The East Carolinian, April 24, 1997







,
THURSOAY
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
'97-98 SGA budget excludes tuition payments for exec board
AMANDA AUSTIN
STAFF WRITE
STl'DENT ORGANIZATIONS
The Student Government Association (SGA)
approved the budget for the 1997-98 school
year. Among many changes made in the bud-
get, SGA Executive Council tuition was not
included.
In the meeting held Monday, April 21, the
amount of funding to be appropriated to cam-
pus groups and organizations was announced.
The total amount to be appropriated has sig-
nificantly decreased. The total amount dis-
tributed last vear was $152,747 to 39 groups.
This year $134,942 was distributed to 45
groups.
"I would like to have been able to give out
additional money said SGA Vice President
Sean McManus.
"It is my job to be treasurer and I think that
this budget is financially sound said former
SGA Treasurer Jonathan Phillips. "There has
not been a dramatic change on anybody
One of SGA President Scott Forbes' cam-
paign issues was to terminate tuition being
paid for SGA executives. He has succeeded in
fulfilling his promise, although SGA tuition
will be paid during summer sessions.
"It feels pretty good that I don'c have to pay
for it said ECU student Michael Smith. "As
long as I don't have to pay I'm happy
"If that is what the people wanted, then
that is what they should have gotten Phillips
said.
Phillips said he feels everyone should be
given the opportunity to become SGA presi-
dent, and anyone can afford to be president
with these scholarships. Phillips added chat
when it comes to athletics, we pay for their
tuition, yet we have no choice in who will play.
In SGA the students are given the opportunity
to decide who should receive a scholarship.
Other than SGA tuition there are mixed
feelings among group organizations over
whether or not they received the funding they
deserve. Some groups are disappointed in
what they received, while others are happy
with the funding.
The Honor Board will receive less funding
this yean Last year the Honor Board received
$3100, decreasing to $876 for this year.
Scott Forbes wishes the Honor Board had
received more funding to be used for training.
Forbes would like to see them get the recogni-
tion they deserve.
According to Present .Attorney General Cori
Sabet the size of the Honor Board will be dou-
bling in the coming year.
A new system is being used by appropria-
tions where funding takes place twice a year.
Phillips said he feels that the new system is
the reason the Honor Board received less fund-
ing, and that perhaps they will receive more
during spring appropriations.
Although the Honor Board is disappointed,
the ECU Friends are happy with what they
have received.
Out of the 48 groups who requested fund-
ing, three were denied. Groups that received
no funding were Eta Sigma Gamma, Thespians
for Diversity, Sigma Gamma Rho and Kappa
Alpha Psi.
Sigma Gamma Rho received no funding
due to the fact that they are a member of the
National Pan-Hellinic Council and, therefore,
not eligible for funding from SGA. Reasons for
the others are unknown.
In addition to the budget, a resolution was
made at the meeting to increase participation
with groups and organizations in the le
ture to better represent themselves to the stu-
dents of ECU.
SGA would like to initiate an active cam-
paign to recruit respective members in the
general legislature to be part of the communi-
ty.
The organizations which receive funding in
addition to those registered with the Off
Leadership Development will be contacted
and given a copy
For a complete break-
down of the organiza-
tions and the approved
amount of money, turn
to page 4.
of this resolu-
tion and will be
briefed regard-
ing the inten-
tions of the res-
olution.
Medical student Moore ready for third-year challenges
Marguerite benjamin
NEWS EDITOR
Trie transition from the first year to the third year of medical school is a momentous occasion to many people for
numerous reasons. On Saturday, April 19, ECU School of Medicine recognized the 76 members of its class of 1999
with a White Coat Ceremony. jr
With family and friends present. Dean of ECU's School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Heath Sciences
James A, Hallock, M.D Assistant Dean for Student Affairs Julius O. Mallette, M.D. and Senior Associate Dean Ann
C. Jobe, M.D. fitted each of the honorees with the signature white jackets medical students wear while making hos-
pital rounds during their last two years of medical school.
Class President Andora Lynn Bass spoke briefly on the experiences she and her classmates shared over the past
two years and the optimism they all hold for the next.
"As we stand here today at this bridge between our years in the classroom as passive learners and our next two years
of practical experience, we must remember that it was our work as a group that got us here as individuals, and
now it will be our performance as individuals that will decide our success as a group Bass said.
Guest Speaker and Professor of Medicine John Christie, M.D Ph.D. agreed with Bass and adv.sed the prospec-
tive physicians that during the coming years, "now more than ever the Class of 1999 will need the support of every
classmate, friend and family member at its disposal.
Family is indeed an important fixture in the lives of all the students present at Saturday s ceremony, but especially
for one student in particular.
In December 1995, TEC featured an article on James N. Moore, III, who left his job at East Carolina University
as biology lab coordinator to take on the challenge of medical school.
Upon entering his first year of medical school, Moore told TEC that the hardest thing about going to medical
school was "going from making money to (making no money" Now after two years of Ixiok work, moncv is the least
of his worries.
"Probablv now the thing I'll miss the most is sleep Moore said, referring the fact that, besides finding the time
to study and review material, third-year medical students are constantly "on call" to perform at the hospital.
As reported in TECs feature on
Moore, he is probably one of the luckier
students in the class of 1999 because he
can rely daily on the advice and support
of his wife. Tammy Conner-Moore,
M.D who has already experienced
what lies ahead of Moore and is current-
ly a family physician at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
At the time of TECs last interview
with Moore, he was worried about the
arrival of his second child (Brandon,
now 19 months old) interrupting his
exam schedule. On Saturday, however,
Moore seemed surprisingly calm and
eager to meet whatever challenges the
next two years will bring.
After the ceremony, like most of the
other newly "white-coat-
ed" sophomores, Moore
was surrounded by friends
and family, including his
parents, James and
Yvonne, wife Tammy, sons
James IV and Brandon and
sister. Candiee.
On Saturday ECU's School of Medicine honored the 76
members of the Class of 1999 with a White Coat
Ceremony to mark the transition between the class-
room based first two years of medical school and the
more practical final two years.
After being filled with his traditional whte coat, sopho-
more James Morman Moore II, stands with pround par-
ents, Yvonne (L) and James N. Moore II (R).
PHOTOS BY MARGUERITE BENAMIN
Oldest residence hall to
be renovated, remodeled
Microsoft exchange to improve
electronic communication
BECKY ALLEY
HOUSING AND OONSJ'VMTOHY SERVICES ISSIES
STAFF WHITER
December 1997 will mark the beginning of a
major $4 million renovation project on ECU's
oldest and smallest tesidence hall.
Jarvis Hall, located in central campus, will
receive total interior and partial exterior reno-
vations to update and improve the living con-
ditions of its residents.
"Right now we have a timeline set for the
renovations but no specific set beginning
date said Manny Amaro, university housing
director.
"We are in the process of briefing archi-
tects and deciding who will do the project for
us Amaro said. "We hope to begin in
December 1997 and have it completed by the
beginning of the 1999 academic year
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Jarvis Hall, which was built in 1909, is the
oldest building on campus that remains in use
as designed by ECU's founders. The only
other original building on campus is the old
cafeteria building which now holds financial
aid and the ECU post office, among other
things.
"It was suggested that we tear down Jarvis
and build a new residence hall in its place
Amaro said, "But we didn't want to do that
because Jarvis is such a part of ECU's history
The renovation project will basically tear
out the entire inside of Jarvis Hall, rebuild it,
and will include some exterior renovations.
The exterior will receive new landscaping,
cleaning and sealing of mortar and brickwork,
new window frames, new wooden trim, and
new gutters.
The interior renovations will be much
more complex. They will include new wood
and carpeted floors, new bathrooms and fix-
tures, new stairwells, new sprinkler and fire
alarm systems, new plumbing and electrical
systems, and a new multipurpose room.
This new multipurpose room will be a
loungesocial area. It will be constructed on
the south side of Jarvis, facing the mall, and
will include a new entrance for the residents
so they do not have to walk around the build-
ing to enter it.
The new entrance will have a handicapped
ramp and elevator to make Jarvis accessible
for all students.
There are also plans to renovate the resi-
dence coordinator's suite and to build an
office for the coordinator.
To keep with Jarvis's rich history, a red clay
tile roof, identical to the original roof, will be
installed to match Cotten and Fleming Halls.
A residence hall which normally houses
approximately 170 students, Jarvis's closing
will create some on-campus housing problems
but University Housing is preparing for them.
"There will be some space issues due to
Jarvis's closing Amaro said, "However we are
prepared to deal with them and we will try to
minimize them as much as possible
Amaro said if space is a problem next
semester, Jarvis may be reopened as tempo-
rary housing like it was in the beginning of
this academic year.
Though Jarvis is the smallest residence
hall, Amaro said the residents really love living
there and the atmosphere stays very positive.
"1 think the renovations will be a wonder-
ful addition and improvement for the whole
campus Amaro said.
University Housing is also looking into
renovation of Belk and Fletcher Halls.
"We're studying them now but they're
long-range projects Amaro said. "Obviously
though, we can't shut down any more resi-
dence halls until Jarvis is completed
Jacqueline D. Kellim
RTS NI) STI'DIF.S ISSIES
STVFF WRITER
Thanks to a partnership between ECU and the Microsoft Corporation,
all students, staff and faculty will soon have access to an electronic com-
munication system called Microsoft Exchange 5.0.
Microsoft Exchange serves some of the same functions as the e-mail
system currently used at ECU. but according to Ernest Marshburn, asso-
ciate director of computing and information systems, it has several addi-
rionai functions and is much more advanced.
One of the key advantages of Exchange is when fully implemented,
anyone holding an ECU account will not even have to be on campus to
make use of it. Exchange is accessible from anywhere, as long as the user
can get to an Internet browser.
"No matter where you are, you have access to your mail Marshburn
said.
Marshburn pointed out such a feature is particularly advantageous to
a university community, where so many of the users are what he called
"nomadic users meaning they often move from one computer to anoth-
er.
"I don't know if you realize how special you are at this point and
time Marshburn said. "We are the first university in the U.S. to have
this
Another advantage to Exchange is the ability to do most of the basic
word processing functions users are accustomed to using. Exchange
includes word wrap, spell check, the ability to do bullercd lists, italicize.
boldface, underline, and center text.
Some of the other features of Exchange include an electronic address
book which will include the names of everyone on campus, and elec-
tronic calendars. Ir is possible students will have increased access m their
teachers through Exchange, not only by being able to send mail to them.
but also schedule appointments with them or submit assignments to
their teachers through Exchange.
Computing and information systems has already lx-gun implement inn
Exchange on campus, but it will take several monrhs to complete instal-
lation. They hope it will be available to students sometime in the t ill.
To assist the campus community7 in learning to use Exchange, a hand-
out has already been written which covers the basics. I here s also amort-
in-depth guide, of which a limited number of copies will lie given to each
department.
Exchange will require a new user ID and password tor ad w
Marshburn emphasized that ECU is the first to haw Exchange.
"East Carolina University will be the first university to impia
Microsoft Exchange 5.0 in a university wide model for all faculty,
and students Marshburn said.
While being the first is something to be proud of, Marshburn said, it
also needs to be kept in mind that being the first also means having to
deal with whatever problems may arise.
"When you're the first, and there is no path, you're going to run into
the thorny bushes Marshburn said.
However, Marshburn said he felt in the end. the bumps in the etec-
tronic road would be worth it. and the benefits of Exchange would far
outweigh the disadvantages.
Presdents's visit provides diversion for victims
of Red River flood
GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, N.D.
(AP) - For hundreds of people who took refuge
in huge jet hangars after the Red River of the
North swamped their city, a visit from
President Clinton was a welcome diversion.
And his pledge Tuesday to pout federal aid
into the region brought hope.
"The spirits are really low, really low Mary
Braden. a Red Cross volunteer, said as dozens
of evacuees pressed to shake hands with the
president. "It will lift spirits up to know he
cares enough to come
Clinton, accompanied by four Cabinet sec-
retaries, flew by helicopter over the inundated
cities of Grand Forks, N.D and East Grand
Forks, Minn.
With the stench of sewage hanging in the
air, caramel-colored water spread as far as the
president could see - the cities are essentially
a lake. Afterward, he was briefed by rescue
workers and state and local officials, and he
spoke to some of the 2,500 evacuees who are
subsisting in three hangars on the base.
"I will never forget what I have seen and
heard here Clinton told several hundred
evacuees gathered in one of the hangars, which
usually house huge KC-135 refueling tanker
planes. The refugees' cots were pushed to one
side to make room for Clinton's platform,
which was decorated with sandbags.
"We'll be there every step of the way the
president promised.
With thousands homeless and the area's
infrastructure destroyed, Clinton told relief
workers and residents he would ask Congress
for $488 million in flood assistance for the
North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota.
That includes the $259 million he had already
requested.
"It's wonderful said refugee Bridgie
Hansen. her eyes reddened with tears. "I just
want to see it happen now
And, in a rare move, the president ordered
the Federal Emergency Management .Agency
to pay for 100 percenr of the immediate emer-
gency work; traditionally Washington pays 75
percent.
"People here are giving KM) percent and we
should, too Clinton said. The traditional 75
percent match is likely to be required for
expenses down the road.
The president also added 18 Minnesota
and 53 South Dakota counties to the lonf
of areas eligible for aid.
Damages in this region could exci
lion. Some 1.7 million acres of
are under water at a time w hen I
normally le planting their rrjj
in Grand Forks told Clinti
remain uninhabitable for v
But Grand Forks Mayoi
to rebuild, telling the pn
given us hope. 1 he no i
will see a city back thriving
Heavy winter stv
swelled the Red River, which
Dakota from Minnesota.
Homes are floatin
water and sewer system:
water is mining so swift
banks and channels through th
said. No one knows ei whai col
and bridges will be left in
"You can't be&eve the emotn
through your mind and your I
can't stop something that's gotn
sour friends said Ken Krucn.
East (irand Forks.
list
and





i
2 Thursday. April 24. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Convicted dniQ dealers say clerk helped them get fake
driver's licenses
WILMINGTON (AP) - A former Cumberland County clerk of court was
paid with money and drugs to get fate driver's licenses for convicted drug
dealers, the leader of a trafficking ring testified.
Marion Person, 71, is on trial in U.S. District, charged with conspiracy to
traffic in drugs for helping a drug gang led by Charles Glenn Parker.
Authorities say Parker's gang, most of whose members are now in prison,
imported $30 million worth of cocaine and marijuana into North Carolina
over a 10-year span.
Person got the phony licenses for them through a license examiner in
Elizabethtown who was paid with steaks and liquor and at least once with
sex, Parker testified.
Person's lawyer, Alice Stubbs, said Person was a man who tned to help
people, not a conspirator in drug trafficking.
But Parker, who is serving a 35-year term in a federal penitentiary, testi-
fied about eight instances in which he said Person helped get fake licenses
that the gang then used to reserve hotel rooms, lease houses and get titles
for cars.
EPA fits building to price
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. (AP) - The Environmental
Protection Agency will have to downsize its new research building by 20 per-
cent to meet its $232 million budget and won't be able to consolidate its
Triangle-area operations under one roof as it had hoped to do.
The decision has left employees in the excluded areas wondenng about
their future and frustrated they won't be part of the new research center.
The state-of-the-art center will be built on a 509-acrc site owned by the
federal government and will be the largest of the EPA's research operations.
It was expected to consolidate more than 1,400 workers in the Triangle.
The cuts became necessary after federal officials invited construction
companies to bid on the project last fall. The lowest bid they received was
I $262 million. Congress budgeted $232 million for the buiiding, of which
$215 million is for the actual construction.
April 19, 1987
Provisional Driving While Impaired- A resident of Garrett hall was arrest-
ed for provisional DWI after driving at a high rate of speed west of lenth
Street and failing to stop for blue light and siren.
April 20,1997
Simple Possession of Marijuana- Two non-students were issued state
citations for simple possession of marijuana during a routine traffic stop.
Assist Rescue- A resident of Aycock Hall was transported from Aycock to
PCMH by Greenville Rescue after passing out.
Drive by Shooting- Warrants were drawn on a non-student for discharg-
ing a firearm into an occupied vehicle, two counts of assault with a deadly
kveapon and danvtge to property- The victims were also non-students. The
Incident occurred on College Hill Drive near 14th S'reet.
April 21, 1997
Larceny- A student reported the larceny of his portable stereo compact
disc player from a room in Jenkins Art.
Larceny- A staff member reported the larceny of a computer mouse from
a computer workstation at Joyner Libray.
Assist Student- A staff member reported that a student was despondent
and friends were concerned. The students was with a friend in Jones Hall.
April 22. 1997
Assist Rescue- A student was transported to PCMH by Greenville
Rescue after she passed out in Mcndenhall.
Parking on Reading Day and
during exams
1. All parking regulations remain in effect on Reading Day and
during the exam period.
2. Unregistered Vehicles are not authorized to park on campus
on Reading Day or during exams. Students without permanent
decals may purchase $2 daily or $5 weekly permits from
Parking and Traffic Services.
3.30-minute loading permits will be available to students with
Freshman decals beginning at noon, Monday. May 5,1997 for
loading and unloading purposes only. Registered Freshman
vehicles will be allowed to park on campus in student areas
beginning at noon Wednesday. May 7,1997.
4. On Reading Day. April 30. Limited Commuter permits may
park in regular Commuter spaces on main campus. This is
allowed because ECU Transit will not provide shuttle services
on Reading Day. The shuttle will run during the exam period.
The Freshman shuttle will run as usual on Reading Day and
during the exam period.
5. Unregistered vehicles or vehicles with student registration
parked in staff areas will be cited for a wrong zone violation.
Vehicles parked in the Private lots without Private permits will
be ticketed for wrong zone and towed.
For further information on parking during the exam period, con-
tact Parking and Traffic Services at 328-6294.
at
Bombing trial jury seated; backgrounds and identities
unknown
DENVER (AP) - The panel selected to hear the Oklahoma City bombing
trial sat togethsr in the jury box for the first time, their faces shielded from
reporters and their names, backgrounds and races kept secret by the judge.
Sources close to the case told The Associated Press the jury consisted of
seven men and five women, with three men and three women selected as
alternates.
Jurors will determine the guilt or innocence of Timothy McVeigh, a ZK-
� year-old Gulf War veteran who faces the death penalty if convicted in the
April 19,1995. bombing of the Alfred R Murrah federal Building. The blast
killed 168 people and injured hundreds more.
No court session was scheduled today, McVeigh's 29th birthday. Jurors
return Thursday to take their oath and hear opening statements.
A sloping wall - built on Matsch's orders - keeps most reporters from see-
ding the jurv box, but members of the public hae a better view.
Audience members said the panel appeared to have 16 whites and two
whose race could not be determined, but who appeared to be either
Hispanic or American Indian.
Little girl whose mother kidnapped to testify against
accused
ABERDEEN, S.D. (AP) - The fate of a former meatpacking worker could
hinge on the testimony of a little girl who told police after her mother dis-
appeared, "A man took mommy and she's not coming back.
Shaina Streyle. then only 3, and her little brother, Nathan, were at home
last summer when a stranger dragged off her mother as she screamed at her
children to hide. .
Police believe she did, and that Robert Leroy Anderson was the mysten-
ous man in a Black Bronco who hung around rural Canistota looking for a ran-
dom victim until he found one in Piper Streyle, 28. Her body was never
found. �
Police believe Anderson was planning to kill women in small towns across
South Dakota. . . -e
Now on trial, Anderson was to watch today as Shaina, now 4, testifies by
dosed-circuit TV about a kidnapper police say was probably not worned that
a child might identify him.
Anderson. 27, is charged with kidnapping with intent to harm and rape
and could get life in prison if convicted.
Shaina was to testify from a library several blocks away from the county
courthouse, out of concern she may be too traumatized in a face-to-face ses-
sion.
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3 Thursday. April 24. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
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If you will be a returning student in the fell and are looking
for a summer job, UHS will be hiring students to assist
with our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to inspect, repair and renovate residence hall
rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance will provide training
and supervision. General knowledge of basic carpentry
skills, painting, installation of hardware, measuring and
fitting components is required. The program will be
approximately 10 weeks. This is an opportunity to have
personal training and learn successful skills in a hands-on
experience. Full-time, 39 hours per week, and part-time,
120 hours per week, positions will be offered. To submit an
application, please come by University Housing Services,
Office Suite 100 Jones Hall.
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Federal authorities say US
equipment diverted to arms plant5
NEW YORK (AP) - Federal investigators have discov-
ered evidence indicating a Chinese firm diverted
American machine equipment to a plant that builds mis-
siles and jet fighters, The New York Times reported
Tuesday.
The Justice and Customs departments are looking
into what happened to equipment bought in 1994 by a
company called Catic that was supposed to be used
exclusively for civilian purposes, the newspaper said.
The probe, launched in the spring of 1996, could be
embarrassing to the Clinton administration if it con-
cludes that Catic purposely misled American officials.
The new evidence, which includes satellite pho-
tographs, questions the Clinton Administration's
approval of the sale in the first place, the Times said,
quoting officials it did not identify.
The equipment was bought from the McDonnell
Douglas Corp. in August 1994, and was supposed to be
used for manufacturing civilian jets.
The approval came around the time Secretary of
Commerce Ronald H. Brown was leaving for China,
vhere he helped persuade the Chinese to keep a com-
mitment to spend $1 billion worth of jets from
McDonnell Douglas.
The Pentagon objected to the sale at the time, argu-
ing that the heavy machine equipment, which is used to
shape and bend large aircraft parts, could also be used to
boost Chinese arms capability.
Satellite photos show a military complex called the
Nanchang Aircraft Co. houses the American equipment,
but Beijing told the United States it was going to a civil-
ian center in Beijing, the report said.
Catic and its lawyers refused to answer questions
about a grand jury investigation, the Times said.
McDonnell Douglas said it did nothing wrong.
Catic is immune from American prosecutors, but its
U.S. subsidiary in Southern California has been subpoe-
naed, administration officials told the newspaper.
"For the administration, this has been a difficult deci-
sion, weighing jobs against counterproliferation said
Adm. Bill Center, who represented the Joint Chiefs of
Staff in 1994 talks within the Clinton Administration.
He said the Joint Chiefs had opposed the sale on
national security grounds.
But after deliberations led by White House officials,
Center said "all of us concluded that if McDonnell
Douglas didn't sell it, others would, and we wouldn't
accomplish anything by saying no
Growing number of babies bom with
drug addictions placed in foster care
WILMINGTON (AP) - As baby Tye
sleeps, her perfectly shaped fingers
relax in response to foster mom
Mollene Smith's tender massage.
But other times, even a light
touch causes the baby to pull her
tiny hand away, ball up her fist and
draw her legs into a tight fetal posi-
tion. It's a crack baby's typical
response to the stroking most
infants find soothing.
Tye was born March 3 to a moth-
er who used crack cocaine and mari-
juana during her pregnancy. She was
immediately placed in the care of
Mrs. Smith, a foster mother since
1992.
"For the first 18 hours, you could
not do anything for this baby Mrs.
Smith said.
Cuddling didn't help. The small
but strong arms and legs stiffened to
the touch, and the child pushed
away.
Tye is among a growing number
of babies bom to mothers who used
drugs or alcohol - or both - while
pregnant. Last year, the New
Hanover County Department of
Social Services investigated 48
reports of babies born to substance-
abusing mothers. The agency todk
custody of 12 of them and required
24-hour supervision by an unim-
paired caretaker for the others.
Sixty-two percent of the 185 chit
dren the department took into pr
tectivc custody last year had parent?
with serious drug or alcohol prob-
lems. Drugs - especially crack -
account for the largest percentage of
child abuse and negiect reports in
New Hanover County.
SEE BABIES. PAGE 5
Attention all News Writers
Be advised that the last meeting of the semester will be held Monday, April
28, in the newsroom at 5 p.m. This meeting is mandatory, and whether oi
not you will be writing for the summer or Fall, attedance is required.
copyright 1997-The Kroger co. items & mmtmtHKmmMmmmmmmmtmn�gmMimmmaiMt
Items & Price! Good Thru April 26,1997 llWd.2HTtMr.24l Bt25l Sit 76 I
FOOD A DRUG
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Zebra Cakes, Nutty Bars, Oatmeal Cream
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99
Kit Kat, Twix, Snickers,
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10-pack
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Feed your brain
GET TO KROGER

S





)
II �
4 Thursday. April 24, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Organization
American Chemical Society
Student Dietetic Association
ECU Economics Society
Environmental Health Club
A.B.L.E.
B-GLAD
Hospitality Mgmt Association
ECU SAGA
Circle K
Sigma Omicron Epsilon
Native American Association
Gamma Sigma Sigma
Cross Culture
SAM
East Carolina Honors Organization
East Carolina Dance Association
National Association of Industrial Tech
ECU Volunteers
EC Association of Nursing Students
ECU Eolk and Country Dancers
Alpha Phi Omega
Omicron Delta Kappa
Adult Student Association
National Pan-Hellinic Council
Campus Crusade for Christ
Phi Alpha Theta
Delta Epsilon Chi
Phi Sigma Pi
EC Construction Association
Beta Alpha Psi
Epsilon Chi Nu
Muslim Student Association
Golden Key
Student Accounting Society
New Gen, Campus Ministies
IFC
Panhellinic
EC Friends
ECU EXSS Majors Club
Arnold Air Society
Honor Board
SGA Exec
Homecoming Committee
GSAC
Approved
846.00
622.00
527.00
175.00
384.00
509.00
340.00
245.00
489.00
8225.00
295.00
484.00
245.00
535.00
517.00
275.00
658.00
1000.00
1299.00
70.00
489.00
405.00
334.00
512.00
1135.00
549.00
636.00
630.00
750.00
1036.00
190.00
270.00
557.00
446.00
200.00
2581.00
2825.00
195.00
425.00
450.00
876.00
80428.00
11783.00
17500.00
If someone c
"Hey, I want
at Mendenha
17,000 of y
What Kind o
inds
ow
u and said,
throw a party
tudent Center for
est friends
Would it
a
're thinking about that, please take a minute and answer the following questiorS:
( m �
fc

Have you ever attended ECU's Midnite Madness? Yes
hat did you like about it?
w
. What didn't you like about it?

n t -
Have you ever attended ECU's Mardi Grasi Yes
No
a
a

No
What did you like about it?
&
&
What didn't you like about it? -
� -
Would you rather attend a St. Patrick's Day party than Mardi Gras? Yes
rather attend an End-of-Year party than Mardi Gras?
Yes
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
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$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
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Army Recruiter.
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ARMY.
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For Interview and Try-Out
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FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St �rw �g�'J Hours:
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These questions �re brought to you by: The Major Events Committee
jtudent Life. sponsors of ECU's annual alcohol-free parties: Midnite �
Gils. Please clip and return your responses to : Marketing Office, 21"
�Q Center, ECU. Llf ill IT I Wll ll drop them oil at the Information DeT1
O

r
S3
The East Carolina University Honors Program congratulates the
following May 1997 graduates for earning
University Honors:
Braden Elizabeth Boone � University Honors in Biology
Darcie Terrell Reasoner � University Honors in Biology
Chantel Louise Sabus � University Honors in Psychology
Rebecca Perry Williams � University Honors in Music Therapy
Congratulations to the following May 1997 graduates for earning
General Education Honors: �
Braden Elizabeth Boone
David Cullen Bowen
Angela Eleanor Bryant
Mary Ann Caproni
Shannon Marchella Clark
Krystal Amelia Coffman
Amy Ann Jones Edwards
Kayse Gail Fields
Lisa Ann Frederick
Wendy Michelle Fulp
Heather Lynne Giorgio
Alisa Nicole Godwin
Winnie Rebecca Gray
Dale Shannon Holloway
Rebecca Dawn Johnston
Joseph Benjamin Kearney
Allison Nicole McCullen
Leslie Anne Mitchell
Francis Lee Moman
Jennifer Lee Murdoch
Shannon Lynn Pollard
Darcie Terrell Reasoner
Cindy Ann Riedel
Robert Edwin Rollason
Chantel Louise Sabus
Owen Alexander Smith
Robin Lynne Taylor
Martin Carey Thomas
Lisa Kay Trtvette
Tracy Luann Cope Wages
Michael William Walker
Deanna Michell Wilt White
Rebecca Perry Williams
Jennifer Leigh Wilson
1
All Honors students are invited to attend the Honors Recognition Ceremony
on Wednesday, April 30, 1997 at 5:00 pm in the MSC Great Room.
s�S
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SP
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r
5 Thursday. April 24. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Babies
continued from page 3
� Summer Discounts for students
� 24 Hr. Access - 7 Days a week
� Fenced & Well Lighted
� U-Lock & keep the Key
551-6700
1110 N. Memorial Drive. Across from Pitt-Greenville Airport
When Tye arrived at her foster
home, her skin was hanging off her
Sones "like an old woman's Mrs.
Smith said.
Her eyes bulged out and her
skin was discolored. She wouldn't
eat. "She had her fists so tight that
her knuckles were white Mrs.
prnith said.
The baby was going through
drug withdrawal.
Infants bom addicted to crack
"are just not fun babies to interact
with said Kathleen Veness-
Meehan, a neonatologist and assis-
tant professor of pediatrics at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
Unlike healthy babies, these
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infants flinch as if in pain at the
slightest human touch. They don't
like to be held, and they avoid eye
contact, Dr. Veness-Meehan said.
"For some reason, babies exposed
to crack avoid looking at people's
faces That makes it difficult for
the baby to bond with a parent or
caretaker, she said.
And they often either cry uncon-
trollably or stay in a deep sleep for
hours. If she could, Tye would sleep
right through her feedings. But she's
gradually becoming more alert and
has started smiling regularly.
In severe cases, the baby's brain
can hemorrhage in the womb, caus-
ing a variety of physical and develop-
mental problems, including cerebral
palsy, paralysis and learning disor-
ders, Dr. Veness-Meehan said.
Tye is the second crack baby Mrs.
Smith has cared for since Christmas.
The first child, born on Christmas
Day, is now with a foster couple who
wants tc adopt her. Mrs. Smith's first
experience caring for a drug baby
was when she took in and adopted
Jenny, who is now 5.
It's important to help the babies
develop a sense of security, Mrs.
Smith said. Even as Tye sleeps, she
strokes and talks to her continuous-
ly-
"We cuddle her a lot Mrs.
Smith said. "We don't let her do a lot
of fussing. I want her to know some-
one is going to be there to cuddle
her
Tye is responding well. She is
starting to make eye contact and
gets fussy if someone isn't holding
her.
Mrs. Smith gives partial credit to
New Hanover Regional Medical
Center, which uses volunteers to
rock and hold the drug babies from
shortly after birth, Mrs. Smith said.
"I tell you what, these are special
babies - just seeing how far they
come with all that attention she
said, cooing at the sleeping bundle
in her lap.
That's not to say Tye won't have
problems. She'll probably start hav-
ing tremors, a normal reaction after
the drugs are eliminated from the
system - about a month after birth,
Mrs. Smith said.
And as they get older, many crack
babies develop attention-deficit dis-
orders or become hyperactive. Dr.
Veness-Meehan said.
In addition to Tye, Mrs. Smith
has Jenny, three of her own children,
two foster daughters and a foster
son. She's also caring for the 2-year-
old son of one foster daughter; who is
expecting another baby.
Recently separated, she juggles
her duties as a parent with a job that
at least allows her flexible hours.
"I'm just real dedicated to them
Mrs. Smith said. "And hopefully, we
are making a difference - one child at
a time
Cat hairs lead to murder conviction
NEW YORK (AP) - Here's an
odd tale from the annals of DNA
evidence in the courtroom: A
Canadian man was convicted of
murder after hairs in a bloodstained
jacket were genetically matched to
his parents' cat.
The man lived with his parents
and Snowball, a white American
short hair.
The case, reported in Thursday's
issue of the journal Nature, is one of
the few times that nonhuman DNA
has been used this way in a murder
trial.
The murdered woman was 32
when she disappeared from her
home on Prince Edward Island in
1994. Her body was found in a shal-
low grave a few months later, and
police suspected her former com-
mon-law husband.
By then, the brown leather jack-
et had been discovered, stuffed in a
plastic bag and left in the woods.
Tests showed the bloodstains
belonged to the woman.
The cat hairs were found in the
lining. Police recalled seeing
Snowball at the man's home during
their investigation.
They sent a biood sample from
Snowball and hair from the jacket to
Stephen J. O'Brien of the National
Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md.
O'Brien has studied cat genetics for
20 vears.
O'Brien and colleagues report in
Nature that Snowball's DNA
matched genetic material from the
root of one of the hairs.
lb help O'Brien compute the
likelihood that such a match would
occur by chance, the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police had a local veteri-
narian draw blood randomly from 19
cats. O'Brien studied DNA in those
samples, plus data from a prior sur-
vey of nine cats from the United
States.
The likelihood that the jacket
hair DNA would match Snowball's
DNA just by chance was computed
at about 1 in 45 million.
The suspect was convicted of
second-degree murder last July, and
the DNA evidence was "a major
contributing factor said Cpl.
Phonse MacNeil of the Mounties in
Summersidc, Prince Edward Island.
Nonhuman DNA evidence has
been used before in murder cases.
In Arizona in 1W3, a man was con-
victed after DNA from seed pods in
his pickup truck was matched to a
palo verde tree at the site where the
victim's body was found.
Edgar Espinoza, deputy director
of the government's National I ish
and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory in
Ashland, Ore said he had heard of
another case in which hairs on a
blanket that wrapped a murder vic-
tim were matched by DNA to a sus-
pect's dog.
O'Brien's analysis was admitted
in the Canadian court after a special
hearing. George Sensabaugh, a pro-
fessor of forensic and biomedical sci-
ence at the University of California
at Berkeley, said he believes the
match is real. He said defense attor-
neys would probably challenge the
analysis in a U.S. court.
"Frankly, I don't know whether a
court would accept it or not he
said.
One objection would be that so
few cats were used to compute the
likelihood of a DNA match by
chance, he said. Another would be
that the particular DNA trait
matched is not generally used in
forensic DNA profiling, because of
concerns about ambiguous findings,
he said.
O'Brien said he made up for his
small number of cats by making
comparisons at 10 sites in the DNA,
which is more than usual in cases
involving human hair. And the DNA
trait he used gave clear results in the
Snowball case, he said
O'Brien's team did the analysis
during O.J. Simpson's murder trial.
"We were all watching the DNA
evidence go down the toilet in the
O.J. Simpson case, and we were
determined that was not going to
happen to us he said.
The Farmville Dogwood Festival
Presents
on Friday, April 25, 1997
Orpeus Fate, Treading Evans, Thomas Brothers,
Kernal Goat, Slow Children Playing,
Three Foot Margin & Laredo!
on Saturday, April 26, 1997
Tulsa James, Panama Steel, The Main Event,
n Uneke The Griswalds, Earl Teel, Little Creek,
Family & Friends, Twisted Fate, Gravity Overflow,
Third of Never, Dorian Grey, Nameless, Kelly Smith,
and The Embers!
on Sunday, April 27, 1997
John Loy, Homebrew, Redalia, Sneaky Pete,
Bivans Brothers
and
Craven Melon!
Call (919753-5814 for Details!
1
i
iMi






6 Thursday. April 24. 1997
The East Carolinian
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Srxfoiran's Land
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Primitiu Man
By Karl Trolenberg
ACROSS
1 Settkmwit
5 Electronic
messages
10 Crazes
14 Bread spread
15 Heated quarrel
16 Give off
17 Make
impervious to
rain
19 Exploding star
20 �law (family
circle member)
21 Fiddle with
23 Hole
24 German one
25 Adrift
29 Miss
33 Milk products
store
34 Very plump
35 Before: pref.
36 Cookie
37 Baseball, e.g.
38 Large: pref.
39 Presidential
initials
40 Sweety
41 Gem weight
42 Perfumes
44 Sanitizes
45 Alphabet run
46 Theater sign
47 Hard to find
50 Ornaments
55 Used
56 Furor
58 Pay up
59 Sawyer of TV
60 Artist Warhol
61 Poverty
62 Begat
63 Snoop
t�r5�4��p��� 7� i� 5�wnr TT w 73-
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TREMOREL
M0OIn� rULE
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1STjVE RTTALE
sEEDEN SE1�RES
DOWN
1 Cattle
2 Russian
mountain range
3 Shea Stadium
players
4 Browning or
Gray
5 �de corps
6 Deserve
7 Like �of bricks
8 OJ. Judge
9 Highest
10 Herb
11 Out of control
12 Plunge
13 Headtiner
18 Take care of a
loan
22 Regarding
24 � now and then
25 Worship
26 Cultivates
27 Legal claims
28 Spanish gold
29 Woodwinds
30 "Carmen e.g.
31 Church
instrument
32 Odist John
34 Chose
37 Gets ahead
38�West
40 Network letters
41 Duplicate
43 Worked for
44 Boxed up
46 Backbone
47 Graceful bird
48 Ice cream holder
49 A Johnson
50 Battle reminder
51 Federal agent
52 Late night Jay
53 Finishes
54 Eye problem:
var.
57 12
Orientation Assistants
Orientation & the First-Year Experience- 214 Whichard Building 328-4173
mmer
The Office of Orientation & the First-Year Experience
proudly announces the 1997-98 Orientation Assistant Staff:
Jason Barclift
Darell Brown
Chonte Calvin
Sharonda Cooper
Clint Dean
David Deike
Christina Gantas
Nicole Gray
Emily Greene
Celena Haaland
Mark Harritan
Beatrice Johnson
Tina Leggett
Khadine Lewis
Rachel Lindsey
Caroline Ross
Patricia Shepardson
Douglas Smith
Amy Staton
Jason Marcus Waak
Beth Wilder
Congratulations & Good Luck
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Expires 5)097 " J
Kappa Sigma
Presents the 16th annual
Bahama Mama
Band Party &
Hawaiian Tropic
Bikini Contest
Featuring
Purple Scboolbus
Saturday, April 26,1997
12:00 PM
700 E. 10th Street
(beside Darryl's restaurant)
For info about Tickets or the Bikini Contest
call 757-1005 or 752-5543
;
?�j
'
-��.






7 ThurHay. April 24, 1117
east�arolinian
BRANDON WaOOKI.I, M'IOi
MATT HROK A��WnC
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HfcATHKR Bl'ROM.i WnEJmt
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As this semester and school year comes to a close, reflect on the pleasant memories that have
transpired. The short time spent standing in line for a pleasant registrar's office employee to
sign you up for the classes you need. The cver-so friendly cashier's office staff to assist with
every need. Never, ever having to run to four or five different places on campus to make a change
in a senior summary.
; Now wake up. -
The fact is many of our academic advisers give little advice. Many are guilty of handing a
blank, yet signed registration form to students with no help at all. Many advisors can't tell a stu-
dent where to go to have a problem fixed, or even worse send the student to the wrong place.
As students, we understand the difficulty of being professors and advisors at this university
The pressures of publishing, teaching and advising must be a heavy load at times. But since
most professors have been in school longer than we have, shouldn't they be that much more sen-
sitive to our needs as undergraduate and graduate students?
Many students are frustrated when they sign up for an appointment to have a schedule
Moved and stand in line to see their advisor to find out the classes are closed; the curriculum
i changed; you shouldn't have taken that class last semester, you should have taken this other
AMANDA ROSS Start! �IOf
Patrick irklan pmoE�w
cki.ksti Wilson NfcnwHmw
CAROI.K MKHt.K ftMdCoftEdrW
ANDY FARKAH SnDMuwmt
problems students have are very real to us. Just as our professors and advisers' problems
: to diem. And when students are having difficulty, our advisers are sometimes the only place
i have to look for answers. They need to know them. Or at least be responsible enough to call
lomeone to find out.
An experience one of our staff members had was completing a senior summary. He needed to
one change in the paperwork. This student went across campus twice and to the same
Office twice to get this one problem worked out.
j Vk just think it's ridiculous that our advisers and professors are not more knowledgeable
pbout the bureaucracy a student faces at ECU. Are advisers not informed of how to give acade-
Jmic advice? We're not just discussing looking on a sheet of paper and telling a student what
rher classes he needs to graduate.
We can accomplish this task on our own. We need our advisers to tell us where offices are
2 located that can help us when we need it. It doesn't matter if we need to find a transcript, finan-
S cial aid information or even pay our fees; we need more knowledgeable advisers to help us. Most
� advisers are also professors. They grade us on our proficiency in class and how prepared we are
"when we take rests. What if the shoe was on the other foot? How many advisors would get an
J� in ADVISING 101?
i
QUEST
Is it possible to drink responsibly?
Alcohol. Moat college students
i St. Whether it be a beer or mixed
prink, we enjoy the thought of joining
u friends fer 6 run-filled night in
mown ursenviiie.
Yes, there are students who choose
to drink. There is nothing wrong
ith not drinking. However; there is
i nothing wrong with drinking just
long as we do it responsibly
What does responsibly mean? Well,
I'm not going to bore you with the
lines. We all know the age limit
I other similar issues.
What needs to be addressed is how
Aware we are of our surroundings after
jjre just took that shot of tequila. Of
urse, all we can think about at that
ime is that queasy feeling we have in
iir stomachs. That's when another
i comes up and offers you anoth-
er shot.
Bo you take it?
Most honest drinkers will say
y'd take it; it's a free shot. But, did
see that person buy that shot? If
didn't, then you might not want
take that shot. I don't care if that
crson has been your best buddy all
Itrough out the semester, you never
know what a person may have put in
ur drink. It could be laced with a
i of drug that'll make you unaware
: happens then?
If you want to accept a drink from
someone, make sure you go to the bar
with them and that you watch the bar-
tender make your drink. Makes you
rhink twice about under-age drinking.
Underage drinkers: how many times
have you asked someone over 21 to
get you a drink? Do you go to the bar
with them while they order the drink?
Of course not. So, how do you know
that your Long Island Ice lea is fine?
fcu don't. bu'rc taking a chance.
Another problem pertains main-
ly to men, though there arc a few arm-
swinging females-fighting and drink-
ing, ror some reason, some men want
to fight when they've been drinking
Blame it on the alcohol. Blame it
on friends. Even blame it on women.
Whatever the reason, they still
look stupid. Everyone else wants to
have fun. Then we get a couple of
trouble-making 'He-Man' wannabes
that try to start a rumble in a club
with bouncers twice their size.
Go figure.
I don't know if they think they
look cool, or they're trying to show off
when they're yelling at each other.
The point is they look stupid. It does-
n't impress women when they fight.
In fact, it turns us off. Ohl And for you
ladies out there who fight in clubs,
what gives? Maybe you should pursue
a career in mud-wrestling where peo-
ple actually want to see such crude
behavior. You might even meet a guy
there who finds your actions attrac-
tive.
Responsible drinkers also have a
safe ride home after drinking.
Whether it be their favorite cab driver
or a ride home from a friend who
works downtown, they find a safe way
back. Some people are even lucky
enough to live close to downtown. In
that case, walking is the answer. Just
make sure you do it in numbers. Use
the system you learned in your
kindergarten class, the buddy system.
After all, there are other people out
there who have also been drinking and
they might not be the friendly type.
Whatever you do, just don't drink
and drive. Yes, we all know the statis-
tics. However, when you're drinking,
you don't realty think about them. All
you think about is what you want.
Well, the next time you're dunking of
driving after you've had more than you
should, or you're about to let a friend
drive drunk, think about this: how
much "fun" is worth ruining your life-
not just your own, but maybe some-
one else's? Get stopped once and your
license goes out the window.
I'm not suggesting that people
should or shouldn't drink. What we
have to realize is that alcohol con-
sumption will continue. We need to
teach those who consume to do so
responsibly
"Writer's block is a fancy term made up by
whiners so they can have an excuse to drink
alcohol
Steve Martin-actor comedian, 1996
1
M
s�
Graduating seniors should get free summer
To the Editor,
I am a graduating senior at East
Carolina University. I am very upset
about the recent news about stu-
dents who are not in summer school
or are graduating have to pay $60 to
use the recreation center. We (the
student body) paid for four years and
have only used it for 3 months.
When I say we, I mean the students
who came to ECU in 1995 and earli-
er.
I was here along with many of my
friends in 1993, and in our second
semester at ECU we saw the plans
for our new recreation center.
The plan for the center was to be
finished in the beginning of my
junior year (1995), but ECU fell
short of funds. So the student body
tuition was raised to complete the
$18,000,000 project that was fin-
ished in January, 1997. Students that
entered school in 19 and later did
not contribute to that $18,000,000,
but yet they can use the recreation
center for four years almost for free.
I feel ECU owes me, and every-
body else who entered in 1993,
another three free years of member-
ship.
OK, maybe not, how about a free
summer to thank us for the dona-
tions that were taken from us to
build a recreation center for future
students.
RahhaGil
Graduating Senior
Biology
Vandalism strikes Jones Hall
lb the Editor,
I am a victim of vandalism!
Why is it that people at East
Carolina University find it so hard to
keep their little paws off of other peo-
ples' property? What is she making a
big fuss about, you may ask? Why is she
so upset, she is not the only one that
this has happened to. What's my story?
Vfcll on Saturday, April 19,1997, I
parked my 19 Dodge Neon in the
front of Jones Hall. My mistake
because on Sunday, April 20, I came
bouncing down to my car to find a huge
scratch from one side of my beautiful
blue hood to the other. I was shocked
and could not believe my eyes. This is
not supposed to happen to people's
property I don't know who the Tittle
bandit was; I better never find out. I foil
to understand the significance of their
actions. 1 would rather think it was a
drunken skunk walking back to their
room after a long night downtown, than
to think it was someone that I know, an
enemy tc say the least.
Whoever it was, 1 hope that you are
happy now that the little urge in your
arm, wrist and fingers has been satis-
fied.
Why don't you key your own car?
I have no sympathy for ignorance,
nor do I tolerate it. Do you think that I
put too much pride into material
things?
Well, you are right. You are right,
simply because of the fact that unlike
many I had to work my bun off to get
my .car last summer, it is one of my
accomplishments; it is the reason why I
work 20 hours a week. I work too hard
for some stupid fool to come along and
destroy my property Do you under-
stand what I'm saying?
My situation once again reminds
ECU and anybody else that we need
some kind of surveillance cameras
monitoring our parking areas.
Something has to be done about people
who have male it their pan-time job to
vandalize.
Tamika Richardson
Sophomore








Thursday. April 24
The East Carolinian
CD
reviews Gray Gallery exhibits graduate work
The Chemical Brothers Blue Dogs
Dig Your Own Hole Blue Dogs
John Davis
STAFF WRITER
.Alright everyone, get your dancing
shoes on. Pull out the boogie clothes,
get ready to tap the feet, shake the
booty and dance 'til dawn. Most tech-
no albums can get tedious, largely due
to the fact that most are compilations
of DJs spinning one style of beat.
Sometimes those beats aren't all that
interesting. The Chemical Brothers
are interesting though, as their
albums tend to pendulum through
every type of beat imaginable. Dig Your
Own Hale is no exception, gyrating
wildly from hip-hop to jungle to
trance during the course of the record.
Quite a few people have compared
this electronic music to disco, claim-
ing that it will pass into the night and-
become the laughing stock of '90s
music. It's possible that most of the
electronic music being churned out by
money-hungry record labels will pass
into musical obscurity, but it's hard to
imagine a duo as good as the Chemical
Brothers fading away like that.
.Anything can happen, but The
Chemical Brothers have succeeded in
drawing techno to a new level of
artistry and craft that will ensure
qhem a mention in music history
Besides, this album just plain
r�cks, bumps, thumps, grooves, dives,
slides, slams and jolts for 63 power-
packed minutes. It is more like good
Bootsy Collins than the Bee Gees.
This isn't all neon and smoke like your
average run-of-the-mill techno album.
This is meaty stuff, and even if people
don't dance to it in ten years, I'll still
be throwing it in the CD player to
play video games or write to.
The album starts off slamming
"Block Rockin' Beats" at you. The
song is very hip-hop. with a butty
woman testifying every few measures
"Back with another one of those block
rockin' beats The P-funk bass line,
accented with an organic drum loop
and wailing sirens, buzzsaw guitar
squeaks and various other red-alert
noises slams right up to "Dig Your
Own Hole the title track that leans
more to a jungle beat, pulsing with a
post-pop bass hook.
"Elektrobank" is a jeep jam, with
pulsing, thudding Miami-style bass
vibrating through the song, with a gui-
tar loop in overdrive. An aggressive,
muffled MC poses rhetorical ques-
tions in between the behind-the-
video-game beeps and squeals: "Who
is this doin' this synthetic type of
alpha beta psychedelic funky?" Of
course, we know the answer The
Chemical Brothers. The track blends
into the mellow trancey "Plku Riled
with static, distortion and fuzz, the
song relies on a very irregular beat
accented by gpthic sounding strings
and voices sampled to the point of
unintelligibility.
SEE CHEM. MOTHERS "AGE 12
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
School of Art graduate students will
get their chance to show off their hard
work next week when the Master's
Thesis Exhibition opens at the
Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery in the
Jenkins Fine Art Center.
The work of Cynthia Blamire,
Jonathan Mugmon, Margaret Angell
Shields Volney II and Linda
Werthwein will be on display April 28
through May 23; the four students
will be honored at a reception sched-
uled to begin Monday night at 5 p.m.
in the Gray An Gallery.
Work showcased in this exhibition
reflects the diversity among the four
students. The artists come from dif-
ferent age groups and different
regions of the country, offering a
plethora of varied perspectives.
Blamire is a 1973 bachelor of fine
arts graduate of the University of
Florida in Gainesville. Specializing in
sculptural ceramic art, she says her
work reflects her urban roots. It takes
a humorous look at popular culture.
A graduate of the University of
Central Florida, Mugmon received his
B.FA in painting and drawing in
1995. His art reflects a deeper look at
everyday objects.
"Newness rises from repetition, it
is the unfamiliar found in the midst of
the most familiar sight he explained.
Volney is a local. She graduated
from ECU in 1983 with a bachelor of
fine arts in environmental design. Her
work shows her love for her home-
town and the influence of her family.
"My grandmother, Annie Shipp
Shields, was a strong influence, guid-
ing me to understand and appreciate
the passion she had for preservation,
as she worked diligently on saving the
Judge William Gaston House located
in New Bern Volney said.
Werthwein, who has studied at
Northern Illinois University, the
University of Utah and the University
of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, brings a spiri-
tual perspective to her work.
"From the quiet stirrings of begin-
nings to the full culmination of life,
my work is inspired by the presence
of the living God and my life in the
West Indies she explained. "On an
environmental scale, semi-abstracr
imagery features contemplation of a
tranquil sea, moving to an ever
increasing power, sun, rain, earth
forming, foliage culminated in a blos-
som
This and all exhibitions and recep-
tions at the gallery are free and open
to the public.
The Jenkins Fine An Center is
located off of 5th Street and Jarvis
Street. The gallery is open for viewing
10 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through
Saturday and until 8 p.m. on
Thursdays.
Beginning May 10 and throughout
the summer, the gallery will be open
10 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through
Thursday and 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on
Friday.
For more information, call Gil
Leebrick, Gallerv Director, at 328-
6336.
DEREK T. HALLE
SENIOR WRITER
A few weeks ago, I wrote review of
Blue Dogs' live album, Liveatthe Dock
Street Theater, claiming that the band
had a very unique style. I thought
that although they did cover songs,
they played very well. Yes, they're a
cover band. A cover band who's front
man is an identical match to Darius
Rucker of Hootie and the Blowfish-
just what we need.
After listening to their new disc,
simply called Bite Dogs, I heard noth-
ing more than a mere interpretation
of the live disc on a solid studio
record. The songs are basically the
same, then again they aren't. What
I'm trying to figure out is just how
these guys can pawn off any of these
new discs. Sure, they're two years
apart, but what has changed? What
has grown? As I listen, I find an alter-
native.
The band has a good sound. It's
just that their tootsy format doesn't
fit in context with it's country lyrics.
It's message is blurred; however, a
vocal sound that mimics Tom Petty
and Don Henley makes up for the
loss.
The band is composed of five
members: Bobby Houck (lead vocals,
acoustic, harmonica), Smilin' Hank
Futch (electric upright bass, vocals),
Greg Walker (drums and percussion),
Jason Hawthorn (electric and
acoustic guitars), and Jesse Thrower
(percussion). They're from
Charleston, S.C a place that is often
heard of these days, especially for the
roots sound. It's easy to hear how
these guys fall in and out of place
with the sound. They are
Charleston's jigsaw puzzle.
There aren't any songs on Blue
Dogs worth going in depth over. Songs
like "Maria" and "Hope She Rills In
Love" will touch you. They will grab
the inner most tight inside your soul
and make today's rain, tomorrow's
sunshine. Does that sound like too
much?
After listening further, the record
proved to be an ample display of
musicianship. I don't doubt that the
live show these guys put on is amaz-
ing. After all, look at the rating I gave
them for their live disc. It was real. It
was true. It captured the essence of
the band. Unfortunately, the studio
didn't do the same for the Blue Dogs-
It took their life through channels,
through digital processors, and some-
where in the middle the sound was
lost.
You can find that sound again on
Blue Dogs live record, Live at-the Dock
Street Theater. It's an evening in itself.
And its raw material allows the band
to seem more human. Blue Dogs will
be playing at Peasant's Cafe on
Thursday, April 24th. Hopefully, for
the band, the atmosphere will be
intoxicating.
scream
aTfhe
WALL
There is mseUug more useless thou stream-
ine at avail. It's just spittle anil bntis,
brirh amispittle. Hwstvtr, if you put
ntougi mires together, thai Ball might just
be Mam aver. So pin hi another futile
attempt to change the status quo ami
Hsu to a �Stream at the Writ
Get out and buy Texas tickets
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifastyle Ed
Class: Graanate St mint
Major: rugii.h
Hometown: Hrmlersaii, SC
As everyone on campus should know by now, Little Texas and
the Kentucky Headhunted, two popular musical acts that
have earned national distinction, are coming to Minges
Coliseum. Thi& is no small achievement, and we all owe
thanks for the hard work accomplished by the ECU Student
Union Popular Entertainment Committee, the group that
constantly struggles to bring hot acts to our campus.
This group was the force that signed A Tribe Called
Quest, one of the most influential and talented rap acts
around today, to play in Greenville. Unfortunately, that show
fell through due to marry unforeseen problems.
Now, the Kentucky Headhunters and Little Texas show
has a problem of its own, but its one that can be solved by the
ECU community. The show is this Friday, and so far only a lit-
tle more than 500 tickets have been sold. The goal for the
Entertainment Committee is to sell 4,700 tickets, and that's
just to break even. J. Marshall, who works with the
Entertainment Committee, assures that the show will go on
no matter what. Still, I say things have got to improve, and
the entire matter rests in the hands of the ECU student pop-
ulation.
The local music scene has generated a lot of press lately.
There has been a big controversy concerning the lack of
diversity within Greenville's musical choices. The
Entertainment Committee is trying to do something about
it, but it is getting no support from the student body. A Tribe
Called Quest suffered lacking ticket sales, and now history is
repeating itself.
Just for your information, my fellow students, if enough
tickets aren't sold, the bands don't take the loss; we do. The
money will come out of the Entertainment Committee's
pocket, which is money out of ECU's pocket, which is money
out of the student's pocket.
If the student population doesn't start to show interest in
campus events like this (and when I say show interest, I
mean actually participate in the events), then there will no
longer be any events like this.
Just a little over 500 tickets for tomorrow night's Little Texas
(pictured above) show at Minges have been sold. Organizers rued
to sell 4,700 tickets to break even.
PHOTO COURTESY OF STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
I hate to say this, but college is very much like a business.
If ECU can't at least break even with events like the
Kentucky HeadhuntersLirtle Texas show, then ECU will-j
simply stop putting money into it. J
I have heard enough complaining about there being noth-
SEE TEXAS. PAGE 9
T�

Run Away
Can't m Iran atonj Tapa it from a fritnd
Buy itUitd
Pay FuM Prica
Our pathetic addict speaks out
J.AV MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
I've been wanting to do this column for a while, but it always seemed to get pushed to the back burner. Since
I've only got next Tuesday's paper left in my tenure at TEC, I figured I had to get it in today, if at all.
I spend lots and lots and lots of time wasting time. I'm a professional at it. I wrote a little while ago about
my addiction to American Movie Classics and Turner Classic Movies. But that's only the tip of the iceberg.
Let me allow you to Icam how pathetic my obsession with entertainment is. Try not to laugh too hard.
My addictive personality is drawn to many facets of pop culture. They not only control my life, they drive
me. If I didn't have my addictions to keep me going day to day, I'd probably end up being an extremely bored
and angry person. (OK, maybe they're not that seriously in control of my life, but it sure seems that way.)
Besides old movies, I'm addicted to TV crime drama shows like ABC's NYPD Blue and NBC's Law and
Order and Homicide. So addicted that I watch the repeats of Law and Order that come on the A&E cable net-
work everyday at 1 p.m 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. I've also begun catching up on Homicide with the repeats that
are being shown on the Lifetime cable network at 11 p.m. every night. This puts me in a bind because
Howard Stem's E! show and repeats of Star Trek: TheNextGenerationare on at 11 p.m too. I'm just glad noth-
ing's on at the same time as The Simpsons. I don't know what I would do. I could probably manage something,
since I've got two VCRs (one constantly on the fritz, one not).
Because of the two VCR thing, I also spend mucho time bootlegging movies from local video stores - you
know, tape-to-tape, supposedly "illegal" stuff. I'm fascinated by B-movies and I fill up tape after tape with
sexploitation films, blaxploitation films, biker flicks, japanimation, spaghetti westerns, and so on, and so on.
In order to weed through the massive amounts of junk and find the real B-movie gems, I refer constant-
ly to Michael J. Weldon's pair of indescribably bizarre film books, The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film (1983)
and The Psychotronic Video Guide (19). These precious, precious documents of all that is weird in cinema
today compose the bible for the true film fanatic.
Weldon says that films are "Psychotronic" if, "(1) they can commonly be identified by their use of
exploitation elements and their interest in humanity's lowest common denominators; (2) they are particu-
SEE PATHETIC JAV. PAGE 10
Billy the Kid vs. Dracula is just one of the many wacko
flicks to be found in The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of
Rim. Rent it today!
PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEl J. WELDON
Watch out! The summer movie onslaught is coming for you
Dale Williamson
SSISTNT LIFESTYLE EDITOR

Vou can almost feel it in the air. There is a
'throbbing, a thickness, that is almost dis-
comforting. The earth itself seems to be
swelling, as if it is going to burst at any
�moment. Something is about to erupt,
�releasing tons and tons of wasteful goop.
I'm not talking about a volcano,
�although a volcano does play a central part.
Jim referring to the impending summer
movie season, the time of year when many,
'many high profile, big budget studio films
I struggle ro drown rhe competition while
'staying securely afloat. Summer is the
! bloodiest moment in Hollywood's financial
jyear. It is the time to make the big buck
I and worry less about artistic integrity. And
even if you don't see a single film this sum-
! mer, you can't escape this onslaught. W:
1 haven't even hit May yet. and promotions
for summer films are all over the place -
I magazines, TV theater chains, radio, bill-
boards, you name it.
Summer for the movie buff is like a buf-
fet dinner at the local K&W While what
you get may not exactly be gourmet
entrees, you sure do get more than enough
to fill you up.
While independent films may have been
the "in" thing last fall, such will not be the
case once the temperature rises. Complex
stories backed by intriguing characters,
superior performances, believable dialogue
and innovative direction will be pushed
aside to make room for fast-paced action,
explosive special effects and big-name
stars.
While big Hollywood films are not nec-
essarily a bad thing (most of my favorite
films happen to be "big" Hollywood films),
much of what will be released this summer
won't be worth a kernel of popcorn, let
alone $6 for a single ticket. So, in a some-
what biased effort, I will use my psychic
powers and predict which summer films
will be worth seeing and which should sim-
ply be ignored.
I mentioned volcanoes earlier, and iron-
ically enough a volcano is the very thing
that will ignite the summer competition.
Volcano, slated to open this Friday, is the $90
million disaster film starring the master of
witty banter. Tommy Lee Jones. While nat-
ural disaster flicks such as Twister and
Dante's Peak proved to be somewhat fun,
enough is enough. Hollywood has milked
this genre for all its worth, and now all flicks
concerning volcanoes, tornadoes, floods,
earthquakes, etc. should just die.
Speaking of films that should die, I hope
that lituman ami Robin is pronounced DOA
and immediately spirals out of the theaters
to video hell. Why is this film going to fail
miserably, you ask? Let me count the ways:
Arnold Schwarzenegger is Mr. Freeze,
George Clooney is Batman, Joel
Schumacher is directing, Tim Burton has
absolutely nothing to do with the series any
longer, and there are going to be at least
seven key characters confined to a thin
script that will do littie or no justice to any
of them.
SEE SUMMER. PAGE II
No this movie is not
Han Solo vs. Dracula,
it's actually Air Force
One, one of the many
Hollywood blockbuster
films coming thit sum-
mer to screens near
you.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
COLUMBIA PICTURES
� ' "I'N
-





r
9 Thursday, April 24. 1997

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SILVER (A
BULLET M
f�'style
The East Carolinian
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. "A Touch OjCtass"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 7fi-fit27f
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country & Western Night
FRI. & SAT: Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
10 OR MORE GIRL
DANCERS EVERY
NIGHT!
Located S Milt Wast of Greenville on 264 AIL (Behind Aladdin Taxi & Umo Service)"
SKYIAC
k
k
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9811
FRIDAY, APRIL 25
BEGINNING @ 10PM
410 ELIZABETH ST.
(BETWEEN LAMBDA CHI
&PHITAU)
TICKETS: $3 ADVANCE � $5 AT THE DOOR
BYOB
NO GLASS PLEASE!
Call 830-2006 or 752-0319
Children Playing and Three Foot Margin at the Dogwood
Farmville Festival.
Shek Ala Shek and Chubbies at the Lizard & Snake
Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Beat the Reaper at the Cave in Chapel Hill.
Doxy's Kitchen with To The Moon Alice at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
April
24 Thursday
Superstar Larry W�ver with Grasshopper Monkeys at
the Cave in Chapel Hill.
Mark Williams CD release party at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
25 Friday
Jazz Ensemble A, Carroll V Dashiell, Jr director, at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Little Creek, Twist, of Fate, Gravity Overflow, Third of
Never, Dorian Grey, Nameless? and Kelly Smith at the
Dogwood Farmville Festival.
Vbmanne and Gold Sparkle Band at the Lizard & Snake
Cafe in Chape! Hill.
Scott Carpenter and the Real McCoys at the Cave in
Chapel Hill.
The Backsliders with Two Dollar Pistols and Trailer
Bride at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
26 Saturday
Treading Evans, Thomas Brothers, Kernal Goat, Slow
27 Sunday
East Carolina Symphony Orchestra, Stephen
Blackwelder, conductor, at 3 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Bivans Brothers, Steel Genres, Redalia, Homebrew and
Sneaky Pete at the Dogwood Farmville Festival.
Melanie Sparks at the Harvey Mansion in New Bern.
Anna at the Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Norbert Palme with guests from La Pan Dowdies at the
Cave in Chapel Hill.
28 Monday
School of Art Master's Thesis Exhibition reception at 5
p.m. in Gray Gallery. The exhibition will run through May
23 in Gray Gallery.
ECU Steel Orchestra, Mark Ford, director, at 8 p.m. in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Gillian Wfeich and David Rawlings at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
29 Tuesday
Starry Wisdom Band at the Lizard & Snake Cafe in
Chape! Hill.
Tim Stambaugh at the Cave in Chapel Hill.
Texas
continutd from page 8
ing to do in Greenville. You, the stu-
dent, need to stop complaining and
start acting. Support the
Entertainment Committee and its
efforts by participating with the
events. If nothing else, form a collec-
tive voice and let the committee
know exactly what it is you want.
And don't complain about the
prices of the tickets. Tickets for tis
how a only JI5 for student Vmi
can't see any major act for less than
that. And I know for a fact that if you
spend your time at the downtown
bars, you're spending at least $15 a
week on your entertainment.
The failure of these shows is defi-
nitely not the result of laziness on the
part of the Entertainment
Committee. They have done ait they
can to publicize their events. If you
haven't at least seen a fryer for the
HeadhuntersTexas show, ycu simpiy
have not been looking.
We at TEC have said it time and
time again, and I will repeat our plea:
pet acrive with your community and
cumpus. Stop compi.nning and start
acting. Nothing gets down by simply
complaining
If we are ever going to get to a
point where acts are banging on the
door to play here, we've got to start
taking steps to show that we want
them here. Otherwise, Carolina,
Duke and N.C. State are just a couple
hours down the road.
For more information about the
Kentucky HeadhuntersLittle Texas
show, contact the Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall student center
at 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. For
TDD access, call 328-4736.
eastcarolinian
Meed
eoop&uence?
Wanttomafie
djomeeodUa nwtveu
torn rt
aummex?
Then you may be Just the person we are
looking tor. We need your help this summer.
We are now accepting applications for all
positions.
Positions includes
� Staff utHitex&
� Opinion CatumnhJfo,
� 3atagxapAex&
� Qteiaiatd SWaductian
Manage
� friediictien CLdJutant$
� (Iduentfoing, SUpxeAenatweA
?xpeiience
Lifetime
Apply at our office on the second floor or the Student
Publications Building (across from Joyner Library).

-Hnr





r
Thursday. April 24. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Pathetic Jay
continued from page 8
Igrry common at midnight movie festi-
vals, in video stores' cult sections, and
j� drive-ins; (3) their packaging is
commonly deceptive; (4) they almost
always appear on videocassette; (5)
they keep sleepless fans glued to their
TVs and lined up outside revival
-houses in big cities and small towns all
awer the country, and (6) their stars
ate ex-models, ex-sports heroes, dead
tock idols, future presidents, would-
iot Marilyns, or anything starring
Linda Blair. David Carradine,
Shannon Tweed or Drew Banymore
:�� To me, these are the kinds of films
?twant to see, the kinds of films that
make me a "sleepless fan glued to my
TV" So for the money, Weldon's books
invaluable reading material for the
dco maniac.
That brings me to another pathet-
pastime of mine: reading. I read
-constantly. Not only the texts that are
.inquired as part of earning my mas-
�fjer's degree in English, but also read-
-i�g for my own pleasure. 1 am a vora-
cious collector of comic books and I
also spend large cash on various maga-
zines that deal with my ' tried inter-
ests.
As far as funny books are con-
cerned, the industry just recently
�Went through a really bad and uncre-
ative time (as a consequence Marvel
Gomics, the owners of Spider-man
4nd The Rintastic Four, have declared
bankruptcy), but it's on its way back.
'Mostly this resurgence of creativity is
.due to some powerhouse titles like
�$tray Bullets, Sin City, Intact it to Chance
"and Astro City that are published by
independent companies and not the
big two, Marvel and DC.
Stray Bullets and Sin City arc crime
fiction in the very best sense of those
; words. Black and white, harsh and
n, both titles cram more intensity.
violence and sex into their pages than
seems humanly possible. Leave it to
Chance is what I think the penultimate
comic book should be - exciting,
engrossing, "fun, beautiful and clever.
The artwork (by one of my favorites,
Raul Smith) is eloquently sharp and
clear. And the plotline (developed by
Smith and writer James Robinson),
involving the supernatural investiga-
tions of a young female protagonist (a
revolutionary lead character in today's
male-hormone-driven comic market)
named Chance Falconer, is com-
pelling. It has the potential to be one
of the greatest titles ever. Kurt
Busiek's Astro City is an interesting
take on the superhero genre, equal
parts pop cultural study and homage.
I buy some mainstream books, too.
Superhero comics, like jazz and rap
music, are a uniquely American art
form, and I find it a shame that the
medium is still thought of as "just for
kids
Besides comics, I also grab up sev-
eral periodicals every month like CMJ
Musk Monthly, MacAddict, Film Thrrat,
Sri-Fi Universe and Cinescape.
CMJ Musir Monthly is a music-
lover's dream. Not only does it cover
what's new and good in music (with
recommended flicks, reads, 'zines,
web , w,es and local town scenes to
boot), there's also a free CD packed
with good stuff every month. The
HBcnthK CD has turned me on to
some really great bands, and for that I
am utterly grateful. One CD even had
a previously unreleased V&n Morrison
track on it as a promotion for a then
to-be-released collection. The collec-
tion never came out (Van's a wacky
guy) and so the only place you can
find that wonderful ditty of his is on
that CD. All that for $5.
Since I have a Mac computer at
home, I couldn't ask for a better mag
than MacAddict. It comes with a free
CD every month, too. Only it's a CD-
ROM chocked full of shareware,
games, demos, and other stuff to clog
up your hard drive. At $8 an issue, it
n:id!
Expose
iDoNt Forget To Advertee your
ttOUDAY SPECIALS -u
tin The East Carolinian s
To place
ad, call 328-200
might be a bit pricy for the average
student budget, but a year's subscrip-
tion runs $30, which is a steal.
Film Threat is Chris Gore's attack
on the motion picture industry. Not
holding back one iota, Gore and his
staff rip Hollywood a new butt-hole
every month. Acerbic and often cruel,
they cover everything indie, from
directors to actors to new movies. It is
THE source for new alti-film info.
Sri-Fi Universe and Cinesiape both
talk about what skiffy nerds want and
need to know. Together they cover
the Science Fiction and Fantasy gen-
res to the nth degree. 'Nuff said about
them.
So, you would think that my
schedule of nerd-dom was full. Well,
you'd be wrong. I also collect action
figures. Yes, plastic boy toys. It all
began when I was nine years old and
the firsr Star Wars figures came out. I
now buy selected Star Trek, Star Wars,
superhero and sci-fi action figures.
I'm pretty picky, but I still spend too
much on 'em. I've got boxes full of the
stuff. Big spaceships, flying creatures,
motorbikes, guys with swords - all
these can be found in abundance
around my house. It drives my wife
nuts. If I wasn't so damn lovable and
endearing (I don't want to think
about that.)
Where's my life heading? When
will it all end?
My guess is, it won't end. I'll keep
on indulging my addictions. In fact,
I've recently added to my list of
obsessions. I've started collecting
Donald Goines' and Iceberg Slim's
blaxploitation novels from the '70s.
Also, I found a new monthly magazine
to purchase. Straight No Chaser - it's a
world jazz mag from England. Way
hip! And I won't even mention my
recent bout of Legomania.
See, compared to me your life ain't
that pathetic. So cheer up. Ar least
you can still slide downhill in your life.
Me, I'm stuck at the bottom, looking
up. At least I've got stuff to occupy mv
time.
MATCH POINT
Always keep a shovel,
rake and water nearby
when burning debris.
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.

n
IT



if
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rt
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I
I
DJs needed for summer.
Apply today at the WZMB office
in the basement of Mendenhall
Student Center.
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
VILLAGE GREEN APARTMENTS
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i






11 Thursday. April 24. 1997
11
;tie
would Like to
Thank
ian
all of the following Contract Advertisers for their Support
A Matter of Taste
All Campus Media
American Passage
ARAMARK Dining
Bicycle PostOutpost
Blue Region Scuba
Book Warehouse
Bowen Cleaners
BW-3
Campus MCI
Carolina Pizza & Pasta
Carolina Pregnancy
Carolina Sky Sports
CD Alley
' Checkers
Chico's
China Buffet
Court side Cafe
EastbrookVillage
Green
Little Caesar's Pizza
Marathon Restaurant
Mobile Music
Nail Salon
Elbo
tl -l.oro
Northwestern Mutual
Nostalgia Newsstand
Onyx Corporation-
Endless Summer Tour Overton'sMarket Smart
ox 8 & -14
GMR
Harris Teeter
iff rev's Beer &Win'
Geor
Pantana Bob's
Pantry, The
Peking Palace
Professor O'Cools
Remco East
Ringgold Towers
Silver Bullet
Sports Pad
Spring Break Travel
Steve Briley Aut
Student Swap Shop
i"ar River Estates,
Target
Texas Two Step
UBE
Wlson Acres Apartments
Underwater Cafe
Jiffy Lube
Pitt Property
Player's Club
monks Again for:your.
support.
hEHdfliX FiLMS
tMURSDAV, JJP�il- 2M
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For a Free 16oz Fountain Drink
with any purchase. NEW! Popcorn Will
Be Available at The Spot for All Showings!
FAiDAV, OPfliL 25
SATUflDAV, QPfliT- 26
For'More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff.
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
"JOHN TRAVOLTA'S PORTRAYAL
OF A MISCHIEVOUS
ANGEL PUTS THE FILM
ON ITS TOES AND SETS
IT SPINNING
-natal homni. mw vmk Tares
"TRAVOLTA IS A FUNKY DELIGHT
- OnM tana, NCWSWCEK
i MICHAEL' IS A WITTY, ROMANTIC
FABLE. JOHN TRAVOLTA IS AT
THE PEAK OF HIS POWERS
- dmirtl TMR. LOS MKIES mres
MICHAEL
(Sd - sacf" P0 raw SEW USE cinbuJJ
����
You re smart. Have fun.
Me the money and run.
Take a fully interactive road trip with the new Ford Escort �2 on www lord com
The new 1998 Ford Escort CaL
While there mav be lots of good deals out there for smart
people, this one is available only to coileoe seniors and grad
students Get $400 cash back toward the purchase or $650
cash back toward the Red Carpet lease (or Red Carpet Option)
of any eligible Ford or Mercury Smart going And that includes
the endting new Ford Escort 2X2 a terrific way to grab lite by
the wheel. Big tun. For more College Graduate Purchase Program
into, cat) 1-800-321-1536 or visit the Web at www.tord.com
�To Se eligible, you iraa graduate witti an associate's Of bachelors degree between 101 95 and 1 M8
j-adiate school You must purchase orlease youf new uerncle between i 4 W
t , � and vehicle eligibility restrictions apply See your dealer tor details
College Graduate Purchase Program
Mercury
The East Carolinian
Summer
continued Itom page 8
And Batman is not the ni super-
hero who stands to embarrass him-
self on the big screen. Two popular
comic characters will be restructured
for live action entertainment when
Spawn and Steel are both released to
theaters across the nation. While
both heroes are somewhat interest-
ing within the comic genre, my
money says that their film adapta-
tions will make Batman and Robin look
like The Godfather of spandex.
And if that isn't bad enough for
you. Isavr It To Reaver will grace the
silver screen in August. Unless a
visionary like Stanley Kubrick or
Quentin Tarantino is helming this
film. I don't have to say how lacking
our friend the Beaver will be on the
big screen.
There will be shades of gray this
summer. Several big films focusing
on adventure and special effects
could prove effective, but lackluster
scripts could kill them. Lost World.
the sequel to Jurassic Park, will more
than likely thrill audiences because
Steven Spielberg is once again
directing his dinosaurs, but the story
may be a carbon copy of the original
film. Men In Rlaek will be powered by
the star power of Tommy Lee Jones
and Will Smith and the quirkiness of
director Barry Sonnenfeld, but alien
invasions may be becoming a tired
concept. And Speed 2: Cruise Control
benefits from not having Keanu
Reeves, but the action this time
take place on a cruise ship, which
doesn't call for much more speeding.
Those films that stand the best
chance of actually being good all
revolve around the talent involved.
Air hone One has Harrison Ford back
in action mode as he goes head to
head with villain (jlity Oldman. With
direction by Wolfgang Peterson (
The Line Of Fire) and a strong sup-
porting cast, including (ilenn Close.
Air hone One could be this summer's
thinking person's action movie. i
The Fifth Element has a story hid-
den in secrecy (nobody seems to
know exactly what this film is about),
but the special effects simply look
amazing. However, the big selling
point of this film is the fact that it is
directed by Luc Besson. the man
who made The Professional, an action
film with style and class. Add Bruce
Willis, who has been impressive late-
ly with tough guy roles in films like
12 Monkeys and Last Man Standing, and
vou've got the makings of a science
fiction masterpiece.
I will finish off the list with hiae
Off. the newest film by Hong Kong
master filmmaker. John Woo. While
Woo has mainlv focused his films on
the action genre, this film, starring
John Travolta and Nicholas Cage,
looks to be a delving character study
about a man obsessed with tracking
down a killer. Personally, I can't wait
to see it.
This is, admittedly, a concise lis�.
I couldn'r mention everything.
There is, like I said, just too much
out there. Remember, the films men-
tioned here are all major studio
releases. If history repeats itself (and
I'm sure it will), the test films will all
be smaller, independent productions
that just slip through the cracks. -1
Still, there will be more than
enough playing at our local theaters,
so have a good summer. .And try ft)
squeeze a book in between your
movies. It cleanses the mind.
We knead someone to
corect hour
misteaks. We need a copy
editor.
Apply at our office.on
the.Second Floor of the
Student Pubs. Buifdine.
�g7
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1
12 Thursday. April 24, 1997
i ft-style
The East Carolinian
CHEM. BROTHERS
continued from page 8
"Setting Sun which you've most
likely heard if you've watched MTV
once in the past six months, is up
next, with its screaming alarms and
extremely catchy drum and bass cen-
terpiece. It's a great song to watch car
commercials to, and features a vocal by
Noel Gallagher of Oasis. It's the only
song on the album with traditional
lyrics.
"It Doesn't Matter" follows with
its stripped-down, almost housey beat
that has been married to a decon-
structed repetition of the song title
and a methodical, mechanical bass
drone. It sounds like HAL 9000 after
Dave pulled all his memory tapes in
ZOOt.
"Don't Stop The Rock" is almost
like Aphex Twin in its purely synthet-
ic sound bank, like a Fisher Price toy
gone berserk. It gets a bit trancey as
well. It's one of the few songs on the
album that doesn't undergo dynamic
and radical transformations. It blends
right into the brief and psychotic "Get
Up On It Like This" which features
some regal synthetic horn arrange-
ments a la James Brown and some wild
scratching.
"Lost in The K-hole" sounds like
what would happen if Brian Eno had
been making beats for Grandmaster
Flash. The beat is layered with ethe-
real bell sounds and disembodied voic-
es whispering half-phrases all in front
of a Tinkerbell glitter-fuzz sound that
oscillates from speaker to speaker.
The song breaks down to almost noth-
ing and then becomes "Where Do I
Begin an ambient number built
around an acoustic guitar sample. It
features a pretty melody sung by Beth
Orton. As she sings, more and more
sounds are woven into the song until it
becomes more lively, but still some-
how manages to keep its low-key
ambient feel. About three quarters of
the way through the song it becomes
lethingelse entirely and then fades
to nothing.
The album's last song is "The
Private Psychedelic Reel" which again
begins with an ambient feel to it, but
slowly builds up into a rousing coda to
the album. The song covers itself in
inspirational guitar noodles, passing
airplane sounds, Doctor Who effects,
and even a moving clarinet m�Io.
Ifway through the song, it too trans-
s into something completely dif-
rent but somehow the same, and
then quickly returns to the ufipnul
beat for a soaring finale that deserves
fireworks and laser lights.
Student paid to
play video games
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Sale Begins Wednesday, April 23,1997
VISA
KIJOE RYOH
KNlnHT-RIIMIF.ilTRiai NF. NEWS SFRVICF.
Kansas University student Stevie Case has turned playing a computer game
into a profitable business adventure.
A junior majoring in political science. Case pays for her tuition from the
$1,250 she makes every three months demonstrating the 6-D game controller
for Spacetec IMC. of Lowell, Mass.
"I've played video games since I was small said Case. "And ever since I
started at KU, I've really started to understand computers and I'm getting
interested in them more and more every day, all through playing the games
Case named herself "KillCreek" after her favorite Lawrence band,
KillCreek, and it's the name of a creek near her home.
Case traces her fame and fortune in the computer game industry to a game
tailed Quake on the Internet. She became so good at Quake, she beat the game's
creator.
"I went to Dallas with some friends and was able to play John Romero, of id
Software, one of the creators ofQuakr" she said. "I lost the first game but won
the rematch, and word got around
All the way to Massachusetts, that is.
Adam Bosnium, vice president of marketing for Spacetec, said the company
started a program a year ago called GamrMasrr, gathering well-known Internet
game players to become the company's spokespersons, o. 'Michael Jordans
Spacetec develops, manufactures and markets 3-D and 6-D motion control
input devices and software. Case demonstrates the company's SpaceOrb 360
game controller.
Controllers are hand-held devices that attach to your computer keyboard.
Players use them to manipulate the game software on the computer screen.
"We started the program a year ago with five well-known men game players
and two months ago realized there were a lot of women playing the game as
well Bosnium said. "We did a search and found out about Case beating one of
Quakr's designers
In her spare time away from the Internet and classes. Case creates and
designs new levels for Quakr.
"I would love to become a level designer, designing the levels of the games
she said. "You would actually get paid fantastic money for playing a game
The excitement makes her wish she could change her major.
"If there was a way ! could switch my major and still get out of school in a
reasonable amount of time, I would Case said. "But I've always enjoyed polit-
ical science and hope to bring the technology I've learned with me
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' �





r
NCAA reinstates 5-second rule
KANSAS CITY, Ma (AP) - Four seasons after abandoning college basketball s
eloserv guarded rule, the NCAA is overturning itself.
The men's basketball rules committee voted Tuesday to reinstate the 5-sec-
ond count beginning new season. They said that, instead of enlivening offen-
sive play, as intended, dropping the rule reduced shots and tended to make
� games less exciting. �
?. "We don't announce vote totals, but I can tell you it was not close, said
'Larry Keating, committee chairman. . , .
Under the rule, an offensive player may not dribble the ball more than five
seconds if a defender is within six feet of him. The offensive player must shoot
or pass or be called for a turnover.
The concern has been that the flow of the game hasnt been as good and
the game doesn't look as good Keating said.
�TTie group felt pretty strongly this was one of the reasons why, Keating
said. "By putting it back in, we hope to get teams more into an offensive flow
rather than having one player dominate up front
During a two-day meeting ending Tuesday, the committee also voted to
require most preseason tournaments next year to use a 40-second shot clock,
instead of a 35-second shot clock. ,
This will be mandatoryfbr most preseason tournaments that begin before
Dec. 1, including the Maui Classic, the Great Alaska Shootout and :he presea-
son NIT.
Tracy Lausach
SENIOR WRITER
Senior Richie Creech marked the end
of not only the 1997 season, but also
his career as a golfer at ECU with a lot
of pride, a lot of class and a first place
individual victory at the CAA
Championships. The tournament was
hosted at the Lane Tree Golf Club
last weekend.
Creech said the key to overcoming
several challenges he has faced in his
college career was focusing on intense
physical training and a tough mental
attitude.
"I decided that if ! was gonna do
something great, now was the time to
do it Creech said.
A three-year member of Barton
College's golf team, Creech came to
ECU as a senior this year, determined
to play at the Division I level. He was
also interested in playing for a full
time coach, something that Barton
College lacked.
"Playing at a Division I school has
pushed my game to a level it never
would have reached at Barton
Creech said.
Creech headed into the champi-
onship looking for a win, but was a bit
surprised when he actually found it.
After day one, he stood in a tie for fifth
place. Day two put a more confident
and better focused player on the
green, and by day three Creech saw
himself as a contender for the victory
for which he had worked so hard. He
birdied the 18th hole to claim a one-
stroke victory over Reg Millage of
Virginia Commonwealth.
"The morning before the tourna-
ment, I wrote myself a note telling
myself that I deserved to win
Creech said. "In so many tourna-
ments, I ended up second best, and I
was determined to go out there and
give it my all
Head Coach Kevin Williams said
that if anyone out there deserved to
win, it was definitely Creech.
"It was so exciting to see Richie
pull it all together and play so well
because he has made so many sacri-
fices to play for ECU Williams said.
"It was a very emotional win because
all of us know how much Creech
deserved it
Overall, Creech is pleased with the
team's success this season. He
expects that Kevin Miller, the team's
only rising senior, will step up to lead
his teammates next year. In the
future, the team will be focusing on
maintaining consistency.
"Everyone on the team stepped up
and played great at different times
during the season Creech said. "In
golf, a little here and a little there can
make a big difference
Creech is looking forward to finish-
ing school this summer, at which time
he plans on looking back and evaluat-
ing his career as an athlete. Regardless
of what his future holds, he is sure he
will always be involved somehow in
the golf world.
"Golf is about hard work and
determination. You can't expect too
much to happen too quickly because
the key to success is patience
Creech said.
Patience, along with dedication
and personal sacrifice are what have
led Creech up the ladder of success.
Victories that are well earned, such as
this one, are what have made his
efforts worthwhile.
Martina Hingis has surgery for knee
hurt in fail from horse
ZURICH, Switzerland (AP) - Martina Hingis, the world's No. 1 women's ten-
nis ptayer, had arthroscopic surgery today to repair a knee injury suffered in a
fall from a horse. She will be out at least three weeks, her mother said.
"So far it is certain that Martina will have to miss Hamburg, Rome and
Berlin said Mefanie Molitor, who abo is Hingis' coach.
The German Tennis federation confirmed that Hingis had pulled out of the
Hamburg tournament that starts April 28.
It is possible that she also may have to miss the Rench Open from May 26
to June 8, Molitor said.
Hingis was hurt as Steffi Graf, whom the Swiss 16-year-old dethroned as No.
1, was recovering from her own knee injury and planning a comeback, in the
mid-May tournament in Berlin.
Hingis' absence won't affect the standings immediately. She has a 771-point
lead over Graf.
The Blick reported that Hingis got up and laughed off her fall Monday from
the horse, which belongs to a friend. But the next day she was unable to
straighten her left leg. .� .
Hingis was then examined by specialists near her home in Truebbach in
eastern Switzerland on Tuesday.
Today's arthroscopic surgery repaired a partly torn ligament, Molitor said,
but she didn t disclose where the operation was performed or whether Hingis
remained hospitalized.
Last January, Hingis escaped injury when she fell from a horse in Australia
before going on to win the Australian Open.
Molitor has previously insisted that Hingis have as normal a life as possible
and continue to enjoy her passions for horse jumping and roller blading in spite
of any risk to her career.
Owner takes second look at Raleigh area
RALEIGH (AP) - Hartford Whalers owner Peter Karmanos says he may decide
between Columbus, Ohio, and Raleigh as a new home for his team before
Columbus residents vote on arena funding next month.
Karmanos, who arrived in Raleigh Tuesday for three days of meetings to
scout the area a second time, abo visited Raleigh two weeks ago. He was in
Columbus earlier this week.
Columbus voters will decide May 6 on a three-year, half-cent sale tax
increase that would generate $192 million of the $277 million needed to build
a sports complex with the arena and a soccer stadium.
But Karmanos said the choice could come in advance of the vote.
! "Hopefully, we'll be abie to make the decision before he saimanews
Conference in Raleigh. "The assumption is (the lefeteliduWfrisill pas WeH�y
.to make an objective evaluation and make the decision at soon as possible
Karmanos praised the people of the Raleigh-Durham area and the television
market. But he also mentioned several links to Columbus. His wife's family is
from a Columbus suburb. Karmanos' Compuware Co. has an office in
Columbus.
But the owner, who is leaving Hartford after failing to reach an acceptable
deal on a new arena there, said he's not "trying to pit Raleigh against
Columbus. We're just trying to see what deals the cities are offering and make
our decision
If the Whalers moved to North Carolina, the team could play at the
Greensboro Coliseum until a new arena in Raleigh is completed. Karmanos told
Columbus leaden he could transform an old McDonnell Douglas aircraft man-
ufacturing plant into a temporary arena.
Matchup of point guards will be key to Heat-Magic
l:
senes
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - There's nothing to debate as far as the Miami Heat
and Orlando Magic are concerned.
They will tell you the best all-around point guard in the Eastern Conference
is named Hardaway. The only argument is whether it's Tim or Penny.
"You're talking about two exceptional players Orlando coach Richie
Adubato said. "Very different styles. But very, very effective
Tim is Miami's 30-year-old floor leader, a three-time All-Star who has res-
cued a career that was in decline because of injuries. At 25, Penny's one of the
NBA's most popular young star a gifted big man who plays a little man's posi-
tion.
One likes to penetrate and break down defenses when he's not launching 3-
pointers from the perimeter. The other uses his size to post up smaller defend-
ers and can be caught most nights finishing moves to the basket with highlight-
film dunks.
� Hardaway vs. Hardaway figures to be one of the keys to the first-round play-
' off series between the Heat and Magic that begins Thursday night at Miami
Arena.
Then again, maybe not.
"It's a nice matchup, but it doesn't always happen because they don't guard
.Penny with Tim Hardaway Adubato said. "They'll play him on either Nick
'Anderson or Dennis Scott and probably play a bigger guy on Penny
The Heat concede as much, acknowledging that Dan Majerle, Keith Askins
and Jamal Mashbum probably will spend as much time on 6-foot-7 Penny as
? ix-foot Tim.


TRMAtime
Name last seasons teams that led in offense
and defense in both the east and west.
omo (taq) Vims Cm)" wffO
CONCENTRATION
Tennis season closes at CAA tournamen
Michelle Clayton hopes she and hat
track teammates fare wefl at the
fain Relays this weekend.
HMTO COUHTiST Of ECU SIP
TRCY LAUBACH
SENIOR WRITER
ECU'S men's and women's tennis season came to a close
last weekend with the men garnishing a fourth place finish
while the women finished fifth. The tournament was held
in Norfolk.
In a battle for third place, the Pirates faced the men
from William & Mary. While ECU posted wins at the num-
ber three and five single positions, the Tribe claimed vic-
tory at the number four and six spots.
The Pirate's number three singles player, Kenny Kirby,
defeated W&M's Trevor Spracklin 6-1, 7-5. Brett Rowley,
playing number five singles for ECU, came out on top 6-2,
7-5 over the Tribe's Steve Williams.
In handing over a 4-2 victory to W&M, ECU closed out
the season with a 14-11 overall record. The Pirates
improved their final conference standings for the year, as
they finished one notch better than they did in 19 at the
tournament.
Rowley, a junior from Ft. Lauderdale. said the season
had its ups and downs, but overall, he is satisfied with the
progress made by the team.
At the tournament, we faced Virginia Commonwealth,
ranked eighth in the nation, in the second round Rowley
said. "If we would have had better seeding, we may have
had a chance to play more teams and advance further in the
race for a conference title
Regardless, Rowley said, the team was looked at differ- d
entry at this year's championship because the Pirates were
stronger this season than they have been in the past. He
expects that the experience gained this year will put an
intense, compe itive team out on the court next year.
"The team needs to be more combined, and learn to
work better together, because we are such a young team
Rowley said. "The longer we work together as a group, the .
better our team chemistry will be ,
The women's tennis team made a strong conference .
showing as well. Singles wins were posted by Anne Svae,
Mona Eck, and Gina MacDonald at number one, three,
and five respectively.
At number one, Svae downed UNC Wilmington's Jill ,
Pertsch 6-1, 6-1, while the Seahawks' number three, ,
Wendy Kulp, handed a 6-2, 7-5 victory to Lady Pirate Eek.
MacDonaid defeated Vara Hartley at the number five spot,
6-3 6-3.
In doubles play, all three of ECU's teams came out on ,
top. Eek and Svae defeated Pulp and Pertsch (8-1), while ,
Cohen and Catherine Morgan edged out UNCWs Hartley
and Kelly Knowles (8-3).
The women posted a fifth place conference finish at
the tournament after a 5-3 victory over the Seahawks. The .
finish helped the Lady Pirates improve their record to a j
final 15-11 for the season.
Next year's teams will have a few seniors to lead the �
path to victory, something the tennis crew lacked this year.
More experience, along with dedication from talented ath- .
letes from around the world will help the teams to domi-
nate in the future.
Freshman proves lightning fast at meet
MIKE DANISKA
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's men's track and field team
threw it into high gear chis past week-
end at the CAA championships held at
UNC-Wilmington. The team finished
strong thanks in part to a strong show-
ing by freshman standout Derrick
Ingram. Ingram won the 200 meter
sprint with a time of 21.20 and the
400 meter sprint with a time of 46.73.
Ingram is also the anchor leg on the 4
x 100 meter and the second leg on the
4 x 400 meter relays
"I knew that I had a chance to win
the 200 and the 400 Ingram said.
"There was a dude from Virginia
Commonwealth who was pretty good,
but we were all good. A lot our com-
petition was between our own team-
mates
Both times were also personal
bests for Ingram, who was named
Athlete of the Meet.
"Our goal was to see if we could
win every sprint meet, the 100, 200
and 400 meter events Head Track
Coach Bill Carson said. "I thought
that Darrick could win the 200 and
the 400, and he did
While most attention in a sport like
track finds itself aimed at individuals,
team play is also important.
"I felt very proud of myself after
each event Ingram said. "But I was
also happy for the team because the
main goal was for the team's success
Ingram hails from Lumberton.
where he was selected as
Southeastern Conference runner of
the year in both 1995 and 1996.
Ingram was heavily recruited by UNC,
as well as other schools.
"1 saw him as a junior and started
recruiting him Carson said. "I
worked as hard on him as anyone
else
One of the more difficult transi-
tions to collegiate running is that
everyone is fast. Part of Ingram's suc-
cess in tackling the stronger competi-
Darrick Ingram
tion is
derived
from a hard
work ethic
"He works
good
Carson
said. "As he
gets more
mature and
stronger,
he will be
able to run
a little
faster.
Right now, he is unable to workout as
hard as say, senior Dwight Henry, but
his workouts are good
Ingram has continued to impress
his veteran head coach all through the
year.
"He is the fastest freshman that I
have ever had in the relay Carson
said. "He could well be the as good an
athlete as we have ever had
So far the season has been going all
right for Darrick and his teammates.
The 4 x 400 relay team is ranked fifth
in the nar oa and everyone is running
good.
"I at. doing better than I thought I
would 'ngram said. "Also, just about
everyone else's times are going down
One of die next steps in Ingram's
career will be the NCAA's held in
Bloomington, Ind. Fellow freshman
standout James Alexander will also
make the journey. Coach Carson also
plans to take Ingram to St. Louis in
June for the Junior Nationals in June
where he has a good chance of making
the team.
After college, Ingram is considering
a pro career, as well as loftier but
attainable goals.
"First I want to try the Pro Track
Ingram said. "But the Olympics are
my ultimate goal
ECU's coaching staff is right
behind him.
"As far as the Olympics go, he
should be thinking as far ahead as he
can Carson said.
Swimmers look to continue success with new recruits
AMANDA ROSS
SIORTS EDITOR
The swim season may be over, but
Head Coach Rick Kobe is hard at work
preparing for next year.
This year the ECU women won
their third consecutive CAA title this
year, while the men came in third
place at the CAA meet. Kobe was
proud of his team and believes their
success will continue into next season
with the returning members and the
new recruits.
"This year was awesome Kobe
said. "The girls finished 8-2, and the
guys finished 9-1 and that's 17-3 and
that's very, very strong We were real
happy
For Kobe and the women, winning
another championship next season
would put them atop of the CAA his-
tory books.
"The girls winning their third
straight championship ties the record
of James Madison in the mid 80's�
they won three in a row Kobe said.
"So if we can win four that would
make us the most dominant team in
the history of CAA swimming
The recruiting process has brought
five swimmers and two divers to ECU
for the women, and they will help
replace five seniors who
will be leaving the cham-
pionship team due to
graduation.
Kobe believes there
will still be a strong
nucleus of girls who can
compete for another
CAA title with the
returning swimmers and
the newcomers.
"We're losing five
girls and we'll have
everyone else coming
back including kids that
didn't make the champi-
onship team that could
make it next year. The
good news is that we
have already signed five
good girls and two
divers, and we anticipate
signing two more girls
Of the seven women
who have signed, only
one hails from North
Carolina, while others
come from as far away as Texas and
New York. The seven new girls signed
are as follows:
Samantha Perry, from Mclean, Va
a junior national qualifier for the 100
arid 200 brcaststroke; Alicia Harris,
one of the top breaststrokers in North
Carolina from Marion; Tracey
Ormand, a top distance freestyle
The women's swim team won their third consecutive CAA title earlier this year and will look to another
title next year with the incoming freshman class.
PHOTO COURTESY RICK KOBE
swimmer in South Carolina from
Goose Creek; Cammy Crossen from
Montgomery, Ala a junior national
qualifier in the 100 and 200 fly; Kelly
Quinn, one of the top flyers in Texas
from Austin.
The two divers are Leigh Ann
Mullay from Paramus, N.J. and Sarah
Raymond from Ballston Spa, N.Y
As far as the men's swim team,?
Kobe said they lost some excellent!
seniors, however a strong recruiting;
class will help rebuild those lost swim-1
mers.
"On the guys side, we lost some
really good seniors�nice kids�but!
SEE SWIM. PAGE 15
ALSO SEE CHART UNDER JUMP

�- �-
p





I
14 Thursday. April 24. 1997
snorts
The East Carolinian
Men's basketball team honored at banquet
Junior forward Raphael Edwards, who paced the ECU men's basketball team in scoring and rebounding this past season, was named the Pirates out-
standing plaver'ir 1996-97 at the annual awards banquet held Tuesday night. . ' . , n. � � o t a .
In addition to being tabbed The Daily bfkrtor Most Outstanding Player, the 6-7 Edwards also was recognized as the Most Outstandmg Reboander an
award sponsored by King Sandwich. Edwards, a native of Brooklyn, NX averaged 13.2 points and 6.6 rebounds per game in his first season at ECU after
transferring from Kilgore (Texas) OHtmsunJiy College. Edwards earr . . , �,rt �, �
A pair of seniors were also among the Pirates honored Tuesday Forward Ttm Basham, who fimshed his career writ 1,039'porno (17ih on the all-ame
ECU scoring list) was named the recipient of the Brown & od Outstanding Defensive Player. Center Jonathan ferner, whose final season at ECU was
cut short because of a fractured hand, was tabbed the winner of the Heart of the Rratc award, sponsored by Bnt Cjuzens Bank. Kerners Aems
third leading scoring at 9.1 points and also averad 4.6 rebounds. He had started SO consecutive games since coming to ECU front Florida State before his
STS�t"S2d Tony Parham was flamed the recipient of the WNCPm Outstanding Free Throw Shooter. The 6-2 Parham connected on 74 of 92
srafomtllir�form4f�rcent,wh -��, rk-jw. w, r�.
Center Alpbons van lerland, who was red-sfct�ed in �-97, was rafised the team's Most Improved Player for last season. The 7-fooet from Oie
Netherlands will pfey his first game at �CU'tftftttttffibet. . v,
. Senior manager Chad Williams of Elraabeth City also was recognised, earning the team's Srxth Man Award, sponsored by Doug and Lmda Byrd.
The Piratesfinished the seiison 17-10 overag aftd $-7 k CM pfey ���� die conference standings
Communications Majors
The ECU Athletic Department's
Media Relations Office is seeking to hire
enthusiastic student assistants for the
1997-98 academic year, preferably
rising sophomores or juniors
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable
experience in the field of communications.
If interested, call the media relations office
at 328-4522 to set up an appointment.
SPORTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
East Carolina men's soccer coach
Will Wiberg has announced his 1997
recruiting class. The Pirate incom-
ing class is made up of two players
from North Carolina, one from New
York and one from Arizona.
Charlotte native Scott Pokorney
heads up the Pirates' newcomers.
Pokorney, who played forward for
East Mecklenburg High School and
sweeper for the Charlotte Park
Sharon Soccer Club in '96, earned a
spot on the all-state squad last year.
He was also named all-region as well
as All-Southwestern Conference in
his senior season. He helped lead
East Mecklenburg HS to the state
championship game after scoring a
team-high 17 goals and adding nine
assists in '96. He is also a member of
the North Carolina Olympic
Development Program Team and
was named Who's Who Among
American High School Students.
"Scott possesses excellent physi-
cal attributes and good speed and
size Wiberg said. "He is a very ver-
satile player who can address a num-
ber of our needs. He is both a pol-
ished defender as well as a proven
finisher
Another North Carolina native
joining the Pirates next season is
Cary's Nick Errato, an outside mid-
fielderback from Athens Drive HS.
Errato was an All-Cap Seven
Conference pick and an Honorable
Mention all-region selection in '96
after scoring two goals and dishing
out five assists. He plays club soccer
with Raleigh Green Caps '78 squad
and has won six state championships
with the club. Errato is also a mem-
ber of the North Carolina Olympic
Development Program Team.
"Nick has a tremendous work
rate Wiberg commented. "He is
very poised and he plays under con-
trol with the ball. He has excellent
speed and he distributes the ball
exceptionally well
Also joining the Pirates in '97 is
West blip, N.Y. native Zach
Baldwin. This midfielder scored 11
goals and notched 32 assists for the
East Meadow Bullets club team in
'95. He was named to All-Suffolk
County team after his senior season
in which he scored three goals and
had seven assists. He is a member of
the New Yotk Olympic
Development Program Team and
played on the Long Island Empire
State Games team.
"Zach has a great ball handling
savvy Wiberg said. "He will help
provide depth at the center mid-
field position. Zach has a strong left
foot, excellent vision on the field
and he plavs the possession game
well
The fourth player to join the
Pirates is goalkeeper George Meek.
The Glendale, Ariz, native was
named to the all-state squad after
compiling a 13-1-1 record and a 0.60
goals against average in his senior
campaign. In his varsity career.
Meek posted a 44-8-4 record with a
0.61 GAA He was a member of the
'96 state championship team and
was named all-region.
"George will help solidify our
goalkeeper position Wiberg said.
"He gives us additional depth at a
very important position. He has
great hands and good instincts
The Pirates will kick off their
1997 season on August 31, when
they play Elon College here in
Greenville.
Your used books
could take you to
Bahamas.
It's easy-come by the Alpha Phi Sorority house at the bottom of
College Hill, or stop in our store on Cotanche Street. Sell your books
for the best prices and register to win a Bahamas vacation.
Plus! Free phone cards & special Little Caesars Pizza coupons!
little Caesars
At the Alpha Phi House
April 29, May 1,2,4-8
9am- 5pm
516 S.Cotanche Street � Uptown Greenville � 758-2616 � http:www.ubeinc.com







The East Carolinian
15 Thursday. April 24, 1997
uefr4
Each way with roimdtrip purchase
NYNEWARK
PHILADELPHIA
WASHINGTON D.CNATL
�'
�od? svcy sw'tft mundtrip purchase
STEWARTNEWBURGH
NEW YORK (LGA)
WEST PALM BEACH
StVftfc
fad? w(y with roundirip purchase
HARTFORD
FT. LAUDERDALE
TAMPAST. PETE
Just a reminder:
Once you graduate,you'll only get
10 vacation days a year.
Take advantage of summer vacation while you still have it. For reservations,
call your travel professional or 1-800-44-MIDWAY.
IRLINI
FEEL
L IK E
F L YIN -GAG A I
Swim
continued front page 13
the recruiting class we're bringing
in includes five really good guys. 1
mean great guys Kobe said. "So
we're excited about their poten-
tial
Two of the five men are from
across the globe coming from
Finland and Germany.
Toumas Terasvouri. a member of
the Finish National Team in
Finland; Dennis Lampe. a member
of the German National Team;
Jacob Hartsell, one of the top back-
strokers and individual medley
swimmers in North Carolina from
Salisbury; Jarret Martin, a junior
national qualifier in the 100 and 200
fly from Dobson, N.C and Cor.y
Foust. one of the top individual
medley swimmers in Texas from
Woodlands.
In this year's championship
meet, the guys came from fifth
place during tbe meet to finish in
third. Kobe feels the men could
contend for the title next season.
"The guys could be in the hunt
next year Kobe said. "We came
from fifth to third and now we are
going to work on making our way
back up to the top
Kobe says a third place finish
shouldn't fool people. The men
swam their hardest but were just
beat out by depth.
"They probably out swam every
team there, without a doubt. We
were the best swimming team. We
did not have the depth to win. But
the guys we had there were the
best. But to win a championship
meet, you have to have a lot of qual-
ity depth and we weren't quite
there yet
ECl" records were broken by
both teams. The women set seven
varsity records and eight freshmen
records and the men set two varsity
records and one freshman record.
(See chart below.)
"It was truly a record breaking
vear Kobe said. "Swimming has
developed a reputation of always
having a good team and next year
will not be an exception. All these
kids coming in here are national
type kids and will score some big
points for us
WatJIMl'lViUMdMi
SETTING YEAR FOR THE
SWIM TEAM AND THEY
HOPE
TO CONTINUE THE PACE
WITH THE NEW
RECRUITS SIGNEtt
VARSITY RECORDS (WOMEN)
Casey Sloan, 500.1000,
1650,400IM
Cindy Ciswson. 200 fM
Sandra Ossman, 100 Fly
Amanda Atkinson. Kp Fields,
! Sandra Ossmanand Meianie
Mackwoofj. 400MR
FRESHMEN RECORDS
Casey Sloan, 500,1000,
� 1650. 400IM
Cindy Clawsen, 20tT IM.
Hoitie Butler, 100 6 200 Free
Teresa Hoekman, Adrtenne
Crass, Boliie Butler and Robyn
; Wiitiford, 400 Free Relay
VARSITY RECORDS (MEN!
Brandon Tilley, 200 Breast
Patrick Kestef, 100 Breast
v? i
j FRESHMAN RECORD (MEN)
i. Daniel Fuller, 1650 Free
eastcarolinian
A
Sportswriters
Paradise!
frictions: College ID required for purchase. All fares are each way from RaleighDurham in Coach, based on a round-trip purchase and are subject to change without notice.
SHust bepunrhased'at least 7 days in advance, and within 24 hours of making reservations, but no later than 51897 hares valtd or travel evej, day-thru 82797
except from Florida 42497-42997. Sat. night stay required in all destinations. Seats are limited and may not be available on every flight every day. Tickets are non
SdablehoweS, changes can be made for $50, pbs applicable fare difference. Up to $3-$6 Passenger r3Cility Charges per person, not included. Other restricts apply.
Coma by and fill out an application at
The East Carolinian offices in the
Student Pub Building.





V
Thursday. April 2. 1997
I
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SUBLEASE 2 BR DOCKSIDE
available May 19 $625month. Please
call Robin 758-9205.
ROOMMATES WANTED TO
SHARE 4 bedroom house near cam-
pus and downtown. $200 monthly in-
cludes: Power, water, heat, AC, washer
dryer. Lease is negotiable. Prefer non-
smoker 328-6938.
$375 FOR ENTIRE SUMMER!
May 12 to Aug. 1. Roommate to share
2 bedroom 1 12 bath E. 5th Street
townhouse w1 other female. Call 758-
$569.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouscs. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP!
2 bedroom 1 12 bath on ECU bus ro-
ute. Rent is $190 12 utilities and
i phone. Call Pat at 757-2725.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED TO SHARE 3bedroom2bath
house on 4th and Elm. $200month
13 utilities, beginning June 1st. Call
Jamison at (919)929-1824.
FEMALE NEEDED TO SUB-
LEASE room for summer: share nice
3 br. duplex, close to campus. Rent
$200, 13 ucil. Call 752-8695. Leave
message.
, SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
" tZbath. Sunken LR apt. $775.00 mo.
AVAILABLE NOW Outer Unit Fac-
ing 5th Street Available June 1st above
BW3. One 2 bedroom above Upper-
erust Bakery AVAILABLE NOW.
jNew carpet) for $475.00 mo. Another
available above Uppercrust June first.
One 2 bedroom apt. available June 1st
above Percolator Coffeehouse $500.00.
Luxury apartmtnts. Call Yvonne at
758-2616.
2 ROOMS FOR RENT close to
ECU. Large comfortable well kept
home. Laundry, and off street parking.
Grad students preferred. Call 830-
0505.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE
OR lease take-over. ECU bus route.
Nice area. Very affordable and con-
venient to campus. Call today! 551-
3702.
TAR RIVER SUBLEASE one bed-
oom apt. available mid May to August.
Call Susan 758-3524.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED. Two blocks from campus. Move
in after May 9th through July 31st.
May rent is free! $250 per month plus
SZ utilities. Please call 757-0046.
Penthouse apt. avail-
ABLE ABOVE BW-3's. 3 bedroom, 2
12 bath, sunken living room, cathedral
fceilingsl Looks directly over down-
town and Fifth St! Call Yvonne at 758-
2616 today!
SUBLEASE SPACIOUS THREE
BEDROOM house. $550 a month.
No deposit. Please call 758-4886.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washerdryer.
Hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
AVOID WAITING LIST AT
Dockside. Nice, new, 2 story duplex, 3
large bedrooms, 3 bath, wd, large back
yard, close to campus, low utility
$795mo. 754-2993.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
FALL 1997 Semester; Eastbrook
Apts. half rent and utilities. Males.
Call 919-793-6278.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOM-
MATE wanted. Nice house close to
campus. Call 752-8682.
SUBLEASE 2 BR. NEAR campus
wd hookups Reedy Branch. For more
info dial 752-8861 or 910-285-4609.
SUMMER ROOMMATE TWO
BEDROOMS two full bathrooms
washer dryer Dogwood Hollow apts.
Very close to campus. Pay half rent and
utilities. Call Kathleen 752-2705.
ROOMMATES(S) WANTED
FOR SUMMER andor FalL Large
bedroom in 3 bedroom house. Cheap
rent and utilities. Close to campus.
Call Jame or Qucntin 830-6279.
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE:
SHARE spacious 3 bdr2 bath duplex;
walking distance from campus. Rent
negotiable. Available May 15. Call
756-8292 for details
HOUSE FOR RENT. 302 Lewis
St. three bedrooms, storage shed, cen-
tral HAC, washerdryer hookup. No
pets. $775month. Call 919-504-2052
for application and credit check.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED ASAP to share "nice 2 bedroom,
2 full bath apt. Rent is $282 12 util-
ities etc non-smoker, responsible.
Apt. is furnished except bedroom.
Washerdryer, spacious, pools, sauna,
everything! Great shape, great area.
Melissa 551-3806.
QUIET FURNISHED BED-
ROOM ON golf course, AC, all utili-
ties furnished available first quarter
summer school, non-smoker, call 756-
2027 after April 28, graduate or older
student only. $195.00
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen, and
living room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yards. Conveni-
ent to campus and the hospital.
$l,000mo deposit. 524-4111.
FREESTYLE BIKE SUBVERT
1.0 chrome. Fusion pegs front and
back. Excellent condition $250 obo.
Call Eric 758-2177 and leave message.
10 OFF MARY KAY Skin Care
until May 7th. Contact Angela
(919)754-2791. Hurry!
93 MAZDA 626 WITH sunroof,
CD player, amp, and speakers for sale.
It is in great condition and it has extra
low miles. Call 758-9640. $10,600.00.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: TV,
recliner, sofa and table. Call Tiffany at
353-7046.
1983 JEEP CJ-7, SIX cylinder, five
speed, 4x4. Gas shocks with 31" tires
$5,500 negotiable. For further info call
752-7616 after 7 pm.
SOFA, LOVESEAT, COFFEE
TABLE, two end tables and two
lamps. $250 for entire set. Great con-
dition. Available first week in May.
Call 758-6055.
NEED FURNITURE OR OTH-
ER items for your apartment? Find it
at a huge churchwide yard sale at St.
James United Methodist Church on
the comer of 6th St. and Forest Hills
Dr. Sale starts at 6:30am on April 26th.
Help Wanted
SUBLEASE ONE
apartment. Fully fur-
I
i
I
i .
i
i
i
i
11
i
i
i
i
i
i .
i
i
i
12 Off SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON ,
(not w wtth Ity osMf roion)
VafVar aUmhnwm
I and 2 tttnmt Rang. Kaftldfaramr,
WWw, Dryar Hookups. Dacta and Patios
in men unfa. Laundry Facility,
Sand VbHayball Court
Locand 5 Model from campm.
FME WATER. SEWER
Tlffcajafitfauaa �'I f
1 BEDROOMS
StovaRafridraratorDisbwaihar
Waahcr. Dryar Hookup.
Patios on First Floor
Locassd 5 Slocks from Campus
immftfmm Awat
t
MaW LaMSKSfftt
THESE AND OTHER FttiE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
For Sale
SUMMER
BEDROOM
nished on ECU bus route. $295 a
�nonth. From May-August. Cali Amy
931-0050. Leave a message.
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY
1st-Aug. 1st one bedroom one bath-
room washerdryer 12 utilities 12
phone free water & cable rent $225.00.
No security deposit 551-3168.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also preleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease in 3 bedroom in Wilson
Acres. Rent begins Aug. 1st. Call Marc
at 757-2952.
FOR SALE: 1994 JEEP Wrangler.
Great condition. Low mileage. Green
with tan soft top & bikini top.
$10,500. Call Maureen at 758-6055 for
more info.
LIVING ROOM FURNITURE
FOR sale. Sofa $175, loveseat $150,
recliner $160. 355-8032 after 6 pm.
PUPPIES FOR SALE 12 Rot-
tweiler 12 Black Lab $150. Ready the
last weekend in April. Call 756-6555.
SLEEPER SOFA AND LOVE seat
for only $250. Both pieces in excellent
condition and very comfortable. Must
sell! Call 413-0346 ask for Mary or Ju-
lie.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4wd's. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-
3726 for current listings.
1990 ISUZU PICKUP, 5 speed,
AMFM stereo wcassette, 150K miles,
$1000 obo. Call Dave 758-9743.
GETTIN' OUT OF GREEN-
VILLE sale! Furniture: washer &
dryer $150, queen size sleeper sofa
$85; bar with two stools and glassware
$95; drafting table with chair $125.
Call 758-2708.
95 CHEVY CAVALIER, LT. blue
AC CD must sell ASAP $9,500. Call
Jennifer Wheeler 328-3514 leave mes-
sage.
MOVING MUST SALE RED tail
boa and set up $150. Dresser $25. bed
$50. Please call 758-2159.
SUPER FAT BURNING DIET
lose 15 lbs. in 7 days guaranteed. Send
S.A.S.E. with $3 to A.G. 102 Ash St
Apt. 1, Greenville, NC 27858 until
May 9th.
TV SET, 1 YEAR old, on-screen dis-
play, caption vision, remote control.
13 Best offer Tel. 752-6079.
75 VW BUG, NEW paint job, re-
cently rebuilt engine, clean interior.
$3,700.00 obo 328-7182.
IBM PS2 55-SX 386-16 40m.b.hd
many programs $100. Panasonic print-
er (ink jet) $50, Together $125. Car
ti.ws 14" falkcn 185-60R like new
wrims that fit Accura Integra $100.
Earth cruiser $50. 752-2997.
FUJI MOUNTAIN BIKE 3 years
old. Unique, in great condition, shima-
no components, toe chips. $100 or
best offer. Call Jeremy at 413-0513.
COMFORTABLE TWIN BED
WITH box spring and frame only $80.
wood desk with lots of storage space
$45. Desk chair S25. Bookcasetele-
vision stand for $30. Must sell every-
thing. Call 413-0346.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN IS
hiring summerFall staff: Asst. Sports
Editor, Photographers, Writers, Opin-
ion Columnists, Production Assistants,
Copy Editors, Advertising Reps, and
more.
HELP WANTED WASH PUB.
Call.between 9-12 pm 752-5222, Tues-
day & Thursday.
ATTENTION! ASSISTANT
WANTED to help with male fresh-
man who has cerebral palsy for the fall
semester 1997. Minimal assistance re-
quired. Hours and payment to be de-
termined. Call 919-732-4748 for an in-
terview.
LEAD GUITARIST 8c KEY-
BOARDIST needed immediately.
Southern RockCountry playing East
Coast Club Circuit. Good pay! Call
Mike at (919)237-3688.
NEEDED! SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office furni-
ture. Must be enthusiastic, positive
and willing to work. Call 931-6904.
and leave a message.
DEGREE IN HAND, NO career in
sight? Looking to grow a business in
Eastern, North Carolina. FullPart-
time positions. Cali 551-6749 for con-
fidential interview.
"THE BEST TWO BABYSIT-
TERS in the world are graduating.
Can you replace them? Two to three
mornings andor afternoons a week.
One child. Must have own transporta-
tion, non-smoker. Call 355-2088.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAI LI NG our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS. Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh 8c Winston-Saiem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC 27113.
FILM PRODUCTION, TAL-
ENT MANAGEMENT, and In-
ternships available. Call C.easivc Ar-
tists Management (800)401-0545.
JUNIORS and SENIORS: Do not
limit yourself to linear income and a
nine to five job. Take 40 minutes out
of your life. Groundftocr. Savings.
Documentation. Come see for your-
self. 888-605-0906.
KIND, PATIENT AND LOV-
ING SITTER wanted Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday (9:00 am to
6:00 pm) to care for two boys, ages 3
years and 5 years. Must enjoy playing
with and reading to children. Please
call 355-7238.
FULL-TIME SUMMER NANNY
to help mom with 2 and 4 12 year old
toddlers and twins arriving this sum-
mer. Must have experience with
infants. References required. Call
321-1663.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn plavmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT AS-
SISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
for homebuilder, Raleigh, NC. Con-
struction experience not necessary, but
helpful. 40 hrs. wk. at $6.00 per hr.
Bragg & Associates, 919-787-3211.
DANCERS (ENTERTA1N-
MENT) SID'S SHOWGIRLS
Goldsboro 919-580-7084.3 PRO-
DUCTION ASSISTANT POSI-
TIONS open starting first summer
session. Asst. Prod. Manager & Prod.
Asst. 1 positions require Mac Based
Quarkxpress knowledge to be able to
design ads. Production Assistant 2 po-
sitions requires no experience. Posi-
tion start first summer session. Appli-
cations are being accepted as of today
until Tuesday, April 29. Apply at our
office on the second floor of the Stud-
ent Publications Building (across from
Joyner).
FUN-LOVING STUDENT TO
take care of 5 yr. old boy and 12 yr. old
girl beginning Mid-May or early June
for 4 12 days a week. Non-smoker, ac-
tive, enjoys swimming, ind must have
own car. Please call Anne at 328-1570,
or after 5:00 at 756-2059. Three refer-
ences required.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
DO YOU HAVE A summer job yet?
Residential Co-Ed Summer Camp near
Greensboro, NC seeking male & fe-
male cabin counselors, male 8c female
adventure counselors, swimming in-
structors, and home instructors. For
more information contact John at
(910)349-9445 or e-mail
schoultz@vnet.net
06 YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Arc you looking for employment? We
are looking for caring, compassionate
individuals who love children to work
as full and part time teachers at our
corporate child care center located in
RTP. If you arc interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
Services
RESEnMBBEPip
LirfK, Ubnry d bftntfn h U.t.
nmmcsMisuuBcn
0ro�rCTM�i��VtaMCrC00
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors A Instructors
lor private coed youth camp located in the
beautiful mountains of western N.C.
Over 25 activities including all sports, water
skiing, heated pool, tennis, art, horseback,
go-korts. 610 to 811earn $1250-
1650 plus room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers call for brochureapplication:
SOO-S32-3539
PAYING AND RECEIVING
TELLER
Must posess a grjod math aptitude,
dexterity, nominal typing (30-40words
per minute), abtfity to work with people
and working krrawtedge of bank
services. Should possess a high schod
diploma or ecpvalent Previous teller
experience heilpfui. Opening in
Greenville. Send resume to: PO Box
7127, Greenville, NC 27835
rflfr
nm Union MaHonar �an or
NonnCaraena
Equal Opportunity Employer
MFHV
Make $$
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Fuli-tirae hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per He & Mileage
MailTax Resume:
MCSI
HO. Bos 370
Cove City, NC 28529
fa: (919)637-2125
NearC�enviile,Kinaioii, New Bern
Hiring Now!
cowtractors
Reljef Drivers
me. arvaaoaaoi
Mini oompspy In
U.i.ra�opa�g�lqrMendper�ie
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crews at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. $5,000 salary plus $1,000
bounua. Experience preferred. Call 1
800-477-1001 and ask for Mr. Helfrich.
Mate $2.361mo.
Looking for 3 ECU students to work with
UNC students in a summer intern.
Travail Chalenge! laml
Min. GPA 2.5
Lifeguard:
Baptist Children's Home
of NC. Inc, Kinston campus
is seeking to employ
2 part-lime and 1 full-time certified
lifeguards for the summer. You may
inquire about these positions by
calling Jamie Godwin,
919-522-0811
8M-3518222
- nahS2.00to:
' 1132. Whs. 0Bt.Mt
"MARINO FOOD CHOICFS
WHICH YOU CAN FEEL GOOD
ABOUT" Free program sponsored by
Pitt Co. Chapter American Diabetes
Association. Gaskin-Leslie Center
next to Pier Co. Memorial Hospital @
7 pm. For more info call 816-5136 8-4
pm Mon-Fh" or 1-800-682-9692.
Announcements
Greek Personals
ALPHA XI DELTA SOFTBALL
team: Thanks for representing us so
well! Love Your Sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI - CON-
GRATS on winning the Greek Week
Mud Football Game. Your sister soror-
ity. Alpha Xi Delta.
MICHELLE MATTHEWS:
CONGRATULATIONS on your
nursing job in the ER at Pitt. Good
luck and best wishes. Your sisters of
Alpha Xi Delta.
ALAYNE MCNEAL - YOU DIDa
great job representing Pi Kappa Alpha
in the bikini contest. Love, your sis-
ters of Alpha Xi Delta.
Lost & Found
LOST KITTEN: 41597 ON
Greenvway at Dogwood Hollow. Cali-
co (white wblack and gold coloring).
Miss Priss is 4 mo. 1 lbs. S50 reward.
752-3255 anytime.
LOST LABCHOWPIT BULL
ABOUT 6 months old. Black with
white chest. Found on 4th and Mcade
St. Call Lori 758-8621.
Travel
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE2
CW)
BUILDING HOMES WITH
GOD'S people in ncedanyone in-
terested in organizing a campus chapt-
er of Habitat for Humanity, to Stan
this fall, call Toni at the Pitt County
Habitat office, 758-2947.
TUES APRIL 22 -FRESHMAN
RECITAL, Jon Johnson, organ, First
Presbyterian Church, 1400 S. Elm St
Greenville, 7:00 pm Tues April 22 -
Guitar Ensemble, Elliot Frank, Direc-
tor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm.
Wed April 23 - Symphonic Wind En-
semble, Concert Band and Symphonic
Band, Scott Carter and Christopher
Knighten, Conductors, Jack Stamp,
Guest Conductor, Wright Auditorium,
8:00 pm. Thurs. - Sat April 24-26 -
Jazz Festival, for more information, call
328-6851. Fri, April 25 - Senior Reci-
tal, Alex Brown, voice, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hail, 7:00 pm. Fri April 25 - Jazz
Ensemble A, Carroll V. Dashiell Jr Di
rector, Wright Auditorium, 8:00 pm.
Fri. April 25 - Graduate Recital,
Michael Weaver, viola, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall. 9:00 pm. Sun April 27 -
East Carolina Symphony Orchestra,
Stephen Blackwelder, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 3:00 pm Sun
April 27 - Senior Recital, Nakia Mau-
rice Medley, saxophone, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00 pm Sun April 27 -
Emerald City Brass Quintet, Britton
Theurer, Director, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 9:00 pm Mon April 28 - ECU
Steel Orchestra, Mark Ford, Director,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm.
Tue April 29 - Student Recital, Reiko
Ishii, piano with Manuel Rebeggiani,
piano, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00
pm. For additional information, call
ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline at
ECU-4370.
' BATTER
SCHOOL
Other
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands
of awards available to all students. Im-
mediate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
GQV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on Si. Delinquent
tax, Repo's, REOY Your area. Toll
Free 800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for
current listings.
UP! MIDDLE
Club vs Elementary
School Club, come out and support or
participate. Game Day Sunday April
27, at 2:00. If interested meet at 1:00
in the parking lot of Speight. Ques-
tions call 328-3888.
ECU LAW SOCIETY -OUR next
meeting will be held on Monday, April
28th at 5:15pm in Ragsdale Rm. 130.
Wc will receive information on I.SAT
and the application process of law
schools. The meeting is open to all
majors and refreshments will be
served.
Advertise in the
classifieds
See, it works.
ithe 1
eastcarolmian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
Wc Need TimberUnd boot
and shoes! Good Jean.
FOR USED MSfa-S SHiRTS. SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGEX, NAUTICA, POLO, I.EVL GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD fc SILVER Jewelry: Coins- Also BEJken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THUSS-FRI lft00-12:00,2.00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in tot of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
IU�
yv


Title
The East Carolinian, April 24, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 24, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1205
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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