The East Carolinian, June 18, 1997







WEDNESDAY
JUNE 18.1997
ast'carol inian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Transfer student to pursue degree at 79
Jacqueline D. Kellum
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
When students return to campus in the fall,
those transferring in will include 79-year-old
Beatrice Sheppard from Craven Community
College in New Bern. She will transfer in as a
junior and work on a degree in English with a
concentration in writing.
As a young woman, Sheppard had no
opportunity to go to college because of the
Depression, the war, and her marriage.
"I didn't get a chance when the
Depression came on. Wfe were essentially a
wealthy family in Seattle Sheppard said.
"My father was in the shipping business. W:
lost everything, including him
As a result of the hard times, Sheppard had
to go to work immediately. She worked in
clerical jobs,
� including that
of court
reporter, and
when World
War II broke
out she served
as a nurse in
the Marine
Corps.
Her husband,
u I want to get that B A
degree in a frame and
just hang it on the wall.
It would mean M much
to me to have a degree
Beatrice Sheppard
whom she met in February of 1942, was also in
the military. Sheppard said that her husband
turned out to be an alcoholic, and their mar-
riage was affected by that.
"All through the married life, it has not
been what you'd call a made in heaven one. I
don't know if there are any that are made in
heaven. It was very difficult, I was abused ver-
bally, never physically Sheppard said.
It was only with her retirement in 1979
and her husband's death that Sheppard said
she could finally go back to school.
"Finally, almost four years ago, the alco-
holism took him Shepard said. "His system
just went down and so I was a widow. And so
then I could really get my teeth into finally
living
With the opportunity finally available.
Sheppard began taking classes at Craven
Community College and eventually decided
to transfer to ECU.
"Thank goodness for the community col-
lege system. I've had some wonderful help
down there Sheppard said.
She chose to work on a degree in writing
because she has written before and has had
several pieces published. She admits to being
a little apprehensive, especially about Spanish
class.
"Now that I've come here to BOU, I bet
you people are just going to throw it at me and
see how I come out Sheppard said.
Sheppard says she has had a lot of support
"Why do you want to
do that? Go to all
that trouble'�to them
it's trouble, to me it is
the most wonderful
feeling
Beatrice Sheppard
for her goals
from her family,
but has received
skepticism from
others.
Why do
you want to do
that? Go to all
that trouble'�
to them it's
trouble, to me it
is the most won-
derful feeling
Sheppard said.
Now that
she finally has her chance, Sheppard says she
is looking forward to the day she will have her
degree.
"I want to get that BA degree in a frame
and just hang it on the wall. It would mean so
much to me to have a degree Sheppard said.
.Although Sheppard says she is not bitter
about the difficulties in her life, she says it
makes her grateful for her chance now.
"You young people have no idea what it
is�or do you?�to have something snatched
awa from you for years and years and years,
and all of a sudden, here's the whole bagful
Sheppard said.
Her advice to her fellow undergraduates
can be summed up in her favorite motto.
"The world is your oyster. Go out and see
it Sheppard said.
Internships
enhance
studies
Becky alley
HOI'SIN(, AND CONSI UTOKV SERVICES ISSI'ES
STUE WRITER
FFitor 's Note: This is part 3 of a J part series on
internships ami shi opportunities they provkle.
Many ECU students participate in internship
programs but few get to intern somewhere as
exciting as a television news program.
Mary Luebke. a senior communications
major, experienced the exciting world of
broadcast news last semester by interning at
WITN-7 News.
"It was a very fast-paced job; new things
were coming up all the time, so I was never
bored Luebke said.
Luebke, who is earning a BA in communi-
cations, worked in the newsroom of WiTN-7.
She helped write the news, pick out which
stories should lead the news and edit video-
tape.
Doing an internship proved to be very
helpful for Luebke.
"It definitely adds a lot and gives you a
new dimension to your studies Luebke said.
"My internship provided me with a whole
new insight into my major
Luebke said that one thing she found out
by doing an internship was that she did not
have some of the technical skills she would
need to go into her field of broadcast journal-
ism.
"One day they wanted me to edit some
videotape, but I had no training on how to do
it from ECU, so it was really difficult for me
to learn how to do it. I really wish we had
more training on the technical aspects of jour-
nalism here Luebke said.
"I now have an idea of what is out there,
what they expect you to know what they can
teach you and what I need to know. I had
been looking through rose colored glasses and
I had to learn pretty fast that the world is not
like that
Luebke said that everyone at WITN-7,
which is also an NBC and CNN affiliate, was
very helpful and nice to the interns. She also
SEE INTERNSHIP PAGE 2
WEDNESDAY
lifestyle 4
Reviewer want a
cracker?
opinion3
Hemp won't get
you nigh.
sports6
Bradford Creek:
Home sweet home.
the east Carolinian
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GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across (torn Joyner library
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THURSDAY:
sunny
high 82
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phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uuieciecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
at the
Gray Art Gallery
located at
Fifth and Jarvis
from
June 5 -27
hours
Monday-Thursday 10a.m5p.m.
Friday 10a.m11:30a.m.
The exhibit honors the founding of
the Leroy T. Walker International
Human Performance Center at ECU.
PHOTOS BY PATRICK IREIAN
Beatrice Sheppard will enroll at ECU in the fall to complete her degree in English.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Students cautioned to
avoid melanoma
A. BRANDON Mlsr
HK.tl.TH ISstks
STWK WRITKH
The summer heat is beginning to bubble
into full blast, which means there will be a lot
more playing and laying out in the sun. And as
a result, thousands of people will get malig-
nant melanoma, a sometimes deadly skin can-
cer, because they failed to protect themselves
from the scorching sun.
The fact has been well known for years,
overexposure to the sun can cause skin cancer.
Yet the rate of diagnosed melanoma doubles
every 12 years, and the current rate of death
from this skin cancer is one person every hour,
or 7,300 a year.
"There has definitely been an increase in
malignant melanoma, not only with fair
skinned people, but all people in general
said Joleen Jernigan, nurse practitioner at the
Student Health Center.
This increase in melanoma related deaths
is attributed to both the depletion of the o-
zone layer, and to changing trends in outdoor
lifestyles.
So why does something so easy to prevent
continue to take more and more lives? Some
people would rather put beauty before their
health and stay tan every summer. Some
don't want to take the time to protect them-
selves from the sun, and others aren't even
aware of the serious damage the sun can do.
Protecting yourself from dangerous UV
rays doesn't take much, you don't have to hide
in a closet for the rest of your life. Just use
some common sense and take precautions.
The suns rays are most harmful during mid-
day, so plan your lengthy outdoor activities
around 3-4 p.m. If you do play in the sun a lot,
either cover up with some clothing or wear a
sun block that is at least 15 SPF
Everybody is at risk for getting skin cancer,
even the young students at ECU. Jernigan
commented that there have been a number of
cases of melanoma seen at the Student
Health Center over
the years. Just
because you are not in
this high risk group
doesn't mean
melanoma won't hap-
pen to you. You may
have been building up
to it with out even
knowing.
"People who were
blistered by the sun
often as a child are
very susceptible to
melanoma, but most
people don't think
about the damage
that has been done in
their childhood
Jernigan said.
Rod Friedman, an
advocate of melanoma
prevention, and pub-
the UC
Wellness
andjohn
Medical
THE PEOPLE WHO FALL INTO AT
LEAST ONE OF THESE
�ATE6GmtS-ARE W-TH� HIGH-
RISK GROUP:
Burn or blister easily
Light skinned
Blond or red hair
� Blue, green or gray eyes
1 Overexposure to the sun between
childhood and teen years
� Family history of melanoma
� More than 100 moles on your body;
50 if you are under the age of 20
"The survival rates have improved
Jernigan said. "It used to be that you would
get melanoma, and that was it, you could
probably die
And that's the good ne Melanoma can
be easily cured if it is discovered early. In
most cases melanoma can be treated in the
dermatologists office, and it's easy to detect.
You should become familiar with your body so
you can see any changes ir bur skin. All you
need is a little time to check yourself once or
twice a month, and a hand mirror for those
hard to reach places.
"Some key spots that malignant melanoma
might show up are the places we never think
to look� the shins, the back, the top of the
ears and the face Jernigan said.
Most malignancies look like moles, and
they are usually discolored, or have changed in
size, shape or texture. Sometimes a brand
new mole will appear.
If you see anything out of the ordinary you
should see a dermatologist as soon as possible.
Remember, the quicker you catch it, the more
likely you are to save your own life.
lisher of
Berkeley
Letter
Hopkins
Ietter, found several
spots of malignant
melanoma on his Ixidy
at the age of 48. Yet
he has dark hair, olive
skin, has no history of
melanoma in his fami-
ly, and he had normal
exposure to the sun as
a child. Luckily he
caught it in time.
Students should guard against spending long periods of time out in the sun
without protection. Such practices could increase the risk of melanoma.
FILE PHOTO





V
2 Wednesday. Jum18. 1997
news
the East Carolinian
ECU Hosts Camps for Youth
ECU will host several camp-style activities for young people this week.
Among them is the Keyboard Camp for piano students ages 7-14. pis camp
meets daily through June 20 at the School of Music. Youngsters from 12 to
17 will attend an adventure camp offered through the Department or
Recreational Services. This camp includes practice on ECU s indoor climb-
ing wall and on the Ropes Challenge course on Monday and Tuesday and a
visit to the mountains during the remainder of the week to tackle rock
climbing, river canoeing and trail hiking.
Faculty member named
occupational
therapy fellow
Dr. Anne E. Dickerson, associate pro-
fessor and chair of the occupational
therapy department in the East
Carolina University School of Allied
Health Sciences, was named to the
American Occupational Therapy
Association's Roster of Rslkws during
the association's annual national con-
ference in Orlando, Fla. Dickerson
was recognized with an award for
"Outstanding Contributions to
Re:�arch and Theory Development
Dr. Anne E. Dickerson,
associate professor and chair of the
occupational therapy department
.
Ventures in Health began Monday
A summer program to introduce minority students to careers in htilth
began Monday and continues through June 28. Twenty-two students�9th
and 10th graders�are enrolled in the program. The students spend time
with professionals in medicine, nursing and a variety of other health-related
areas.
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(wttkin walking distance of ECU)
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GETTING THE DETAILS
A painter takes advairtaoe of the warm weather. Cooperation from the elements
allows this artist to see the effect of the sunlight and shadows up close.
FILE PK0T0
Internship
continued from page 1
said the main reason she did an
internship was to get first hand work
experience because she knew that
was highly recommended.
Though Luebke found she was
lacking some skills, she feels doing
an internship was a valuable experi-
ence.
"You mav lie able to do some-
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thing on paper, but when you gt out
in the world it can be completely
different. Internships help you real-
ize that; they are like stepping
stones to your future Luebke said.
Doing an internship in her major
actually varied Luebke's career goals
a bit.
"It dampened my goals, but did
not really change them. I found out
that I didn't have some of the skills
1 would need, so now I have to
either get them before I graduate in
December or change my goals
Luekbe said.
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Kingston Rental Companies � 3002 Kingston Circle
Hunt declares stiff enforcement on
erosion control
NEW BERN (AP) - Hog waste runoff" and municipal sewage plants aren't .
the onlv problems for the troubled Neuse k.ver, which also is being threat-
ened by construction runoff, says Gov. Jim Hunt.
Two years ago, a series of hog waste lagoon spills sullied several nvers in
eastern North Carolina and drew attention to the booming hog industry.
The most infamous spill was June 21, 1995, when 25 million gallons of
hoe waste flowed from a lagoon into the New River. Rmr other major spills ,
affected tributaries of the Cape Fear or Northeast Cape Fear nvers and Six
Runs Creek that year. �
There were 29 discharges into the Neuse or tributaries in 199a, officials
said A Johnston County hog farm discharged untreated waste into a tribu-
tary at a rate of 40 gallons a minute. A Greene County farm wasordered
closed for piping waste into another tributary for several years. The next
year, a Craven County hog farm lagoon near the river ruptured and spilled
1.5 million gallons of waste.
Roses gives up Duke post to lead gene-based
research at Glaxo Wellcome
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK (AP) - A Duke University neurologist
noted for research confirming a genetic link to Alzheimer s disease has left
the university to lead a new gene-based research program at Olaxo
CAlleneRoses moved Monday from his lab office in Duke's neurology
department, where he served as chairman, to a corporate office in Research
After 27 years at Duke, he is now vice president and worldwide director
of genetics for one of the world's largest drug companies. At Glaxo, he will
lead the company's nrw �30 million "genetics directorate.
Over the vears, Roses has battled repeatedly with federal grant-givers
and other Alzheimer's researchers. He said he took the Glaxo job so he
could begin searching for the cures, rather than the causes, ofthe disease
The worldwide genetics program Roses will head has a 1997 budget of
$49 million and 150 researchers based in three countnes, including Glaxo s
U S headquarters in Research Triangle Park, the comoanv said.
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r





r
inion
The East Carolinian
3 Wednesday, June 18. 1997
easferolinian
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JOHN MI'RMiY �
With the recent media attention given to Beatrice Shepparf, the 79-oldundergradu.
ate who will be transferring to ECU in the fall to finish her degree, we as t�d,t�nal s�i-
dents are being reminded yet again that the model of the so-called tradtuonal student is no
longer the only kind of student to be found on college campuses.
�ieta. expectations lead us to believe that we should 1
finishing high school, finish our degree in the standard four years, graduate, find a nice job
and live happily ever after.
If only life were so nice and tidy.
In today's complicated and diverse world, there are all sorts of reasons why some people
may not be able to attend college right away, or may choose not to. One of the most com-
mon reasons is financial-some simply can't afford it. Others choose to get mamed and raise
their families while they are still young, and return to school latet Others may be prevent-
ed by circumstances completely beyond their control, as in the case of Beatrice Sheppard-
nothing like a world war to spoil your life plans. . . ,
Luckily for those who don't go to college at the standard age, societal expectations are not
ironclad There are many non-traditional students on campus, and the increasing avail-
ability of night and weekend classes at community and four-year colleges all ovenin addi-
tion to other degree completion programs targeted at older students, may be proof of the
increasing acceptance of education at any age. '
And why not? Education is supposed to be a lifelong process. What is the use of growing
older if you do not also grow wiser? As scientists probe the mysteries of aging and speculate
on wavs to extend the average human life span, the question we need to ask ourselves is,
"What would we do with that extra fifty years if we had it?" Also, with a longer life span,
perhaps we would no longer feel as if we have to finish our education within a standard time
ft is also true that having older students sharing the campus is not only advantageous for
them, but for the younger students as well. Professors of non-traditional1 studenusoften
comment on how dedicated the more mature students are, and how they bring a different
perspective to class discussions.
In addition to their contribution in the classroom, there is also a more subtle effect out-
side of it. A college campus is supposed to be a place of diversity a place where 5tufents�n
be exposed to as many aspects of life as possible. This should include people of different
races, nationalities, religions and ages.
We at TEC applaud the effort and positive attitude of Beatnce Shepoard, and others lite
her. At the age of 79, after already living a full life, she has decided that she's not ready to
be content with what she has and who she is, but to keep changing and learning. She has
decided that she is not finished living. We should all be so hopeful.
OPINION
Columnist
Hemp and Marijuana need different regulation
Hemp for Victory, or at least that is
what the United States Department
of Agriculture movie said during
World War II. During the second
World Wir, American farmers were
encouraged to grow hemp. The fed-
eral government asked farmers to
grow hemp for the war. Hemp even
saved George Bush's life during the
war; his parachute webbing was
made of hemp. For some unusual
reason, hemp is illegal. According to
many, including Audrey Yeager, a
deputy sheriff in Kentucky, hemp
should remain illegal.
A brief explanation is needed for
those people who cannot distinguish
between marijuana and industrial
hemp. Marijuana and hemp
(cannabis sativa) are close to being
one in the same. It is the dried flow-
ers on the top leaves of the female
cannabis sativa plant that consti-
tutes marijuana. The flowers con-
tain THC, the active ingredient in
marijuana. The THC chemical is in
such small quantities (less than
rpercent) in hemp that smoking
hemp will not get you high.
Yeager's reasoning for the contin-
ued prohibition against hemp is
absurd. It is Yeager's opinion that
law enforcement cannot distinguish
between marijuana and hemp. Not
being able to tell the difference
between hemp and marijuana on
sight alone is true for the untrained
eye. Non-filtered cigarettes to the
unknowing look like joints. I am
sure that Yeager, a resident cf a
tobacco producing state, does not
want non-filtered cigarettes out-
lawed because they took like joints.
Proponents of industrial hemp claim
that the difference between mari-
juana and hemp is distinguishable.
The deputy is also worried about
a fanner supplementing hisher
income by growing a few marijuana
plants along with the hemp plants.
The deputy has a very good point.
Yes, some farmers will grow marijua-
na in fields of hemp, much the same
way some farmers now grow marijua-
na in fields of com.
If Yeager and those who agree
with his opinion want to worry about
the THC content in the hemp being
planted, we could do like France.
Farmers must obtain their tow-level
(THC) seeds of hemp from the
National Hemp Producers
Federation, inform the Ministries of
Health and Agriculture of their
intent to grow hemp and, on top of
all that, must have a guaranteed
buyer. .
Yeager's opinion stems an inci-
dent involving a local teacher who
had the audacity to - get this - actu-
ally trv and teach her children the
truth. The teacher had a special
guest, Woody Harrclson, come and
talk to the class about industrial
hemp. Harrelson, of Cheers fame, is
a big proponent of industrial hemp.
Evidently the deputy feels it is
wrong to tell children about a plant
that � illegal for all the wrong rea-
ions; its appearance and infinitesi-
mal amounts of THC.
I will agree with the Deputy on
two points. The teacher should have
chosen � mere appropriate date for
Mr. Harnetaon to come to ctass.
Harrelson came on the day of the
DARE graduation. The teacher was
also wrong in passing around hemp
seeds, which are illegal.
Hemp is a very useful product.
Hemp can be used for paper, bio-
masss fuel and cloth. The first draft
of the Declaration of Independence,
"Common Sense" by Thomas Paine,
the King James Bible (17th century)
and the works of Mark Twain and
Alexander Dumas were ail printed
on hemp paper. The paintings of
Van Gogh and Rembrandt were pri-
marily painted on hemp canvas.
Look around; more and more people
are wearing hemp.
The teacher was not wrong in
teaching her students about hemp.
The best teacher I ever had told us
not to believe everything we see or
hear, that sometimes it is best to
question authority and yes, even
question the tews. Is there any other
plant in this country whose seeds ate
illegal, the ownership of the plant is
illegal, the growing of the plant also
being illegal, yet whose products,
paper and doth are completely legal
to own? Hemp should not be illegal
because it looks somewhat similar to
marijuana.
" 'Off-the-record' conferences are subterfuges which
stifle the voice of the press and deprive the people
of their right to know
L
Jay Crouse. journalist, author, 1960
OPINION
Columnist
NICHOLS
Confidential testing threatens everyone
Recently the North Carolina State
Government has decided to ban all
anonymous HIV testing and
replace it with confidential test-
ing. This means that instead of a
number being assigned to test
results, the person's name and
Social Security number will be
included in all cases. They are say-
ing that the test results will still be
just as secure as they were before
and that there is no need for alarm.
No need for alarm as long as you
are in the majority of people who
do not have the Human Imuno-
Defeciency Virus. But what about
those who do? These people will
be permanently tagged by some
bureaucrat as being INFECTED.
We all know how efficiently the
state government is run and how
well they keep their business in
order. Take, for example the
Department of Health, Environ-
ment, and Natural Resources'
recent triumphs in organization.
They allowed one nursing home to
go on doing business while patients
inside were sitting in pools of urine
for days, while patients were left
without fluids to the point of
death. One man required 22 liters
of fluid before he became con-
scious.
This kind of organization
allowed these atrocities to happen
and now they claim they can keep
your confidential medical records
safe from outsiders. Who are they
kidding?
In the past "confidential" med-
ical records have been just that as
long as they do not pose a direct
threat to public health. Diseases
like tuberculosis and small pox are
such cases that arc dangerous to
public safety because they are
spread as easily as the common
cold. HIV on the other hand, has
been proven not to spread like this.
Why do they need these people's
names? This question has been
avoided because they don't seem to
have an explanation. The main rea-
son is that some legislator decided
it should be this way and now it is.
This tactic will not curb the
spread of the virus nor will it
spread better knowledge of how to
avoid this disease. It will, however,
scare people away from getting
tested and increase rhe chance of
them giving it to another person
because they do not know they
have the vims. The fear is very real.
Imagine having your name on a
database in some granite office
building in Raleigh and next to it
the number of HIV tests you've
had along with their results. Who
knows what people will be looking
at that computer screen. Raleigh's
state government offices are not
Fort Knox!
Orr top of the fear of your pri-
vate health record being not so pri-
vate is the possibility that the same
program recently enacted in South
Dakota will spread to our part of
the world. The Governor of South
Dakota has mandated that, under
certain circumstances, a person
(for example, person A) may be
detained and quarantined if anoth-
er person (person B) believes he
has been exposed to the virus by
person A. Also, once a person has
contracted the disease he may also
be detained to insure he does not
threaten the health of others. How
would the authorities know who is
a possible "threat"? Check out the
database "locked" in the Depart-
ment of Public Health.
For those of us fortunate enough
not to have the disease, this all
seems a little distant and we feel
detached from it. But, if it is OK to
incarcerate a person for having a
disease, why not for all diseases?
And lets go one step further, let's
isolate them into "camps" where
we. the normal members of society
will all be safe. Just maybe we will
be able to put all public threats
away: alcoholics, the mentally ill,
those with physical handicaps,
pesky opinion writers.
And where did all this start?
Because we sat by and let the gov-
ernment categorize us, put us neat-
ly into separate stacks, divide the
population and destroy what bit of
humanity is left in civilization.
OPINION
William S.
COGHRAN
Columnist
Death penalty, retribution or revenge
Does the death penalty deter crimi-
nals? A TIMECNN poll showed
that Americans stand divided on this
question: only 45 percent thought
yes. That's quite a disparity for a
subject whose very controversy has
waned to the point of indifference in
most Americans' lives.
While researching material for
this ankle it was difficult, personal-
ly, to rid myself of emotions sur-
rounding the Timothy McVeigh ver-
dict. Guilty on all 11 charges includ-
ing: conspiracy to use a weapon of
mass destruction, use of a weapon of
mass destruction, destruction by an
explosive and the murder of eight
federal law-enforcement agents, all
of which carry the possible penalty
of death, I couldn't help but think if
ever the death penalty should be
used, this is the time.
Indeed, Judge Richard Matsch
has fought to keep this case from
becoming a circus. He has repeated-
ly ordered jurors to discern the facts
of the trial "free from the influence
of passion He might as well have
tried to adjudicate a tornado. "I saw
a body in a blanket recalled Jerry
Flowers, a member of the Oklahoma
City police force. "When I opened
up the blanket, there was a 5-year-
old boy. His face was gone
Kathleen Treanor testified for the
prosecution, recounting the horror of
losing her only daughter, Ashley. She
remembered kissing her daughter
good-bye for the last time. Then
after days of searching through the
debris of the federal building, her
daughter's body was found, and
Treanor was able to bury her proper-
ly. Only seven months later, Treanor
received a call from the medical
examiner's office. "He said 'We have
recovered a portion of Ashley's
hand Treanor testified fighting
back tears, and we wanted to know
if you wanted that buried in the
mass grave or if you would like to
have it And I said. Of course I want
it. It's a part of net
All the while, McVeigh has sat
stone-cold without the slightest sign
of remorse. It is apparent that he
believes his bombing of the
Oklahoma City Federal Building was
a just cause. And it is with this bur-
den that the defense has had to por-
tray McVeigh as a human being who
thinks and acts and plays just like
the rest of us. It is an insurmount-
able obstacle indeed. Glen Seidl,
whose wife died in the bombing,
read a letter written by his 9-year-
old son. "I will the letter said, "still
make my mother a Mother's Day
card and Valentine's Day card like
the other kids
In connection with the powerful
emotions involved in this case, the
question as to McVeigh's future revi-
talizes an old controversy: the death
penalty. Three-fourths of Americans,
along with the President, Congress,
and the courts are in favor of capitol
punishment. Why then is the popu-
lation split on the question of
whether the death penalty is effec-
tive in deterring crime (52 percent
of Americans think it does not)? If
we can't seem to resolve whether or
not lethal injection, gas chambers
and electric chairs deter crime, why,
then, do 2,8 states utilize this means
of punishment? If it doesn't work,
why use it? Is it retribution or
revenge? Because if we use the
death penalty as a form of revenge,
aren't we just as guilty as the mur-
derers? Certainly, revenge and retri-
bution become mingled in cases as
emotional as this.
America stands alone among
Western democracies in its use of
capitol punishment. In 19, 79 exe-
cutions were carried ouwwith Texas.
Virginia, and Missouri conducting
the most, 23, 10, and seven respec-
tively (North Carolina did not
administer the death penalty at all in
'96; however, it has been used eight
times since 1976).
The thing is, McVeigh's trial is
unique. He has been featured on 60
Minutes, the cover of Time and
Newsweek and myriad other sources
of news. However, I believe it is fair
to say that the 3,214 death row pris-
oners in the United States (154 in
NC) have not been given the same.
In fact, capitol punishment has
become a mundane, trivial occur-
rence that rarely even makes the six
o'clock news. All the while, over half
of America thinks the punishment
does not deter criminals. So why do
we use it?
No doubt, Timothy McVeigh
likens himself a martyr. Last month
he read W Somerset Maugham's
The Razor's Edge. He is currently
finishing Man's Fate by Andre
Malraux. Time and time again he
has stated his admiration for The
Turner Diaries, a fictional account of
an uprising by white supremacists.
Earl Turner, the story's hero, faces
his death with sang-froid, even joy.
"Brothers he says, addressing an
elite group called the Order. "When
I entered your ranks for the first
time, I consecrated my life to our
Order and to the purpose for which
it cxistsNow I am ready to meet
my obligation fully. I offer you my
life While McVeigh might adorn
himself a martyr and may very well
be executed by lethal injection in
the not-too-distant future, the
American question of capitol pun-
ishment still lies unresolved and
unanswered. Does capitol punish-
ment deter crime? If not, why use it?
Think America, think.
� .A -�- �. -1" �





r
myTi r�
i, June IS, 1897
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Summer Theater kicks off

JENNIFER TAFE
STAFF WKITF.R
ng for entertainment that's a little bit out of the
ordinary in Greenville? The East Carolina Summer
Theater 1997 station promises to provide many laughs
and a whirlwind of musk and dancing. This season will
feature two blockbuster musicals guaranteed to thrill
audiences with pure musical theater entertainment.
Opening the season is Crony rorYou, show styled
after old-school musical comedies, which features the
music and lyrics of George and Ira Gershwin and the
newfy-revised book of Ken Ludwig.
Including such recognizable Gershwin classics as
"EmbraeeaMe You "1 Got Rhythm" and "The Heal
American folk Song is a Rag Crony For You is a theater
dance masterpiece.
The East Carolina Summer Theater will be joined in
this production by New York guest artists Norb Joerder,
lirector, and Susan Kaszynski, choreographer. East
's own scenic designer Robert Alpers, will pro-
vide the intricate set design for the stage.
Crony for You opens on June 24th at 8 p.m. and will
run through June 28 wkh an 8 p.m. show every night. On
June 25th and 28th, the cast will also present 2 p.m.
matinees.
Next in the East Carolina Summer Theatre's 1997
Season is Nunsense II: The Serond Coming. Lighthearted
and hilarious, this show is perfect for summer entertain-
ment.
like its predecessor Nonsense, which was performed
by the East Carolina Summer Theater in 1990, Nmwnse
II features the humor of Mother Superior and a crew of
singing, dancing, joke-telling, roller-skating, Elvis-imper-
sonating sisters.
Audiences will be treated to song-and-dance num-
bers such as "What Would Elvis Do" and the lyrical
"Angeline Nwtsense will run Jury 8th-12ch at 8 p.m. each
evening, with 2 p.m. matinees on Jury 9th and 12th.
Tickets are on sale now and start at $40 for season
tickets or $22.50 for individual tickets. Tickets may be
purchased at the box office, by phone with a VISA or
MasterCard at 328-6829 or 328-1726, or by mail at East
Carolina Summer Theater, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
The box office is open Monday through Friday from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. or 8:15 p.m. on performance dates.
Cracker conquers Greemilk
mOVf �3re view
Cage takes an absurd ride
in Con Air
DftLEWtUIAMSON
SFNHRtWRfTfiR
SIX OUT Of T6N
A plane filled with escaped convicts takes off amid an
explosive war zone, dragging along a long, thick rope
with � large set antlers attached at the end. Just before
the plane lifts off, the antlers hook onto a shiny, new
sports car. As the plane becomes airborne, so does the
car. Meanwhile, the hero of the day (in this case,
Nicolas Cage) attempts to get his friends off the plane,
but realizes the plane is already in the air. Standing at
the open end of the aircraft, Cage witnesses the sports
car soaring behind thousands of feet above the earth. In
a perfect southern drawl that carries a hint of Elvis,
Cage calmly and flatly states, "On any other day, that
would seem strange
In any other
type of movie, the
above scene would
not only be strange
but ludicrous. But
in Cm Air, the lat-
est adrenaline rush
from producer
Jerry Bruckheimer,
such moments are
common.
Bruckheimer
has never been
concerned with
plausibility in his
films. He and his
late partner, Don
Simpson, amassed
a fortune and cre-
ated a small empire
with such nonsen-
sical action-orient-
ed movies as top Gun,
Beverly HUis dp It,
Bad Boys, and Tie Rock. In many ways, their films help
define the acceptable mold for the action genre: things
need to be quick, flashy, glossy, over-the-top, and vio-
lent. And, if possible, there should be some sort of plot
tying everything together.
Con Air has all of these necessary ingredients, and
when viewed with a certain frame of mind, it works
wonderfully, l his is a popcorn movie loaeed with sever-
al squirts of salty butter. Excess and an indulgence in
absurdity is what keeps things thrusting.
This is not necessarily a bad thing. Films like Robert
Rodriquez's Desperado and From Dusk TtUDmsn and John
Win's Broken Arrmr thrived because of their don't-ajve-
a-damn attitudes. Absurdity and over-the-top antics
made those films immensely fun, and the same can be
argued for Con Air.
However, Robert Rodriquez and John Woo are both
visionary directors in their chosen field, and they do
have talent. Unfortunately, Con Air's director. Simon
Wat, does not have the necessary style or sense of con-
trol needed to make an outlandish action movie great.
As frantic as these films may get, a sense of pacing is
still necessary. West fills his screen with a number of
impressive shots, but when the action starts rolling, the
screen becomes a muddled mess.
Wat is so concerned with capturing the sensation of
a high-octane adrenaline rush thai he sacrifices visual
comprehension.
Many key scenes,
such as the film's
climatic chase fea-
turing our two
heroes (Cage and
John Cusack)
speeding after a fire
truck, is so quickly
edited that the
audience never gets
a chance to firmly
enjoy the ride. This
is the MTV style of
filmmaking.
Constantly feed the
audience with many
smali visual bires so
they lever get full
or bored.
The result, unfortu-
nately, creates an
action film that never
has a great actior
moment. Films like Die Hard and Lethal Weapon, while
both absurd, had a sense of where they were going and
what they were doing. Those films sporadically spread
the action out, slowly building toward explosively ener-
getic climaxes. Con Air, while somewhat entertaining,
SEE CON AIR PAGE �
MtyUNIrMisnjnrtromthiOlotofCiwA:
FMTO CSMTtSV Of SUEB VIST MCTMtS
ANDY TURNER
I.IFF.STYI.F. F.HITOR
Minutes after Michael Jordan and the Bulls won their
fifth championship in seven years Friday night, the
screen showing the game went up and Cracker
appeared on the Attic stage.
By the end of the night, the Attic crowd was as
sweaty as his Airness's bald head was in the fourth quar-
ter. High temperatures, a packed crowd and some of
that rock-n-roll hoochie coochie (heh, heh) provided
courtesy of Cracker contributed to rampant body odor
and wet, clinging clothes. But isn't that what rock and
roll is all about? Smelling so bad it's good.
The heat did not affect the crowd, who danced and
screamed loudly after every song, or the band, who
played for nearly two hours with only brief pauses
between songs.
Cracker, at their best, cranked out blistering ver-
sions of their radio-friendly anti-anthems ("I Hate My
Generation "Teen Angst (What the World Needs
Now)"). At their worst, Cracker sounded like some sort
of southern rock cover band, churning out stale Lynyrd
Skynyrd riffs (lots of other stuff).
Lead singer David Lowcry's ragged vocals are per-
fect for the cynicism Cracker's song lyrics often convey.
But I thought they were perfect for Camper fen
Beethoven's (his former band) twisted songs also. I
mean, come on, "Take the Skinheads Bowling" should
be a generational anthem, not "Get Off This
Guitarist Johnny Hickman and bass player Bob
Rupe (late of the wonderful Silos) are tough and tal-
ented players. However, similar to sunlight, you do not
want to look at them directly, as Hickman enjoys strik-
ing excessive guitar hero poses and Rupe is a member
of the G.E. Smith School of Constipated Musicians,
squinting his eyes and sucking in his cheeks at every
turn.
Cracker brought out the yee-haws with a couple of
cool country numbers. Hickman headed the hoe-down
with the excellent "Lonesome Johnny Blues
Ixwery waited to the encore to finally address the
crowd, blasting a few of his "alternative" rock contem-
poraries. He gave the thumbs down to Sponge and
Seven Mary Three and called No Doubt's music "Lita
David Lowery hatas his generation, especially No Doubt.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ENTERTAINMENT ALLEY
Ford power ballads I like him more now.
Cracker wrapped up the evening with "Low send-
ing the crowd home stanky and smelly, but happy.
Openers and Ohio natives the Haynes Boys were
great - for the two songs I got to see them play. I arrived
late and missed most of their set, much to my disap-
pointment, as I thoroughly enjoyed their most recent
release, last year's self-titled album. If you dug 'em, you
should get the album, if only for "Bitters Past which
will remind you of every failed relationship you ever
had.
Overall, it was a great night for music in the Emerald
City. It was encouraging to see a band in town as big as
Cracker, who offered something different from the
usual roots rock fare. Let's hope it happens more often.
Rusted Root sends Ritz
into 'Ecstasy'
Pat Reid
ASST. I.IFF.STYI.F. EDITOR
I have seen the light. When Rusted Root first showed up
on the music scene in 1994,1 couldn't stand them. I was
totally and completely repulsed by their music and made
jokes about them non-stop. Slowly though, I became
adjusted to their sound, and before long, as much as I
hated to admit it, I dug them. This reversal reached its
height when I finally got their debut CD Wken imke-ot
so I thought. Then, before I knew it, I was making plans
to see them live at the Ritz in Raleigh. After having seen
a snippet of their live show at this past year's Farm Aid,
I was ready to see how they did in a full length set.
The 9 p.m. show started with Jump Little Children
from Charleston. SC. The bassist looked like Buster
Poindexter, one of the singers looked barely old enough
to shave, and the cellist looked more like an accountant
than a musician, but musically they were pretty good,
and that's what really counts. More importantly, they
had a diverse enough sound to fit in with Rusted Root.
They combined rap, funk, rockabilly, and folk to form an
eclectic mix that got the crowd pumped and dancing.
After only about a half-hour, Jump Little Children
said their good-byes and the crowd settled down to wait
for Rusted Root. And a good little wait it was. The usual
half-hour turned into 45 minutes, which then turned
into nearly an hour before the lights went out and the
incense was lit.
Finally the band appeared and did the usual warm-
ups with each member fiddling around on their respec-
tive instrument, but then the warm-up suddenly
became the beginning of "Laugh As the Sun The band
was dead-on and the surprisingly diverse crowd was lov-
ing it.
I went to the show expecting mostly college age hip-
pies to be in the audience, but in fact people from every
walk of life were there and they all were dancing and
having a blast.
Finishing "Laugh the band slid straight into "Cat
Turned Blue without so much as a break in the flow.
Finally, on the third song, they turned the energy up a
notch and jammed with "Virtual Reality off their sec-
ond CD, Remember. They kept the energy up as they did
a few final seconds of "Drum Trip" as an intro to
"Ecstasy By now the Ritz had gotten hot and the audi-
ence was a sea of bodies dancing to the native percus-
sions while singing along.
The band didn't show any signs of letting up as they
ripped through the barnstormer "Rain and the mellow-
er "Food and Creative Love One thing about live
Rusted Root is that they pick up the pace of songs com-
pared to the album versions.
After about an hour, lead singerguitarist Michael
Oabicki sent the crowd into a frenzy as he began play-
ing the band's biggest hit, "Send Me On My Way After
playing the opening part a couple of times, Glabicki sim-
ply said, "You sing it and the crowd was happy to
oblige. After letting the crowd sing the first verse,
Glabicki joined in and everyone sang the rest of the song.
After jamming the end out a little, they concluded the
song to thunderous applause. n
About a half-hour later, they kicked into "Cruel Sun,
which included introductions of the various band mem-
bers and little jams by each member. At the conclusion
of "Sun" the band waved good-bye, said their thank-
you's and left the stage. The crowd stomped, chanted
"Rusted Root and flat out screamed for the band to
return. After about a five minute wait, the band slightly
appeased the crowd with a single encore, "Martyr
In all the band ripped through 19 songs in a little
under two hours. Needless to say, they looked drained,
and to be honest I think the crowd was too. A few peo-
ple hung out after the show and were rewarded with
drumsticks, but most people simply wandered out the
doors to their cars, knowing that they had just seen a
show unlike any other.
June
18 Wednesday
domes at Fleming Hall Courtyard at 9 p.m.
Comedy Zone with Mike Veneman at the Attic.
Hickory Hawkins & Side Meat and the Blue Dogs at the Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
Tina Turner and Cyndi Lauper at Walnut Creek in Raleigh.
19 Thursday
RetroDance Party at the Attic.
John Thursday at Peasant's.
Spatula, Poem Rocket and Karma to Bum at the Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Day by the River at Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill.
20 Friday
Unsound at the Attic.
Day room and Breed 13 at Peasant's.
Bluegrass night with Crucial Smith and others at the Local 506 in ChapeJ
Hill.
Dave Matthews Band and Los Lobos at Walnut Creek in Raleigh.
Brother Monk, Nancy Middleton, Bobby Hinton Blues Band and Lois
Dawson at the Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill.
Lynyrd Skynyrd, Paul Rodgers and Corey Stevens at the Va. Beach
Amphitheater.
Neville Brothers and Steve Riley Sc the Mamou Playboys at Tbwn Point
Park in Norfolk, Va.
21 Saturday
Root Doctors at the Attic.
Last One Standing at Peasant's.
Mind Sirens and Family Dollar Pharaohs at the Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Lynyrd Skynyrd and Paul Rodgers at Walnut Creek in Raleigh.
9811 at the Brewery in Raleigh
Athenaeum, the Gathering Field and Mishap at the Cat s Cradle in
Chapel Hill.
60 Ft. Dolls, Iggy Pop, Catfish, Linda Perry, Nixons, Sponge, Rev. Horton
Heat, Ryan Downs and Treadmill Trackstar at the Va. Beach Amphitheater.
Tile Iguanas and Little Rat at Tow n Point Park in Norfolk, Va.
22 Sunday
Mountain Goats and Simon Joyner at the Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill.
24 Tuesday
Craxyor You at McGinnis Theatre at 8 p.m.
SEE SHOWTIME, PAGE S






5 Wednesday. June 18. 1997
IT
I. IK
style
The East Carolinian
Con Air
continued from pape 4
comes off as just one mindless action moment after anoth-
er with no satisfying pav off m the end. Kven the film's big
selling scene, which has the plane crashing madly into
downtown I-as Vegas, seems blandK tired.
However, good talent tan make even the driest cookie
taste sweet, and the cast of Con. rare the chocolate chips
in this dessert. There are more good actors packed into
this film than time can do justice. Still, the skills of Cage,
Cusack, John Malkovich, Steve Busccmi, Ving Rhames,
Colm Meaney and Mvkelti Williams (you know, Bubba
from Forrest Gump) all make this plane ride worth the
time.
Like the film itself, these performances are over-the-
top and absurd, and that's what makes them so appealing.
Cage is particularly interesting as Cameron Poe, the hero
of the day. He looks like Jesus on steroids and talks like a
Vegas Elvis impersonator, making him one of the more
unique action heroes in recent memory. The character's
motivation also makes him stand out among other action
heroes. He does not really care about stopping the bad
guys: he just wants to help his only two friends trapped on
board the plane, and1, more importantly, he wants to get a
stuffed bunny rabbit to the daughter he has never met. As
ridiculous as this mav sound, it works and Cage pulls off
being macho just as well as he pulled off being drunk in
Leaving Ims Vegas.
In many ways, this film is one drunken ride. It's loud,
wild and non-apologetic. It is what it is, and you either
love it or hate it for that simple fact.
Prior expectations make or break any film, and this is
especially true ofCon Air. If you want a more realistic slice
of action cinema, rent The French Connection. Clear and
Present Danger or Heat. If you just want a fast-paced ride
and not have to think, Con Air will get you there.

$395 LUNCH
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Monday 12 Price Pitchers of Draft
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Wednesday Mexican Imports $1.50
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Blockbuster Music, Kroger, Hecht's, select School Kids
Charge by Phone: (919)834-4000
Convenience and Handling Charges are Added
Dates and Support Acis Subject 10 Change Wichout Notice
Showtime
continued from page 4
Seal I i wag at the Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Buck-O-Nine and the Mephiskapheles at the Brewery- in Raleigh.
Clawhammer and Smooch & Bandway at the Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill.
Eacst. Carolina Summer Theatre
The Gershwin Musical Comedy Hit
June 24-28, 1997
The Little Sisters of Hoboken are Back!
wm m
July 8-12, 1997
Season Tickets: $40.00 to $55.00
Individual Tickets: $22.50 to $30.00
Senior Citizens: $20.50 to $27.50
Children: $10.25 to $13.75
Call 328-6829
Monday - Friday
10:00 am until 4:00 pm
Every Evening at 8:00 P.M. with additional matinee perfor-
mances at 2:00 P.M. on Wednesday and Saturday.
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Wednesday @ 9pm Fleming hall courtyard. Bring your own lounge chair





V
6 Wednesday. June 18. 1997
The East Carolinian
Bradford Creek perfect for any golfer
Doctor is optimistic about Konstantinov's
slight movements
ROYAL OAK. Mich. (AP) - With modem medicine able to do little right
now for their friend, members of the Detroit Red Wings have turned to
music to reach defenseman Vladimir Konstantinov.
Konstantinov, 30, remained in critical condition and in a coma Monday
morning following a limousine accident Friday. A doctor said he was encour-
aged that Konstantinov appeared to be responding to his favorite song from
the Red Wings' Stanley Cup victory: "We Are The Champions" by Queen.
"There is movement, there have been subtle signs of racial expression
said Dr. James Robbins, a trauma surgeon at William Beaumont Hospital.
"There's, still reason for a tot of concern Robbins said Sunday. "But it's
an optimistic sign and it gives good reason to remain hopeful and optimistic
that ultimately he is going to do well
Team masseur Sergei Mnatsakanov, 43, also remained in a coma listed in
critical condition and breathing with the help of ventilators.
Two others in the vehicle, Wings defenseman Slava Fetisov, 39, and lim-
ousine driver Richard Gnida, 28, remained in good condition and could be
released Monday, Robbins said.
Fehr asks Senate to enforce antitrust laws
WASHINGTON - Major league baseball, in the midst of interieague play
and hoping to win back fans, revisited its labor problems yesterday when
union leader Donald Fehr urged a Senate committee to hold the game to
antitrust laws.
Fehr, appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, said baseball,
like every other professional soon, should be subject to antitrust provisions.
The owners and players agreed to see such legislation as pan of the
agreement that ended the 1994-95 strike.
Fehr told the committee that baseball executives and the players' union
had agreed on the bill, subject to the team owners' approval. Baseball offi-
cials declined to send a representative to the hearing, which had been post-
poned repeatedly since the beginning of the year at their request.
Judiciary Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and the panel's
top Democrat, Patrick Leahy of Vermont, are sponsors of legislation to
revoke baseball's antitrust exemption except in the areas of relocating
teams, the minor leagues and sports broadcasting.
The agreement between the players and owners would be an alternative
to the Hatch-sponsored legislation.
The Supreme Court ruled more than a half-century ago that baseball was
a sport, not a business, and therefore not subject to antitrust laws.
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDJTOR
This is the stcond'feature of a series ofgolfcourses me are highlighting throughout the
Greenville and surrounding areas.
Bradford Creek is the home of the Pirates and for good reason. This golf
course hosts the ECU golf team for any home matches and is their practice
course. But it's not only for the golf team it's for you too.
Jeremy Shadle, who is a newcomer to Bradford Creek, but not to the
game of golf, was hired as the club pro a month ago. Before his move to
Bradford Creek, Shadle worked at clubs in Wilmington and New Bem. He
says this course is player friendly to any type of golfer.
"The fairways arc generous, and there's not a lot of trees, and the rough
isn't very deep Shadle said. "A good player can have a good time out there
because it's challenging, yet a high-handicapper can hit it almost anywhere
because there's not water everywhere and trees or thick grass. Everybody
seems to have a good time
The openness of this 7100-yard course allows golfers to play on a more
open course that allows for more mistakes than courses cut out of the woods
there is more room for error.
"The average golfer seems to play better because of the openness,
Shadle said. "There aren't as many hazards and not as much trouble
Since the course is still immature, the beautification process is still
underway. James Duke is the course superintendent and Shadle says Duke
is making every effort to make the grounds as plush and filled in as possible.
"The fairways arc very good Shadle says. "The tee boxes and the greens
(Bermuda grass) are good, so he has made some of the changes on the golf
course to better it
Bradford Creek, in an effort to keep costs lower tor golfers, offers a
Preferred Player Card that entitles golfers to better rates and offers a special
deal on range balls at the driving range. Anybody can buy this card for $40,
and it is good for a year (see ad on page 7). Most golfers can spend that much
in just two rounds of golf. It is especially useful for the college student who
is trying to stretch their budget. Shadle says Bradford Creek tries to make a
welcome environment for any golfer, especially students.
"We rely heavily on students to come out here and play and we want them
to be welcome Shadle said. "It benefits us, but we're trying ro give back to
the people that play regularly out here
This course offers many amenities. After your hard
round of golf, there is a full service bar to kick back and
cither rejoice about your round or drown your sorrows
(of course it is for the 21 and over patrons), a driving
range with a bunker and practice green and a pro shop
for all Your golfing needs.
The driving range allows for plenty of practice balls
and buckets can be lxught in three sizes, with the
largest containing about 75 balls for S3, S4 or $5 dol-
lars. A special rantfc card can be bought for $50, u liich
gives the card holder 13 buckets for the pr f 111.
"We have a real nice ruime Shadle said.
(Above) The club house veranda overlooks the driving range. (Below) Greens keepers
keep hole 14 in tip-top shape. (Bottom left) A look at the course layout.
PHOTOS BY CHRIS 6AT0OSH
Shadle, along with ECU golf coach Kevin Williams, teaches individual
lessons for $35 a session with each lasting around an hour or so.
"Kevin and I teach seven days a week Shadle said. "We both work our
schedule around our lessons
Currently Shadle and Williams are working on a program that would incor-
porate a full service teaching center with club fittings and instruction in the
near future. The format would be like a school that lasts for a few days and
would be the first of its kind in this area.
During the week (Monday through Friday), cart and green fee is $25 and
walking is permitted Monday through Thursday, Saturday and Sunday and
after 3 p.m. on Friday. The cost for jusr walking is $15. During the weekend,
cart and green fees arc $31 and for just walking it is $21.
j�J� Don't call Tiger the greatest yet
The 1997 Michael Jordan Celebrity
Golf Classic is rigfu around the corner
and this year is parted full of celebrities.
Belme is a list of important information
to know for this years event.
Date- Sunday, June 29th. (The
last Sunday in June.)
Location-
Countrv Club
Brook Valley
Benefits- The tournament
benefits the four Ronald McDonald
Houses of North Carolina located in
Greenville, Chapel Hill, Durham
and Winston-Salem.
History- The tournament first
began in September 1984 as the
Eastern Carolina Celebrity Golf
Classic. Michael Jordan became the
honorary chairman of the event in
1988, and the tournament was
renamed the Michael Jordan
Celebrity Golf Classic in 1989. The
tournament, now in its 13th year,
has grown from a one-celebrity tour-
nament with a $100 entry fee to a
tournament with nearly 40 partici-
pating celebrities and top sponsor-
ship levels of $30,000.
Tickets- Golf tournament
gallery tickets may be purchase on
the day of the event at Minges
Coliseum parking lot on the ECU
campus. Transportation to Brook
Valley Country Club will be provid-
ed from Minges. No public park-
ing is available at the tourna-
ment site.
Ticket Prices-Adult - $10.00,
Youth (6 to 12) - $5.00, Children (5
& under) free of charge
Format- All golfers will tee off
with a shotgun start at 9:30 a.m.
The tournament is a superball or
captain's choice event with 36
teams of five golfers per team. Each
team includes one celebrity and
four sponsored golfers.
Funds Raised-The 1996 Golf
Classic raised over $200,000. To
date the tournament has raised over
$900,000 for the Ronald McDonald
Houses of North Carolina.
Amanda Ross
A Senior
Cnminiiiiiiinmii major-
gnirlunhiif. in Heremher,
she hopes lo brrome a
Itvision spartsrastrr.
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS KIllTlte
The roar of the tiger was reduced to a
meow this weekend at the U.S. Open in
Bethesda, Md.
Being an avid golfer and a fan of the
sport for many years, I am glad to see
the interest in the sport is at an all-time
high. The crowds have surged at recent
events and a lot of that sudden surge is
due to Tiger Woods.
Woods is an incredible golfer with a
killer swing and hits tee shots 30 yards
past his competition on many holes.
And some are saying he could possibly
be the greatest player to ever live. Okay,
maybe someone is looking into a crystal
ball and sees something I don't. He has
been on the tour for one year and he is
already being dubbed as the greatest?
Sorry, but being great in my book means
years and �years of conaistent improve-
ment with many titles under your belt.
My point for this editorial is to
remind people that greatness doesn't
constitute outdriving your competition
and winning one major. It takes years to
be great and he has the game to become
that way, but aren't we forgetting the
true legends and the greats of the game?
Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Ben
Hogan, Sam Sneed and many more set
the precedent for how the game is
played today. They set a standard that
will forever be remembered as long as
the game of golf is played.
SEE T1GM. PAGE 7
History of
In 1985. MicheaJ Joidan made his first api
just before embarking err his NBA career
in 1988, Jordan se�verf as the honotaty'
The tournament is primarily a volunteer
out the support of Greenville area residents
ttai for t cwnpltta fitting �f
TRIVIAtime
GORDON'S
GOLF AND
SKI SHOP
Name the fourth highest rating of a television
programevent in history of all time totnated TV programs.
?86I�!K-9e
SumuiJi stMfip xi tjmptiDilsD2tuq MfjpiwstM6P H AXIL'S S
ALL EYES ON CRIME.
It fakes two sets of eyes to help prevent crime: yours and the police
department's. Keep your eyes open. Be aware of your surroundings.
There are many simple things you can do to keep yourself and your
property safer. Your octions send a mm� . BBmjmMm
message. Coll the Greenville Police mZULIlLKYtZEB
Department's EqualEyes program 830-EYES
for crime prevention information.
207 East Arlington Boulevard 756-1003
Come see our
new selection of
In-Line Skates
ta pi'
7�iitlMiitaniliM�art�MMei�HieinUailMM
� !?� CUT O OttlMVIUl NC
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
Q
on the corner of Evans and Third Street
ma cafe setting, vie serve iA4u
from 8:00 am. through 10:30 am. and
Ue4 from 10:30 am. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Ask about our Frequent Diner Card.
Call ahead & well have your favorites ready to go
757-1716 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716





T
7 Wednesday. June18. 1997
The East Carolinian
TJE&U Uttfflfc
SQn3EEE5Lhas
lira
Four newcomers will be added to the team including three in state players
and one player from Arizona.
Charlotte native Scott Pbkorney heads up the Pirate's incoming class.
Pokornev played forward for East Meckienburg High School and sweeper
for the Charlotte Park Sharon Soccer Club in 1996. Among his honors in his
senior season, Pokorney was named All-State, All-Region and All-
Southwestern Conference.
He led his East Mecklenburg squad to the state championship game last
season after scoring a team high 17 goals and added nine assists. He was a
also a member of the North Carolina Olympic Development Program team
and was named "Who's Who Among American High School Students
"Scott possess excellent physical attributes and good speed and size
Wiberg said. "He is a very versatile player who can address a number of our
needs. He is both a polished defender as well as a proven finisher
A second North Carolina native is Cary's Nick Errato an outside mid-
fielderback from Athens Drive High School. Errato was an All-Cap Seven
Conference performer and an Honorable Mention All-Region selection in
'96 after scoring two goals and dishing out five assists. He has played club
soccer with the Raleigh Green Caps '78 squad and won six sate champi-
onships with the squad. Errato is also a member of the North Carolina
Olympic Development Program Team.
"Nick has tremendous work rate Wiberg commented. "He is very
poised and he plays under control with the ball. He has excellent speed and
distributes the ball exceptionally well
A third Pirate signee is Zach Johnson, a transfer from Furman. The 5-11
Johnson is also a Raleigh native where he was a standout midfielder at
Lcesvilie Road High School.
"Zach is a very versatile player who can play a number of positions well
Wiberg said. "He possess good size and excellent speed
The fourth signee is George Meek. Meek, a native of Glendale, Ariz, was
named to the All-State squad in his senior year. For the '96 season. Meek
had an 0.60 goals against average (GAA) in propelling his high school to the
state championship. For his varsity career, Meek posted an outstanding 44-
8-4 record with an 0.61 GAA.
"George will help solidify our goalkeeper position Wiberg said. "He
gives us additional depth at a very important position. He has great hands
and good instincts
Tiger
continued (rom page 6
Newspapers have also said that
Woods is the next Nicklaus. If I had
a nickel for every time I heard that
about a golfer, I'd be stinking rich.
All the newcomers who have an
explosive impact on the game are
dubbed the next Nicklaus And
then we see they are human and
make mistakes. Woods finished the
Open at 6 and many people prob-
ably had him winning the whole
thing.
I believe the media frenzy sur-
rounding Woods has gotten out of
control. Every time you turn around
it's Tiger this and Tiger that. What
about these other pros who have
proven themselves on the course
day in and day out for several years?
Gee, the media probably didn't
know what to do with themselves
when they saw Woods wasn't in the
hunt for the Open title. What would
Bradford Creek Preferred Player Card
Cardholder etjtiflfed 6 the following rates:
i:O0 atn - J@fM& - $22
j f
lar S"
in
fgiurchase
fouThisday
Hang out with the Professor
Every Tuesday on WINE NIGHT
SWtW ?tee4 $li &l�&
Call 919-757-7745 to schedule a tee time or
to set up your tournament or organizational outing
Coming
July 1st
Well
Known
Recording
Artist
Mf�
the commentators talk about? Oh
yeah, the other great golfers on the
course who were "ying for the title.
Over the weekend, Tom
Lehman, who was in contention for
the title until the 17th hole on
Sunday, indicated that he and the
rest of the tour weren't going to roll
over just because Wuods was play-
ing. And they didn The competi-
tion was strong and fierce even
without Woods.
Woods showed he was human
and made mistakes. It happens to
the best of players, and it will hap-
pen a lot more in Woods' career, like
it has others. Sometimes when a
player starts off too strong they have
nowhere to go. Others must work
their way up.
I'm not doubting any part of
Woods' game. He has proven that he
can play with the best and his skill is
far beyond a lot of fan's comprehen-
sions I'm just saying that we
shouldn't label him the best to live
after one year on the tour. Who's to
say someone won't come along next
year and experience the same com-
parisons that Woods is facing now?
You just never know in this sport.
Now this editorial may sound
like a double standard since I am
the sports editor and want to go
into television sportscasting, but I
hope that I never dub someone the
greatest after one year. On many
occasions, the media is quick to
make judgments on just a few per-
formances.
What Woods has brought to the
game of golf is a renewed interest
with the young and old and even
people who didn't care a thing
about golf before his arrival. But you
know what? Nicklaus did that in his
time too. Let's not forget the true
Masters of the game, who continue
to play when most people their age
are retired. It takes years to be
great, not just one tournament.
355 2946 � Located in WINN DIXIE Market Place,
on the corner of Greenville Blvd & Arlington Blvd.
The East Carolinian
328-2000
Alive After Five
Thursday, June 26
5:00-7:00 p.m.
SRC Outdoor Pool
Come enjoy free food,
live music, fun, and friends.
Featuring: "Sneaky Pete"
Battle of the Bands Winner!
Sponsored by Recreational
Services, Dioing Services
and Mendenhall Student Center!
Lifestyle Enhancement
FacultyStaff Aerobics
Date: June 23-August 15
Time: MWF Noon
Cost: $15
FacultyStaff Aqua Fitness
Date: June 23-August 15
Time: M-Th 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Cost: $15
SRC Membership not required
Intramural Program
Softball Registration Meeting
July 1 at 4:00 p.m. in the SRC Classroom
3-on-3 Basketball Registration Meeting
July 1 at 4:30 p.m. in the SRC Classroom
Racquetball Singles Deadline
July 2 by 5:00 p.m. in the SRC Main Office
TUESDAY NIGHT LIVE
Acoustic night With S
Best Local Bands!
June 24th Thorn
July 1st Nicl
$1.00 Domestics & Hlghb
WEDNESDAY GLASSICS NIGHT
10 Specials $1.25 Domestics
THURSDAY LADIES NIGHT
v:j
Sand Volleyball Registration Meeting
July 8 at 4:00 p.m. in the SRC Classroom
V
Adventure Program
Tar River Canoe Float
July 9-Register by July 2
Cost is $5 (SRC Members)
Climbing Skills Workshop
July 10-Register by July 8
Cost is $5 (SRC Members)
$1.25 Domestics $
750 Miller Lite Bottles
$2.00 Cosmopolitan
TGI - FRIDAYS
Greenville's Only Disco & 70's Pa
All Night Long
$1.00 Michelob Light Botljps
$1.50 New Castle Bottle!


P
�&
For more information on any of our programs please
contact Recreational Services at 328-6387.
SATURDAY WEEKEND PARTY
$1.00 Domestics & High Ball
750 Natural Light Bottles

THURS FRI & SAT
LADIES 21 & OVER FREE
GUYS WITH SCHOOL ID 21 & O





For Rent
ONE BEDROOM, ALL UTRJTIES m-
12 block from campus on
9t $306.00 a month. CaH
757-9387. Available now. Cats
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
I bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
$ioo on stcmuTT ocsosrr
W!TH HIMMTATION OF
THBCOURM
topLDadn
mmcmwm.Minnfttatr.
H�WAT�.SWV�
iKwSoHS
retfot on Rrtt rtoor
LocateStocks from Campus
fit, SDpMfKBt,
S Modes from ctmoui. Nbw owner strip.
3 8ft DUPLEX AVAILABLE
dtatety , to share wMh
parson. $187.50 psr m
utNs. ate, fsmala prafarrad, CaH
AteaSB1.78f1.LM.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
gat an apartment togsthsr or for
ma to move in whsra s roommats
is needed. Call 758-7819. ask for
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 2 br 1 12 bath
$225.00 12 utftmas 12
ECU bus route. Cal Laura at 758-
7128.
TO SHANE 2 BR 112 bath dfrectiy
across from Recreation Canter,
campus, downtown, non-smoker
prafarrad. Laass bsghw Aug. 1st.
Contact Stephan 752-4320.
1917 REStOREb TWO STORY
housa. Thraa badrooms, two
baths, dining room or fourth bad-
room, fireplace, 108 Paris Avonus
$475 month. Uppar daas-
mangrads prafarrad. Cal 355-
5150.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEDTO
share thraa badroom houas. Ona
block from campus. Waahardryar,
osntral heat ac, rant and 13 utW-
tkM. CaH Katia today 931-0348.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR sacond summer sossion.
Short wanting distance from cam-
pus. No laass. No dapaaft. Rant
$208 and pay 12 of utlHtas. CaH
757-2891.
206 NORTH EASTERN STREET 4
badroom, 2 12 bath, walking dis-
tance ECU. Call 910-883-4740 for
appointmant. Laavs masssgs.
WM return caN. $800.00 a month.
$800.00 deposit.
CANNON COURT AND CEDAR
Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhousss. On ECU bus route
$4004415. Call Wainright Property
Management 7564209 proteasing
for fall eteo.
NEED SOMEONE TO TAKE over
lease ASAP at Kingsarms.
$285mo. CaM 758-9644.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM apartments on 10th street.
Free basic cable, water and sewer
also proteasing for the fed $415.00.
CaH Wainright Property manage-
ment 756-6209.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. BEAUTIFUL two story Sterling Point Condominium. Rent $275 and half utHmes. Washer dryer included. Work sH time and place stays empty. CaH 353-1676. No
FREE ROOM, UTILITIES. CABLE in exchange for evening care 5 nights week of my 15 month son. CaH Jayme at 353-5590.
ONE 2 BEDROOM ABOVE CATA-
LOG Connection available now!
(New Carpet) for $528.06 mo. 1
outer unit feeing 5th Street across
from The Fhehouse Tavern - avail-
able Jury 31st. One 2 bedroom apt.
available June 1st above Percolator
Coffeehouse $600.00. Luxury Apar-
tments. CaM Yvonne at 756-2616
GREAT DUPLEX FOR RENTWynd-
ham Circle. AvaMabi
Contact Stephen 758-3630.
PERFECT FOR GRADUATE 8TUf
ENTS 3 bedrooms 2 bath housa ki
quiet subdivision. 1 12 years old.
Deck, fenced backyard.
$750morrth. Available August
752-3466.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Own bedroom, own bathroom,
washerdryer. No deposit, free wa-
ter Si cable. Pay 12 irtHraes &
phone. Rent $225. 551-3168.
Available now -August
BIG 3 BEDROOM HOUSE
walking distance of campus,
remodeled, btg rooms, t
back porch and washerdryer in-
cluded. Pats OKI CaH MaHssa TV-
ley at 830-8602.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS AVAH
ABLE JULY 1,1997. One, two, and
three, bedroom apartments on
10th Street, Five Mocks from ECU,
now proteasing. CaM Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
1993 HONDA DEL SOL, 42k, Mack,
$9395. Wainut Coffee Tank (SOin.
x 23in), $30. Walnut phone stand
(131. x 25ki.) $125. Come take a
look! CaH Tom S 8304943.
MOVING MUST SELL. COUCH
$200, BM computer $150, Mt. bice
$325, bicycle 950. Wke rack $30,
WedcSnggown$400. CaR7564332
or 355-4149.
3 PfECE LIVING ROOM set sofa,
tovaaaat armchair, tawny brown.
Must sal. Good condrtien $200.
Firm. Must see to appreciate
Woodekfe Apts. S Brookwood Dr.
across from Pfnobrook Apts. River-
bfuffRd. CaH 796-2312.
6'4' RUSTY SURFBOARD $125.
7574738 ask for Brttt.
Help Wanted
ATTBVnONI ASSISTANT WANT-
ED to help with mate freshman
who has cerebral palsy for the fs
semester 1967. Minimal assistance
required. Hours and payment to be
CaH 919-732-4748 for
FILM PRODUCTION, TALENT
MANAGEMENT, and internships
available. Call Creative Artists
Management (800)4014545.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 302 Lswis St
3 bdrm, 1 bath, storage shed, off-
street parking, wd hookup, central
ac. No Pets! $775mo. 919404-
2052.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM-
MATE WANTED. House located
behind Pitt Community College.
$325.00 rent and half utHmes. De-
poaft negotiable if necessary. Gail
356-2705 or leave i
For Sale
SAMtCK ELECTWC GLHTAR WITH
8" amp. Excellent
Cornea with hard and soft
motromere, tuner, guitar staj
many extras. CaH Brandon
7245 $625 obo.
at 756-
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share spacious house.
$220mo 13 utilities. Three
blocks from campus & washerdry-
er. For more info caH BiH at 752-
6947.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
es, CadWecs, Chevys, BMWs. Cor-
AJso Jeeps, ?wtTs. Your
ToH free 1400-2184000 ext.
A4726 for current listings.
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. 100 financing available.
Student discounts. CaH Alfred at
(919)355-7067.
The East Carolinian
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent
tax, Reoo's, REO's. Your area. ToH
Free 800-218-9000 Ext H-3726 for
current Ratings.
WANTED LOAN OF DORM RfFRIG-
ERATORS for Russian student and
summer session, I will store them
untH the start of FsH Semester.
3284347 or 7564334.
Announcements
JOHN JACOBS AND THE Power
Team wM be at Community Chris-
tian Church located at 1104 N.
Memorial Dr. in GreenvHta on June
18-22 at 7:00pm rightly. The Pow-
er Team is a group of world class
athletes that perform exhibitions
of strength, power, and speed with
s message of motivation and inspi-
ration. They have e message for
young people world-wide against
drug abuse, alcohol, and teen sui-
cide, along with a program of aca-
demic achievement. Everyone is
invited to attend. Churches srs en-
couraged to bring their youth
groups. Admission is FREE1 For
more information, please caH Com-
munity Christian Church at (919)
7524883 (Love).
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOPS.
SPONSORED by Career Services,
wM be held on Wed. June 18 at
4:00 pm and Tue. June 24 at 3:00
pm in the Career Services Bidg.
Open to all students especially
those preparing for the job search,
the workshops are designed to
help you learn professional tech-
niques in presenting yourself to
employers.
PfGfSTRATIONORfENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES- The Career
Services Office wi hold orienta-
tion meetings in the Career Servic-
es Bidg. for seniors and
students on the fdaowaig
Thur. June 19 at 4:00 pm and Mon.
June 23 at ZM pm. Students wrH
receive instructions on logiatereig
with Career Services, estabasreng
a credentials file, am'
csdures for campus interviews.
RESUME WRITING WORKSHOPS.
LEARN how to present your ojuaHH
cations in writing to get that ea-im-
portent interview! Come to this
workshop at Career Services on
Wed. June 25 at 2:00 pm (Students
who haw a resume already written
and would like to have it critiqued
may coma to Career Services on
Thur. June 19 at 2:00.)
NEED A SUMMER JOB? Play at
rJay & make money at night! Work
nights andor weekends and have
your days free with The ECU Tele-
fund. Make your own schedule!
86.00hr. plus bonuses! Stop by
the Rewi Annex, Rm. 5 between 2-
6pm for more info.
Other
"SELLMG S WHAT THEY Dont
Teach You At Harvard Business
School, says Mark H. McCormfc
Gain valuable sales experience
through our internship. CaH Jeff
Mahonay at 355-7700.
WANTED TWO TICKETS TO the
June 20, Dave Mathaws Concert, tf
you want to aaR, caH 353-4142.
DOYOUNEEDMQNE3l7
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
TOMMYHILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO,
RUFF HEWN,). CREW, ALEXANDER JULIAN,
We also buy GOLD, SILVER, Jewelry-Also Broken Gold Pieces
& Stereo's, TV's, VCR's, CD players
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come Into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown, drive
to back door at ring buzzer
SOUTHEASTERN TOURS.INC.
Summer Fun and Travel
830-1080 FAX: 8300088
Price Depert Return
aatwesMM it;
tea
(won)
Jun30 Mfitttl
(mon)
�MOTE: ALL TWPS MUST
M FULL BV JUNE 18,
ithe I � �
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things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
Advertise witk
us in
TheEast
Carolinian.
Furniture set for sale
Two large chest of drawers,
nightstand and mirror.
$60 takes aU.
Coffee table and end table
$40.
Call 758-4 96 ask for Lisa
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Lake Imp USA
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 18, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 18, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1211
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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