4582.
NEAT. CLEAN.
rnf roommate needed. 3 blocks
from campus, unique 2-bodroom du-
plex. $232 plus 12 utilities. Wash-
erdryer, dishwasher. 112 bath,
central heatac. Available now. 758-
9672. Jennifer.
AWESOME BEDROOM WITH
HUGE brick fireplace only $200 a
month at Tar River. Moving - Need
someone to take over lease ASAP.
Male or female. Call Shawn, 830-
6882.
MALE OR
wanted to share 3 BR apt. at
Eastbrook. $160mo. plus 13 utili-
ties. Bus route available. Ask for
Shawn at 758-4385.
A JOB? PLAY at day and
make money at night! Work nights
andor weekends and have your
days free with The ECU Telefund.
Make your own schedule! $5.50hr.
plus bonuses! Stop by the Rawl An-
nex. Room 5 between 3-6PM for
more info.
Hftb l-SHtHI
-�-$1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
whopping $B.00VtSA
application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT
BLOCK TO CAMPUS AND
NEW REC CENTER! ART-STUDIO-
APARTMENT, -KITCHENETTE. BATH
AREA. HIGH CEILINGS- $500 a
month! One 2 bedroom apartment
above Percolator Coffeehouse. $450
a month! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
FOR RENT: 3 BEDROOM. 2 bath
house. $650 per month. Living room,
den. fireplace and more. 756-6286.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
TO share new 3 bedroom. 2 bath-
room house on ECU bus route. Rea-
sonable rent, great neighborhood.
Call me at 752-2489.
For Sale
FOR SALE: COUCH, LOVESEAT,
and table for $100 0B0. Entertain-
ment center for $75. Chandelier for
$50 OBO. Please call Tammy or Cha-
rles at 353-2413.
TVVCR CABINET PERFECT FOR
apartment or house, $20. Kenwood
KT-594 tuner. Kenwood KA-894 am-
plifier. 10- band equalizer. 2 Har-
monKardon 4-way speakers, afl for
$200. Call 758-1686.
LARGE WHITE DORM FRIDGE
less than year old, $80 OBO. Call
830-2606. leave message.
CANNONDALE MSOO MOUNTAIN
BIKE with JudyXC shocks XT V-
brakes and Shimanoe 535 pedals.
Also too many extras to list, worth
$1200. asking $900 OBO. CaH Jeff
at 752-7109.
FULL SIZE MATTRESS. BOX
spring and frame. Perfect condition.
Price negotiable. Call Mel at 758-
5593.
PART-TIME CMLDCARE
two cays per week for my 3 and 8-
year old sons. Need experienced.
furHoving, energetic student with re-
liable transportation. Please call 353-
7446.
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS
WITH knowledge of Soccer, will
train. Must have transportation. Work
on Saturdays only. Call Rita at 830-
4216.
HfOTOGRAPHERS WANTED TO
TAKE pictures for The East Caroli-
nian. Must have camera and some
experience. Apply at our office on
the second floor of The Student Pub-
lications Building. Must be a student!
The Ad Department is now
for end of
end faM
being
('aslcarolinian
to
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S MEN'S
Stores are accepting applications for
additional Part-Time associates.
Work with the new fall season's
styles in your favorite departments:
Juniors. Young Men's, and customer
Service. Flexible morning, afternoon,
or evening hours. All positions in-
clude weekend hours. Applications
accepted at customer Service. Bra-
dy's. The Plaza.
SALES CLERK, MALE OR female.
15 hours per week. Big Splash Golf
Range. 758-1341.
SPRING BREAK! OUTGOING WHM-
VIDUALS - sell 15 and go FREE.
Cancun. South Padre. Mazatlan. Ja-
maica. South Beach FL Guaranteed
best prices 1-800-SURFS-UP.
www.studentexpress .com
KARATE INSTRUCTOR: RECREA-
TION COMPANY seeks part-time
help. Evenings. Great $. Call 919-319-
1228.
TEMPORARY JOBS AVAILABLE:
BRODY'S is accepting application
for saleswarehouse positions. All
hours needed up to 40 hours per
week. Ideal for students sitting out of
school, or for individuals presently
between jobs. Positions could lead to
long term employment. Warehouse
areas require some lifting. Applica-
tions accepted at Customer Service,
Brady's, The Plaza.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MAS-
SAGE earn great money. Confidential
employment. Call today. 747-7686.
Greek Personals
DELTA ZETA WANTS TO wish all
fall sports a great season.
ORDER OF OMEGA MEETING To-
night at 6PM in the Mendenhall Mul-
tipurpose Room. All members must
attend.
CONGRATULATIONS AMY HIN-
NANT ON winning Phi Kappa Psi's
Queen of the Beach Contest! We love
you! The sistersand new members of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
KAPPA SIGMA. THANKS FOR the
Labor Day Bash at Harry's. Hope to
get together again real soon. Love,
the sisters and new members of Del-
ta Zeta.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON. THANKS
for the pre-downtown Tliurs. night.
We had a great time. Can't wait to
get together again soon! Love. Alpha
Delta Pi.
LAMBDA CHL THANK YOU for the
Quad social on Tues. and Pref night
on Sat. We had the best time at
both! Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
FIRST ORDER OF OMEGA meeting
tonight! 6:00. Mendenhall Multipur-
pose Room. All members must at-
tend.
THINK 14
DELTA ZETA WANTS TO wish all
fraternities a great rush.
PI KAPPA PHI. THANKS for our
70s social on Thurs Let's get
together again real scon. Love, the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
TO THE HIP HOP Brothers of Pi
Kappa Phi and Phi Kappa Tau. we
thank you for a Jammin' Time on the
Reggae Lake. Love. Chi Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CHI
Omega pledges of the week: Kimber-
ly Finch and Ashton Anderson to
Super Senior Lisa Smith and Sister
Beth Roberson. We love you. Chi
Omega.
THANKS PHI KAPPA TAU for the
awesome Pre-downtown before
Lambda Chis kicking band party.
Let's do it again soon! Love. Chi Ome-
ga.
CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR
PINNING Gamma Gammas: Carly
Ackerman. Cat Anderson. Tracy
Auten, Monica Brock. Samantha
Gardner, Tiffany Hadley. Jessica
Livingston, Jensina Sturz, Aimee
Whitfield. Jessica Williams, and Beth
Woodruff! We love you! The sisters of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
TIRED OF GUYS IN ties, then check
out Sigma Pi's. Stop by the Green
House right next door to Miami Subs
bVs week and check us out!
THANKS PHI KAPPA TAU for steal-
ing our hearts at Pref. You reallv
showed our new girls a great time
Love, the sisters and new mer. bsrs
of Zeta Tau Alpha.
PI KAPPA ALPHA. WE had so
much fun with you guys on both
Tuesday night and Friday night. We
can't wait to get together again!
Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
BROOK. CONGRATULATIONS ON
YOUR Pi Kappa Phi lavalier from
Barton. We love you! Your Delta Zeta
sisters.
THURS. SEPT. 11- GUEST RECITAL
Gail Williams, horn, from the Chicago
Symphony, and Mary Ann Covert,
piano, from Ithaca College. A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. 8:00 P.M. Frid.
Sept. 12 - GUEST RECITAL Kick-off
concert of the "Viva Viola" workshop,
September 12-13. Jonathan Bagg.
violin and Jane Hawkins, piano, from
Duke University School of Music.
AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall. 4:00 P.M.
Sat. Sept. 13 - ECU STRING
ORCHESTRA, with "Viva Viola" work-
shop guest violists. Fritz Gearhart. Di-
rector, AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall. 3:00
R.M. Mon Sept. 15- FACULTY RECI-
TAL. Twentieth-Century American
Music for Clarinet and Piano
Nathan Williams, clarinet with Au-
drey Andrist. guest pianist. Hendrix
Theatre. 8:00 P.M.
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUD-
ENT CENTER announces inquiry
classes, confirmation classes. 1st
communion classes, spirituality
classes. Dates: Monday. Sept. 8.
7:30 p.m. and Wednesday, Sept. 10.
8:00 p.m. The center is located at
955 E. 10th Street (2 houses from
Fletcher Music BWg.). For informa-
tion call Fr. Paul. 757-1991.
ADULT SWIM LESSONST SEPT. 2-
Sept 25 (TTh) from 7-8:00 p.m. in
the Student Rec Center pool. Dept of
Rec Services
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS WILL
MEET on Wednesday. September 10
at 7:00 p.m. in the Underground in
Mendenhall. For more information
call David at 353-0808.
WANTED: FIRST YEAR STUO-
ENTS who live off-campus. Join us
for a first year student Brown Bag
Lunch on Tuesday. September 9 from
12:30-2:00 p.m. in The Underground
of Mendenhall Student Center.
Speaker Mr. Jim Sturm, a great guy!
JOIN EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS,
a student mentoring program for
children in need. Interest meetings
will be held on September 9th at
3:00 p.m. or September 10th at 6:00
p.m. for more information, call Tory
Williams at 328-8777. Meetings wiH
be in Brewster D-305.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT MAR-
SHALS. STUDENTS interested in
serving as a University Marshal for
the 1997 Fall commencement may
obtain an application from Room A-
16 Minges Coliseum. Student must
be classified as a junior by the end of
Spring semester 1997 and have a 3.0
GPA to be eligible. Return completed
application to Carol-Ann Tucker. Advi-
sor. A-16 Minges by September 27.
1997. For more information call 328-
4661.
VOLLEYBALL PREVIEW REGIS-
TRATION MTG(M,W,CR): the
�� vill be held Sept. S at 5:00
p.m. i SC Room 244. Dept. of
n�C. del �
THE SOCIETY FOR AOVANCI
MENT of Management (SAM) will be
meeting Tuesday at 3:30 in GC1026.
Sandra Blanton. the Human Resourc-
es Director from BB&T. will be guest
speaking on resume writing and in-
terview techniques. Refreshments
will be served. All majors welcome.
THE GREENVILLE POLICE COM-
MUNTTY Relations Committee will
be meeting in Greenville Municipal
District 3 the evening of Wednesday.
September 10. at 7:00 p.m. The
meeting will be held in the Activity
Room of the Jaycee Park Administra-
tion Building, located at 2000 Cedar
Lane. Residents of District 3 are invit-
ed to attend and share their sugges-
tions, ideas, and concerns about rela-
tions between the community and
the Greenville Police Department.
Please use the Activity Room's Cedar
Lane door for access.
NORTH CAROLINA ZOO:
YONE interested in taking a trip to
the North Carolina Zoo on Sept. 21.
needs to be sure to register by Sept.
13 in the Student Recreation Center
main office. Dept. of Rec Services
WATER SKI CLINIC: IN the Adapt-
ed Recreation, if you enjoy water ski-
ing, then you should enjoy this all
day outing to Washington. NC on
Sept. 13. Dept. of Rec Services.
PHI SIGMA PI: DON'T forget.
Smoker is tonight in GCB 1031 at
6:00 p.m.
Travel
SPRING BREAK 'SB- sell trips, earn
cash and go free Student Travel
Services is now hiring campus
repsgroup organizers. Lowest rates
to Jamaica. Mexico & Florida. Call 1-
800-648-4849.
Other
frrtBwestSfB HbIbb. life
Sales letenulip Available
Rated in Top 10 lirkijWr Propatns
by Princeton Review
Contact
Ml Makes at 35S-77M
KING-SIZE WATERBED WITH six
drawers: large headboard with mir-
ror, shelves and overhead light and
mattress with baffles for minimal
movement. Call 758-2971 for more
info.
PIANIST AND BASS PLAYER
needed for Rock Band. Call Johnny
at 321-8993 for details. Serious inqui-
ries only.
Announcements
ADVERTISE IH
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLEGE STUDENT
Doctors Vision Center is currently seeking a PART-TIME front
deskreceptionist for our Greenville office. Individual must be professional,
outgoing, and have excellent people skills.
Must have computer skills, be able to assist in patient needs, and have
strong multiple line telephone skills. Billing and insurance experience a plus.
Must be motivated and team oriented. Willing to train.
Send resume with salary requirements to:
DocrxsVisionCenter
499 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
Btkc MAINTENANCE: SfePT 10
from 6:30-7:3r p.m. in 'He Brickyard
of the Student Rec C .nter Dept of
Rec Services ,
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA. A serv-
ice sorority helping our campus and
community FALL RUSH Sept. 8-11.
5:30-6:30- p.m. at Mendenhall in the
Underground. Questions, call Beth.
754-2061.
QUIETUDE: COME ENJOY 40 min-
utes of stress reduction, meditation,
etc. Sept. 9-Sept. 25 only on Tues.
and Thurs. from 12:10 p.m12:50
p.m. at the SRC. Dept. of Rec. Serv-
ices.
THE CENTER FOR COUNSELING
and Student Development will be of-
fering the following programs the
week of September 8th: Stress Man-
agement workshop: Thursday from
3:30-5:00 p.m. Time Management
Skit's workshop: Tuesday from 11:00
-12:00 noon. Note-Taking workshop:
Thursday from 2:30-3:30 p.m.
"Choosing a Major and a Career
Wednesday from 11:00-12:00 noon
and Thursday from 2:30-3:30 pO.m.
If you are interested in either of these
workshops, contact the Center at
328-6661.
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR
Society will be holding a meeting on
Tuesday. September 9 in the Genera!
Classroom Building. GC 1010. We
welcome all members and look for-
ward to seeing you. Refreshments
will also be served. Come join the
fun.
ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY, Inc.
Fall Social. Come out and socialize
with the ladies of Zeta Phi Beta
Thursday. September 11, 1997. 1012
GC. 7:00 p.m.
THE CROSS CULTURE PRESENTS
REVIVAL ON THE MALL Sept- 8-11.
7:00 p.m. nightly. Join hundreds of
students for an awesome time of
worship and ministry. Special guest
speakers; Bishop John Harker and
Tim Gray- Come and be blessed of
God
QAULEY RIVER EXPERIENCE:
JOIN us on Sept. 268-27 for some
rafting at Gauley River. Be sure
register by Sept. 12 at the Sti
Recreation Center main office. Dept.
of Rec Services.
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMU-
NICATION Sciences and Disorders
will be providing the speech, lai
guage and hearing screening
students who are fulfilling requn
ments for admission to Upper Divi-
sion on September 15 and 16 for
students in the College of Arts and
Sciences. General College, and the
School of Art. Health and Human
Performance. Human Environmental
Sciences and Music. Screenings for
students in the School of Education
will be held Wednesday. September
17. 1997 and Tnuisday. September
18. 1997 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. These
are the only screening dates during
the Fall Semester. The screening will
be conducted in the Belk Annex
(ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic) lo-
cated next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Health Sciences),
near the intersection of Charles
Street and the 264 By-pass. No ap-
pointment is needed-please do not
call their office for an appointment.
Waiting is outside the clinic waiting
room. Sign in begins at 4:50 p.m.
Screenings ar� conducted on a first
come, first serve hasis.
HAW RIVER WHITE WATER: Join
us on Sept. 21 to go canoeing at
Haw River. Be sure to register by
Sept 13 at the Student Recreation
Center main office. Dept. of Rec
Services.
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student-run media
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1223
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58724
Preferred Citation
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