The East Carolinian, September 4, 1997







THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 4. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
VOLUME 73, ISSUE 05
Parking deck not immediate concern for ECU
Funding, security obstacles
to construction
DWN ERNTEMAN
II FF WRITER
Despite reports to the contrary, ECU is not getting a park-
ing deck anytime soon.
'The need for a parking deck is contingent upon the
demand for one said layton Getsinger, vice chancellor for
administration and finance. "My obligation is to maximize
the use of the available surface lots to satisfy the needs of
the students and faculty before building a deck
There have been several lots lost to construction going
on around campus. G-etsinger plans to get these lots up and
running again as soon as possible.
Jim Midgette, director of transportation, said that his-
toricallv, the top three state-supported institutions in
North Carolina tend to get a parking deck. Both UNC-
Chapel Hill and N.C. State have parking decks. ECU,
according to the trend, would be next in line. However, a
parking deck comes with its own problems.
The biggest issue concerning the parking deck is
money. The state cannot finance this project, which forces
the financing to come from fees. The average cost of a sur-
face parking lot space is SI,000 in contrast to a SI0,000
parking deck space.
ECU would have to increase parking permit fees from
$96 to S250 in order to finance a S10 million deck.
However, the $250 parking permit cost would not nec-
essarily mean that those people who paid for the permit
would be able to park in a new deck. There is also the cost
of security, operations and annual maintenance.
"I am extremely concerned about the safety of a parking
deck because of the isolated areas created. We would have
to have very good lighting, security and cameras to make
the deck safe to use Midgette said.
"Parking decks by their very nature create places for
would be criminals to vandalize cars or assault individu-
als Getsinger said.
If the campus population grows as projected. ECU
will more than likely have to build a deck. Vet. pians to
build a deck will not start until three to five years from
now.
Unfortunately, ECU cannot sell the current $96 park-
ing permits on a one-to-one basis because it doesn't
make much sense. Not everybody is on this campus all
at the s- Tie Pirking, on this campus, is made avail-
abL to peiv "� -eatest convenience possible.
.v f the begin, " "his year, FCU has added 672
new pa. ing spaces to a.nps. The r :ccs were created
by reconfiguring the Mamie Jenkins lot, Kivers Building
lot, and the Reade St. lot- between 'rd and 4th streets.
Phase 1 and II of the Allied health lots huve also provid-
ed about 500 additional parking spaces.
The University is currently reconfiguring the lots at
Harrington Field and at the completion of construction
of Ficklen stadium, the recreation fields will be recon-
SEE PARKING DECK PAGE 2
Tuition increases,
rising fees allow for
expanded services
Additional billing will
be done
after refund period
ends
ANGELA KOENIC
x T F v WKITF.K
With the costs of attending college on
the rise, some students arc asking,
"Show me the money
Students saw a slight increase
when they received their fall bills.
And just when students believed it
was safe to start spending after the
tuition ctunch, an additional S13 bill
will be arriving soon, thanks to a
retroactive tuition hike when the
stare budget was approved two
months after its original deadline.
University Cashier Michael Balko
said the retrocactive increase amounts
to $13 a semester fot in-state full-time
students. The Cashier's Office has not
yet decided when students will be
billed for the increase.
Comptroller Dan Bishop said the
increases are due to two primary fac-
tors.
The first is your basic inflation or
cost of living increase. The second
reason is enrollment growth Bishop
said. "In the budget process, so much
is allocated per stu-
dent and when the
number of students
incteases, services
must also increase
"What we will prob-
ably do is wait until
after the refund period
has ended on Sept. 17.
That weekend we will
probably print up the bills and mail
them the 22nd or 23rd and give stu-
dents until probably Oct. 30 or 30
days to pa the bill Balko said.
According to Balko, the tuition por-
tion of the bill is set by legislators and
covers the educational portion of uni-
versity expenses. �
'Tuition makes up about 10 per-
cent of the cost for instruction, facili-
ties and all support systems Bishop
said. "The rest of the money comes
from the state
Bishop said the state appropriates
$6977 per year, approximately 90 per-
cent, for every in-state student
attending ECU Out-of-state tuition
is more expensive because the state
does not supplement money for these
students.
'The state gives extra money for
students to go to an in-state institu-
Michael Balko,
University Cashier
PHOTO AMANDA AUSTIN
"An out-of-state
student is virtually
paying for themselves,
Oan Bishop. Comptroller
tion. An out-of-state student is virtu-
ally paying for themselves Bishop
said.
Fees, Bishop said, are supported
only by this money. Any increase in
fees must be approved first by ECl 's
Board of Trustees and then by the
UNC Board of Governors before rhey
can be increased.
According to Balko, there are three
fees everyone -
in or out of state
- must pay, the
educational
technology fee,
the student
health fee and
the university
fee.
The educa-
tionaltechnolo-
gy fee covers
"state-of-the-
att, hands-on,
educational
Balko said. This
fee pays for the
class equipment to science courses
labs and computer labs on campus.
Balko said this fee was approved
years ago when it became apparent
that the university was lacking in
hands-on training for students.
The student health fee pays for the
medical staff and facility available to
ECU students.
The largest of the fees, the univer-
sity fee, covers several areas, including
the student activity fee. This money
is divided between
Student Government
Association (SGA),
media, fine arts, any cul-
tural events to which
students are admitted
free, transit, intramu-
rals. and are used to run
Joyner Library,
Mendenhall Student
Center, Minges Coliseum and the
Student Recreation Center.
A portion of these fees goes to debt
retirement, Balko said. This covers
long-term bond referendums the
school has for things such as new
buildings, renovations or construction.
"What the students have to realize
is that fees are mandated first by what
the students determine that they
need, and second by what the univer-
sity feels we need to keep up with
other schools our size and bring in new
students Balko continued.
"If you went to one school and saw
a state-of-the-art rec center and went
to another school that had a gym the
size of a high school gymnasium, you'd
be more likely to go the school with
the better facilities Balko said.
THURSDAY
Sunny
High 74
L ?� 53
WEEKEND
Sunny
High 80
tow 55
rite east Carolinian
SIUOTI PlMMUM BIDC WfflBlili. NC ?7858
phont
328-6366 newsroom
378 7000 advet'Sinij
328 6658 la
mm
In 1960, officials from the
Southern Conference,
promised the university
that with expanded
facilities and enthusiastic
fans, they would soon be
granted membership.
Until ECU builds a parking deck, temporary solutions, such as
this freshmen overflow parking lot.
SGA plans
training
for members
SGA hopes sessions will
help better serve students
AMANDA AI ST IN
SSISTNT NF.VVS EDITOR
Construction workers continue to work on renovations to Scott Hall courtyard.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Students cautioned about
dangers of binge drinking
Scott Forbes,
SGA President
FILE PHOTO
NATASHA PHILLIPS
STFF WNITFR
.As a result of last week's alcohol-related death at
Louisiana State University, school officials are con-
cerned about ECl' students and their drinking
habits.
In the case at LSU, Benjamin Wynne. 20. liter-
ally drank himself to death. He consumed at least
24 drinks Monday night before he went to Sigma
.Alpha Epsilon, a fraternity where he was a pledge.
Early Tuesday morning, police found a dozen
students passed out on the fraternity's floor, includ-
ing Wynne. The coroner said Wvnne's blood-alcohol
level was .588, which is six times the legal limit for
automobile drivers.
According to research, over 65 percent of adults
drink, but they don't binge drink, like Wynne.
Dr. Donna J. Walsh, director of Health
Promotion and Weil-Being at ECU, defines binge
drinking as "drinking to get drunk
Social drinking tends to be done slowly and in a
relaxed environment; however, binge drinking
involves drinking a large amount of alcohol quickly
and reaching a very high blood alcohol level. Many-
people who binge drink experience problems as a
result of their drinking patterns.
The quantity of alcohol consumed, the time
frame in which it was consumed, and a person's
weight and sex are all determining factors in binge
drinking.
Alcohol is a poison to our system. Once it's in the
stomach, it passes through the intestines, and is
absorbed into the bloodstream. Within three min-
utes, it reaches the brain.
.Alcohol is a depressant and slows down the cen-
tral nervous system. It affects the outer cortical
layer of the brain first, which is responsible for judg-
ment abilities. During the initial phase, the indi-
vidual mav begin to socialize more without regard
to what they're saying or doing.
THURSDAY
Once the judgment layer is affected, the indi-
vidual is more likely to engage in risky activities.
"A person who has consumed two to three drinks
in an hour loses their judgment ability; therefore,
they're more likely to engage in activities that they
normally would avoid said Dr. Walsh.
One drink is either four ounces of wine, 12
ounces of beer, or 1.5 ounces of 40-proof liquor.
Studies show that family background, family
upbringing, culture, religion, politics, environment,
peer pressure, personal expectations and looking for
a place to belong all affect a person's decision about
whether or not to drink.
"Freshman tend to drink more than upper class-
men. They're trying to find a home away from
home. They experiment in many aspects of their
lives, but their experimentation with alcohol tends
to decline over the course of a couple of years Dr.
Walsh said.
Whether a person is going through a phase or if
they are just partying, people should always drink
with caution. Never drink if you're angry, possibly
pregnant, or if you're taking medication.
If you take medicine and drink, your body
metabolizes the medicine first. While the medica-
tion is being broken down by the liver, the alcohol
remains in the bloodstream. This continues to
SEE DRINKING. PAGE 2
Drinking Q and A
What are the risks of over-drinking?
Aicohol-reiated injuries
Legal problems
Unplanned pregnancy
Transmission of STD's
Acquaintance rape
�Assault
Death
The Student
Government
Association (SGA)
will be hard at work in
the coming weeks to
better themselves fot
the benefit of the stu-
dent body.
The executive
council of SGA has
been planning for
some time a two-
week long workshop
when they will learn
how to utilize Roberts
Rules of Order.
"Roberts Rules of Order is the format by
which meetings are run said SGA President
Scott Forbes.
In past years SGA has run into problems
because those voting in meetings were not
sure of the long term effects of their actions.
"Last year some of the problems that leg-
islators had was inconsistency in some of the
bills and the process for which policies and
bills were implemented said Forbes.
"People didn't know what they were voting
on or the long term ramifications
The training sessions are intended to put
an end to these problems in the future.
Training sessions for Roberts Rules of
Order will be conducted by Laura Sweet,
who is a certified expert in the area.
SGA also hopes to build a solid student
government that can better serve the stu-
dent body.
"A lot of times the newly-elected legisla-
tors may not be as familiar with parliamentary
procedures as necessary to properly interact
with the process said Forbes. "Because they
may not be as knowledgeable as necessary,
they may not speak up
The training session is also the first step
to SGA working togethet as a team.
'This educational program is designed
and intended to put all legislators on equal
footing with one another so they will feel
more comfortable in suggesting or debating
bills said Forbes.
These training sessions will start immedi-
ately after the general legislature is elected.
Applications are being filed now as they
are required by the university's constitution.
Training sessions should improve SGA not
only for their personal benefit, but for the
benefit of the student body.
'The worst thing that can happen would
be a few select people dominating the meet-
ing, therefore not all students will be truly-
represented said Forbes.
Though this has not been a problem in
the past, SGA would like to ensure that it will
not become a problem in the future.
opinion.
Three-person occupancy
law discriminatory to
students
lifestyle7
Henry Acrobat releases
brand new disc!
sports.
10
Chris Mackey strives for
success in athletics
on line
www.stu. entmedia scu.sdu
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r
2 Thuntfiy. Stptembtr 4, 1997
yews
Greensboro requires sprinklers in frart houses
dffifiNSBORO AP) .Alt fraternity and sorority houses in Greensboro must be
eqinpped with fire-procection sprinkler systems within five years under a mea-
suk adopted by the City CouncH.
In May 19, five students were killed in a fraternity house fire in Chapel
Hilt. The house did net have a sprinkler system.
Greensboro and Chapel Mill are two of five cities that now require the pro-
tection.
Under the new rule, houses designated for fraternity and sorority use that are
larger than 1,000 square feet must be equipped with sprinkler systems within
five years.
Local Kre Marshal ftul Brooks said the University of North Carolina at
Greensboro is the only university in the city with official fraternities housed off
campus.
Residents around plant leave
after unsafe air quality reading
GLENOLA, N.C. (AP) - Several dozen residents living near a Randolph County
foam-manufacturing operation left their homes early today after higher than
acceptable levels of hydrocarbons were reported in the air.
TTrinity American Corp. President Jerry Drye said this morning the voluntary
evacuation was prompted by the high readings for unknown hydrocarbons on
property near the operation.
The US. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry took the reading
and alerted Randolph County health officials, which issued the voluntary evacu-
ation. More than 55 people decided to leave their homes after firefighters arrived
in the community about 2 a.m WXLVTV reported. Residents west taken to a
recreation center in nearby Archdale.
Drye said he does not know what prompted the higher reading. In Match,
Trinity reached an agreement with state health officials to reduce emissions from
the foam plant. State and federal regulators have been taking air-quality readings
over the past several months.
Prosecutors want mental examination of Kaczynski
: SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Defense attorneys want to block the government
; from forcing Unabomber defendant Theodore Kaczynski to submit to psychiatric
;�tests, saying that would violate his rights.
Prosecutors on Tuesday asked U.S. District Judge Garland Burrcll Jr. to allow
the government to have its own experts examine Kaczynski in preparation for his
trial, set to begin Nov. 12.
Defense lawyers suggested in June that they would seek to introduce expert
testimony on Kaczynski's mental health. They have said they do not plan to
argue that he is insane, but may try to show that the former Berkeley math pro-
fessor lacked the mental capacity to form the intent to commit a crime.
Assistant U.S. Attorney j. Douglas Wilson told Burrcll on Tuesday that if the
defense planned to offer testimony about some mental health claim, it was only
fair to allow prosecutors to examine the defendant.
Diocese tries to nullify ordination of abusive priest
DALLAS (AP) - Local Roman Catholic officials asked the Vatican to revoke the
ordination of the priest at the center of a sexual abuse lawsuit that led to a119.6
million judgment.
Monsignor John Bell, No. 3 official in the Dallas diocese, said Tuesday if the
request for "nullification" is granted, it would mean that Rudolph Kos was never
really an ordained priest.
The diocese is asking for the unusual step on grounds that Kos deceived
church officials about his background and sexual orientation.
The jury ordered the award to 11 plaintiffs in the civil suit on Jury 24, finding
unanimously that the diocese was grossly negligent and concealed information in
its handling of Kos.
The diocese did not deny the plaintiffs were abused but said its handling of
the situation was not negligent. Kos himself did not appear at the trial to contest
the allegations.
Bell, a canon lawyer who proposed the nullification, wouldn't speculate on the
chances that the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the
Sacraments at the Vatican would grant the request or when it might rule.
The last such nullification granted on grounds of misrepresentation was 47
years ago, Beli said.
Parking Deck
continued from page 1
figured to provide about 875 spaces.
Issues of landscaping and lighting
could hold up this process.
According to Getsinger, there is
enough parking on this campus to suit
8pMBMHSSaaSBHMBBMSHSSSSBBSBI
the needs of the students and the uni-
versity at this time. Campus is busiest
during the hours between 9a.m. and
3p.m. During these peak hours, about
90 percent of these available spaces
are taken.
There is ample parking for stu-
dents and staff. The lots may not
always be convenient but there is
parking available Getsinger said.
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Karadzic wants to negotiate demands
he be tried for war crimes
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (AP) - Radovan Karadzic wants U.N. lawyers to
come to Bosnia for a pretrial investigation into his suspected war crimes
before deciding whether to stand trial on the charges, one of hi allies said
today.
The offer was made to U.N. human rights envoy Elisabeth Rehn by
Momcilo Krajisnik, a close Karadzic associate, during a meeting in Pale,
Karadzic's stronghold.
Krajisnik said the safety of witnesses would be guaranteed during the
investigations of indictments against Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic, the
wartime leader of the Bosnian Serb army. The two men are the top war
crimes suspects.
The U.N. war crimes tribunal has already rejected an offer by the
Karadzic camp that he be allowed to stand trial in Bosnia instead of in The
Hague, Netherlands, where the court is located.
Today's offer was new in suggesting an investigation before an actual trial.
With both suspects having the option of rejecting a trial should the investi-
gations further implicate them, the tribunal was not expected to approve
the offer.
2nd annual community job fair
and business opportunity expo
Business Works is sponsoring the Second Annual Community Job fair and
Business Opportunity Expo Sept. 17 at the Greenville Hilton from 10 a.m.
until 4:30 p.m. During the expo, citizens in the Greetiviile-Rn Coontv area
as well as all over Eastern North Carolina will have the chance to meet with
prospective employers and learn more abouf what type of business opportu-
nities currently exist in the area. This year's list of exhibiting companies
includes Sara Lee, TRW, the Prudential, Carpet Masters and others from
the sales, banking, technical and temporary employment Industries.
ECU political scientist wins scholar of the year award
Dr. Tinslcy E. Yarbrough. an East Carolina University political science pro-
fessor, has been recognized by a national honor society as one of the coun-
try's top. scholars.
Yarbrough received the Southeastern Phi Kappa Phi Scholar of the Year
Award at the Northeastern and Southeastern Regions M�J��ennial
Conference in New Orleans last month. He was nominated for theawrd bv
the ECU chapter of The National Honor Society Of Phi Kappa Phi.
The regional award recognizes the scholarly activities of chapter mem-
bers. Yarbrough, a veteran of the ECU faculty, has written numerous books
and articles about the U.S Supreme Court and its justices and is one of
ECU's most respected teachers and scholars.
ECU karate club represented at world championships
The East Carolina University Isshin-Ryu karate club sent four representa-
tives to the American Okinawan Karate Association World Championships in
Springfield, Mass. In the men's beginning division, Ben Baughman placed
second in empty hand kata and second in fighting. In the men's intermedi-
ate division, Marcus Jones placed seventh in weapons kata and third in
empty hand kata. David Fair placed third in the advanced seniors 35 and
over weapons kata. Anthony Gobble placed fifth in instructor's division
weapons kata, third in instructor's empty hand kata and third in the instruc-
tor's division fighting.
Drinking
continued from page 1
progress to the central nervous sys-
tem, which not only affects the judg-
ment but motor skills and functions
of the heart and lungs.
Combining medication andor
drugs with alcohol can be an
extremely dangerous combination.
It can also be deadly.
If one is going to going to drink,
drink responsibly. Don't drink more
than one to two drinks the first hour.
Sip the second drink and skip the
third. Avoid drinking games; don't
drink quickly, eat first, learn more
about how alcohol affects someone
your size and gender, and consider
the consequences of being intoxicat-
ed.
For more information about
binge drinking, alcohol, drugs, sexu-
ality, or general health and safety
issues, please stop by 210 Whichard.
The Office of Health Promotion and
Well-Bcing will supply you with free
brochures andor pamphlets. They
also have books, videos and CD-
ROM resources for your use and
convenience, or please feel free to
call Walsh at 328-6793.
The East Carolinian
&fWf ���� ��
CynpftUe
325 Arlington
Greenville 35
i
� � Mt4�
With purchase of hotdog Stench fries.
i.��
StreetWhys
Who Can Park in a
UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
Parking Lot?
UNIVERSITY REGISTERED refers to vehicles displaying
COMMUTERMEDICAL COMMUTER, RESIDENT STAFF,
HANDICAP, and VENDOR permits. All of these permits
are valid in areas designated for UNIVERSITY REGIS-
TERED parking. After 4:00 p.m. on weekdays, UMITED
permits are valid in UNIVERSITY REGISTERED lots.
UNIVERSITY REGISTERED parking lots are typically
located in the fringe areas of campus, or in areas which
are utilized by a variety of students and staff.
Some signs Indicate UNIVERSITY
REGISTERED parking after
5:00 p.m. What Does That Mean?
Many of the STAFF parking areas are posted for UNIVER-
SITY REGISTERED parking after 5:00 p.m. Some areas
designate a later time for UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
parking. This means that in a STAFF lot, for example, only
STAFF permits are valid from 7:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on
weekdays. After 5:00 p.m any COMMUTER, RESIDENT,
or LIMiTED permit is valid in that lot.
Are FRESHMAN permits valid in
UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
parking lots?
FRESHMAN permits are restricted on weekdays. Beginning i
at 4:00 p.m. on Fridays, FRESHMAN vehicles may be parked
in UNIVERSITY REGISTERED spaces for the weekend. All
FRESHMAN vehicles must be parked in FRESHMAN
designated lots by midnight on Sunday.
When are LIMITED permits valid
in UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
parking lots?
UMITED permits are valid in UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
parking areas at Minges Coliseum and the AiHed Health
Complex, but are not valid on the main campus until 4:00
p.m. at the earliest, or at the tone indicated on the sign
posted in that parking lot At the School of Medicine,
LIMITED permits are valid only in the G lot before 3:45
p.m. After 3:45 p.m UMITED permits are also valid in
UNIVERSITY REGISTERED areas (B lot and C lot).
Where are UNIVERSITY
REGISTERED parking lots located?!
? East of College Hill Drive at ETenth Street
? Parallel parking along both sides of College Hill Drive
? Unpaved lots off of Lawrence Street, between ETenth
Street and Library Drive
East of Reade Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets
? West of Reade Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets
INorth and South of the Student Recreation Center
? Allied Health Sciences Complex & Minges Coliseum
? B & C lots at School of Medicine
:�
Got Something To Say?
Write i Latter to ttw Editor j
Parking lot designations are subject to change.
A message from
Parking and Transportation Services
305 E.Tenth Street
Greenville
(919)328-6294
www.ecu.eduparkingparking.htm
UU
east
carolina
university
HENDRIX FILMS
I K E
Y E R S
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. : � . Sop!
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lav. September 6
1 � ;)(v.(i Information. Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
films sti't rit 8 00' PM unless otherwise ne
incl are FREE to Students. Faculty, and Staff -
(one fjuest allowed) with valid,ECU ID.
No Backpacks Nn ,bias Allowed in Hendnx Theatre
International Mian Of Mystery
I PGlST'SS! Ml NEW LINE CINEMaJI
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P �





3 Thursday. September 4. 1997
I
news
The East Carolinian
August 20
Breaking & Entering Motor Vehicle-An officer observed a vehicle driving in a
suspicious manner in the Curry Court parking lot. The vehicle was stopped and
a search of the vehicle produced a backpack containing a compact disc player, a
screwdriver and a trailer hitch. A check of the parking lot revealed that a vehi-
cle had been broken into. Several persons were arrested and issued trespass
warnings for breaking and entering a motor vehicle.
August 21
Damage to Property-A staff member reported damage to her vehicle while
parked in the A-Lot at the School of Medicine. A three-inch hole was cut or
punched in the windshield of her vehicle.
Damage to Property-A staff member reported that nine trees had been
uprooted and stripped of their branches from south of Mendenhall.
August 23
Assault-A resident of Aycock Hail reported an unknown subject called and
threatened him. Later that night, the subject arrived at the student's room and
lightly sjapped the student. The subject left the scene without being identified.
Driving While ImpairedAid & Abet a DWI-A non-student was arrested for
driving while impaired after driving a vehicle on the sidewalk south of the Fifth
and Reade Street parking lot.
August 24
Carrying Concealed WeaponWeapon on Campus-A non-student was arrested in
the Fifth and Reade Street parking lot after being stopped for public consump-
tion. The non-student was found to be carrying a small dagger and was also
charged with possession of a fictitious drivers license and underage alcohol pos-
session.
August 26
Underage DrinkingAssist Rescue-A staff member reported a resident of Aycock
Hall had fallen in the bathroom and struck her head on the floor. Greenville
Rescue was contacted and transported the student to PCMH. The student was
issued a campus appearance ticket for underage consumption of alcohol.
August 30
Resist, Obstruct & Delay-A non-student delayed and obstructed a police officer
by failing to properly identify himself during an investigation of an alcohol vio-
lation. The non-student was arrested and transported to the Htt County
Detention Center. Once his identity was verified, the magistrate found no prob-
able cause to detain him.
astcarolinian
i,
Someone put spots
on my gloves!
Please, help me find
who did it.
y
Someone please help Bufffy solve the mystery!
News Reporters or detectives
'ff fill out an aplication at The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the student pub building.
V (across from Joyner Library)

20 Off Any Eyeglass
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Purchase with I.D.
(Excludes Disposable Contact Lenses)
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!�Y�CAR�0�MT�R? October 31, 1997
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975-8040
75&4204
77USHwy64E
Plymouth Market Center
Plymouth, NC 795-2103
Dr. David L
Fitzgerald
2 - 4 AND 6 PERSON
SPAS AVAILABLE BY
THE DAY, THE WEEK
OR WEEKEND.
All prices include
deliverysetup and pickup.
to live by; v. -
�'��' ' . 'V
Rush
SIGMA NU
For more information, call 830-5439
9

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nKO AND OKT
PRKSKVrS
REGGAE on
THE
MAJESTIC LIONS
DONCvmi a posse
frm
BYOB
no bottles
803 Hooker Rd.
For Info. Call
756-2149
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at Mendenhall Student Center 0 1
COUNT DOWN
Just ten days until the World Famous Count Basie Orchestra comes to town.
Student tickets are now available at the Central Ticket Office for10. All
tickets purchased at the door are $20. Q
FRIDAY, SEPT. 12 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM.
votijal vacation 5:
Use your ECU ID to take a free virtual vacation to the Benelux Countries - 4�
Netherlands, Belgium, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in a Travel-Adventure �
film. TUESDAY, SEPT. 16 AT 4 OR 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE. An all-u- J
can-eat theme dinner is served at 6 p.m. for just1Z Dinner tickets must be ikN
reserved by Thursday, Sept. 11 with meal cards, cash, check, or credit card. g
wimwm
Mike Myer's Austin Powers (PG-13) will screen in Hendrix Theatre SEPT.4-6
AT 8 P.M. Your student I.D. get you a guest in for free.
fcj
BaSePpMt BaNdS S
Catch the latest up-and-coming bands for free in The Pirate Underground
EVERY THURSDAY AT 8 P.M. IN THE MSC SOCIAL ROOM. g
This week: Duality and Redalia �
� :
WORTH A LOOK
Check out the Art Exhibition: Complex Gifts in the MSC Gallery
Artist Reception on Thursday, Sept, 11 from 7-9 p.m.

BE A KINGPIN
Name Our Center Contest - If you can come up with just the right name for
our bowling center, you will win a free bowling ball and bag and all the .
prestige and press that goes along with being a kingpin. Pick up your entry
form at the bowling center. Deadline for entry is Sept. 30. Call 328-4740.
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL Jag
Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from 8-11 p.m.for
just $5 (includes shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Give your Monday a boost from 1-6 p.m. with 50C bowling (shoe rental included). 4
ONE-BUCK BOWLING
Make Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10 frames for just $1 (shoe
rental included) between 1 -6 p.m. v
ENDENHAtL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity
SERVICES: Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games � Student Locator Service
� ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board � Art Gallery
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.mll p.m. �
- �4fc






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4 Thundsy, Saptsmbtr 4, 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
easti(!arolinian
AMY L.ROYSTKR Editor
CRUESTE WILSON Mwnj Et�
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John Davis MitMiJMtiiEiM John murphy Shh imsmioi
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oumew
! Three non-related people may not live together in the same house in Greenville due to a city
djrdinaace which makes economical college living difficult.
If the four-bedroom house one block from campus, which you've had your eye on since your
freshman year, suddenly becomes vacant, unless you have cousins or siblings at school here, the
rent will probably be out of the question. $1,000 a month rent would be hard enough to swallow
cfcvided by four and out of the question split three ways. Without that fourth roommate to share
afcpenses, the house is unobtainable to most students.
What to do? If the landlord, as many landlords have been known to do, decides to look the
(fther way and sign three of you on a lease, with the understanding that the fourth may stay
tlhiess they get caught, the house may be yours.
I; Here's the catch, lfbur neighbor, who has been parking in the house's driveway for the last five
clears, is not happy because you told him there was no room for his car anymore. Well, it may not
legal to have more than three unrelated people in a house, but it is legal to call the city
jpector and report violators anonymously. So, of course, the neighbor calls the inspector, the
Inspector finds more than three unrelated people living in the home, and yo�; re k ung for a
place to live.
What's going on here? Why in a college town would there be an ordinance so counter-produc-
to college living? Certainly the residence halls cannot hold all 17,000 students and apart-
:nt living is not for everyone. With an entire district of homes stretching over three miles long
m Cotanche Street to 10th Street and several blocks deep from 5th Street to the Tar River,
10 else does the city think is going to inhabit this area other than students?
TEC understands that the city has an interest in preventing communes of people from Irving
together in massive numbers in houses not built to accomodate large numbers. We aren't sug-
gesting the city have no regulations at all. What TEC would like to see are the numbers changed
from three unrelated people to four or five.
Most of the houses in the "student district" are old homes, many of which have more than
fhree bedrooms. The city council needs to address this problem and help students live in
Greenville economically while attending ECU.
I There are zoning exceptions for fraternity and sorority houses, allowing large numbers of
inrelated people to reside together. Apartment complexes, such as The Players Club, are zoned
In such a way as to allow four unrelated people to live together. If the city recognizes a need for
these zoning regulations, it does not seem unreasonable to recognize a need for the "student dis-
trict" to offer more affordable housing, by allowing four rather than three unrelated people to a
home.
i Whitlc it may mean more work for city officials to address homes on an individual basis and
jjet limits which are appropriate for larger or adapted homes, making housing more affordable for
tudents is a service which the student community and TEC would appreciate all the way to the
oting booths this November.
?PINION
OPINION
Mary
WEBB
Distribute fees among patrons of services
truly believe that ECU
pro: ides excellent services
to its student and they
should he applauded
for their efforts.
However, isn't there a
fairer way to even
up the fees PI don't have
use for many of
these facilities
I am poor. Like a vast majority of
ECU students, I am in need of ever-
increasing funds for school. And this
makes me unhappy. Well, more like
annoyedirritatedangry. Take your
pick.
Let me exnlain. 1 work extremely
hard end save every penny. For exam-
ple, I don't go out on the weekends
with my friends. There are no fancy
dinners, no new clothes and the same
old, beaten up car. I feel that in-state
tuition for 12 credits and above is fair-
ly reasonable at around $800 or so.
What makes me see red are ail the
added on costs like the
"EducationalTech" fee ($30) and
"University fees" ($344). What exact-
ly are these? In an effort to find out
and understand both sides of the
story I telephoned the cashier's office
an 'oke with Miciud lidko.
liuiko explained that the educa-
state of the art equipment for the
chemistry, physics and biology labs. It
also covers the computer labs avail-
able at the library. The University
fees provides us with a broad range of
services. These include transit ser-
vices, intramural activities, functions
held at Mendenhall, the recreation
center, the SGA as well as the media
board.
My major is Communication and
this is a field that requires both tech-
nical as well as strong academic sup-
port. I have been at ECU for two years
now and am getting ready for gradua-
tion in the Pall. However, during all of
this time, the only 'technical services'
that I have had to avail myself of were
the computers located at Edwards
Lab in the General Classroom
Building � for a couple of hours a
week. And then there were some vis-
its to the library to use Proquest.
It is noted in the tuition payment
schedule (which each student
receives every semester) that the
above mentioned fees entitle part-
time students to the same services
and privileges as full-time students. I
truly believe that ECU provides
excellent services to its students and
they should be applauded for their
efforts. How er, i.Mi't th.re a fairer
way to even p the toes? I d� t have
use for mam of these facilir id vet
full semester. I commute to school so
I don't use the purple buses. Being a
transfer student, I have already com-
pleted the required classes in Biology
etc. and therefore don't have need for
the labs. And as far as I am concerned,
the SGA has not done anything worth
mentioning � so that's a waste of
money as well.
Contributions are also made to cer-
tain organizations from these fees. 1
don't care if it's just $2.00 - at least ask
us. What if I don't agree with these
organizations goals, ideals or princi-
ples?
And then there is the ever-growing
problem with some professors who
require students to purchase three or
four expensive books for their class-
which they never use! But that's
another column
William S.
COCHRAN1
TV only makes viewers feel bad on daily basis
what happens to our
generation, which grew up
literally spending
more time watching
TV than communicating
withfamity?
Statisticians report average U.S.
households watch over six hours of
television daily. Personally, I don't
know any average U.S. households. I
suspect Martha Stewart's may be. At
any rate, that's six hours of ogling a
day. We watch ER, Bayuatck, Seinfeld.
We know the characters' lives better
than the lives of real people we
know.
But what happens to our genera-
tion, which grew up literally spend-
ing more time watching TV than
communicating with family?
Watching silicon-injected, cucum-
brously coot, characters, saving lives
or falling tropically in love. What
happens when we watch tons of TV
which affects nearly every aspect of
life, from deodorant soap, to what we
look for in a sp e? ProMem is,
most of us don't realize the deep
effect of TV; or if we do realize, we
don't really care (the TV as indiffer-
ent living room furniture syndrome).
Why has this generation seen a
spike in the number of cases of clin-
ical depression? Why has the divorce
rate rocketed since 1950?
Because Joe Briefcase watches six
hours of good looking, sinisterly
charming people living extraordinary
lives. Then Joe looks at his own life
and says, "My wife isn't nearly that
good looking" or "All I do is sell insur-
ance or real estate or teach elemen-
tary kids etc Ironically, what does
Joe do? Does he go out and save lives
or meet gorgeous people? I think it's
safe to say that in most cases, no. He
plops down for another six hours
and, whether conscious of it or not,
subtly feels even worse about him-
self. It's a vicious, self-deprecating
cycle that 250 million Americans
subject themselves to daily.
" While tribute is paid to freedom of the press
in theory, the rights upon which it rests
are attacked in detail
James Russell Wiggins, newspaper editor, 1977

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5 Thursday, September 4. 1997
mi
The East Carolinian
Everyday Life
by Michael Litwin
Hop-Scotch
Nick Holt and Kate Kohn
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Seventeen Days in May
by Rich Cornwell
M�r, HicW�� arj T.yr, o�r $�U Vi�v� h.�n tipp��
tt,� f�A wt� ftnj ye ;� j ;m, to 3
'NIKE HEADQUARTERS
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Lake Imp USA
QHSfTtH ran- a o&4tEETt�?
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Ml IWrXI THT$ 4
TAcu HAglT'
$c UHS'C IN SUM
SWKTtAfa?
BY JOHN MURPHY
(WE" aus n sire.
iCoiuo e PE�su4&et
TO, IK
P.EMEt8EEeb I'M .4
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130. WlllW.

Answers fromTuesday
wAsHo0RGEPAWS
ARTJs1ANUTAH
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ANEAARE
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MENTALLY0EC0YS
EL1S?YRE
LEQREEARSENALS
1RONN0VAS1�LIA
N1NATn1B�oMP
KEELSAsSYEAS
ACROSS
1 Tormentor
5 Oolf gadgets
9 Tennis" Arthur
13 State strongly
14 Celestial body
15 Repast
18 Long car, (or
short
17 Nimble
18 Sculler's
equipment
19 Purveyor of
wordly goods?
22 Agreeable
answer
23 Research
building
24 � milk
28 Nepal's capital
33 Good-bye, Juan
34 Hiding place
35 Hockey's Bobby
36 M�h jongg piece
37 Malicious
38 Kermit, e.g.
39 A Gabor
40 Meanders
41 � of absence
42 Asserts
44 Joined together
45 Shapely letter
46 Family member
47 Rubble rouser?
54 Formal order
55 Urchin
56 Sleuth Wolfe
58 Choir voice
59 Escape by
deceit
60 Abel's brother
61 Performer
62 Dry
63 � vera
DOWN
1 Chum
2 Nasty
3 Trucking rig
123'1�567'I9101112
131415
16171832
192021
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NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
A Home Away From Home
Inquiry Classes - Confirmation Classes
First Communion Classes - Spirituality Classes
Interested? Come Monday, Sept 8th at 7:30 pm or Wednesday, Sept 10, at 8 pm
Place: The Newman Center, 953 E. 10tui :reet
( 2 Houses from the Fielcner Music Building )
eWUo 7S7-t99f
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
ID at the
i.ampus and get a 25
ire dinner check. Try our
i : ork
I ire Grille
RECTAURANT&BAR
1111 � r1111 itiii
800 East 10th Street � 751MQ07
Roadside Chicken Sandwich. Steak and Cheese
Sandwich. Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts. It's all specially pnced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun'
The Firehouse Tavern
O 19B7 Tribune Meda Srvtct. Inc. 32 CcaXOd
34 Bear lair
All rights reserved
Certain gait 20 Hurricane
Ancient
garments
Moslem prince
Squirming
centers
21 Sports contest
24 Married
37 Prom flowers
38 Bog
40 Unpleasant
outbreak
Sneaky
One-celled
animal
Connery
Red deer
Overhead
railways
25 Take � (throw a 41 Protracted
50 General Bradley
51 Move slowly
52 Circus performer
53 Singing group
54 Hunk
57 Undivided
fight)
26 Fragrant flower
27 Sock end
28 Jackson and
Mulgrew
29 Play sections
43 Public reader
44 Pat or Daniel
46 Playground
fixture
47 Slngor Guthrlo
48 Ceremony
f Thursday
Underfoot
Friday
Back Porch Circle
Saturday
Sunnywheat
Sunday
NFL Ticket on DSS
FREE FOOD
Monday 8
Monday Night
Football
Tuesday 9,h
Jazz Night
Onix
Wine Tasting
Every
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday
Dance to DJ Will
upstairs
14 Shnwfvl cnrvorn J1 Motored
:10 Defense system 49 Roof edge
j Greenville's
Thursdays
$1.00 Domestics
Fri & Sat
Beer Tub Specials
Sunday :
32 oz. Domestic'
Draft $1.50
14 oz. Domestic1
Draft 75�
FREE FOOD
NFL Ticket on DSS
Tuesdays
wine tasting &
Onix Cigar
Tasting Display
Monday
Football
75 Southpaw
L Sports Bar





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Student Email @ ECU
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Beginning Fall 97 ECU Students will receive NEW e-mail accounts as a
part of an initiative to enhance campus electronic communication.
The new mail service is free and begins August 20, 1997
You do IJMI need to apply for this account, one will be ge
for you automatically.
The new service based on Microsoft Exchange will be phased in while ECUVM,
ECUVAX, & ECUSUN based e-mail will be gradually phased out.
Exchange mail can be accessed from anywhere (home, dorm, campus lab, etc) that you
have access to a web browser. Just surf to the following URL:
http:www.mail.ecu.eduexchange
Your B2B3will be your legal initials followed by the month & day
you were born. For example, James T. Kirk, born March 4 would
have a userid of JTK0304. If there are two people with the same
initials and birthday, then a "D" will be added to the end of the
userid.
You can search for and confirm your userid from the ECU home page (http:
www.ecu.edu) by clicking on Telephone & E-Mail Information under About ECU or at:
http:www3.ecu.eduemailemail.cfm
t Your ffHffffffl will be the last six digits of your social security
number. You should change this the first time you use your account
by clicking on Options on the left side of your Exchange screen.
Then click on Change Exchange Password. Change your password to
something that you can remember but one that is not easily guessed.
Your e-mail address will be your userid followed by �mail.ecu.edu .
For on-line help, go to the ECU home page (http:www.ecu.edu) and click on
Telephone & E-Mail information under About ECU. Then click on On-line help for
Exchange Web Access.
If you have any questions, or problems using your account, stop by
Austin 208 or call 328-0077.
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WffH
7 Thursday. September 4. 1997
lifestyle
The Eatt Carolinian
Playhouse prepares
for full fall season
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The idea of watching a play probably isn't very appealing to most of us. The
word "theatre" conjures images of English actors trilling their 'R's while spout-
ing droll renditions of Hamlet. Worse still, it may bring to mind getting dressed
up as one of the lumpy sheep in the annual Christmas pageant down at the local
church. Mom always thought you looked so cute in that shepherd outfit.
Musicals probably make you think of Julie Andrews and the family Von Trapp.
Fortunately, the East Carolina Playhouse hasn't been talking to your mother.
They've been busy lining up what is sure to be a blockbuster set of plays and
musicals for the fall semester. The Playhouse is run by professors from the
School of Theater Arts and the actors are usually ECU students. The produc-
tions themselves are rarely dry or boring. Last year the Playhouse put on the
controversial Suburbia and the wickedly funny Lysistrata.
This fall, the first musical is the Tony Award winning The Mystery of Edwin
Drood. This Broadway musical is based on an unfinished mystery by Charles
Dickens. Characters like Princess Puffer, an opium addict; Rosa Bud, the play's
obligatory pure heroine; and an unnamed male lead, who is supposed to repre-
sent the murdered Drood populate the play. Composer Rupert Holmes has
worked every possible ending into the musical by allowing the audience to
make critical decisions in the progress of the plot, like one of those Choose Your
Own Adventure books from the '80s. This means, naturally, that one could con-
ceivably attend the show three nights in a row and see a different play each
time.
The Mystery of Edwin Drood will be directed by newcomer Marcus Olson, who
has just come from Broadway himself. The show runs from October 16 to 21.
The second production this semester, Mothei Hicks, is a touching drama set
in the Great Depression. Steeped in American Folklore, much like past
Playhouse performance The Dark of the Moon, it explores the roots of prejudice.
It centers around the story of Girl, an orphan who searches for her parents and
ends up at the lair of Mother Hicks, whom the townspeople think to be a witch.
The play features a hearing-impaired character, and therefore incorporates
American Sign Language into the script. If for nc other reason, the visual poet-
ry and choreography of ASL should be enough of a reason to see this play.
Directed by East Carolina Playhouse veteran Donald Biehn, (Someone to
Watch Over Me, Dancing at Iughnasa) Mother Hicks shows November 20-25.
Tickets are available individually or for the entire season and can be pur-
chased at the box office in the lobby of McGinnis Theatre or by calling 328-
1726. Prices for season passes are $32-836 for faculty and staff and $36-$40 for
the general public. Individual ticket prices are $5-$6 for children and students,
$7-$8 for faculty and staff, and $8-$9 for the public. All shows run Thursday -
Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. and on Sunday at 2 p.m. only.
This is not a rant. The goal: to write
complete sentences and hopefully to
make some sort of point. Just another
ass with an opinion
Howard can't touch
the twang
"The moon went behind the clouds to hide its head and cry
PHOTO COURTESY OF CMG
ANDY TtRNF.R
I.IFF.STVJ K EDITOR
Henry Acrobat releases new disc
�TrVTflftH
John Davis
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Note: I wanted to title this article "Looking for
Henry Acrobat Unfortunately, AP style (that's a
writing style used by newspaper writers, kids)
demands an active verb in every headline. This is
why most headlines sound stupid: "Local band
releases first CD "Search for Acrobat continues
Never mind my pun on DeNiro's recent adapta-
tion of Shakespeare's history Richard III. Never
mind originality and creativity AP style must win
out. I'm sure the Iiluminati have had some hand in
this
Because I'm hostile to the local music scene
(especially Purple Schootbus) and Peasant's (which
is a hotbed of Melrose Place-style gossip and petti-
ness), I've never actually, until Thursday afternoon,
heard Henry Acrobat. So when I tripped on down to
the Percolator and chatted with Todd Roberts, the
singersongwriter of the group, I was shocked and
surprised to discover how articulate, intelligent and
coot he was.
Unfortunately the bureaucratic powers that be
have not yet provided me with one of those handy
mini tape recorders, so you'll never know just how
cool Todd is unless you talk to him yourself, or check
out Henry Acrobat's fab web page. I will, however.
relate the important facts revealed by said interview.
Roberts was a fun kid to chat with. He's well-
read and humorous, which no doubt shines through
in his lyrics. His vision for his music is to have fun
most of all. While he doesn't want to be "some ultra-
depressing MorisseySmiths freak he doesn't want
the band to be just another Greenville party band
either. The latest trend of roots-rock bands in the
downtown scene has constrained bands like Henry
Acrobat, but Roberts values his relationship with the
Greenville music scene and is pleased with recent
developments such as the Musician's Guild.
The CD itself was recorded and produced by the
band. I was given a cassette tape with four of the
album's songs featured on it. The songs themselves
are a pretty good mix of funk, punk and other sorts
of loud music. Fortunately, Henry Acrobat does not
sound like a copy of the latest ska trend. They actu-
ally sound like themselves, which is a refreshing
change from certain Grateful Dead copy bands who
have made their home here. Roberts commented
that he worked very hard ro recreate Henry
Acrobat's live sound on the CD. The only drawback
to the songs I heard was the obvious stamp of engi-
neer John Phmalc, who has managed to become a
big shot in the North Carolina music scene.
Phmale's mixing style is dry and uninviting, turning
Henry Acrobat's otherwise spacious and loud songs
into a kind of mush at points. But the demo is still
pretty enjoyable in spite of Phmale's murk.
Henry Acrobat themselves will be performing at
Peasant's to celebrate this momentous event. Their
aforementioned fabulous web site is www.grecnvii-
lenc.comhometodd.

Kufteai I
4i inm I �-
ii -
Henry Acrobat will hold its CO
at Peasant's.
PHOTO COURTESY OF HENRY ACROBAT
party this Friday
Comedy Zone brings in the laugh
JENNIFER LEGCETT
STFF WRITER
For the past 26 years The Attic in downtown Greenville has been a gathering
place for a growing number of ECU students and Greenville residents. Voted
one of the top 100 college bars in America by Piayhov magazine, The Arric has
become a multi-event kind of club hosting dance nights and concerts as well as
weekly comedy acts.
The Attic's Comedy Zone is an attraction that has been packing the house
for years. The Comedy Zone is actually an agency that books comedians in clubs
once a week in towns, around the country that might not be able to support a
full-time comedy club.
Every Wednesday night for the past 11 (yes 11) years, students, friends and
everyone else have been piling into the Attic to catch the latest comedy acts
and laugh until their faces hurt. The crowds tove the comedians and the come-
dians love the college age crowds who heartily respond to NASCAR, sweet tea
and sexual prowess (or lack thereof) jokes. Prop comics also do well with The
.Attic crowd - the goofier the better.
A regular performer at Comedy Zone, comedian Jim Holder, seems to enjoy
his job. "It's a really good gig said Holder. "I get to sleep all day hang out and
work 45 minutes a night. What could be better?" The comedians are great at
getting the audience to have fun and participate - drunken heckling doesn't
count.
Comedy Zone is a great place to hang out on Wednesday nights. Attic owner
joe Tronto likes to keep admission cost down so it will cost you only a dollar,
with your student ID, to come hang out and see exciting new comedy acts every
week.
On Comedy Zone nights the Attic is set up with lots of group size tables, big
enough for all of your suitemates, study partners, or co-workers. Waitresses
Phil Hogan (left) and Jim Holder (riglit) m ngalars it Conwdy Zone
PHOTO COURTESY OF ATTIC
come around to cake your drink orders so you don't have to miss a minute of the
show standing in line at the bar and baskets of freshly popped popcorn wait for
you on your table (for snacking, not throwing).
Usualy, two comedians perform each Wednesday for about 45 minutes each.
The show starts around 9:30 p.m. and is over at an carry midnight time. For any-
one having to get up at the crack of dawn for class or work, this may be the per-
fect night out for you and your friends.
For those of you who are weary of straying from your television on Wednesday
night, maybe Comedy Zone just might be able to break you from your Melrose
habit. Comedy Zone has a different and hilarious act each week, providing an
exciting and fun atmosphere where you can't help but have a blast.
Aerosmith's Toys still fun to play
pat Reid
SENIOR WRITER
This Is
the column
where
focus on the
stuff you miss
and the stuff you
missed. We will examine
the books, albums,
movies and television
shows we feel deserve
further exploration. Ifs
the stuff we dug back in
the day
That Howard Stem done got me riled up, mama.
No, the "King of All Media" didn't offend me with any cmde jokes about les-
bians or cotton pickin' Christopher Reeve. This time he really messed up. He
was picking on country music, ywu :cc. This rile incident occurred while I was
watching that movie of his, Prkvtc Parrs. I had seen the movie before, so I real-
ly don't know why this time it got my pickle peppered. In the movie, Howard
tuit his job at the radio station he was working after they switched formats to
country music. Howard said he couldn't relate to country music because he
went to college and didn't fool around w ith his sister or nothing like that. That's
what got me. He was saying he was too smart for country music - he thought he
was above it.
I think I lot of people feel they're too smart for country music. The people
who listen to country music, they think, are about as sharp as a stick of butter.
They envision backwoods rednecks with tobacco juice dripping down their
SEE BACK IN THE DAY PAGE S
Okay, let me start by admitting that I am totally
corrupting the "Back In The Day" column with
this article. It's my understanding that the
column is meant for obscure CD's and
movies that have gone way too long with-
out due praise. Unfortunately I'm a retro
idiot who has very little obscure taste, so
instead, I'm focusing all of my "Back In
The Day's" on what I consider quintes-
sential albums of mainstream rock.
That being said, my first choice is
Aerosmith's classic Toys In The Attic.
Despite
their phe-
nomenal suc-
cess in the '70s,
most people who
think of Aerosmith these
days think of "Dude
(Looks Like A Lady)" as
being the start of their
career, and this voids an
overwhelming amount of
good music.
The highlight of this
era of Aerosmith is Toys In
The Attic. Far enough along
in their career that they
had experience and fan
support, yet carry enough
that drugs hadn't taken
too much of a toll, the
Toys-cn Aersomith had it
together in a big way No
Aerosmith tan can consid-
er their collection com-
plete without this jewel
and. likewise, any rock fan
at all would find it a suit-
able addition to their col-
lection.
With a quick look at the
song list one immediately notices the anthems "Sweet
Emotion" and "Walk This Way "Sweet Emotion" is the
complete version as compared to the short version available
on the band's greatest hits. Not a whole lot more needs to
be said about these since anyone who listens to any rock
radio at all can probably already sing along to these songs.
However, these two songs are nowhere near being the
highlights of the album. The album is a mix of blues.
rhythm and blues, and, at the time, groundbreaking rock.
Songs like "Toys In The Attic" and "Adam's Apple" walk
the fine Aerosmithian line between hard rock and pop
while songs like "Big Ten Inch Record" and "Uncle Salty"
allow the boys to pay homage to the blues greats that
inspired them. Also, lyrically "Uncle Salty" is a preview of
things to come. A close listen to the words will show that
"Uncle Salty" confronts the same issue as their hit "Janie's
Got A Gun" over a decade before that song was ever writ-
ten.
Still my personal favorites come late in the album. "No
More, No More" is a tribute to life on the road but with ail
the downs that come with it. Lines tike, "Blood stains the
ivories of my daddy's baby grand1 ain't seen the daylight
since the scan of this band foreshadow the tensions and
stress that eventually broke the band apart at the end of
the 70s, while, "You love 'em and you leave 'em with your
sold out reviews char-
band's
the
at
Toys continues to please twenty years later.
CO COVER COURTESY OF COLUMBIA RECORDS
acterizes the
public persona
time.
Then there's "Round
and Round In my per-
sonal list of all time
greatest Aerosmith
songs, "Round and
Round" is near the top.
Heavier and slower than
almost any other
Aerosmith song, its dark,
pounding rhythm
topped off with a heart
and soul performance by
Steven Tyler on vocals
make it a sun among the
stars. After this the last
song, "You See Me
Crying is anticlimactic
to say the least. My
advice, if you have a pro-
grammable CD player, is
to program "You See Me
Cryin somewhere in the
middle because, despite
being a great song, after
"Round and Round" it
just doesn't compare.
So, now that I've totally ruined the point of this.column,
I suppose I'll crawl back into my cave of lava lamps and
Pink Floyd posters, but not before I add this one note: if
you're looking to buy Toys you're in luck. Columbia recent-
ly remastered all of the old Aerosmith catalog and rere-
leased them complete with full inlays. If nothing else, the
inlays alone make it worth getting the new version so keep
a sharp eye out, ya dig? "�

�mr





w
8 Thursday. September 4, 1997
I iit-style j

September
4 Thursday
Ptmers showing at 8p.m. in Hendrix Theater
(through Sept. 6)
PSrttte Underground at 8-10:45 pm in Mendenhall
Underfoot at Firehouse Tavern
The Jumpstarts at The Attic
Grinch w Jonglers at Peasant's
Just Us Jazz Quartet at Staccato
Bailter Space and John Todd at Lizard and Snake in
Chape! Hill
5 Friday
yf utncmt nauitct: otx Israeli rmuograpnm ana tsom
Carotim to Israel PnifKt (photography exhibits) at Gray
'Gallery. Exhibits will show until 924.
. : Etephtm Boy at The Attic
Henry Acrobat CD release party at Peasant's
Back Pbrch Circle at Firehouse Tavern
Delbert McClinton at Hard Times II
Hipbone at The Brewery in Raleigh

6 Saturday
The Jumpstarts perform at the Attic on Thursday.
PHOTO COURTESY Of THI JUMnTARTS
Skellingtons at Firehouse Tavern
The Back Doors at The Attic
Keller Williams at Peasant's
9 Tuesday
One Step Beyond at The Attic
rendering at Peasant's
Flicker (local film festival) at Cat's Cradle in Chapel
Hill
Psycho Trash and Zoot Suit at Lizard and Snake in
Chapel Hill
Audio explorations at The Brewery in Raleigh
10 Wednesday
Comedy Zone : Al Katz and Mike Cornell at The Attic
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertise
with tu in
The East
Carolinian
Free Pregnancy Test
White You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
20&& S.Evans St Hours Vary as Needed
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I

Screaming Cheetah Wheelies 911 Purple School Bus 927
Everything 913 Jupiter Coyote 1011
JGB 918 Breakfast Club 1013
Far Too Jones 919 Chairmen of the Board 1027
Jimmie's Chicken Shack 925
Thanksgiving Dinner!
1. Stop at Harris Teeter and pick up a card
like the one shown at the right.
2. Shop 10 out of 12 weeks between
September 3 & November 25,1997.
3. Spend $35.00 or more each week on one
visit.Excludes alcohol and tobacco.)
4. Show your VIC card and have the cashier
validate your Thanksgiving Dinner Card.
5 When 10 out of 13 blocks are validated,
you are eligible to receive a FREE
Thanksgiving Dinner.
Ifs That Easy!
See Store For
More Details.
12 gallon
s Choice
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12" Tombstone
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1012 lb. Grade A Frozen
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6 oz. Stove Top Chicken or Corn
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Two 145 oz. Cans Del Monte
�reen Beans
16 oz, Can Ocean Spray Jellied
Cranberry Sauce
13 oz. Package Folger's
Automatic Drip Cofiee
S2S oz. Betty Crocker Super
Moist Yellow Cake Mix
6 ct Plain Or Sour Dough
Harris Teeter
-
;
With VIC Card -Limit 4 Total
Saturday
$1.50 Busch Light BottlesG I
$2�� 32oz. Draft
bock doors
The shocking reincarnation of Jim Morrison & The Doors'
'if.
iiutt
�Si
Thursday Sept. 1 8
ADVANCE TIX AVAILAN.E AT
CD AI1EY � SKUUY'S
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With former members of Jerry Garcia Band :
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I
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Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday, Sept 3 Through Sept 9.1997 In Our Raleigh Area Stores
OnlyYfe Reserve The Right lb Limit Quantities. None Sold TbDealeiVfeSladly Accept federal Food Stamps.
am �f
ifriemi� i e i in
,jr m r





9 Thursday, S�ptimtt�r 4. 1897
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Ramblin
Continual) from page 8
chins trying to play hide the corn cob
with theircousirvThelma Lou Louise
Cindy. Those are the type of people
who listen to that kind of music.
Rjt me, country music is nothing
like that. I see country music as this
form of music that tells the stories of
people who don't always get their sto-
ries told, people who may never get
their story told anyway else.
Country music is often called the
"white man's blues However, peo-
ple don't seem to look down on the
blues like thev do country music. It's
A A KITC"TV F,RST"YEAR STUDENTS a.k.a. Freshmen
YViIN I CLi (who live off campus)
Once a month get together with other first-year students who commute!
Eat lunch with new friends!
Talk about issues that interest you!
When: 12:30 to 2:00 p.m Tuesday, September 9
(and every second Tuesday of every month)
Where: The Underground in Mendenhall Student Center.
(Bring your Lunch or pick up something on the way.)
This Month's Guest Speaker:
Jim Sturm, a great guy and
Director of Student Leadership Development
He'll tell you about ail kinds of fun things to do at ECU!
It's Social, it's Fun, and it's FREE!
Frw Drinks will
be provided.
For more information about the First-Year Brown Buh Lu, . h Series
or if you need disability support call 328-4173
probably because their version of the
blues consists of little more than long
guitar solos and Eric Clapton or Stevie
Ray Vaughn. The two genres often
share similar themes: loneliness,
poverty, trouble with the law, etc I
read a recent article where they said
the difference between country
music and the blues was that country
music had no pride; the songs consist-
ed of link more than self-pity with no
sense of hope or something better: I
don't buy that; I think country music
does offer hope, if only in knowing
that some one else has the same
damn troubles you have.
A friend once told me that you
couldn't like country music unless
you've been to the boctom. You had to
hurt to understand. She said that her
and I had been to the bottom. Bull. I
haven't been to the bottom. I've got
my fender scratched a few times by
falling for someone too quick, but that
ain't exactly the bottom, and I'm not
martyr enough to think it is.
I understand what she was trying
to say though. Some people think
country is simply depressing. To
understand why anyone would want
to sing about being so far down, you
have to have experienced what they
did, been where they've been. That
doesn't ring true to me either. I think
the good country songs have charac-
ters that I can imagine, that 1 know
exist, even if I have never actually
been there or known someone like
therm. Merle Haggard's song about a
prisoner on his way to his execution,
"Sing Me Bock Home docs that for
me. f have never known anyone on
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We also carry posters.
black lights, tarn tamps,
incense, candles and
hemp jewelry.
Loath, b,
� �I
jug ia tfcis ad as gut z FREK ptUa
death row, but when he sings, "Sing
me back home to a place I use to
know make my old memories come
alive I can see that. I can see this
guy getting ready to die, looking back
at his life, wanting to go back to wher-
ever he was before his troubles begaifc
Now, if your idea of country is Bil
Ray Cyrus or any other singing asses
in cowboy hats, that ain't what I'm
talking about either. Country music
for me is Hank Williams Sr Hag,
George Jones, Loretta Lynn and Bob
Wills. It's sweet melodies and lyrics
that sting your innards like a gang of
hornets. Steel guitars and fiddles so
fine they make your ears tear up.
They play a lot of those old ones on
1070 AM "Real Country They rake
me back to some place I haven't ever
been. Of course, in between all that I
have listened to Bryan White or some
other little whiny turd.
Some of the realest contemporary
country music is coming from the-
k country punk alternative
Trcountryalternatwanginsurgenjt
countryy'allternativeno depression
cornet Whatever you call it, a lot of
good country musk is being produced
through that movement. There are
good more "mainstream" (main-
stream in that they have achieve)!
some popular success) country acts,
too. The Mavericks, Lyle Lovett,
Dwight Yoakam and others all have
the stuff 1 like.
OK. so my point is: don't think
you're too smart for country, tater. You
might have been to college, but don't
you be nobody's fool. Do it for Daddy
Hank if for no one else, who wrote
the loneliest line ever. "The moon
went behind the cloudsto hide its
bead and crv You can't beat that
with a 50-foot stick.
�VwaHuaJJM
Every Thursday 7:00pm
GCB Room 1028
Fun, Friendship, and Bftle Study
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
eastcarolinian
WANTED
Sports Writers
Apply at our oXos
on the second fioor
of to Student Pub
Buidng
IFC
Fall 1997
Fraternity Rush
Sept. 8-11 8-11pm
bids extended at 12 midnight Sept. 11 th
Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
Delta Chi - AAII House
Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St
Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St
Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Elizabeth
Sigma Nu-501 E. 11th St.
Sigma Pi-506 E. 10th St
Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E. 10th St
DKF
OKT
IIKA
IIKO
IIAD
IAE
LOE
rrr
0X
Phi Kappa Psi - 909 Forbes St
Phi Kappa Tau - 409 Elizabeth St
Pi Kappa Alpha - Sigma Sigma Sigma House
Pi Kappa Phi - 803 Hooker Rd.
Pi Lambda Phi - 41fr Elizabeth St
SighfiaAlpfiTEpsilon - Alpha Phi House
Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E. 5th St
Sigma Tau Gamma - 203 Oak St 8
ThetaChi-312E. 11th St
OKT
1
CAMPUS
zndibKX
da
KE
KA
nm st.
ZAE
STTf
1�St.
5th St.
10th St
Friendships are common, but Brotherhood lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek
i
'rrr
w$mm�m�mim0Smmmm0bmm






Ml
10 Thursday. Septtmbar 4. 1997
Courage carries disabled student far in athletics
ffnfrA! Mackey has done anything but let his disabilities brine Dlace swimming rirlev rhn� nniifino f�r rh- � k ji� i� �
TRACY LAl'BACH
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
"If you think you are handicapped, then you are. If you think
you're not, then you're not. You may rave challenges, but
everyone else has challenges too. You have to look past those
challenges and set your heart into doing something that you
love to do, and then go for it Chris Mackey said.
A sophomore from Gary, Mackey is one of the most spirit-
ed, determined and accomplished students on campus. He
can often be found on the basketball court at the Student
Recreation Center, shooting basket after basket, or at the
pool, swimming lap after lap.
But Mackey doesn't run up and down the basketball court,
and he doesn't walk to the pool when he wants to go for a
swim. As one of the university's 21 physically disabled stu-
dents on campus, Mackey shoots from a wheelchair and
swims using his arms and upper body only.
Bom with an orthopedic disability known as Spina Bifida,
Mackey has suffered from severe nerve damage from his waist
down. Recent research suggests that the condition, in which
a small hole exists in the back of the spine, may be hereditary.
Mackey has done anything but let his disabilities bring
him down. At the age of six, he began swimming, and six years
later, he took up an interest in basketball. As a member of a
Chapel Hill-based youth team for young athletes with dis-
abilities, Mackey traveled the entire country with his team-
mates throughout his high school career.
Looking to pursue a degree in recreational or occupation-
al therapy at a school not so far from home, Mackey decided
to enroll at ECU because of the variety of Allied Health pro-
grams and career choices that are available.
"I knew that in coming to ECU, I would have the oppor-
tunity to change my major ifl wanted while still remaining in
the same field of study Mackey said.
A first semester freshman looking to get involved but not
quite sure how, Mackey received information in the mail
about a university program called ARISE, standing for
Adaptive Recreation Intramural Sports Enrichment.
Comprised of faculty from recreational services, university
staff, and disabled students, the program aims to let the dis-
abled give input on the types of recreational activiries they
would like to see available Through ARISE, Mackey was able
to obtain information pertaining to athletic competitions for
disabled persons, which he immediately entered and began
training for.
In a regional competition last April amongst students from
both North and South Carolina, Mackey clinched five first
place swimming titles, thus qualifying for the national cham-
pionship, held three months later at Springfield College in
Springfield, Mass
The national meet, the Disabled Sports USA National
Summer Games, hosted disable athletes from around the
world. With competitors from as far away as Canada and
Australia, Mackey swam in three events, claiming two fourth
place and one fifth place finish.
In the 100-meter freestyle event at nationals, Mackey fin-
ished in an incredible 1:25, just four seconds shy of tying the
American record of 1:21.
"I am positive that with a lot of hard training, I can go into
a meet in the future and set a new record Mackey said.
Ron Curl, a past paraolympic swimmer and member of the
Greenville community, led Mackey in the right direction after
the two athletes met at an ARISE meeting last year.
"Ron got me started and gave me a lot of confidence
Mackey said. "He convinced me that I had a lot of potential
and could take my swimming to a new level
Mackey recently received an application for an interna-
tional competition, scheduled to be held this December in
Argentina.
"I'm not sure if I am ready to compete at that level yet
Mackey said. "But one thing I do have going for me right now
is that at the national meet in Springfield, I was the fastest
American in all of the events I competed in
Mackey"s ultimate goal is to follow
in the footsteps of Curl and compete in
the paraolympics, which are held every
four years in conjunction with the
Olympic games. The second largest
athletic event in the world, the compe-
tition amongst the disabled is held a
few weeks after the closing of the
Olympics. Four people arc selected for
each event from each country.
For now, Mackey is in search of a
permanent coach, someone to provide
guidance and stick by his side.
"I need a coach that will devise a
workout program for me to stick to, and
to be on the side of the pool to give me direction and push me
to work hard Mackey said. "When I work out by myself, 1
don't usually push myself to train as hard as I need to -
Mackey encourages ail students, disabled and not, to get
involved and take advantage of the vast variety of programs
that arc offered at ECU. He is Irving proof that with a lot of
heart, anything is possible, and that no matter who you arc or
what your conditions may be, a lot can be accomplished, rf
only you believe.
Chris Mackey
Players ready to take field Voice of Pirates heard throughout the Ian
AMANDA ROSS
spouts EniToa
The players know how important this game is against West Virginia on
Saturday and they are ready for the challenge.
Senior linebacker Matt Semenza left Morgantown last year, after the 10-9
ECU loss, with a sour taste and wants to get back to claim a victory they felt
was theirs.
"I think our mood is very anxious Semenza said. "We're ready to get back
up there. Last year it was a real tough loss for us
Fellow senior comerback Tabari Wallace feels the same.
"Last year left a sour taste Wallace said. "We were so close, but then came
up short
Defensively the Pirates will have to hold offa surging West Virginia offense
that includes Amos Zercoue. This sophomore, who was the Big East's rookie-
of-the-year last season, rushed for 1,035 yards and was the only WVU freshman
to rush for more than 100 yards in five games, including 111 yards against the
Pirates. Last week against Marshall, Zereoue started the season rushing for 174
yards on 27 carries.
The ECU defense knows they will have to contain the 5-10, 200-pound
running back if they want the a in.
"Zereoue is lot stronger, a lot more mature, and now he is a finesse power
back so now we have to come after him Wallace said.
Junior noseguard Travis Darden knows that containing Zereoue is one of
the most important keys to the game. �
Melissa Potter
STIFF WRITER
5
SEE FOOTMU. PAGE II
After another win for the ECU Pirates, it looks as though "You can paint this one
purple Yes, folks, it's the Voice of the Pirates, Jeff Charles, that you hear every
time you watch one of our fabulous football or basketball games. But what is it
really like to be the Voice?
Having joined the ECU media team in 1988, this is his 10th year with the
program. I
His previous position as the Voice of the Hoakies at Virginia Tech helped to
launch him into the position of director of electronic media for the Pirates
Sports Radio Network (PSRN). With his help, ECU has gained more television
and radio coverage than ever expected.
"Our program is consistently growing thanks in part to the consistent wins
from our teams and the support of the school Charles said.
The PSRN handles much of the publicity our teams receive. It holds the
rights to all radio broadcasts at ECU and is responsible for selling the commer-
cials and ads which are seen during televised games. As director of electronic
media. Chalks coordinates, produces, and directs all operations of the PSRN.
Originally from Piqua, Ohio, Charles has had the opportunity to travel to
Hawaii, Texas, Seattle and New Mexico, as well as all over the east coast. He
previously did broadcasts for the University of Illinois, Furman, and WSB
Atlanta, and currently works college basketball telecasts for FOX SportsSouth,
Raycom, Creative Sports and Home. Team Sports. These broadcasts can be
TRIVIAtime
Name the major league
baseball player who joined
Hank Aaron and Willie
Mays as the only players
with 3,000 hits and 500
homerc, last September 6,
1996.
�Surnm ifjuxix yj w ojtj xft
rZ "Pff" "P �l�s � PI 'fo-uxft PF3
ECU DOES LOVE ESPN
These fans show their spirit last season. This year ESPN will pick up two of ECU's flames. (Back L-R)
David Burr, Jay Cochran. Brain McNeery. Rob Gray. Mike Cerminara. (Front L-R) Will Macintosh. Brad
Church. Matt Melons. Shannon (toiling, Kriston Barnes, Josh Briggs.
FHOTO COURTESY OF J0R 0. JUOT
Get ready to paint the town purple
Jeremy Anderson
STAFF WRITER
It's time to "Paint it Purple" again.
Last season. Pirate football fans were greeted as
they entered Greenville with signs proclaiming
Welcome to Purplcville This season, Pirate fans
fill not be greeted quite the same way.
"They (the signs) will probably not be put back
p this year said Craig Stanley, president of the
itt County Pirate Club.
The reason why the signs will not be put back
p is simply economical.
We had some signs stolen last year and they
rcre kind of expensive to replace Stanley said.
In the absence of the signs, the Pitt Counrv
Pirate Club is still sponsoring the "Paint it Purple"
campaign. Just like last year, t-shirts are being sold
to local businesses and other members of the com-
munity.
"We have already sold over 6,000 shirts to Icc-1
businesses and other area citizens said Lindy
Daughtry, a representative of the Pitt County
Pirate Club.
"We (Pirate Club) want to make it a communi-
ty effort Daughtry said. "If we keep the price low
we can reach out to everyone in the community
The "Paint it Purple" shirts are relatively cheap
$5 and can be purchased at marty locations
throughout the city including UBE, ECU Student
Stores, local Trade Marts and Evans Street Texaco.
All of the money made from shirt sales is
returned to the university.
"We return all the proceeds to an endowment
fund for student athletes the Pirate Club has set
up with the school Stanley said.
The "Paint it Purple" campaign originated from
Pirate Club members who attended a game in
Tennessee a few seasons ago.
"We got the idea when we saw the whole town
( in Tennessee) was orange Daughtry said. "We
thought we should be able to do the same thing
here in Greenville
The purpose was to get fans excited for the
Pirate home football games.
"The main goals of the 'Paint it Purple' cam-
paign is to create a festive atmosphere for opposing
teams as they enter town and to raise excitement
around the ECU football program Stanley said.
Stanley attributes the success of the campaign
to the hard work of Daughtry.
"I can't say enough about how hard Lindy has
worked at UBE to make this campaign a success
Stanley said.
I CRATES S
n the street
What do you
predict the score
will be in this
weekend's ECU
West Virginia
game?
ECU 28 WV14
Berausf we 've done so well in the past years
mil still have returning starters.
Dusty Rhodes
Chemisiry
Freshman
ECU 32 WV12
ECU is the greatest � we hate to win!
Jennifer Hart
Biology
Freshmsn
ECU 21 WVU
We have a great team this year!
Laila Susan Farhadi
Elemeniary Education
Junior
Jeff Charles
heard on several stations throughout North Carolina and
the east coast.
It is often heard after victories that we can "paint this
one purple However, most people don't know what it
means or where it came from. In his first year with ECU,
Charles coined the expression after many of ECU's tri-
umphs. He felt that it was important to paint a picture
through the broadcast so the listeners could "see" the
game.
"People get enthused about the color purple Charles
said.
With the way our team is shaping up, we may just be
able to paint everything purple.
"We've got a young team in some areas, but they're
solid (Charles said.
Through selective recruiting, many key players have been picked up.
"They just need some more experience Charles said.
It looks as though experience is what they're going to get, since ECU has
been picked to win Conference USA.
In addition to his play-by-play of ECU sporting events, Charles also hosr�
The Steve Logan Show. Aired weekly, the show gives viewers an inside look
ECU football. Catch it on WNCTTV Channel 9, at 12:30 p.m. on Sundays.
Charles said he likes the area and enjoys watching the growth of the Pirates?.
"I like it here. It has been really gratifying to watch the program and the.
University grow, and to be a part of it
It is evident that the hard work has paid oft With the addition to the stadi-
um and increased media coverage, ECU is headed for bigger and better seasons.
Let's continue to "Paint it Purple
'
.i
gpjjgjg�mjjg�-g�
uSATHSVWttHB
iati at TbIsbV
ve.
West,
Virginia
don't
fortta Saturday's
nUMountimxr match
up wtt be deviseri m 5PN
5mbki neb�� .
West Viriginia is 1-0 this season after sarm& r"1
beating Marshall 42-31 last week
West Virginia leads the series 9-1
ECU made a come back in last year's game
to come within one point, but a failed two
point conversion left ECU with a 10-9 loss
Series hjg-fcory
1970 � WVU, 28-14 at Greenville
1971 � WVU, 44-21 at Morgantown
1981 � WVU, 20-3 at Morgantown
1982 �WVU, 30-3 at Morgantown
1986 �WVU, 24-21 at Greenville
1987 � WVU, 49-0 at Morgantown
1988 � WVU, 30-10 at Greenville
1992 � WVU, 41 -28 at Morgantown
1995 � ECU. 23-20 at Greenville
1996 � WVU, 10-9 at Morgantown
Running back campari&on
from 1993 sta-ts
Name
Scott Harley
Amos Zereoue 11-1
G-GS
11-11
Yards
1,745
1,035
Avg.
5.7
4.7
TD
14
Long
75 yards
69 yards
m I ii I �
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z
7
11 Thursday. September 4, 1397
snorts
The East Carolinian
12 PRICE
WINGS!
TONITE & EVERY THURS. NITE
AFTER 9P.M. DINE IN ONLY
Pink Margaritas
" $2 is
Hi BALLS!
ALL DAY THURS.
$1 99
Agassi out, Chang and Williams are in
NEW YORK (AP) - The tennis at Arthur Ashe Stadium is taking on the look of a Magic Show.
Fan favorites Andre .Agassi and Monica Seles disappeared Tuesday. And Michael Chang pulled off his latest escape.
Welcome -to the 1997 U.S. Open, where, without mirrors or wires, the latest sleight of hand tricks were performed by
Patrick Rafter, Marcelo Rio and Irina Spirlea, and the newest smash hit is Venus Williams.
Today, sixth-seeded Lindsay Davenport attempted to join Williams as the only Americans in the women's singles semi-
finals. Davenport, the 1996 Olvmpic gold medalist faced No. 3 Jana Novotna.
Tonight, top-seeded Martina Hingis, who is seeking her third Grand Slam tournament title of the year, plays No. 10
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, the 1994 U.S. Open champion, for the last women's berth in the semifinals.
The men are looking for the last berths in the quarterfinals. Two of the sport's biggest hitters - Britain's Greg Rusedski
and Richard Krajicek of the Netherlands - face off before giant-killer Ffetr Korda takes on Sweden's Jonas Bjorkman in the
last match of the night.
Charities denied 'Shoeless Joe1 Jackson's will
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - Shoeless Joe Jackson's rare signature will stay in a vault rather than be auctioned off by two char-
ities that want to make money for medical research.
Joseph Jefferson "Shoeless Joe" Jackson died in 1951 in Greenville, still fighting allegations that he and seven Chicago
White Sox teammates threw the 1919 World Scries.
The illiterate player with the career .356 batting average rarely signed anything, and as a result his signed will has been
estimated to be worth more than $100,000.
The American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association claimed the document because Jackson s wife,
Katie, who died in 1959, named them as her beneficiaries. However, the five-member South Carolina Supreme Court
ruled unanimously Tuesday that she never owned the will, and it will stay in a Greenville County vault.
The court ruled in 1990 that original wills must be kept for 75 years after they are filed. Records released by county
Probate Courts must go to the state Archives and History Department.
SEE FAST BREAK. PAGE 12
12 PRICE
PITCHERS
OF DRAFT
EVERY MONDAY
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 757-1666
Mexican Restaurant
5 T.V
5 T.V.s!
5 T.V.�!
5 T.V.�!
5 T.V.�!
(iamttia
All members will meet on
Tuesday, September 9th at 5:00
in General Classroom
Building Room 1032
COMIN
mW mW mm Wf W. mm m WM
55una
HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVE ELECTIONS
umwmmioui
immmmm
m9mmBRma
tm-nsamLvmm
1
rawycTMfcH
PIRATEFEST
HOMECOMING COURT
ANNOUNCEMBIT RECEPTION
MHKMAU STIKIT CIITEII GKfl RMM. 7:81 - N m
TUESDAY OCTOBER 21
AUTOGRAPH NI6HT
OMUIA EAST HAU. 6 3CPH-7:3tm.
HIS JMKMH NNS!?! (OMME114 AM INEI)
ALL DECKED OUT
FOR THE 90
THE HOMECOMING COMMITTEE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE F0LL0WJ6 ACTIVITIES
FLOAT, BANNER CONTEST, HOUSEHALL DECORATIONS, KING AND QUEEN CANDIDATE r
S APPLICATION DEADLINE ALL
ACTIVITIES IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 BY 4:18 PM
TURN ALL APPLICATIONS IN TO ROOM 210
IN THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
SATUSHT, OaOKR 25
PARADE LINEUP
EUlSTlEnSTHIAH
HOMECOMING PARADE
1W-11N
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 22
BANNER CONTEST JUDGING
KCMRM.11MMI
THERE WILL BE A MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL CONTACT
PERSONS AND HOMECOMING REPRESENTATIVES IN
THE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER ROOM 221
AT 7PM MONDAY, SEPTEMRER 22
ONLY OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS MAY APPLY
HOMECOMING PACKETS ARE TO BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT LEADERSHIP OfflCE, MENDENHAU. STUDENT CENTER, ROOM 189. FDR MORE WFORNATION,
f
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME 2PM SATURDAY
MEMPHISSMTf TIGERS VS. ECU PIRATES
HQMECQMIN� ORT ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE HALF
0Jr WimBtNG OF THE SHRIT CUP
i
CALL 321 � 4711. SCHEDULE Of EVERTS IS SUBJECT T01
V





12 Thursday. September 4. 1997
c r i
Oil
Tile Edit Cdluiillimi
Fast break
continued from page 11
ESPN to acquire Classic
Sports Network
NEW YORK (.AP) - ESPN reached
agreement today to acquire Classic
Sports Network, providing a powerful
backer to the smaller, nostalgia-orient-
ed sports netwotk.
Classic Sports, launched in May
1995. offers archival and original pro-
gramming from all the major sports
leagues and includes exclusive rights
to a large library of boxing films. The
network is currently available in about
10 million cable and satellite homes.
Brian Bedol, the CEO of Classic
Sports, said the deal with ESPN gives
the network its best opportunity to
grow.
"Classic Sports relives the events
Bedol said in a joint statement with
ESPN president and CEO Steven
Bornstein. "It captures the memories
of the people, games and headlines in
sports, much of which has been
brought to the public through ABC
Sports and ESPN
ABC Inc which is a subsidiary of
the Walt Disney Company, owns 80
percent of ESPN. Bornstein said
Classic Sports is a natural fit into
ESPN's stable of networks, which
includes ESPN, ESPN2 and
ESPNews.
"Classic Sports Network is a per-
fect complement to the ESPN family
of services Bornstein said. "Adding
the promotional power of the ESPN
brand and our programming and mar-
keting resources promises accelerated
growth for the network
Classic Sports had in a battle with
Cablevision Systems Corp. over access
to Cablevision's Rainbow
Programming unit. Classic Sports
charged that Cablevision squashed its
plans to carry Classic Sports in the
lucrative New York City and
Connecticut markets when its bid to
buy the vintage sports network failed.
Football
continued from page 10
"You can't let him bounce it outside because he's got real good speed
Darden said. "So what we have to do is contain him. If we contain him. we'll
have a good ballgame
Head Coach Steve Logan said it will be hard to prepare for Zereoue in
practice.
"The bad news for us is that West Virginia is going to have a 250 pound
fullback coming in on those linebackers Logan said. "We're not going to Ik
able to simulate that too well in practice
The defense has worked hard on containing their opponents in practice
and trying to strip the ball to create turnovers.
"We're always trying to improve on the defense Semenza said. "We
always put a strong emphasis on wrapping up the ball carrier and trying to
strip the ball from him
Rod Colcman, a junior linebacker, wants to create the turnovers so the
ECU offense can get the points on the board.
"We have to force turnovers and hope our offense doesn't turn the ball
over Coleman said. "Coach (Paul) Jette told us we should have at least four
or five a game. If you have that many turnovers it gives our offense more
opportunities, and more chances to win and score
Gametime for the Pirates is set for 12:50 p.m. this Saturdav in
Morgantown. The game will be aired nationallv on ESPN. For ticket infor-
mation call 1-800-WVU-GAME.
�1
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA NEWSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)758-6909
it TM C Comes � 14U
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
Drosonts
the gtfate-ffKfefffotn
Free live music!
C- V
Thursdays, 8-10:45pm
Support Your Local Musicians!
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room (Across from WZMB)
Thursday,Sept.4,1997
Duality
Peenuckle
Presents
REVIVAL
WJ"tfEi,
Just imagine hundreds gathered on the
mail worshipping God together. His peace
and His power is there. You are encouraged
as God's truth is ministered. Your eyes are
opened to His reality. You are never the same.
? Bishop John Barker
v ?Tim Gray
Young
Tral
usic b
ierlt
SEPT. 8-11 7PM
�OIN US FOR AWESOME WORSHIP C- MINISTRY
Still haven't found a good job?
Well you're in luck!
oastrarolinian
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING
positions: Production Assistant
News writers
Photographers
Sports writers
e've G"
to Pir
GET INVOLVED
THE ECU STUDENT UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE
DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE 1997-1998 TERM
QUALIFICATIONS:
Full-Time Student
Resides Off Campus
Independent
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Deadline to apply is Friday, September 12, 1997
Applications can be picked up at the Student Union
Office - Room 236 in Mendenhall Student Center.
For more info, call the Student Union at 328-4715
Celebrating at HOME.
Dowdy Student Stores is a pick-
up site for STUDENT'S home
football tickets. Tickets are
available Tuesday throush
Thursday of game weeks,
PLUS, when you pick up your
tickets to the same, pick up your
double chance entry form to win
FREE Textbooks for Spring
semester, sponsored by Dowdy
Student Stores and ECU Vending
Services. Drop your first chance
in the drawing box at the gate
BEFORE kick-off, and drop your
second chance in the drawing
box AFTER the final whistle.
Dowdy Student Stores
carries a full line of same
day apparel and tail$atins
decor! Watch for SPECIAL
SALES throughout football
season!
We've got an assortment of Game Day
Mascot T-Shirts and Season Competition
T-Shirts!
Store Hours:
Monday -Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
t Your Ticket
te Football.
rhole lot more!)
And AWAY.
After every "away" football
game won by the Pirates,
Dowdy Student Stores will
discount regular priced gifts
and apparel by 1 for each
point scored by the Pirates,
up to 30 points!
The Points Sale runs Monday,
September 8th and Tuesday,
September 9th if the Pirates
win asainst West Vjrsinia!
1997 East Carolina University
Football Schedule
September 6
September 13
September 20
October 4
October 11
October 18
October 25
November 1
November 8
November 13
November 22
West Virginia
Wake Forest
South Carolina
Syracuse
So. Mississippi
Tulane
Memphis
Louisville
Houston
Cincinnati
NC State
AWAY
HOME
HOME
AWAY
HOME
AWAY
HOME
AWAY
AWAY
HOME
AWAY
Ronaid E. Dowdy
w
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Do you like to draw
comics? If so then you may
want to apply for a job as a
staff illustrator for us at The
East Carolinian.
Apply in at office on
the second floor of
the Student
Publications
Building across
from Joyner.
Centrally located on campus, in the Wrisht Buildins, just off Wrisht Circle
328-6731www.studentstores.ecu.edu DRESS RIGHT
Purpleville, NC DRESS PIRATE.
ft 7S





DOUBLEI11
manufacturers' � � �
COUPONS
Up to
and
Including
-DAY
APER
SAl�!
Wed Theirs Fri. & Sat
Sept 3rd. rth. 5th & 6th
v
Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi, Mountain Dew
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
2-liter
Save
5yat least
60t
Four 2-liters per customer
at this price please.
Wampler Fresh
m

FULLY COOKED (13-16-10. AVC.)
Cumberland Cap
Whole semi-
Boneless Ham
BonelessSkinless
mn Breast
Pound
Pound
obRS ;
S&sSS
rfi
Save
at least
$2.30Lb.
US DA CHOICE BONELESS ROUND STEAK OR
Bottom Round
Roast
Pound
Sf49
c least
(srsoApJ
Spotlight
Bean coffee
390Z.
Buy One - Get One
FRE
KROGER
Orange Juice
or 2 Milk
Gallon � T
I' f.
$199
Items & Prices Good Through Sept 6.1997.
Copyright 1997 Trie Kroger Co
item & Prices Good in
We reserve me right to umit auantines
None sold to dealers
WED THUR FRI SAT
wm
We are Committed to Serving You
1-800-853-3033
If you have questions,
comments or suggestions,
AN6ELSOFT
BATH TISSUE
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Kleenex
ONELLE
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Bundle
Per 4otl pica, when purchased in
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SPARKLE
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Umit two A-roll rckages wirii coupon Coupon eood through Sept 6 1997
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14 Thursday, September 4, 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 ' edroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SPRAY STUN GUNS AND
. Take responsibility for your se-
curity. For a free brochure e-mail Firlirt-
secSaoi.com or write First Line Security.
TO Box 287. Greenville. NC 27835.
Heip Wanted"
FEMALE ROOMMATE NESDED TO
share 3 bedroom house 1 mfle from cam-
pus. 13 rent, utilities and cable. Nice
neighborhood. Call Kim. 788-2800. after
6PM. 830-9036.
FEMALE STUDENT TO
bedroom apartment. Clean and in good
location. Must be responsible and con-
cerned about school. $225 per month
plus utilities. Call 353-5412
FREE UTILITIES, 1 BMMMOM.12
block from camps on Molty St. Cats al-
lowed with deposit. Rent $306 a month.
757-9387.
for Players Club Apartments Rent it $220
monthly 14 utilities. Includes pool, ten-
nis, washerdryer Please contact Jessica
at 756-7539.
SERIOUS MALE OR FEMALE needed
ASAP for 2 bedroom apt. close to PtaM
on ECU Busline CaM Phil today for further
info 321-2813.
ROOMMATE NESDED ASAR TWO
blocks from campus and downtown and
just a skip away from City Market. Call us.
leave a message. 581-8178.
MEED A JOB? PLAY at day and make
money at night! Work nights andor wee-
kends and have your days free with The
ECU Telefund. Make your own schedulel
$5 50hr phis bonuses! Stop by the Raw!
Annex. Room 5 between 3-6PM for more
info.
PART-TIME INTERIOR DESIGNER
needed to work in wallpaper, window
treatments and carpet department. Stud-
ents please cad 758-2300 to set up a time
for an interview.
JOB TIM SBC - Join the Buffalo Brew
Crew. BW-3 is now hiring kitchen, cash-
ier, and door staff for Fall Semester. Apply
within M. 1-5PM. 114 E. 5th St.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential employ-
ment. CaM today. 747-7888.
STUDENT MARKETING ASSOCIATE.
ffrllaTBf Park Communities, the nations
largest private owner of off campus stud-
ent housing properties, has an entrepre-
neurial employment opportunity available
for an ECU student, as a Marketing Asso-
ciate in Greenville. NC. Responsibilities in-
clude assisting in the development of a
database of local housing and commer-
cial properties, and assisting in uncover-
ing opportunities for new property acqui-
sitions. Average of 10-16 hours per week.
$600 per month plus BONUS potential,
based upon performance. Interested can-
didates may call Mr. John Oaffigoi at
(810)687-6321 extension 141. or fax re-
sume to Mr. DeRiggi at (610)687-3695.
NOW HIMNO PART-TIME, HELP need-
ed. flexible hours. Sbarros. Plan Man.
356-5166.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
Alpha Delta Pi's) Melissa Barrington.
Allison Barrows. Lindsay Oeutsch.
Jennifer Galloway. Anisa Gherari. Colleen
Gillis, Ellen Hartzoge. Tori Johnson. Shana
Maxon. Kristen McKeithen. Amy Miller.
Kasey Sanderfer. Rachale Shifter. Layne
Summerfield. Ashley Triplett. Alison
Ward. Christina Wichrich, Courtney
White. Katie Williams, Sarah Winchester.
Jackie Wright. Andrea Young.
PM StBMA PI: HOPS everyone in Tau
Chapter had a wonderful summer. Get
ready for smoker on Sept. 9. It is going to
be an awesome year)
TONIGHT IS THE FINAL night of rush
for Gamma Sigma Sigma National Serv-
ice Sorority. Come see what service and
sisterhood is ail about! Dress casual. 8:00
p.m. in MSC Multipurpose. For details call
Jenny Cove at 328-7889.
QUIETUDE: COME ENJOY 40 minutes
of stress reduction, meditation, etc. Sept.
9-Sept. 25 only on Tues. and Thuis. from
12:10 p.m12:50 p.m. at the SRC. Dept.
of Rec. Services.
THE NEXT MEETING OF the Pitt County
Chapter of the American Diabetes
Association will take place on Monday.
September 8. 1997. at 7pm at the Leslie-
Gaskins Building at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. This months topic is "Food.
Folks, and Fun and will include speakers
from the North Carolina American
Diabetes Association headquarters in
Raleigh, phis a "Healthy Eating Tip of the
Month Refreshments and door prizes
will be available.
t PI: aHIORin invitations are
in the mail. Start looking for yours.
of Soccer, will train. Must
have transportation. Work on Saturdays
only. Cad Rita at 830-4216
KARATE BtSTRUCTOR: RECREATION
COMPANY seeks part-time help. Even-
ings. Groat $. Call 919-319-1228.
TO share spacious home 3 blocks from
campus. Washerdryer, dishwasher, gas
heat For more info leave message for Ke-
vin at 830-8828.
GREAT OPPORTUNITY! CUTS STUON)
apartment in RinggoW Towers. I need a
roomie or someone to sublet. Don't mind
sharing? Pay $156mo. and be my new
best friend. Want it all to yourself? Pay
$310mo. and I'D get the heck out! Call
Jenny. 758-3867
NONBMOKBta ROOMMATE
RENT S2S0mo awaaem
ehKtee own 12 bath. Clean,
I TO TAKE
picture for The East Carolinian. Must
have camera and some experience. Apply
at our office on the second floor of The
Student Publications Building. Must be a
student!
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHAM 2
bedroom townhoute. Grad student pre-
ferred. Non-smoker. $250 phis 12 utili-
ties 353-6190
For Sate
JOBS AVAR-ABLE. Joans
Fashions, a local Women's Clothing store.
is now filling part-time positions. Em-
ployees are needed for Saturdays andor
washday between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00
p.m. The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business need. The
job are within walking distance of the
university and the hours are flexible. Pay
is commensurate with your experience
and job performance and is supplement-
ed by an employee discount. Apply in per-
son to Store Manager. Joan's Fashions.
423 S. Evans Street. Greenville (on the
Downtown Mad).
for four year old with mild lung disease.
Own transportation, references, criminal
check. Hours arm 12-5:00 p.m. Monday.
Wednesday. Friday. May also need some-
one on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Call 830-
9082 after 500 p.m. and leave message.
DVS is accepting applications for sales
warehouse positions. AH hours needed up
to 40 hours per week. Ideal for student
sitting out of school, or for individuals pre-
sently between jobs. Positions could lead
to Ions term employment. Warehouse ar-
ea require some lifting. Applications ac-
cepted at Customer Service. Brady s. The
Plaza.
PART-TBBB CHBJDCASS NESDED two
days par week for my 3 and 8-year old
sons. Need experienced, fun-loving, ener-
getic student with reliable transportation.
Please caM 363-7446
LAI ISBN MONTH CAROUNA'S FASH-
ION leader is seeking an Assistant Buyer.
It's a great opportunity for individuals
with a retail or visual merchandising back-
ground. Perform administrativeclerical
duties while learning about the fashion
buying. A full time position that requires
daytime availability. It's a wonderful and
exciting opportunity to explore the fash-
ion industry while obtaining valuable
work experience. For information. caM An-
gela Roberson. Brady's. The Plaza. 758-
3140
THE SISTERS OF GAMMA Sigma Sig-
ma would like to extend their congratula-
tions to Sharon. Andra. Amy, and Sam on
their engagements) We love y &
BRYCE. CONGRATULATIONS ON A
successful 1st Annual Phi Kappa Psi King
and Queen of the Beach. Love, your big
Bra Buddha
Travel
S- sell tripe, earn cash
and go free Student Travel Services is
now hiring campus repsgroup organiz-
ers. Lowest rates to Jamaica. Mexico 8
Florida. Call 1-800-648-4849.
Other
Motor and Physical Fitness Competnecy
Test is Scheduled as Follows:
Place: Minges Coliseum (Williams Arena)
Time: 12:00 Noon
Date: Friday. September 5. 1997
A passing score on this test is required of
all students prior to declaring Exercise
and Sport Science as a major.
"Any student with a medical condition
that would contraindicate participation in
the testing should contact Mike McCam-
mon at 328-4688. To be exempted from
any portion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed summary
of the test components is available in the
Human Performance Laboratory (Room
371. Sports Medicine Bldg.). Your physi-
cian's excuse must specifically state from
which items you are exempt.
WANTED: FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
who live off-campus. Join us for a first
year student Brown Bag Lunch on Tues-
day. September 9 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. in
The Underground of Mendenhall Student
Center. Speaker: Mr. Jim Sturm, a great
guy!
looking for drummer bass keys lead to
form a band. Experience and vocals a
plus. Call Patrick today. 356-9668.
Announcements
HOPE MBN1THNE INVITES
you to come be a part of our praise and
worship services each Sunday at 10:30
a.m. Also, we have chikfrens church, sin-
gle' ministry, marriage seminars and
much morel Come and be blessed and
enjoy yourself. Call (919) 753-7815 for
more information.
OFFICIALS
4 at 9:00 p.m. in the Student Re-
creation Center Room 202. Dept. of Rec.
Services.
mSSSSb COME SB OUT what the
D.A.N.S.E aerobic class is all about on
Sept. 5 from 4:00-6:30p.m. at the Stud-
ent Recreation Center. Dept. of Rec. Serv-
ices.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS, a
student mentoring program for children in
need. Interest meetings will be held on
September 9th at 3:00 p.m. or Septem-
ber 10th at 6:00 p.m. for more informa-
tion. caB Tory Williams at 328-8777. Meet-
ings will be in Brewster 0-305.
RESUME WORKSHOP. POLISH Up
your skills in developing a professional re-
sume to use in your job search. Learn the
latest techniques in making it technology
friendly, graduating students will need re-
sume for career days, interviews on cam-
pus, mailing and faxing to employers, and
putting them on file with Career Services.
Workshops will be held in Career Service.
Room 103. 701 E. Fifth Street on Wednes-
day Sept. 10 at 4:C0 p.m. Resume Cri-
tique sessions will be held on Fri. Sept. 5
at 2:00 and Thur. Sept 11 at 3:00 for
those who would like to have their alrea-
dy prepared resumes reviewed by a staff
member.
needs Soccer CoachesRef-
erees for the upcoming soccer season.
The games will be played on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings and practice win be
determined by the Coaches. For more in-
formation, contact Jay Johnson at the
Winterville Recreation Department. 756-
2221.
IGUANA AND SAIL-PIN DRAGON
both 1 12 years old Separately $40
apiece, both for $70. Includes water
bowl, heat rock and other accessories
Cage not included. Call Scott 353-2408.
leave message.
CANNONDALE MSOO MOUNTAIN
BIKE with JudyXC shocks XT V-brakes
and Shimanoe 636 pedals. Also too many
extras to list, worth $1200. asking $900
OBO Call Jeff at 752-7109.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER laptops
100 financing available. Student die-
counts Finance for less than $36.00 a
month. Cad Alfred at (919)365-7057. Free
carrying case.
3 FENDER 6TRATOCA8T8R OUfTARB,
2 Washbums. an electric. 2 acoustics. wW
trade. Call 919-637-6650 before 8:00 p.m.
RETRO SLEEPER SOFA FOR al. $60
or best offer. Call Dana at 758-5763
hiring public relations imams for the Fall
Semester! Imams wilt assist us with our
biggest iivhouse fundraiser of the year.
"Light a Luminary" In addition, they may
write press release and use Pagemaker
to develop our newsletter. You will need
two available afternoons per week and at
least one Saturday per month. The posi-
tion is unpaid, but you will gain valuable
experience! for more information, please
contact J.P Wortey at 8300062,
ECU STUDENTS,
Begin the new school year and the fall se-
mester with a part-time position with Bra-
dy s or Brody's Man's Stores. Work whit
the hottest and newest styles for the up-
coming fall season. Part-time hours avail-
able in Juniors Sportswear. Young Man's
apparel, and customer Service. Flexible
morning, afternoon, or evening hours. All
positions include weekend hours. Appli-
cations accepted at Customer Service.
Brody's. The Plaza.
i ALPHA. A service so-
rority helping our campus and communi-
ty FALL RUSH Sept. 8-11. 5:306:30- p.m.
at Mendenhali in the Underground. Ques-
tions, call Beth. 754-2061.
.
will be presenting
the first of many Interact Programs on
Monday. September 8 at 4:00 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room. "Now
What' is designed to teach us how to
start the semester fast and end strong- It
is free 8 open to everyone.
L
Services
FOR SAL- FULL SIZE
$125 7586625
A-frame Futon,
COMIC BOOK AMD SPOUTS card col-
lection for sale, below book price. Will sen
entire collection or individually. No rea-
sonable offer refused. Caff 751-9072.
1996 CHEVY CAMRUBR M great condi-
tion. Call Nikki at 353-7452.
ranT'TMM '
Greenville Recreation 8 Parks Depart-
ment. FALL YOUTH SOCCER COACH-
ES. The Greenville Recreation 6 Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches for the fall
youth soccer program. Applicants must
posses some knowledge of the soccer
skdt and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people age 6-15. in soc-
cer fundamentals. Hours are from 3:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with some night and
I coaching. Mas wttli hour
elaaa schedule.This pro-
gram will run from September to mid No-
vember Salary rates start at $6.15 per
hour. For more information, please call
Ben James or Michael Dely at 830-4550
after 2:00 p.m.
TUTORING
FROM professional Spanish speaker.
Don't struggle in Spanish anymora. Cheap
hourly rate and satisfaction guarantee.
Call UVA Services 8 Publications today.
766-4248
Greek Personals
SERVICES ORIENTATION.
I and graduate students graduat-
ing in December 1997 or SpringSummer
1998 are invited to register with Career
Services tor heip in your job search!
Come to our Orientation on Thursday.
Sept. 11 at 4:00 p.m. Learn how to use
the many services available to you such
as interviews on campus, resume referral
to employers, reference (credentials) file,
internet job searching, job listings and
much more!
FRL SEPT. S FACULTY RECITAL. Duo
recital of Works by Beethoven. Schumann
and Shostakovich. KeUey Mikkeisen. cello
and Paul Tardif. piano. AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 8:00 P.M.
THE CENTER FOR COUNSELING and
Student Development located at 3116
Wright BuiWing will be offering the fol-
lowing programs the week of September
4th: A Stress Management workshop wili
be held Thursday from 3:30-5:00 p.m. A
Time Management Skills workshop will
be held Thursday from 2:30-3:30 p.m. If
you are interested in either of these work-
shops, contact the Center at 328-6661.
Al IfcNIHJN ALL COFR EDUC - SPED
Majors! ECUAEYC will have its first meet-
ing Thus. Sept. 4 at 5:00 p.m. in HESC
116C. Come see what serving children is
ail about or contact Meighan at 830-6081
with any questions.
! GO with us to
Sand Dollar Island on Sept. 14 for sea
kayaking. Be sure to register by Sapt- 5 in
the Student Recreation Center main of-
fice. Dept. of Rec Services.
the Pre-
downtown Thurs. night. We had so much
fun at the Halt Crawl. Hope to get togeth-
er again soon! Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
PMA, THANKS FOR THE social last
Wad. We had great time. Can't wait to do
it again soon! Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
ABSOLUTELY
TUTORIAL Assistance offered by ECU
Professors to ECU STUDENTS. In Math
and Science. Come by The Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center (Btoxton House) at
4pm on Monday. Tuesday and Thursday.
ALL ECU STUDENTS ARE WELCOME.
BBJBAM CATHOUC STUDENT
I announces inquiry classes, con-
firmation classes. 1st communion class-
es, spirituality classes. Dates: Monday,
Sept. 8. 7:30 p.m. and Wednesday. Sapt.
10. 8:00 p.m. The center is located at
965 E. 10th Street (2 houses from Fletch-
er Music Bldg.). For information call Fr.
Paul. 757-1991.
CULTURE PRESENTS RE-
VIVAL ON THE MALL Sept. 8-11. 7:00
p.m. nightly. Join hundreds of students
for an awesome time of worship and min-
istry. Special guest speakers; Bishop John
Harker and Tim Gray. Come and be
I of Sod
H.CH): the meeting will
be held Sapt. S at 5:00 p.m. in the MSC
Room 244. Dept. of Rec Services.
DO
AN
Ali LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
must bo typed, 250 words or
leas, and must include your
name, major, year, and phone .
TIM Ad DpartiTiant n fsow lavla� m4kMWaWaam� nfl HIJJ WlYVTUMn �xacutiv for end of MMfWfMI Mid nut SSflMMHDatV Ptoaia? being raaufna to f'iihtcarolinian
��Ml "I lOM'
US FOR back-
packing in Mr. Mitchell on Sept. 12-14.
Be sure to register by Sept 5 in the Stud-
em Recreation Center main office. Dept.
of Rec Servxss.
ADVERTI
HHyM
oastcaroli
(the 1 � �
eastcaroliman
classified
ad info
OPEN RATE-$3 for25 or
fewer words
STUDENT RATE-$2 for 25
or fewer words
(Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify.)
Additional words over 25 are
5C each
AD EXTRAS-Bold type is $1
extra 8 All caps type is $1
extra
(Charges for extras are in addition to the
line ad charges shown above.)
DEADLINE:
4 p.m. FRIDAY for the next
TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY for the next
THURSDAY'S issue
ALL CLASSIFIED ADS MUST
BE PREPAID.
ADVERTISE IN
eastcarolinian
CLASSIFIED,
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU �
$ r, TT �, We NeedTimberUnd boots
C A S H .hiG�j
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD - SILVER � Jewelry fc Coins � Also finn Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 200 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come Mo the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door 4 ring buzzer.
With the help of everyone who plans and schedules activities on campus.
we're compiling the most complete calendar of campus events available.
If you're planning an event, go to our web site and submit it to our calendar.
If you're wondering what's happening, go to our web site to find out.
Campus Calendar - it's just another service of eastcarolinian
.
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I .


Title
The East Carolinian, September 4, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 04, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1222
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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