The East Carolinian, August 19, 1997







TUESDAY
AUGUST 19. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
TUESDAY:
Slight chance of
V snowe'S-
High 80
Low 69

WEEKEND:
Sunny
Low 68
opinion 14
Columnist updates
the Pee Oee
incident and other
highlights of the
summer.
sports.
.19
L 1
Is is
lifestyles33
's Showtime
calendar highlights
the honest events of
the campus scene.
Athletic Director,
Mike Hamrick
and Chancellor,
Richard Eakm talk
Pirate football.
the east Carolinian
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Twidiy, Ausutt 19. 1997
news
The Eist Carolinian
SGA gears up to serve with new projects
National SGA
being planned
AMANDA AUSTIN
staf� waiTsa
Throughout the summer the Student
Government Association (SGA) has
been planning and preparing for the
return of the student body.
first on the SGA agenda is to train
and prepare the legislative body so
they will be able to better serve the
students.
"What we are actually aping to do
is run a series of training sessions so
that people aw actually aware of what
their roles and responsibilities are as
legislators, lb make people aware of
how the whole system functions as a
whole and give them some tools to
use said Sean McManus, SGA vice
"There is a lot of power that lies in
the legislative and judicial bnwches I
want to see that utilized more said
Scott Forbes, SGA president.
By utilizing these training ses-
sions, SGA hopes to give more back to
the students.
"If we cover the basics and give
everybody a framework to work from
and have a basic understanding of
what is going on, I think that we will
be able to accomplish a lot more
said McManus.
"I want to make sure the legisla-
ture as we)) as the executive and judi-
cial branches are fully educated and
knowledgeable of their powers and
duties so the student government
wit) work as efficiently as it was
designed to said Forbes. "I want to
make sure that the president is not
percieved as padding his own pocket.
Training will take place during the
first two weeks the legislature meets.
SGA has also been hard at work in
creating a 24 hour computer lab in
MendenhaH. Appropriations have
been started for this project.
"We are waiting for the one-card
system to go into effect for security
measures said Forbes.
SGA has plans to organize and pro-
duce a National Student
Government Association. This orga-
nization would act to pull information
together about what is going on in dif-
ferent states and regions across the
country. The organization will give an
outlook on what is going on with SGA
at a national level.
"What we have done, in talking
with some different people on differ-
ent campuses around the country, we
are going to look into setting up a
steering committee of which will be
the chair to establish a national SGA.
A preamble to that will probably be
forming a southeastern SGA said
McManus.
"It is designed to bring leaders
from ail over the country here said
Forbes.
For the SGA, the project entails
building an organization from scratch.
"W; are going to target confer-
ences so we can recruit people rp
become members of the organiza-
tion said McManus.
A dozen schools across the south-
eastern region have shown an interest
in helping to build this organization.
SGA is looking at the big systems,
such as the UNC-System and other
state systems.
"The organization will look at
state regional and national issues and
try to give some guidance and direc-
tion as far as where student govern-
ment is heading on all those levels.
But, at the same time, what we are
hoping to do is set up in a fashion that
we have four or five regional organiza-
tions that then affiliate with the
national body said McManus.
"It is going to bring notoriety to
the school and national exposure that
will make our degrees more desire-
able in the workplacesaid Forbes.
Jn a recent SGA meeting the exec-
utives went back over their campaign
promises. One issue that has been
brought up for discussion is parking.
"We are looking at the parking
issue to see what can be done and
hopefully work out some interim
Overcrowding in on-campus housing reduced
Additional students will be
housed in Jarvis temporarily
JACQUELINE D. KELLUM
newt iniToa
Housing Services faced a momentary problem
heading into eke fell semester. For a while it
looked as if overcrowding would result in a signif-
icant number of students being housed in triple
rooms.
However, the situation is not as bad at it
looked at one time, according to Emanuele
Omaro, director of university housing services.
Many students who were signed up for rooms
have already cancelled, opemrtgup room for those
on the warring list for housing. The remaining stu-
dents who are still over the capacity limit are
being temporarily housed in Jarvis.
�Jarvis was supposed to be dosed this semes-
ter for renovation. We decided to bring Jarvis back
on line Oman) said.
There will be a total of 140 students housed!
Jarvis when classes first start. Forty rooms will
hold two students each and 20 rooms will house
three students each.
Omaro ssys Housing Services will probably
have many more spaces that will open up in the
first week of school. These will be provided by
students who never cat) to cancel, but simply
don't show up for classes. Housing cannot be sure
how many rooms will actually be needed until
classes start, regardless of how many reservations
they have.
"We have an historical trend of about 125
spaces that open up Omaro said.
The temporary overflow is being caused by an
unusually targe incoming freshman class and by an
increasing number of students who have chosen
to return to campus housing after their freshmen
year.
"five years ago we had a 42 percent return
rare. Now we have a 54 percent return rate. On
rep of that, our freshman data has increased
Omaro said.
All housing in Jarvis wHI be temporary. As soon
as possible, Universrty Housing will move those
Scott Fortes
agreement
with parking
and traffic.
We are trying
to establish
some sort of
measure to
make sure
that parking
slots off cam-
pus can be
increased to
accomodate
of parking said
for the loss
McManus.
"No, you won't be able to park at
your front door, however, the student
transit system can deliver you there
said Forbes.
In reviewing campaign promises,
the executives are also in full swing to
work hand in hand with other stu-
dent organizations no matter how big
or small they are.
"We are trying to increase the
standard of excellence. In the past we
have settled for mediocrity, and that
is something that we are really con-
cerned about. If the school is going to
go to the next level, and the students
and organizations that are a part of
the school have to oe prepared to pick
up their baskets and go to it said
McManus.
"We want to incorporate more stu-
dent organizations, large and small, to
expand the demographics of the stu-
dent representation said Forbes.
SGA hopes to be fully prepared so
they will be a role model other stu-
dent organizations will follow.
"We want to use SGA as a measur-
ing stick for all the student groups on
campus. Wfe want to set an example
and help those organizations with
training and activities that run out of
the Student Leadership
Development Office to help those
organizations in any way we can to
increase their level of excellence
said McManus.
SGA has been working hard and is
ready for the students to come back
for the fall.
students out so they can reckwe Jarvis for renova-
tion.
"As we get notified of cancellations, we'll move
those students to other dorms Omaro said. "The
latest projection we have is December
Omaro said it is hoped that the students will
actually be moved out much earliet
Although Housing typically does not have this
problem, they are looking into the possibility of
building more dorms in the future, or perhaps
adding on to existing dorms.
"We're gearing up for next year to be ready
carry. I think we were kind of caught by surprise
this year Omaro said.
All students being placed in temporary hous-
ing are those who turned in their housing applica-
tions late, Students who lived on campus last year
and filled out their housing applications early, or
freshmen who turned in their applications carry,
wiH be in their permanent housing from the start.
Requests for single rooms were also not affected
by the situation.
"We haven't touched those rooms at all.
Everyone who contracted for a single is in a sin-
gle Omaro said.
Joyner Library Hours-Fall semester
Regular Hours for rM (August 20 to December 20)
Sunday 1 pjn. to 1 a.m.
Monday�Thursday 8 a.m. to 1 a�m.
Friday 8 a.m.�8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Exceptions to Scheduled Hours
August 19 9 a.m. to j p.m.
August 29 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
August 30�31 Closed
September 1 Closed
October 2 8 a.m. to 10 pjn.
October 3 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
October 4�5 Closed
October 6�7 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
November"26 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
November 27�29 Closed
Closed for semesterbreak
December 21, 1997 to January 11, 1998
and library move to renovated space.
Notice to Patrons of Joyner Library
The Joyner Library Microcomputer Lab (Room 304) closed
permanently on August 2,1997.
There will he no word fwocewsng facilities in the librae from that
date until the end of Phase III of the renovation in 1998
Welcome back ECU and Pitt Community College students!
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MWH
3 Tuesday. August 19. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Trustees approve site for new dining hall, Galley expansion
AMANDA AUSTIN
STAfF WHITER
STUDENT OKGANIZATIONS
The Board of Trustees accomplished
several important items of business
when they met in July. One high-
light was the approval of a site for a
new multi-million dollar dining hall.
The board approved several
changes for Dining Services as the
university seeks to improve the din-
ing facilities on campus. The
Trustees approved the complete
renovation of the Galley. Jones base-
ment wifl be the site of the new
GaHey after undergoing complete
renovation and expansion.
The new GaHey will seat approx-
imately 250 and will include a coffee
house, lounge space, an open food
court, and an entertainment area.
The ECU Board of Trustees offi-
cially voted on and approved the site
for the new dining hall.
The first order of business at the
meeting was the induction of the
new members and new officers to
the Board of Trustees.
New members are: Dan V Kinkw
of firyettevilte, N.C Henry G.
Williamson of Winsron-Salem, N.C
and Willie Martin of Wilmington,
Del.
New officers include former vice
chairman Gene Rayfield of Chapel
Hill who was named chairman, for-
mer secretary Phillip Dixon of
Greenville was named vice chairman
and Charles Franklin of Elizabeth
City took over the role of secretary.
"Let me extend my congratula-
tions to the new officers for their
support and commitment to East
Carolina said Dr. Richard Eakin,
Chancellor of ECU.
The Board of Trustees now has a
total of 12 members.
An update was given on LeRoy T
Walker International Human
Performance as it has completed its
second successful session on July 19.
"Twenty-three athletes and nine
coaches, trainers, physicians and
administrators came from 20
nations. Their comments were
favorable and without exception
they think their experience here will
be beneficial to their athletes and
their nation said Eakin.
Undergraduate and graduate
studies gave a brief summary of how
academic affairs and enrollment
stand today.
Enrollment for both departments
is projected to be up for the upcom-
ing school year. This increase
includes 200 more undergraduate
students and 116 more graduate stu-
dents.
The number of applications sub-
mitted to graduate studies is down
by seven applications, but the num-
ber of the students accepted
increased from 319 to 435.
The athletic department
announced a possible contract with
Fox Sports South.
The contract would include an
agreement that Fox Sports South
will televise 11 athletic events in the
next three years. The athletics
events projected to be televised are
football, men's basketball, and
women's basketball.
"The television exposure we
have had has in some way benefited
our program said Steve Logan,
Head Football Coach.
Administrators hope to be able to
remove the chemistry department
from the Flanagan Building as soon
as possible, as well as expand and
improve on all the science depart-
ments.
Planning is taking place to decide
on a location to build a new building
that will house the chemistry
department and renovate the old
space.
Trustees briefly discussed
whether or not Dowdy-Rckien will
be completed by the Sept. 13 game
against Wake Forrest.
Contractors working on the stadi-
um will have to work a third shift to
complete the upper deck.
As a precaution, the University
has stopped selling tickets to the
new seats. If the worst happens, the
overflow of students will be tem-
porarily seated in the end zones.
"We will continue to hope and to
pray that the stadium renovation
will be completed by Sept. 14,
although the contractor has experi-
enced delays said Eakin.
According to the Daily Reflector,
the Board of
Trustees met in
closed session
on Thursday,
July 24 to dis-
cuss whether
ECU will con-
tinue to be
involved in the
N.C Alignment
Group.
The N.C
Alignment is a
group of four of
the state's
largest medical
centers.
Medical cen-
ters included
are: Pitt
County
Memorial
Hospital and
the ECU
School of
Medicine;
Bowman
GrayBaptist Hospital Medical
Center; Carolina HealthCare
System; and the University of North
Carolina Health Care Systems.
The group was formed to share
information in order to become more
efficient in care.
Voting did not take place in these
discussions.
The dining hail will be built on
west campus between Clement and
Fletcher Residence Halls where the
amphitheater now sits and will face
Reade Circle.
Overcrowding at Mendenhall
Dining Hall will soon come to an
end. Expected seating capacity for
the new facility will be 600 com-
pared to 370 at Mendenhall.
"Mendenhall is operating at
twice the volume it was designed
for said Al Matthews, vice chancel-
lor for student fife
The dining hall is expected to
cose approximately $7.4 million and
will be paid for out of dining bond
issues.
Discussions focused primarily on
how the dining hall will affect the
relationship between the university
and the downtown business area.
According to the Daily Reflector,
"We have stiived to be good neigh-
bors. I think there should be a will-
ingness for some give and take said
Eakin.
Trustees came to che conclusion
that they are working in the best
interest of the students and this is
what they need
Fees provide services students need, demand
Computers, health
center, SGA
supported by fees
AMANt) AUSTIN
�TFF WHITS
Every year students pay fees
included in their tuition. The fees
are paid to serve various causes and
provide students with the services
they demand.
We need to offer these ser-
vices to be competitive with sister
schools of our size said Michael R
Balko Jr University Cashier.
There are three required fees
that the full-time students pay per
semester. The fees are:
Educational Technology fee;
Health Service fee; and University
fees.
The Educational Technology fee
is (30 per semester for a full-time
student.
This fee pays for the computers
and technology that a student uses,
such as the Chemistry lab.
"It funds an initiative to have
state of the art equipment said
Balko.
The Health Service fee costs a
student $69.50 per semester.
This fee provides each student
with a facility to go to when they
are ill or have minor injuries. The
Student Health Center is staffed
with licensed nurses and physicians
that are available to each student
when needed.
"it provides for a medical facility
and staff for your needs said
Balko.
University fees cost a student
f 366.50 per semester.
Though these fees may seem
high they cover a large portion of
activities and services provided to
students every year.
University fees support the
Student Government Association
so they will be able to function and
provide to the students a wide
range of services.
These fees also support the
media, transit services, fine arts,
intramurals and varsity athletics.
�TJie use and operation costs of
Mendenhall Student Center,
Minges Coliseum and the
Recreation Center are also paid by
University fees.
University fees also support the
Debt Retirement Fund which
allows for the many new buildings
and renovations taking place on
campus. Renovations include
Minges Coliseum, Joyner Library,
Student Stores and the addition to
Dowdy-Rcklen Stadium.
There is no correlation between
the costs of student fees and the
costs of tuition. Tuition is set by the
General Assembly, while fees are
determined by the Board of
Govenors and the Board of
Trustees.
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4 TMidiy, August 19. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Tuition slated to increase as
state budget decreases
AMANDA AUSTIN
STAFf WMTKH
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
As the summer dragged on, the
House and Senate were not able to
come to an agreement on revenue
availability; making this session the
second longest and the most expen-
sive in N.C. state history.
Conferees had been chosen and
discussions on the education system
had just begun to take place.
The budgets increases and
reductions will affect the UNC-sys-
tem, including ECU.
Fn the House budget there has
been a proposal made to increase in-
state tuition by three percent. Out-
of-statc tuition would not be affect-
ed by this increase.
"The General Administration,
the Board of Governors and the
administration of this university are
all committed to holding down
tuition as much as possible said
Richard Eakin, chancellor of ECU.
Eakin added that, "It is stated in the
constitution of our states that higher
education should be provided at the
most practical of costs
The Student Government
sociation (SGA) had not yet
lared where they stood in terms
possible tuition increase.
"Students have an inordinate
amount of expenses being in college.
Additional expenses do nothing to
enhance the education process
said SGA Vice President, Sean
McManus.
"Our effort is to see no tuition
increase for anyone�period said
Dr. Emmett Floyd, School of
Education.
A ract that is not well known to
students in the UNC system is that
North Carolina has one of lowest
prices of tuition, if not the lowest.
There are a number of positive
aspects to be brought to ECU in
terms of the budget. ECU
Administration has planned several
capital projects scheduled to take
place in the coming years.
"In terms of the General
Assembly there arc three projects
that are before them for considera-
tion said Eakin.
The first project, which is already
underway, is the completion of the
expansion of Dowdy-Fickien
Stadium. This is a $7 million project
to add 8,000 seats to the stadium,
bringing seating capacity to 43,000.
The second project is a $2 mil-
lion continuation of the planning
department in the Science and
Technology building.
The third project in front of the
General Assembly is a $500,000 pro-
ject to explore the capability of a
third floor for the Rivers Building.
"For a long time it has been said
that was a part of the original plan
said Eakin.
There are more projects the uni-
versity is planning that have not
been brought before the General
Assembly.
There was a proposal brought in
front of the Board of Trustees to
expand and improve the Student
Health Services. This expansion
should make Student Health
Services more functional.
"Another proposal brought in
front of the Board of Trustees is to
expand the dining facilities on west
campus said Eakin.
The dining facility would be
located where the amphitheater
now sits between Clement Hall and
Fletcher Hall.
A project that is being planned at
this time is the complete renovation
of Jan is Residence Hall in 1998.
"This will preserve the building
as you see it today and will allow us
to have central air conditioning
said Eakin.
The tile roof on Jarvis will also be
restored, giving the building a mod-
em and contemporary look.
"A project that is already in
progress behind the Allied Health
Sciences Building are the intramural
fields being expanded and further
developed said Eakin.
"After the completion of the
intramural fields, we will construct a
large parking lot on the north side of
the stadium said Eakin.
The parking lot will have dual
usage. On game days the lot will be
used for game parking, but during
the week the lot will be used for stu-
dent parking. Parking classification
of the lot is unknown at this time.
Administration also has high
hopes of improving the shuttle ser-
vice. They want students to have
more access and the shuttle to make
more frequent stops.
"We have long term plans to
make the shuttle service even better
than it is today said Eakin.
In addition to all the improve-
ments on campus there was a pro-
posal for a one percent reduction for
all academic support areas on cam-
pus. This reduction will save the
university approximately $196,000.
Chancellor Eakin has stayed
extremely optimistic about the
University receiving the potential
$3.1 million in funding, reasoning
that it has been approved in both
the Senate and House budgets.
"Typically, anything that is in
both versions of the bill will find
itself in the final version said
Eakin.
The budget is expected to be
completed and approved in mid-
August.
"We arc going to take our fair
share said Floyd.
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pMM
Twtidty. August 19. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Switch to one-card system begins with incoming freshmen
System slated for
January completion
BECKY ALLEY
HOt SING AND CONSI'MMATOOr
SERVICES ISSUES
STAFF WHITE
After being in the plans and dreams
of East Carolina University for many
years, the university is finally ready,
willing, and able to switch over to
the new one-card system.
This one-card system will do
away with the days of carrying a meal
card ami a student ID card. All the
functions of the two cards will be
combined into one card.
Currently ECU uses a manual
sticker based system that allows
access to activities and entitlements
by the university staff viewing a val-
idation sticker or marking an activity
sticker. This system will be entirely
replaced by the new one-card sys-
tem.
"This card will be a meal card, a
library card, a student ID card, an
activity card, and, eventually, will be
an access card for the residence halls
on campus said Johanna Kline,
office assistant for University Dining
Services.
The university plans to have
completely instituted the new cards
by January of 1998. Incoming fresh-
men have received the traditional
student ID and meal card along with
the new all-in-one card.
For current students there will be
an office set up in the student store
where they can get a new all-in-one
card made to replace there old set of
cards. Students will just have to
turn in their old cards and get a new
one made.
"Hopefully over the course of the
fall semester we should have all of
the students updated to the new
cards and the system running
smoothly Kline said.
There will be no charge for the
first card but to replace the new card
there will be a $10 charge, just like
there is now to replace a meal or stu-
dent ID card.
The new cards will be very simi-
lar in appearance to the old ones
except the new photo imaging tech-
nology being used will make the pic-
ture slightly different.
In the past the student's picture
was laminated onto the student's
ID, now the picture will actually be
a part of the ID.
These new cards will require
ECU to update a lot of the current
technology. There will be card read-
er equipment at all events students
attend and at every entrance point
within the facility to scan the stu-
dents' ID cards for admittance.
This new system will also allow
the university to have up-to-the-
minute reports about who is attend-
ing functions and the numbers of
people attending events.
Under the new one-card system, to be implemented in January, students will no longer use a separate card for the dining facili-
ties. One card wiH provide aH functions for students.
photo by cams MM
First female takes over UNC-system presidency as veteran retires
Spangler ends 11-
year tenure
Dawn ernteman
STAFF WHITER
After 11 years of devotion to higher
education in this state, C.D.
Spangler, president of the
University of North Carolina
System left his post in July.
Spangler was succeeded by
California educator Molly Broad,
the first female president of the
UNC-system. Looking back over
his tenure and toward the future,
Spangler discussed the changeover
with TEC.
Spangler reflected upon his
tenure fondly, saying that a combi-
nation of "good people, colleagues
and chancellors who are devoted to
their students characterized his
presidency.
Taking pride in one of his most
notable projects as president he said
keeping the rising costs of tuition to
a minimum was important. He
explained that most of the gradu-
ates of the North Carolina
University system will stay in North
Carolina, pay taxes and become
good hard-working citizens of this
state. Therefore, it makes sense to
him to provide them with an afford-
able education.
"It's an investment in the stu-
dents Spangler said.
Spangler offered advice to Broad,
his successor, encouraging her to
work toward bettering the entire
state through her new position.
Spangler stressed that the general
assembly acts as our bankers, and
that without a good economy they
cannot act favorably towards the
UNC system.
"She should hope for a good
economy in North Carolina
Spangler said. "This is North
Carolina's time at bat
Spangler said that he did not
anticipate significant changes in the
system after Broad took over.
"Ms. Broad has sensitivities. She
understands the importance of stu-
dents and faculty. I am very confi-
dent that she will be an excellent
presidentshe wants to do the job
Spangler said.
Spangler said that when he took
the job in the mid 1980's he did not
have prior qualifications which
specifically suited him for the posi-
tion.
Deeming his presidency a
"unique experience he said he is
looking forward to retirement.
While Spangler does not have defi-
nite plans yet, he knows he will
always remember his position as
UNC-system president as worth-
while and "the best job in North
Carolina
"It's really been fun. You know
you're working for something mean-
ingful Spangler said.
Broad has high
hopes for UNC
campuses
Dawn ernteman
STAFF WHITER
Molly Corbett Broad, formerly execu-
tive vice chancellor and chief operat-
ing officer of California State
University, became president of the
16-campus University of North
Carolina in July. Broad, 56, succeeded
CD. Spangler, 65, who announced last
year he would retire this summer after
11 years as president.
Broad stated that she had a num-
ber on things on her agenda to tackle
right away as president. They include
implementing a budget and formulat-
ing overall plans and strategies with
chancellors and the board of governors
to outline the agenda
"Budgets can be mud) more effec-
tively manageable with accountability
on one hand and managerial flexibility
on the other Broad said.
Broad hopes to secure an increase
of managerial flexibility on campus.
This would give individual schools the
freedom to utilize sources if the chan-
cellor is provided with flexibility to
use those sources.
"The biggest problem with bud-
gets is that they come with a lot of
restrictions on how the sources can be
used Broad said.
The single most important strate-
gy for maintaining low tuition, in
Broad's opinion, is to enhance access
to higher education. She hopes to
generate additional sources for rev-
enue available to the universities to
serve the projected growth of the sys-
tem, which is expecting a large poten-
tial growth of students. Broad will
seek to diversify revenue sources
through fund raisers, federal govern-
ment, and legislation.
Broad stated that in order for
North Carolina to be competitive with
the economy the University must play
an important role.
"The University is the economic
Broad
enj,nc for North Carolina
saiu.
Broad does have long term plans
for rhe system as well.
"1 did not come into North
Carolina with a plan developed some-
where else to be implemented here
Broad said.
She insisted that the changes
would come from within the state
through business, the public, the leg-
islature, and the individual universi-
ties.
Broad stated that the reputation of
the UNC system played a part in her
decision to come here.
"The University of North Carolina
has a marvelous reputation for quality.
passion, and commitment of citizens
to the University Broad said.
It appears that some in ihe state
have a similarly high opinion of Broad.
"We have entrusted to you the
greatest treasure of North Carolina
said Senator Leslie Minner in a note
to Broad.
"It is a great honor to be here
Broad said.
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�i i iii�.






6 Tuesday. August 19. 1997
j jt JH
The East Carolinian
New Faculty for 1997-98
School of Allied Health
Sciences
Donald Shaw. l'hl). Associate
ftufcssoi
David (iahricl. I'M), totstatll
Professor
School of Education
Lee Daniels, I'h.D. ssist.ini
Professor. Library Studies and
Educational lechnotag)
Patricia Miller. 1'd.l) Associate
Professor. Klcment.m and Middle
(irades Education
l).n Cox Walker. I'h.D tssistani
Professor. Klementan. and Middle
(irades Education
School of Human
Environmental Sciences
Lofie Barnes, Child Development &
Familv Relations (CDFR)
Kliaoeth Carroll. CDFR
Cindy McGaha,DFR
Stephanie I (unbar. Nutrition iS:
I lospitalitv Manaapment
(Catherine Wirsco, Interim Dean.
pp.irei. Merchandising Interior
I tesign
Department of
Communication
Shearlean Duke. Instructor
KclK Ridge, Instructor
Department of Psychology
Dr. Katrina Walker. Assistant Professor
Dr. Kim Meyer, Assistant Professor
Department of Political
Science
Dr. Scott Krisih. Visiting Assistant
Professor
Mr. Frank Palumho, Lecturer
School of Music
left Pair. Lecturer in saxophone
Herbert Kckhoff. Robert L Jones
Distinguished Professor in Music
Performance
Doughs Morrison. Assistant Professor.
Director ECU Symphony Orchestra
Department of History
Jeffrey Bcshoncr. lecturer of Modern
Russian History
Michael Cross. Assistant Professor of
Modern Cerman History
Timothy Runyan. Professor and
Director of Maritime History and
Nautical Archaeology
Aaron Segal, Assistant Professor of
Modern European History-
Department of Sociology
Marieke Van Willigan, Assistant
Professor
School of Business
Dr. Mark A. Coffin. Assistant
Professor. Department of Decision
Sciences
Michael L. Harris, Lecturer,
Department of Management
Dr. Michael B. Hayden. Assistant
Professor. Department of Decision
Sciences
Eric T. Reifschneider. Lecturer,
Department of Decision Sciences
School of Nursing
'�Miriam Cordell, RN, MSN, CNM:
Clinical Instructor
Judv Mayo. RN. MSN: Clinical
Instructor
Sonya Montgomery, MSN, RN. CS;
Clinical Instructor
Sonya Pfeifer, RN, MSN; Clinical
Instructor
Susan Schaeffer Jay RN, Phd:
Associate Professor
Anna Vance. RN. PhD: Assistant
Professor
A Great Place to Relax
Enjoy Good Food & Great Sports
Casual Dining
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355-2946
Located in WINN DIXIE Market Place, on corner of Greenville Blvd & Arlington Mud
Dining Services Hours
SatSun
Todd and Mendenhall Dining Halls
ML Breakfast? a.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Lunch II a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 p.m 7:30 p.m.
BrcakfastClosed
Lunch
Dinner
Lite Night
12 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Sat - 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Sun-8 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
Sat Sun
Brunch
Dinner
10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
4 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Croatan
M-F Breakfast7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Lunch 10:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Dinner Closed
The Spot
M-F Breakfast8 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Lunch 10:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Dinner 3:30 p.m. - Bp.m
Late Night 8 p.m. - 11 p.m. (Friday till 12:00 AM)
SatSun Breakfast losed
Lunch I 3:30p.m.
Dinner J:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Late Niiilu S.it - S p.m. - 12 a.m.
Suii 8 p.m. - 11 p.m.
SatSun
Closed
The Galley
M-F Breakfast
I .unch
Dinner
I -ate Night
H an - I o 3o i in
10:30 a.ni - i W p.m.
1:30 p.m. Bp.m
8 p.m. - 12:30 p.m. (Friday nil 9:00 I'M i
The Wright Place
M-F Breakfast 7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Lunch 10:30 a.m. - 3 30 p.m.
Dinner 3:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Late Night 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Sat Breakfast7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Lunch 10:30 a.m3:40 p.m.
Dinner Closed
Sun Closed
Center Court
M-F 7 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Sat &Sun 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.
9Jair Resigns gjaii �aloo
off
Haircut and style � Now thru Sept. 30th
(no coupons needed)
Just show your ECU ID.
We offer the best in Men's and
Women's Hair care.
Manicures, Pedicures, Acrylic and Gel
Nails, and waxing.
107 Eastbrook Drive Located pasf Pizza Inn in front :f
Eastbrook Apts.
758-7570
SKUiirs
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Coupon valid til Sept. 15, 1997
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More ECU discounts than anywhere else. Special offers for the 1997-1998 school jear
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SALES AND MARKETING
INTERIM 3 HIP
Oflto Supply SoMtom. one of
North Cwoffnt'e largest indepen-
dent dealers, is now accepting
appflosHons for our Sales and
Marketing Internship program.
- Our program ir
to business or related
mayors who have astrong interest
to pursuing eMes and marketing
upon graduation. The
candidate win wort
part time
hours whUe letfttog the profee-
of busmes-to-bus�ness
-CancNoatesrnust
be rising juniors or sertfijrs who
possess a strong desire to pursue
a sales and marketing carder
after college; must have strong
employment references; must
maintain at least a 3.0 GPA while
employed; andyoiust be willing to
travel at least twice a month tor
sales an marketing meetings to
be held either in Raleigh, NC or at
other locations around the state.
A personal computer and internet
access is also required.
Base salary is $150 per
(minimum of 20 hours) plus
and expenses.
Disability Support Services is look-
ing forward to a promising year.
They arc excited about many new
faculty members they have added to
their staff.
The six full time interpreters are:
Sand Cottrei, Renee Pittman, Amy
Edwards, Maurine Lver, Suzanne
Palu and Delia Liuzza.
All new employees are certified
on the state level with the exception
of Delia Liuzza who has national cer-
tification.
Disability Support Services is
expecting an estimated 300 stu-
dents. 20 students have requested
interpreters, increasing from six last
year.
Disability Services covers a wide
range of students varying from the
deaf and blind to those students
with medical and psychiatric prob-
lems.
Services for these students
depend upon the individual student
and their condition. The initial doc-
umentation identifies the students'
disability and then services are
planned according to the needs of
the student.
There is a great determination to
communicate to the faculty the stu-
dents' needs. One way of doing this
is to monitor the student as much as
they are willing.
"Faculty needs to be a good
source for information and assis-
tance said C.C Rowe, director of
Disability Support Services.
Faculty of Disability Support
Services works under the American
Disabilities Act (ADA) and section
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
combined.
According to Rowe, much of the
DijsMlly "ii �iiin prmrirtu frrthn nnitr of disabled stodsnts on eamaw. Many deaf students i
American Sign ienov&es. which is bting prscticsd in this sign Isnooaat dsss lor potsntisl ir
faculty does not have a good under-
standing of either act. Programs will
be field for faculty to gun more
information about disabtities.
There are many exciting projects
being added to campus facilities to
aid those students with disabilities.
Funding is available to install an
elevator in the Rawl Building. This
project is soon to take place. Soon
thereafter, elevators wii! be installed
in Austin and Graham.
Renovations in residence halls-
are ongoing Fire alarms are now
equipped with strobe lights for the
hearing impaired and almost ail resi-
dence halls have become handicap
accessible.
Disability Services is also very
involved in clearing adaptive activi-
ties tor their students.
The swimming pooi at the recre-
ation center is equipped with ramps
so that students in wheel chairs may
also enjoy che pool, and the bowling
alley in Mendcnhall is accessible for
the blind.
All buses purchased by the uni-
versity arc now handicap accessible.
This allows students with disabili-
ties to ride the same buses as other
students.
Faculty in Disability Support
Services are also working hard to
please the student from the class-
roomaspect.
Students are provided test taking
time in privacy when a professor is
unavailable to do so himself
"Surveys taken by students have
showed that students with
ties, are very satisfied with
and staff working with them said
Rowe.
ECU has been determined to be
one of the most handicap accessible
campuses in the state of North
Carolina.
Student Recreation Center Drqfln
Recreation Hours
Events Coming Up Soon at the
Rec Center
Monday�fttday
Saturday�Sunday
6 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.
9 a.m. -10:30 p.m.
Aerobics RegistrationAugust 18
Free AerobicsAugust 20 -23
Fitness Area OrientationAugust 21 �23
Free Aqua FitnessAugust 25 -28
Aembics .Session IAugust 25 -October 17
T-N-T Energy ExplosionAugust 27
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provided you make all these transactions at a First Union ATM or over
the phone, you don't pay a dime. Thars right No monthly checking
fees, no per-check fees, no First Union ATM fees, no CheckCard fees,
and no rnmimum balance requirement But if you do need to use a
tetter, all you'll pay is a flat $8 monthly fee.
To sign up for College Express Checking, just visit your nearest
First Union branch or give us a call at
1-800-761-4022.
(See, you don't even have to pay for the call.)
Smbjtct to cruHt approval.
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Hours: 7:3oam-5:oopm
(919) 32S-6731 9
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9
� �





8 Tuisday, August 19, 1997
lews
The East Carolinian
Campus Parking Map 1997-98
RESIDENT parking
and UNIVERSITY
REGISTERED parking
on College Hill
Parking Key
��Fatuity & Staff O possible construction)
15)University Registered (B possible construction)
B Private
�Commuter (? possible construction)
EDfreshmon fS possible construction)
�Resident (5 possible construction)
I Construction Area�No Parking
? Visitor Parking
� Motorcycle Parking
Handicapped Accessibility Key
? Completely Accessible
J Partially Accessible
B Inoccessible
HonOKopped Parking Area
� Curb Cuts
Additional COMMUTER
LIMITED permit parking
available at Minges
Coliseum, with
RAPID SHUTTLE service
to Chrlstenbury Gym area
FRESHMAN and
UNIVERSITY REGISTERED
parking at
Allied Health Curry Ct.
Welcome Back Students
QIIJS (WHM
ALICE CHAN
Formerly of Far
East Restaurant
Washington. NC
Dine In �Take Out
Lunch Special $2.95 Before 4 PM
Steam Cooking No Extra Oil or Fat
Open 7 Days a Week � Mon-Sat II - 10 � Sun 12-9
Across from Carolina East Mall
�)Fr 71 �LQ in Pier One Shopping Center,
JDD- I OO Hwy 11 South, Greenville
l the 1 � �
eastcarohnian
WANTED
Sports Writers
1 Additional RESIDENT lot,
1 FRESHMAN lot, 1 UNIVERSITY
REGISTERED lot, and
1 COMMUTER perking lot
off of Reade Street
Apply at our office
on the second floor
of the Student Pub Building
i.
2.
3.
4
5.
P

t5
16
7.
8
r9
JO.
il
i2
3.
H

h.
28
4
I2
I
t
.
Rivers Building
Rivers Building
Croatan Building
Fletcher Music Center
Brewster Building
Speight Building
Austin Building
Chrlstenbury Memorial Gymnasium
McGinnis Auditorium
Messick Theatre Arts Center
Howell Science Complex
Ward Guest House
Ragsdale Hall
Dowdy Student Stores
Wright Auditorium
Rawl Building
Rawl Annex
Facilities Services Office
Howard House
Whichard Building
Graham Building
General Classroom Building
Taylor-Slaughter Alumni Center
Spilman Building
33. Cotten Residence Hali
34. Flanagan Building
35. English Department Annex
36. Maintenance Warehouse
37 Fleming Residence Hall
38. Student Health Center
40. Slay Residence Hall
41. Umstead Residence Hall
42. Family Therapy Clinic
43 Career Services Office
44. Jams Residence Hall
45. Central Supply
46. Mail Services
46a. Student Financial Aid
47. Student Publications
47a. University Printing & Graphics
and Rapid Copy Center
48. Joyncr Library
49. ECU Police Department (Blount House)
61. Chancellor's Residence
62. Jenkins Fine Arts Center
63. Mamie Jenkins Building
64. Mendenhall Student Center
65 Envin Hall
66 Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center in Bloxton House
67 Garrett Residence Hall
68 Greene Residence Hall
69. Parking & Traffic Services
70 International Affairs Office
71. Maritime History (Eller House)
72 Fletcher Residence Hall
73 White Residence Hall
74. Clement Residence Hall
75 Flanagan Sylvan Amphitheater
76. Student Recreation Center
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the �
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs. Award Winning Fajitas
Grande. New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks. Fresh Vegetable Pasta.
RESTAURANT .&BAR
t e f t - m iii it my
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
Roadside Chicken Sandwich. Steak and Cheese
Sandwich. Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts. It's all specially priced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favonte
place for food and fun!
�Does noi include Alcoholic Beverages

1
.
4





r
. �
9 Teestfey. A�Mt 19. 1997
iievvs
The East Carolinian
SCHOOL IS
FALLS
FOOTBALL!
Come Watch Your Favorite Team
or Have Dinner After the Game
Try Our Bk�PttSf�cMs For Lunch Cnty $5.95
Check Out Our New Menu, Drink Specials & Wine List
fetor: 3nt ANNUAL FALL BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION
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12 OFF FREE
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tf Purchase efAtfult Entree
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:eur A SM0NICH At REGULAR
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We do
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Tobacco &
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on the bustling Evans St. Mail
Bring in this ad to receive a free gift w any $5 purchase. I
Its Yourhoici!
eve
Looking for a more convenient way to pay
your utility Mil? Try using 'GUC Express
Greenville Utilities' satellite office. GUC
Express features three drive-thru lanes so you can
pay your bill quickly, and there's plenty of parking
if you want to go inside to apply for service,
transfer service or inquire about your bill.
For your convenience, GUC Express is open
Monday through Friday from 7:30 am. - 3:30 pan.
The 24-hour Drop Box is also be available for
payments.
GUC Express is located in the former Centura
Bank building at 509 SE Greenville Boulevard,
across the street from First Christian Church.
rmAM
GUC
EXPRESS
Career Services helps grads with job search skills
Workshops,
registration,
interviews offered
COURTESY OF CAREER SERVICES
"I'm going to be graduating soon
and I don't know where to sun
looking for a job
"I majored in, but after
doing an internship decided this is
not for me. What arc some other
options?"
These are some of the questions
the staff in Career Services hear
almost dairy. Students are encour-
aged to begin planning early in their
academic career by getting involved
in campus life, getting some work
experince related to their major or
career goals and taking advantage of
the resources at Career Services.
Students, or alumni seeking help
in their career planning and job
search will find an array of services
available to them. All students are
invited to participate in the career-
related workshops offered through-
out the year such as resume writing,
interviewing skills and career
searching on the internet. You may
also attend the various career days
which include the Business Career
Day in September, the Health
Career Day in November and the
Education Career Day in ftbruary.
Individual career counseling is avail-
able and may be supplemented by a
computer-aided career guidance
program, SIGIPLUS, as well as a
wide variety of career resources.
The following services are
reserved for graduating students in
their last academic year who register
with Career Services: eligibility for
campus interviews with prospective
employers; a credentials file with
references; a monthly
newsletter,The Job Guide; referrals
to job openings at employers'
request; and access to hundreds of
job listings- To register with Career
Services, students who will graduate
in Rill 1997 or SpringSummer 1998
are invited to attend an
OrientationRegistration meeting
carry in the Fill semester. The first
orientations are scheduled for
August 26, 27, and 28 at 3 p.m. and
Jarro VYeftmordend, director
5 p.m. in Mendcnhail Student
Center, Room 244.
Workshops and special events
sponsored by Career Services are
printed in The East Carolinian
announcements and the Job Guide,
posted in various departments and
will be listed on our website this
f a I I
http-Vwwwl .ecu.edu.studlifecarce
rindexhtm. Or students can come
by Career Services and pick up a list
of the month's activities, browse
through the employer informa-
tionmedia rooms and get some
answers to their questions. Career
Services is located on the comer or"
Fifth and Jarvis Streets and is open
during the hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday-Friday. Director Jim
Westmoreland and a staff of four
Margie Swartout and Debra Baker,
assistant directors; Gwen Harris and
Marilyn Davis, recruitment and cre-
dentials secretaries, respectively,
of Career Services, helps a student utifee computers for a job search.
PHOTO BY PATRICK IREUN
Career Services is located on the comer of 5th and Jarvis Streets.
along with workstudy students, and
intern and graduate assistants,
maintain a dynamic and fast-paced
environment in trying to meet the
demands of their constituents.
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We Take Customer Service PERSONALLY
We'll Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
Still paying
the cover charge?
Get Reasonable!
Books discounted
10 to 90 always.
Bestsellers
Metaphysical
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Special Orders usually 15 off
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4,
news
The East Carolinian
Be prepared and cautious about STDs
Students should
know the facts
cawntY or ECU STUOWT HMITH SERVICE
Most students learned during
Orientation that the national trends
related to sexually transmitted dis-
eases indicate that 1 in 4 college stu-
dents are estimated to become
infected. It may seem hard to put
that into perspective, but when you
think about the things that can be
transmitted sexually (chlamydia,
gonorrhea, herpes, genital warts,
syphilis, Hepatitis B, HIV crabs, sca-
bies, etc.) it makes you realize that
there are a lot of diseases that can be
spread. Those individuals who are
most sexuaHy active place them-
selves at the highest risk for con-
tracting STDs. It is possible, howev-
er, to contract some infections
through sharing razors, clothes and
linens with an infected person.
There's also the risk of contracting
some infections through unsamtized
hot tube and tanning beds as well.
And you cannot forget die increased
risk of infection associated with the
ROTCc
Tuition assistance
available
courrESY of rotc
Army ROTC (Reserves Officer'
Training Corps) is a program which
cm enhance your education by p�V
viding unique leadership training
use of intravenous drugs.
One thing that is important to
understand is the relationship of
symptoms to infection. Many times
symptoms will appear on infected
individuals anywhere from a few
days, to months to even years after
exposure. Common symptoms
include: any unusual discharges from
the penis, vagina, rectum, or mouth;
rash; pain during urination; pain in
the exposed area(s);flu-like symp-
toms and so on. On the other hand,
some people will be asymptomatic,
meaning they experience no symp-
toms. People can still have an infec-
tion, even if there are not symptoms
present. This is why testing is so
important. Testing is the only sure
way to know if an infection has
occurred. The student Health
Center can provide testing for any
STD, the only exception being HIV
HIV testing can be performed at arty
local health department. Alt tests
performed are confidential.
Remember that if STDs are
caused by bacteria (chlamydia, gon-
orrhea, syphilis), there is a cure for
the disease. On the other hand, viral
infections cannot be cured. There
are medications that help control
symptoms for illnesses that cannot
be cured. Examples of viral infec-
tions include herpes, Hepatitis B,
and HIV Student Health Service
carries medications for both types of
infections.
As far as prevention of sexually
transmitted diseases, abstaining
from sexual activity and drug use is
recommended. Be sure to always use
proper hygiene for protection. If you
choose to engage in sexual activity,
mutual monogamy and latex con-
doms arc recommended to help pro-
tect individuals from STDs.
Condoms should be used consis-
tently and correctly with every act of
intercourse (oral, anal and vaginal).
Dental dams reduce the risks of
STDs for people practicing cunnilin-
gus.
. The use of alcohol and other
drugs should also be avoided. Drugs
can alter your decision making skills,
which may lead to unwanted conse-
quences. Also, be aware of the unex-
pected. With drugs like Rohypnol
(Rootles) and GHB on the streets,
one can never be too sure. These
drugs create an amnesiacomatose
effect on individuals who ingest the
substance. Be aware of your sur-
roundings. Never take a drink (soda,
water; etc) from someone you do
not know well. Never leave a bever-
age unattended. Remember to use
caution at all times. Testing for
Rohypnol and GHB can be per-
formed at Student Health if possible
exposure has occurred. There are
time frames involved with these
tests.
Good communication is also a
good preventative tip regarding sex-
ually transmitted diseases. Always
talk with partners about past sexual
experiences and contraceptive
options before becoming intimate.
This is also a good time to bring up
testing. Discussing expectations of
the relationship or date is also rec-
ommended.
Be prepared and remember to
use caution at all rimes, and keep in
mind the tips presented related to
the prevention of sexually transmit-
ted diseases. If you've put yourself at
risk or just want more information,
simply call Student Health at 328-
6317 for an appointment or 328-
6794 for information.
JOIIYS FI.OWF.ISS
.vein's
"&0&Ad
7X35r&
ROBERT CAUSEY, MXR
Accept All Major Credit Cards
Same Day Fast Delivery
IS
2221 Stantonibure Rd.
Greenville, NC 27834
discipline
and management experience.
ROTC helps to develop qualities
that are essential to a successful
career, military or civilian.
The increasing costs of education
these days creates a heavy strain on
you and your parents. Army ROTC
can help by offering two, three and
four year scholarships that cover 100
�pereWpf tuition at ECU. In addi-
tion toTruflTtlmlrjcthe Army will pay
$450 for books and supplies, as well
Amy ROTC udtt John Lang leaks for ttw '�mmy" duni a
m Fort Bragg, NC
men cowrrtsv or mny sstc
training txsreisa
as up to $1,500 a year tax free spend-
ing money.
Army ROTC offers two courses:
Basic and Advanced. The basic
course is usually taken during the
first two years of college and is
offered with no military obligation.
Learn about the Army and yourself
while building self confidence.
The Advanced course is offered
for those who demonstrate officer
potential and who meet physical and
scholastic requirements. A
monthly stipend of $150 is paid
to all contracted advanced
course students,
in addition to monetary reasons,
there are many benefits and
opportunities available in Army
ROTC. A guaranteed job upon
graduation is an important one.
Once your degree is completed,
you will be commissioned as a
second lieutenant, earning
approximately $27,000 a year.
Army Reserve and Army
National Guard commissions are
available as well.
Physical fitness, comradery and
adventure training offer experi-
ences that are highly desirable.
Army ROTC at ECU also offers
Airborne training, air assault
school and Northern Wirfare
Training to cadets. Cadets Brian
Parsons, David Matthews and
David Lynn recently completed
the challenging Airborne course.
Cadet Michael Poe graduated
from the rigorous Northern
Wirfare School, located in
Alaska, this August.
Ranger Challenge, ROTC's var-
sity sport, is open to all cadets,
male and female. It pushes both
your physical and mental abili-
ties to the maximum. Exciting
events such as the grenade
assault course make this sport
both challenging and rewarding.
The National Society of
Pershing Rifles an organization
closely associated with ROTC, is
open to all students. Pershing
Rifle members must attain high
scholastic standards and undergo
a pledging process, which takes a
semester.
Army ROTC will be sponsoring
military equipment displays on
August 21 at two locations on
campus. An Army Blackhawk
RifjM Shoe Repiirl
0w$M$tfr (� 25 If
3193-A East 10th St
Next to the Merita Brad Outlet
Phone 7584)204
Mon-Fri 7:30am - 6pm
Sot 9am - 2pm
We Have Dress and Western Style
Beits to Sell!
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Attention
Freshmen & Transfer
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Sls�asMriFREE
first rental for Tree.
Nkmtloft or bring tlttsad.
BRAKE SPECIAL JScf0
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g fMwIfartPiNfli
MunMMMi Sar
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Complete Engine
Replacement
$100.00 OFF
MOST VEMCIC5
helicopter wilt be landing at the bot-
tom of College Hill. A Bradley fight-
ing vehicle and wheeled tactical
vehicle will be displayed at the
Student Store, fiee food and ROTC
representatives will be at the dis-
plays.
On Sept. 13, during the first
home football game. Army and Air
force ROTC will sponsor the "First
annuai ArmyAir Force Rgkin
Cookout It will be located across
from Dowdy Rcklen Stadium.
Familv, friends, alumni and anyone
interested in ROTC are invited to
attend. Plenty of "fixins" will be
made available.
For more information about ECU
Army ROTC call 328-67, 328-
6974 or visit us on our W:b page at
WWWSit.EClEduVAROTCMS.
Home.HTM. Army ROTC is locat-
ed in the Rawl Building.
GORDON'S GOLF & SKI SHOP
�THE FINEST IN GOLF & SKI EQUIPMENT APPAREL'
207 E Arlington Greenville 756 -1
207 E. ARLINGTON BLVO. GREENVILLE. NC 27858
UNDERWATER
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JAMAICAN RESTAURANT & BAR
511 sTcOTANCHEST. GREENVILLE, NC
919-754-2207
.Appetizers
Saltflsh Fritters
Fried Plantains - 4 slices
Buccaneer Wings - 6 Wingettes
Jerk Wings - 6 Wingettes
Jamaican Beef. Vegetable, or Chicken Patties
Salads
Jerk Chicken Salad
Tost Saiad
Irle Chef Salad
6.95
2.95
5.95
Side Orders
Chicken - Jerk. Curried or fricassee 3.95
Jerk Pork
Oxtail
Carried Qoat
Calialoo Stew without fish 3.50
Rice & Peas
Steak Pries
Cocobread
Sandwiches
Jerk Chicken
Captain Morgan Burgers
with Cheese
Myam an' Scram Chicken
Seafood
3.95
1.50
3.95
3.95
2.00
4.50
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4.20
3.50
Market Price
4.95
4.95
5.95
3.95
2.95
1.50
.75
Escovitch Stew
Brown Stew Fish
Steamed fish
Shrimp 6V Vegetable Combination 9.25
Curried Shrimp 9.25
Lunch Dinner
Entrees
Jerk Chicken 5.25
Jerk Pork 6.95
fricassee Chicken 5.25
Curried Chicken 5.25
Curried Ooat 7.25
Oxtail 6.95
Pirates' Ratter 7.95
Vegetarian Meals
Bonga Nya Stew 5.25
Vegetable Stirfry 5.25
Calialoo Stew - with Codfish 5.25
without codfish 4.95
7.25
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Calendar of Events
Wednesday � Karaoke
Thursday � Live Music
Friday � Live Reggae
Saturdav � Live Music
20
DISCOUNT ON
DINNER WITH
STUDENT ID
Jj
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nU-
Ill'�i 1" T
4. fr-






Tecstfty, Acifttit 19, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
r:
i
i
i
MBC
MAIL BOXES ETC.
740 Greenville Blvd.
Su)m400
Greenville. NC 276S8
TEL 919 321-6021 FAX
919 3214026
"I
I
I
I
I
International Affairs can get you away from it all
nnnncRj. posters.
Gm .ii foi Pdotd.ill Wi rlonds, Rush, Hip Charts,
Bit 11 h lays. ,iHl Sk -r i,il Ainiwiiu.rn K.nts
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BUY ! GE f I FttF'F
21 y.il Pctel from your 8 I 2" ty !��"
i 9 (!) 'it

QUNAIO
CHINESE RESTAURANT
2516 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
830-2238 Fax 830-1735
Open 7 Days a Week
Reservations Welcomed!
ECU Welcome Back Special j
115 Off Entire Menu With This Couponl
J Take Out or Eat In J
L, � � � � � JrJi �3i�9Zl
Several new
programs available
JACQI'EUNE D. KELLUM
NEWS EDITOR
College can be the gateway to a
wider world for students. For those
who choose to take advantage of ser-
vices offered by International
Affairs, it can literally take them
around the world.
Through International Affairs,
students can participate in
exchanges on the national or inter-
national level, enroll in a study
abroad program or participate in
other international activities which
International Affairs can offer advice
on.
According to Dr. Linda
McGowan, overseas opportunites
coordinator, there are several new
programs which have only recently
become available.
One such program is an exchange
in Ecuador, which is open to any stu-
dent proficient in Spanish.
"All areas of the University there
are open to exchange students
McGowan said.
There is also a new exchange at
Osaka University in Japan, for which
students need to have studied seme
Japanese language. Any students
considering this program need to be
aware that the semesters are not
exactly synchronous with the semes-
ter schedules of American universi-
ties.
There are nine universities in
PI RATES B
Tuition and fees was
recently raised from
$836.50 to
$903.00. Where do
you think your
money is going?
Germany with which ECU has
exchange agreements. At least two
years of German arc required for
those.
Students who have not had train-
ing in another language need not
miss out on an international experi-
ence. There arc several programs in
English-speaking countries or at uni-
versities where classes are taught in
English.
"We now have two universities in
Finland where classes are taught in
English McGowan said.
The Finland program would be of
particular interest to students inter-
ested in the arts, according to
McGowan. There is also an honors
exchange available in Australia at the
University of Melbourne. Another
program which would not require
foreign language training, and is cur-
rently in development, will be in
Belize, in Central America.
While any kind of international
experience will require advance
planning, a student going on an
exchange needs to keep in mind
that they will be responsible for see-
ing that any courses they take over-
seas will transfer back to ECU and
count toward their degree.
They need to come over and see
what's available. They need to get
approved for the courses they will
take on exchange McGowan said.
While exchange programs have
the advantage of being more eco-
nomical, there arc also study abroad
programs available for which stu-
dents pay a program fee and have
many aspects of their trip organized
for them. Many study abroad pro-
grams are short term and take place
in the summer. These may be attrac-
tive to students who do not want to
spend an entire semester or year
abroad.
Summer exchange programs
which are currently in development
and may be offered next summer are
to England, Finland, Estonia and
Russia.
"We're also going to be working
with faculty members on expanding
summer opportunities McGowan
said.
Summer programs may vary from
one year to the next and students
should check with International
Affairs for the most up-to-date infor-
mation.
While most students go on
exchanges or study abroad programs
during their junior year, anyone who
has finished their freshman year is
eligible.
"There are also possibilites for
Work Abroad, which many students
go on immediately after graduation
McGowan said.
Work Abroad is conducted by the
Council on International
Educational Exchange and aids stu-
dents in applying for work permits
and finding jobs and housing in such
countries as England, Ireland,
France, Germany and others. This
program is open to currently
enrolled students and recently grad-
uated seniors.
Although freshmen are not eligi-
ble for exchanges, they can begin
investigating the possibilities open
to them.
"It's never too early to find out
McGowan said.
Many of next year's programs are
still in the process of being finalized.
Definite information will be avail-
able sometime in the fall.
"We're hoping to get at least ten-
tative information during the fall
semester so students can appK early
in the spring semester McGowan
said.
Anyone considering an exchange,
a study abroad program or any other
overseas excursion can utilize the
support services of the International
Affairs office, which will help with
the application process and other
details.
"We have an orientation program
for students who are going on
exchanges where we provide infor-
mation on practical matters
McGowan said.
Those practical matters include
such things as information on travel,
airline reservations, cultural differ-
ences, health, safety and medical
insurance.
Valuable advice and insights can
also come from students who have
already been overseas.
"We have students who have
gone on these exchanges who are
willing to talk to them about their
experiences McGowan said.
Students interested in any kind
of overseas experience should go by
the Office of International Affairs,
located in a brick house on Ninth
Street, or call them at 328-4829.
They are encouraged to begin look-
ing into the possibilities as soon as
possible.
"The opportunites are here.
Students need to find out early
McGowan said.
1
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Szechuan Garden
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Located up town Greenville
at 909 S. Evans St.
757-1818 fax 757-8708
take out orders welcome
vegetarian menu available

�CHINESE RESTAURANT
Private banquet room for up to 120 people
Lunch Buffet
$3.55
includes fgg drop A
Hot & tour soup
'drinks not included
�dmon-fri 11:30-2:30
Buffet toko out $3.95 lb.
Dinner Buffet
$3.95
includes Egg drop A
Hot & sour soup
'drinks not included
served sun � rhur 5:30
fri sot 5:30-10:00
9:00
$3.95 Lunch Special 11:30 - 3
regular menu available all day 7 days a week
Sunday Buffet
$5.95
served 12-3 pm
mon - thur
fri
HOURS
11:30-9:30 sat
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�� 1255
Atklftics, such as expanded
stadium seals.
Mary Jon Littleton
luniot
Nursing major
It is probably going to pay for
the stadium expansion.
Bo Lewi;
sophomore
Business major
To compensate for the construction
underway.
Dtmion Brewington
jepfcmore
Psychology maiur
It is probably going into someone's
pocket siii: r I haven't gott, n sriiuf "f
anything extra.
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kegs and STOP SHOP also has all the
setups: Ice, cups & munchies, too!
ECU's Party People
connect at
STOP SHOP!
CALL TODAY
752-6366
STOP
SHOP
Corner of 5th and Reade Streets in Downtown Greenville
rVTmTWTYWT!





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Si
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3
4�
Refusal le Vacaae ftemiacs A
reudenc of Bdk Hall reported that
her boyfriend refined to leave her
mum. i boyfriend left the room
and naaed he moid net return
that night.
July 14
Indecent Exposure�A student
waa arrested far indecent exposure
in a mom in the Brewster Building
after another student witnessed
him exposing himself.
Assault on Law Enforcement
Officer, Trespassing, Resisting
Arrest and Communicating
Threats�A Greenville citizen was
arrested for assault, trespassing,
resisting arrest and communicating
threats after being stopped en
College Hill Drive southeast of
THE BlfiOEST SUPPLY OF USED BOOKS IN GREENVILLE.
August 2
DWI, Controlled Substance
Violation, Driving Left of Center�
A non-student was arrested for dri-
ving while impaired, simple posses-
sion of marijuana, possession of
drag paraphernalia and driving left
of centet The DWI charge was dis-
missed due to the hreathah 'cr
reading of .06.
516 S. COTANCME STREET � UPTOWN SREENViLLE
7SS-2C16 � HTTP:WWW.�REIMC.CCIf
any purchase of
$75.00 or more.
IUUL
Ji�V$CaTilCIIE STREET � UPTOWN 6REENVILLE � 75-2fl� J
One coupon per customer.
Not valid with other offers.
Not vaHd on previous sdes.
Not valid after 8-26-97
M

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r
13 Tuesday. August 19. 1997
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865 -
FREE UTILITIES. 1 BEDROOM, 12
block from camps on Holly St. Cats al-
lowed with deposit Rent $305 a month.
757-9387
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
3 bedroom. Tar River, has pool, washer
and dryer, semi enclosed yard, cable. 3
blocks from campus. Call Dave at 752-
0009.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR 2 bedroom
apt University Apts $175month 1st
months, on ECU Bus Route. 12 cable,
phone, utilities Nikki. 758-4325. Need by
August 31.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom townhouse at Kingston
Place. $870 per semester. Respond ASAP
to Anna at 919-449-0923 or Jamie at 919-
441-1449.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
share 2 bedroom duplex, one mile from
campus on the Purple Line Bus Route.
$200month plus 1.2 utilities. Call 551-
0592. ask for Kathleen.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO share
2 bedroom duplex, one mile from campus
on the Purple Line Bus Route.
$165month plus 12 utilities. Call 551-
0592 ask for Kathleen.
NEED A NEW PAD? roommate wanted
to share 2 bedroom 2 bath duplex. Walk-
ing distance from campus. Lots of extras.
Non-smoker requested �250 month plus
12 bills. Call 758-2232
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
apartment on 5th Street. 12 rent and
12 utilities. Graduate preferred. Call Su-
san at 768-8567. Fall Semester Only
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3
bedroom duplex. $200 a month plus 13
utilities. Washerdryer, big screen TV. Call
Dave at 752-1463
WANT YOUR OWN BATHROOM and
bedroom? Recent graduate seeks room-
mate 2 bedroom. 2 bathroom duplex
near campus Lots of extras. Non-smoker
$250month plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
2232. leave message.
For Sale-
BEAUTIFUL RUG. NEVER BEEN
WALKED on. From Pier One. 6x8 multi
color Call 931-0449
FOR SALE: GARY FISHER Pro- Caliber
mountain bike. Super light. Comes with
lock and pump $400. Call Jon at 758-
7923
1993 HONDA DEL SOL. 42k. black.
$9,995. Walnut Coffee Table (50in. x
23m). $30 Walnut phone stand (13in x
25in.) $15. Come take a look! Call Tom
@ 830-6943.
Computer For Sale
5mhz Pentium, 1.5GB. HO. 16MB.RAM. 4x
CD-ROM, 3.5 floppy, 14.4 fax. modem, �7 Ans
Machine, sound blaster sound card. 14" color
monitor. Win. VI & Win. 9& All software.
connections and original manuals incl.
Verv user friendly $900.00 firm 355-2912
WP-2200 BROTHER WORD processor
with CRT display and spreadsheet soft-
ware. Like new. Asking $150. Call and
leave message. 756-5660.
APPLE HE COMPUTER. DISK drive, col-
or printer, paper. Print Shop. Appleworks.
manuals, excellent condition, cne owner.
Ideal for student. $500. 758-4952.
"Help Wanted
PERFECT PART-TIME JOB. Seeking
math tutor and a study buddy to work
with students on individualized basis. Ap-
ply at: Sylvan Learning Center. 2428 S.
Charles Blvd Greenville. NC
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT; FULL
TIME. Detail oriented, organized, good
customer skills, excellent computer skills,
enthusiastic worker. Call 931-6904 and
leave a message.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS OFFICIAL -
$4 95. Officiates intramural sports, re-
quires little or no previous officiating ex-
perience or training. Must pass a rules
test for the prospective intramural sport
and attend the designated training ses-
sions. Contact David Gaskins or Allison
Kemp, 328-6387.
$6.00 PER HOUR. COMMUNITY Bible
study, a women's interdenominational Bi-
ble study, is in need of several young
women to work with children four and un-
der. Tuesdays 9AM-11 45AM at Covenant
Methodist Church in Greenville. Thurs-
days 9AM-12:15PM at Christ Presbyterian
Church in Winterville Sitters will provide
patient, loving care and instruction to our
youngest participants. Experience pre-
ferred, references requested, must pro-
vide own transportation and make com-
mitment from August 26th until Decem-
ber 11. 1997. Call Nan Garrett. class coor-
dinator at (919) 756-6084.
classifieds
UNITED METHODIST STUDENT
WANTED for work with Bethel UMC
Youth group. Applicant must have a
strong Christian faith. Youth meet from
5:00p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sunday evenings.
Pays $30.00 per week. Call 825-8041.
PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPERCHILD-
CARE: MONDAY-Friday. 12 00-4 00 p.m.
Must have someone at house at 2:30
p.m otherwise, somewhat flexible about
time. 20 hrs.week. Minimum wage. Call
353-4239 evenings.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER. PICK up from
school, help with homework, and trans-
port to activities. Must have NCDL and
transportation. Call 752-0748 and leave
message.
LEAD INTRAMURAL SPORTS OFFI-
CIAL- $5.35. Officiates intramural sports.
Requires previous officiating experience
of at least one year in two or more sports
offered by the ECU intramural sports pro-
gram. Must pass a rules test for the pros-
pective intramural sport and attend the
designated training sessions. Contact Da-
vid Gaskins or Allison Kemp. 328-6387.
BABYSITTER NEEDED TO SIT for two
children - ages 4 and 1. all day on Tues-
days or Wednesdays. No smokers. Call
355-7875
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER NEEDED
TO cans for 17 month old. Some even-
ings, plus Friday and Saturday nights.
Non-smoker. Must have own transporta-
tion, references required. 353-1797.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS SUPERVISOR
- $4.75. Serves as a timer and scorekeep-
er. Is responsible for the supervision of in-
tramural act' 'ties, equipment check-out
and control. Must attend training clinics
and meetings as scheduled. Perform re-
lated tasks as assigned. Contact Cliff Og-
burn. 328-6387.
TELEMARKETER; PART-TIME, STRUC-
TURED program, good customer skills,
positive attitude. Call 931-6904 and leave
a message.
NEED A JOB? PLAY at day and make
money at night! Work nights andor wee-
kends and have your days free with The
ECU Telefund. Make your own schedule!
$5.50hr. plus bonuses! Stop by the Rawl
Annex. Room 5 between 3-6PM for more
info.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7886.
MALE DIVERS NEEDED! ECU Swim
Team needs guys who like to flip and
twist. Call Coach Rose. ext. 0010 or come
to Mmges Pool Office.
JOIN THE BBC - Join the Buffalo Brew
Crew BW-3 is now hiring kitchen, cash-
ier, and door staff for Fall Semester. Apply
within M-F. 1-5PM. 114 E. 5th St.
WFXI FOX814 IS LOOKING for a fall
intern. Candidate must get credit for in-
ternship. Creative business or communi-
cations major preferred. Must be willing
to work a minimum of 20 hours a week.
Intern will learn various aspects of tele-
vision, including copywriting. sales and
production of commercials. Applicants
should send resume to LSM, WFXI-TV,
600 Country Club Dr. Suite C. Greenville.
NC 27858. WFXI. GOCOM Broadcasting
is an EOE employer.
PART-TIME TENNIS ATTENDANT
INSTRUCTOR positions at River Birch
Tennis Center. Tennis playing and teach-
ing experience required. Start end of
August. Call 830-4559.
WFXI FOX814 IS LOOKING for a fall
intern. Candidate must get credit for in-
ternship. Creative business or communi-
cations majoi preferred. Must be willing
to work a minimum of 20 hours a week.
Intern will learn various aspects of tele-
vision, including copywriting. sales and
production of commercials. Applicants
should send resume to LSM. WFXI-TV.
600 Country Club Dr. Suite C. Greenville.
NC 27858. WFXI. GOCOM Broadcasting
is an EOE employer
PART-TIME IN HOME caregiver needed
for two children Tuesdays and Thursdays.
7AM to 6PM. 752-5922 after 6PM.
Services
DO YOU LIKE TO learn German. French.
Arabic? Call 754-2487.
The East Carolinian
Announcements
THE GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY Spe-
cial Olympics will be conducting a Soccer
Coaches Training School on Saturday.
September 27th from 9am - 4pm for all
individuals interested in volunteering to
coach soccer. We are also looking for vol-
unteer coaches in the following sports:
Basketball Skills. Team Basketball. Swim-
ming. Rollerskating and Bowling. No ex-
perience necessary. For more informa-
tion please contact Dwain Cooper at 830-
4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
IF YOU DRIVE TO class from out of
Greenville or if you live in Greenville but
are not located near a bus route, check
out the new weekdays commuter board
in The Wright Place, where you can find a
RIDE or RIDERS to share the driving. If
you need a ride over weekends or breaks,
use the board in Mendenhall Student
Center. For more information, contact
Commuter Student Services. 211
Whichard, 328-6881.
at��a�4�Hat
mi HVOMMlM Of iih vitotn t iMttsiKUu not-
CALL US TODAY!
353-4147
PROMPT, PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
� RtPORTS - THfSts � PRIMES . LETTERS
I-IVERYTIIING YOU NP.F.D
Travel
SPRING BREAK '98- sell trips, earn cash
and go free Student Travel Services is
now hinng campus repsgroup organiz-
ers Lowest rates to Jamaica. Mexico Er
Florida Call 1-800-648-4849.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need TimberUnd boots
and shoes! Good Jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILF1GER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2.00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
ii n i - i S v' x i S n o r
$100 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
(not vjik) with any other coupon)
Expires 83197
Hbdm fimmmtm 5wtftf
I and 2 Bedroom Range, Refridgerator.
Washer, Dryer Hookups Decks and Patios
in most units. Laundry Facility,
Located S blocks from campus
FREE WATER. SEWER
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable.
5 blocks from campus. New ownership
New Landscaping.
rroc
roperty I lanogemenr.
Apartments & Rental Houses
PO 8o� 873 � DB Bronrteo Orw, Suto A
Oreerwis. North Coiolno 27835-0873
OT7) 758-1921 � FAX (919) 757-7722
4 the 1 � �
eastcaroliman
classified ad info
OPEN RATE
$3 for 25 or fewer words
STUDENT RATE
$2 for 25 or fewer words
(Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify.)
Additional words over 25 are 5C each
AD EXTRAS
Bold type is1 extra
All caps type is $1 extra
(Charges for extras are in addition to the line ad charges
shown above.)
DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY for the TUESDAY issue
4 p.m. MONDAY for the THURSDAY issue
ALL CLASSIFIED ADS MUST BE PREPAID.
THE INCREDIBLE BACK-TO-SCHOOL
ART PRINT S POSTER SALE
OVER 2, OOO IMAGES
fhe Scream
The Beatles
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Bob Marlev
Tuesday-Friday
August 19-22
Outside Dowdy Student Stores
Wright Building
9 am - 5 pm
Kim Anderson-Photos

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Belushi
Photographs
MilWlWl http:wAvw.trentgrf.com
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y






flH
14
19. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastforolinian
AMY L.ROYSTER Ednw
CELESTE WILSON MarujmjEditor
MATT HEGE MaartaaatjOman TRACY Lai BACH Assistant Sports Editor
JACQUELINE D. KELLl'M HasaEdtor DAVID SOI'THFRI.AND ProductionManasat
andy Turner Litetytf ew Carole Mf.hi.k IMCopyEdimt
John Davis taisumuttstyncts John mirphy Staff iKustrator
Amanda Ross SpomEdnw Heather Burgess WirsEror
��eiit6matBMiTl�!BiiretoiB�fa��i�im�r)�iw. tawed to 2W � rt ma, be ed�� !sr ibcancy m biawy Tbi Eati
adiai�jlaiBadattiaa�leneB��e�aii�eti A�laawii��aaaajtialEaiiatiil��Wtiaaa�iaMii�iii�inet�,ttieEiti
I tm GnaaiOe. 2MM3U For ntoflMM. c S�m6m
oumcw
"Journalism is not only an obsession but a drawback that cannot be overrated The author
i Asquith said this in 1922, three years before the first copy of The EastCarolinian was pub-
i at ECU.
Today, the biweekly publication is the pride and joy of over 50 students who identify with
Asquith's observation. The employees at TEC represent a range of majors and study concentra-
tions, but we share one thing in common: a desire to work hard to bring the most reliable and
insightful source of information available to ECU.
Rom advertising representatives to staff writers, all of the employees at TEC want to welcome
students back to campus with our Welcome Back edition. We would also like to take this space
to share some information about our baby, our obsession, our paper.
TEC is one of the few 100 percent student-produced newspapers in the state. From beginning
reporters to the Advertising Manager and Editor-in-Chief, we are all students obsessed �some
to a greater degree than others � with pulling together and bringing ECU a paper which is fair
and accurate. We want readers to count on us to bring them stories and details they haven t heard
before.
We cover news events, lifestyles issues, ECU athletics, the Greenville entertainment scene
sraTa broad range of opinions. Our classified section is the ideal trading post for readers and cam-
pus organizations can't find a better place to advertise their events. We welcome feedback or
story ideas, and are delighted when a reader picks up their own pen to write a letter to the edi-
mt Look in the masthead box and find the appropriate person to write or call.
We are always looking for students who are interested in journalism, advertising, production
or photography to join us. If a student has the interest, we have a fun job for them which pro-
vides a hands on experience in the company of peers.
We publish on Tuesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester and arc distributed at 35
locations on campus and in the surrounding area. Look for upcoming articles on the Residence
overcrowding problem, stadium expansion updates and information about the entertain-
ment scene.
TEC baa become increasingly successful in the past several years and is pleased not to rely on
student fees to produce the paper. Our ad revenue is our primary source of income and surveys
show that 95 percent of ECU students read TEC.
There may be other schools in the UNC-system better known for journalism, but ECU is used
to being the underdog in many respects. Times are changing and this year's staff at TEC wants
its readers to know the extent of our devotion and the reach of our dedication to becoming the
beat student newspaper in the state.
The obsession is clear, and the drawbacks and obstacles, though many, are worth it. When stu-
dents are finishing their night classes, or heading to their favorite night spot, we are up in the
: student publications building working our hardest for a paper we are proud of.
4AD mats
MIL tOUOtJ IW
SUIT AS TH�
STUBCAJTS FUJCb
OPINION
Paper, pens, books and inspriation
Life is great if you
wort for greatness,
Love what you do and
do it brilliantlyAs
summer winds to a
close, enjoy the
layover.
Hands calloused, nails lined with
black grit, dirt-forehead damp with
sweat. My feet hurt. My stomach
gnaris with hunger. My hands shake
from exertion and work, work, work
and more work.
Over 20,000 words into the novel
and the rejection slips keep coming-
thank you for your interest in Farrar,
Strauss; thank you for your interest
in The New Yorker; thank you for
your interest in Harcourt, Brace-
thank you, thank you, thank you;
however, we at The Pbughkeeps'ie
Review regret to inform you that
we're are unable to find a place for
your work.
Invigorated by defeat, I press on.
When you have a passion, when
you have a dream, when you believe
that no matter what people tell you,
no matter how dire the prospects
seem, when every possible hurdle
stands before you, press on. Never
accept defeat. Only accept the
absolute best. Never compromise
your confidence or your belief in
what you do. Strive for genius.
Life is free will, if you free your
will to be the absolute best and stop
at nothing less.
The intensity of summer is over
and a new school year is upon us.
Relish in your summer's achieve-
ments. Prepare your mind for
autumn to come. Keep your focus.
Keep your concentration. Look
beyond the moment and realize your
dreams. This is the absolute horizon
of thought.
Grandfather worked as a butcher
during the '30s for $5 a week. Either
grew up with three brothers and two
sisters, all sharing two bedrooms and
one bathroom. I remember the tiny
house from my early childhood. I
remember the concrete front porch
painted gray with speckles of
chipped paint here and there. I
remember the hole in the living
room wall covered over with plaster,
once connecting to a furnace before
my aunts and uncles paid to have
central heating put in for my grand-
parents.
My father worked 30 years, never
once using the iwo weeks of paid
vacation the sales company offered
him each year. When he retired, he
had over a year of paid vacation accu-
mulated and enough money to buy a
house with a pool and 20 mile views,
not coo far from the Biltmore Estate.
Hard work pays.
Mother was a painter, she sold
her work for meager sums to help
pay the mortgage, to save for my
brothers' and my college education.
Now I read Baudrillard, Ricliard
Ford and Toni Morrison, work two
jobs and dream of a doctorate in
English. My fiancee and I will both
have our graduate degrees next
spring She wants to teach children;
she loves kids. I want to teach at a
university and write novels, and I
will.
We will be together. She calls me
her oak tree, and I say to her, "You're
worth my life
Life is great if you work for great-
ness. l.ove what you do and do it
brilliantly.
I saw a pen, nalized license plate
the other day that read U MATTER.
I could not help but think what a
champion heart that person must
have.
A� summer winds to a close,
enjoy the layover. Take some time to
relax and free your mind. Tell your
parents you are proud of them. Tell
them you love them.
Then prepare yourself for over-
drive this fall. I know I will be ready,
and I am sure you will be too. Peace
to all.
OPINION
BERGMAN
Columnist
Summer brought many changes to ECU
Forget Pee Dee, our
new logo and mascot
should be the bright
orange construction
cone. When I walk
across campus Iser
more construct
signs, barrels, ana
corns than the beltline
in Raleigh.
To all new incoming students fresh-
meawomen and transfers, I wel-
come you with open arms and dosed
parking lots, lb the returning stu-
OPINION
dents a hearty welcome back is
issued. Those of you that were
gone, were missed by the downtown
merchants. To those people I will
try to fit in what happened this sum-
mer in a ten inch column.
The Dowdy-Ficklen stadium
expansion is behind schedule and
will not be open for the first home
football game. Gee. who would have
thought, the stadium was going to
be behind schedule. Well, me for
one. I can not remember the last
time ECU had something that was
completed on time. Todd Dining
Hall, Joyner Library, and the Rec.
center ail opened behind schedule.
Speaking of building the Board of
stees approved a site for a new
ng hall. The site is behind
t. Ml were he amphitheater
cun uy jsides. I .V; their a new
dining hall alreadv on ca:npus?
The Jnivcrsity -eems to like to
build. Forget Fee Dre, our new logo
and mascot should dc the bright
orange construction cone. When I
walk across campus I see more con-
struction signs, barrels, and cones
than the beltline in Raleigh.
Why can't the board of trustees
be happy? All I want is for one year
to go by without planning for con-
struction, raising money for con-
struction, building anything, (Hating
down anything, or ripping up wt.t
few parking lots we have.
Those of you that vote may find
yourself in a new city district. The
districts were changed because of
population growth and the old one
person one vote idea. Never mind
how I feel the districts were gerry-
mandered to undercut rhe
University's voting power, we still
have to deal with the new districts.
As a reminder to those of us who
care, city elections are upon us once
again. Just a reminder to register to
vote. Truth be told, if you don't
vote, nobody cares about you. Unless
you happen to have lots of money.
For those of you who were gone
the only other thing you missed was
Pee Dee the Pirate's arrest. It would
seem that Pee Dee was caught
unbuckling his swash in public. No
he didn't, but wouldn't it be cool if
he did?
. Watasha
PHILLIPS
Degree may not guarantee job
I began filling out
applications at
department stores,
restaurants, movie
theaters and clothing
stores. Unfortunately,
all of these positions
were filled by high
school students.
PIRATES
A college education means abundant
employment opportunities, right?
Wrong Take it from a graduate who
spent her summer searching for
employment; a degree is just the
beginning.
I was under the assumption that
my bachelor of science degree in
psychology would at the least lead to
a summer job as a camp counselor or
a mental health assistant.
Instead, ail of the camp counselor
positions were filled months in
advance and the local mental health
facilities never returned my calls.
After contacting potential employ-
ers, I grew tired of hearing, "W: pre-
fer employees who have a master's
degree in psychology and "We'll
contact you when we make our deci-
sion
I spent four months filling out
applications, being interviewed and
going through the various rigors of
the job hunt. Once I realized I was
not going to be hired, I decided to
gain work experience through voiun-
on the street
teer work. Again, I applied for sever-
al volunteer positions but nothing
panned out.
Reality kicked in with the onset
of the summer and I realized I need-
ed a job and I needed one fast. I
began filling out applications at
department stores, restaurants,
movie theaters and clothing stores.
Unfortunately, ail of these positions
were filled by high school students.
Needless to say, I spent my sum-
mer at home looking at my degree;
however, I am much wiser from my
penniless holiday experience.
What exactly have I learned?
I have learned that one needs a
master's degree in psychology to
cam a decent salary, i have learned
to start looking for a job at least six
months prior to graduation. Most
importantly, I have learned to never,
never, never tell a potential employ-
er you are only interested in summer
employment.
What would you write
about if you had the chance
to write an opinion column?
sotthl write an opinion cnlumn
about the pessimism of opinion
column miters.
Gale Beaney
senior
vould write a column expressing my
disjoin over the United States'
subjugation of the world population
purely for corporate American
economic gain.
Dave Wells
jL-mor
would write an opinion column on
the committee selection of boards for
Barefoot on the Mall. From
Widespread to who are these guys?
Jason Hakooi
junior
��� ���, mm � .iWi
i
0 r





15 Tuesday. August 19, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
M,))VUS
VISA
Oscar Mayer
Meat Wieners
ISctpkg.
VClBUYONEgp.
pmtamCwt��� LVE ON
Vrry Important Cusfcmw
Ihunis XYM
MjjII.N .
Sale!
lO ob. Harris Teeter
With VIC Card
WSoa. Post
Honey-Comb Cereal
With VIC Card � Limit 4 Total
125 02.
Triton Spring
Wfeter
With VIC Card � Limit 4 Total
In The Bakery
1 loaf Fresh Baked
French Bread
12 oz. Harris Teeter
Deluxe American
Sliced Cheese
With VIC Card � Limit 4 Total
9.5 02.
Marie Callender's
Chicken Pot Pie
With VIC Card � Limit 4 Total
In the Peli 6 oz.
Pillow Pack
mi
With VIC Card
In The Deli
12"
With VIC Card � Limit 4 Total I With VIC Card � Limit 4 Total
Diet Coke Or
Coca Cola
Prices Effective Through August 19,1997
Prioes In This Ad Effective Wednesday, August 13 � August J9,1997 In Our Greenville Area Stores
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16 Tuesday, August 19. 1997
comics
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19 Wednesday. August 19, 1997
orts
The East Carolinian
. . - PREVIEWS, SCHEDULES, AND
InSldC MUCH, MUCH MORE
The Players
Regular season practice began last
week in preparation for the upcoming
season. Even in the heat, these players
are dedicated to making themselves as
tough as they can be. Look inside for
the entire football schedule and find
out what was said at football media
day about this season. Read on for
what players to watch this year and
get ready for an exciting football
season packed with action and thrills.
PHOTOS BY AMANDA PROCTOR
Fullback Scott Harley is ready to run past the opponents this year and hopes to
have the same kind of season, if not better, then he did last year.
Center
FILE PHOTOS
� � i hwtkv CfJ wkmmu.V
m
T vMMt it '�
i ygj ijy
l iM i �-ttr f iH ' i. 1, 1a jlJ
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Completed earlier thi pounds. With basketbs more, this has become a various sporting equips year, the new recreat II courts, a weight roo popular place for ECU ment and many of the PHOTOS BYion center allows students to work off those extra m, aerobic rooms, indooroutdoor pools, and much students. The rec center also allows students to rent ntramural programs are played in the new facility. JONATHAN 6REEN
GONZALEZ
Ready to make the calls this year, quarterback Dan Gonzalez will take the snaps
and look to put the points on the board.
FILE PHOTOS
Stadium





20 Tuesday, August 19. 1997
hpon
s
The East Carolinian

Football season right around corner
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS EDITOR
This season, pirates are wondering
wether the offensive line will sur-
vive with only one returning starter,
wether quarterback Dan Gonzalez
can pick up where he left off last
season and wether Scott Harley will
better his stellar 19 performance.
Head Coach Steve Logan is can-
did that this year could be a strug-
gle. VWth only nine returning
starters, he is concerned.
This year, Logan feels his
defense will really have to step up
and rise to the occasion.
"fery pointedly, we're going to
have to count on our defense to win
early Logan said at a recent media
conference. "Things ate going to
start out a little stow is what my gut
feeling is. and we're going to have to
do some defensive work and special
teams work
It was that defense which ranked
37th in the nation in total defense
and led the nation in takeaways last
season. In 1992, ECU's defense was
ranked 105th in the nation, so in just
four years the defense moved up 68
places in their rankings.
Due to graduation, three of the
linebackers that accounted for 321
tackles on the defensive end are
gone. But Junior Rod Coieman, who
accounted for 52 tackles last season,
says this year's defense is roaring to
go.
"We're up to the challenge
Coieman said. "Wre not scared -
we're just ready, ready to get the
season started
The offensive line has been a
concern, with only one returning
starter, and that is junior center
Danny Moore.
Moore says since everyone seems
doubt the job the offensive line
do, it isn't hard for them to get
imped up.
"It's not Iwrd to get motivated
when everybody tells you that you
can't do it - you can't get the job
done it makes you want to go out
there and prove yourself and makes
you chomp at the bit to get out
there and show everybody that you
can get it done Moore said. "It
makes you want to work that much
harder
The offensive players have confi-
dence in their line, and say they
have the talent. They just haven't
had a chance to play alt together yet.
"I think they are a good group of
players senior quarterback Dan
Gonzalez said. "They ire reafly tal-
ented, but of course it's going to be
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Larry Shannon runs for ons of nine touchdowns scored lost sssson. Shannon and ttw rest of tha Pirates look forward to many
touchdowns this yoar as they play for a conference championship in their first season in Conference USA.
FILE PHOTO
LOST IN THE
Rec Center?
Work out with a personal trainer at
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the first time they are playing
together. I'm not expecting them to
do everything perfect
Gonzalez feels if they try their
hardest then he can't ask for any-
thing more.
"Eventually, I want them to build
some consistency down the road,
and it might not be there for the
first game but as long as they are try-
ing their hardest, there's nothing
more I can ask of them Gonzalez
said.
With the start of this season,
Gonzalez, who filled in nicely for an
injured Marcus Crandell lasr season
for the remaining four games, says
the rest of the offense has worked
hard for the anticipation of this sea-
son.
"We've put in a lot of hard work
this off-season Gonzalez said. "I've
done a lot of things personally to
make sure I'm flH rettdv as I possibly
can be, and I think the offense in
general has done that
Logan is confident Gonzalez.
who threw for 1,322 vards last year
on 90 completion's, will steadily
improve throughout the season.
"I talked to Danny, and what I'd
like to see him do is get better each
game throughout the jf! jpme
schedule we have ahead of us, and if
he does eftat then fieU be thettwd
of quarterback who can win for us
Logan said.
One player who has proven he
can help win is Scott Harley who
rushed for 1,745 yards and is the
nation's leading returning rusher.
That figure set the single season
record by nearly 400 vards estab-
lished Here at ECU. N.C. State
experienced Hartey first hand last
season as they watched him roll to
351 yards which is the ninth best
single game effort in NCAA history
and best ever by a sophomore. He
averaged 158.6 yards per game.
When asked what he will have to
do to have the kind of season he had
last year, Harley simply put it in two
words, "same thing.�
Harley said while he'd like to
rack up just as many yards, as long as
he can help the ream to victory; the
yards come second.
"I'm jusr goinjj ro go our there
and play as hard as I can Harley
said. "I'd rather have wins than a
hundred-some yards a game. What's
the use of running for those yards
and not even winning, so' I'd rather
win first, then the yards can come
Logm notes that it's net'just
Harlcv's ability to run the bcM mat
makes Wm jjogsod, but the way e
protects the ball.
"The main thi1daM&�ry2ar
that ao one really talks
about is the way he took
care of the football
Logan said. "I think he
had two turnover's ail year
long"
Pot Logan, he is interest-
ed in seeing how Harley
will handle the title of
nation's leading returning
rusher.
"We're going to sec, now,
how Scott handles this
leading rusher m the
nation, and afl this stuff
Logan said. "He's put in a
lot of hard work last year.
He's put in-a tot of hard
work this summer, so we'il
see
This year marks the inau-
gural season for
Conference USA, and the
.players know they now
have a conference chsm-
pienship they can com-
pete fot.
"It's very exciting Jason
Nichols, senior flanker said. "Now
we have something real to shoot for.
We have a conference champi-
onship we can go out for, and if we
play right and win the right games,
we can win. So, it's not so much of
the pressure of the years before as
having to go out and wm every game
to get into a bowl game. I'm not say-
ing we're not trying to win more
games but now that we have the
right games, that we have to win, if
we take care of that we can still get
in
Fans will get the chance to see
the Pirates prove themselves as
they compete at West Virginia on
September f in the season opener,
and then come home for the start of
the home schedule on September
13 against Wake Forest.
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21 Tuesday. August 19. 1997
!
HJTlS
The East Carolinian
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MAIL BOXES ETC. Greenville. NC 27858
ftp�:
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Exciting season in store for ECU athletics
VVf WAN I !() I!f VOl'K( )I'Y (
3C COPIES
Amanda Ross
A Senior rommuntrafiotts
major zttiHuutinz in
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forward to ti in ret r in
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Kiffht now. more than ever, it is a great time to be a Pirate.
With football season right around the corner, you won't want to
miss a minute of the action.
The Pirates will look to storm into Conference USA and
make an impact in their inaugural season. Last year, ECU went
8-3, and this year they will look to improve that record.
Scott Harley, who is the nation's leading returning rusher,
will ride his way on the field and look to surpass his 1,745 rush-
ing yards he gained last season. There is already talk of Harley
and the Heisman. Is it too soon to predict such an award? Who
knows, but if he has the kind of season he had last year, it
would be a travesty for him not to be considered for the award.
Split end Larry Shannon made his mark last season, catch-
ing 39 passes for 834 yards, which was the second highest sea-
son total. He became the Pirates all-time leader last season in
touchdown receptions with a 20 since '94. And he is sure to add
to that total this year.
One player who emerged and rose tr the occasion last sea-
son was quarrcrback Dun Gonzalez. The then-junior stepped
in and filled in for Marcus Crandcll, who went down in the
Arkansas State game with a season-ending knee injury, and
racked up 1,322 yards, including 383 yards versus Ohio. That
effort earned him the second best total for passing yards in a
game, and that was only hb second career start.
But it wasn't just the offense that was impressive last year,
ECU led the nation in takeawavs with 36 and ranked second
overall in turnover ratio.
Just thinking about this football season gives me the chills.
I can't wait to look up into the stands and see the seats filled
with fans. And then my eye will go up a little further and see
the additional 8,000 fans in the new upper deck, which hope-
fully will be completed as soon as possible.
Yes, this is a great time to be a fan and things are only going
to get better. I can already hear the roar of the siren letting fans
know that the Pirates are taking the field and getting ready to
kick some butt.
WELCOME
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ECUCincy to be
televised on
ESPN
East Carolina and Cincinnati
will play their 1997 football
game in front of a national tele-
vision audience.
The Pirates and Bearcats
will meet in Dowdy-Ficklen
Sridium on Thursday, Nov. 13
with the game to lie televised
by ESPN (8 p.m.). The
Conference ISA matchup had
been cheduled for Saturday,
Nov. 15 before the switch for
television.
"We are excited about the
opportunity to play on ESPN
again said ECU Director of
Athletics Mike Hamrick. "We
have developed a positive rela-
tionship with the people there
and ESPN has recognized the
tremendous atmosphere we
have had in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium on their previous trips
to Greenville
EaH Carolina played Miami
last season on ESPN with the
Pirates winning 31-6 at the
Orange Bowl. ECU also made
television appearances in 1996
nn ESPN2 in games against
Southern Mississippi, Virginia
Tech and North Carolina State.
The Southern Miss contest was
plaved in (ireenville.
PIRATES BY THE NUMBERS FOR THE 1996 SEASON
351
The rushing total recorded by RB Scott Harley last season against NX. State. That repre-
sents the ninth best single game effort in NCAA history and best ever by a sophomore.
158.6
The average rushing yards per game by Harley in '96.
68
The number of spots improved upon by ECU in the national total defense rankings over
the past four years. The Pirates ranked 37th in the NCAA in '96 for total defense, up
from their 105th ranking in '92.
50
ECU sent the Wolfpack home with their tails between their legs with a 50-29 win. That
was the Pirates' highest point total in 31 games.
24
The average yards per reception for SE Larry Shannon. That figure led the nation last sea-
son, according to the final '96 NCAA statistics.
8
The average number of victories registered by ECU over the past three seasons.
3
The consecutive number of winning seasons recorded by the Pirates.
What U tCV
known for?
1. Pirate football
2.The new rec center
3. The new stadium
4. Medical School
5. Business School
6. Education Dept.
eastcarolinian urges you to
drink responsibly this semester!





m - -
"iil�:iiBB
22 Tuesday, August 19. 1997
mkm'Ls
The East Carolinian
Athletic Director forecasts bright future
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
Recently I sat down with Athletics
Director Mike Hamrick, who was
appointed in 1995, and asked him
questions regarding the outlook of
ECU athletics and the success of
the sports programs at ECU.
TEC: ECU athletics has really bern
on the rise. What is the biggest changeyou
have seen sinre your arrival?
Hamrick: I think probably the
level of support we're receiving. It
keeps increasing each year. The vis-
ibility and respect our program is
starting to receive right now. I think
that has been a big change in the
short time, to our softball teams, to
our track teams, to our basketball
teams clear out to our 8-3 football
team.
TEC: How important is it that the
fans, especially the freshmen, fill'the stands
for every football game in the fall?
Hamrick: First of all, we have a
great schedule this year, a great
home schedule. Students have
excellent seats, and it is a very, very
exciting atmosphere around the
football game. I'll be quite honest
with you, our student support here
has been very good compared to
other athletics directors at their
schools that I talk with. Everyone is
struggling to get students to come
to their athletic events. You know
sometimes we don't have as many
here as we would like to, on given
days our students have been very,
very supportive of our football pro-
gram and our athletic program in
whole. I think it's important that
students are here, because students
set the tone for the atmosphere that
is in the stadium, i mean the enthu-
siasm and their showing up. We
can't look across that stadium and
see empty seats and, now that we're
going to add an additional 8,000
seats it's even more important that
our students fill up some of those
seats.
TEC: Tali about the national televi-
sion exposure ECU has gotten the past
few years and the exposure ECU hopes to
get his year.
Hamrick: The Cincinnati game
will be Thursday night (Nov. 13) on
ESPN. It's very important that we
have that stadium full because this
football program is exposing this
entire university and the students
who are here, the people who work
here, the alumni, and we want the
whole nation to see a full stadium,
an enthusiastic stadium. And,
Amanda, the number one reason
why ESPN likes to do our games
from here Thursday night is the
enthusiasm and a lot of that comes
from our students. I think it is
important for our students to fill
that stadium for not only that game,
but all the television exposure
games that we get.
TEC: Talk about Conference USA
and the impact it will have on ECU.
Hamrick: This will be the first
time since 1976 that we'll be play-
ing for a conference championship.
Therefore the Memphis, Southern
Miss and Cincinnati games really
mean something. We're playing for a
championship and we're playing for
an opportunity to go to the Liberty
Bowl, with an automatic bid into the
Liberty Bowl. We're tied into a bowl
game now, whereas the last 20 years
we have not been, so the conference
is important to us. Every week we
get to look at the conference stand-
ings and see where we are and
who's beating who, and who plays
who and I think it's just going to add
an extra dimension to our football
TEC: The women's teams have expe-
rienreda greater amount of success recent-
ly. Can you talk about the women's pro-
grams and how they are rounding out the
entire success of the athletics at F.Cl'?
Hamrick: Well that has been a
priority for me since day one to have
a well rounded program. Our soft-
ball team won a school record of 49
games. Our women's track team fin-
ished second in the CAA. We have
some outstanding athletes. I think
our 4x100 meter relay team is one of
the tops in the country. Michelie
Clayton, one of our throwers, has
qualified for the NCAA meet. Our
women's swim team has won the
Colonial the past two years since
I've been here. Our entire program
is getting better and better. We're
not where we want to be by any
means, but we're taking steps to
improve our programs.
TEC: How are some of the snudler
programs at ECl' important to the ath-
letic department?
Hamrick: They're important
from the stand point that we want a
well rounded program. There's only
so much exposure that your program
can get and obviousK football is our
high visibility sport. Football is our
major revenue sport and that gets
the exposure, but that doesn't keep
our other sports from doing well. As
Stadium addition faces continued delays
Mick smith
STVFF WRITFR
Dowdy Ficklin stadium will not be
entirely finished by September 13,
when ECU is scheduled to play its
first home football game against the
Wake Rrcst Demon Deacons.
This season, ECU will play five
of their 11 games at home. The sta-
dium, which started its construction
in the late part of last fall, is sup-
posed to increase in size by 8,000
seats with the addition of an upper
deck. That would boost the seating
capacity of Dowdy Ficklin stadium
to about 42,000.
Officials are not certain as to
when the upper deck will be com-
pleted.
"Vtfe really don't know when the
stadium will be finished completely.
Right now we are taking things day
by day Henry fcnSant, Associate
Athletic Director of ECU said.
"Hopefully it will be finished by the
third game
ECU faces off against the
University of South Carolina
Gamecocks in the third week of this
season. After that, the Pirates have
three other home dates listed on
their schedule. Teams to visit
Greenville will be Southern
Mississippi, Memphis, and
Cincinnati. As of this date the
Cincinnati game is
scheduled to be tele-
vised on ESPN.
As for the delay in
construction, VanSant
says that it's the normal
type of construction
delays, sort of like what
happened to the
Student Recreation
Center.
However, some of the
seats in the upper level
have been sold already.
"Those seats, that
have already been sold
have been reassigned
VanSant said. "These
reassigned seats will not
restrict student seating.
Students will have the
same amount of seats
available
VanSant is hoping
that the tickets that
have been sold already
won't have to be refund-
ed. Rr now, he in not
expecting an overflow of
people.
VanSant still expects
a big turnout for this
season, even with the
construction delays. For
now, ECU football fans will have to
be happy with the seating as it
stands.
The upper deck expansion project, struck with delays,
will hopefully be ready for the third home game.
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
MARK A. WARD
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Mike Hamrick
ECU Athletic Director
they do well, they will continue to
get exposure.
TEC: Coaches are very important to
all sports and we have some great i vm hes
here. What makes our coaching personnel
so special?
Hamrick: The heart and soul of
this program is the coaches. The
coaches are the ones who do the
recruiting. They're with the ath-
letes day to day. They make the
decisions on the field off the field.
on and off the courts, and I think,
for the most part, we have a real
good coaching staff that are com-
mitted and we just need to keep
trying to provide them with
resources so they can be successful.
TEC: II 'here do you set ECl' athlct-
us over the next ft years?
Hamrick: Well. I'd like to think
that from a conference standpoint
all of our sports are competing year
in and year out for conference
championships and competing for
the post season bids and invitations
that go along with those conference-
championships. We can see us in
the NCAA tournaments and have-
some All-Americans and, at the
same time, continue to have good
quality student athletes in our pro-
gram. That's where Id like to see
us, and we're making small steps
towards getting there.
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23 Tuesday, August 19, 1997

)0l
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The East Carolinian
Under New Management
Wyndham Court Apartments
Dockside Duplexes
� 2 Bedrooms & 1 Bath Units
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Kitchen Appliances & WasherDryer hook-ups
Pets Okay With Deposit
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561-RENT
Now Taking Applications for fall semester
Chancellor talks ECU athletics
AIAI) Ross
SPUKTS Kl)l TDK
Since 1987, Chancellor Richard Fakin
has seen the ups and downs of ECl'
athletics. In recent years there have
been more ups rhan downs with all
sports at ECl .
Whether it's from football to track
to Softball to basketball, both men's
and women's athletics continue to
dominate in every contest.
The dominant, most visual sport
at ECU is football. The Pirates have
continued to excel with each and
every game and each year are gaining
more national television exposure on
ESPN and ESPN2.
"The Pirate foocball team the past
several years has been verv success-
ful Eakin said. "Tracing back to the
Bill Lewis era (1989-1991) and the
East Carolina victors over North
Carolina State in the Peach Bowl, in
what was the best year we've had in
recent history through today
That success has resulted in ECl!
becoming a new member of
Conference USA. This season will
mark the inaugural season of confer-
ence play. ECU has been an indepen-
dent foocball team since the end of
the 1976 season when they were a
part of the Southern Conference.
"We will be playing in Conference
USA as a full member this year and for
the first time that membership carries
with it a number of advantages to our
university Eakin said. "First of all, it
makes scheduling a lot easier.
Secondly it provides us with an oppor-
tunity year in and year out to play in
bowl games
ECU was extended an invitation
to play in the Liberty Bowl, while it
was still an independent team in 1994
and lost to Illinois 0-3(). However, the
next year they came back and
avenged that loss with a 19-13 tri-
umph over Stanford in the Liberty
Bowl. List season they weren't invit-
ed. With the affiliation of Conference
USA they will have a chance to com-
pete for a conference championship
and the Liberty Bowl vict(y year in
and year out.
Eakin believes the head football
coaches at ECU have done a.i effi-
cient job building up rhe prnsmim and
bringing in gifted athletes on and off
the field.
"We have had such great success
under coaches Lewi and (Steve)
Logan Eakin said. "They both have
been ideally suited to the times here
at the university. They have brought
to our university athletes who arc first
rate citizens of the community, who
have demonstrated that they arc good
students
But football isn't the only thing on
these athletes' minds, academics has
been a major emphasis with the team
and that has been demonstrated with
the team being recognized by the
College Football Association. For the
past several years, ECU has been on
the honor roll of universities in which
70 percent or more
of the football play-
ers have graduated.
"That. I think, is
something that's
very important to
say about our foot-
ball team
One of the main
interests for fans
and players is the
renewed rivalrv with
N.C. State Not
since 1987 have
these teams played
a regular season
game and ECU
came out on cop 32-
14. Last season these teams battled it
out in the Carolina Panthers Stadium
and ECl' again came out on top 50-
29.
"1 am delighted that the series has
been resumed and, as you know, we
played the first of those resumed
series last year in Charlotte Eakin
said. "That was a wonderful experi-
ence for East Carolina people. VJc are
anxious to continue that relationship
and hope the friends and supporters
of East Carolina continue to exhibit
the fine sportsmanship they have
shown in recent years in connection
with this contest.
An upper deck that will add an
additional 8,000 seats to Dovvdy-
l-icklcn is currently being constructed
and it is important that all students
attend the games and fill every seat.
"There are two things I would ask
of the new students arriving on .am-
pus this summer and fall and that is
they would come to the football game
early so they can come for the open-
ing fesriviries and kickoff and also rn
stay right on through the game
Eakin said.
ITie ECU football team has sur-
" am delighted that
the series has been
resumed and, as you
know, we played the
first of those resumed
series last year in
Charlotte
Chancellor Richard
Eakin
prised many opponents and come
through late in the game, but the stu-
dents' stands were virtually empty, so
no one was there to cheer the Pirates
on to victory in the last remaining
moments.
"Coach Logan is often fond of say-
ing that we are a team that is geared
to winning on the last play of che
game and while that may sound like a
cliche, I have seen it happen so many
times that I have become a believer in
that Eakin said.
"Noc only has football endured
great success recently;but so have sev-
eral other sports around campus. The
track team had outstanding
spring meets, placing sev-
eral runners and relay
teams in the number one
position at meets around
the country. The women's
swim team won its third
Colonial Athletic
Association championship,
while the Softball team fin-
ished second in the Big
Souch Conference. The
men's and women's basket-
ball teams experienced
great success with che
Lady Pirates playing in the
CAA championship game.
"fe are showing consider-
able improvement in chese sports
chat are typically played in che CAA
Eakin said. "Women's softball was
simply stunning in cerms of its suc-
cess the way chey represented East
Carolina Our men's and women's bas-
kecball ceams are showing very impor-
canc growch and developmenc wich
che leadership of coaches (Joe)
Dooley and (.Anne) Donovan
The success of women's sports at
ECU continues co excel as many
more of the teams are bringing home
conference titles or are closely in the
hum co bring home che title.
"Vfomen's sports ac Ease Carolina
have prospered in recenc years
Eakin said. "Ic's largely due co bring-
ing cogether a very fine cadre of
coaches, but it's also because of che
efforts of the athlecic adminiscrarion.
By chac, I mean che achletic director's,
both Dave Han (now at Florida
State) and Mike Hamrick (current
.AD) have been dedicated to making
improvements in women's athletics
ECl I athletics is on rhe rise and is
only going up year by year. It's a grear
time to a be a Rrare fan.
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24 Tuesday. August 19, 1997
StlOl
!
The East Carolinian
Club sports present opportunities for all
TR M 1. W H W H
I s S I s I I MMlKIs HllliiK
Students who want to get involved
with ECU athletics but are not
quite sure how ma find the answer
in club sports.
From volleyball to ultimate fris-
bee, and even underwater hockey
participating in club sports is a fun
way for students to enjoy athletics.
With approximately 20 clubs
open to anyone interested, there are
countless opportunities available for
all of you Pirates out there with a
competitive edge.
Most of the club sport teams
practice anywhere from two to three
times a week, dedicating their time
to developing team unity and
improving skills in their respective
sport.
Heather Southerland, a member
of the Women's Volleyball club,
encourages all who are interested to
come out and get involved.
"As a member of a club sport
team, vou get a chance to really take
a part in ECU athletics, and also the
opportunity to work closely with
other people your age that have sim-
ilar interests Southerland said.
The Women's Volleyball club,
like many others, competes against
teams from other schools along the
east coast.
For those of you looking for some-
thing a little different from the rest,
underwater hockey may be the club
"or vou. Started in the 1950's bv
scuba divers who wanted to stay in
shape during their offseason, under-
water hockey is played with a four
pound puck and is similar to ice-
hockey in terms of positions and
team set-ups.
Ed's underwater hockey team
practices twice a week at Minges
pool. Rob Church, an active member
and past president of the club, says
there is much to be gained bv get-
ting involved.
"Playing this sport gives you a
great cardiovascular workout
because you are constantly moving
Church said. "Also, there is alwavs :i
door open for leadership skills to be
gained
Tim Doran was one of a group of
26 fortunate enough to have the
opportunity to travel to Sacramento.
(A, in late May to represent ECI at
the National Ultimate Frisbee tour-
nament. Finishing third behind
Stanford, the team is another of the
unique clubs offered at ECU.
"I Itimate Frisbee is a mixture of
basketball, football and soccer
I )nr in said. "It's so much fun to play.
"r even to watch, and best of all vou
get to travel with a group of people
that are your best of friends
Most of the clubs kick off their
seasons when classes begin. Other
club spurts not alreadv mentioned
include: disc golf, women's ultimate
frisbee, women's field hockey, in-line
hockey, men's and women's lacrosse,
kayaking, men's and women's rugby,
racijuetball. men's volleyball, water
skiing, swimming and several martial
arts programs.
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training. Training that builds
your character, confidence and
decision-making skills. Again,
words other courses seldom use.
But they're the credits you need to
succeed in life. ROTC is open to
freshmen and sophomores with-
TeAPJrshiSi �ut obligation and requires
�� about five hours per week. Reg-
ister this term for Army ROTC.
(Above) Rugby is a growing sport on campus. (Left) Ultimate fris-
bee has seen success the past few years with national titles.
Here Pete Gutowski throws to a teammate this past June against
Standford in the national finals where they finished third.
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25 Tuesday. August 19, 1997
0!
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The East Carolinian
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to Smj?
Write a Letter to the Editor
All letters to the editor must be typed,
250 words or less and include
name, major, year, and phone number.
Send your letter to
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Changes ahead for men's soccer
TRAO I.Al'BACH
ssisTvr SI'OKTS EDITOR
Head Coach Will Wiberg has big plans
for ECU's men's soccer team.
Coming off a 5-14-0 record last sea-
son, Wiberg is determined to com-
bine confidence with consistency out
on the field to make this year one for
the books.
Returning to lead the Pirates as
team captain is senior Jay Davis, along
with co-captains Brett Waxer and Jon
Smiley.
Joining Wiberg, along with assis-
tant coach Chris Padgett, will be Jeff
Oberg. Oberg comes to ECU as a
1995 graduate 'of Virginia
Commonwealth University with a
degree in physical education. A four-
year goalkeeper for the Rams, Oberg
was a member of VCU's 1993 team,
which, finishing 15-3, ranked 23rd by
the National Soccer Association of
America.
As part of the Coionitil Athletic
.Association, the men's soccer team
has a schedule jam packed with chal-
lenges, including top teams such as
William and Maty and James
MEN'S SOCCER
AUGUST
31 ELON COLLEGE
SEPTEMBER
4 Citadel
GREENVILLE
Charleston. SC
2 P.M.
7 P.M.
6 Charleston Southern Charleston, SC 2 P.M.
For hither scheduled events in Men's Soccef check with The East Cat'oilmanevery
Tuesday and Thursday in the Sports Section.
Madison.
"Our goal is to start the season out
on the right foot by picking up some
wins at the top of our schedule
Wiberg said. "I'd love to see us go into
a game as the underdogs and come
out with a win. That could do a lot for
the program as a whole
New faces to look for on the field
include freshman Nick Errato. from
Cary, N.C freshman Scott Ibkorney,
from Charlotte, and sophomore Zach
Johnson, coming to ECU from
Furman University. All three men join
the Pirates as members of the
Olympic Development Program.
"One of our biggest challenges will
be getting the guys in here and get-
ting to know each other's style before
the first game Wiberg said.
Last year's team suffered 10 of its
14 losses by only one or two goals.
Wiberg hopes that this year's group
will be able to fight back and turn
such games around for more Pirate
victories.
"Being out on the field, the play-
ers need to realize that it's not the
end of the game just because the
opponents are up one goal on us
Wiberg said. "It's important to stay
focused and realize that with so many
minutes left in the game, anything is
possible
Many of the games posted on this
season's schedule are to be played
SEE M. SOCCER PAGE 29
Lady Pirates kick off with experience
WOMEN'S SOCCER
Tracy Laibach
ASSISTANT SPOUTS EDITOR
With 17 of its 22 members return-
ing from last season, the ECU
Women's Soccer team will be start-
ing their year off as a unified team.
Senior Captains Stacie Cause,
from Jacksonville, NC, and Sheila
Best, of Cary, NC. will be two of
four returning seniors to step up
and lead the Lady Pirates in the
direction of victory. Cause was the
leading scorer for ECU last season.
Courtney Jurcich, of Springfield.
'a, transferred from N.C. State last
year and. after suffering from sever-
al injuries in her junior year, is
expected to be another valuable
team leader. Also from Jacksonville,
NC, Jennifer Venters will be anoth-
er to provide leadership for the
team. Venters is known best for the
AUGUST
20 University of Oklahoma Scrimmage)
30 Liberty University
SEPTEMBER
3 Barton College
6 fladford University
7 Virginia Tech
HOME
HOME
Away
Away
4 p.m.
2 p.m.
4 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
for hither scheduled events in Women's Soccer check with The East Carolinian
every Tuesday and Thursday in the Sports Section.
depth she provides at the goalkeep-
er position.
Head Couch Neil Roberts said
the experience the girls are bring-
ing with them in to the game this
year is something that the team
lacked last season.
"The girls are returning this
time with their feet wet Roberts
said. "They know what to expect
and they know what is expected of
them, which makes them stronger
The Lady Pirates finished last
season 7-11-2. a record that
Roberts feels will be improved with
good ream chemistry
SEE W. SOCCER PAGE 21
FREE RANGE
TOES
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(Inside r3icycle Post)
Downtown Greenville
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26 Tuesday, August 19. 1997
spoils
The East Carolinian
Runners hope to recap solid season
Tracy l.ubach
ASSISTANT SPORTS F.DITOR
According to Head Coach John
Welbom, last year was the best that
ECU's Men's Cross Country team
has seen in over 20 years.
Finishing third at the Colonial
Athletic Association Championships
and eighth at the North Carolina
State meet, the Pirates did more
than make a solid showing last sea-
son.
Returning to lead the men this
year from Wilmington, Del is junior
Jamie Mance. Mance was All-State
and All-Conference last season after
finishing seventh overall at the CAA
tournament.
"Jamie gets every ounce he has
out of his talent Welbom said. "He
is one of the team's most motivated
and dedicated members
Also returning as the number two
runner is Jeremy Coleman, of
Williamsburg, &. Coleman and
Mance are two of eight
Icttermcn to return.
Welbom, assisted by
Assistant Coach Mike
Ford, says that he expects
this year to be even better
than last.
"We are really going to
have to hustle to have cite
success that we saw last
season, but I am confi-
dent that the guys will
pull through Welbom
said. "We have lots of tal-
ent coming back from last
year plus we have some
additions to our roster
that will really help the
team out
Among the new faces
to look for are Steve
Arnold, from Woodbridge,
Va, and Stuart Will, from Lilburn, Ga.
Both are coming to ECU as freshman
with excellent credentials.
Welbom said that much of the
program's success lies within the
hands of Ford, who has been with
ECU for five seasons now.
"Coach Ford puts his whole heart
into the program Welbom said.
"He gives it all that he's got, and he
truly is one of the team's most valu-
able assets
No big changes will be seen this
year for men's cross country. Welbom
said that he and Ford plan on run-
ning this year's program just as it has
been run in the past.
"We plan on building upon the
foundation that has been built with-
in the past five years Welbom said.
In working together and concen-
trating more on a team than an indi-
vidual win, the Pirates have been
successful due to their commit-
ments to each other and the cross
country program.
"Trie kids work hard, and they
really have a lot of respect for each
other Welbom said. "The closeness
of the group has a lot to do with our
success
The men will kick off their sea-
son on September 6 at the UNC-
Wilmington Seahawk Invitational.
All of the meets that ECU partici-
pates in are invitational meets with
anywhere from four to 25 teams pre-
sent. Of those members of the CAA,
Welbom predicts that William and
Mary and James Madison University
will once again be the teams to beat,
as they finished first and second
respectively at last year's conference
tournament.
"We are really aiming to close that
gap between William and Mary,
James Madison and ourselves
Welbom said. "George Mason and
UNC-Wilmington have also chal-
lenged us in the past, so our confer-
ence is packed with tough teams to
beat
MElT$�aQa$ COUNTRY
SEPTEMBER
n
27 WtHiam and Mary Invitational WiBiamsbm VA
OCTOBER
n
I
2S
Wilmington, NC
Chapel Bill. NC
Williamsburg, VA
Buies Creek, NC
Fayetteville, NC
Charlotte, NC
Iferth Carolina State Ptameionships at Charlotte
Fw futfw sehedated wants m Mw's &o�Cfjyfary died: with The East Caroftnizn&mhtsiw
8�l"Rwf5dayiflrte Sports Section.
WELCOME BACK PIRATES!
Dry Cleaning � Uniform Rentals � Laundromats
ITS RIGHT - ITS READY - ITS GUARANTEED
321-2111 756-9455 752-6117 756-6800 752-4299 756-6200
Bi�Forti 1 Carafe Eat Cntr. 111 E. 10mSt. 3114SEvtn�Sv 1B98Gmvi��Blvd. Stanton Squaw
25 OFF!
on your next
dry cleaning order
(includes alterations)
Only valid with student ID
Expires 9-31-97
Only 1 coupon per customer per order.
25 OFF!
on your next
dry cleaning order
(includes alterations)
Only valid with student ID
Expires 9-31-97
Only 1 coupon per customer per order.
B�u
t
eating Youip to be Victim?
Crime PREVENTION Js your 1 Defenseless
Programs Offered:
W Serf-Defense Training
� Akohol Awareness
�- Pirate Protection - Operation ID:
engraving service for your valuables
� Bicycle Registration
� Drug Awareness
Date RapeSexual Assault
Prevention Workshop
�� And more!
Blue Light Emergency Phones:
Push the button or lift the receiver on
these phones to connect directly to
the ECU police dispatfifer. A police
officer s dispatched iri&iediately to
your location. These phones are
located in various academic buildings,
elevators, outside residence halls, and
other areas of dfcnpu. These phones
are for your sabjusftihem to
report suspicion J�j� fty or to call for
an escort any tfnEJmrfeel uncom-
ECU Police are On Duty 24 Hours a Day
EMERGENCY: 9-1-1
Non-Emergency: 328-6787
TDD: 328-4827 K
ECU Police Night Patrol Escort:
(Student Patrol Unit) Call 328-6787,
or use campus blue light phone.
Sunday - Thursday: 8:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m.
Friday & Saturday: 9:00 p.ih. - 3:00 a.m.
Du
EAST
CAROLINA
TJNTVERSrrV
Visit our website to
anonymously report a crime:
www.ecu.edupoliceecupd.htm
Police Department
609 E. Tenth Street

Parking Lot Safety Tips:
Park as dose as possible
destination.
When nearby parking is
call for an escort.
Park in well lit areas.
Utilize ECU Transit whenever possible.
Lock your car doors.
Don't leave valuables (CDs, cell
phones, stereos, etc.) in plain view.
Jamie Manr.e, the number one
runner for the men's cross
country team, will look to guide
the Pirates to another winning
season. Head Coach John
Welbom, says last season was
the best they had in 20 years.
Mance and company hope for
another successful season.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF SPOUTS
INFORMATION
756-1234
Professionally managed by
Pro Management of
Greenville
fa
� 3 bedroom2 bath units
� watersewerbasic
cable included
all major kitchen
appliances
� cable hookups in all
rooms
�phone jacks in all
rooms
� washerdryer hookups
� central heat and air
conditioning
Attention
�Student Organizations!
Did you know. .Q
� All student organizations MUST register with
Student Leadership Development Progams.
Registration is due by September 10, 1997.
� All Student Origanizations now have a mailbox
located in the Student Leadership Development
Programs Office - please check yours as it contains
valuable and dated materials.
� Registration for "Get A Clue" is due by
September 5, 1997. The registration form is in
your assigned mailbox.
� The Student Leadership Development Programs
Office is here to help you and your organization!
Student Leadership Development Programs
109 Mendenhall Student Center
ECU-4796
0





2 7 Tuesday. August 19, 1997
0
The East Carolinian










ft
�H
Tueaday, Auouit 19, 1997
.spoils
Student Pirate Club offers unique benefits
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS KDITim
One club all spirited Pirate fans will
want to join is the Student Pirate
Club, (SPC).
If you've never heard of the SPC,
then you're missing out. This is the
best way to get the latest scoop on
ECU athletics and SPC offers exclu-
sive privileges to members only.
Last season members had first
pick on the N.C. State vs. ECU tick-
ets in Charlotte. While many stu-
dents camped out, the SPC mem-
bers had their tickets in hand.
This season since the big match-
up is in Raleigh, ECU students are
only allotted 1,000 tickets. Mark
Wharton, who's in charge of the
SPC, says currently they are working
on a plan to make sure some SPC
members get first pick again on the
tickets.
"V only have 1,000 tickets for
the students for the N.C. State
game on Nov. 22 Wharton said.
"We are trying to develop with the
athletic department co allot x-
amount of tickets, either 50 or 100
and allow Student Pirate Club mem-
bers a lottery for them
Wharton said the deal isn't done
yet, but things are looking up.
"It's in the working stages but
it's getting very positive reviews
Wharton said.
For those lucky enough to have
tickets ahead of time, a bus trip is in
the works for the ticket holders to
get to Raleigh.
As was the case last season, all
SPC members will get home football
and basketball tickets before the
start of each season in one bulk,
unlike non-members who must go
on a game-by-game basis throughout
the season.
During basketball season, the
SPC has an annual bus trip to one
away game to watch the men's team
play, and it looks like this season the
trip will head to watch the Monarchs
of Old Dominion. In the past it has
been to UNC-Wilmington.
Last season the SPC had its high-
est number of members with over
300. Wharton believes this season
could be even better.
"We're looking for '97 to be a very
good year just because of the excite-
ment with the football schedule and
the general excitement within the
town of Greenville and the universi-
ty Wharton said.
Another project currently being
worked on is having a cookout for
members before the Southern
Customer Appreciation
CELEBRATION
&d
Wednesday, August 20th
Through Sunday, August 24th
MISSES'KIM ROGERS
SPORPTOPS
11.99
Reg. 184)0. Misses' long sleeve
crew neck pull-over style
cottonpolyester knit tops from
Kim Rogers Sport are available
in solid colors. Sizes S-M-L.
LADIES'ASSORTED
PANTIES
25 off
Reg. 3.S0-9.00, SALE 2.62-
6.75. Basic and fashion style
panties from Shadowline,
Maidenform, Bali, Warners and
more. Sizes 5-10.
YOUNG MEN'S
LEVI'S 565� JEANS
31.99
Reg. 41.99. Save on Young
Men's Levi's 565 loose fit, boot
leg jeans. Assorted washes
available. Sizes 28-40 waist.
MEN'S & LADIES'
REEBOK9 SHOES
39.99
Reg. 49.99. Men's and Ladies'
white leather Reebok "Classic
Walker" walking shoes. Men's
and Ladies' sizes.
LADIES'
LEATHER COATS
25-30 off
Reg. 169.00-250.00. Save on
our entire stock of casual and
dressy leather coats from
Colebrook and Direct Action.
Ladies' sizes.
LADIES'MONEr&
MARVELLA� JEWELRY
G�t 1
Reg. 10.00-50.00. Choose from
earrings, bracelets, necklaces &
pins. But 2 pieces and get the
3rd, of equal or lesser value,
FREE.
JUNIORS'
SEPARATES
25 Off
Reg. 9.99-46.00, SALE 7.49-
34.50. Choose from a variety
of Juniors' separates in
assorted styles and colors.
Sizes S-L, 3-13. Not in all
SPECIALTY SIZED
COORDINATES
25 off
Reg. 42.00-54.00, SALE 31.50-
40.50. Save on Alfred Dunner
Tahitian Medley" coordinates
for Petites' and Today's Woman.
Sizes 6p-16p, 18w-22w.
YOUNG MEN'S
LEVI'S� T-SHIRTS
12.99
Reg. 18.00. Choose from an
assortment of Young Men's
screened t-shirts from Levi's.
Sizes M-XL
YOUNG MEN'S
SHORTS
19.99
Reg. 28.00. Young Men's
Nikoata twill shorts are
available in a variety of fashion
colors. Young Men's sizes.
NEWBORN INFANTS'
LAYETTE &SLEEPWEAR
30 off
Reg. 2.00-24.00, SALE 1.40-
16.80. Save on our entire stock
of Newborn and Infants'
Carter's layette and sleepwear.
Newborn and Infants' sizes.
ENTIRE STOCK
OF PILLOWS
50 off
Reg. 14.00-140.00, SALE 7.00-
70.00. Save on our entire
selection of pillows including
Dacron II, Super Firm and
more. Not in all stores.
LADIES"TRESHMAN"
LOAFERS
29.99
Reg. 39.99. Ladies' Mootsie
Tootsie "Freshman" stacked
heel loafers are available in
black or coffee. Ladies' sizes.
TRI-COASTAL
GIFT ITEMS
25 off
Reg. 6.00-26.00, SALE 4.50-
19.50. Great items for back to
school. Choose from agendas,
photo albums, address books
and more.
MEN'S JOCKEY�
UNDERWEAR
25 Off
Reg. 6.00-19.00, SALE 4.50-
14.25. Basic and contemporary
fashions including briefs, tee s,
boxers and sport styles. Sizes
M-XL, 32-44.
PORCELAIN OR
BRASS MINILAMPS
9.99
Reg. 14.99. Choose from brass
or porcelain mini lamps.
They're great for bathrooms,
hallways, foyers or any room
where you need a little light.
Not in all stores.
Insert Your Local Tagline Here!
The East Carolinian
Mississippi game.
"We are probably, before the
Southern Miss game, going to have
a cook-out for all members at
Bunting Field, which would be cov-
ered tent catered by Outback
Restaurant Wharton said. "We
would try to do similar with the bas-
ketball and baseball games
For those who like to take
charge, the SPC offers an executive
board which helps make decisions
in what is going to happen for the
year ahead. Come this fall, the SPC
will look to fill positions for those
interested in holding an office.
"They can be a voice from the
athletic department to the students
and have their cooperation
Wharton said. "We're really search-
ing for a rebuilt board
Now, with ail good things, there
is a cost involved, but you pay it
once a year and your privileges run
throughout the entire school year.
It's just 25 dollars and for such a
small price you get an abundance of
privileges. In fact, the money you
put forth is matched and you actual-
ly are a $75 member for one-third of
the price. And you build up points
during your college years if you con-
tinue through until you graduate.
So, it's a good idea to join as soon as
possible because you will have
points built up by graduation which
will put you ahead in the regular
Pirate Club, as compared to those
who don't join while in college.
Not only do you get benefits
now, but you are building up for
your post-college years which will
allow you even more benefits.
Interested persons can contact
Mark Wharton at 919-328-4540.
M. Soccer
continued from page 25
against other teams from North
Carolina schools. According to Coach
Wiberg, playing within the state
benefits the program.
"By playing lots of teams in state,
we can show a lot of our competitors
what our program is ail about, "
When said.
Trie Pirates will take on N.C.
State in early October, a matchup
that proves to be a true rivalry
regardless of the sport. Wiberg said
that he hopes to see more fans out at
the games to cheer the guys on.
"It's always good to have the
home team advantage Wiberg said.
"Every one of our wins last year was
a home victory, and having a crowd
there to show support for what you
awe doing is definitely important
And so, as the Pirate community
gets settled back into Greenville for
the fall semester, the men's soccer
team will cake their places on the
field once again. In combining those
with experience and those with tal-
ent, along with guidance from
Wiberg, Padgett, and Oberg, this
year very weU may end up in the
books.
W. Soccer
continued from page 25
"The core of the girls are
returning comfortable with each
other Roberts said. After playing
together as a team for a year, they
have been able to adjust to each
other on the field
Only five freshman faces will be
added to the roster this fall.
Leanne Mcinnis, of Raleigh, Erin
Cann, from Bordentown, N.J and
Katie Moran, of Oakton, Va. will be
posted as midfielders for ECU.
Additionally, Kim Sandhoff, all the
way from Waipahu, Hawaii, and
Jennifer Bush, of Havelock, N.C,
will join the team as forwards.
"I fully expect these five girls to
present the team with lots of ener-
gy and enthusiasm that will push
those returning Coach Roberts.
Of those teams part of the
Colonial Athletic Association, the
toughest matchups for the girls will
be William and Mary, James
Madison and George Mason
University, which Roberts refers to
as the "kingpins of the CAA Also
appearing on the list are N.C. State
and UNC Ashville.
"Having an upgraded schedule
is good for us Roberts said. "The
girls seemed to give their best
efforts last year when they were
playing the tougher teams. They
really like to face challenging
teams
Roberts, like many other coach-
es, is hoping to generate enthusi-
asm among students and other
Pirate fans about the soccer pro-
gram. As in most any sports, sup-
portive crowds are always a plus.
The Lady Pirates will kick off
their season with a home game
against Liberty University on
Saturday, August 30th at 2 p.m
n.
.
r
K





Welcome Back
ECU Pirates
� KROGER COUPON
KROGER 2, 1, 12, 5.25, SKIM,
FA T-FREE SKIM PLUS, BUTTERMILK OR CHOCOLA TE
Gallon
Milk
Each
wm
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Limit one gallon per customer with coupon and additional $15.00 purchase.
Coupon good through Saturday, Aug. 23, 1997.
CALIFORNIA
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usfe
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Assorted Varieties, Kroger j
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12-Gallon
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16-oz. Pkg.
Regular, Low Fat or
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WED THUR FRI SAT
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item & Prices Good in
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r
31 TuMday. August 19, 1997
sport
s
Tht Eatt Carolinian
Returning players key to volleyball team
Ellen walker
STAFF WHITER
Returning players senior Kari Koenntng (outside hitter), junior Kristin
Warner (outside hitter) and Shannon Kaess (outside hitter) will lead.the
Lady Pirate Vfolleybafl team into a new season coached by third-vear coach
KimWalker.
Junior transfers LaKeya Mason (middle hitter) from North Carolina A&T,
loni Ninni (outside hitter) from Western Carolina and Shannon Owens (set-
ter) will also help out die team with experience and skill. These upper class-
men will help in motivation and teamwork.
Half of the team consists of fretirrneri this yeat Althc inexperienced,
the new players wilt provide upcoming talent and will also allow for a deep
bench. Although the team has many freshmen, Walker still cannot assess who
the strongest ones tre�only rime will tefL
"This is a solid group of athletes who have good attitudes Walker said.
They are all really solid athletes
Only being at East Carolina for three years. Walker is still trying to build
up the strength of her team.
"We're still melting, because we are such a young team, but we will do
well this year Walker said about her young but very athletic team.
Walker has faith and confidence in the team this year.
"They are fun to watch, they hit the ball hard, play good defense and
enjoy playing together Walker said.
Main competitors North Carolina and North Carolina State will be the
ultimate test to finishing out on top.
"We wilt do weli, we get better every time, we learn from previous games
and of course from practice Walker said.
This young team will take the time to get to know each other. In order to
be successful, they have to be close like a family is. The team attended a
retreat together from August 8-10.
"The team really bonded and got to know each other Walker said. This
retreat also gave the players an opportunity to get to know one another's
playing style in a more intimate way
According to Coach Walker, these girls are a good group who most of all,
"They enjoy playing together
Women run for victories
Ellen Walker
STAFF WRiTF.K
Returning runners, senior Kerri
Harding and junior Karen
Reinhard, will lead the Lady
Pirates in leadership and motiva-
tion, and will give � touch of expe-
rience and confidence to the ECU
Women's Cross Country team.
Other strong runners include
senior Emily Linnemeier and
sophomore Robin Rates, who will
also help the team in experience
and talent.
"Well need five strong runners,
and the kev is, who that fifth run-
ner will be Coach Charlie "Choo"
Justice said.
Two incoming freshmen will
push the team over in the talent
department. Fran Iattie from
Lumberton, NC, was state cham-
pion last year in the one mile and
Becky Testa from McDonald, Ohio
was a top runner in various events.
These new-comers will provide a
new facet for the team and help
the girls in many areas.
"We are coming off our worst
year ever Justice said.
Actors contributing to last sea-
son's rut were a lot of injuries-
namery Bates which made her
miss most of the season, and
Linnemeier, who did not run last
year because she was studying
"Hopefully we will have less
injuries and more dedicated run-
ners this year Justice said.
Justice is hopeful that this
year's team will be just that.
"I want us � finish at the top
half of the conference this year
Justice said after their finish but
year of seventh place out of nine
teams. Trn excited about the new
girls coming in and I'm anxious to
rebound from last year and put the
team back up
Top competitors include
nationally ranked William and
Mary, and James Madison
University, who will be among the
team's ultimate quests for victory
and will test their dedication and
drive.
The key to success, according
to Justice, is that, "We have to run
faster arid the girls have to have
more confidence in thcimclvcs
that they can run well
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SWIMMING
Thur. Oct 16PurpleGoldM6W3 p.m.Home
Sat. Oct. 25College of CharlestonM6W10 a.m.Away
Sun. Oct. 26Georgia SouthernM6W1 p.m.Away
Sat. Nov. 1American UniversityM&WnoonHome
Sat. Nov. 8Old DominionM6W2 p.m.Home
Sun. Nov. 9William 6 MaryM6W1 p.m.Home
Sat. Nov. 15DavidsonM&WnoonHome
Nov. 20-22Nike CupM6WAISDayAway (Chapel Hill)
Sat. Dec. 6DukeM6W2 p.m.Away
Wed. Jan.Palm Beach RelaysM&W10 a.m.W. Palm Beach
Sat. Jan. 17RichmondM&W2 p.m.Away
Sat. Jan. 24UNC-WtlmingtonM&W2 p.m.Away
Sat. Jan. 31Virginia TechM&W1 p.m.Away
Wed. Feb. 18-
Sat. Feb. 21CAA ChampionshipM&WAll DayChatham, Va.
Feb. 25-28ECAC ChampionshipsM&WAH DaySeweil, NJ
March 19-21NCAAWOnlyAll DayMinneapolis, MN
March 26-228NCAAMOnlyAll DayAuburn, AL
1997 FALL GOLF SCHEDULE
SEPTEMBER
15-16 LibertySea Trail Fall Classic
29-30 UNC-WBelvedere Plantation Inv.
OCTOBER
13-14 State FarmRail Classic
27-28 ODUSeascape lntereollegi-2
NOVEMBER
34 Davidson College Fall Intercollegiate
Sunset Beach, NC
Wilmington, NC
Chattanooga, TN
Kitty Hawk, NC
Davidson, NC
mmmBmm�fimpmmimm
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
AUGUST
. II nffl&U Football Pick'Em Entries avail.
10 a.m. in SRC 128
Tires. 21 Flag Football Officials mtg. 9 p.m. in
SRC 202
SEPTEMMn
Tuts. 2 fltagfoattiilFB Preview reg. mtg.IM
Sports Cai&Ys Certification 5 p.m. in MSC 244
Thim. 4 VbiWyball Officials mtg. 9 p.m. in SRC
202
Tm. S VblleybaliPreviewlM.W, CR) Reg. mtg.
5 p.m. MSC 244
Tut. If inrtis Singles entry deadline 5 p.m. in
SRC 128
Tms. 23 Co-Rec Basketball reg. mtg. 5 p.m. MSC
244
Tttss. 23 Super Bail Doubles Golf entry deadline
5 p.m. SRC 128
Wtd. 2S frTtHrt. 21 Frisbee Golf Singles 3-6
p.m. Fristwr Goff Course
MSC-MendiBhalf Student Center
SR&StiHhm Recreation Center
Calt David Gaskins at 328-6387 for more informa-
tion.
.
MON TUfeS VWgD THORFR1 SAT SUN
-
W&WZ
7. am to 9 tun.
MORNING SHOW
� � ' "pS�
9 am to 12 pm
;j!
12 p.m. to 3 pm
tJtfljflWrtrjV i.�i
3 p.m. to 6 pm
BLUE NOTE CAFE
WOMEN'S ONLY HOUR
WMZmfflk
iinbii Aii ' wwMJiiBiU ,7' .
Afternoon Drive
TOP
Afternoon
Grateful
Dead Show
6 pm to 9 pm
Snsight
Fiii?l
9 p.m. to 12 a.m.
.C1 'yie
12 am to 3 am
3 am to 7 am
rW
o
Grateful
Dead
Show
1ETL
RETRO
SHOW
tZwZwvwy,
. ,� -
F
H
A
R
Listen for NEWS updates at 8 & 10 a.m. and 12.2.4 & 6 p.m. and SPORTS updates at 8:30 & 11:30 m. and 2:30.4:30 6 7:30 p.m.
91.3 FM
NOW SOUNDS
An independent A regional music mix
IUKNOTECAFE
A hmchtime mix of smooth jazz
WOMEN'S HOUR
An hour featuring women artists
RETRO SHOW
Music from the late 70s & 80s
INSIGHT
f hour news show
PIRATE TALK
1 hour sports show
ROOTS ROCK
Current, performance-oriented musk
from the college circuit
IRIE FM
Reggae show featuring old style artists
During the hours when we're not featuring a
specialty show, you can tune in our mix of
alternative rock.
REQUEST LINE
328-691.3
BBMOilBagraBWKTOi I'liW. WW �

- - . ��; � . - 'jt . .
��





32 Tmid�v. August 19, 1997
s
pon
s
The East Carolinian
Got
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vrr $S mttlfon to studUK
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with purchase. Offer good while supplies last.
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4 ECU Notebooks
$3.49
Pack includes 4 - 80 sh. count rwtebooksraflege
ruled, with assorted cokx covers, ECU Imprint
&�-3:00
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through August 31,1997
NEC 166 mmx, 15" SVGA, 32 MB RAM,
3.2 GB Hard Drive, 256 K Cache, 16x
CD ROM, 33.6 modem, MS Office '97,
3 year warranty$1,999
NEC Laptop, 133 mhz, 16 MB RAM,
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Edition, 32 MB RAM, 3 GB Hard Drive,
15" AV Monitor, 12x CD ROM, 33.6
modem, Software bundle $1,977
Apple� PowerMac 7300200: 32 MB
RAM, 2 GB Hard Drive, 15" AV Monitor,
12x CD ROM, Ethernet $2,720
Apple� Stylewriter 4500 color inkjet,
600 DPI, 5 ppm$ 267
Mac OS 8 $84.95
(plus youflg�t a $30 rebate if you already have OS 7.6)
Other Models and Manufacturer's Available!
Software and Hardware Priced
at Educational Discount by Manufacturers!
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sold by Dowdy Student Stores are provided in the store. If out of
warranty, service is avaiable forafee of $30 first hour, $20hr thereafter.
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�l� "���





AUGUST
1 fi Monday
� Complex Gifts:
Introducing the Artists of
Signature Home at Mendenhall
Gallery through Sept. 12.
� Hotshots at
Mendenhall and Student Rec.
Center from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Oi thursday
fln I Liar, Liar at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre through Aug.
23.
O O friday
� Pirate Underground
from 8 to 10:45 p.m. in
Mendenhall Social Room.
S E PT EMBER
4 thursday
Austin Powers at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre through
Sept. 6.
thursday
Pirate Underground
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Social Room.
5 friday
A Delicate Balance:
Six Israeli Pnotographers and
Norm Carolina to Israel
Photographic Project at Gray
Gallery through Sept. 24.
Gallery reception and lecture
series at 5 p.m.
14 thursday
Con Air at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre through Sept.
13.
IO friday
��� S RuHoIr
I'Mfll 1? t f 9

S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series:
Count Basie Orchestra at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium.
IE monday
P Africa, a Continent
Revealed at Mendenhall Gallery
through Oct. 3.
1�t tuesday
TravelAdventure
Series at 4 p.m. and 730 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre (dinner at 6
p.m. in Great Room): Holland,
Belgium and Luxemburg.
1� thursday
P Anaconda at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre through
Sept. 20.
Pirate Underground from 8-10:45
p.m. in Mendenhall Social Room.
O E thursday
4Lm 3 Mallrats at 8 p.m.
and Clerks at 11 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre.
26
friday
Clerks at 8 p.m.
Carmen will be performed Nov. H.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARKETING DEPT
and Empire Records at 11 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre.
PAPA 000 RUN RUN brings the beach to ECU Oct. 10 during Parent's Weekend.
PHOTO COURTESTY OF MARKETING DEPT
Ballet Hispanico will perform Nov. 13 as part of the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARKETING DEPT.
thursday
2 "7 Saturday
"�� Empire Records at
8 p.m. and Mallrats at 11 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre.
OZ tuesday
�P F Chew on Thi
"Exercise & Heart Disease" from
12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in Mendenhall
Underground.
OCTOBER
Wednesday
Visual Arts
Exhibition: "Cajun Music and
Zydeco" Southern Arts
Federation in Mendenhall Gallery
throuah Nov. 10.
sdai
Jerground
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Social Room.
I Saturday
� The School of Art
Faculty Exhibition at the Gray
Gallery through Oct 20.
Reception at 5 p.m. on Oct. 10.
Q thursday
Batman & Robin at
8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
through Oct. 11.
Surfs Up: Papa Doo Run Run at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Pirate Underground from 8-10:45
p.m. in Mendenhall Social Room.
IO monday
mw TravelAdventure
Series at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre (dinner at 6
p.m. in Great Room): Aiong the
Infracostal Waterway with Ken
Creed.
1C Wednesday
W S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series:
Quartetto Gelato at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
1�t thursday
Vr My Best Friend
Wedding at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre through Oct. 18.
Pirate Underground from 8-10:45
p.m. in Mendenhall Social Room.
Wednesday
Herbert Eckhoff,
Baritone Singer at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
" O thursday
mmm mW Speed 2 at B p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre through Oct.
25.
Pirate Underground
from 8-10:45 p.riV in Mendenhall
Social Room.
fiipflav
iu�9uay
Chew on This:
"Evolution of the BrainMind and
Horror Science Fictions" from 12-
1 p.m. in Mendenhall
Underground.
thursday
Carrie and Scream
at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
through Nov. 1.
Michael Cooper from 9 -11:30
a.m. and at 2 p.m. on Nov. 1 in
Wright Auditorium.
Starstruck Studios from 9 p.m2
a.m. in Mendenhall.
NOVEMBER
Saturday
Pirate Underground
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Social Room.
3 monday
TravelAdventure
Series at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre (dinner at 6
p.m. in Great Room): High
Country Adventure with John
Wilson.
8 Saturday
Artist as Activist:
Ecological Concerns in the '90s
at Gray Gallery through Dec. 3.
Reception and keynote lecture at
4 p.m. in Speight Auditorium on
Nov. 21.
1 monday
Jr Love Makes A
Family: Living in Lesbian and
Gay Families at Mendenhall
Gallery through Nov. 26.
1 3 thursday
" Pirate Undergrounc
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Social Room.
�1 if friday
� �� S Rudolo
S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series:
Carmen at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
IO tuesday
Chew on This
"Diving in the Antarctic" from 12-
1 p.m. in Mendenhall
Underground.
Id Wednesday
9 S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series:
Ballet Hispanico at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
thursday
Pirate Undergrounc
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
Social Room.
24 friday
� Hans Brinker and
The Silver Skates from 9 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. and at 2 p.m. on
Nov. 22 at Wright Auditorium.
DECEMBER
14 thursday
� School of Art
Christmas Exhibition and Sale at
Gray Gallery through Dec. 13.
IO thursday
Ci "Folk Photographer
W.R. "Pictureman" Mullins
Southern Arts Federation at
Mendenhall Gallery through Feb.
12,1998.
a
I
I





r
34 Tuesday, August 19, 1997
IIH'SlVie
Gallery hosts
special exhibition
Festival promises fun for all
STFF HF.POHTS
The ECU School of Art is trying a
new approach to welcoming back
students this year.
The school is presenting a special
exhibition featuring graduate stu-
dent art work at the Wellington B.
Grav Gallery from today until Friday.
The exhibition will conclude with a
reception Friday, beginning at 5 p.m.
at the gallery Both the exhibition
and reception arc free and open to
the public.
The exhibition will feature the
work of 20 students and more than
i 30 pieces of artwork representing
various media, Paintings, drawings,
sculptures, ceramics, metals, woods
and computer generated art will all
be pan of the exhibition.
Refreshments will be served at
the reception and music will be pro-
vided bv disc jockey Gary Greenway
The'Gray Gallery is located off of
5th and Jwvis Sweets in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center. The gallery is open
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday
through Ftiday and until 8 p.m. on
Thursdays. On Saturdays, the gallery
is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information, contact Gil
Lcebrick, gallery director, at 328-
6336.
JENNIFER L. TAFE
STAFF WHITER
CDreviews
Two Dollar Pistols
On Down the Track
9 OUT OF 10
ANDY TURNER
I.IFF.STTl.F. MITO�
If you hate real country music, then surely you'll
hate Two Dollar Pistols. Two Dollar Pistols are the
real deal Lucille. Unlike fellow Trhngk country
boys, The Backsliders and Whiskeytown, Two
Dollar Pistols are 200 percent undiluted country
They don't play the Bakersfield-infiuenccd country
rock of The Backsliders or the Rolling
StonesReplacements gutter country of
Whiskeytown. Two Dollar Pistols suggest nary a
rock-influence, instead taking their cue straight
from the honkv-tonk heroes of the '50s; Lefty Friz Ernest Tubb and Webb
l-ierctr would be proud. If it were I957 instead of �7, th��e guys would also
i worried after listening to the Two Dollar Pistols' debut album, On � tkr
The familiar country themes of alcohol, depression and honky-tonk angels
Classes are fining and students are back in
Greenville jusi in time to be a part of the biggest
gospel event ever to take place in Pitt County
Family Music Festival "97 will take place on
August 23rd at noon in the Greenville Town
Commons. Building on the phenomenal success
of last year's festival, organizers anticipate dou-
bling the attendance at this year's outing.
Don't be misled by the name, though; the
Family Music Festival is for everyone. In addition
to national gospel recording artists, the Festival
will also feature stand-up comedy, modern dance,
the ECU Gospel Choir, the ECU Steppers, spe-
cial guest DJ Slide and guest speaker Mayor
Nancy Jenkins.
Those wishing to take a break from the per-
formances can take their pick from vendors sell-
ing everything from pizza to tee-shirts. Children
haven't been forgotten either, storyteller Peggy
Griffin will be on hand to provide entertainment
especially for kids. Family Music Festival 97 has
something for everyone.
"We'd really like to see everyone in Pitt
Countv become involved in this; we'd love to
have students from East Carolina out there said
Jon Hartey, one of the event organizers.
Last year's success was surprising to organiz-
ers because it was slated to be a small show, draw-
ing an audience of a few hundred people. In spite
of minimal
promotional
efforts
though,
Family Music
Festival '
turned out to be
the biggest
gospel event to
take place in
Pitt County.
One of the most
interesting
aspects of last
year's Family
Music Festival
was the diversi-
ty of the audi-
ence. Over
3,000 people
converged on
the Greenville
Town Commons
TJT�rKviJpZp�Tw�ad the gospel through music when they perorm Aug Ti as part of tht Famoy Musk
Festival.
MWTO COURTESY OF IW SURIES
Gospel performrJohn Butler will
also perform at the festival.
PHOTO C0MTESV OF SOURCE ONE
to listen to an amazing array of gospel performers.
This year's showcase of performers is even more
varied and impressive.
"This festival draws all kinds of people, said
Shonda Bullock, another organizer. "We were excit-
ed to see that people of all races were represented
in the audience
This diverse audience and positive message to
the community has drawn the support and interest
of manv people in Greenville. Mayor Nancy
Jenkins, a featured speaker at this year's Festival,
was eager to become involved in the event.
"We were realrv surprised at the help that Mayor
Jenkins gave us said Harlev. "I expected a nod or
sci. . vrxal support, iut she really went out if her
way to help us out as much as she could. It's really
flattering when important people like that become
so interested in a project you're working on he
said.
Family Music Festival 97 will feature over 40
acts; most are nationally known professional record-
ing artists. Music of all types will be featured
including traditional and contemporary black
gospel, southern gospel and everything in between.
"We realrv feel that reaching young people is
important Harley said. Performers like Israel The
Warrior target a young crowd with a positive mes-
sage dnwn from their own life experience.
In fact, the principal focus of Family Music
Festival '7 is to improve Pitt County and
(Jrecm ille. Sponsors Source One C lommunkations,
WEIS-FM, A Taste of Heaven and Grandk's
Limousine Service will donate the profits from the
Fcstiv to several lcal organizations.
The lieneficiaries of these donations arc the
Creative Living Center, Little Wille Center,
Operation Sunshine and the Meatal Health
Association in Pitt County.
r
Vrgetiot pul
the wool over your
eyes about our
roomy 1,2 & 3
Eastbrook A Village Sreen
204 Eortbrook Drive
Srtenville, NC 27856 .
(919)792-5100 W
Visit us today!
Tfie East Carolinian began publishing
in 1925. And white our name has
changed since that time, our commit-
ment to keeping the campus informed
hasn't wavered.
But don't get us wrong. We aren't
interested in retiring. As a matter of
fact, we feel like we're just entering
our prime.
With our recently revamped look and
the debut of our electronic edition next
week, we feel much younger than 72.
See what you think. Pick us up every
Tuesday and Thursday. Let us know if
you think we look old.
Carolinian
L
"5
r
r
h
tVkft





ffmfim
Tuesday. August 19. 1997
IT
UK
style
The East Carolinian
reviews
Whiskeytown
Strangers Almanac
9 OUT OF 10
Jennifer Legc-ett
STAFf WRITER
Local Raleigh sccnester music super-
stars have finally hit it big with their
new album Strangers Almanat, a bril-
liant follow-up to their first release
Fa unless Street.
Though Whiskeytown is currently
being billed as an alternative country
act, their music is much more remi-
niscent of The Rolling Stones with
hints of Uncle Tupelo and Gram
Parsons. Their apparent homage to
The Replacements is also hard to miss
as lead singer Rvan Adams seems to be
going for that mil Westerberg style
(and it's more than just the hair).
Srangers Amanor is full of the
drunken poetics of 22-year-old
Adams, lead singer and guitarist.
Writing about his life around familiar
Raleigh haunts Sadlacks and
Hiilsborough Street, Adams turns
hanging out, drinking, breakups and
the dissatisfaction of dairy life into
beautifully crafted songs that are far
from the trite and typical lyrics of
those tcar-in-the-beer country songs.
This is good rock n' roll with a little
violin and steel pedal added for char-
acter.
One of the best songs on the CD is
"Excuse Me While I Break My Own
Heart Tonight With backup vocals
by Alejandro Escovedo, most recently
of the garage rock band Buick
Mac Kane, this song rocks along with
the heartfelt intensity of a soured rela-
tionship. You can tell that someone's
heart has definitely been ripped out
ECU Business Sirvkis
Doing INIiatcwtrHIMitt" to pro
What about PARKING?
Parking on campus it by permit only. Parkins �� arc potted
with signs designating the type of permit required for that area.
All vehicles parked on university property must be registered
with the Department of Parking and Transportation Services
and have a valid parking decai. 10 register your
vehicle, visit Parking and Transportation Services,
305 E. 10th St to complete a vehicle
registration card. Questions? Can 38S-4894.
Parking and Transportation Services continually seeks additional
parking locations for students and staff. During the year, parking lot
designations may change m order to better utilize parking areas.
New parking opportunities or tot adjustments will be announced
when warranted.
Need to know if CLASSES are CANCELLED?
Call 388-0009, the Campus imcrgency Hotline. K �l2
carries recorded information regarding class delays or lf-
canccllations due to severe weather. This recorded f
information is also broadcast on AM530 radio, the
ECU Parking information Station.
Expecting some MAIL?
Student mail is delivered Monday through Saturday to
resident mailboxes by University Mail Services. Mail Services
also provides a US Postai Service customer window for you
to purchase stamps, mail packages and overnight express,
buy money orders, and pick up packages sent to you via US
mail. Mail Services is located just west of the mail, near the
cupola. Questions? Call 3SS-6091.
Need to COPY your class notes or term paper?
Self-service, card operated copiers are located in Joyrter Library,
some classroom buildings, and at some community service desks.
Full service, RAPID COPY CENTERS are located In Joyner library,
as well as in the Printing 4 Publications Building, and at the School
of Medicine, Brody OE-101. Rapid Copy Joyner is open daily,
including evening hours. Additional services such as full-color
digital copies and color output, binding, typesetting,
laminating, and faxing are also available through RAPID COPY.
Need BOOKS? a COMPUTER? new SOFTWARE?
some cool ECU CLOTHES? class SUPPLIES?
Dowdy Student Stores, located in the Wright Building, offers a great
selection of merchandise and friendly service catered specifically to the
needs of ECU students! We strive to keep our pricing in line with
competitors, and then we return our profits, less expenses, to the students
through scholarships and support of student activities. By shopping Dowdy
Student Stores, you are helping us to help the students of ECU.
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores is the leading
contributor to ECU scholarship funds!
Over 34 MILLION DOLLARS in USED
textbooks available for Fall semester
$" General reading books & reference
$ Computer hardware a software
P School a art supplies
$" The coolest ECU apparel
$" ECU room decor & accessories
Gifts, ECU jewelry A morel
Need EMERGENCY assistance?
Call the ECU Police directly by using
any blue light phone, or call 9-1-1
from any campus phone. ECU Police
are on duty 84 hours a day,
7 days a week to assist you.
Walking alone at night?
Dial 328-6787 or use a blue light phone to call for
a Student Patrol Escort. They'll escort you
between campus buildings andor parking lots!
What is the ECU 1 CARD?
The ECU 1 Card will become the official
identification card for ECU in spring semester,
1998. The card to now in its early stages of
implementation. Freshman and transfer students
received their ECU 1 Card during orientation. All
other students and staff will have their cards made
during fall semester 1997. In the beginning, the ECU
1 Card will be used as the dining card and in
vending machines and copiers. Additional uses will
come on-line in the spring. The 1 Card Office,
located Inside Dowdy Student Stores, Wright
Building, to open Monday through Friday, 10 aunt, to
3 pan 328-2015.
Hungry for a SNACK or SOFTDRINK?
ECU Vending Services provides snack and
beverage machines all over campus. Most
machines arc operated by coin, currency, or a
vending card such as the ECU 1 Card, or CopiServ
a Vending Card. These cards may have a small
cash value added to their magnetic stripe through
Cash-to-Card machines located in Joyner Library,
Mcndcnhall Student Center, Student Stores lobby,
Fletcher Music Library, Nursing
Building, Aycock Computer Lab,
Bclk Lounge, Garrett and Tyler
residence halls, tf you have problems
with a vending machine, call Vending
Services at 328-6731.
Dowdy Student Stores is
a distribution center for
ECU Football Student
Tickets!
Check out our NEW Mojo
Designs� official same day
t-shlrtsl
Also coming this season
Prc-kickoff and post-game
drawings for FREE
textbooks! Watch for
t details!
iHTtusito m womoho Stadium CoHosstoMS? Cau 328-731
Dowdy Student Store Hours:
Monday - Friday; 7t30 a.m. � SiOO p.m.
Saturday! SsOO �.m. � StOO p.m.
Student Stores
Where your dollars support student scholarsl
� StS-4731Wrtjfcl ����! �i
and stomped on by a large cowboy
boot when Adams sings, "Excuse me
if I break my own heart tonight. After
all it's mine, could I have it back
sometime
The third track, "Yesterd;
News is just a good old rock
that with Adams' scratchy mel
voice, has the same feeling
Wssterberg's "Dyslexic Heart
But "16 Days" is perhaps the best
example of wnat Whiskeytown is aii
about. This heartfelt miss you"
song starts off with a soft, easy fiddle
and some incredible harmonizing
between Adams and Caitlin Cary.
Guitarist Phil Wandscher also lends
his incredible vocal talent as the
tempo picks up with "16 days, gora
bible and a rosary; God I wish that
were close to me, 'cause I owe you
apology
Since signing with Geffen after
the release of Faithless Street on local
Mood food Records, Whiskeytown
has gone thorough several tumul-
tuous lineup changes that almost
ended in Adams signing on as a solo
act. With a new drummer and several
changes in bass players, the only con-
stants are Adams, guitarist Phil
VVandscher and fiddler Cary. Even
with all the lineup changes,
Whiskeytown has successfully man-
aged to create a near- perfect second
album that shows their maturation
from Faithless Street .while hanging on
to its same intensity and emotion.
Strtmgrrs Almanac is an album that
satisfies most of my musical cravings.
It's a little bit of urban with a little bit
of rural - it's punk rock and honky
tonk at the same time. This CD real-
ly is a hell of an accomplishment for
the young twenty-something kids
who used to spend their days and
nights at the local sandwich shop
wishing they could.be rock stars.
Pistols
continued from page 34
with bullet-proof hearts are ahundam
on On Domi the Trark. Lead singer and
rhythm guitarist John Howie has
deepfrom-the-gut voice reminiscent
of the late Mr. Tubb. Unlike Tubb,
however, Howie's voice has an added
dose of lonely soulfulness. No one is
gonna mistake Howie for Joe 'lex or
Al Green, but, damnit, he's got soul
nonetheless.
Howie and the Pistols sound as if
they have been together for much
longer than just a few years. Acoustic
guitarist Greg Hawks, guitarist John
Price, drummer Chris Phillips and
Jack Campbell on walking bass are a
talented group of players. Pedal steel
guitarist Steve Watson and fiddler
Jon Kamppainen are wonderful
soloists.
However, the key to the success of
On Dmn the Track is Howie's song-
writing capabilities. He writes the
laments of the blue-collar man.
Howie has mastered the art of the
honky-tonk weeper painful, heart-
felt lyrics coupled with a catchy cho-
rus. Howie informs the women who
did him wrong "you bring the heart-
break and I'll bring the tears "I
haven't found the time to forget yourf
and "You did all right 'til you did
wrong by me It's sing-along music,
but not of the "happy" variety. It's
Bill Clinton-country (but with sincer-
ity): I feel your pain, Howie.
"Let Me Be Your Fool" anC
"Someday You'll Be Mine" are Two
Dollar Pistols at their best. "Let Me
Be Your Fool" is where Howie is most
likely to break your heart as he offers,
his pride in his back pocket, "You
don't need a man to hold you, darling,
tightly through the night loneliness,
consoles you, so I stay out of sigh xl I'd
rather be this close to you and be able
to say I'm cool You don't need a man
to understand, so let me be vour
fool "Someday You'll Be Mine"
finds Two Dollar Pistols at their most
cohesive; Watson's pedal steel cuts
its hardest.
The Pistols pay proper respect i
their heroes, covering songs bv Roger
Miller (A World So Full of Love").
Tom T. Hall ("I Flew Over Our
House Last Night") and Frizzel
("She's Gone, Gone, Gone").
The songs on On Dmsn the Trmk
are timeless. Heartbreak is always
relevant when done this well and this
convincingly: Now leave me lie, I've
got to go cry about my babv for
awhile.
ECU Business Services Committed to Quality, Committed to You!
f
�t






:S
36 Tu��d�y. August 19, 1997
lift-style
The East Carolinian
Student Union plans fun fall lfegjlllomat
203 Jarvis Street, Greenville
Open every day 6a.m. to 10p.m.
Convenient Parking
Single-load, Double-load & Triple-load washers
& Hot Dryers!
(FW � & fold service, see Tyrone)
Sofia
Snacks
Games
Urn, y�ih. what's going on with the Student Union this semester?
PHOTO COURTESY Of MIRAMAX PICTURES
Pat Reid
SF.NIOR WRITER
How many times have you looked at
your tuition bill at the beginning of
the semester and wondered exactly
what that pesky student activities
fee was used for? Or how many times
have you seen the list of upcoming
activities and wished you had a say in
what or who gets scheduled to
appear on campus? The answer to
both of these questions centers
around the Student Union.
The Student Union is just what
the name implies, a union of tu-
dents working together to provide
entertainment for all students on
campus. They schedule all the
comedians, lectures, concerts and
movies, as well as any late night
activities, such as midnight bowling
and Mardi (iras.
j In the past, the Student Union
lias brought the likes of Barry
Williams (TV's Greg Brady), Dr.
uth, Chris Rock, The Allman
jkothers Band, Little Texas and
Carrot Top to campus for special
�vents. This is on top of the regular
Ivcnts they have every year, which
fticlude weekend movies at
Mendenhall Student Center, a wel-
come back concert in August and the
Innual Barefoot On The Mall festi-
gal.
So what's planned for this year?
Some things are already scheduled,
Sthers arc in the works and a lot
,Jriore is still left to plan. That's
herc we, the student body, come
�nto the picture.
� Without any students there
Jrould be no Student Union. The
Jtudent Union is made up of eight
�bmmittees that are responsible for
wanning events in their particular
�rea. The committees are: the
JBarefoot Committee: the Cultural
awareness Committee; the Films
Committee; the Lecture
Committee; the Marketing
Jiommittee; the Popular
Entertainment Committee; the
Special Events Committee; and the
Ssual Arts Committee.
� In order to join a committee you
Jan stop by the Student Union
gfices on the second floor of
cndenhall, room 236, or you can
fell them at 328-4715. If it's easier
for you to e-mail them, you can find
them at uuunion@cis.ecu.edu, or
you can check out their home page at
http:www.cis.ecu.edustudentuni
onthehomepage.html for even more
information.
The process of joining a commit-
tee is simple. One merely picks up
an application, fills it out and returns
it to the Student Union office. The
office then forwards applications to
the head of the appropriate commit-
tee). The committee head then
calls, interviews and lets students
know the time and place of meet-
ings. It's that easy.
Movies already planned for this
fall include Lim. I mi, Cttu Air. Auim
Pmxrs, and Batman ami Robin. Also
planned are films that aren't exactly
new, but favorites anyway. These
include Kevin Smith's Mallrats and
Clerks, as well as the horror films
Carrie m6 Stream. These films are all
shown in Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall and start at 8 p.m.
Admission is free with a valid ECU
ID and one guest per ID is allowed.
The Student Union is trying
some new things out this year, too.
This includes something they're
calling The Pirate Underground.
The Pirate Underground will take
place every Thursday night and will
feature bands from campus or the
Greenville area. The plans call for at
least two bands per night and all this
will take place in the social room in
Mendenhall from 8 p.m. until 10:45
OF II.
So, no matter what you like, lie it
art, movies or music, the Student
Union offers something for you. And
since you've already paid for the
entertainment through your student
activities fees, you deserve to go out
and enjoy all they have to offer.
If you feel misrepresented by the
Student Union or just wish to
become involved, pick a committee
or two, or three and sign up today.
There's no deadline on applications
and all are encouraged to join. After
all, without student participation it
wouldn't really be a Student Union,
now would it?
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37 Tuesday. August 19. 1997
The East Carolinian
Greenville entertainment at a glance
Tonight
Breakfast
Club
70's 80's retro dance party
continues every Tuesday
$1 Bottle
Busch lite
Resieve Free Pass
to next Tuesday
before 1 1 p.m.
Wednesday 20th
$ 1.50 Hiballs
$ 1.50 Tallboys
$1 Bud Draft
Free Lizard Bud Cups
"Kier"
Lee Spencer
Thursday 21st
Gibb Droll Band
99X Welcome Back
� ECU Party
$1.50 Hiballs 1.50 Tallboys
With Special Guest
Far Too
Jones
Friday 22nd
Beach Musics 1 Show
w
Chairmen of
tht lioam
Sunday 23rd
Dale w i i. l i i s o n
SKNIOR WKI IFK
So. the school year is upon us once
again and students find themselves
firmly planted in Greenville, the
Emerald City of the southeast. The
beach is just a few hours away, but you
can't always afford the time to make
such a journev. What do vou do for
fun?
While Greenville may not exactlv
be a thriving metropolis like New
York or Los Angeles, it still has its fair
share of entertainment and escapism.
So, for all you movie,
music and book freaks,
here's the two-minute
tour of the Pirate coun-
try.
Since I atrogantlv
pride myself on being an
"expert" in the world of
film, let's start our tour
with the local movie
scene. At the moment,
Greenville has five the-
aters, although a 12-
screen multiplex com-
plete with a state-of-the-
art THX sound system is
slated to be built. But
that will be then; this is now.
The Carolina East Cinema is the
"classiest" theater in town, especially
since it recently installed a UTS
sound system in a couple of irs
screens. Aside from that worthy fea-
ture, the Carolina East has the dis-
tinction of being the only Greenville
theater with four screens. The
screens themselves aren't much to
brag about (none of the local screens
are), but they still offer the more
pleasant viewing experience.
The main advantage Carolina East
has is its lobby, which is more spa-
cious and conveniently constructed.
Once inside the theater, one has easv
access to the individual theaters,
located in four sectioned- ff corners
of the lobby. Sectioning otf the the-
aters is essential ixxause it allows
traffic leaving one showing to exit
w ithout crashing into those waiting to
get in. The other local theaters have a
big problem with traffic flow simpK
because the theaters and the lobb
"While Greenville may
not exactly be a
thriving metropolis
like Nem York or Los
Angeles, it still has its
fair share of
entertainment and
escapism
The other key to the success of
Carolina East is the fact that the
snack bar is smartly located in the
center of the lobby, as opposed to the
rear. This not only allows lines to form
around the snack bar w ithout bother-
ing those who simply want to skip
food and see the movie, it also allows
the emplovees to serve as many cus-
tomers as possible as quickly as possi-
ble, thereby making the wait for food
short.
But the Carolina East is not per-
fect, and, like the Carolina East, the
other theaters also suffer problems.
The Buccaneer, which tends to have
wider screens than the Carolina East,
has its snack bar in the
center of the lobby, but
the lobby still leaves
much to be desired
because it isn't built to
hold a large, sell-out
crowd.
The Park, Greenville's
only SI.50 theater, han-
dles itself nicely. Since
the Park only has one
screen, there isn't
much of a problem
with traffic flow. While
the theater itself isn't
great, the Park, for its
price, is pretty satisfy-
ing. The main complaint with the
Park centers around the movies it
typically decides to show, but I won't
deal with that issue now.
The worst of the bunch is. without
a doubt, the Plaa. Not only is this
theater simply ugly, it is also illogical-
ly constructed. The lobby is too small
for a three-screen theater, thereby
causing serious crowding problems;
the snack bar is located in the rear of
the lobby, thereby causing more
crowding problems: and the individ-
ual theaters are awkwardly situated
down narrow halls, thereby causing
even more crowding problems. Oh, by
the way, the screens and the projec-
ors here equate poor cinema. When I
finally saw Stiimtrr's Ijr M the Plaa.
I distinctly heard the projector crank-
ing the reel around. The Pla.a almost
makes a movie trip to Raleigh worth
the effort.
There is one final option open
only to ECU students, faculty and
friends: the Student Union theater
are not arranged in a rational manner. located in Mendenliall, the one the-
ater not monopolized by the same JJ
man. This, in many ways, is �
Greenville's best cinematic choice. �
Its screen is large and maintains the Z
aspect-ratio of widescreen cinema.
The seating area is spacious, allowing m
for a rather large sell-out crowd, �
which can get rowdy at times, '1
depending on what movie is showing. J
Mendenhall has several advan-J
tages over the other local theaters. Rr �
starters, all films can be seen for free,�
which makes Mendenhall the best B
choice for your buck. Also, JJ
Mendenhall, unlike the Carmike �
chain, will, once in a while slip, in��
higher quality film selections. 5
However, if your taste buds lean I
more toward the art house features,
then you better dig into the local ��
video market, which is quite strong. n
There are more video stores in this
town than you can shake some type of
thin, wooden object at. Greenville has
the standard video options like
Blockbuster and Hollywood Video, Jj
but the place to get your more risque W
cinema is East Coast Music and j�
Video. Here, one can find a wide j�
assortment of mainstream and alter- �
native films. And, oh yeah, they have �
lots and lots of new and used music "
for sale.
Speaking of music, Greenville is
also a hot place to increase your CD
collection. Believe it or not,
Greenville offers some of the finest
selections in CD's anywhere in this
state. Within one single block there
are two primo music stores, CD Alley
and Skulley's. While both are fine
stores, my personal preference slants
toward CD Alley, which has almost
become an institution at ECU. If you
can't find it at, or get it from, CD ;
Alley, you don't need it.
But, of course, ECU students
aren't simply here to dance and slam
to the best in music. They are here to
broaden their minds. Here's a novel
idea: read a book. Greenville's rapid
grow th has resulted in a book surge,
thanks to such major book chains as
Barnes & Noble and Waldenbooks. ;
But if corporate chains aren't your
thing, there are several independent
book stores around. The Book
Warehouse constantly has deals on ,
new books while many used goodies J
can be found at such spots as the
SEE GUI0E PAGE 44
The Veldt
Special Guests
TheAlmighty &
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Tuesday 26th
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Ladies Free until! 11 pm
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38 Tuesday. August 19, 1997
i ii -style
The East Carolinian
The definitively lame guide to downtown
ANDY TlRNER
mm JTTlIt f in fOi
Do you hear it calling you? Come, dance with me.
I listen to my music. Partake of my mans- offerings.
Spend vour money.
Downtown Greenville - it is a place of legend,
infamous or otherwise. It beckons forth the newly
matriculated to enter the bars and clubs that have
certainlv contributed to ECU's "party school" rep-
utation. You've heard the stories. You have visions
of tanked bovs and girls flinging and flopping
against one another. You wanna fling. You wanna
flop.
The first thing you may wonder: Where the hell
is'downtown? It's located near the end of campus
where Clement and White resident halls are. If you
can make it to the corner of 5th Street and
Cotanche Street, you'll be smac' dab in the middle
of all the bars. Now what?
Hopefully, the following summaries of down-
town establishments will give you some idea as to
where you want to go. Nearly all of the bars admit
persons 18 years and older; however, they all strict-
ly enforce the minimum drinking age. Snicker,
snicker. Well, most of them do.
The Attic: I'm starting with one of the two
This is 5th Street, the piece they call downtown
PHOTO BV CHRIS GAYOOSH
oldest establishments. If a fairly big band comes to
town, more than likely they will be playing at The
Attic. The Ramones, Drivin' and Cryin' and R.E.M.
have all plaved there in the past. Hootie and the
Blowfish and the Dave Matthews Band played at
The Attic all the time for like $5 before they
lecame huge rock stars. .Also, there's Comedy
Zone on Wednesday nights.
The El bo: The second of the veteran down-
town bars, The Elbo is often the first place fresh-
men head. There's plenty of dancing, drinking and
"hooking up" among the mostly young crowd.
BW3: If you want some really good and really
hot hot wings, this is the place. There's no cover
charge, so it's often packed, especially on the
weekends. You can hang out and play the trivia
game. It also has a patio where local bands play
everv so often.
La Vista: Many people still call this place
Milano's, so don't be confused. La Vista always has
a good number of food and drink specials. The
deck is great, especially when the weather is nice.
Underwater Cafe: Underwater is a laid back
place to relax and hang out with friends and have a
few beers. It attracts a slightly older crowd; small
(often acoustic) bands play many nights.
Peasant's: It's heaven to the roots rock crowd.
If you like Phish and the Grateful Dead, this is your
thing. Bands play several nights each week.
Peasant's also has a pretty big
patio.
Alfredo's Alfredo's II:
Alfredo's is the perfect place to
grab some pizza after a long
night - cheap and pretty good.
Alfredo's II has a diverse crowd
and pool tables.
Sports
PadSplashSharkey's: This
place is huge. It has. like, a mil-
lion pool tables, and there's also
air hockey and video games. If
you want to dance, go to the
Splash side. If you want to relax
a little, go to Sharkey's. where
acoustic musicians are often fea-
tured.
The Percolator Coffee
House: Coffee is another liquid
refreshment that you will more
than likelv learn to love during your college days.
All kinds of interesting folks can be found at the
Percolator. It has open-mic nights and poetry read-
ing sometimes. Just remember to not drink of the
dreaded decaf. Decaf is evil.
Bo I i 's: Boli's has great calzones. It's a very well-
lit place, good for watching games on the TV or
whatever else pops in front of you.
Pantana Bob's: There's lots of flipping and
flopping here. Dance the night away if you want at
Pantana Bob's. The age of the crowd varies.
Firehouse Tavern: The newest joint down-
town, the Firehouse Tavern bills itself as
Greenville's Ultimate Sports bar. If you need to get
your sports kick, go there. However, beware on the
weekends; it's plenty packed, and you may have a
hard time finding a seat to watch the big monster
truck rallv on ESPN2.
Cheap Shot O'Malley's: Never been. I've
heard, however, it's popular with the fraternity and
sororitv whippersnappers.
Wrong Way Corrigan's: Corrigan's featutes a
lot of blues and blues rock bands on the weekends.
The crowd is generally older; there are a lot of non-
students.
The Cellar: The Cellar is another place you
can shake it. It features three different rooms, one
plaving rock, one country and one dance. The
crowd is normally a little older than the Elbo
crowd.
Hurrah Harry's: Hurrah Harry's is an inter-
esting place. The laid back atmosphere compli-
ments the place, which always seem kind of dark
and garage-like, a good thing. Omar's: Omar's has
very good Greek food. They also have a good selec-
tion of microbrews.
Happy's Pool Room: Happy's is timeless. If
you want a good taste of Eastern Carolina life, go to
Happv's. It's a great place to play pool, and you
gotta love the Pabst Blue Ribbon Beverage Center
sign that adorns the wall.
Chico's: Chico's has great Mexican food. Make
sure you trv the Hungry Pirate sometime. If you are
under 21. you won't be able to get in later on in the
So, I hope this helps you somehow. there are a
lot of other places to go in Greenville that are total-
ly different from the downtown scene. Explore. Ik:
creative. But remember, the boogie man is alive
and well, and he lives in Greenville. Be safe.
Downtown Greenville�they'll leave the light on for you.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAYDOSH
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r2






39 Twrity. fatutt 19, 1997
ils-style
The East Carolinian

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! ii iCtVIP The E�" Carolinian
.ur.u, auo. ,o. J �
Dealing with your Jell-0 stealing roommate and other advice
. i�" v.iM'�. �'�.
JENNIFER LEOCiETT
STUf wmTK.it
It was a ninety-seven degree day in the
middle of August. My parents were help-
ing me move into my room in Clement
Hall and were probably as happy to get
me out of their house as I was to go.
Roaming the hall in search of new friends,
I remember thinking that dorm life might
not be so bad.
Well, I have never regretted for one
second living in a residence hall. It has
been an education all in its own, and even
though some of the time I was miserable,
most of the time living in the dorm was
pretty cool.
Just think, as freshman most of you arc
away from home for the first time. Maybe
you are scared or a little worried, and that
is okay. But, with so much freedom, after
the first night or two you won't even
remember why you were worried in the
first place.
What could be better than living on a
hall with thirty-two or so people, staying
up late, going downtown, dodging calls
from your mother, exposing your hall-
mates to your exquisite music choices
(just don't be mad when they return the
favor), and ordering pizza at two in the
morning? When you live in the dorm the
world is yours. No one is screaming at you
to mow the lawn or eat broccoli. Your
mom isn't yelling at you to turn the stereo
down a few decibels. And you don't have
to wash your dishes until they are so rank
you can't stand them.
On the down side to all this, you have
to do your own laundry, eating at
Mendenhall pales in comparison to a
home cooked meal (even if that home
cooked meal is a TV dinner), and when
you are worshipping the porcelain god
after a night of heavy drinking at the Elbo,
just pray you are lucky enough to have a
roommate that will hold your head.
Speaking of roommates, roommates
can be a great thing. In fact, my best
friend was my roommate at orientation.
But from my experience, ECU Housing is
not known for matches made in heaven.
There is only one section on the housing
application where you get to make anv
decision about who you spend the next
two semester with- the "smoking" or
"non-smoking" box. Wow! What a scien-
tific approach to placing strangers togeth-
er who have to live in a nine by twelve
room for two semesters. Shouldn't ECU
Housing at least ask for your music pref-
erences or a zodiac sign?
But no matter how uncomfortable
things may be, having an automatic friend
such as a roommate makes things a little
easier. So what if they eat all your Jell-O
out of the mini fridge or borrow your
favorite jeans without asking. You can
feel confident you will always have
someone to eat with in the dining hall.
There is so much about life in a resi-
dence hall that could never be squeezed
into this article. You will just have to
have your own experiences and wade
through this first year in the dorm the
best you can. Just be sure that if you arc
living without air conditioning, bring
lots of fans because it will be practically
unlivabl. until October. Also, try and
follow the rules. You know no
overnight guests of the opposite sex, no
drinking in your room unless you are
twenty-one, no more than six people in
your room at a time, blah, blah, blah.
Your RA will give you the rest of the
rules and it is best to stay in good graces
with your RA. Some of you will have a
great time living on campus. Some of
you will end up wanting to live in your
car rather than sec your roommate's face
again. At least when it is all over, you will
have some great stories to tell and in
five years it won't matter if your room-
mate boiled your goldfish or scratched
your twenty-five dollar Rage .Against the
Machine import.
Need some advica on getting along with your new roommate.?Just remember that you have to know when to walk away, and
know when to run. Wait, that's gambling. Never mind.
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� u �





r
ECU Alum tackles Jeopardy
golden,
corral
JENNIFER TAFE
STUF WKITKH
"HWhr tuesdey
$2 dollar imports
$2 hi balls
bass $1.75 mugs
$5.95 pttchorr
kHHans night $1.75 mugs $5.95 pitchers
762-BOLI � We Deliver
Answer: General Norman
Schwarzkopf, Tony Randall and Luke
Perry have this in common.
Question: What is they have all
been contestants on Celebrity
Jeopardy
That's right, Jeopardy.
So what's the deal with the 1
ranked quiz show in America anyway?
The contestants are I brainiac rock-
et scientist types with nothing better
to do on a Friday night than sit down
and peruse an Almanac for obscure
tidbits of information, right?
Wrong. Henry Brabble, an ECU
. graduate, recently got a firsthand
account of the Jeopardy experience.
Brabble's appearance on Jeopardy will
air Sept. 4 on WCTI.
Some people may assume anyone
on Jeopardy must be way smarter than
those of us who sit in our living rooms
shouting answers at Alex Trebeck and
wagering all of our imaginary win-
nings in Fatal Jeopardy.
Sitting in an office space covered
with Led Zeppelin shots and dis-
cussing education and various other
ideas, however, Brabble proved to be
anything but the stereotypical infor-
mation jockey one might expect.
Brabble, who is currently the night
manager at Joyner Library, got the
opportunity to compete on eopardy
through a contestant search in
Washington, D.C. These contestant
searches take place in major cities
throughout the country. Prospective
contestants from all walks of Wfe are
required to answer 50 fast-paced
questions on a broad' range of topics.
"It's more about knowing a little
bit on a broad range of subjects than
being an expert in one particular
thing Brabble said.
Ever wonder why the contestants
on Jmpany rarely choke up and get
nervous being on television? Well, it
turns out the screening process care-
ECU alum and history major Henry Brabble takes on JtoptrdySepH, 4.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAYDOSH
fully curries the competitors before
their TV appearance.
"The contestant search is like a
cattle-call. They shuttle you through
a screen test, diction and make-up
Brabble explained. Basically, the pro-
ducers do anything they can, from
wardrobe advice to verbal coaching,
to guarantee a smooth presentation.
C Competitors are even coached on the
little anecdote they share during the
"gctting-to-know-you" segment. I
have to admit that I was a little bit
i Qool
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disillusioned.
The actual show went off without
a hitch. As a history major at ECU,
Brabble's strongest subjects are con-
centrated in history and the civil war
period. He even managed to pocket a
Daily Double question in the
Shakespeare category. Brabble said
that the only category that really gave
him trouble was Opera.
If you've seen White Men Can't
Jump, you may think Jeopanh; contes-
tants spend a lot of time just reading
almanacs and dictionaries for trivia)
information. Not so.
"The quickest way to learn is to
pick things up from those around you;
people ou admire and respect, your
friends Brabble said. Although he
admits that working in joyner Library
and exposure to Internet resources
have contributed to his knowledge ori
a broad range of subjects. Brabble
maintains that experience is the
way to learn.
Different experiences are some's
thing that Brabble has had a lot ofj
practice in. .As a child, Brabble's f
ily lived in the mid-west. New Jer
and North Carolina. Before his pre-
sent job at Joyner Library, Brabble was!
a student teacher at Greene Centralj
High School. Brabble explained that
each of these new situations became a
learning opportunity.
"People look for excuses not to;
have new experiences. No money, noj
time: this keeps people from trying;
new things and learning fmm them"
Brabble said. "If you want to do some- �
thing he said, "it's just a matter of
striving and getting it done
treitWhys
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Win pert! eMfcd far reu�lpmb,adiri
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tmim
Wn&mitebsrtommMwf?MiK�d&n!
one let et 3rd oat Ibedejreei ad let on Curry Court at the School
ot Aid Health Saeeres. 'Jehida detcecyintj on f permit rnoy pork in
R�S�en and UlalVBrStTMrEGISTace, parking tots from 4.iW p.m.
on Friday unMiwwi im MM Rednptton Sunday. Vehicles with F
em penWwcnpKeteeW ieeswi bt tidnied, urmh
fiesnMui Shuffle service is provided by ECU Student transit Authority,
SurdoytbouoT1wrsdeyefle
to the residence has areas.
COMWtl-Ceen
Wmim(Wimx(Fiknte and�nUNIVERSITY
REKSTBtHr periong k. The perm is not void on ttmpusafler 1:00
oji. aWMUTapedaejIotsanlocok
entrance off of Cofcge Hi Drwe: and smth of Library Drive with entrance
off of OSorteSlnet,�hidiwi he open shortly after start of dosses.
rveeeeee t� reew eeteei
IsfNTO-Leaner!
leieitted between the hours of 7:00
ojh end 600 bjjl, IVndQy �eeaejb
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Al tehidos regstered nib ECU Pariane, eflafreRMrlotionServkes are vahan areas
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potto on rested alienaaawoi The fol
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Owe; seiet bt on DO Street at �� feet rf Cdhprti0ri�e; lets nonii and sooth of j
the Student leoeakon Center; lots south ef RckkwDnVeraerkyivjesColMumlofc
east of the Sdeeol of wed IIqmHi, and iMtittjIuii field off of Charles Boulevad.
j:tJlDSWITWSaVXI
Shetee servn biteean Mi Cofeetim
Trenrirfoni 730 ml unti 5:30 bjil, Mondey through Fmbyr during reulariy
sheduW,fii4spnae5S�s.Sh�lk5er
faadhi
Perfeiaf bt deihpeHeei are sehject te
be sere te dwdi aM sipts befere eerkatf. If yee bewe fnstiees, please
aatact Perking aad traiBjiertatiei Services.
Parking and Tronsportatton Services
305 E. Tenth Street
ijijwjMI klr
D1I
EAST
(?19) 3W 6994 CAKOL1NA
WWW.�CWGNKpmWfl�fmKMlJZm OHeeeaeMBi
�.
I �





42 Tuesday, August 19. 1997
ii' style
The East Carolinian
Classic punk albums still rock 20 years later
This is the
column
where we
focus on the stuff
you miss and the
stuff you missed. We
will examine the books,
Will Tl I RISER
I. i K Ks m.F kditok
1977 was the vear that punk rock was at its best, its most vital. A handful
of great records, some considered legendary now 20 years later, were
released. The Sex Pistols declared war with Never Mind the
Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols. The Clash released their self-
titled debut album, and the Ramones launched a Rocket to
Russia. But there were two bands who epitomized the punk
rock attitude, if for no other reason then the titles of the
albums thev released that year: The Dead Boys' Young Iut
and Snotty and Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers'
LAJf.F. (Like a Mother Copulator).
The Dead Boys formed in Cleveland in 1976, before moving
to New York's Bowery district and hooking up with C.B.C.B.
owner Hilly Kristal. Stiv Bators, Cheetah Chrome. Jimmy Zero,
Jeff Magnum and Johnny Blitz were exactly vv hat their album
proclaimed: Young, I joud and Snotty. Some critics have written that
attitude was all the Dead Boys possessed; actual musical talent was
non-existent. Rubbish. The Dead Boys were much more than the
musical equivalent of Kevin Bacon's dancing rebel character in Footloose.
Thev wrote some damn fine songs.
The opening track. "Sonic Reducer sets the tone: "I don't need anyone, don't need no
albums, movies and mom and dad don't need no good advice, don't need no human miceI got some news lor you.
television shows that don't even need vou. too Fast and furious, "Sonic Reducer" is more than just sell-help tor
we feel deserve further angn punk rockers. The song sums up what punk rock means to alienated, angst-ndden teens
exploration The stuff the world over. Kvervone who considered the song's narrator a loser gets it from the sonic
we dug back in the reducer with Bators proclaiming at the end of the song, "Then I'll be 10 feet tall, and you II
day be nothing at all ,
The alienation theme is continued on tracks such as "Not Anymore. Am t Nothin to I Jo
and "High Tension Wire .After hearing these songs, you taste the sew-
ers and gutters of New York City in your mouth. They are tales of the
terminallv poor, bored and pissed off. Offering more than just "love
stinks, yeah, veah Young. I.out'an Snotty gives us "What Love Is" and
"Caught With The Meat in Your Mouth These two songs are potent
pictures of rotten love, love that stinks worse than bad meat.
The Dead Bovs have no doubt influenced a number of aspiring punk
rockers. Pearl jam. Green River and The Supersuckers have all covered
their material. Bomp Records has recently released the original,
rougher mix of Young. I .owl and Snotty. Youngrr. I.oiuir and Snotfiv. Sadly,
Stiv Baton died in 1990 in Paris as a result of injuries he received after
lieing hit b a car. (heetah Chrome is slated to have a new album com-
ing out soon on Bomp. The whereabouts of the remaining members
are unknown.
U-s, Johnnv Thunders and The Heartbreakers played rock and roll
with their "hearts on their sleeves, but they also played with their arms
strapped for another heroin injection. They were junkies. They even
briefly considered renaming themselves the Junkies. Ixad singer and
guitarist Johnnv Thunders and drummer Jerry Nolan were former
members of glam punkers The New York Dolls. Walter Ixire and Billy
Rath played lead guitar and bass guitar respectively. Richard Hell
served briefly as a Heartbreaker before leuv ing to form his own band.
L.f.h. did not reach its potential upon its initial release. Problems in
the mi of the album hindered its quality Remixes for the album were
done in 1984 and again in 1994. The 1994 version on Jungle Records
is pmhablv the best version. The Heartbreakers sound wasn't quite as
harsh as The IX-ad Boys, who sound almost heavy metal on some
jnfljp. Their sound was rooted in the Rolling Stones and '50s and "oOs
R&B. The Heartbreakers wrote rock and roll anthems. Most of their
songs featured catchy melodies and even catchier choruses. Just as
rften as their songs were alxmt depcndeiKv on drugs and excessive lives.
The 1 k-arrbreakers' songs were about - what else - women.
There's a lot of love on I.A.MF. You get "I Wanna Be Loved "Pirate
Ixive "I Love You and their version of "I You I-ove Me Barry Ciordy. who wrote'
"Do You Love Mer should have thought about signing The Heartbreakers to Motown
or at least as songwriters. Thev w ere the druggie v ersion of HollandDozierHolland. On
"I' Vanna Be Loved Thunders sings in a drunken slur, do what I'm gonna sayI'm so
era -y 'bout you1 don't wanna play, I wanna be loved by you It would have been a hit
for Marvin Cave.
The 1 leartbreakers had their punk anthem, too. "Bom to Lose" lives down the street
from The Dead Bovs' "Sonic Reducer "Living in a jungle, it ain't so hard but living in
a city, it'll eat out vour heart I think I'll just stay in the country forever.
Johnnv Thunders and The Heartbreakers left more than just the track marks on the
arms, thev left a mark on rock and roll. The Devil Dogs, The Humpers, The
Candysnatchcrs and millions of lesser bands have taken their cue from the band. The
current "alternative country" movement also owes much to The Heartbreakers.
The Replacements, 1 think, are one of the few bands who equaled and even topped
The Heartbreakers in spirit, musically and in their relationship with illegal substances.
The Replacements even did a song in the early '80s about Johnny Thunders (and prob-
ablv a lot about themselves also) called "Johnny's Ckinna Die The song detailed
Thunders' excesses in his music and his life. The chorus offered a taunting "Na Nanna
Na Na The Replacements' prediction came true in 1991. Johnny Thunders died in
New Orleans hotel room after combining a lethal mixture of methadone and alcohol.
Nolan died a vear later.
Johnny Thunders and the
Heartbreakers defined rock-n-roll.
PHOTO COURTESY MR THUNDERS HOME PAGE
onnection
f (A Division ol U.B.E.)
� Name Brand Quality Catalog Clothing
� Discount Prices
� Metis and Womens
Two Dead boys Stiv Bators and Divine get sassy
on the C.B.G.B. stage
PHOTO COURTESY Of C 8 GB S
irrTTrTl
uu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Welcome Back Students
Student Recreation Center Hours
Monday-Friday � 6am to 11:30 pm
Saturday-Sunday � 9am to 10:30pm
Free stuff!
Free Aerobics - Aug, 20-23
Free Aqua Fitness - Aug. 25-28
Free T-N-T Explosion - Aug. 27
Free D.A.N.S.E. -Sept. 5
Pick -up your
Fall program guide
at the SRC
Game on
Flag Football officials - Aug. 26
Flag Football meeting - Sept. 2
Volleyball meeting - Sept. 9
(Intramurals)
Looking for
Adventure
ii
Jump into ECU
Climbing Wall SRC 0pen House. Aug. 17 8-1 opm
Monday & Wednesday � 8pm to 11 pm Po0 Party. Aug. is 2-5pm
Tuesday & Thursday � 2-4pm and 8-11pm street Dance-Aug. 18 7-1 ipm
Friday - Sunday � 2pm to 6pm
SRC Open House - Aug. 19 6 - 8pm
SRC � 328-6387 Rec Hotline � 328-6443





BOB BARBOUR
HONDA
WELCOMES BACK
STUDENTS & FACULTY
Beer doesn't have to be expensive
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Arriving Daily
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JENNIFER LE00ETT
STAFF WRI TRR
If you are over 21, chances are you
have had your fair share of
Milwaukee's Best, Natural Lite, Bud
and other such stale beers usually
found at college keggers. But when
the time comes that keg beer just
won't do the trick, you may realize
you have developed standards. You
know, one day Beast is just fine and
the next day nothing but Heineken
will suffice.
This is the kiss of death for the
college student who depends on a
$2.89 six pack. Beer drinkers may
eventually find themselves leaning
toward the more expensive selection
of beers for several reasons. The more
expensive imports and microbrews
provide a greater deal of variety than
your average Anheuser- Busch dealer.
This makes it easier to find some-
thing to suit your tastes.
However, if you find yourself
broke and needing good beer, there
are a few alternatives. I am not trying
to advocate ways to drink cheaply (if
that's what you want, Peasant's has a
great mug night on Tuesdays), but
being the beer snob that I am, I knew
I had to find an alternative to premi-
um beer at a college beer price. So I
decided to choose nine beers at ran-
dom, all under five bucks for a six
pack of bottles, and rate them in an
attempt to find something afford-
able, yet drinkable.
The research took all weekend
and was a long and laborious process.
I struggled with my decisions as I
tasted and tasted again, making sure
the data was correct and that my
decisions were unbiased. The nine
samples I tried were Dundee's
Honey Brown, Miller High Life, Bud
Ice, Saranac Summer Wheat,
Michelob Amber Bock, Micheiob
Classic Dark, Michelob Gold Pilsner,
and just for good measure, Pabst Blue
Ribbon and Schlitz Malt Liquor.
Michelob seems to be trying to
capture the microbrew market.
Unfortunately, their recipes don't
have that microbrew variety. Maybe
they need to narrow their production.
But the Amber Bock at $4.29 a six
pack was great and the best beer I
sampled. It was a good amber beer,
smooth and rich without being bitter,
and free of any funky after taste.
The Golden Pilsner, also $4.29,
tasted too much like the Amber Bock,
but not as good. I wouldn't buy this
again.
Another good one was the Honey
Brown. It's flavor is similar to
Drink too much bear and you'll look like this
fine citiztn.
PHOTO COURTESY Of WWW. BEE. COM
Newcastle Brown Ale, but not quite
as bitter, and at $4.49 a six pack, it's
half the price of the English ale.
I had a neutral reaction to the
Michelob Classic Dark , the Pabst
Blue Ribbon, and the Schlitz Malt
Liquor. All are drinkable but not
much better than keg beer. PBR is
the cheapest at $2.79 for a six pack of
cans, and even though it is the most
watered down beer I have ever had,
drinking PBR make me feel like a
pan of Americana. The only bonus to
the Schlitz Malt Liquor is that if you
SEE KIR PAGE 44
1
5
Welcome to poverty
1

Pat Reii)
SF.NIOK WRITF.R
3142-A Moseley Dr. Greenville, N.C.
(Behind Parker's BBQ off Greenville Blvd.)
752-5043- Hours: MonFri 7:30a.m5:30p m.
Congratulations, you've made it!
You're on a college campus, away from
home and in control of your own life
now. Despite what your parents may
think, most of you are far enough away
that you can do what you want with-
out too much input from them.
However, that means that you have
some decisions to make for yourself
that could affect your life for years to
come, including financial decisions.
Every college student, whether if
it's true or not, makes jokes at some
poinr like. "Money? Please. I'm in col-
lege Unfortunately this scenario is
most often true as college life seems
to be a giant money vacuum that sucks
its victims dry. So, how do you avoid
the poor man's burden of college?
Stan planning now for the rest of your
iife.
First and foremost, all students
should have a banking account of their
own, and a checking account is highly
recommended. Checking and savings
is even better, but you have to fit your
accounts to your money. When open-
ing a checking account you should
shop around for the best offers. Most
banks have college banking plans that
really help, so don't be afraid to ask.
Other questions to keep in mind
include:
What are the complete charges
that the accounts have? (i.e. Is there a
flat monthly fee, and are rhere any
hidden charges that may pop up.)
Is there a limit on the number of
checks written monthly?
Does the account come with an �
ATM card? g
If so, are the bank's ATM machines
close and readily available? Is there a
certain number of free ATM with
drawals?
Is there a "1-800" number for 24
hour account information?
Docs the bank offer a form of overt
draft protection? �
One major pitfall of checkings
accounts is the infamous bounced -
check. Overdraft protection allows �
you to guard against this. Some banks �
have a line of credit available that, in .
the event of insufficient funds, will a
cover the check up to a certain
amount. Some banks also have a sys-
rem that, if you also open a savings
account at the bank, will rake the
SEE MONEY PAGE 44
;
J MPO R.T A
N U ,M B � R S
207 East 5th street
18
33
69
t Si
the minimum age.
the number of people
that wake up after a night
at THE FIREHOUSE and said
"I did what last night?"
the year most of our managers
were born (what else would you expect.)
fcatmn
70
17
100
the average IQ of our
bar staff (that's why they act so crazy.)
number of clubs in one.
4,000 sq. ft. sports bar downstairs
live music. 2,000 sq.ft. dance
upstairs w G-ville's best Dj.
the number of tv's.
the number of cases of beer
we sell in a night.
900 the number of pounds of
ice we use in one night.
4 0 0
UP COM'NC SHOWS
grooveriders aug I 4 28
back porch circle aug I 5
treading evans aug I 6
tbird of never aug 20
nameless aug 2 I
big stoner creek aug 22
level aug 23
mike corrado band aug 27
colouring lessons aug 29
melanie sparks aug 30
UNDERFOOT sept 4
ck porch circle sept 5
skellingtons sept 6
velvet jones sept I 0
UNDERFOOT sept I I
natural healing sept I 2
kernel goat sept I 3
sunnywheat sept I 7
UNDERFOOT se i 9
Jt ;





44 Tuesday, August 19. 1997
i i' style
The East Carolinian
Hungry for grub, low on cash, no problem
Money
continued from page 43
Carolyn Weakland
STU'F WHITER
Coming to a new town, especially one as colorful as Greenville can
require some getting used to. If you're anything like me, you like
to eat good food, be surrounded by good friends, and not have this
experience tear to deeply into your pocket. Where might you find
such a balance of life's little pleasures?
Well, good cheap food, I think I can help you with, but as far as
friends, you'll have to be on your own. Now, I'd like ro caution -
well, more like remind you - that these places are for cheap, good
food, in a cool atmosphere-right? Well, sometimes many of the so
called more colorful people in this town also know these deals too,
so please do not be shocked by any peculialiar actions you may be
exposed to. Whether you're in the mood for down home cookin' or
a burrito, there's a place and a price for just about every taste imag-
inable.
Longing for grandma's cooking? You might want to check out
Vfenters Grill, (752-2767) located on Mumford Road. This restau-
rant converted from a double wide trailer will not let you walk
awav hungry. Upon arrival. There's a sign posted clearly stating no
profanity Take this sign seriously, they will throw you out if you
get too rowdv. You can seat yourself at any of the picnic tables and
read the daily specials on the chalk board posted on the wall-there
are no tangible menus. You are served on paper plates and eat with
plastic utensils-very cost efficient don't you think? Hopefully, vou
like tea because it's the only tasty beverage served there aside
from water. However, if you are unpartial to tea, there is a soda
machine right outside the trailer for your convenince. A typical
lunch will run you about $3-$4 bucks and you can choose from bar-
becued turkey, vams, and corn on the cob to meatloaf, cabbage,
and rutabaga. Your plate will be full untii you are, so bring an
appetite.
If vou're looking for a meal that doesn't require a nap after com-
pletion, perhaps vou want to check out some of the restaurants
located on downtown Fifth Street. Chico's Mexican restaurant
located at 521 Cotanche Street (757-1666) has developed a lunch
special in honor of the starving ECU student. Dining in it's
authenticallv decorated atmosphere, the hungry pirate is a treat
for all. This burrito is stuffed with beef, beans, rice, lettuce, sour
cream, special Mexican sauce, and cheese. Did I mention comple-
mentarv chips and salsa come with every meal-unlimited
amounts? However, be
warned, the salsa is home-
made and can get a bit hot
at times. All together this
massive meal will run you
about $3.95 and if you are
still hungry after this, I'll be
surprised. I usually ask for a
doggy bag.
O.K. Mexican and down
home cookin' aren't quite
vour speed today. Your more
in the mood for a pizza. You
ought to check out Boli's
Fifth Street Pizzeria located
at 123 East Fifth Street
(752-Boli). This quaint
relaxing feel good pizzeria
has a taste and a price for
everyone. .Aside from dail
lunch specials, you can get a
You go here (above) to eat on your own. You there (left) when ma and
pa come to town.
FILE PHOTOS
large salad and a slice of pizza bread for under S4 bucks. Boli's also
takes pizza to a new level, serving it's famous Greek pizza made
with oil instead of tomato sauce and topped with spinach, toma-
toes, and fetta cheese-They are addicting. They also serve strom-
bolies, stuffed with three kinds of cheeses and toppings of your
choice. A small feeding several and a large feeding a small army.
Say todav vou're just in the mood for a hot dog and some fries.
Cubbie's restaurant, 501 South Evans Street (752-6497) has
earned che reputation of serving the best burger in town. This
relaxing little stop decorated with sports paraphernalia, is usually
playing beach music and showing a game of s'ome kind on the
tube. Here vour serve: can bring you the famous Cubbie's cheese-
burger topped with chili, cole slaw, onions, catsup, and mustard for
under 52.50-it's a big burger. A hot dog will run you a buck and so
will fries or hush puppies. It's a great place for a fast filling lunch.
.All in all. these places are where it's at for good food, in a cool
place that doesn't put a strain in your pocket. Be warned, most of
these hot spots can become addictive, I can personally attest to
rhat. Don't be surprised if you find yourself becoming a local at
more than one of these watering' holes. Did I mention the color-
ful people of Greenvrlte yet? Well, regularly visiting any of these
spots will aquatint you with some of them and may make you
some new friends.
Beer
continued from page 43
don't finish it, you can screw the
cap back on and drink it for
breakfast.
A few beers to stay away
from are Bud Ice and Saranac
Summer Wheat. Bud Ice may
have a higher alcohol content
than regular beer but, trust me,
it is not worth it. Bud Ice is a
- r.plcte waste of money and
the only thing even remotely
interesting about this beer is its
tacky bottle. But, of the nine
beers I sampled, the Saranac
Summer Wheat was the most
vile and undrinkable beer of
them all. Saranac should be
ashamed to bottle such a con-
coction. If I got this beer for
free I still wouldn't drink it. Yes,
it was just that bad.
There were some winners
and there were some losers
among the nine beers that I
sampled. Though the Micheloi)
Amber Bock tasted the best and
was fairly inexpensive, the
Miller High Life has to be my
overall primo choice. It's cheap
at $2.99 for a six pack of bottles.
It's drinkable - even tasty. It
does not have any special flavors
or a fancy bottle or label; it's just
a good plain beer.
Remember, according to the
Surgeon General, women
should not drink alcoholic bev-
erages during pregnancv
because of the risk of birth
defects. Also, consumption of
alcoholic beverages impairs your
ability to drive a car or operate
machinery, and may cause
health problems.
Guide
continued from page 37
Book Worm and the Bxk
Potato.
If vour br.iin thirsts for
something with more visual
flair. then dive into
Greenville's lucrative comic
book marker. Comic fans need
not fear because Greenville
(rhankfully) supports two
excellent comic shops. e:ch
with its own personality.
Heroes .Are Here Too is locat-
ed right downtown, so it is the
most convenient of the two.
But that is not all this store has
going for it. If you want your
superhero stuff, including
Trading cards, this shop and its
uncannily fricndlv service does
not disappoint. Everything
from Captain America to
Cerehus; heroes are indeed
here.
If your tastes are more, let's
say. alternative, hop and skip a
few blocks down to Nostalgia
Niewssrand. locared off
Dickinson Avenue. If you
thought comic books were just
for kids, step into this colorful
and sometimes unsettling cor-
ner of the world. Nostaligia has
heroes and much, much more.
Okay, that was more than a
two-minute tour, but you get
the point. Maybe Greenville
isn't Charolotte or Paleigh, but
it's also not a watery hole in
the ground. Like anything.
Greenville is what you make of
it. If you're new to town and
you W3nt this strange land to
become more familiar and
develop inro vour new home,
then get out and brave your
extra amount of the check from your
savings account. These are important
options considering that a big enough
mistake will stay on record with the
credit bureau for seven years.
.Another step in money manage-
ment is to prioritize. Take a look at
what is important to you, and decide
how much money you want to put
into each thing. Then decide what
sacrifices will have to be made to
accommodate that. For example, last
vear I decided to buy a new guitar. I
looked at my money and decided I
could eat cheaper and stay home more
instead of going out a lot. So, I used
the money I saved from those amend-
ments to my life to cover my pur-
chase.
Speaking of going out, everybody
knows that Greenville has a reputa-
tion and some great clubs, but before
you head out the door think about
how much money it'll take to com-
plete your plans for the night, and vow
not to spend more. It's easy to get
caught up in club-hopping or buying
food downtown, but it gets expensive
quick, so be careful.
Finally, avoid the Satan of college
finances, credit cards. es, it feels nice
when all these companies send you
packets offering you instant credit,
but realize that, as friendly as chese
companies sound, their main interest
is themselves. If you do feel that you
must get a credit card or if you decide
to get one to build a credit history,
shop around again. Some have lower
finance charges, and with a little bit of
looking, you can find one with no
annual fee. .Always be sure to read the
fine print, and keep track of what you
charge. Allow yourself to only use the
card in certain situations and think
about how you're going to pay rhe bill
before you charge. If you realize that
you won't be able to pay the bill, put
the card back in your pocket and
remember that you'll thank yourself
later.
No financial plan can account for
everything, and nobody is perfect at
keeping money. However, if ou take
the time to lay down some rules for
yourself and then keep to them, you'll
find that after your rime here at East
Carolina you'll be on better ground
than many of your peers, and you'll
have a good start on how to live the
rest of vour life.
the
APPLY
PERSON
2 ND FLOOR STUDENT PUB BUILDING
11 he !� �
eastcarolmian
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i
45 Tuesday. August 19, 1997
iili 'style
Become on
WANTAGE
Account Member!
� The Advantage Account is ECU'S
convenient and economical declining balance program.
Use goar Advantage Dollars at ang Campus Restaurant.
� look tor savings each week on selected menu items,
available to members onlg.
� Breeze through cashier lines
using the Advantage Dollars on gear meal curd.
� Students pug no sales tax on food
purchased with Advantage Dollars (SAVE 6).
� leave uour ATM curd � cash at home!
Let convenience und good sense work for gou
tag using gour Advantage Dollurs!
The East Carolinian
Advantage Pallors are occupied of these rine localioBis:
The Wright Place Croatan Omter Court ttigjl
The Spot Todd Pining Hall Mendenhall Pining Hall
niortB olreudi iwndrasrt o meal plui. Mwirt
1 ��-��,





niTT-r-
M lMtUj, Af� �8, 1887
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
9
A
1
' M.
TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
the East Carolinian
Pkk us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and
information you need to know about campus
issues and activities.
MINORITY MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up three times during the Fail and Spring
terms for discussion of the problems and issues
facing ECU's minorities.
STUDENT RADIO STATION LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
WZMB 91.3 FM Rebel
Pkk us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of Pick us up annually in the Spring to view a
music including alternative, jazz, metal, rap and showcase of campus literary and artistic cre-
more. ations.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
MEDIA
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL
Watch for the debut of cur web site next week!
J


Title
The East Carolinian, August 19, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 19, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1218
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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