The East Carolinian, April 29, 1997







T
TUifOAY
intake higher than reported
ANGELA KOENIO
HEALTHENVIRON MF.NTAI, ISSI'F.S
STAFF WRITER
According to a recent survey, ECU students
believe more alcohol is being consumed than is
actually being reported.
The results of the survey show that 79 per-
cent of the respondents indicated shey
believed the average ECU student had con-
sumed beer on at least six out of the 30 days
immediately preceding the survey.
However, only 18 percent reported drink-
ECU working
to comply with
Title DC
Women s athletic
programs not equal
to men s
Jacqueline D. Kellum
ARTS AND STI'IJIES ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
ECU, along with other schools in the UNC-
systcm, has not been complying with Title K,
the 1972 law recently upheld by the Supreme
Court requiring equality between women's
and men's athletics.
This law states that schools must have
enough women's sports so that the percentage
of female athletes is proportional to the per-
centage of women in the overall campus pop-
ulation.
ECU is working on gender equity, accord-
ing to Henry Van Sam, associate athletic direc-
tor, and has been for several years.
"Wfc'vc been really serious about Title IX
gender equity VanSant said. Ail our signifi-
cant increases have gone towards women's
programs
Van Sant said the increases have primarily
in the past several years.
"When we started this, women were gross-
underfunded Van Sant said.
Ail North Carolina schools are working on
this same problem. The schools are having to
either add women's teams or cut men's teams
attain equity ECU added a women's soccer
in the 9495 school year, and hopes to
add another by the year 2000. They have not
had to cut any men's sports.
"We really have not cut anything other than
have not gotten the same increases that
n have Van Sant said. "We've been for-
tunate that we've been able to generate the
revenue, and we've simply applied it to
women's rather than men's sports
Historically, women's sports at ECU have
not been given the same priority as men's
sports�no athletic teams for women even
existed until 1969. However, Van Sant pointed
out that the same priorities have historically
been true all over the country
This is not an ECU problem, this is a
national problem Van Sant said.
One aspec of the larger issue is there are
not as many atnlctic opportunities for women
at the higf school level, thus female athletes
are not as well prepared to participate in
sports at the coiiege level.
"In the high schools, you have greater par-
ticipation in men's sports than in women's
Vkn Sant said.
Van Sant agreed this is indicative of the
state of women's athletics in general. Women's
athletics has begun to be taken more seriously
over the past decade or so, but the country as
a whole is still trying to build up women's pro-
grams.
Time is one of the answers to this fcn
Sant said.
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) is doing its part to
encourage compliance, according to Rosie
Thompson, who is the director of compliance
for NCAA rules. Last year they began to
require that gender equity studies be con-
ducted each year.
SEE TT1U. PAGES
ing beer on six of the 30 days, and 51 percent
reported having consumed no beer during this
time.
"People generally overestimate the reality
said Donna Walsh, director of the Office of
Health Promotion and Weil-Being. "We tend
to generalize what is being done by saying
everyone's doing it but they're not
The survey was distributed tc 1200 under-
graduate students and 50 percent were com-
pleted and returned to Southern Illinois
University's Center for Alcohol and Other
Drug Studies survey.
According to Walsh, SIU has been adminis-
tering this survey to colleges across the coun-
try for approximately 10 years. SIU uses the
information retrieved each year to compare
campuses across the country.
ECU's responses did not differ from those
of colleges across the nation when compared to
responses made between 1992-1994. Of ECU
respondents, 83.4 percent reported having
consumed alcohol at least once during the past
year compared to 83.6 percent of students
nationally.
Walsh said she feels the results of the sur-
vey will hcip the reputation of ECU.
"It gives us an interesting position to
reframe what we mean Walsh said. "There
are a lot of people who come here because of
the sociable image and 1 don't think this is
necessarily wrong. But the sociable image does
not translate to the amount of alcohol con-
sumed. Partying means a lot of different things
to a lot of different people
"I think it's a challenge to reframe our con-
cept. I think we've been doing this on an ongo-
ing basis Walsh said.
"Now we have the stars to prove we're not
any different than anyone else Walsh said.
"In a sense we're more well-balanced because
we're stressing social as well as academic
development
SEf. DRIMIMG. PAGE S
Herman Event. Mary Seitz, Rebecca McCormick,
and Melissa Mitchell, were awarded campus dining
certificales by Or. Kris Smith. They became eligible
for the prizes after completing the alcohol survey.
PHOTO COURTES OF ALSDKJF
DAY
lifestyle 8
Yee-haw or the
Hazzard Boys
opinion
SGA President
keeps promise
�pom12
Zombies die ugly
the east Carolinian
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STEPPING FOR CHARITY
Early morning shooting
leaves one dead, one injured
The brothers of the Eta Psi chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. performed a chanty step show
Sunday at the Grover C. Middle School in New Bern, to assist in a week-tang fundmsing project to
help a New Bern child receive a heart transplant.
The brothsrs performing were were Franklin Shipp Tabari Wallace. Terrance Evins and Elliott
Armstrong. Brothers present but not pictured are Collin Hines and Edward Arnold.
FILE PHOTO
University assists students with
medical coverage during summer
BECkV ALLEY
HOI SIN, NI) CONS1M TORV SF.RVIrF.S ISSI KS
STU'K WRITF.R
Graduating seniors look forward to leaving
many things behind, like tests, homework and
professors; however, one thing they may not
have thought of leaving behind is medical
insurance.
The majority of students are being covered
by their parents' insurance, but many seniors
have not realized that once they graduate,
many, if not all, of the insurance companies
drop their coverage because they are no longer
considered a dependent.
This can lead to major problems if a gradu-
ate is injured or falls sick before they get a job
and their company insurance begins.
The ECU Alumni Association is now help-
ing students protect themselves during this
insurance "down time" between graduation
and employment by offering Short Term
Medial (STM) insurance.
"What we have here is an opportunity for
graduates to have insurance in the gap
berween college and a career said Donald
Leggett, associate vice chancellor for alumni
relations.
The Alumni Association is sending detailed
information about this insurance to all seniors
graduating this year.
This STM plan is unique in that it allows
you to choose your own effective date and to
purchase coverage for the exact number of
days you need to be covered, in most states as
few as 30 days to as many as 185 days.
SEE MEDICAL PAGE 5
JfiFF GENTRY
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES
STAFF WRITF.il
A Maryland man was shot and killed near the
Cellar in downtown Greenville early Sunday
after an apparent dispute over a taxi.
Andrew Albert O'Donnell, 22, was shot at
208 E. 5th St. after an argument involving who
would take a cab that had pulled up, turned
violent. O'Donnell, from Churchton, Md was
pronounced dead on arrival at Pitt Co.
Memorial Hospital at around 3:00 a.m. Sunday
morning.
Also shot in the incident was Officer Tony
Smith of the Greenville Police Dept.
According to police officials. Smith was appar-
ently inadvertantly hit in the leg when the
shooting started while responding to the inci-
dent. He was also taken to Pitt Co. Memorial
Hospital, where he was treated and released
later that night.
Officer Smith is part
of the Greenville
Mice Depts down-
town bicycle patrol.
Glenn Doyle
Taylor, 31, was arrest-
ed at the scene of the
crime. Taylor, who is
from Las Vegas, is a
welder who was in
North Carolina on a
job. He has been
charged with first-
degree murder and
assault with a deadly
weapon with intent to
kill.
"There were six
.45 shell casings
found, so we know he
fired at least six
times, perhaps more.
He was shooting a Colt .45 Automatic, which
only holds seven or eight rounds said Lt.
K.M. Smeltzer of the Greenville Police Dept.
O'Donnell was visiting friends at ECU and
was on his way to Rirt Bragg to visit his broth-
er, who was scheduled to leave this weekend
for duty in Bosnia.
The argument apparently started when
both men went for a taxi. The argument then
became heated, and Taylor allegedly pulled
out a gun and started firing, killing O'Donnell
and injuring Smith.
.After Taylor's arrest it was also discovered
that federal authorities want him for proba-
tion violations as well.
"Tavlor has been wanred by the U.S.
Marshall Service since September of 1995 for
violating probation Smeltzer said.
Tiylor is currently on probation for various
weapon and drug charges.
Onlookers stand in front of the CeHar, now a memorial site for the young man
gunned down earn Sunday morning.
PHOTO BY PATRICK IftEUM
� , r -





I
2 Tuesday. April 29. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Three men charged in joy ride across course slated
for PGA tournament
CARY, N.C. (AP) - An early-morning joy ride Sunday across the
Prestonwood Country Club golf course, the site of a PGA tournament in
May, left at least $50,000 worth of damaged putting greens and property
Police arrested three Camp Lejeune Marines and charged them with
felony larceny and damage to real property.
Casey William Hane, W, Michael Trentor Lucas, 18, and Jacob Edward
Stoulil, 22, were arrested after police cornered their Jeep Wrangler on a
deadend street.
Police say the three men damaged 25 putting greens and stole a ball
washer and 25 flags and pins.
An anonymous caller told police at 2:45 a.m. that someone was driving
on the golf course, Cary Patrolman Jim Conder said.
Man on trial for second-degree murder after accident
JACKSONVILLE (AP) - A habitual drunk driver who killed a Jacksonville
man in an accident last August faces second-degree murder charges at his
trial this week.
Jury selection was scheduled to begin Tuesday in Onslow County
Superior Court in the trial of Chauncey Marshbum, 37, of Spring Hope.
Marshbum crossed the center line on U.S. 17 in Onslow County and col-
lided with Vincent Richmond, 32, of Jacksonville on Aug. 20,1996.
Richmond died shortly after being transported to Onslow Memorial
Hospital the night of the crash. Marshbum was taken to the Camp Lejeune
Naval Hospital where he was treated and released. Marshburn's blood alco-
hol content registered .13 percent, according to a lab test. In North
Carolina, a person is presumed to be impaired if the level is 0.08 or higher.
Parking on Reading Day and during exams
1. All parking regulations remain in effect on Reading Day and dur-
ing the exam period.
2. Unregistered Vehicles are not authorized to park on campus on
Reading Day or during exams. Students without permanent decals
may purchase $2 daily or $5 weekly permits from Parking and
Traffic Services.
3.30-minute loading permits wili be available to students with
Freshman decals beginning at noon. Monday, May 5,1997 for load-
ing and unloading purposes only. Registered Freshman vehicles will
be allowed to park on campus in student areas beginning at noon
Wednesday, May 7,1997.
4. On Reading Day, April 30, Limited Commuter permits may park in
regular Commuter spaces on main campus. This is allowed because
ECU Transit will not provide shuttle services on Reading Day. The
shuttle will run during the exam period. The Freshman shuttle will
run as usual on Reading Day and during the exam period.
5. Unregistered vehicles or vehicles with student registration parked
in staff areas will be cited for a wrong zone violation. Vehicles
parked in the Private lots without Private permits will be ticketed for
wrong zone and towed.
For further information on parking during the exam period, contact
Parking and Traffic Services at 328-6294.
Gays, lesbians set to fete coming out of TV's 'Ellen'
NEW YORK (AP) - The invitations are out and so, no doubt, arc a lot of the
revelers.
At least 30,000 invitations have been mailed around the country, and as
far away as Finland and Japan, urging people to "come out" in celebration
of Wednesday night's episode of "Ellen in which the title character
reveals she's a lesbian.
Among the festivities are a midnight costume party at the Cambridge,
Mass home of a Harvard theater student and a fund-raiser thrown by a
financial adviser in Manhattan.
While many gays and lesbians say the "coming out" episode is a mile-
stone in their efforts for equal rights, others bristle at the heavy promotion
and commercialism of the event.
San Franciscans have been spotted in T-shirts with the last name of the
ABC show's star, Ellen DcGeneres, crossed out and replaced with
"Ginsberg Pink-and-black bumper stickers in the Castro read "Ellen -
come out already
DcGeneres did iust that, of ismhuk, in pmminer n tzinc and tv
skm interviews prior to the show in which her character, Ellen Morgan.
announces to her therapist she's attracted to women.
In last Thursday's edition, the captions appearing below the pho-
tographs accompanying our feature story entitled "Medical stu-
dent Moore ready for third-year challenges" were erroneous. The
captions should have read as stated below. We apologize for
any inconveniences this may have caused.
On Saturday, April 19, ECU'S School of Medicine honored the 76 members of
its Class of 1939 with a White Coat Ceremony to mark the transition
between the classroom-based first two years of medical school and the
more practice-oriented final two years.
After being fitted for his traditional white coat, sophomore James Moore
stands with proud parents, Yvonne (I.) and James Norman Moore II (r.).
TUESDAY
APRIL 29�
cJsaaiyia ni�xjs.
Business
students receive
prestigious
awards
The ECU American
Marketing Association
recently received the
international award for
the most outstanding
special projects at the 19th annual AMA International Collegiate Awards
Banquet. They received this award for a variety of projects conducted in
the Carolinas.
The AMA also received the Best Chapter Performance Award. The
ECU chapter is therefore one of the most recognized chapters in the nation
and abroad.
For more information on the AMA contact Rob Lewis at
riewis@ecu.campus.mci.net or call Jim Zemanke at 328-6368.
Marshals named for Spring commencement
ECU has picked 15 students to serve as marshals for the spring graduation
ceremony Saturday, May 10.
Marshals serve as assistants to the graduates, provide information and
help with seating. They also precede the traditional processional and reces-
sional of graduates, faculty, administrators and guests.
Carol-Ann Tucker, the advisor to the marshals, described their responsi-
bility as "one of importance and honor She said each marshal has an out-
standing academic record.
About 2,300 seniors and graduate students will be recognized at ECU's
graduation ceremony scheduled for 9:30 a.m. at Dowdy-Rcklen Stadium.
Sandra Mims Rowe, the editor of the Portland Oregonian and the president
of the American Society of Newspaper Editors will deliver the commence-
ment address.
The names of the student marshals are Lori McBane Dettmer, Dcnise
Renea Pope, Laura McNair Sawyer, Daniel Andrew Beaver, Kathy Wiggins
Sheppard, Susan Elizabeth Fields, Jennifer Elizabeth Selleck, Rhonda fitye
Sinquefield, Stephanie Ann Russell, James Travis Gammons, Susan Maria
Pfister, Mary Elizabeth Kushman, Christopher Lee Lenker and Timothy
Edward Richards.
Teaching Awards to be presented
ECU's award-winning teachers will be introduced at a Teaching Awards
Ceremony on Widnesday at 9 a.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre. The program, the first of its kind held at ECU, will rec-
ognize the 1997 winners of the Alumni Teaching Excellence Awards and
the winners of teaching awards from the University of North Carolina
Board of Governors. Rhonda Fleming, a music professor and rhis year's
recipient of the Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, will
� ak on her philosophy of teaching, following the ccr r.ony, there will be
a reception in the student center at 10 a.m. hosted by Chancellor Richard
Eakin.
�'��:
-

to Mendenhall Student Center &
Y O U R CENTER O F ACTIVITY &
����-��������� �
B
Paxk

4 Specials
: r
Late Night
758-4591
or
752-4715
For more info visit
our website at
netman.comuserselbo
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:
m
g
m
W
:
Cram Session
Mendenhall will be open until midnight every day f
beginning on Reading Day and lasting until May 7. SS
� C A
Free coffee will be served near the information desk, mk
a
Reserve A Room �
Ne 3d a room for a group study
session? Call the MSC operations
office at 348-4730 to reserve a group
study room.
H

studm mm
Take a break between exams with a
game of bowling or billiards.
The Bowling alley will open at noon dur-
ing exams and will close at 11:30 p.m.
The Billiards room will open at the regu-
lar time (9 a.m.) and close at 11:30 p.m.
31
���
; Hi �
m
CENTER �
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
- � Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8a.m11 p.m Fri. 8a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.mll p.m
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r
3 Tuesday. April 29, 1997
news
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Witnesses take McVeigh jury on
virtual tour of bombed
federal building
DENVER (AP) - Witnesses in the
Oklahoma City bombing trial are
taking jurors on a virtual tour of life
at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal
Building as they describe how an
ordinary morning became blood,
chaos and death.
They greeted co-workers,
dropped their kids off at day care
and sipped coffee at the start of
April 19,1995.
Michael Norfleet, then a recruit-
ing officer for the Marine Corps, had
stopped to speak to his commanding
officer when the bomb hit.
"I took a piece of glass from the
top of my head, and it flayed open
my right.eyc he testified Friday. "It
cut an artery in my forehead. It cut
an artery here in my cheek; and at
the same time, it cut an artery on my
wrist.
"I could feel the life ebb out of
my veins. I just knew that I was los-
ing strength and that if I stayed in
the building, that I would die
Norfleet said he followed a trail
of blood down the building's steps
and found help. Doctors later told
him he had lost 40 to 50 percent of
the blood in his body.
Norfleet was one of 126 survivors
and nine witnesses the prosecution
presented on the first day of day tes-
timony in the trial of Timothy
McVeigh, accused of killing 168 peo-
ple in the bombing.
Testimony was to resume
Monday when Danny Atchley, a fire
department photographer who
pulled injured children from the
rubble, goes back on rhe stand.
As witnesses testified, U.S.
Attorney Patrick Ryan had them
mark a floor plan of the nine-story
building with spots where their col-
leagues died.
Susan Hunt, who worked in the
Department of Housing and Urban
Development, ended her account by
reading the names of the 35 HUD
employees who died in the blast, her
voice sometimes shaking as she
added a brief description of each
person's job.
Her presentation contrasted
sharply with a longer list of bombing
victims read by defense attorney
Stephen Jones during his opening
statement. Jones mispronounced
several names during his dry recita-
tion, while Ms. Hunt's voice
betrayed her grief at the loss of col-
leagues and friends.
"It makes a mockery of what
Jones did said Andrew Cohen, a
Denver attorney who's following the
trial. "It makes it seem like a cheap
trick
Friday's most searing testimony
came from Helena Garrett, whose
16-month-old son, Tevin, died in
the building's day-care center. She
talked of dropping him off and turn-
ing to look at him through the floor-
to-ceiling windows as she walked
across the street to her office.
A few Tautes later, she was fran-
tically searching the rubble for
Tevin, anH recalled watching rescue
workers lay out a line of the bodies
of his schoolmates.
"A lady came, a nurse Ms.
Garrett said. "She started tagging
our babies; and right then I realized
they were dead
NCCU computer center transmits success
DURHAM (AP) - A new videocon-
ferencing and .computer network
system on line at North Carolina
Central University for about a
month is working better than
expected, the system's manager
said.
Wanda Mclver is in charge of the
state-of-the-art facility, recently
completed by NCCU and the N.C.
Research and Educational Network.
It occupies space on the third floor
of the James E. Shepard Library.
Aside from day-to-day offerings,
such as conference link ups, the cen-
ter recently won a state grant to
make it easier for registered nurses
to get their bachelor's degrees.
The center also had the chance
last week to transmit its first class
from NCCU across the state.
"We are getting more requests
than we anticipated, but we are also
happy with the person that we have
running our center said Marvin
Duncan, who oversees the center's
operations.
Duncan said he is in the process
of hiring a graduate student to assist
Mclver - and at least give her a break
during the day.
From NCCU's 28-seat teleclass-
room, N.C. State University's
Thovd Melton addressed communi-
ty college students in Faycttevillc,
Jamestown, Statesville and
Pembroke on the "Academic
Preparation Needed for Transition
into Biotechnology
Melton's presentation was a seg-
ment of a three-pan series that will
help minority community college
students transfer to a four-year col-
lege to study a science-related disci-
pline.
The major coup for NCCU, how-
ever, came when the UNC Board of
Governors gave NCCU permission
and suppon to develop a pilot pro-
gram that will use distance learning
to offer bachelor's degrees to Wake
County's registered nurses.
Registered nurses without bache-
lor's degrees remain the largest sin-
gle group of nurses practicing in the
state.
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J
4 Tuesday. April 29, 1997
lit rv
The East Carolinian
Community riled over teen's
sexual assault case
PORT WASHINGTON, Wis. (AP)
Kevin Gillson and his 15-year-old
girlfriend found themselves in the
kind of trouble experienced by
thousands of teens � she was preg-
nant.
The 18-year-old wanted to take
responsibility by marrying her, get-
ting a job and raising their child,
expected in early June.
But then police found out and
arrested Gillson on a charge of sexu-
al assault, which was later boosted to
sexual assault of a child. Since he
was convicted, he will have to regis-
ter as a sex offender and faces a sen-
tence ranging from probation to 40
years in prison.
One tearful juror said she
despised her vote to convict the
young man, but believed she had no
choice under Wisconsin law.
Despite assurances from
Gillson's girlfriend that the sex was
consensual, the longstanding law
says no one under the age of 16 can
consent to a sexual relationship.
Few of the 10,000 people in this
town 30 miles north of Milwaukee
side with the district attorney who
prosecuted Gillson.
"It's pathetic said Penni Fcezor,
32, serving burgers, chili and coffee
at a George Webb restaurant. "If he
had intentions of doing the right
thing, why put him in jail?"
"It takes two people to do it, and
he's not the only person who's got-
ten a 15-year-old pregnant, and I
don't think he deserves one year, let
alone 40 said Cheryl L. Huettl, 37,
as she enjoyed a beer at a local bar.
"There's not that many guys who
are willing to quit school to get a
good job to support their child
"I think it's got a lot of people
who are dating younger people
scared said 15-year-old Annette
Moe. "I still don't think you should
go to jail or get in trouble for it and I
don't think he should be known to
his neighbors as a sexual predator.
He didn't rape anybody
A juror said it wasn't that simple.
"We were led to believe that we
only had one choice, the way it was
presented to us said juror Holly
Sutinen, 39. "We had a copy of the
law, and they both said they did it
and that was our only choice
"My eyes were full of tears,
because it's all our kids sitting
there Sutinen said.
Ozaukee County District
Attorney Sandy Williams won't dis-
cuss specifics on the case, saying it
would be a violation of ethics.
But she said her office tried to
negotiate a pretrial resolution and
was told Gillson wanted to go to
trial. She would not disclose the
terms of any proposed deal.
"Docs it mean that because he
said he's sorry, we're supposed to
close our eyes to it?" asked Williams,
who is up for re-election in 1998.
Gillsonls lawyer, Doug Stansbury,
said the negotiations "didn't take us
to a point where there was an incen-
tive to settle the case before it went
to trial
He said they haven't yet dis-
cussed the possibility of an appeal of
the April 17 conviction.
The Gillson family does not want
to talk to reporters until after the
sentencing, he said, although
Gillson's mother talked earlier to the
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
"You know, the only thing that
hasn't let me down in all this is
God Sue Gillson told the newspa-
per. "I feel there is no God in the
system. I just don't trust the system
anymore
The piosecutor said she would
recommend a sentence that does
not include jail time. "I can tell you
that in cases like this, probation usu-
ally occurs, if the person usually
takes responsibility for his actions
and has minimal contact with the
criminal justice system Williams
said.
In the meantime, Gillson is free
on bail pending sentencing June 24,
but a condition of his bail is that he
not see his girlfriend.
Regardless of the sentence,
Gillson must register with police as
a convicted sex offender.
The sex offender registry bill
wasn't intended to punish people
like Gillson, said state Sen. Alberta
Darling, who helped write the mea-
sure. She wrote to Gov. Tommy
Thompson urging a review of sexual
assault laws, and the governor's
office said last week that Thompson
would meet with her.
At least one juror has written a
letter to the judge, asking for a
lenient sentence. Sutinen and at
least one other say they plan to do
the same.
"This kid told the truth and he
was trying to do what was right
Sutinen said. "Both of these kids
told the truth and now they're get-
ting blasted for it.
'What they did was not right, but
it wasn't a crime
MATCH POINT
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Ban on cigarette, liquor billboards upheld
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Supreme Court, in an apparent vic-
tory for President Clinton's pro-
posed crackdown on tobacco adver-
tising, today left intact Baltimore's
bans on billboard ads for cigarettes
and alcoholic bceraes.
The justices, without com-
ment, turned away arguments that
the city's twin bans on such ads
violate free-speech rights.
A federal judge in North
Carolina left that constitutional
question unanswered last week
when he ruled that existing federal
law doesn't allow the Food and
Drug Administration to restrict cig-
arette advertising and promotion.
But the judge also handed
tobacco companies a big setback in
ruling that the FDA can regulate
tobacco as a drug.
President Clinton said that part
of the judge's ruling on advertising
and promoting would be appealed.
The president has proposed for-
bidding cigarette brand advertising
at sports events, on T-shirts and
billboards within 1,000 feet of
schools and playgrounds, and in
magazines likely to be read by
teen-agers.
Opponents of the proposal con-
tend it runs afoul of a constitution-
ality test created by a 1980
Supreme Court ruling.
In it, the court said commercial
speech that is truthful and not mis-
leading may be limited only if gov-
ernment has a substantial interest,
the limitation directly advances
that interest and is no more exten-
sive than necessary.
The Baltimore dispute dates
back to a pair of 1994 ordinances
that forced the removal of cigarette
and alcoholic beverage ads from
most city billboards.
The ordinances were aimed at
reducing illegal underage drinking
and smoking.
The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals upheld the bans last year,
bur was ordered by the Supreme
I:ourt t r - its rulings in light
of the justices' decision last May
giving adertiscrs significantly
greater protection from government
regulation.
The trend of rulings by the
nation's highest court in recent
years is to give commercial speech
enhanced protections from govern-
ment regulation.
But after reconsidering each of
Baltimore's bans, the 4th Circuit
court again upheld both in August.
The appeals court said the bans
withstood the scrutiny required
under the Supreme Court's 1980
ruling, and that the May ruling did
not applv to the hillhmrd dispute.
The lower court added that
measures to protect children
deserve "special solicitude" by
courts.
"Baltimore's interest is to pro-
tect children who are not yet inde-
pendently able to assess the value
of the message presented the
appeals court said.
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Three ways to
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Second, if you have�or obtain�a
qualified student loan not in default,
you may get it paid off at the rate of
15 per year or $500, whichever is
greater, up to a maximum of $10,000.
Selected military skills can double that
maximum.
Third, you can earn part-time
money in college, and here's how it
works: One summer you take Basic
Training, and the next summer you
receive skill training at an Army
school. You'll earn over $1,500 for
Basic and even more for skill training.
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r
,
�eastcarolinian
Advertise With Power
� � �
"You will encounter many new
places and with the knowledge
you've acquired at East Carolina
University, you know there's only
one place that will brighten your
future - CHICO'S
The Place
Where v
Alumni Meet!
Mexican Restaurant
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
(You know
Where That Is!)
All ABC Permits
757-1666
School Work Piling-Up?
Are you running out of time?
If the anwers are yes, then be
sure to take advantage of the
extended operating hours in
Mendenhall Student Center
during the exam period.
Open until Midnight April 30-May 7.
Mendenhall Computer Lab
open until Midnight
April 30-May 7.
Mendenhall has comfortable, and
quiet, lounge areas
for studying.

Group Study Rooms available
in Mendenhall Student Center.
Call the Reservations Office,
328-4730, to reserve space.
FREE
COFFEE
Medical
continued from page 1
The benefits of this insurance
plan include: four deductible choic-
es, choice of benefit period, in-hos-
pital and outpatient treatment, no
restrictions on providers, and a cred-
it card payment option (not avail-
able for N.C. residents).
The coverage will cover the grad-
uate, his or her spouse, and their
dependent children. This STM
insurance is available in almost every
state or they have an alternate plan
-available.
Under this insurance you are con-
sidered a resident of the state in
which you apply and if you move
anywhere in the U.S. or Canada, you
may keep your insurance.
The plan will cover medically
necessary expenses for services,
treatment, and supplies prescribed
by a physician as the result of sick-
ness or injury, lb be eligible for full
benefits certain medical services,
including hospital stays and physical
therapy, must be authorized in
advance.
Pre-existing conditions are not
covered. A pre-existing condition is
defined as a sickness, injury, disease
or physical condition producing
symptoms or requiring medical
advice or treatment from a physician
within five years before insurance
began.
This policy also does not cover
routine physical exams, pregnancy,
birth control, dental services, eye
exams or mental illness.
The coverage is being provided
by Meyer and Associates and is
underwritten by Time Insurance
Company.
for more information about this
temporary medical program for i
uating seniors, contact the
Alumni Association at 328-6072 or
Meyer ami Associates at 1-800-635-
7801.
Title
How UNC schools measure up to Title IX
continuid from page 1
"Every school has to do a gender-
equity study, which has to be avail-
able for public knowledge
Thompson said.
The information in these studies
is used as part of the criteria to
determine a school's athletic status.
"A school will net be certified (in
Division I) if they do not comply
with certain guidelines Thompson
said.
Looking toward the future, hn
Sant says they will continue to make
changes to bring ECUS athletic
programs up to the standards of
Title DC
"Wfe wili continue to do every-
thing we can to build up our
women's program &n Sent said. "
We want to have a good women's
program
SchodiSfemale female
�flfOWIWWItJtnMtSS
Otto4534
N.C. State4132
UNC-Chaoe! HHI5741
Wake Forest4834
Appalachian St.5234
Campbell5547
Davidson4837
East Carolina5835
N.C.A&T5031
UN&Asnavfta5543
UNCChafWtta5146
UN&6reensboro8542
UNC-WamngtOfi5846
Western Carotin5329
Sources: Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North CeroSne 1995-96; The
Chronicle of Higher Education
The News & Observer
Drinking
continued from page 1
Beer consumption is just one por-
tion of the survey. Other results of
the survev will lie published next
fall.
"We wanted to get some of the
information out now about use,
abuse and misconceptions Wulsh
said. "Vk just received the results
ourselves
The survey was administered in
fvbroary. ECU students who com-
pleted the survey were eligible to
win one of four $50 gift certificates
donated by the student store or one
of five $!0 declining balance cards
donated by University Dining
Services.
Thursday the winners were pre-
sented with their prizes. Herman
Everett, Melissa Mitchell,
Stephanie Jones and Rebecca
McCormick received the gift certifi-
cates. Rachel LeCompte, Jennifer
Kelly, Mary Scitz, Brian Henson and
Mashonda Simmons received the
declining balance card.
� �! �
eastrarolinian
Build
experience
with us!
Good Luck
on
Your Exams!
Then you may be fast the person we are
looking lor. We need your help this summer.
We are now accepting applications lor all
positions
Positions includes
� Staff, whU�H&
� (Hpinion 6a�umiUdt&
� 3!fiotegxapAe&
� CU&iMant 3Woduction
Manage
� JWoducticn CU&idiantA
� (IdtmtiMng, ffiepxe&entatwe&
� Cof CditexA
JZxpetience
Lifetime
Apply at our office on the second floor or the Student
Publications Building (across for Joyner Library).






5
6 Tuesday. April 29. 1997
Profrenor Penguin's leleporter Mashene
By Chapman & Murphy
CvWfr OH �4tTH CQUUs�
AjOUMCftC SPECIAL,
0N?isirti(RtsrAWSAMiAi?
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5 C�Wrpr?o�7
Hveryd
ay life
By Michael Litwin
r, 1
an. vp J1 �
�for jshi'5�sooo
Servor I Shre-
wish XeoMhc
herecoes8-
btone-ju
Md o life
must be. ont
rtt snrac
BY AMDRE OLWIATI
one fitT, w mo
"wete mot
?mt, OVK Kis
23'
Copyright jc) 1M7 by Andrt Gcmwn
Linerntf
ACROSS
1 Domicile
5 Urged, with "on
10 Final sale words
14 As strong as �
15 �Gras
16 Strobile
17 Jay of TV
18 Beethoven's
"Fur�"
19 Players
20 Broker
22 Pies, cakes, etc.
24 Press
26 Dregs
27 Indianapolis
natives
31 Abate
35 "What kind of
fool�?
36 Cuts
38 Norman Vincent
39 NaCI
41 River ducks
43 Sketched
44 His and her
46 Breaks suddenly
48 Compass pt.
49 Merited
51 Sweaters, e.g.
53 Sailors
55"� Grit"
56 Short dramas
60 Wading birds
64 File
65 Coup �
67 Wound with
horns
68 Poker stake
69 Anserine
creatures
70 Island dance
71 Some votes
72 Goofed
73 Very, in Vichy
r1I "4 55r8110111213
141516
171819
20212223
242526
2728293031323334
35363738
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44145� 464748
49505152
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O 1997 Tribuna Madia Sarvicai, Inc.
Ml rights reserved
Answers
from Thursday
cAMPEMA1LJFADS
oLE0SETToEM1T
wATIRPR0OFNOVA
s1ST IER1NT1NKER
P1TE1NE
AFLoAT,0VERL0OK
DA1RYolBESEPRE
0RE0�P0RJMEQA
nMNCUTEYCARAT
ESSENcEScLEANS
ABcDsR0
s cARCEspANGLEs
woRNEXc1TEMENT
ANTE0lAN11NDY
NEEDs1RE01"OSE
DOWN
1 Stop
2 Unmatched
thing
3 � Lisa
4 O.T. book
5 Coming into
view
6 Lass
7 Grating
8 One of the
Fords
9 Kind of engine
10 Got at
11 Rise sharply
12 Part of MIT:
abbr.
13 Hardens
21 Discord
personified
23 Ooze
25 Amerindians
27 Speediness
28 Missouri River
city
29 Cargo vessel
30 .Hit as punish-
ment
32 Ranee's
garment
33 Actress Verdugo
34 Fresher
37 Bias
40 Old photos
42 Full of energy
45 Genuine
47 Ticket remnant
50 Coat with flour
52 Importance
54 Bovine animal
56 Beg
57 Road division
58 Movie dog
59 Ending for pun
or gang
61 Vinegary
62 Writer Gardner
63 Oceans
66 Enzyme: suff.
11
The East Carolinian
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7





' '
Matt HtKHI MvwtanQ Dinaot
MARGl'ERITE BENJAMIN NwwEdtto
AMY t. RoYSTKK Assisimt Nws Editor
JAY MYERS UtottyltEtoM
Dale Williamson Assaumliiwn �rar
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Whenever an election rears its ugly head, the public is constantly bombarded with one empty
wnise after another by desperate politicians. Well, to the joy and surprise of many, one car.di-
ce has stayed true to his word.
Scott Forbes, the newly elected SGA president, promised that, if elected, he would eliminate
the bill that stated a portion of student fees would go towards paying the tuition of SGA exec-
utives. Now that Forbes in securely in his office, he has already taken action.
The '97 SGA budget has been determined, and SGAs paid tuition is not part of the plan.
This is a small yet very significant act on the SGA's part. More than that, this is a very good
�tion as to what type of government we, the ECU student body, can expect from our newly
i officials. Forbes made a promise, and he stuck to it, and he did so with the student pop-
in mind.
'Members of the SGA listened to the students' complaints about the tuition bill. A majority
oftthe student population did not feel it was fair to have their money go towards paying for the
education of members of the SGA. While there has been controversy as to exactly how this bill
ws Initiated, the problem has been resolved thanks to swift action on the SGAs part,
'An elected body, no matter if its a student position or a professional one, exists to serve its
people.
We at TEC have heard the SGA situation being compared to student athletes, but we don't
fefel this to be a justified comparison. SGA and student athletes are two separate entities serv-
inte two different functions We all acknowledge the reality of student athletes getting free
rnney, but that is a necessary evil. ECU football brings a great deal of money and publicity into
campus, and many feel that the best athletes need to be reimbursed for their hard efforts.
Regardless of one's stance on student athletes, the executive members of SGA serve a dif-
ferent purpose. They are not entertainers performing for the mass populace. They are elected
ofJRcials whose sole purpose is to improve conditions en campus for the students. This is not a
sef-serving position where one gets reimbursed for hard work. You do the hard work because
you want to be active and make a difference in your community: Sadly, many elected officials
Jet this simple fact.
loweveT, Forbes and his colleagues are definitely off on the right foot. We at TEC applaud
newly elected SGA's take charge attitude and obvious concern for the changes the student
b$dy desired.
Good luck on your new job, gang. And don't lose sight of your purpose.
I
Students need Parking 101
i the Editor
don't we all just team how to
t? Everyone who is enrolled in
scfool here at East Carolina is always
complaining about the amount of
parking that is present. The students
are consistently asking for a parking
deck or expanded lots both of which
cost lots of money and are said to be
unrealistic solutions by the school.
In the immediate future we as
enrolled persons at this institution
will not have a solution to the parking,
so we need to make the best of what
we have. If the cars in the parking
Ion were parked like the drivers had a
little common sense, then a few more
can would have a place to rest. Way
too often I find myself walking to my
car, asking myself, "How much space
does one person possibly need to get
out of their car?" I suppose that this
is a question that goes better unan-
swered.
Another waste of parking space is
cars parked at an angle to prevent
from being hit. No one wants their
car hit, but no one else should suffer
because of a couple of paranoid stu-
dents who have parked in an illegal
manner.
Please use your best judgment to
park. If you park like an idiot or leave
your car in the middle of the driveway,
chances are you will get a ticket. I
know that getting a ticket makes a lot
of people mad and then they ask why,
but the simple truth is that they
deserved it. If you don't have the
sense not to park at an expired park-
ing meter or on the sidewalk then you
really don't even need to be driving.
There is no way that everyone will
park properly, and, if they did, there
would still be a problem with the
amount of parking space. The simple
fact remains that there is not enough
parking to accommodate everyone,
this is why we as the students, do not
need to complicate things with negli-
gent parking of our automobiles.
Michael Stewart
Freshman
undecided
Freshmen deserve to park too
To the Editor;
I know everyone is probably sick of
hearing about ECU's parking prob-
lems, but I can't keep quiet about the
change in freshman parking tots any
longer. When returning to ECU after
Spring Break, I was really irritated to
discover that one of the freshman
parking lots was changed to residents.
I understand that the residents are
older and have a whole semester on
freshmen, but why do they need so
much parking?
What also bothers me is that there
are more freshmen living on campus
and therefore that means more fresh-
men cars. When I observed the new
"resident" parking lot, I have noticed
it has never been foil. As a matter of
fact, it is never even halfway filled.
The freshman parking lot is always
jam packed and now it's almost impos-
sible to get a spot. I know there is
another freshman parking, lot by col-
lege hill, but that one is also small and
always packed. I think the logical thing
to do would be to divide the second
parking lot in half, residentsfreshmen
or make it first come, first serve.
With ECU expanding every semes-
ter the parking problem will only
become worse. I think ECU needs to
sate that there is limited parking for
freshmen on the housing agreement.
This might discourage people from
bringing a car.
Stephanie Erb
Freshman
Nursing
How 'bout a ride?
To the Editor,
�Have you ever been studying late
inKhe library only to find yourself
wfrnout a ride back up rhe hill? Or,
haVe you ever been visiting a friend on
a weeknight and stayed past 12 a.m
arid had no ride back across campus? I
know that more than once, I have
found myself in this predicament.
jfeCU provides excellent bus and
vajri service, but the hours do not
extend past 12 a.m. Sunday through
Thursday. Many campus computer
labs are open until 2 a.m. Residence
Hall visitation hours extend until that
same time. The library is open until
midnight as well F.CU transportation
stops at 12 a.m. on weeknights. How
are students supposed to safely get
back to their dorms?
Your suggestion may be to walk,
but as a female, I hesitate to walk
alone on campus in the wee hours of
the morning. Call me a chicken, but
I'd rather be a live chicken than a
dead duck.
More Tower' to determined dancer
To the Editor,
So often, rhe news is filled with
hate and violence, we think it is time
to share some positive news with the
ECU community. Jennifer Hayrtes is
a very special person. When she came
to ECU three years ago, she brought
with her a passion for dance. She
quickly came to realise, however, the
difficulty of finding a place to dance
when you have a. disability.
This challenge did not stop
Jennifer. In fact, she became more
determined than ever that she and
others with disabilities should have
an opportunity to share their talents.
With this in mind, Jennifer created
"Wheel Power a dance troupe for
people with and without disabilities.
This group has been Jennifer's pride
and joy since its inception in 1995.
She even had the name and logo
copyrighted.
We have seen many performances
in thearts, but nothing compares to
the beauty and passion of the
dancers on stage April 23rcL for those
who missed it, "Wheel Power" per-
formed as part of Disability
Awareness Wee, and it was agj
ordinary event.
We would just like to take a
moment to recognize and congradu-
late Jennifer and the other dancers
on a supreme performance. Without
Jennifer's determination and inspira-
tion, "Wheel Power" would not exist.
Heather Holzworth
Katie Stephens
If I have a late night study session,
or even if I'm visiting a friend, I'd like
to know that I can have ECU trans-
porrarion rr get me safely home. My
suggestion is to extend the hours of
operation until 2 a.m. every night of
the week. I'm sure many current dri-
vers wouldn't mind the $12 per hour
they would get for driving past mid-
night couple of nights a week.
Jennifer Dougherty
Freshman
Special Education
"In life, journalists stand side-by-side with foot
soldiers and with presidents, with heroes and
with victims. But in death they have too often
been forgotten
Charles L Overby, The Freedom Forum, 1996
i

s "





$
8 Tuesday, April 29. 1997
The East Carolinian
CDreview Little Texas tears roof off Minges
I Innocent Nixon
Welcome to
Nixonville
Derek T. Halle
SENIOR WIUTF.R
As a mix of art to gain in a political innuendo, Innocent Nixon provides the
sounds of the Beach Boys with a punk tip. Oh, don't forget the rock and roll
IVelrome to Nixonville is set up to match a certain theme, this one being poli-
tics. The group has songs like "Dirty Little Town "Young Republican , All
Day Sucker" and "World's Newest Profession They're songs that reflect the
image of Richard Nixon, a president that worked his way up from the bottom
only to find that the top was much more cruel.
As the album opens, vou'U catch the groove. It s very simplistic. There are
not many drum fills to excite you but the message is clear. Having two ladies
along to sing background vocals and play percussion is probably one of the most
exciting aspects of the band.
They keep their sound tight. This is good and bad. It s good because it
makes them easy to identify. It's a sound that you'll remember The bad thing
is that it doesn't leave the band much room for excitement. There s absolutely
no improv or signs of compatible musicianship. Sure, the sound could be mar-
keted and maybe a record deal waits in the future, but is it what you really want,
Innocen' Nixon? Are vou happy with your reflection of yesterday s hero, or is
the symbol of his presence subject to a mere mockery, leaving the world to won-
der of how much sarcasm was really put into the naming ot this band.
On the cover, there's a picture of a man, with a helmet, holding a donkey.
Nixon was a Republican, I might add. This proves more sarcasm for Nixon it
anything. The songs may not be sarcastic, but the image sure is.
As for the tunes, each one revolves around the rest. So, III just pick one to
write about today. Let's see! How about "Machine Gun the last song on the
record. It starts off with a simple guitar riff. A drum beat that definitely accom-
panies it follows as well. The lyrics are interesting, though: "Big, big, gun I got
me a machine gun Yeah, all right fellas. That's some exciting poetry for back-
ground singers to have fun with.
The record, as a whole, is adorable. I just can't get over the way that six guys
came together and accomplished one, great feat. How many six member bands
do you know of that sound like three people? Wow, that s amazing. The only
thing more exciting than that is the sarcasm. Dig in people!
You can see Innocent Nixon at Peasant's Cafe on Apnll7. Oh that was last
week I'm sorry. I'm sure you'll be able to catch them on the last leg of the world
tour. By the wav, their E-mail address is lnNixon@aol.com. If you write them
soon, they'll send you a real donkey courtesy of Innocent Nixon records. Isn t
that something? . ���. Kr
"Therefore I say to you today I most humbly resign. - Richard M. Nixon.
JENNIFER COLEMAN
SENIOR WHITER
It may not be "politically correct" to
say so, but 1 am a big fan of country
music. Reba, Garth, Wynonna -1 love
them all. I watch CMT with a passion,
and my car radio switches between
two country stations with a push of
one button.
So I was thrilled to discover that
the Kentucky Headhunters would be
opening for Little Texas right here at
ECU. Last year they brought the
Allman Brothers Band, but really, that
didn't mean too much to me. I'd never
even heard of them. But Little Texas!
I couldn't wait to get my tickets,
because I was afraid they'd sell out.
Well ECU, you've disappointed
me. I don't think more than 600 peo-
ple bought tickets for this concert. I
hear people complaining all the time
that we never have any big bands play-
ing in our area, and now I know why.
The one time wc get one, no one
bothers to support them by buying
tickets.
All I can say is that it was your loss.
Anyone who attended this concert can
back me up - it was more than worth
it! I arrived early, because I wanted to
get a good seat. (Again, not a problem
- it wasn't like I was fighting a crowd).
When it was finally time to begin, the
entire audience got quiet and then
erupted into a cacophony of sound as
the Kentucky Headhunters took the
stage. They opened up with what
should be the official ECU theme
song, "The Party Zone By the end of
this song, I noticed one girl already
dancing. They followed it with one of
their signature songs, "Walk Softly on
this Heart of Mine to which every-
one sang along. The one drawback
were the lights. The reds and blues
were ok, but there were really annoy-
ing pulses of white and yellow light
that frankly hurt my eyes. But even
that didn't stop me from enjoying the
music. Everyone let out a yell when
they played their newest release,
"Sirigin' the Blues which sounded
even better live than it does on the
radio.
One thing I have to say about the
Kentucky Headhunters is that they
SEE TEXAS PAGE 9
TStie Texaspictured) and the Kentucky Headhunters had the sparse crowd on its feik
Friday night at Minges Coliseum
PHOTO COURTESY OF STUDENT UNION
SKANKIN' AT BAREFOOT
ei
o� io
Music!
s
Run Amy Curt tvm hum Hong T,p� rt Iron, � tritnd BuyriUstd Ply Full Pric.
New York ska band. The Toasters, got the crowd movin' and grown at Barefoot last Thursday.The band was joined by
several students and a gorilla at the end of their set.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CELESTE WltSON
scream
WALL
Tkert is o�ihm more useless than stream-
ing at a mall. It's justspittleml' hrirhs.
Mits ami spirit, However, if you put
enough MM togfther. that troll might just
he Horn aver. So Join m another futile
attempt to change the status quo and
listen to a "Stream at the Wall
Greenville doesn't totally suck
Jay Myers
Jesus Christ Superfly
Class: None
Major: Disaster
Home: Boy
Goal: Rye
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
I've been criticized for my criticisms again and again
in the paper. All the torment I've created - for Jesus
bands, for Greenville's lackluster movie theaters (and
the crap they usually show) and for the lack of choice
in the downtown music scene - has been scrutinized
and thrown back in my face with equal, if not greater,
forcc- - . .
I've loved every minute of it. Thanks to everyone
who has written, called or otherwise contacted me
about what I've had to say in the paper. Criticism is
nothing (if it is actually anything at all) if it's not
heard. The fact that I've caused such controversy does
my heart good.
And despite what you may think of me, I do have
a good heart. My only purpose in writing for this paper
at all is to try and make things better.
I wrote badly of Jars of Clay because their music is
derivative and boring and I feel that people who buy
it are selling themselves short. There is much better
music out there for you to spend your hard-earned
dollars on than pop fluff wrapped in a blanket of
Christianity. . .
I criticize the local theaters and their choice ot
movies because I think they underestimate the film-
viewing populace of Greenville. The Emerald City is
growing by leaps and bounds both economically and
socially. Entertainment by default needs to grow at
the same rate. There's a reason for the amazing num-
ber of video rental stores that have sprung up in town
over the last few months. Those stores wouldn't be
able to all stav in business if Greenville residents
weren't interested in seeing a more interesting and
diverse movie selection. All I wanted to do with my
criticism was change the status quo and give a voice
for what people want.
Finally, my commentary on the downtown music
scene was also motivated by a need for more diversi-
ty. It was never intended to be an all-out attack on
local musicians and club owners. Rather, I wrote those
pieces as a shout out to those who believe, as I do, that
the downtown scene is lacking. I wanted them to get
off their collective butts and do something about it. It
has always been my belief that our local music scene
has potential, we just haven't reached it yet.
As harsh as I am with my criticisms, I do have some
praises for Greenville. I've made many good, and I
believe life-long, friendships here. As a retail clerk, a
newspaper editor, a teacher and a scholar, I've also
gained quite a bit of experience and had the chance to
work with some really great people.
And I can't forget that I wouldn't even have come
here if it wasn't for Andrea, my girlfriend and later my
wife. I began mv marriage in Greenville. My wife and
I moved into our first house togerher here. These for-
mative vears of our life together will be ones we will
never forget, and despite my often-stated dislike for
this town, it will always hoid a special place in my
heart for that very reason.
It's not like me to get this sentimental, but I felt
that I needed to share what is good about life here in
Greenville just once before I leave. I've haven't total-
lv hated my time here.
But there comes a time in every man s life when he
has to sav goodbye - a time when he must part from
the life he has known, and go on to something greater,
something better.
Well, screw it! You're not getting rid of me that eas-
ily! I'm not leaving! I will be here until the end of
time! My voice will not be silenced! Where's my lithi-
um5? Why are vou putting that jacket on me
White's not my color! No, the sleeves go the other way
around! What's with all the straps?? Ow, that hurts
PS. There's a new sheriff in town, and he ain't
gonna go easy on ya like 1 was. Ya better watch out,
he's an ornery ol' country punk, who'd put a boot up
your backside as quick as he'd spit on ya for looking at
Good luck, .Andy. I hope you can keep a good hold
on your sanity, like I did mine.
Buenos tardes, amigos.
TV rednecks yee-haw back to Hasmrd
student
wins 1
awardf
Megan Gray will jj
play with Raleigh!
Symphony
jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Megan Gray, an ECU student in i
School of Music and concertma
of the ECU Symphony Orche
and Chamber Orchestra, was onef
five winners out of a total of 48 con-
testants in the Raleigh Symphoirfc
Orchestra's Concerto Competit&ii
held on February 1, 1997. H
Gray, a native of Columbia, S.C,
received ECU's Hardy Viol$i
Scholarship in 1993, after serving
the concertmaster for her hWi
school orchestra and winning tjfc
Richland District Conce4
Competition. In 1996, Gray wifi
the ECU Concerto Competing.
She will perform with ECU's sym-
phony again this season.
Gray began studying the violi
at the ripe old age of 11. She con-
tinued her early studies with sufch
luminaries as Amy Herin, a membjer
of the South Carolina
Philharmonic, and Ryan Kho, the
concertmaster of the Augusta
Svmphony. Gray now studies with
ECU's own Fritz Gearhart.
All five winners of the February
competition will play individually
with the Raleigh Symphony
Orchestra. Gray will perform
Chausson's Poeme.
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
I know where you were Friday night. You may
not want to admit it, but I know you were
watching. Stating at the tube, overcome by
memories, crying in your beer, finally you broke
down, "Damnit, I missed you, Duke boys
Those royal rednecks from Hazzard yee-
hawed back into prime time Fridav night with
the Dukes ofHaxzarel reunion on CBS. CBS tried
the same trick last year with a Dalas reunion.
But Cooter kicks the cornbread out of J.R. every
time.
The show has enjoyed a revival of sorts since
The Nashville Network began running reruns
last year. Supposedly, the Dukes of Hazwtl is
TNN's top rated show. I'm sure Club Dance has
to be a close second.
This was the first reunion of the cast since
the show went off the air in 1985. Nearly all of
the original cast appeared on the reunion.
However, rwn main characters were missing
Boss Hogg (Sorrel Booke) has gone to the big all-
you-can-eat buffet bar in the sky. Waylon
Jennings, who served as narrator for the show,
was a no-show. Wavlon. what the hell are you so
busy doing? The absence of Jennings led to a
godawful new theme song for the reunion sung
by Bo and Luke themselves. John Schneider and
Tom Wopat. "Just a good ol' boy, never meaning
no harm It's like a hymn, how could they get
rid of it? Sacrilege.
To properly enjoy the reunion and to rid your
mind of intelligent thoughts it was necessary to
consume large quantities of cheap, stank beer.
My beverage of choice was Stroh's Light, svhich
happened to be on special down at City Market.
To further enhance the experience, I also had to
down a bit of that mighty, mighty pleasin' corn
squeezins. My roommate's girlfriend drank wine
coolers. In turn, she com-
plained about how bad the
show sucked. What do you
expect? Wine coolers and
Duke don't mix. They don't
serve Bartyles and James at
the Boar's Nest, baby.
Because Boss Hogg bit it,
Roscoe (James Best) assumed
leadership of Hazzard. He was
now going by "Boss Roscoe"
and wearing epaulets and a
Boss Hogg inspired hat. Did
thev just have some spare cos-
tume parts laying around?
Why? Bo was a race car driver,
and good ol' hoy number 2.
Luke, served the Forestry
Department as a firefighter.
Cooter (Ben Jones) returned
to Hazzard from Congress. In
real life, Jones, a Georgia
native, was a senator. I he
future of our country in the
hands of Cooter. Makes you gets all misty and
patriotic, doesn't it? Daisy (Catherine Bach) was
studying for her Ph.D. at Duke University. She
paid her tuition bv providing special "services
to former Duke basketball players Christian
Laetner and Bobby Hurley as part of Duke's
"Bang em Blue" alumni program. That last
part's not true. Sounds good though, huh?
The plot of the reunion, lifted straight from
Masterpiece Theater, revolved around a woman
named Mama Jo, who wanted to build a theme
park over the Hazzard
County Swamp. For the
park to be built, Uncle
Jesse (Denver Pyle)
would have to give his
farm to make room for a
highway. The Duke boys
will have none of it. so
they challenge Mama Jo
to a moonshine stock car
race and bring the
General Lee out of
retirement. Hijinks
ensue, Daisy is kid-
napped. Mama Jo tries to
cheat, the Duke boys
prevail - same cheesv plot
structure as every Dukes of
Hazzard episode ever
made.
There was an even
cheesier subplot. Bertha
Jo, played by martial arts
mama Cynthia Rothrock,
wants to win the Tough "Person" contest, but
she doesn't want to have to fight her big, love
man Bubba. The romance between Daisy and
Bo and Luke Duke haven't changed their
clothes in ten years. PU!
PHOTO COURTESY OF BOSS HOGG
Enos (Sonny Shroyer) is played up, leading to
them about to be married at the end ot the show.
Of course, it doesn't happen because Daisys
husband shows back up. So. Bubba and Bettha
Jo get married in their place. That Enos is a love
martvr, I tell vou. Speaking of banging em
"blue geez Enos, they are about to fall off by
now.
In retrospect, the reunion was awtui ana
rather depressing. Enos, Daisy, and Roscoe all
looked old enough to owe Jesus a quarter. Daisy
in fact, refrained from wearinganv "Daisy Duke
shorts. And I think we should all be thankful for
that. However, there were other instances of
minor characters being unnecessary scantily
clad. Bad taste is what the Dukes of HazzinlwM
built on. How else could have the phrase "slick-
er than deer guts on a doorknob" been used it it
were not fof bad taste? There was limited car
smashing, surprising considering during the
course of the show's seven-yeaf run. they went
through mote than 300 General Lee s
Disappointingly, no country music star showed
up at the end to plav at the Boar's Nest in order
ro nay off a speeding ticket. I guess chat s good.
Instead of Loretta Lynn, it would probably been
Billv Rav Cvrus, Satan Country- Star.
To sum it up, the show was delightfully
wretched. Bad is good sometimes. It certainly
fulfilled anv nostalgic cravings. I think I'm gpnna
go hunt down mv Dukes oj Hesuant lunchbnx. ()r
maybe I'll go put on some 1 )aisy Dukes, u eld mv
car'doors shut, and drive around town really fast.
I love it. 1 love it.
The Concerto Competition
Concert will take place an
Sunday, May 18 at 8 p.m.
in Jones Auditorium on the
Meredith College
campus in Raleigh.
Tickets are S11 for adultjs,
$8 for students and sencr
citizens and $5 for

children under 12.
For more information,�
contact Amy Cavenaugri
with the Raleigh
Symphony Orchestra at
(919) 832-5120.
r





I
lift 'style
The East Carolinian
Texas
continued from page B
uASUiSHmwis
ljnm i C'ik! ,Uon 0 Nt
)ANU1)S (INPIMOS)
� s.i' N-i
are certainly energetic. They honesrly
have a great time onstage. You'd think
they were playing to a house of 50.000
instead of a little more than 500, the
way they bounded across the stage
with spirit and vitality. They soon had
people dancing everywhere, which
made me think of an idea. Next time
we host a country band (and I hope
that despite the poor attendance we
do host another big name country
band) we should leave the center free
of chairs for line dancers and two-
steppers. After all, who can resist tap-
ping their feet to some great music?
One of the new songs they played,
from their just-released album
Stompin' Ground, is their first real shot
at a love ballad. They didn't say the
name, but my best guess is that it's
ailed "My Cowboy Best Let me tell
you, this one song is worth buying the
album for. It was absolutely breathtak-
ing.
After a few more songs, the band
left the stage, al! except the drummer.
He launched into a drum solo that was
incredible. I swear he needed at least
eight arms, but you never would have
missed them. Eventually he threw his
drumsticks into the audience (I'm
still jealous of the woman who caught
them) and used his hands like a bongo
drum. He must be a masochist,
because he was hitting those drums so
hard I'm surprised he didn't cry out in
pain. He ended the solo to a standing
ovation and hoots and hollers from
everywhere.
When the Kentucky Hcadhuntcrs
left the stage, there was an incredibly
long wait to see Little Texas. I under-
stand that they have to change the
instruments and all, but it was more
than 30 minutes. Still, it was worth it.
I noticed that many people came in
right after the Kentucky Headhunted
left the stage. I suppose they just
wanted to see Little Texas, but boy
did they miss an awesome opening
act.
Little Texas opened up with a clas-
sic, "Life Goes On I don't think a
person was left sitting; it was totally
M . � '
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to
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Simply sell back tour or more books I�
ICU-Dowdy Student Stores, starting Tuesday, April tf,
and receive a FRII promotional t-shirt Limited to mt soo student
$
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April 29 - May 3 & May 5 � May 8

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Saturday: 9:00 am � 3:00 pm
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www.studentstores.ccu.edu Hours. Monday - Friday: 7 am - 7 pm & Saturday: 9 am 3 pm
awesome. The audience called out
lines right along with the band, and
at least 50 people rushed the stage. I
considered it, but at about the time
I'd made up my mind, security
stepped in and didn't let anyone else
past. They led into the ballad "Amy's
Back In Austin one of my favorites.
This one definitely benefitted from
live performance, if it could indeed
get any better. The band really knows
how to work an audience, especially
the female members.They sang
"Amy's Beck In Austin" as if it were
going out to each and every lady in
attendance.
Although I like the oldies, I just
have to talk about some of the new
songs they introduced at this concert.
One, a love song called "In the Line
Of Love just took my breath away.
The chorus goes, do what I do
Only for You I'd even lay down my
life Never ask why 'cause it's ail in
the line of love I thought I would
cry and vowed to buy the new album
the minute it comes out.
I don't want to say that the next
song got rhe most audience participa-
tion because if there's one thing
Lirtle Texas knows how to do, it's
work the audience. They had us
singing almost half of their songs for
them. But "There's A Rrst Time For
Everything" was a definite crowd
pleaser. Another favorite was a total
surprise. It turns out that during rhe
making of their latest album, they got
a call to record a song for Disney. The
song? "You Gotta Kiss The Girl" from
The Little Mermaid. And I'm certain
there wasn't a female in the audience
who didn't wish they would take
their own advice.
Several of their songs they worked
into medleys and only sang bits and
pieces. For example, they had a med-
ley version of "You and Forever and
Me "I'd Rather Miss You "My
Love is Ready For You and
"Southern Grace I really wish they
had sung the entire version of
"Southern Grace It's a phenomenal
song, and one of my favorites. The
concert ended with three block-
busters, "What Might Have Been
"God Blessed Texas and "Make
Love To Me Of course they did the
"fake leaving" thing that you get at
most concerts, and of course the
audience dove right into it, shouting
and screaming and stomping their
feet to bring the band back. If you ask
me, that's the sign of a good concert -
the ability to make the audience
scream for more.
Anyone who missed this concert
missed a great one. Both Little Texas
and the Kentucky I kadhuntcrs have
an amazing stage presence. They're
real pros who honestly enjoy their
work.
I would have paid much more
than the SIS in advance or even the
$25 at the door to see this concert. I
can only wish that more people felt
that way. A word of caution ECU, if
we don't start supporting the
Student Union, they're going to stop
supporting us. I personally wish to
thank the Student Union. I enjoyed
it, and I'll go again!
The Third Annual
Pin Pickin' Plate
Pick-Up Fund
Raiser will be
held May 29 by
REAL Crisis
Center.
Tickets are $5 in
advance and $6
at the event.
Advance tickets
may be pur-
chased from any
member of
REAL
Plates will be
available from 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. at
Hooker Memorial
Christian Church.
For more infor-
mation, call 758-
HELP.
r





i
10 Tuesday. Apnl 29. 1997
il-style
The East Carolinian
Glancing back at the year in movies
RIGGAN
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752-0952
John Cusack stars in Grosse Pointe Blank as a hitman with a heart. The him is one of the few good movies that has made it to
Greenville theaters in the last year. It is still playing in town, so go catch it while you can.
PHOTO COURTESY OF BUEM VIST PICTURES
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Last week I predicted which films would be worth seeing
this summer and which ones should best be left for dead.
Now that the academic year is winding down, I invite you
to take your cinematic eye and look back.
I've seen more than my fair share of films this past aca-
demic year, both in the theater and on video. I've enjoyed
films that are destined to earn the status of being consid-
ered masterpiece classics, I've seen trash that should be
burned, and I've seen everything in between.
Despite my constant complaints about Greenville
severely lacking in cinematic choices, our local theaters
still managed to pull in some very worthwhile treats. The
closer Thanksgiving and Christmas approached, the more
appealing many of the films became.
Tom Hanks topped himself by writing and directing
J'hot Thing You Th, an innocent yet fun flick that chronicled
the rise and fall of a late '60s rock band known as The
Wbnders. But all was not so innocent at the box office,
largely thanks to a man known as Shakespeare. The con-
temporary updating of UWiam Shakrsprarr's Romro ci"Jiiirt
garnered mixed reactions, but it nonetheless proved that
cbttsk stories uin be t.iid with manv different visions. As
absurd as Romeo &Juirt may have been, it was a visual, in-
your-face thrill ride that featured impressive perfor-
mances by its loving leads. Leonardo DeCaprio and Claire
Danes.
Outstanding performances by some surprising talent
made several great films even better. Etna allowed
Madonna to show off her classic movie star looks and her
vocal abilities. Backing up Madonna both with physical
beauty and worthy lungs was .Antonio Banderas, who had
not been so good in a movie since he packed two guns at
his side in the over-the-top action feast, Desperado.
While The DeviTs Oscn was more of a disappointment
than a work of art, it was still powered by exemplary per-
formances from stars Harrison ford and Brad Pitt.
The shining star of the moment, however, turned out
to be the relatively unknown Billy Bob Thornton, who
wrote, directed and'starred in the Oscar-winning southern
gothic, SlingBlade. Aside from Thornton's remarkable per-
formance, this film was also an acting showcase for John
Ritter and Dwight Yoakam of all people.
But not every film released within the last year
demanded great acting in order to be great. Exhilarating
action was the necessary ingredient for films like Star lirk:
First Contort and Bruce Willis' hist Man Stamling. And
twisted humor made Tim Burton's Mars Attak a much
grander treat than huleprmlrme f)ay.
Several other notable films graced Greenville's silver
screens. Howard Stem bared his heart in the semi-autobi-
ographical film. Priviti t'rtt. Woody llarrelson and
Courtnev L�ne tt.uk i - ie critics and the censors with
the controversial ThePmplevs. fjmyffmf. Kevin Bacon got
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V
11 Tuesday. Apri! 29, 1997
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lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Ellen's gay so are thousands of others
.
EDITORIAL
THf. CAlirOMKU STATF. VNIi-SUKTHRincf.
n.ui.r sc.vdiai.
It has got to be a tough gig being a
homosexual in the age of "political
correctness Who really cares that
this is America, "the home of the
free?" The country that prides itself
on being the nation where "all men
are created equal
A recent cover of Time magazine
boasted Ellen DcGeneres, star of the
hit sitcom Ellen, announcing that she
was indeed gay.
Speculation on this matter has
been running rampant over the course
of the past few months, it almost
became a matter of national impor-
tance. Still it prompts many self-
respecting citizens to ask the ever-lin-
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gering question: "Who really gives a
damn?"
Yeah, she's gay. So are hundreds of
thousands of other people.
Nonetheless, there are still several
simpletons out there who can't find
anything better to do with their time
than make a big brouhaha - one such
example being the American family
Association, a radical right organiza-
tion dedicated to upholding "family
values
And what better way to uphold the
moral fabric in American society by
targeting a source of such moral
depravity as the show Ellen? Let us
not forget the sitcom is produced by
the Disney corporation, the symbol for
all things good and pure.
The American family Association
has compiled a list of the three leading
Ellen advertisers from Jan. 1, 1997
through March 22, 1997. In an
attempt to get the show off the air, the
group is encouraging its followers to
contact these advertisers and "polite-
ly" ask them not to sponsor
DeGeneres' show and stop pushing
the "homosexual agenda
Agenda?
Movies
continued from page 10
to play the bad guy in Barry
Levinson's "true" crime flick,
Sleepers, Ving Rhames played hero in
John Singleton's historical piece,
Rosewood. Tom Cruise earned critical
praise and Cuba Gooding, Jr. won an
Oscar for their energetic perfor-
mances in Jerry Maguire. And, if
you're lucky, you can still catch John
Cusack's return to prime comedic
form in Grove Pomte Blank.
Still, ali was not so rosy in the
world of movies. Some brain-dead
Are they planning on
weaving an evil, mindlock
web around America's tele-
vision viewing public in an
attempt to brainwash them
into their "way of living?"
Probably not. Oprah has
been doing this for years; no
one is sabotaging her adver-
tising.
It becomes increasingly
hard to editorialize against
such narrow-mindedness.
Hey, people are gay. Get over
it. Is bigotry a family value
we want instilled in our chil-
dren? Hopefully not.
People aren't gay by
choice, and if even if they
were so what? "All men
created equal Apparently,
this doesn't mean anything
unless one is straight, but
even then it doesn't mean a
helluva lot.
Unfortunately, we're a
country built on hypocrisy.
It's a shame people care
more about Ellen's sexual
orientation.
Ellen DeGeneres comes out of the closet tomorrow
night on ABC. -�
PHOTO COURTESY Of ABC m
producer decided that the public
really wanted to see Jean-Claude Vui
Damme and Dennis Rodman work
together in a formulaic action vehicle
called Double Team. Another producer
thought that Ernest Borgnine fans
would love to see Tom Arnold play
the lead in the film version of
McHak'sNavy.
Other clunkers that were generat-
ed from the mass mind set of
Hollywood included Tim Allen's cul-
tural awakening in Jungle 2 Jungle
Barbara Streisand's tribute to herself
in The Mirror Has Two Facer, Michael
Jordan's teaming with Bug Bunny in
the two-hour commercial known as
Space Jam Keanu Reeves' teaming
with Morgan Freeman in the forget-
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We offer many Tbwnhomes. apartments, condominiums and single
family houses throughout the University and Greenville area.
table Chain Reaction; and Geena Davis
playing tough with Samuel L. Jackson
in The Long Kiss Goodnight.
The best place, of course, to catch
the best films in this town is on video,
and it's been a great year for video.
Lonestar, Trainspotting, Supercop, .
Welcome to the tollhouse, Dead Man, Fly
Away Home, and Kansas City are all ;
wonderful films currently available on �
video for your viewing pleasure. Titles :
to keep an acute eye out for include
Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet, Al Pacino's '
Looking For Rkhard, Jackie Chan's Ftrsf.
Strike, bonme Brasco, The Crucible and
When We Were Kings.
Limited space doesn't allow for
detailing these films, but my biased
opinion guarantees they will be worth
your S3 rental fee.
Summer is quickly approaching,
and the summer movie season has
already invaded our theaters (Hmmo
opened last Friday). If you hawe the
time to catch a movie during whatev-
er break you have and if you are not
impressed with what's playing at the
theaters, keep this list in mind. My
tastes may be biased, but they are also
eclectic enough to include everyone.
Have a great summer!
ABSOLUIEIX
posmvEix
WITHOUT A DOUBT.
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Jf-I6l6P-(2b5-a4339
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Rates subject to change. $.95 for each additional hour, billed in one-minute increments. Remote access available for $.10 per minute. Internet service
provided by MCI Telecommunications Corporation In association with campusMCI Internetsm. �1997 MCI Telecommunications Corporation. Ail rights reserved.
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campusMCI. Internet
with MirjCJiaft internet Exptorer
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y






i
12 Tuesday. April 29. 1997
The East Carolinian
TRIVIAtime
Name the NBA's Rookie of the Year last
season.
Regular season winding down before tourney;
Going back to Houston, Foreman plans
homecoming fight
ATLANTIC CITY, NJ. (AP) - George Foreman wants to stay home next time.
The amazing 48-year-old heavyweight, who has made a second career out of
proving people wrong, says he wants his next fight to be in Houston, near his
Marshall, Texas, home.
Still glowing after Foreman's 12-round split decision over unbeaten and
untested Lou Savarese, his promoters said they hoped to sign an opponent to
fight in August, September or October, perhaps in the Astrodome.
No doubt Foreman will monitor the selection process. After all, he headed
into Saturday's fight with Savarese thinking the rangy 31-year-old would be
another cupcake. He wasn't.
Savarese, who was unbeaten in 36 fights, gave Foreman all he could handle
before 7,102 fans - including Joe DiMaggio and Roseanne, who sat separately at
ringside - at Convention Hall.
Foreman pulled out his 76th victory in 80 fights by winning the last five
rounds on the cards of judges Barbara Perez and Shafeeq Rashada on the
strength of left jabs and hooks.
"If the judges said he won, he won Savarese said.
Jordan scores 55 as Bulls go up 2-0
(AP)-People have called his team vulnerable. People have said the MVP resides
elsewhere. People have convinced themselves that this year will be different.
How dare they.
Michael Jordan proved again Sunday that his era is far from ovec The great-
est basketball player in the world scored 55 points, including 20 of his team's
23 in the fourth quarter, to lead the defending champion Chicago Bulls to a
109-104 victory over the Washington Bullets for a 2-0 lead in their best-of-5
scries.
"I got into that zone and I couldn't get out Jordan said. "I just felt com-
pelled to stay in that mode
It was a good thing he did, too, because the rest of the Bulls weren't doing
much. Scottie Pippcn managed just three points in the second half. Dennis
Rodman grabbed just eight rebounds. Toni Kukoc scored six points and Steve
Kerr had just two. And nobody seemed able to stop Chris Webber, Juwan
Howard and Calbert Cheaney on the defensive end.
But just as he has done so many times in his career, Jordan carried the team.
"M.J. is M.J Chicago's Ron Harper said. "We allow him to do his thing. If
he wants to take over a game, there is nothing Scottie can say or (coach) Phil
(Jackson) can say to stop it
Said Jordan: "That's my job. That's what I get paid the big bucks for. I want
to win. I want to win another championship
Elsewhere Sunday, the Lakers and Heat went ahead 2-0 in their series and
he Sorties and Pistons bounced back with victories that tied their series 1-1.
The Lakers defeated Portland 107-93, Miami trounced Orlando 104-87,
Seattle crushed Phoenix 122-78 and Detroit topped Atlanta 93-80.
Team concept works to end Team Penske drought
NAZARETH, Pa. (AP) - Its middle name is Team.
And that's the concept Marlboro learn Penske clung to through the dark-
ness of a 20-racc losing streak.
"We worked hard all last year, all winter Paul Tracy said Sunday after win-
ning the Bosch Grand Prix to end the longest drought since Roger Penske
formed the team 28 years ago.
That's how old Tracy is, and how long his personal losing streak would have
been had he lived down to the expectations of his critics. Instead, he held off
defending champion Michael Andretti in a magnificent late-race battle.
"This is one of the greatest races of my life Tracy said.
In defeat, Andretti could have said the same thing and not been challenged.
He just ran out of laps. And he was unlucky.
"I definitely think we had the best car out there Andretti said. "I just did-
n't have enough time to get him
Parker Johnstone hit Raul Boesel and spun to the wall, where he was T-
boned by Richie Heam. That brought out the final of 10 yellow flags, aborting
the last three laps of the Tracy-Andrctti duel.
"I must have done 10,000 laps here in practice Tracy said of the Penske-
owned Nazareth Speedway. "But that was with no traffic and no Michael
Andretti on your gearbox.
'You can run lap after lap here in practice, but it can't match what it is like
when you race
Early Derby longshots: Celtic Warrior's in; D. Wayne
Lukas out
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - There are two longshots at the Kentucky Derby
already this week. One is Celtic Wfcrrior by his presence; the other is D. Wfcync
Lukas by his absence.
Celtic Warrior hasn't won in four starts this year, beaten a total of 37 34
lengths. Trainer Danny Hutt figures by Saturday's Derby his horse will go off
"about 100-1, but I'll be betting on him
In Lukas' case, the odds are looking shorter by the minute. The trainer was
lobbying to get his champion filly Sharp Cat out of Friday's Kentucky Oaks and
Into the Derby to avoid being left without a Derby starter for the first time
since 1980.
"I'm training for the Oaks at this point Lukas, who has won seven of the
last eight Triple Crown races, said Sunday. "If I owned her, I would run her in
the "Derby. I really think the prince would like to go in the Derby
So fer, owner Prince Ahmed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia hasn't changed his
mind about running in the Oaks, following the advice of racing manager Dick
Mulhall. But Lukas, who has run a record 31 horses in the Derby, meets with
the owner late today or Tuesday in a final effort to change the game plan.
While Sharp Cat put herself in Derby contention with four straight victories
against fillies before finishing sixth against the boys in the Santa Anita Derby,
Celtic Warrior seems an unlikely Derby starter.
His last victory was on Nov. 1 - in a 6 12-furlong allowance race at Churchill
Downs. Since then, he's been second in the Kentucky Jockey Club, ninth in the
San Vicente, eighth in the San Rafael, sixth in the Louisiana Derby and fourth
in the Blue Grass.
Lopez claims 48th career victory when rain washes out
final round
STOCKBRIDGE, Ga. (AP) - Less than two years ago Nancy Lopez said she
"needed to get myself more prepared or quit golf"
She opted for preparation - losing 40 pounds and working hard on her game.
It paid off so well she was able to capture her 48th LPGA Tour victory on
Sunday and look confidently toward a new objective.
"Fifty definitely is a goal she said after winning the Chick-fil-A Charity
Championship shortened to a 36-hole event when a severe thunderstorm
washed out Sunday's scheduled final round.
"I have to say I'm in the best shape I've been in she said. "I don't feel old
and stiff. Two years ago I felt heavy and stiff. Now it's different. I feel stronger.
'The most important think is the wav I feel. A year and a half ago I didn't
feel I could win. I started feeling good. My golf game was getting a little bit bet-
ter
She had enough of a game on Saturday to secure the $82,500 first prize at
the 6.187-yard Eagles Tending ('ounrry Club course.
Mike Daniska
SENIOR WRITER
The CAA Baseball tournament is
approaching fast as the regular season
winds down. The Pirates wrapped up
a three-game series against confer-
ence foe James Madison by taking two
of three. The Pirates slipped by in the
first game 7-6, but squandered a four
run lead in the second and lost 6-5.
The team rebounded in the third
game and pounded out a 16-6 victory.
The Pirates can now look forward to
being seeded anywhere from fourth to
sixth.
"We knocked ourselves out of third
place Saturday Head Coach Gary
Overton said.
The weekend series upped the
Pirates' record to 24-25 overall and 10-
11 in CAA play. The overall play this
weekend was a bit indicative of how
the season was played out early on.
"We have been up and down this
season, but we have played some fine
baseball in our past four games
Overton said. "We have settled on a
lineup that appears to be pretty
good
Despite the less than thrilling
record, the Pirates are a much more
improved team than last year's squad
that finished 22-25.
"We have played a tough and
demanding schedule this year; there
were no patsies Overton said. "We
have faced some really tough pitchers,
but all of this has onrv made us bet-
ter
Highlights this season include
wins over Duke, West Virginia and
Virginia.
Leading the team this year are the
top five fitters
which include out-
fielders Antaine
Jones, who is hitting
.317 with six home
runs along with 28
runs batted in;
Steve Salargo, .397,
10, 41; Randv
Rigsby, .344, 11,44;
catcher Tim
Flaherty, .339, 17,
41, along with 33
stolen bases and
shortstop Ryan
Massimo, .235, 9,
36.
"Salargo has been
on a hot streak all
year Overton said.
"And Flaherty has
been on one just
recently
The top two
pitchers this year
have been Brian
Fields, a southpaw
from Greenville and
Brooks Jernigan,
also a southpaw who
was supposed to be
red-shirted at the
beginning of the
year. Fields is tied
for the team lead
with six wins, has pitched four com-
plete games, and has held opposing
batters to only .239. Along with six
victories and a team best 4.47 ERA,
Jernigan has 93 strikeouts in only 88. 2
innings of work.
"We are still very young, only one
senior Overton said. "We were
picked anywhere from 5-7 in our
league, but we have played better
baseball than most anybody thought
The regular season is winding down for the Pirates and their last home game is May 6. The week after they
will battle for the CAA title at Grainger Stadium in Kinston
FILE PHOTO
we would
The Pirates roll into the final week
of the regular season having lost seven
out of their last 10, but hope to turn it
up a notch for the festive CAA tourna-
ment, which will be held in Kinston
May 13-17.
"We feel very confident going in
Overton said. "There is a lot of parity
this year. There is an old joke going
around that nearly every team could
trade uniforms and not be told apart
THE REIGNING CHAMPS
It was a hard fought battle but The East Carolinian triumphed in the end. beating
WZMB 27-25 in their second annual game between the newspaper and the radio
station. TECxwY. a win last season which makes them 2-0 against WZMB. Thanks
to all who participated; we all had a lot of fun. Above are some of the winning
members of the TECxeam (unfortunately not all players of the winning team could
be pictured). Sorry WZMB. maybe next year.
Softball team heads into CMs
seeded first
Tracy laubach
SENIOR WRITER
What better way to end an incredible
season than a conference title and a
ticket to the NCAA Championships?
No better way exists, and that is why
the ECU Softball team has placed the
Big South Conference tournament at
the heart of their season.
Heading into the tournament,
scheduled to be held this weekend,
the Lady Pirates are seeded number
one. According to Head Coach Tracey
Kee, any of the top six teams have a
chance to c)aim a conference victory.
"Everyone comes to the tourna-
ment 0-0 because at this point in the
season, what was done earlier doesn't
matter Kee said. "We won't be tak-
ing anyone lightly because so many
teams have proven how talented they
are
Because ECU is seeded number
one, they will have a bye in round one
of the battle. The number four seed
will take on the number five seed
(unknown at this point), with the
winner advancing on to round two to
become ECU's first mission.
"We have seen all of our oppo-
nents, we know their tendencies, and
we are doing our best to prepare for
them Kee said.
The girls are focusing most of their
final practice time on offense and
touching up their mechanics. With a
team that has been cut down to 14
girls, some positive adjustments have
been made as each Lady Pirate is get-
ting a maximum amnunr of swings ar
bat.
The team's ultimate goal, to qual-
ify' for the NCAA Championships,
may very well be a reality within their
grasp. The winner of the conference
title gets an automatic entry into the
tournament, which will lie held in
Oklahoma just one week afrer confer-
ence.
In the meantime, the girls will be
finishing up the last of their practices
and competing proudly as contenders
for the title they have been compet-
ing for all season.
At the season's official ending, the
Lady Pirate team will bid farewell to
five of its valuable members, each of
whom have contributed tremendous-
ly to the program. Dana Hulings,
Tonya Oxendine, Rhonda Rost,
Sharon Strickland and Amy Swain will
be tossing their bats and gloves aside,
as each will be graduating.
Catcher Hulings will graduate
with a degree in elementary educa-
tion. A three-time letterwinner from
Corry, Pa she stands at second place
on the all-time home run list for
ECU.
Oxendine, from Winston-Salem,
played in the outfield for the Pirates.
Known for her leadership qualities,
she will be graduating with a degree
in exercise and sports science.
Rost, graduating with a degree in
business, ranks second on ECU's all-
time home run list. A three-time let-
terwinner from Richmond, she has
earned numerous honors throughout
her career, including the 1995 Round
Robin Golden Cove Award. Rost is
known as an excellent defender and
played third base.
Strickland, posred at shortstop,
opened the season as the top return-
ing hitter from the 1996 season, as
she ranked in the top 10 in eight of
ECU's career batting categories. .An
exercise and sports science major
from Chesapeake, Va she was select-
ed to several ail-tournament teams.
Swain, named ECU's 1995 Most
Improved Player, will graduate with a
degree in social work. From
Kernersville. she is known for her
speed and depth in the outfield.
Each senior on the team will be
passing on their talent and leadership
qualities to those returning next sea-
son. All five of the girls have made a
personal mark in Lady Pirate history,
and w ill be missed bv all.
The tournament winner gets an
automatic bid to the NCAA's, but tfie
the defending champs Old Dominion
will be hard to beat.
"George Mason and Virginia
Commonwealth are playing really wall
right now Overton said. "But vve
have won it five times and are looking
to get our sixth
Tickets can be purchased through
the Indians at 527-9111.
Clayton sets new record
at Penn Relays
ZlNA BRILKY
STU'K WRITKR
ECU's junior star hammer thrower,
Michelle Clayton, set a new meet
record at Penn Relays during this
weekend's competition in
Philadelphia. Clayton's winning per-
formance made her number one in the
women's hammer throw.
Clayton competed among 50 other
women and her awesome performance
earned her top honors. Clayton's
throw of 176-0 was a new meet record,
replacing the former record of 170-11,
set in 1994 by Kiza Brunner of Brown
University.
"Michelle really had an awesome
throw, " said ECU Head Coach
Charles "Choo" Justice.
"She has prepared hard all season,
and she is seeing a lot of rewards now
for her efforts
Clayton's victorious mark was just
short of her personal and ECU record
of 176-10, set last weekend in
Wilmington at the CAA
Championships. Last year, as a sopho-
more, Clayton placed 11th in this
event with a throw of 148-0.
The Lady Pirate 4x400-meter relay
team composed of Kai Eason, Amanda
Johnson, Nikki Goins and Rasheca
Barrow took first place honors in the
ECAC Division with a time of 46.48
and this same team of superstars fin-
ished second to Seton Hall in the
4x200-meter relay ECAC division
finals. Their rime of 1:38.59 was the
best this season. Other teams in that
race were Penn State, New York Teeh
Manhattan and West Virginia.
Other Lady Pirate competitors this
weekend were Lave Wilson in the
women's long and triple jump and
Darlene Vick in the women's discus
On the men's side, sprinting sensa-
tions Titus Haygood, James
Alexander, Christia Rev and Darrick
Ingram had their best performance of
the season in the men's 4x200 meter
relay IC4A division. The men clocked
in a time of 40.30 to gain the top spot
in this event.
They qualified for the 4x400, but
after some problems in the 4x20D,
they pulled out of the race.
The Pirates 400 relay squad of
Haygood, Alexander, Rev and Ingram ,
ran in a time of 40.78, while the 800
team of Damon Davis, Dwight Henry;
Bevan Foster and Ingram finished
with a time of 1:25.01 placing ninth
overall, one spot out of the champi-
onship final.
"Our guys are a little tired right
now said ECU Men's Head Coach
Bill Carson. "We ran real hard last
weekend at the CAA meet, and we're
feeling the results of that in this meet.
Still, I'm pleased with our perfor-
mance today. I thought our 4x400
relay ran well
Continue to watch for the Pirates
and the Lady Pirates as they finish up
the season.
THE WOMEN'S ULTIMATE FRISBEE TEAM, THE HELIOS
The women's Ultimate Frisbee team has been rocking their competition
ail season long. On April 12 and 13. the Helios stepped onto the William
& Mary College fields and showed what ECU Ultimate is all about. That
Saturday the Helios went undefeated over William & Mary. Delaware and
Virginia Tech. The next day, they kept their flow and won the finals over
Maryland (12-2), bringing home the trophy.
Saturday, April 19, the Heiios attended sectionals in Wilmington. They
won four cut of five games, shutting out Duke and UNC Chapei Hill. This
advanced them into the Regional Competition. Regionals are this week-
end, May 3 and 4 in Wilmington. They hope to place in the top two
which would send them to Nationals in Davis, California. The Helios are
officially ranked sixth in the nation. Come out and support the team.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SI0
-���
�jT





T
13 Tuesday. April 29. 1997
SIKH
The East Carolinian
Communications Majors
The ECU Athletic Department's
Media Relations Office is seeking to hire
enthusiastic student assistants for the
1997-98 academic year, preferably
rising sophomores or juniors
REG SERVICES
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable
experience in the field of communications.
If interested, call the media relations office
at 328-4522 to set up an appointment.
To meet your recreational needs, the student
recreation center will have
special summer hours:
Monday-Thursday 6 a.m9 p.m.
Friday 6 a.m6 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday H a.m6 p.m.
Saturday July 5-Sunday July 6 9 a.m6 p.m.
August 1-start of fall semester 11 a.m8 p.m.
Spring fever turns into hot fun
in the summertime with upcoming
activities for everyone at the
Student Recreation Center. The
Department of Recreational
Services is pleased to announce a
sizzling summer calendar that will
satisfy all of its customers including
students, faculty, and staff.
Intramural programs feature
softball, tennis, volleyball, racquet-
ball and golf. And if you want to see
just who's on first (it could be you),
plan to be at the basketball shoot-
ing triathlon on June 17. If you
have children between the ages of
Your
could take you
It's easy-come by the Alpha Phi Sorority house at the bottom of
College Hill, or stop in our store on Cotancne Street. Sell your books
for the best prices and register to win a Bahamas vacation.
Plus! Free phone cards & special little Caesars Pizza coupons!
little Caesars'
At the Alpha Phi House
April 29, May 1,2,4-8
9am- 5pm
7 and 12, our youth sports camps
offer a wide variety of fun activities
to keep your children active,
healthy, and yes, out of trouble.
Registration is open now in the SRC
main office.
The fitness and lifestyle
enhancement programs offered this
summer are second to none. An
exciting menu of aerobic and aqua
fitness classes will certainly wet you
appetite for keeping fit. The ever so
popular fitness classes for faculty
and staff are offered throughout the
summer due to the high demand
and strong customer satisfaction.
New to the lifestyle enhancement
program are beginner racquetball
lesson, a learn to rollerblade clinic,
and a basic bike maintenance class.
Everyday is an adventure at the
Rec Center and this summer is no
exception. The adventure program
area will challenge the novice
climber and the seasoned outdoors
person with climbing, backpacking,
and orienteering workshops, white
water rafting trips and more. For the
younger crowds ages 12-17 or the
young at heart, exciting adventure
camps and climbing camps are being
offered so sing up soon before they
are filled up.
Thank goodness it's Thursday!
This summer the Rec Department
premiers Alive After Five beginning
Thursday May 29 at 5 p.m. Ail fac-
ulty, staff, and students are invited
to the outdoor pool at the SRC to
mingle with your friends and co-
workers, enjoy delicious munchies
and hear good tunes for a couple of
fun hours. This new event will be
held every other Thursday and
could be your favorite summer tradi-
tion.
Don't miss all the activities and
events beginning in May at the
Center of Activity.
For more information please call
32S-6387.
REMINDER
Here is a list upcoming home
events. The baseball team will
play its final home game next
Tuesday versus Campbell at 7
p.m. at Harrington Field. The
following week the CAA base-
ball tournament will be held in
Kinston from Tuesday May 13
through Saturday May 17. The
times will be announced at a
later date. For more information
about tickets and times call the
Kinston Indians at 919-527-9111
516 S.Cotanche Street � Uptown Greenville � 758-2616 http:www.ubeinc.com
SPORTS
INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
The ECU Lady Pirates
announced the signing of Apex,
N.C. native Tricia Peckham on
Wednesday. Peckham, a 5-7 point
guard, was a standout at Apex High
School throughout her prep career
playing for head coach Scott
Campbell.
Peckham averaged 18 points and
five rebounds per game in her final
season at Apex HS. She also dished
out four assists per game and aver-
aged three steals. She was named as
the Tri-Six Conference Player-of-
the-Year in 1997 as well as earning
all-conference status in both the '96
and the '97 season. She netted 1300
points in her high school career.
Head Coach Anne Donovan
commented, "We are extremely
excited Tricia has decided to join
the program. She is a versatile play-
er at point guard as well as a strong
shotter
ECU freshman Casey Dodge
(Aurora, Col.) was named CAA Co-
Rookie
Diver of
the Year.
She shared
the hone
with
Richmond
fteshman
Abby Sims.
Sloan
finished in
second
place at
the CAA
championships in the one meter
diving competition. Dodge racked
up 352.10 points, only eight less
than the first place finisher. That
was her best score of the season
during the one meter competition.
Dodge's best score in the three
merer events came in November.
She scored 334.35 points in the
Nike Cup at Chapel Hill, N.C. on
the 21st of that month.
Dodge is a member of the
Colorado High School Hall of Fame.
She attended Smokey Hill High
School. Dodge is planning to major
in communications.
Casey Dodge
j� HM





I
14 Tuesday. April 29. 1997
�4
on
s
The East Carolinian
Nobilo wins playoff with Faxon gSQPgSS hair d8Sl8nS
GREENSBORO (AP) - Frank
Nobilo has won golf tournaments all
around the world, but America had
been anything but the land of
opportunity for him this season.
The .year-old New Zealander
decided, lite so many foreign play-
ers in the '90s, that the United
States was the place to take his
game to the next level.
Nobilo didn't count on back
problems and a circulatory condition
that led to arthritic-like symptoms
in both arms for the better part of
the last 10 months, sending him to
doctor after doctor and into a deep
golfing slump.
But Nobilo put all his ailments
aside Sunday during a miserable day
for golf when he birdied six of his
final 11 holes and made a scram-
bling par on the first playoff hole of
the Greater Greensboro Chrysler
Classic to beat Brad Faxon.
"Given the nature of what has
happened to me the last six or seven
months, and the state of mind, this
is the one I'll probably always
remember said Nobilo. "When you
become uncompetitive for a length
of time you really miss it and you
want it to come back.
"To come through this week and
in this weather, I think this will go
to the top of the tree
Nobilo, who started the day five
shots off the lead, tied Faxon at 14-
under-par 274 through 72 holes,
forcing the fourth playoff in the last
10 years at a sopping wet Forest
Oaks Country Club course.
"It hasn't sunk in Nobilo said of
his first PGA Tour win. "I knew last
year it was difficult coming to
America, nothing seemed to be easy.
But I was determined I wanted to
play here because I thought my best
golf was ahead of me.
"A lot of other players have done
it. I lite playing around the world
but some of the tournaments here
have very strong fields and if you
want to improve your game you have
to play against the best. I stuck with
it, so it mates me the happiest guy
in the world today
The rain was pelting down on
the pair, temperatures stood in the
low 50s and No. 18 was close to
unplayable for the first sudden-
death playoff hole. Faxon appeared
to have the edge when Nobilo - who
had to wait 45 minutes for Faxon to
finish - drove into the left rough off
the tee and could advance his sec-
ond shot only within 75 yards of the
green.
But Faxon, now 1-5 in playoffs,
caught a bad break when his
approach shot landed in a section of
the green that would constitute a
putt through the fringe. Faxon chose
to take a drop in the light rough
under the clean and place rules
being used in the inclement weath-
er. He then chipped toward the hole
instead of putting. But his third
shot sailed 12 feet past the hole and
he missed the putt.
"I would like to play (the hole)
again but I don't think I want to go
out there again Faxon said.
Nobilo hit his third shot within 8
feet and drilled his par-saving putt
to claim the win and the $342,000
check that went with it.
"I panicked Nobilo said when
asked what his reaction was when
he found out there would be a play-
off. "Sometimes you do silly things
with your mind - if you feel there is
going to be a playoff then there isn't.
I was trying all those sorts of tricks.
When there was 10 or 15 minutes to
go I just said. 'Well, you better
accept the inevitable
Nobilo is considered a tour rook-
ie despite winning eight events
around the world over the last 12
years. He caught Faxon with a final-
round 67 as Faxon could manage just
a 72. Faxon had gone 45 holes with-
out a bogey, but bogcyed two of his
final five holes of regulation, forcing
the playoff in the virtual monsoon.
"That was as hard of conditions
that we've had to play in a long
time Faxon said of the weather.
"The last five holes we couldn't find
places to drop, there was casual
water everywhere. It was really
hard
Kirk Triplett finished in third
place at 13 under, one shot behind
Faxon and Nobilo.
Walk-ins welcome
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all of the following Contract Advertisers for their Support
AH Campus Media
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To Raise Your Child!
HOW?
OPEN-ADOPTION
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SORORITY RUSH
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FALL 1997
Zm LmA Z-S
AEA
REGISTRATION
i i
I eafti �aroina University
I tffl P-uan Pgiatration
Your registration must be accompanied
! with a check for $30, non-refundable made to
ECU Panhellcnic Association. Rush dates are on
j Thurs. August 13th-17th. You must also supply
eight (8) photos of yourself at the start of rush.
Registration deadline is August 8, 1997. For
questions call 919-328-4235.
Return to:East Carolina University
204 Whichard Building
Greenville, NC 27858

Last Name First
Off Campus Address:
Social Security
Is there a Sorority affiliate in your family? Y N
Relationship:Name
1 Relationship:Name
High School
Activities:
A
Other Colleges Attended:
Name:GPA-
Hobbics:
Together Complete !
Panhellcnic Association Information Release Form
In compliance with the Family Education Rights Hid Privacy Act of
1974 I hereby grant the Dean of Students at ECU the right to release
the needed academic information for sorority pledging and initiation
to Panhellcnic or the appropriate sorority when ncccssary.My termi-
nation from Rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
STUDENT SIGNATURE:
Date:
I
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' m





r
� i i inn
15 Tutrtty, April 28, 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
Report says women's programs years behind
men's in athletics
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757-1716 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP)
While gaining in rheir long race for
equality in college sports, women
arc still at least 10 years away from
pulling even with men, the head of
the NCAA said Monday.
According to a new NCAA study,
women's programs made gains in
several areas between 1992 and
1996, including expenditures,
coaches' salaries and scholarship
money. But not as much as NCAA
officials expected.
"After seeing the results, we are
somewhat disappointed said
Cedric Dcmpsey, the NCAA's exec-
utive director and an outspoken
advocate of increased funding for
The East Carolina University Honors Program congratulates the
following May 1997 graduates for earning
University Honors:
Braden Elizabeth Boone � University Honors in Biology
Darcie Terrell Recaoner � University Honors in Biology
Chantel Louise Sabus � University Honors in Psychology
Rebecca Perry Williams � University Honors in Music Therapy
Congratulations to the following May 1997 graduates for earning
General Education Honors:
Braden Elizabeth Boone
David Cullen Bowen
Angela Eleanor Bryant
Mary Ann Caproni
Shannon Marchella Clark
Crystal Amelia Coffinan
Amy Ann Jones Edwards
Kays Gail Fields
Lisa Arm Frederick
Wendy Michelle Fulp
Heather Lynne Giorgio
Allsa Nicole Godwin
Winnie Rebecca Gray
Dale Shannon Holloway
Rebecca Dawn Johnston
Joseph Benjamin Kearney
Allison Nicole McCullen
Leslie Anne Mitchell
Francis Lee Moman
Jennifer Lee Murdoch
Shannon Lynn Pollard
Darcie Terrell Reasoner
Cindy Am Riedel
Robert Edwin Roilason
Chantel Louise Sabus
Owen Alexander Smith
Robin Lynne Taylor
Martin Carey Thomas
Lisa Kay Trhiette
Tracy Luann Cope Wages
Michael William Walker
Deomna Michell Wilt White
Rebecca Perry Williams
Jennifer Leigh Wilson
All Honors students are invited to attend the Honors Recognition Ceremony
on Wednesday, April 30,1997 at 5:00 pm in the MSC Great Room.
women.
In the some 300 major athletic
schools of Division I, women regis-
tered an increase of 6 percent in
total participation while men
declined nearly 10 percent.
"If you take (that growth rate)
and try to run it out, it would take
about 10 or 12 years before we
reach equity Dempsey said. "The
results do not reflect the type of
progress we thought we were mak-
ing toward the gender equity issue.
In particular, we were disappointed
in terms of the participation
increase
The survey showed that in
1996. Division I schools had an
average of 225.6 male athletes and
129.6 femaie - a women's increase
of 18 per school from 1992, the last
year surveyed. Much of rhe dis-
crepancy is due to football, which
women do not play.
In Division II schools, the aver-
age number of female athletes rose
from 79 to 80. It remained
unchanged in Division HI at 116.
While women's participation
showed an overall increase, the
number of men declined an aver-
age of 24 in Division I. But
Dempsey said this did not neces-
sarily indicate schools are dropping
men's sports to try to comply with
Title K, federal law banning sex
discrimination in education.
"I haven't seen large numbers
dropping programs Dempsey said
in a conference call. "There may
be some capping (of men's pro-
grams)
The survey found that while
operating expenses from 1992
grew by 89 percent for women's
programs, men's operating expens-
es grew by 139 percent.
"An overall concern I have is the
total cost of increases not only from
the women's side, but the men's
side as well Dempsey said.
"That's a significant increase in
the cost of operation of programs.
We have had two significant cost-
reducrion studies and a great deal
of legislation presented in the last
decade. With ail those changes, it
hasn't had a tremendous impact on
the rising cost of intercollegiate
athletics. It mav be something we
need to reassess
Patty Viverito, commissioner of
tfefun.
wpet tese or
ro carpet optfon

SMI IN IMS � iMi SM
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Mercury @
the Gateway Conference and head
of the NCAA committee on
women's athletics, said escalating
expenses in college sports can off-
set gains by women.
"It's important to note any
progress as good news she said.
"However, it is disheartening to
know after 25 years of Title K, we
still are making only slow progress
in women's athletics
The NCAA does not have rules
governing the commitment schools
must make to women's athletics,
leaving that up to conferences and
individual institutions.
Last week, the Supreme Court
refused to hear an appeal by Brown
University in a Title IX case. The
court declined to free Brown of rul-
ings that it discriminated against
female athletes.
"The decision not to hear the
Brown case could inspire institu-
tions to work toward compliance at
a faster rate said Janet Justus,
director of the NCAA's education
outreach program. "There may
have been some schools that were
wondering what the status of the
law will be. I think this will clarify
it
Sports writers
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I
16 Tuesday, April 29.1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
FALL 1997 Semester, Eastbrook
Apts. half rent and utilities. Miles.
Call 919-793-6278.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouscs. On ECU bus route $400-
S415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
1 BEDROOM ON FIRST St wa-
ter included, central heat & air. Avail-
able now. $270, call Pro Management
756-1234 ext. 24.
SUBLEASE 2 BR DOCKS1DE
available May 19 $625month. Please
call Robin 758-9205.
ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR
SUMMER. Two bedrooms at Players
Club. No deposit needed! Pool, ten-
nis, volleyball courts, gym. 14 utili-
ties. Call Jen 321-7366.
CHRISTIAN FEMALE LOOK-
1NG FOR roommate to share nice,
spacious 2 br 1 12 ba apt. Starting
Mid-July or August 1st. Please call
752-8612 for any inquiries.
AVOID WAITING- LIST AT
Dockside. Nice, new, 2 story duplex, 3
large bedrooms, 3 bath, wd, large back
yard, close to campus, low utility
$795mo. 754-2993.
2 ROOMS FOR RENT close to
ECU. Large comfortable well kept
home. Laundry, and off street parking.
Grad students preferred. Call 830-
0505.
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washerdryer.
Hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share 3 bedroom 1 bath
house. One block from campus, free
parking, central heat and ac, wash-
erdryer. Rent 13 utilities. Call
931-0348.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED. TWO blocks from campus.
Available May thru July 31st. No de-
posit! $250 per month plus 12 utili-
ties. Please call 757-0046.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 302 Lewis
St. three bedrooms, storage shed, cen-
tral HAC, washerdryer hookup. No
pets. $775month. Call 919-504-2052
for application and credit check.
SUMMER ROOMMATE TWO
BEDROOMS two full bathrooms
washer dryer Dogwood Hollow apts.
Very close to campus. Pay half rent and
utilities. Call Kathleen 752-2705.
QUIET FURNISHED BED-
ROOM ON golf course, AC, all utili-
ties furnished available first quarter
summer school, non-smoker, call 756-
2027 after April 28. graduate or older
student only. $195.00
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY
lst-Aug. 1st one bedroom one bath-
room washerdryer 12 utilities 12
phone free water & cable rent $225.00.
No security deposit 551-3168.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TU
SHARE 3 bdrm house close to cam-
pus May - July. Perfect for summer
school students. Please call 754-8389.
ROOMMATES(S) WANTED
FOR SUMMER andor Fall. Large
bedroom in 3 bedroom house. Cheap
rent and utilities. Close to campus.
Call Jame or Quentin 830-6279.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO share 2 bdr $197.50 plus 12 utili-
ties, phone close to campus on 10th
Street. Please call 754-2169. Leave
message.
SUBLEASE SPACIOUS THREE
BEDROOM house. $550 a month.
No deposit. Please call 758-4886.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE
FOR Summer and Fall. Walking dis-
tance from campus and downtown.
Large room (15x15). Private phone
linecable in room, washerdryer in-
cluded. $175 per month utilities.
Call Mike at 752-2879.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOM-
MATE wanted. Nice house close to
campus. Call 752-8682.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath town-
house. Directly across the street from
campus. Recreation Center and down-
town. Rent $260 utilities and
phone. Malefemale: contact "Lee"
758-5604. Washerdryer included.
TAR RIVER ESTATES SUB-
LEASE one bedroom apartment Mid-
May to August $375.00 per month.
Option to resign lease in August. Call
Susan 758-3524.
ROOMMATES WANTED TO
SHARE 4 bedroom house near cam-
pus and downtown. $200 monthly in-
cludes: Power, water, heat, AC, washer
�dryer. Lease is negotiable. Prefer non-
smoker 328-6938.
OAK KITCHEN TABLE WITH
two benches sits eight and matching
piece with two drawers and two
shelves. Must sale before graduation!
$165 for both pieces (neg.) Call 830-
9257, ask for Kacey.
GETTIN' OUT OF GREEN-
V1LLE sale! Furniture: washer &
dryer $150, queen size sleeper sofa
$85; bar with two stools and glassware
$95; drafting table with chair $125.
Call 758-2708.
75 VW BUG, NEW paint job, re-
ccntly rebuilt engine, clean interior.
$3,700.00 obo 328-7182.
HAS TO GO. TWO couches, two
chairs, and a kitchen table with four
chairs best offer accepted. Willing to
sell cheap. Call Janie at 752-9943.
FOR SALE: 1994 JEEP Wrangler.
Great condition. Low mileage. Green
with tan soft top 8c bikini top.
$10,500. Call Maureen at 758-6055 for
more info.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also preleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
2 BEDROOM APT. AVAILABLE
in Wilson Acres. Take over lease with
option to renew. Available May thru
July 31st. Please call 754-2188 for
more info.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
SUMMER SUBLEASE ONE
BEDROOM apartment. Fully fur-
nished on ECU bus route. $295 a
month. From May-August. Call Amy
931-0050. Leave a message.
FOR SALE: NIGHT stand $15,
women's bike $25, couch in excellent
condition $50, dishes $10, cabinet to
put tv on $15. Call Cindy 758-9741.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Aiso Jeeps, 4wd's. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-
3726 for current listings.
MOVING MUST SALE RED tail
boa and set up $150. Dresser $25. bed
$50. Please call 758-2159.
FURNITURE SALE, CHEAP!
and great condition sofa, chair, dresser,
desk, coffee table. 754-8284.
1990 ISUZU PICKUP, 5 speed,
AMFM stereo wcassette, 150K miles,
$1000 obo. Call Dave 758-9743.
Help Wanted
MOTHER'S HELPER: FULL
OR part-time. Stay at home Mom
needs assistance with 3 children all un-
der 5 years old, and light housework,
(321-6931).
JUNIORS and SENIORS: Do not
limit yourself to linear income and a
nine to five job. Take 40 minutes out
of your life. Groundfloor. Savings.
Documentation. Come see for your-
self. 888-605-0906.
ATTENTION! ASSISTANT
WANTED to help with male fresh-
man who has cerebral palsy for the fall
semester 1997. Minimal assistance re-
quired. Hours and payment to be de-
termined. Call 919-732-4748 for an in-
terview.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. Forinfocall
301-429-1326.
LIFEGUARDS FOR OUTDOOR
FACILITY - immediate part-
timefull-time hours; experience pre-
ferred, WSI a plus. Also looking for
certified individuals interested in
teaching swim lessons or water aerob-
ics. Please call 752-0385 to schedule
an appointment.
PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL is seeking qualified in-
dividuals to teach aerobic classes
through its Employee Recreation and
Wcllness Department. Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time basis.
Interested candidates should contact
Gilian Tyndall Between 8:00am-
4:30pm at (919)816-6501.
DANCERS (ENTERTAIN-
MENT) SID'S SHOWGIRLS
Goldsboro 919-580-7084.
NEEDED: SOFTBALL OFFI-
CIALS FOR Greenville Recreation
& Parks Department Adult Spring
Softball League. Clinics will be held
to train new and experienced officials.
However, a basic knowledge and un-
derstanding of the game is necessary.
For more information, please call 830-
4550 after 2:00pm. Softball season will
run from May thru August.
3 PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
POSITIONS open starting first
summer session. Asst. Prod. Manager
& Prod. Asst. 1 positions require Mac
Based Quarkxpress knowledge to be
able to design ads. Production Assis-
tant 2 positions requires no experi-
ence. Position start first summer ses-
sion. Applications are being accepted
as of today until Tuesday, April 29. Ap-
ply at our office on the second floor of
the Student Publications Building
(across from Joyner).
DEGREE IN HAND, NO career in
sight? Looking to grow a business in
Eastern, North Carolina. FullPart-
time positions. Call 551-6749 for con-
fidential interview.
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Are you looking for employment? We
are looking for caring, compassionate
individuals who love children to work
as full and part time teachers at our
corporate child care center located in
RTP. If you are interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
IMMEDIATE OPENING -
PART-TIME WATER analysis
technician. Must be available on Sat-
urdays and Holidays. Apply in person.
Will train. Hwy 43 So Bells Fork.
355-7121.
DO YOU HAVE A summer job yet?
Residential Co-Ed Summer Camp near
Greensboro, NC seeking male & fe-
male cabin counselors, male & female
adventure counselors, swimming in-
structors, and horse instructors. For
more information contact John at
(910)349-9445 or e-mail
schoultz@vnct.net
THE EAST CAROLINIAN IS
hiring summerFall staff: Asst. Sports
Editor, Photographers, Writers, Opin-
ion Columnists, Production Assistants,
Copy Editors, Advertising Reps.
Classified Ad Manager, and more.
GRAPHIC DESIGNER LOCAL
AD agency seeks graduating GDwith
some outside classroom design experi-
ence. Great opportunity for advance-
ment. Send resume and 3 samples to:
Human Resources, 3408VA S. Evans
Street, Greenville, NC 27834.
LEAD GUITARIST & KEY-
BOARDIST needed immediately.
Southern RockCountry playing East
Coast Club Circuit. Good pay! Call
Mike at (919)237-3688.
SOFA, LOVESEAT, COFFEE
TABLE, two end tables and two
lamps. $250 for entire set. Great con-
dition. Available first week in Mav.
Call 758-6055.
U2 TICKETS (3) FOR CLEM-
SON SHOW May 16. Must sell.
Best offer 830-1821.
SIGMA ALPHA F.PS1LON:
THANK you for the social last Wed-
nesday night. Everyone had a blast and
we can't wait until the next time we
can all get together. Love the Pi Del-
ta's.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE NEW sisters of Delta Zeta:
Kelly Woodell, Brook Owens, Holly
Clagon, Natalie Everhart, Quita Valen-
tine, Randi Fishbone, Amy Gearing,
and Melissa Sebastianelli Love, The
Sisters
SENIORS: YOU FINALLY made
it! Graduation is here. Best of luck in
the future! Renee, Kerri, and Melissa
we'll miss you guys! Keep in touch,
Love your Pi Delta Sisters.
LAMBDA PLEDGES: THANKS
for the surprise sister social Wednesday
night! We really appreciate all your
hard work. You guys are the greatest!
Love the Pi Delta Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO PI
DELTA'S new exec, board for 1997-
98! President: Ami Brasure, ViccPres-
ident: Kathleen Meaney, Secretary:
Fulshruti Pacel, Treasurer Stephanie
Jones, Pledge Educators: Meredith
Dowry and Laura Hollingsworth, Pan-
heilenic: Kelly Goodman and Laura
Hollingsworth, Alumniparent contact:
Leslie Garris. Congratulation and good
luck to all the officers!
THE BROTHERS OF PI
Phi would like to thank the Sisters
Chi Omega for a great social. Leo
together again soon and twist the ni
away.
THE SISTERS OF PI Delta would
like to welcome their newest mem-
ben: Alexi Hasapisv Shelly McCut-
cheon, Alex Perez, Jeonifer Thompson,
and Michal Wagner. Congratulations!
ZTA, IT WAS SO great to get to-
gether with you at the Quad last
Thursday. Hopefully we will do mote
things with you soon! Love Alpha
Delta Pi.
For Sale
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share two bedroom 1.5 bath
townhouse in Twin Oaks. $220.00 a
month, furnished, you provide bed-
room furniture. Nonsmoker preferred,
relatively neat and responsible. Avail-
able after May 9th or on August 1st.
Please help! Call Amy at 752-8924.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen, and
living room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yards. .Conveni-
ent to campus and the hospital.
$1,000modeposit. 524-4111.
BUNK BED, DORM REFRIG-
ERATOR, excellent condition. Call
757-2679 after 5 pm leave message.
KING SIZE WATER BED with
lighted headboard and padded sides.
Triple dresser with two large mirrors.
Sell separate or together. Call 756-
8481.
PUPPIES FOR SALE 12 Rot-
twciler 12 Black Lab $150. Ready the
last weekend in April. Call 756-6555.
MUST SELL COFFEE TABLE
ONE end table, dining room table
with four chairs and shelving system.
Call 321-5936 will take best offer.
TWIN EXTRA LONG BED with
box spring only $75. White five drawer
dresser $45. Large entertainment cen-
ter and two end-tables $25' (total).
Prices are negotiable. Call 752-7224.
COMFORTABLE TWIN BED
WITH box spring and frame only $80.
wood desk with lots of storage space
$45. Desk chair $25. Bookcasetele-
vision stand for $30. Must sell every-
thing. Call 413-0346.
IBM PS2 55-SX 386-16 40m.b.hd
many programs $100. Panasonic print-
er (ink jet) $50, Together $125. Car
tires 14" falken 185-60R like new
wrims that fit Accuia Integra $100.
Earth cruiser $50. 752-2997.
MOTORCYCLE 1992 GSXR
1100 excellent condition, like new.
Very, very fast. Must see to appreciate
$5,500 neg. Call 758-5261 ask for
Todd.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: TV,
recliner, sofa and table. Call Tiffany at
353-7046.
CRUISE AND LAND TOUR
EMPLOYMENT. Discover how to
work in exotic locations, meet fun peo-
ple, while earning up to $2,000mo. in
these exciting industries. Cruise infor-
mation Services 206-971-3554
Ext.C53621
FILM PRODUCTION, TAL-
ENT MANAGEMENT, and In-
ternships available. Call Creative Ar-
tists Management (800)401-0545.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
monev while vou learn plavmatcs mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
WFXI Fox814
� looking tor summer Intern.
Candidate must get credit for
internship. Creative business
or communications majors
preferred. Must be willing to
work a minimum of 20 hrs a
week. Intern will learn varies
aspects of television, including
copywriting, sales and produc-
tion of commercials.
Appfeants should �endreeume to:
LSM, WFXI -TV,
600 Country Club Rd
Suite C,
Greenville, NC 27858. WFXI,
QOCOM Broadcasting is an
EOE employer
SZECHUAN GARDEN NEED
PART time or full time wait staff. No
phone calls. Come after 2:00 pm in
person onlv. 909 South Evans, Green-
ville, NC 27834. (10th & Evans)
SUMMER JOBS: CAMP CARO-
LINE in Arapahoe, NC has openings
for Lifeguard, Waterfront Director, and
Maintenance Director this summer.
Fantastic summer job Call John
Utham at (919)249-0848.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY WORK-
ERS NEEDED for summer. Sunday
mornings 9:15-12:15. .Additional hours
available. Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church. 510 S. Washington
Street. Apply at Church office. 8am-
12noon, l:30-5pm.
KIND. PATIENT AND LOVING
SITTER wanted Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday (9:00 am to 6:00 pm)
to care for two boys, ages 3 years and 5
years. Must enjoy playing with and
reading to children. Please call 355-
7238.
TOYOTA PICKUP TRUCK.
Black, 5 speed, bedliner, AC, AMFM
radio. $10,500 neg. Must sell! Call
and leave a message 355-3219.
FOR SALE: DRAFTING table
with light and chair. Excellent condi-
tion. Call 758-7531.
SLEEPER SOFA AND LOVE seat
for only $250. Both pieces in excellent
condition and vcrv comfortable. Must
sell! Call 413-0346 ask for Maty or Ju-
ATTENTION CYCLISTS '97
470 trek road bike. 250 miles. Shima-
no RSXergo-shiftcrs. 52" fits S'SV
stature. Excellent! Firstupgrade!
Quality. $575, negotiable. 752-6993
whenever!
LIVING ROOM FURNITURE
FOR sale. Sofa $175, lovescat $150,
recliner $160. 355-8032 after 6 pm.
THANKS FOR THE SOCIAL
Thursday Sigma Alpha Spsilon. We
had a ball making our deals. Hope you
guys had fun. Love, Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS BENNY!
YOU will make a great RA next year.
Good luck! Love Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to
congratulate our graduating seniors.
Wcndv Ballard, Brie Garni, Kelly Joyce,
Jackie Kirby, Heather Mann, Pam Mill-
er, Olivia Plyale, Erika Rupp, Jonni
Wainwright, Lori Will, Melissa Gentry
Barbara Gile, Sheril Nanney, Angie
Nix, and Tiffany Norton. We are so
proud of you and wish you ail the best
of luck. All our love. Your Alpha Phi
Sisters.
ALPHA PHI CONGRATU-
LATES MARY Paige early on her
manv outstanding awards she received
at the SGA banquet. We ate very
proud of you Mary Paige! Love, Alpha
Phi.
nmimcs.Miamm
On Cag Tay w� Vh� MC or COO
811-351-8222
Or, njrtC.MteJjT-r
ii3?; mo aw mm. u� rtogmcAWBj
THIS IS TO GRADUATING
Seniors in PI Lambda Phi. I am proud
of what you have accomplished and
wish you all the best of luck. Much re-
spect. Big Poppa.
AMY MCGRATH: GOOD luck at'
Old Dominion. What are we going to
do without you next year? Never for-
get that we're here for you! Love, your
Pi Delta Sisters.
Lifeguard:
Baptist Children's Home
of NC. Inc. Kinston campus
is seeking to employ
2 part-time and 1 full-time certified
lifeguards for the summer. You may
inquire about these positions by
calling Jamie Godwin,
919-522-0811
$2,3S1mo.
Looking for 3 ECU students to work with
UNC students in a summer intern.
Min. GPA 2.5
n
WD
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors A Instructors
for private coed youth camp located in the
beautiful mountains of western N.C.
Over 25 activities including all sports, writer
skiing, lieoted pool, tennis, art, horseback,
go-torn. 610lo811eorn $1250-
1650 plus room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers ca for brochureopplication:
�0O-S32-S539
�PROFESSIONAL
SECURTY OFFICERS
X NEEDED A
1
1
1
i1
t
r

1
I
1
1
1

1
12 OFF SECURITY DfcfOSfT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THBCOyPpN ,
7IMm6mi ceteMMrM
I and 3 BaoVuom Ranf. Rafridftrator.
Wathar. Dryar Hookups. Oadcs and PatJoi
in mow unto. Laundry FacMey,
Sand VMaaM Court.
Located S Mocki from campus
FK WATER. S�VV�
Tfcyrtam e�wu
2BCOKOOMS
ScovWRafrlissa HfirPMiwainai
Waatwr. Otyar Hookupi
Patios cm Rrat Rooe
Located 5 tVocta from Campui
4��ft 'PaiUL
pHancai. watar. tmtc caWa. 5 bkxta I
campui New ownership
Naw Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHEH RNE ROf�TIES
MANAGED BY
rTTT FttorewrY
MANAGEMENT
I0S A BKOWNLEA DRIVE
7SS-I92I CHter Exptrei 5-31 97
Make
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per Hr. & Mileage
Mailfax Resume:
MCS1
PO. Bo 370
Cow City. NC 28529
v fax: (919)637-2125
Near Greenville, Kinston, New Bern
Hiring Now!
We are a nationally recognized
company that ppvides high quality
security to our client. Become a
part of a team that excels in it's
industry. We have FullPartitime
positions available in Greenville.
Minimum rewritwiwntt jfH
� Have NO criminal record
� Be at least 21 years old
. Must have a H.S.dfp. (additional college or
military experience proffered)
Qualified individual will be subject to a
background investigation.
Succesful applacants will enjoy an
excellent benefits package wtiich
includes:
� Starting pay of $6 60hr, FT or PT
� MedDentOpt. Insurance
� College tuition assistance program
� 401k plan
� Paid Vacation after 1 year
� Performance bonuses
� Career oriented rrtaragement training pro
gram
� Free uniform
Noexpertenoe needed New hires wi attend 56
hrs of paid training.
Apply in Person to your M Emptojjiisant
Security CuiiatHaalcn 09m,
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crews at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. S5.8W salary plus S1.0W
bounus. Experience preferred. Call 1-
800-477-1001 and ask for Mr. Helfrich.
END OF SEMESTER! MOV-
ING? Need carpet cleaned in order to
receive refund deposit? For more info
on student discount rates, call Econo-
my Cleaning Service at 931 -1767, leave
message.
TYPING SERVICE - DEPEND-
ABLE, CONFIDENTIAL, fast
turnaround. Low rates you can afford.
Call today for Glenda at 919-527-9133
or E-mail me at GStev22480AOL.com
GREENVILLE RECREATION
& Parks Dept. Summer Tennis Pro-
grams 1997. Jr. Novice League, Ages 6-
10, Pee Wee Tennis, Age 5, Jr. Work-
out, Age 11-15, Junior Team Tennis,
Age 11-18, Adult Beginner, Age 16-up,
Adult Intermediate, Age 16-up. Regis-
tration begins April 29. Classes start
June 16. Call 830-4559.
SWtM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salcm pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salcm,
NC 27113.
"THE BEST tWO BABYSlT-
TERS in the world are graduating.
Can you replace them? Two to three
mornings andor afternoons a week.
One child. Must have own transporta-
tion, non-smoker. Call 355-2088.
Lot & Found
LOST"TABCHOWPIT BULL
ABOUT 6 months old. Black with
white chest. Found on 4th and Meade
St. Call Lori 758-8621.
3
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
(Wl
Greek Personals
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college, We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on 1. Delinquent
tax, Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll
Free 800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for
current listings.
-MAKING FOOD CHOICES
WHICH YOU CAN FEEL GOOD
ABOUT" Free program sponsored by
Pitt Co. Chapter American Diabetes
Association. Gaskin-Leslie Center next
to Pitt Co. Memorial Hospital @ 7 pm.
For more info call 816-5136 8-4 pm
Mon-Fri or 1-800-682-9692.
CONGRATULATIONS TO JES-
SICA THEOBALD, StaccyRodem-
er, and Faith Noyes on your upcoming
graduation! We are going to miss you
lots! Iove your Delta Zeta Sisters.
THANKS TO THE BROTHERS
of Phi Kappa Psi for the social on Wed-
nesday! You made our Big Sis party a
night to remember! Love the sisters of
Delta Zeta.
DELTA CHI THETA CHI, it was
so great getting together wyou at the
Quad Social wZeta. Thanks so much
we had a great time Love ADPi
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to wish
everyone good luck on their exams.
Have a safe summer!
Announcements
TENNIS SINGLES ENTRY DEAD-
LINE: Be sure to sign up for tennis sin-
gles by 5:00pm on May 28 in the Student
Recreation Center main office. Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.
5-ON-5 BASKETBALL registration
meeting: If you are interested in playing 5-
on-5 basketball, be sure to attend the meet-
ing on Mav 27 at 4:30 pm in the Student
Recreation Center classroom. Department
of Recreation Services.
INTRODUCTION TO ORIEN,
TEERING: join us to learn more about
orienteering on June 4 for free Be sure to
register by June I � bUD pm in the Student
Recreation Center mam office. Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.

T
l iiajpl �� �
I


Title
The East Carolinian, April 29, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 29, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1206
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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