The East Carolinian, April 22, 1997







i
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
GHB's unpredictable effects pose threat to students
lesigner drug' of
cc at IX .1 earli-
nearty died from over-
�m the lawn of a
pril 4 after ingesting
the time of their dis-
. r being rushed to Pitt
t colleges in North
ms uf GHB use. Matt
udent Health Service
re.
nvolving the sub-
file reason for
been happening
i happened in
sec have not said
anything about it either, but that doesn't mean that it is not
out there
"Right now. 1 am only aware of the one incident that
happened in Greenville a few weeks ago Sgt. GAY
Williams of the Greenville Police Department said.
"However, as I understand it. there have been several cases
in the last M) days documented at Pitt Co. Memorial
Hospital that have invoked the drug
One of the biggest problems with GHB is the unpre-
dictability with individuals. A half a dose to one person
could have the effect of five or six doses on another. It is
also very cheap, with 9-li) doses usually costing about $10.
It is currently illegal only in Georgia, but is illegal to sell all
over the VS. It was sold for a short time to body builders,
although no positive effects on performance in bodybuild-
ing have ever been proven.
GHB was developed as an anesthetic in Europe and is
still in limited use there. Because of its unpredictable side
effects, it has been discarded by most of the medical com-
munity.
It was first discovered by authorities in the U.S. at the
University of North Florida during a routine surveillance of
the campus. Two 18-year olds were apparently given a dose
b an older man. who was carrying one of the 18-vear olds
out of a wooded area with the second 18-year old stumbling
beside him. Both lapsed into a comatose state soon after
their discovery, and three vials of a pink, cinnamon smelling
liquid were found. The suspect confessed that this was
GHB.
Users of this drug are looking for a quick high, usually
followed by periods of heavy sedation. It usually takes 15-
36 minutes after ingestion for GHB to take effect. It is a
clear, oily liquid that has a slightly salry taste, and is often
mixed with cinnamon to help kill the taste, giving it a pink
tint. Many people try to make it in their home, and then
distribute it in small bottles, such as hotel shampoo bot-
tles. This is a major problem according to many officials.
Because of the inexact process of making it at home, it is
likely that a user can get a bad dose of it and experience
side effects ranging from dizziness and confusion to amne-
sia or respiratory collapse. Ingredients of the homemade
mixture include such chemicals as Gamma-Bury .olactone,
vinegar and charcoal.
While often mixed with water, some users chase the
drug with alcohol, which can produce deadly results.
"Mixing any drug with alcohol can produce unpre-
dictable side effects and definitely causes the drug to act
quicker said Donna Walsh, director of health promotion
and well-being at ECU.
The addition of alcohol to a drug
has proven deadly to some users, and
mixing the two is believed to be the
cause of the death of River Phoenix,
along w ith many others.
While there have been compar-
isons between GHB and Rophypnol,
or "roofies the general consensus is
that GHB is not a date rape drug
because it has a taste, whereas
"roofies" do not. There have been
incidents reported of men
slipping roofies into
women's drinks to make
them lose their inhibi-
tions and have sex with
them, but, unlike GHB
users, these women nor-
mally have no recollection
of what happened, while
GHB users usually
remember things except
in extreme cases.
GHB is a colorless and odorless
substance with a salty taste that
can easily be overcome by adding
cinnamon or other household
spices. Here the drug is shown
disguised in a mouthwash bottle.
Once added to an alcoholic bever-
age or mixed with other drugs,
the effects of GHB range from
mild to deadly.
EC! "s last
edition of video
yearbook available at
Barefoot Thursday
Corn met not expected to
be renewed
GAMMA SIG WALKS FOR AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
has Hi.irked the
i i he past scver-
is the
this year
ha - booth
24, whi re they
iil Between
� � � nines have
nd �ill be av ail-
ok will include
nd skits, as well as pre-
. n iations .ind frater-
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Instructor lake
product and
leased with what
:d. Posta, w ho is a pro-
ii.il a part time teacher.
I last e.ir
ported being
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TUFSOAY
;fd.nesday
In-line skates and
skateboards banned
from campus buildings
Violators must stand
before Dean of Students
Various campus organizations, including ECU s chapter of Gamma Sigma Sigma, and local participants
of all ages enjoyed beautiful weather on Saturday during a walk-a-thon for the prevention and treat-
ment of cancer.
ANGELA KOENIG
UK VI THK.NV IROWIKNTU. ISSI KS
s rvKK WRITES
The days of skating into your seat in class
are ov er.
Dean of Students Dr. Ronald Speier wants
students to know that in-line skates, skate-
boards, bicycles and all similar Items are pro-
hibited from being used inside buildings. This
includes residence halls and academic build-
ings.
"My fear is that the police are going to start
writing citations before the students are
aware of this (ban) Speier said.
Students caught by the ECU Police
Depaitment and Parking and Traffic Services
violating this rule will be issued campus
appearance tickets. This ticket will refer the
students to the deans office.
According to Speier, the first offense will
result in a warning. Subsequent violations will
result in further consequences which have not
yet been decided. Each offense will result in a
campus appearance ticket.
Speier is worried that students will be
harmed and may harm others if the objects
continue to be used indoors. People are riding
down stairs on them and bumping into others.
He advises students to treat rollerblades,
skateboards, etc. like any other wheeled vehi-
cles, such as cars, and keep them outdoors.
This is a concern not only due to protect-
ing the safety of students, but also because of
the damage rollerblades and skateboards are
doing to the buildings.
"We have a problem because in-line skates
are being brought into the buildings said
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Administration
and Finance-Facilities Dr. George Harrell.
According to Harrell, in-line skates and
skateboards cause the floors and carpets to be
damaged quicker than they would be under
normal conditions.
"This (using these in buildings) ruins the
wax jobs and causes excessive wear and tear
on carpets and floors Harrell said. "They
(rollerblades and skateboards) were not
designed to be used indoors
The damage to the buildings was first
brought to attention by housekeepers who
reported that floors which had recently been
refinished were damaged. The floors are prop-
erly rewaxed and rebuffed once they have
been reported as damaged.
According to Harrell, this causes an
increase in the maintenance budget, but
there are no estimates as to how much of an
increase this will cause.
"Students can help us keep buildings in
better condition if they won't ride theit in-line
skates indoors Harrell said.
It is unclear if this ban is currently being
enforced, but, according to Speier, it will def-
initelv be in effect next fall.
Students encouraged to celebrate Earth Day everyday
ANGELA KOKSK,
II K I III ENVIKON V1K.NT VI I s s I K s
STAFF WRITER
Today is the 27th Earth Day. One of the goals of Earth Day is
to encourage people to make everyday Earth Day
According to Hill Koch, director of the office of environmen-
tal health and safety, typical Earth Day activities include clean-
cams and parks. On campus people can take part every-
recycling.
The office of environmental health and safety heads the
recycling program on campus. They recycle aluminum cans in
residence halls and paper in academic buildings. There is also a
11 iilet w huh is circulated around campus in which students can
deposit these items as well as glass, plastic and newspaper
V ffding to Koch, recycling is a state mandated program on
campuses and ECU does a large amount of recycling
each vear.
Between July 1995 and June Wo, H242 pounds of alu-
minum cans were recycled. In addition to this. 532540 pounds
of newsprint, an estimated WK)0 pounds of glass and 236,570
pounds of office and computer paper were recycled.
Items do not need to be sorted when placed in the bins in
the trailers. According to Koch there are instructions on the side
of the trailer.
"We do generate some money (from recycling) and it goes
back into the recycling program for upgrades Koch said.
"Anybody on campus should look for the recycling trailer
and please get involved in the program Koch said. "We're real-
ly chewing up a lot of the landfill certainly in the country and
also in this area
In addition to recycling, students can conserve energy and
water, in their dorm rooms and apartments. According to Koch
water can be conserved by taking shorter showers and
installing water conservation shower heads.
"Water is one of the fotgotten resources but it also needs to
be conserved Koch said.
Energy can be conserved by turning off lights and televisions
when not in use. I sing screen savers on computers can also
save energy. Computers in labs on campus do have screen savers
which are used to help conservation.
Recycling centers like this large outdoor bin are visible all over
campus and especially in residence halls for the disposal of plastic
bottles and aluminum cans. Recycling daily is one of several ways
to reach Earth Day goals. Other ways include reducing the amount
of personal refuse (trash) and reusing certain plastic containers.
PHOtO BY PATRICK IRELAN
Team targets toxic microorganisms responsible for N.C. fish kills
NORFOLK (AP) - Old Dominion University
scientists plan to search the lower Chesapeake
Bav and its main tributaries in Virginia for a
microorganism that has caused large fish kills
in Nnrrh f Inmlina
Pficsteria has been blamed for killing mil-
lion, ol fish and sickening several fishermen,
divers and researchers who came in contact
with the single-cell creature in North Carolina.
"In m opinion, pficsteria is already in
lia waters and it's only a matter of tune
� I'm it produces a fish kill here said Harold
Marsl ill t marine biologist at Old Dominion.
"What W( wani to tin is find nut where in
the bav system these critters are and see if
there's a wav to control them, he said.
Ol)l wants the state and federal govern-
ment to help finance the collection of samples
taken from 2(111 ro vlWI spurs in rhe much of rhe
bav and the James. Viik. Rappalunnnck and
Elizabeth rivers.
The sediment sampling would begin in the
summer. After that it would take months of
studying to get the initial look at the potential
threat of pficsteria to the lower bav. Marshall
said.
Pficsteria is onlv one of a number of micro-
scopic organisms that can produce toxins and
kill fish in the bay undet the right environ-
mental conditions, Marshall said.
Nicknamed "the cell from hell pficsteria
survives bv preying Oil othet organisms. It can
secrete a toxin that eats holes in fish, then
slowK paralyzes their muscles and suffocates
them. The microorganism then reproduces as
the fish die.
Nowhere has the tinv killer Ijeen more
prevalent than in North Carolina's huge cstu-
aties. where slow-moving saltwater is captured
behind the islands of the Outer Banks. It has
left millions of menhaden, shad and flounder
dead and rotting on rhe shores of the Neuse
and New rivers.
Research has shown that the tiny creatures
proliferate and take on a deadly form when
exposed to high levels of nitrogen and phos-
phorus - bvprodiicrs of human and animal
waste.
Scientists believe the organism became a
problem in North Carolina as the state's hog
farming industry and population rose dramati-
cally over the past decade.
Dead fish with similar symptoms recently
have turned up in the Choptank River, which
SEE DOMINION PAGE 6





s
2 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
news
across, the state
Area code decision process getting started
RALIEGH (AP)-State utility regulators were scheduled to begin considering
a proposal today to split North Carolina's three area codes into six.
A coalition of 22 telephone companies proposed the split to meet the
growing need for new telephone lines. The demand is fueled by increased
use of cellular telephones, computer modems and fax machines.
The telephone coalition would like a decision from the commission by
June 1 so it can start preparing equipment and customers for the changes.
Adding three new area codes to the state could mean the third phone
number change for some North Carolinians this decade.
The plan also would provide a new area code to Asheville, Hendersonville
and points west, replacing the current 704. And Greenville, Rocky Mount
and even the Outer Banks would get a new code to replace 919.
Other large metro areas - including Charlotte. Raleigh-Durham,
Fayetteville and Wilmington - would keep their current area codes.
Greensboro, High FAiint and Winston-Salem residents also would get a
new area code.
GOP lawyers lobby against further tort reform
RALEIGH (AP) - Republican lawyers across the state are lining up against a
proposal that wou'd require juries to be informed of insurance and other pay-
ments received by people who bring lawsuits.
Supporters of the bill, filed in the Legislature by Rep. Chuck Neely, R-
Wake, say it would keep people from being paid twice for the same injuries.
The opponents say the proposal, if passed, would allow wrongdoers to
benefit from their victims' prudence in having insurance coverage and other
benefits.
The bill addresses a complicated area of the law that probably will have
the most effect on lawsuits resulting from automobile accidents.
Two years ago, the business and insurance lobby teamed up with
Republican lawmakers to push through major changes in the laws that gov-
ern how injured people sue companies.
But many Republican lawyers say these changes go too far.
Boy killed, six others injured as roller
coaster malfunctions'
TULSA. Okla. (AP) - Amusement park officials say a roller coaster was
inspected just two weeks before an accident that killed a 14-year-old boy and
injured six others.
One of the cars on The Wildcat was being pulled to the top of an incline
Sunday night when, just before reaching the crest, it slid 45 feet back down
the track and collided with another car, said Harry Baker, assistant fire chief.
Witnesses said the boy who died was in the front car. He was ejected, hit-
ting his head on one of the ride's metal bars.
Bell's Amusement Park was packed as visitors enjoyed a 25-cents-per-ride
promotion. The park remained open after the accident.
'ITie ride was inspected two weeks ago by the Oklahoma Department of
Labor, park president Robert Bell III said. He said all rides are inspected
once a year.
Two 14-year-old boys were in serious condition today at St. Francis
Hospital, spokeswoman Lisa Ingram said. A father, two of his daughters and
another young girl who was a family friend were treated and released.
The cause of the accident was unknown. Baker said the cars are pulled to
the top of the initial crest by a chain and are supposed to descend forward.
Sprint cutting international telephone rates
ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) - Sprint is set to lower weekend rates for telephone
calls abroad as consumers benefit from the elimination of trade barriers and
increased traffic on the international network, USA Today reported today.
Sprint's announcement today will cut rates to as low as 10 cents per
mrnute on the weekend, making a call to England as cheap as a domestic call,
according to the report. Sprint had been charging 45 cents a minute.
Weekend calls to Germany, Italy and France will fall to 30 cents a minute,
from 45 cents now. Weekday rates are higher.
AT&T and MCI charge 12 cents a minute for calls to Britain, seven days
a week, 24 hours a day. All three carriers impose a $3 monthly fee for discount
rates.
Among the reasons for the cuts are a World Trade Organization pact in
February, which is opening the $580 billion global market. State-owned
monopolies are lowering rates charged to foreign carriers connecting to their
networks.
Also, traffic on the global network is growing, allowing big phone compa-
nies to buy access to other countries at lower bulk rates, Alcazar said.
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The East Carolinian
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Jennifer Simon
Aiumnus, Director of One Card System
begins work at university
ECU alumnus Jennifer S. Sutton has joined ECU
Business Services as Director of One card Systems
under the direction of Associate Vice Chancellor for
the Administration and Finance Layton Getsinger.
Sutton is responsible for the coordination and admin-
istration of the university's new one card system which
is expected to begin implementation this summer.
Beginning in June 1997, the new student orienta-
tion attendees will be the first to receive the ECU One
Card. The card will bear the student's photograph and
name, and will be encoded with the student's identi-
fication number and other pertinent information. The
initial use of the ECU One Card will be for Dining
Services. Students will also be able to add monetary
value to an encoded magnetic stripe for use in campus copiers, vending
machines and event ticket purchases. Additional features will be added over
the course of the fall 1997 and spring 1998 semesters.
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores
sponsors
class project
Students from the Department of
Apparel, Merchandising and Interior
Design in the School of Human
Environmental Sciences recently took
part in a project with the ECU
Student Stores. Twenty-eight stu-
dents from Asst. Professor Jayne Geissier's Visual Merchandising class paired
off to design and construct window displays for store promotions, holiday
themes and general topics. Each week, four display cases outside of the
Student Stores in the Wright Building were transformed into masterpieces
spotlighting such events as Mardi Gras, National Snack Food Week,
National Embroidery Awareness Week and ECU's 90th Anniversary
Celebration, as well as in-store promotions and sales.
As an incentive, the Student Stores awarded prizes for the best window
of the week during the month-long project, as well as an "overall" and a
"most memorable" prize. All students received a certificate of appreciation,
and enjoyed a class pizza party following the project. The creators of vin-
ning window displays received ECU sweatshirts.
Weekly winners were:
Meghan Moser and Jessica FjIco, "Mardi Gras"
Melissa Dowd and Karen Osborne, Overall Award, "Valentine's Day Sale"
Tameika Mills and Juliette Gunther, "National Embroidery Awareness
Week"
Adriene Babb and Leanne Griffin, "ECU's 90th Anniversan Celebration"
Robbi Lancy and Melissa Lackey, Most Memorable, "Nation l Snack
Food Week"
ECU students place at piano festival
ECU students Manucla Rebeggiani (right) and
Reiko Ishii (left) placed first and second runners-
up respectively in the collegiate division of the
19th Annual Rano Festival and Competition at
Southeastern Community College.
five collegiate competition finalists vied in a public
recital for the S5(K) prize. The winner (center),
Ciro Fbdere or Uruguay, is a junior at the college of
charlcstion and a student of Enrique Graf.
PeopleAct. a community theatre organization, needs actors for an origi-
nal play based on the lives of Pitt County residents. Actors will have the
unique opportunity to collaborate with the writersdirector in the cre-
ation of the stage production. We are looking specifically for actors who
can play the following agesethnicities:
African-American male (20's). African-American female (30's), African-
American male (40's-50's), Caucasian female (50's-60's), Caucasian
male (20's40's). Asian-American femaie (20's-3D's), Jewish female (late
teens-early 20's). Native-American male (20's), Hispanic male (20's-
30's).
The project is supposed by grants from the North Carolina Humanities
Council, and the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation. Actors will rehearse in
July and August and will tour with the show on four Saturdays during
the Fall of 1997. Actors will receive an honorarium at the completion of
the project. All interested persons should contact Deborah Morrison at
757-1637 to schedule an audition.
Pitt County Arts Council's Arts in the Schools Program presents the
Rampant Theatrical Company Performance Troupe in Wiley and The
Hairy Man. J.H. Rose Honors Theatre students produce, perform and
direct Wiley and the Hairy Man for all Pin County fourth graders.
Pitt County Arts Council Arts in the Schools program regularly funds
cross curriculum productions to insure all students have a chance to
enjoy, learn and produce the arts.
Parking on Reading Day and during exams
1. All parking regulations remain in effect on Reading Day and during the
exam period.
2. Unregistered Vehicles are not authorized to park on campus on
Reading Day or during exams. Students without permanent decals may
purchase $2 daily or $5 weekly permits from Parking and Traffic
Services.
3. 30-minute loading permits will be available to students with Freshman
decals beginning at noon, Monday, May 5,1997 for loading and unload-
ing purposes only. Registered Freshman vehicles will be allowed to park
on campus in student areas beginning at noon Wednesday, May 7,1997.
4. On Reading Day, April 30, Limited Commuter permits may park in reg-
ular Commuter spaces on main campus. This is allowed because ECU
Transit will not provide shuttle services on Reading Day. The shuttle will
run during the exam period. The Freshman shuttle will run as usual on
Reading Day and during the exam period.
5. Unregistered vehicles or vehicles with student registration parked in
staff areas will be cited for a wrong zone violation. Vehicles parked in
the Private lots without Private permits will be ticketed for wrong zone
and towed.
For further information on parking during the exam period, contact
Parking and Traffic Services at 328-6294.
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n
Tuesday. April 22, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Norwegian family turns tragic death into gift of life
SEATTLE (AP) - Hildc Kvant
rushed to he United States wlici
she got word her brother suffered a
brain jueurysm while visiting this
country. By the time she Kiived
from Norway, Bjorn Ovc Grandum
was brain dead and on life support.
Rather than just making arrange-
ments for a melancholy return to
Norway, Mrs. Kvant and her hus-
band Ivar did something unusual -
they donated Grandum's organs to
Americans.
"It's not unheard of to have for-
eign nationals become donors in the
United States, but it's rare said
Joel Newman, a spokesman for the
United Network for Organ Sharing
in Richmond, fa.
The Kvants, weary and grieving,
agreed to an airport interview with
The Associated Press last Thursday
before returning to their home in
Bergen, Norway.
"We're doing this to get others to
think about donation Ivar Kvant
said.
"We don't need to know who he's
helping Kvant said. "It's important
to know his death isn't for nothing -
that people are helped with this
donation
By donating Grandum's heart,
heart valves, kidneys, lungs, pan-
creas and liver, the Kvants were able
to help a half-dozen Puget Sound
people and their families, said
Tamila Timm. procurement coordi-
nator at LifeCenter Northwest, the
organ donation center for
Washington. Alaska, northern Idaho
and Montana.
There are a number of reasons
why such donations are rare.
For one thing, few people die
while on vacation. The age and
health of the deceased and the man-
ner of death also can rule out dona-
tion. In other cases, families may
raise cultural or religious objections.
But a donation can have a memo-
rable effect when made in another
country.
The best-known example of
international organ donation
occurred in 1994 after bandits shot
and killed a 7-year-old California
boy, Nicholas Green, during his fam-
ily's vacation in southern Italy.
Italians vtere stunned by his fam-
ily's decision to donate his organs, an
act that saved seven people in Italy
and inspired a surge of organ dona-
tions in a country where the practice
remains unusual.
Norway has no organ donation
program. In Japan, transplants are
virtually non-existent.
The country does not legally rec-
ognize brain death. Death is consid-
ered to occur after a patient's heart
stops beating, but at that point
internal organs deteriorate quickly
and become unsuitable for trans-
plant.
Your used books
could take you to
Bahamas.
It's easy-come by the Alpha Phi Sorority house at the bottom of
College Hill, or stop in our store on Cotanche Street. Sell your books
for the best prices and register to win a Bahamas vacation.
Plus! Free phone cards & special Little Caesars Pizza coupons!
little Caesars
At the Alpha Phi House
April 29, May 1,2,4-8
9am- 5pm
Eight-year-old Miyuki Monobe of
Tokyo came to UCLA Medical
Center in California in search of a
new heart. She died last week before
a suitable donor organ could be
found.
The United Network for Organ
Sharing doesn't keep specific records
on the number of international dona-
tions, Newman said. But even the
number of domestic donations is
small. Of the more than 2 million
deaths in the United States each
vear, organs might be feasibly donat-
ed in only 15,000-20,000 cases. Of
those candidates, organs from only
5,400 deceased Americans are donat-
ed to others.
Grandum, 32, was always busy,
his sister said. He had worked day
and night to save for his trip to the
United States. An Oslo taxi driver,
he had two children.
"He was very fond of traveling.
He really enjoyed life Mrs. Kvant
said.
Grandum planned to drive from
Seattle north to British Columbia to
visit relatives. He never got out of
town, collapsing in his hotel room
April 13.
Grandum telephoned his sister
frem Harborview Medical Center to
tell her what was happening. It was
their last conversation. When she
and her husband got to Seattle on
April 15, machinery was keeping
Grandum alive.
Although their native country had
no donation program, the Kvants
knew what it was like for those who
wait for organs.
They endured an agonizing wait
for a liver for Ivar's gravely ill 2-year-
old niece in England. The toddler
suffered a heart attack and subse-
quent brain damage while waiting
for a donor organ.
As a result, the family had talked
about organ donation before, and
Mrs. Kvant knew they were making
the right decision for her brother.
Still, she said, "It's hard to think
about this when you just have lost
someone
Mandatory
Editorial Board
meeting
for ail
editors,
asst. editors,
wire editor,
photo editor
and
head copy
editor.
Wednesday
@
5:30 p.m.
516 S.Cotanche Street � Uptown Greenville � 758-2616 � http:ww.ubeinc.com
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)
The East Carolinian
4 Tuesday. April 22, 1997
Under oath, tobacco executives insist smoking not deadly
MIAMI (AP) - Four top tobacco
company executives said under oath
that smoking cannot kill despite
Liggett Group's admission a month
ago that smoking is addictive and
can cause cancer.
In private dep. sitions given last
week, the executives clung to long-
held industry statements about the
dangers of tobacco, according to
transcripts and videotapes obtained
bv The Miami Herald and reported
Sunday.
The depositions were given in
response to class-action lawsuits
filed by Stanley Rosenblatt, a
Florida lawyer.
Rosenblatt talked to James
Morgan, president of Philip Morris;
Andrew Schindler. president of R.J.
Reynolds Tobacco; Nick Brookes,
chief executive of Brown &
Williamson: and Alexander Spears,
chairman of Lorillard Tobacco Co.
The depositions were lengthy,
often acrimonious and sometimes
personal.
Spears' father, a heavy smoker.
died of lung cancer. Schindler's
father, who smoked three packs a
dav. had circulation problem- and
died from a stroke.
"The doctor told him 'You can
either stop smoking or I can cut ort
your hands and feet some day
Schindler said.
Nevertheless. Schindler said he
did not believe tobacco is deadly or
conclusively linked to any illness.
He does not believe tobacco is any-
more addictive than coffee or car-
rots.
"Carrot addiction?" the lawyer
asked.
"Yes Schindler answered.
"There was British research on car-
rots
Schindler smokes more than a
pack a day. His wife smokes a pack a
dav. She tried to quit once. He tried
to quit twice.
Spears said he quit smoking in
1977. though he still has an occa-
sional cigarette. He said he stopped
because he had a heart attack.
Morgan said he began smoking
as a college freshman and still
smokes three packs a week. He has
quit three times, never for more
than a year. The last time was in
1987, after he suffered a collapsed
lung.
The depositions came less than a
month after Liggett, maker of
I A'Ms and Chesterfields, settled 22
SEE SMOKE. PAGE 6
WHEEL POWER
WheelPower dance troupe, featuring dancers with and without disabilities, practice for a home performance after having
Vravelled Greensboro. The troupe will be performing in Hendrix Theatre April 23 at 7 p.m. as part of ECU s Diabihties
Awareness Week.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ABE SiNGLETAdY & BON: BCSJVEU
The Farmville Dogwood Festival
Presents
on Friday, April 25, 1997
Orpeus Fate, Treading Evans, Thomas Brothers,
Kernal Goat, Slow Children Playing,
Three Foot Margin & Laredo!
on Saturday, April 26, 1997
Tulsa James, Panama Steel, The Main Event,
II Uneke The Griswalds, Earl Teel , Little Creek,
Family & Friends, Twisted Fate, Gravity Overflow,
Third of Never, Dorian Grey, Nameless, Kelly Smith,
and The Embers!
on Sunday, April 27, 1997
John Loy, Homebrew, Redalia, Sneaky Pete,
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Call (919753-5814 for Details!
j Carolinian
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summer
If you will be a returning student in the fall and are looking
for a summer job, UHS will be hiring students to assist
with our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to inspect, repair and renovate residence hall
rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance will provide training
and supervision. General knowledge of basic carpentry
skills, painting, installation of hardware, measuring and
fitting components is required. The program will be
approximately 10 weeks. This is an opportunity to have
personal training and learn successful skills in a hands-on
experience. Full-time, 39 hours per week, and part-time,
20 hours per week, positions will be offered. To submit an
application, please come by University Housing Services,
Office Suite 100 Jones Hall.
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SHOULD MARIJUANA BE LEGALIZED?
TONIGHT AT 8PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE TICKETS TOR STUDENTS, STAFF, AND FACULTY. $5 FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC $8 AT THE DOOR. FREE
TICKETS MUST BE PICKED UP TODAY BY 6PM FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE. MASTERCARD AND VISA ACCEPTED.
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and are FREE to Students. Foculty. ond Start
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�"TWO THUMBS UP
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ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE $25
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALl STUDENT CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL 328-6004 OR 1 800 ECU-ARTS.
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5 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
news
The Eett Carolinian
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Hours: Monday - Friday: 7 am - 7 pm & Saturday: 9 am - 3 pm
Good year workers on strike
in seven states
AKRON, Ohio (AP) - About 12,000
striking workers have set up picket
lines in seven states outside plants
of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co the
largest tiremaker in North America.
Discussions between Goodyear
and the United Stcclworkcrs of
America broke down late Saturday-
night just before the contract
expired at midnight, said union
spokesman Curt Brown.
The company and the union
agreed to resume talks today in
Cincinnati. Goodyear has vowed to
continue operations at its plants.
The first strike against the
Akron-based company since 1976
involves negotiations .on a new
three-year contract that began
March 6.
Contract issues include wages
and benefits, but the union also
wants all contracts covering
Goodyear's 20,000 union employees
to expire at the same time. The
average Goodyear production worker
makes about $18 an hour.
Mike Runyon, a Goodyear worker
for 14 years in Lincoln, Neb said he
and his fellow 1,700 union workers
were prepared for the long haul.
"All we're asking for is to be treat-
ed fairly and equitably like any U.S.
worker, and to enjoy a standard of
living that any American worker
should enjoy he said.
The union has targeted
Goodyear and its Kelly-Springfield
Tire & Rubber Co. as a basis of this
year's negotiations with all its tire
and rubber industry labor contracts.
The talks in Cincinnati affect
workers at nine plants in Akron, St.
Marys and Marysville in Ohio;
Gadsden, Ala Union City, Tenn
Danville, Va Sun Prairie, Wis
Lincoln, Neb and Topeka. Kan.
Another 8,000 workers at eight
other Goodyear locations are work-
ing under different contracts. Those
include about 5,000 union workers
at Kelly-Springfield plants in
Freeport, III Tyler, Texas; and
Fayetteville, N.C.
Goodyear'employs about 90,000
people worldwide.
"Goodyear intends to maintain
production during the strike to serve
its customers spokesman John
Perduyn said in a statement. "The
company has no intention or mort-
gaging its future by agreeing to a
contract that would widen a contrac-
tual disadvantage with its competi-
tors
The union is negotiating on
behalf of Goodyear's hourly employ-
ees for the first time since the
United Rubber Workers merged into
its union in 1995.
The 90,000-member URW was
unable to make any progress to end
a strike it had called against
BridgcstoneFirestone Inc the
Nashville, Tennbased arm of
Tokyo-based Bridgestone. The
strike ended after the Steelworkers
union took over negotiations follow-
ing the merger.
Another concern among the
Goodyear union workers is job secu-
ri ty and the sending of work to other
companies. Goodyear recently
announced it would move produc-
tion of bias-ply race tires from Akron
to a plant in Santiago, Chile, result-
ing in the loss of about 150 jobs.
"That's the type of deterioration
we're concerned about Brown said.
But Goodyear officials said they
need a flexible contract to operate
efficiently.
Math prodigies face off
WASHINGTON (AP) - It's the
kind of drill that drives math nerds
crazy. And it wouldn't matter so.
much if rhese statisticians, scientists
and others weren't parents as well.
The drill, as described in a
California workbook for seventh-
graders:
Students, in a group, must fill an
imaginary recycling container with
imaginary phone books. But the
books and container have only two
dimensions. And the kids also may
use a calculator to figure out .75
times 600, part of the exercise. The
text gives the answer, right next to
the problem, just in case students
can't get it with a calculator.
Critics like Paul Clopton, a 46-
year-old statistician and angry San
Diego parent, say 1992 changes in
California math teaching, prompting
such exercises, are creating math
dummies, A state board is working
on new standards this year.
And the issue has attracted angry
parents' attention beyond
California, because some of the
teaching philosophy under fire
would show up in voluntary national
standards and tests that President
Clinton supports.
Critics say the math curriculum
reflects the handiwork of the
National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics, which in 1989 called
for a national overhaul of math
teaching.
The council, worried about
America's math phobia and dropping
test scores, hoped to make math
more meaningful by changing from a
dry-as-chalk focus on drills, postu-
lates, definitions and proofs - the
memorization of tables and rules - to
a more real-world focus.
The council also recommended
that all grades use calculators.
"All of the research that we've
seen shows that children learn dif-
ferently said Jack Price, professor
of mathematics education at
California State Polytechnic
University in Pomona and past pres-
ident of the national group. "For
some, direct instruction in the class-
room works well. For others, it does-
n't.
"We have never said anywhere in
any of our publications that children
shouldn't know their basic skills he
added.
In an interview, though, Price
questioned the need to learn the
SEE MATH PAGE 6
Ihe
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p � �





i
6 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
iieWb
The East Carolinian
� Math
continued from page 5
L
multiplication tables, or at least
more than half of them. Why mem-
orize 4 times i if you already know i
times 4?
Why figure a square root without
a calculator? Or long division for that
matter? Why do a stack of division
' problems for homework?
Should standards be so specific
'h to say children in the first grade
ought to be able to write every num-
ber up to 100?
I
Some kids are not going to be
Dominion
continued from page I
empties into the Chesapeake Bay
from Maryland's Eastern Shore. But
rJfiesteria hasn't been confirmed as
the culpri
.There have been reports in
repent years of pfiesteria being
found in the Rappahannock and York
rivers in Virginia, but no damage was
reported.
it Pfiesteria has existed for thou-
sands and perhaps millions of years.
It-has been found as far north as
Delaware and as far south as the
Gulf of Mexico. It can live in either
ffesh or salt water.
It's possible that the microorgan-
ism has lived harmlessly in the bay
and its tributaries for years because
environmental conditions haven't
been right for it to turn lethal, said
Leonard W Haas, a phytoplankton
ewlogist at the Virginia Institute of
Marine Science at Gloucester Point.
I don't want to say it's only a
matter of time before pfiesteria
ca�ses fish kills in Virginia waters
Haas said. "It may never happen.
But generally, the deterioration of
witter quality will cause problems of
that kind
able to do that he said.
Under the council recommenda-
tions, students instead were encour-
aged to focus on problem solving,
generally in groups, as the best way
to pick up skills and prepare them
for the real world.
The council also recommended
that students learn geometry, proba-
bility and pre-algebra before they
reach high school - a seemingly high
standard.
But critics worry how wl the
children use classroom time, and
whether the stress on group activi-
ties too often substitutes play-act-
ing for real learning.
Marianne Jennings, a 43-year-old
lawyer and professor of business
Smoke
continued from page 4
state lawsuits by agreeing to label its
cigarettes addictive and admitting
cigarettes are targeted to teen-agers
and cause cancer.
Despite the settlement, scientif-
ic studies and newly released damn-
ing documents from their own com-
panies, the executives said they still
don't believe that tobacco is addic-
tive or can kill.
"You don't agree that tobacco use
causes any human tragedies, do
you?" Spears was asked.
ethics at Arizona State University,
has crusaded in newspapers and
other publications against a widely
used algebra textbook that talks
about Maya Angelou's inaugural
poem for Clinton, .African tribes,
pollution - striving, she suggests,
more to be politically correct than
educational.
"I was driven to write about this
because it became very clear my
daughter was becoming a math illit-
erate Jennings said, talking about
Sarah, now 14.
Critics also complain there's too
much stress in the early grades on
"manipulatives" - cubes, little fig-
ures, colored sticks and other pieces
that critics call "concrete pacifiers
"No, I do not he said.
Schindler and other executives
testified repeatedly that, as far as
they are concerned, smoking is noth-
ing more than a "risk factor" for can-
cer and other diseases.
"My view is that cigarette smok-
ing is a risk factor for those diseases
and �� may cause those diseases
Schindler said. "I do not know if it
does or doesn't in that sense. I
believe that maybe it's a risk factor
Morgan said cigarette smoking
"ma possibly cause cancer
One of Rosenblatt's cases is a $5
billion lawsuit for flight attendants
who say secondhand smoke gave
them lung cancer and other diseases.
It's set for trial June 2 in Miami.
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T
7 Teufty. April 22.1997
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FREE PARKING ONE BLOCK
FROM campus. Two roommates need to
share three bedroom one bath house. Fully
furnished except for bedrooms. Washerdry-
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ties. Call Katie today 931-0348.
TAR RIVER SUBLEASE one bedroom
apt. available mid May to August. Call Su-
san 758-3524.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
TO SHARE 3bedroom2bath house on
4th and Elm. S200month 13 utilities,
beginning June 1st. Call Jamison at
(919)929-1824.
2 ROOMS FOR RENT close to ECU.
Large comfortable well kept home. Laun-
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FEMALE NEEDED TO SUBLEASE
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FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
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and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613.
Very Affordable!
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER. Rfc
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house 3 blocks from campus. Master bed-
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Call 758-7762.
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS St new
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NOW Outer Unit Facing 5th Street Avail-
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above Uppercrust Bakery AVAILABLE
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Another available above Uppercrust June
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above Percolator Coffeehouse $500.00.
Luxury apartments. Call Yvonne at 758-
2616.
SUMMER SUBLEASE ONE BED-
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ROOMMATE WANTED FOR FALL
1997 Semester; Eastbrook Apts. half rent
and utilities. Males. Call 919-793-6278.
ROOMMATES(S) WANTED FOR
SUMMER andor Fall. Large bedroom in
3 bedroom house. Cheap rent and utilities.
Close to campus. Call Jame or Qucntin
830-6279.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED?
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May 9th through July 31st. May rent is free!
$250 per month plus 12 utilities. Please
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
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non-smoker, responsible. Apt. is furnished
except bedroom. Washerdryer, spacious,
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SUBLEASE 2 BR. NEAR campus wd
hookups Reedy Branch. For more info dial
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and air. All apartments on ground level.
Call 931-0790.
I a OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THISCOyPpN ,
(not vjm wUfi VHf uwr covaoft)
1 xnd 2 BawroORi Ranajs, RcfndgQrator,
Wisher. Dryer Hookup, Decks and Patios
in mott units. Laundry Facility,
Sand WDMywH Court.
locatad 5 blocks from campus.
�K WATER. SEYVW
2MDHOOMS
SwveRefridgeratorDishwasher
VMM Dryar Hookup,
Patio, on First Floor
Located S Blocks from Campus
fanpifitt rtvtaf
� 2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable, 5 blocks from
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campus. New ownership.
NCW t aMlaltaaaaalMiael
THEM ANO OTHtH Hr�?�OPE�TIES
MANAGED BY
lOiAfjaOWNlEAOmvE
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$375 FOR ENTIRE SUMMER! May
12 to Aug. I. Roommate to share 2 bedroom
1 12 bath E. 5th Street townhouse wl oth-
er female. Call 758-8569.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One, two,
and three, bedroom apartments on 10th
Street, Five blocks from ECU, now proteas-
ing, flail Wainrighr Property Management
756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SUB-
LEASE 2 br townhome. $20)mo. Free
heat, free water, free cable, AC. Safe
neighborhood. Close to campus ECU bus.
Smokers welcome 757-9625.
CANNON COURT AND CEDAR
Court two bedroom I 12 bath townhouses.
On ECU bus route $400-$415. Call Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209 pre-
Icasing for fall also.
-EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, SPA-
CIOUS example of Frank Lloyd Wright ar-
chitecture. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, large din-
ing room, kitchen, washerdryer and living
room with fireplace. Beautifully landscaped
- three fenced vards. Convenient to campus
t hospital. $1000010. dep. 524-41II.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOM apartments on 10th street. Fret
basic cable, water ,ind sewer also preleasing
for the fall $415.00. Call Wainrighr Proper-
ty management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! 2
bedroom 1 12 bath on ECU bus route.
Ren' is $190 12 utilities and phone. Call
Pat at 757-2725.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO sublease apartment over the summer.
Call Shari at 353-0966.
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY 1st-
Aug. 1st one bedroom one bathroom wash-
erdryer 12 utilities 12 phone free water 6c
cable rent $225.00. No security deposit
551-3168.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE OR
lease take-over. ECU bus route. Nice area.
Verv affordable and convenient to campus.
Cali today! 551-3702.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR TWO
bedroom one bath apartment $200 a month
and split utilities. Person must be mature
responsible and Kind. Incase starts in May.
Contact Matt 328-3866.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED TO take
over lease in 3 bedroom in Wilson .Acres.
Rent begins Aug. tst. Call Marc at 757-
2952.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. Nice house close to campus. Call
752-8682.
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE:
SHARE spacious 3 bdr2 bath duplex:
walking distance from campus. Rent nego-
tiable. Available May 15. Call 756-8292 for
details
ROOMMATES WANTED TO
SHARE 4 bedroom house near campus and
downtown. $200 monthly includes: Power,
water, heat. AC, washer dryer. Lease is ne-
gotiable. Prefer non-smoker 328-6938.
PENTHOUSE APT AVAILABLE
ABOVE BW-3Y 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath,
sunken living room, cathedral ceilings!
liooks directly over downtown and Fifth St!
Call Yvonne at 758-2616 today!
SUMMER ROOMMATE TWO BED-
ROOMS two full bathrooms washer dryer
Dogwood Hollow apts. Very close to cam-
pus. Pav half rent and utilities. Call Kath-
leen 752-2705.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities, split
cable, phone and utilities 4 ways. Call
Todav! 321-7613. Verv Affordable.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - 1990 BAYI.INER. 20 ft.
long. Force motor I.SOhp and trailer. All in
very good condition. Call (919)356-2665 af-
ter 6 pm.
FOR SALE: 1994 JEEP Wrangler.
Great condition. low mileage. Green with
tan soft top 6c bikini top. $10,500. Call
Maureen at 758-6055 for more info.
FREESTYLE BIKE SUBVERT 1.0
chrome. Fusion pegs front and back. Excel-
lent condition $250 obo. Call Eric 758-2177
and leave message.
1983 JEEP CJ-7. SIX cylinder, five
speed, 4x4. Gas shocks with 31" tires
$5,500 negotiable. For further info call 752-
7616 after 7 pm.
sofa! LOVESEAT, COFFEE
TABLE, two end tables and two lamps.
$250 for entire set. Great condition. Avail-
able first week in May. Call 758-6055.
MUST SELL COFFEE TABLE, end
table, dining room set with four chairs and
shelving unit price negotiable will take best
offer. Call 231-5936 leave message.
sTeFpER SOFA AND LOVE seat for
only $250. Both pieces in excellent condi-
tion and very comfortable. Must sell! Call
413-0346 ask for Mary or Julie.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsche
Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs, Corvettes. Also
Jeeps, 4wd's. Your area. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000 ext. A-3726 for current listings.
PUPPIES FOR SALE 12 Rottweiler
12 Black Ub $150. Ready the last wee-
kend in April. Call 756-6555.
TV SET. 1 YEAR old, tin-screen display,
caption vision, remote control. 13 Best
offer Tel. 752-6079.
BEIGE SOFAHIDE-A-BED. Queen
size, like new! Great for apt. or dorm.
$100.00 (ncg.) 758-6722.
Jb7- BOOKSHELF SPEAKERS.
BRAND new $75.00, 5000 BTU ac works
�cll SI00.00. CjII 830-2870 jk fur Todd.
75 VW BUG. N EW paint job. recently re-
built engine, clean interior. $3,700.00 obo
328-7182.
classifieds
93 MAZDA 626 WITH sunroof. CD
player, amp. and speakers for sale. It is in
great condition and it has extra low miles.
Call 758-9640. $10,600.00.
LIVING RCOM FURNITURE FOR
sale. Sofa $175, loveseat $130, recliner
$160. 355-8032 after 6 pm.
FUJI MOUNTAIN BIKE 3 years old.
Unique, in great condition, shimano com-
ponents, toe chips. $100 or best offer. Call
Jeremy at 413-0513.
IBM PS2 55-SX 386-16 40m.b.hd many
programs SI00. Panasonic printer (ink jet)
$50, Together $125. Car tires 14" falken
185-60R like new wrims that fit Accura In-
tegra SI 00. Earth cruiser $50. 752-2997.
FOR SALE: NIGHT stand $15, wom-
en's bike $25. couch in excellent condition
$50, dishes SI0. cabinet to put tv on $15.
Call Cindy 758-9741.
ATTENTION CYCLISTS 97 470
trek road bike. 250 miles. Shimano
RSXergo-shifters. 52" fits 5'475'6" sta-
ture. Excellent! Firstupgrade! Quality.
$575, negotiable. 752-6993 whenever!
95 CHEVY CAVALIER, LT. blue AC
CD must sell ASAP $9300. Call Jennifer
Wheeler 328-3514 leave message.
U2 TICKETS (3) CLEMSON May 16.
Best offer 830-1821.
COMFORTABLE TWIN BED WITH
box spring and frame only $80. wood desk
with lots of storage space $45. Desk chair
$25. Bookcaseteicvision stand for $30.
Must sell everything. Call 413 0346.
NEED FURNITURE OR OTHER
items for your apartment? Find it at a huge
churchwide yard sale at St. James United
Methodist Church on the corner of 'th St.
and Forest Hills Dr. Sale starts at 6:30am on
April 26th.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: TV. reclin-
er. sofa and table. Call Tiffany at 353-7046.
SALE! A FULL SIZE POOL TABLE.
GOOD CONDITION AND FUN TO
PLAY. ASKING $300.00 OR BEST OFF-
ER. CALL EMILY OR SCOTT AT 561-
7808.
MOVING MUST SALE RED tail boa
and set up $150. Dresser $25. bed S50.
Please call 758-2159.
HELP WANTED
FILM PRODUCTION, TALENT
MANAGEMENT, and Internships avail-
able. Call Creative Artists Management
(800)401-0.545.
NEEDED! SOMEONE TO dotcleser-
vicing and selling of office furniture. Must
be enthusiastic, positive and willing to
work. Call 931-6904. and leave a message.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call 301-
429-1326.
FUN-LOVING STUDENT TO take
care of 5 yr. old boy and 12 yr. old girl begin-
ning Mid-May or early June for 4 12 days a
week. Non-smoker, active, enjoys swim-
ming, and must have own car. Please cali
Anne at 328-1570, or after 5:00 at 756-2059.
Three references required.DANCERS
(ENTERTAINMENT) SID'S
SHOWGIRLS Goldsboro919-580-7084.
FULL-TIME SUMMER NANNY to
help mom with 2 and 4 12 year old toddlers
and twins arriving this summer. Must have
experience with infants. References
required. Call 321-1663.
SASLOW'S JEWELERS IS NOW ac-
cepting applications for part-time sales as-
sociates. Apply in person at The Plaza.
HELP WANTED WASH PUB. Call
between 9-12 pm 752-5222. Tuesday 6c
Thursday.
ATTENTION! ASSISTANT
WANTED to help with male freshman
who has cerebral palsy for the fall semester
1997. Minimal assistance required. Hours
and payment to be determined. Call 919-
732-4748 for an interview.
DANCERS (ENTERTAINMENT)
SID'S SHOWGIRLS Goldsboro 919-
580-7084.
Contractors
Relief Drivers
SfftdN P�vcM Dwiwy
QfWMTVfMel AIM
Rcdw�y PacfcaQfi) M Inc fit Mart
U.S hat ostntnga tor M and part-ma
rafftf drtwm and oontradon
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and flntitcina).
If you ardtrtkaaat 21, !���� dean MVB, 1
yaaraomsidas driving swpsmtw ana good
credit cat
Make $$
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per He & Mileage
MailFax Rnume:
MCSI
RO. Boa 370
Cove Lily, NC 28529
fin: (919)637-2125
New Crecnvillr, Kiraion, New Bern
Hiring Now!
KILL -TIME SUMMER NMY to
help mom with 2 and 4 12 year old toddlers
and twins arriving this summer. Mum have
experience with infants. References
required. Call 321-1663.
SASLOW'S JEWELERS IS NOW ac-
cepting applications for part-time sales as-
sociates. Apply in person at The Plaza.
HELP WANTED WASH PUB. Call
between 9-12 pm 752-5222, Tuesday 6c
Thursday.
ATTENTION! ASSISTANT
WANTED to help with male freshman
who has cerebral palsy for the fall semester
1997. Minimal assistance required. Hours
and payment to be determined. Call 919-
732-4748 for an interview.
CASHIERS: PREP PERSONS, early
morning, afternoon positions available.
Weekends a must. 16-25 hrs per week. Ap-
ply in person Blvd. Bagel, 327 Arlington
Blvd. No phone calls, please.
DEGREE IN HAND, NO career in
sight? Looking to grow a business in East-
em. North Carolina. FullPart-time posi-
tions. Call 551-6749 for confidential inter-
view. v
DO YOU HAVE A summer job yet? Rcs-
iden tiai Co-Ed Summer Camp near Greens-
boro, NC seeking male & female cabin
counselors, male & female adventure coun-
selors, swimming instructors, and horse in-
structors. For more information contact
John at (910)349-9445 or e-mail
schoultz@vnet.net
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN? .Areyou
looking for employment? We are looking for
caring, compassionate individuals who love
children to work as full and pan time teach-
ers at our corporate child care center locat-
ed in RTR If you are interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
JUNIORS and SENIORS: Do not lim-
it yourself to linear income and a nine to
five job. Take 40 minutes out of your life.
Groundfloor. Savings. Documentation.
Come see for yourself. 888-605-0906.
INOUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER In-
ternships in sales. $1,000 guar-
anteed plus commission. Cali Jeff
Mahoney at Northwestern Mutual.
355-7700.
3 PRODUCTION ASSISTANT PO-
SITIONS open starting first summer ses-
sion. Asst. Prod. Manager 6i Prod. Asst. I
positions require Mac Based Quarkxpress
knowledge to be able to design ads. Produc-
tion Assistant 2 positions requires no ex-
perience. Position start first summer ses-
sion. Applications are being accepted as of
today until Tuesday. April 29. Apply at our
office on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building (across from Joyner).
WANTED: STUDENT WITH
CDFR, EDUC, PSYC. NURS major to care
for 5 year old boy this summer. Own trans-
portation, non-smoker, and swimming skills.
�Access to 2 local pools. Hours: Monday-
Thursday 8-5. Call Sherrie at 328-2009. (af-
ter 5) 355-7597.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS. IN-
STRUCTORS, Lifeguards needed for
Raleigh & Winston-Salcm pools May-Sept.
Contact David 1-888-246-5755 for applica-
tion or mail resume to PPC, PO Box S474
Wmston-Salem. NC 27113.
LEAD GUITARIST KEYBOARD-
IST needed immediately. Southern
RockCountry playing East Coast Club Cir-
cuit. Good pay! Call Mike at (919)237-
3688.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MUST
be 18 years old. Earn great money while you
learn playmates massage. Snow Hill, NC
747-7686.
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crews at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. 95,000 salary plus $1,000
dohihu. Experience preferred. Call 1-
800-477-100 i and ask for Mr. Helfrich.
PAYING AND RECEIVING
TELLER
Must posess a good math aptitude,
dexterity, raxniriciJtyp
permir�ui8),abitytoy�)fkwi1hpi3c
arxlwrjfkingraxwteckjedbank
services. Should poooooo a high school
rjpkxna or equivalent Previous teler
experience helpful. Opening in
Greenvie. Send resume to: PO Box
7127, Gtoeenvie, NC 27835
&
�.�
Equal Orjportunity Employer
MFHV
$2,361
Looking for 3 ECU students to work with
UNC students in a summer intern.
Min. GPA 2.5
SERVICES
TYPING SERVICE - DEPEND-
ABLE. CONFIDENTIAL, fast turnar-
ound. Low rates you can afford. Call today
forGlenda at 919-527-9133 or E-mail me at
GStev22480.AOL.com
ADULT TOY PARTY - for women only!
Earn free products just for hostessing a par-
ty. Call a romance specialist today! 7
5533 and ask for Jenn.
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Ubrary of Intanrntton � U.S.
it.i7$ma-Misimj$m
Orov CMfco Today th Wsi MC or COO
P3fr 800-351-0222
,ushS2.00lo
Urn Avt 1206-RR, las AngHa. CA 90025
The East Carolinian
PERSONALS
MY NAME IS FRANCISCO Martinez.
I'm from Nicaragua and am interested in
corresponding with a nice gir! as I remem-
ber ECU was a fine, friendly place. Please
write me at Box 83A7227 Drawer B, Storm-
ville, NY 12582.
GREEK PERSONALS
PI KAPPA AS USUAL champagne
brunch was a blast! We can't wait until next
year to keep the tradition going. Love, Chi
Omega.
HAPPY FOUNDERS DAY TO Sigma
Sigma Sigma on April 20th.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
SIGMA dancers for winning the Alpha Xi
Delta all sing. You giris did a great job.
Love, your Sigma Sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PL WE had a
great time at the Big Sis Beach Blast. Can't
wait until we do something again. Still
soaked. The Phi Psis.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON THANKS
for the fun at O'Malley's last Wednesday. As
always we had a great time. Love, Chi
Omega.
ALPHA XI DELTA WOULD like to
congratulate and welcome their new sisters:
Katie Hamil, Cyndi Bowman, Jennifer
Thornton, Holly Drill, Karen Webb, Heidi
Gantt, Dana Menture, Lesley Parker, and
Nikki Schmitt. We love you!
ANN, WE WILL MISS you terribly.
Good luck in Kentucky. Love always your
Sigma Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO KATIE
MCCABE. We know you will do a great
job. Love your Sigma Sisters.
GREEKS OF THE WEEK Alpha Delta
Pi (-aura Holcomb, Ashley Danner Alpha
Omicron Pi Meri Mann, Lisa Hinnant Alpha
Xi Delta Kristi Rose, Michelle Matthews Al-
pha Phi Nicole Nicosia, Jonni Wainwright
Zeta Tau Alpha Liz Gibson, Betsy Roberts
Pi Delta all the new officers Sigma Sigma
Sigma Krishna I-acy, Sage Hunihan Chi
Omega Stacce Deiner, Emma Thomis. Kate
Smith
PI KAPPA. SIGMA SIGMA Sigma, and
Sig Ep of NCSU - the quad was a blast. Al-
pha Xi Delta.
KAPPA ALPHA PSI: THANK you for
an awesome social last Thursday! We had a
really great time and ran not wait to do it
again. Love the Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta.
THE ALPHA IX DELTA Greek All
Sing was a huge success. Congratulations
Sigma Sigma Sigma on winning 1st. Thanks
to everyone who participated. The sisters
of AZD
SIGMA PI CONGRATULATES THE
Nu class for doing what it takes to become a
Sigma Pi. Our new bros are: Creighton Bar-
rett, Dan Haught, Rob Jordan, Brian Kaiser,
Jay O'Brien, Josh Peters, Justin Stafford.
KAREN KUSHNER, KAREN WEBB,
and Heidi Schmitt � We are proud of you for
representing us in Pika's Greek Goddess.
Alpha Xi Delta.
PHI TAU CORRIOAN'S WAS great
on Thursday. Hope you had as much fun as
we did. Thanks again. Love, Chi Omega
GAMMA SIG: CONGRATULA-
TIONS to our 97-98 Exec! President Mei-
anie Knox, Service Vice President Amber
James, Membership Vice President Jenny
Love, Treasurer Beth Wilder, Recording
Secretary Jessica Corcoran, Corresponding
Secretary Jen Jones, Alumni Liaison Aman-
da Worsham, Chapter Betterment Lisa Vexl-
er, National Representative Scarlett Foster,
Historian Tata Butler, Social Chair Jen Paige
Atkinson, and Parliamentarian April Hol-
ton.
PI DELTA SOFTBALL PLAYERS:
Congratulations on your victory last Monday
night. The championship is that much clos-
er! Keep up the good work! Love, Your
Sisters.
ALPHA XI DELTA CONGRATU-
LATES the winners of their formal awards:
Outstanding Officer - Heather Atkinson.
Outstanding Senior - Alison Furgal, Best All
Around Sister - Andrea Luther, Sister of the
Year - Michelle Matthews, Academic Excel-
lence - Catherine Sanders, Outstanding
New Member - Karen Webb, New Member
Academic Excellence - Jennifer Thornton,
and President's Award - The Gamma Phi
Chapter of East Carolina University.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
N EW SGA Exec. Lisa and Leslie you guys
did an awesome job. We're so proud of you.
Love, Your Chi Omega Sisters!
LOST & FOUND
LOST KITTEN. 41597 ON Greenv-
way at Dogwood Hollow. Calico (white
wblack and gold coloring). Miss Priss is 4
mo. 3 lbs. $50 reward. 752-3255 anytime.
LOST LABCHOWPIT BULL
ABOUT 6 months old. Black with white
chest. Found on 4th and Meade St. Call
Lori 758-8621.
TRAVEL
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
(W)
OTHER
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY to
borrow money for college. We can help you
obtain funding. Thousands of awards avail-
able to all students. Immediate qualifica-
tion 1-800-651-3393.
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on St. Delinquent tax.
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free 800-
218-9000 Ext. 11-3726 for current listings!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BUILDING HOMES WITH GODS
people in needanyone interested in organ-
izing a campus chapter of Habitat for Hu-
manity, to start this fall, call Toni at the Pitt
County Habitat office, 758-2947.
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS TUTOlL
TRAINING workshop scheduled �
(Greenville) - Teach an adult to RED.
Literacy volunteers of America-Pitt County
is holding a tutor training workshop begin-
ning on April 24, ac 7pm. The workshop'
consists of five training sessions. The ses
sions will be held on Monday and Thursday11
evenings. Volunteers will learn to teach
functionally illiterate adults how to read
Call 752-0439 today for more information of'
to register for the tutor training workshop! �
Workshop dates: Thursday, April 24, Mom
day, April 28, Thursday, May 1, Monday
May 5, Thursday, May 8.
TUES APRIL 15 -juniorrecital,Whir
ney-Colc Kleinschustcr, voice and Senior1
Recital, Theresa Stone, voice, AJ Fletcher"
Recital Hail. 7:00 pm Wed April 16 - Soptv -
omorc Recital, Matthew King and Allan" '
Rascoe, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 90"
pm Thurs April 17 - Friends of the School'
of Music Scholarship Showcase Recital, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 700 pm Fri April 18
- Senior Recital, Julius McAdams, saxesf���
phone, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm, i
Fri April 18 - Graduate Recital, Susan A
Vbges, cello, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 ��
pm Sat April 19 - Senior Recital, Ralph
Stewart, horn, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 1:00
pm. Sat April 19 - Graduate Recital, lo-
nathan L. Askey, guitar, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 5:00 pm Sat April 19 - Senior RecitaBX
Kelley L. Williams, violin, AJ Fletcher Ret-
tal Hall, 7:00 pm Sat April 19 - Senior Re-
cital, Richard Ramirez, composition, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 90 pm Sun April
20 - Sunday at the Galley Concert: String
Concert. Frit Gearhart, Conductor. Green-
ville Museum of Art, 802 S. Evans St
Greenville. 2:00 pm Sun April 20 - Junior
Recital, Jurij Brewer, piano, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 2:00 pm Sun April 20 - Graduate
Recital, Natalie Stroud, voice, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 4:00 pm Sun .April 20 -
Graduate Recital, Greg Srreuber, crumpet,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 90 pm Man
April 21 � Trombone Ensemble, George-
Broussard, Director, AJ Fletcher Recital
I tail. 8:00 pm lues April 12 - Hrcshman
Recital, Jon Johnson, organ, First Presbyte-
rian Church, 1400 S. Elm St Greenville,
70 pm Tucs April 22 � Guitar Ensemble
Elliot Frank, Director, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 80 pm. For info, call ECU-6851 or
the 24-hour hotline at ECU-4370.
ECU LAW SOCIETY - OUR next
meeting will be held on Monday, April 28th
at 5:15pm in Ragsdalc Rm. 130. We will re-
ceive information on LSAT and the applica-
tion process of law schools. The meeting is
open to all majors and refreshments will be
served.
FRISBEE GOLF DOUBLES; COME
join us for frisbee golf from 3-60 pm on
April 23 & 24 at the frisbee golf course.
TUES APRIL 22 -FRESHMAN RE-
CITAL, Jon Johnson, organ. First Presby-
terian Church, 1400 S. Elm St Greenville,
7:00 pm Tucs April 22 - Guitar Ensemble,
Elliot Frank, Director, AJ Fletcher Recital �
Hall, 8:00 pm. Wed April 23 - Symphonic.tT)
Wind Ensemble, Concert Band and Sym-
phonic Band, Scott Carter and Christopher
Knighten, Conductors, Jack Sump, Guest-
Conductor, Wright Auditorium, 8:00 prr!jfc
Thurs. - Sat April 24-26 - Jazz Festival, fora.i
more information, call 328-6851. Fri, April J!
25 - Senior Recital, Alex Brown, voice, AJ �J!S,
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm. Fri April 25 Jm'i
- Jazz Ensemble A, Carroll V Dashiell Jr '�')
Director, Wright Auditorium, 8:00 pm. Fri. " �
April 25 - Graduate Recital, Michael Weav-
er, viola, AJ Fletcher Recital Hail, 90 pm. Z
Sun April 27 - East Carolina Symphony �
Orchestra, Stephen Blackwelder, Conduc- '
tor, Wright Auditorium, 3:00 pm Sun April
27 - Senior Recital, Nakia Maurice Medley;
saxophone, AJ Fletcher Recital Halt, 7:00
p.m Sun April 27 - Emerald City Brass
Quintet, Britton Theurer, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall. 90 pm Mon Apri
28 - ECU Steel Orchestra. Mark Ford. Di
rector, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm.
Tuc April 29 - Student Recital, Reiko Ishii
piano with Manuel Rebcggiani, piano, AJ -
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm. For addi-
tional information, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370. nntm
�j-iawi
Your ad
could be
328-2000
1 R
CAMP
aAa
PPWBWi
00D
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors & Instructors
for privo co�d youth camp tccossd in she
twautiful mountains of wirtm N.C.
Over 25 achvitws including all sports. �
skiing, healed pool, tennis, art, horsebnek,
go- Earn. 610 to 811earn $1250 -
1650 plus room, meats, laundry & great fun!
Non-imok�rs call for brochureapplication:
�00-S32-5539
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8 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
vyvllllAvO
The East Carolinian
mr
Sparo Time
By Farkas
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ptiirtttt
Snowman's Land
By Rob Chapman
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ACROSS
1 Yellow color
5 Pigtail
10 Minute opening
14 Fit of shivering
15 Stallone role
16 Surmounting
17 Annoys
18 Bay window
19 Ascend
20 Begin
22 Diplomat
24 Quarrel
26 Lacking spirit
27 Inhabiting trees
31 Reaches the top
of
35 Gehrig or
Costetto
36 Blunder
38 Stair post
39 Ova
41 Bill and �
42 Hack
43 OW object
45 Enroll
48 Homo sapiens
49 Shaking
51 Certain kind of
singing
53 Satellite
55 Precept
56 "Hamlet"
character
59 Young swan
63�die
(indomitable)
64 Where Tripoli is
67 Gas pref.
68 Punta del �
69 Turn inside out
70 Yam
71 Farming need
72 Compact
73 Minerals
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ANSWERS
FROM THURSDAY
A1DA1ASTERlRAN K
OR1oOEESEELA N
HASH1NAPTLOR E
ANCEST0RA P!EC E
REARD1 RE
REPEAT� rENOVAT E
ALA� mETALPENA L
GUNsIDENTS01M E
E01TSAGA�ElSE C
DECREASEHRE LV EER T
EASEMA
sfEARSM01STuR E
HARMoR1o;1�NE S
ELSER1NsE�DE N
0EERTOTE��0L E
DOWN
1 Way of walking
2 Monster of fairy
tales
3 "Cool Hand �
4 Spanish
explorer
5 Tender
6 Household god
7 French pal
8 Girder
9 Indian of Mexico
10 Bird often caged
11 Oftheear
12 � Hashanah
13 Sword
21 Discharge
23 Seagull
25 Broad comedy
27 Like a lookout
28 PiloTs "OK"
29 Horn
30 Nuts
32 Hindu ascetic
33 Austin native
34 Throw
37 Helicopter part
40 Stewed
44 Unfriendly
46 School
47 Be dependent
50 Stirred up
52 Smoothly, in
music
54 Artless
56 Works in verse
57 Affectation
58 Table rf�
60 Close
61 Writer Gardner
62 Foot parts
65 "� Hur"
66 Time periods:
abbr.
We ironUl i
everyone ivhtf helped make the 99
ftMi Ttit sin" tt success
HEALTH PROMOTION & WELL-BEING
PULSE � BRADFORD CREEK
CHARLES JUNE KARATE �
ECU CHEERLEADERS
BURGER KING �
ARAMARK � ECU STUDENT STORES
� STUDENT RECREATION CENTER
BARNES & NOBLES � BLT'S
� GREENVILLE FUN PARK
KROGER'S � WZMB
GAIL FERRELL WEIGHT LOSS CLINIC
APPLEBEE'S � SRC AEROBIC DEMO TEAM
AND ALL WHO CAME AND JOINED US THAT DAY!
Congratulations to the Grand Prize Winners:
Sfionise Miller- Mountain Bike
Trucy Cox SRC 12 Membership
HoUey Ripe- Roller Blades
georfles hair designs
Walk-ins welcome
Full service unisex salon
European trained stylists
WOLFF tanning beds
Latest in facial & body wax
Skin & nail care
Professional hair products
HOT
NEW
BULBS
$5 off
Suntan Packages
u�����
With this cuupun. Not vaW with any
other uttav Valid at all 3 locations.
Expires 5J0W

to Mendenhall Student Center
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
LITTLETEXAS
with special guests
THE KENTUCKY
HEADHUNTERS
in concert.
Friday, April 25 at 8 p.m. in Williams Arena.
Advance-priced tickets now on sale
in the Central Ticket Office.
$15 for ECU studentsfacultystaff and
$20 for the general public. All tickets are $25 at the door.
Co)oniiini Socmti.
Michael (PG) April 24-26 at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre
Free admission with valid ECU I.D.
a -
.

MlflttW
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL
Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from
8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the games
you can bowl, plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of discounted
bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m.
Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity"
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 -p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.mll p.m.
-r-






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M.MUit'KRITK BKN)M IN Niw. Editor
AMY I. ROYSTKR Ajjisiim IWws Editor
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The end is near, there's a light at the end of the tunnel that is the spring semester. But how
many papers have you got to do this week? How many exams do you need to study for? And have
you really packed a box to get out of your dorm room?
! Even though the end of classes is a week away, this is the week when students could begin
Co get stressed out. when stuff hits the fan for a couple of weeks. This is the week your profes-
sors and teachers will atcempt to give you that one last assignment, just a little something to
average into your already-suffering grade.
: This is the week a lot of important stuff will be going on in class and on campus, like Barefoot
on the Mall. And if Mother Nature is in a good mood, it will not be a week you want to be in
class. It will be a week you'll want to be outside, perhaps working on that Coppertone tan. It
will be a week during which you will look at the clock and convince yourself your teacher is not
only agoraphobic, but also photophobic.
� Remember this is the week you get to tell off, we mean honestly evaluate, your teachers. Isn't
the joy of being able to trash your instructor on a bubble sheet reason enough to go to class? This
is also the week the teachers will be looking at attendance and beginning to average things, like
your grades.
I; This is the week those sun-fearing, outdoors-fearing teachers start reviewing material that
Will be making a return appearance on that butt-kicking exam that only counts for a massive
chunk of your final grade. Now are you really looking forward to walking in blind (and possibly
hungover) to a test that means that much?
And yes, it will be the last weekend until fall for one last bash when you really should be
studying for those four exams the next day. It will be the time to send off the graduating seniors
with a party not to be forgotten soon.
On top of all that studying, partying and socializing to cram in, Mom and Dad are expecting
that you'll have your packing entirely done when they pull in at 7 a.m. the day after your tough-
est exam and are ready to take their slave home for the summer.
We at TEC just want to remind you, our readers, not to stress out, but take the next couple
of weeks seriously; try a little time management. We're not saying study all day and go to bed
at 8 p.m. We're simply reminding you to have some common sense. Don't go to bed at 3 a.m.
and expect you'll be sunshiny and fully alert at 8 a.m. for that grade-defining exam.
Party after you've studied. Sleep in late during the exam schedule, just remember to study.
We want you back here in the fall. So, party and have fun, just remember to study and go to class.
You'll be glad you did when you walk out of that last exam, well-rested and ready to celebrate
how well you did on your exams.
Practice what you preach
lb the Editor,
In his article Can't we all just get
along?" John Davis first points out that
the members of B-GLAD should have
contacted a member of Another Way so
that "dialogue is opened up between
the two groups, and then some judg-
ments can be made I agree with Mr.
Davis on that point.
But I couldn't help but notice that
Mr. Davis was making some judgments
of his own. At the end of his article,
when he relates an incident he "heard
about" concerning InterVarsity
Christian Fellowship, he seems to
make a fairly strong judgment of their
actions by seating that the girl was
"harshly treated If this is an incident
he only heard about, and did not
research, then I hardly think it is fair for
him to be making that sort of judgment
call. Not only that, but he is doing the
very thing for which he chastised B-
GLAD, that is, coming to a snap deci-
sion. While! agree with Mt Davis' idea
that we should ail be willing to talk
with each other and learn about one
another, I feel that he might want to
exercise some of the same wisdom he
seems to want from everyone else.
Jay Paul
Junior
English
Learn to live with tolerance and respect
lb the Editor,
I am writing out of deep concern
about the recent escalation of gay vs.
anti-gay sentiments on campus. It is
extremely upsetting to witness so
many negative comments and hateful
remarks coming from both sides of the
issue.
This is America: "Land of the
Free a country founded on freedom
and tolerance. Why then are we so
intent on denying this freedom?
Our history is made up of struggles
for acceptance and equality. It is what
we have fought for. If we deny the
rights of one group, do we not deny the
rights of all Americans? Do we not
betray all that we have worked so hard
to preserve over the last 221 years?
This is also a university community.
Supposedly, we are all intelligent, edu-
cated people. fet, haven't we learned
anything? Look at Nazi Germany, look
at the McCarthy hearings, look at the
Jim Crow laws, look at ourselves. Have
we not learned anything? ,
Hatred, intolerance and violence
lead to more of the same. It is time for
both sides to stop. Stop judging; stop
attacking; stop taking sides. Vfe must
realize that there are differences
among all of us. Neither side will ever
convert the other, nor should we try.
instead, we must accept our differ-
ences and celebrate that we live in a
country that allows us to disagree.
Together, we must find a way to live
with tolerance and respect, because
divided, we will surely all perish.
Maureen Prendergast
Senior
Education
ECU needs new registration process
To the Editor,
Did registration nearly kill anyone
a few weeks ago? My plan was sim-
ple�15 minutes before class I head-
ed to the registrar's office to compose
next semester's schedule. Two days
earlier, I sat in the hall outside my
adviser's office for about an hour
before he signed my form and sent
me on my way.
The registrar sent me on my way,
too, after finding out that I could not
take one of my classes until I was
secure in my major. So I went back to
my advisor's office to collect my fold-
er after another long wait in line, then
to the undergraduate office for a ran-
dom signature, and finally to my
department, where I waited for
another half hour before officially
declaring my major, at which point I
could register.
I am not the only one with this
problem. I missed all my classes that
day and ended up collapsing on my
bed from exhaustion and stress.
At NCSU, students register by
phone. At other universities, students
do not need to see advisors unless
they have specific questions. This is,
after all, nearly the 21sr century.
Paper is becoming obsolete. Granted,
registration is fairly simple if there are
no problems in the schedule, but 1
had no way of knowing when I woke
up that morning that by noon I would
already feel like I walked to Kansas for
a signature. I know that I am not
alone.
Clementine Tran
Freshman
PsychologyPre-med
Consider off-campus meal plans
To the Editor,
Throughout the past few weeks, I
have read about various concern on
how to better conditions at ECU
such as parking, registration and
other issues. Well, now I would like to
introduce an idea I have for improv-
ing ECU's dining.
Well, we all know how it is to go to
the mail, and stop by the Food Court
to grab something to eat at Chick-Fil-
A or Taco Bell. Weil, how would it
sound to be able to do that in the
convenience of your own backyard
using your meal card? I know we have
six places to eat on campus all which
are good places to eat, but wouldn't it
be nice to be able to use your meal
card in more placrs than these six?
I know some people may be ask-
ing themselves wnsre would we put
places like sav Chick-Ftl-A, Taco Bell,
Lil' Dino's or Subway. Well, if for
some reason we cannot put these
places on campus for student conve-
nience, then maybe consider the idea
of allowing us to use our cards where
these places already exist even if it
means going off campus to do it.
There are places right next to cam-
pus such as McDonald's Wendy's
Subway, Miami Subs and more. Wriy
not, if the idea of a small food court
consisting of franchises of these
national chains on campus does not
work then consider extending our
meal plan privileges right next to
campus.
1 for one would love the idea of a
Chick-Fil-A right on campus for say
lunch or dinner. Other campuses
such as North Carolina State
University have these restaurants as
part of their dining experience.
I think it is time for ECU's dining
services to catch up with other uni-
versities and consider the idea of an
on campus food court or the idea of
having the privilege of using our meal
cards at places right next to campus.
It may even get more students to sign
up for on campus dining.
Crystal Howard
Freshman
Undeclared major
Drivers can't see around dirt mounds
To the Editor,
For those of you who haven't seen
the dirt monuments along 10th Street,
let me bring you up to date. A few-
weeks ago, dirt mounds were erected
on the bottom of the hill along 10th
Street, across the street from
Christenbury. This spelb curtains for
all those jaywalkers out there.
Jaywalkers are a problem for drivers
along 10th Street which made this
"sandbox project" seemingly a good
idea. However, what was missing in this
haste to build the mounds were the
student drivers. Everyday hundreds of
cars make their wav up and down the
hill.
Try going down the hill tonight
around 10 p.m. when the lights are on
flasher. As you stop at the light, look left
to see if it's clear to turn, unless you
have X-ray vision all you can see is dirt.
The dirt mounds are causing a bigger
problem for drivers than just jaywalk-
ers. This is an accident waiting to hap-
pen. W; can't sec
TTie mounds need to be lowered or
cleared out nearest the street comet
Let's try to prevent a tragedy before it
happens.
Danete Williams
Freshman
Undeclared
n � in �
7





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GRASSROOTS 1:30-2:30
0 R G A N lZ A T I 0 N
IHBACKSLIDES 3:00-4:00
THl TOASTRS 4:30-6:00
PRISIHTID BY THl CU SIUDFNT UNION � APRIL 24,1997,12:00 NOON ON THl (
fUWlin nf fOLLOVIlHG HOmilES:
VILCRO WALL � ORBUROH � POii JOUSl � UMPORA
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PLUS! HO ALCOHOL, COOLERS, PUS, 0
SPONSORED IN P4PJ H P4P4 JOHN'S Plllfi





11
. '

i ftp 1997
The East Carolinian
Barefoot
Toasters, Backsliders, Grass
Roots and Jumpstarts invade
WIH Tl K I. R
-I Miih WKIi'K
The end of the semester and school year nears and pressure mounts as exams loom heaw i your head like a metal
sombrero, hut there is relief in sight, lake out nur frustrations tins I hursdav it the 18th annual Barefoot on the
Mall.
s usual. Barefoot, sponsored In the E( I Student I 'nion, otters students plenty to do: a rock climbing wall, tem-
porary tattoos, a bungee run. a gladiator pole joust, the Orbitron. and the Velcro wall.
Perhaps more encouragingly, barefoot offers a wider diversity of music than the downtown music scene or the
past feu Barefoots. Ska legends The Toasters headline the event (ther performers include honky-tonk rockers I he
Backsliders, the hip-hoppin GrassRoots Organization and battle of the band winners rhe Jumpstarts.
The Toasters formed in New York's Lower East Side in 1982. Fifteen cars later, they are touted as "ka pioneers
and recognized as major influences on bands such as Rancid and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. I hey have also
helped to spread the sounds of ska through their own record label. Moon Records, home to lit s C�o Bowling,
Seofflaws. llepeat.The Pietasters,The Allstonians and Skavoovie and The Epitones.
The backsliders, leaders of the Triangle twang scene, released their debut album, Thrrtsrin' Ruth (hi 1A �� ear-
lier this year. The group released a six-song II! From Raleigh, AY . last tall. They play honky-tonkin country rockin'
and roll in' music that will change your mind it your idea ol country roc k is I he Eagles.
The irassRoots Organization is somewhat of a mystery. Their press release reters mainly to the Middle Fing:
Clique, a division of the GrassRoots (Organization. Who exactly from the organiz it ion will he performing at Barefoot
is unclear. The press release stresses that the organization avoids the gangster ii.uk taken by many rappers. It also
sas the (Clique aims to prove that "North (Carolina isn't all
cattle, farms, and dirt roads
Out of Chapel Hill. The Jumpstarts retrain from the
skapunk leanings of groups such as The Mighty Mighty
bosstones and The Suicide Machines. They sink to "old-
school" rock stead and soul-ska. going hack to '50s and
(ills Jamaican dance music for influences and blending m
with rhsthm and blues, soul and jazz.
Slated to kick off at noon. Barefoot is expected to tun
about six hours. Vm w ill be shot and talked had about it you
bring alcohol, pets or bicycles.
There's lots and lots of novelty attractions, music and
Iwioths from various on-campus organizations, and it's all
free. So come.
lor more information, call the Student I nion at iJS-
471x
The Toasters itop). a ska band from New York, The
Backsliders (bottom tight), a honky-tonk band from
Raleigh, and The Jumpstarts (bottom left), a ska band
from Chapel Hill, will perform for our benefit on the Mall,
starting at noon on Thursday.
PHOIQS COJRTESY Of STUDENT UNION
Minges welcomes Little Texas and Kentucky Headhunters
V
is slated tor relea I
The anti-prett - Kentucky Headhunters otter
N ' " perhaps a more raw sound than I attle Texas, presenting
a souped-up, dixie-fried version ot a roadhouse band.
The band originated from the south central region of
This Fridav night don't mess with Texas or. for that mat- Kentucky foi ;in the spring of 1985 after more than
don't mess with Kentuck either
se Efiri Barnyard
Hi rt i lw.ii with
15 vears of performing under different names and line-
Little Texas and tl - Kentucky Headhunters will be tips
two-steppm' into Williams Vena ai Minges Coliseum. In 1989, the Kentucky Headhunters released their
The concert, sponsored by the EC1 Student I'nion first album. Pirth nSashvilh which sold more than two
Popular Entertainment Committee, is scheduled to million copies and earned them album of the year and
hcginatSp.m. group of the rds at the CM V CM. and
Both groups, while country at heart, bring along a Grammy award pres
slateof musical influences, ranging from blues to rock n 1 he gi
roll. ' 1991 I, ft
Little Texas has enjoxed tremendous success since piano hen) Johnnie Johnson.
first public performance in 1989. The group was a real mpiiation, Tk Rest of the Ktvtmky
given the 1944 Academv ot Country Musk's Vocal Hettit v� was released in 1994.
( uoiip of the V-at award andlountry Music Television's tor the show are 20 for the public
Groupof the Year and Video of the Year awards. andS15l E ts. facultyand staff.
The group's press release sas the concept behind Ml tickets will cost ;) It I
Little Texas' sound combined "the harmonies of For more infom tact the Central Ticket
Restless Heart, the turbulence of the Kentucky Office at Mendenhall s idem center at 328-4788 or 1-
Headhunters. as well as the versatility of using multiple 800-E I -ART'S Foi TUD iccess. call 28-4736
vocalists as did the Eagles Thev also list labama as an The ' ' ' .Monday
influ, I' ' - 21. April 22
Littl d three albums: ��� ' Tim ' � and Vpril I
I � �� � ���� : � � (1993) and Kik a Vdva . sets I ie show can also be pur-
. Ie ised i greatest hits con - ' I Style, located behind the new Parker's
lew songs.
Ibum, the self-titled fjtft A u,
V
Little e) Iwangers from the Lone Star state, and The Kentucky Headunters (right) ant
Bluegrass state, will be pickin and grinnin for your pleasure Friday night in With in rt Minges I
PHOtOS COURUSV OF STUDfNl uN





I
12 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
lifestyle
Tte East Carolinian
WheelPower makes dancing
dreams come true
BONI BOSWELL
KXF.RCISF. AND SPOKT SCIENCE
DALE WILLIAMSON
5SISTNT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
"Rr as long as I can remember, I
wanted to dance recalls ECU stu-
dent Jennifer Haynes, "and finally
although proceeded by operations
and hospital stays, I was able to
achieve my goal. The therapeutic
effect of dancing was not only physi-
cal, but also emotional. The five years
1 have spent dancing represent some
of the happiet moments of my life
Jennifer, who is a special education
major, cherishes the ability to dance
more than the average person. Rr her,
dancing is not a thing to be taken for
granted, for her, it is a miraculous gift.
And she is not the only ECU student
who has these feelings.
Jennifer, like several students on
campus, is disabled. She was born
with cerebral palsy, which has con-
fined her movements for her entire
life. But Jennifer has not let her con-
dition stop her from being physically
active, and thanks to an ECU inte-
grated dance troupe, she has now dis-
' covered the joy of dance.
This dance group is integrated in
the sense that it includes both people
with disabilities and people without
disabilities. With the support of
ECU'S ARISE program in 1995,
Jennifer's idea of founding a dance
program including people with dis-
abilities was bom. Jennifer chose the
name Whcelfower for the group.
Wheelftjwer currently includes
ten members. Six of the dancers have
a wide range of disabilities (physical,
visual and auditory) and four dancers
, are able-bodied. The troupe contains
dancers that attend ECU and dancers
from local communities. Three of the
dance members are from New Bern;
one is a public school teacher and the
other two are public school students.
The New Bern dancers joined the
troupe in the fall of" to perform
with WheelRjwer at a regional confer-
ence in Greensboro.
The faculty advisor and director of
the troupe, Boni Boswell, Ph.D is an
Associate Professor in the
Department of Exercise and Sport
Science.
Recently, Boswell choreographed
Awakening for the entire troupe.
Jennifer choreographed a solo, Reach,
for herself.
Mike Hamer, an ECU English
Department lecturer, has composed a
musical score especially for Awakening,
and will be "jumping in to fill in for
one of the dancers from New Bern
who will not be at the performance
"I take my hat off to Dr. Boswell
and the disabled dancers she has
worked with Hamer said. "They
have been working on this every
Sunday since late October of last year.
That's dedication
Through contributions from the
ECU School of Health and Human
Performance and the College of Arts
& Sciences, Awakening was recorded at
Blue House Studios in Greenville.
ECU faculty members from the
School of Music, including Barbara
Memory, Paul Tardif and Darren
Holbrook, as well as independent
artist John Sutton, generously con-
tributed their talents to the record-
ing. Funding for costumes for the
troupe was provided by Pitt County
Community Schools.
The troupe performed both
Awakening and Reach in Greensboro in
March as part of a regional conference
entitled "A Total Commitment
The troupe's upcoming perfor-
mance will be pan of ECU Disability
Awareness Vek. This performance is
scheduled for April 23 at 7 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre.
For further information about
WheelPower and its future perfor-
mances, contact Anne Kitchin, ECU
recreational services representative,
at 328-1570 or 328-6387.
Get the Credit You Deserve
with the East Carolina
Universit Credit Card!
WheelPovw will perform it 7 p.m. in Htndrix Theatre tomorrow night
PHOTO COURTESY OF AtC SMfilETAHT t SOW 10SWEU
Apply for
the East Carolina
University Visa or
MasterCard and show your
support for ECU! It's the credit card
with a low competitive annual rate, and
there's no annual fee ever, as long as
you use your card at least once per
year. PLUS, every time you use your
ECU credit card BB&T will pay a royalty
to the university.
You'll be proud to display your ECU
Visa or MasterCard while enjoying
the full benefits of a credit card.
Use it for school supplies, traveling
and emergency cashand
it's a
great
way to
establish
good credit!
� Low Annual Percentage Rate
� No Annual Fee
UU
EAST
CAROLINA
1222221. to 11:00 p.m Saturday
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
To apply for your ECU Visa or
MasterCard, call toll-free �
1-600-476-422&, Monday
through Friday, 7:00 a.m.
Show your school
spirit -call today!
�Musi imc Uk canl �! least once aiiiiimllt iirSJO.UII lev rs mm Ml
Visit our tent at Barefoot on the Mall on April 24 to
complete your application and receive a free T-shirt
� eastcarolinian
Meed
eaop&Uence?
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r-V"1 &(






13 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
ilcstyle
The East Carolinian
Customer Service
Representatives
Bowen Cleaners is
seeking individuals to fill part-
time positions as customer
service representatives. Hours
will be 3p.m. to 7p.m. and
Saturday.
Qualified individual
must have a positive & quality
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leaners
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CD
reviews
fi � ikv-i
Ben Folds Five
Whatever and Ever
Amen
321-4862
315 SE Greenville BLVD
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and Personal Checks
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w any purchase
10 Xtra Pokey
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For a limited time only.
John Davis
STAFF WRITF.R
Indie rock can get really really boring
and really really pretentious.
Sometimes you just get tired of hear-
ing postmodern deconstructionist
noise filtered through old broken
amps. Sometimes you just want to
hear somebody who can sing in tune.
Sometimes you want something cre-
ative but not hard on the ears.
Sometimes you want to have a little
fun, the way you did when you were a
kid iistening to the radio.
Even though they're big in the
indie-rock scene, even though they're
young, even though they're from
North Carolina, even though there's
only three of them, Ben Folds Five are
such a relief from the worn noisepop
scene that sometimes seems to be the
only "alternative" to alternative
music. Ben Folds Five are a trio of nice
young men performing a nice blend of
soul and '70s rock with just a dash of
that early '80s flair that makes their
songs so darn catchy. The group is
centered around the piano and vocal
skills of Ben Folds, who also happens
to be the group's songwriter. (That's
probably why they named the band
after him.)
Whatever andEver Amen is the trio's
second album. Jaunty and loud, this
album is a blend of the humorous and
the deadly serious (usually in the
same song.) The songs are danceable
peppy numbers spiced with flashy
piano solos and the solid grooves of
Robert Sledge and Darren Jessee on
drums and bass. Ben Folds has better
keyboard skills than Elton John or
Jerry Lee Lewis, but without John's
Vegas-like self-importance or Lewis'
attraction for close family members.
The album opens up with "One
Angry Dwarf and 200 Solemn Faces
a rollicking ditty about judging people
by appearances, inner human torment
and sweet, sweet revenge. "Fair"
works from the old "all's fair in love"
saying, blending it into a hook-filled
piano jam. "Brick" is a lament about
the loneliness of being in love with
someone who is dying: "Now that I've
found someone, I'm feeling more
alone than I have before. She's a brick
and I'm drowning slowly
"Song For The Dumped" is a God-
sent rant to all those girls who've left
us poor nice guys in the dust. The
chorus is wonderfully poetic: "Give
me my money back, give me my
money back, bitch. And don't forget
my black t-shirt
"Selfless, Cold and Composed" is a
lovely ballad featuring a gorgeous
string arrangement by John Mark
Painter. "Kate" is one of the cleverest
love songs I've heard in a while: "She
plays wipeout on the drums, the
squirrels and birds come gather
around to sing the guitar
"Smoke" is a ballad lamenting the
mortal nature of man. "Steve's Last
Night in town" is a jazzy song featur-
ing a New Orleans trumpet about an
annoying but nice guy: "I think
Steven was mad. Maybe he wasn't
mad. but we felt strange for a moment
then the moment was gone and for-
gotten
"Battle of Who Could Care Less"
is a complaint about those people who
make mountains out of molehills. The
album closes out with two ballads,
"Missing the War" and "Evaporated
J3JPg?W,mmma� cyv ?
�m ! flLt.
Itr-i
Lake Trout
Lake Trout
Jay Myers
I.IFF.STVI.F. EDITOR
Haven't heard of Lake Trout? Well,
neither had I until The House of
Blues informed me that the band was
coming to perform on campus. I asked
them to send me some bio info and a
copy of their CD. I got both and was
immediately overcome by Lake Trout
fever.
Needless to say, Lake Trout played
on campus last Wednesday in front of
Mendenhall student center. Due to
some unforeseen problems, they did-
n't actually play until over an hour
after they were scheduled to begin. I
had planned on staying for the entire
gig, but I had other things to do that
day and had to leave when they went
so far over schedule. I heard it was a
good show.
That's too bad, too, because I have
really fallen in love with this album
and I was looking forward to seeing
them live. If you like jazz, hip-hop and
soul, especially in the vein of current
artists like Dag, Jamiroquai and
Charlie Hunter, then it's worth every
bit of money you have to pay to get
your hands on this record.
Recently, I've felt as though soul
music has become "soul-less with
SEE BEN FOLDS. PAGE 15
E
Can't even hum along Tape it from a tntni Buy it Ihwd
SEE LAKE TROUT. PAGE 15
Pay FoH Prict
rdtuldtions
to Graduating Seniors
IT DOESN'T TAKE AN ECONOMICS MAJOR TO KNOW THAT A TRIP
TO TARGET PAYS OFF. FOR A DISCOONT STORE, THERE'S A
PRETTY AMAZING RETORN ON YOOR INVESTMENT,
EXPECT MORE. PAY
at 3040 South Evans Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
919-355-8020





s
14 Tuesday, April 22. 1997
t ft style
The East Carolinian
Lysistrata disappoints
One of my favorite lines from the
ECU Playhouse version of
Aristophanes' classic play Lysistrata
belonged to the Commissioner. He
remarked after a party celebrating a
treaty with the Spartans, "Get drunk,
and nobody gives a damn
Maybe if I had been drunk, watch-
ing this play would not have been so
painful.
I've been reviewing the ECU
Playhouse since my freshman year
and have never, in all that time, seen
such a poor production. Before I start
in on what I didn't like, I would like
to point out that this can in no way be
blamed on the cast. They did an
excellent job with what they were
given. Unfortunately, that wasn't
much.
I'd like to start off with the cos-
tumes. The characters were basically
dressed in long underwear draped in a
satin-type curtain. The color scheme
was really quite clever though - pink
for women, blue for men. However
did they come up with that?
Another big problem I had with
the costumes were the phalluses. Not
a single one stood up by itself. The
poor actors had to run around stage
holding them up, and heaven help
them if they needed both hands for a
gesture. They wilted so fast it made
my head spin.
As for the Spartan Herald - well,
while I must say I'm impressed with
those boys they grow in Sparta, I was
very amused to notice the snaps on
his phallus that held it draped over
his shoulder. You'd think something
as obvious as these snaps could have �
been hidden a little more gracefully. I
have to ask - did they run out of
money? If not, there really isn't any
excuse for the poor quality of these
costumes. I know Costume Designer
Kathleen Gossman can do better. Her
designs for the earlier production of
IB. were nothing short of spectacular.
Another big problem with this
production was the music. Perhaps it
would have been better if they had
just left the music out. The first big
conflict was the fact that the music
just didn't fit the play. Sure, they
were singing about what was going
on, but the songs sounded like they
were written for the modern world
and totally didn't fit with the ancient
Crock costumes and set.
Furthering the problem was the fact that the dia-
logue within the play was in an entirely different
style than the words of the songs. And what were
those dances? I could have sworn I saw the same
thing on an episode of Family Matters - a little dance
called the Urkel? By the time the male chorus sang
to Zeus to save them from the womn, I was singing
a prayer of my own - save me from this play!
I want to personally apologize to Amanda
Whitford and Michael Scialabba for what I'm about
to say. I can not bring myself to blame this on the two
of you. I'm certain that it wasn't your idea, but the
country hick accents for the Spartans just don't work.
Talk about a cheap gag. These accents just came out
of nowhere and really made my stomach turn. My
overall impression is just that this play does not rep-
resent the quality theatre I'm used to seeing at the
ECU Playhouse. I was reminded of a middle school
production, and I must in all honesty say that I was
ashamed that people actually paid money to see this.
There were a few bright spots in this otherwise
extremely poor production. The set and lighting
were extremely well designed. At first f had been
bothered by the loud colors, but as the show went
on, in comparison they really became like works of
genius. Set designer Robert C. Alpers and lighting
designer Ken White are to be commended.
As I mentioned before, the cast did an excellent
job with what they were given, and a few individuals
stood out by overcoming great obstacles and giving
good performances. Jamie Bullock was an absolutely
delightful slut, although some of her actions in the
beginning brought to mind of Jamie Lane's character
in Suburbia (especially rubbing herself along the
bench).
I was also extremely impressed with Leane Jones,
who played the leader of the women's chorus. I can't
decide if her energy and enthusiasm came from hon-
SEE LYSISTRATA. PAGE 15
arts
Jennifer Cnleman
Senior Writer
CIms: Junior
Major: Theatre Fjluration
Home: Wilmington, SI.
Inquiring Minds
Want To Know
If someone came to you and said,
"Hey, I want you to throw a party
at Mendenhall Student Center for
17,000 of your closest friends
What Kind of Party Would it ��
5i$li()WGIEL$A-
193F N. William Street � G'otdsborrb. NC
DANCERS (ENlffiftiNtfiS
ADMISSION
Open Every Tues Wed Thur Fri. & Sat. Niehf
Non Stop from 8 P.M. til 2 A.M,
re thinking about that, please take a minute and answer the following question?:
I rjave you ever attended ECU's Midnite Madness? Yes
0 what did you like about it?
6
No
0
What didn't you like about it?
Have you ever attended ECU's Mardi Gras? Yes
What did you like about it?
No
What didn't you like about it?
Would you rather attend a St. Patrick's Day party than Mardi Gras? .Yes
rather attend an End-of-Year party than Mardi Gras? j Yes
&
Noe
0" Q-
o
These questions are brought to you by: The Major Events Committee of djf
1 -fj � Student Life, sponsor's of ECU's annual alcohol-free parties: Midnite Madness and
Gras. Please clip and return your responses to : Marketing Office, 21 t Mendenhall
Center, ECU, Greenville, NC 278S8 or drop them on at the Information De
4,
t�
,
Kappa Sigma
Presents the 16th annual
Bahama Mama
Band Patty &
Hawaiian Tropic
Bikini Contest
Featuring
Saturday, April 26,1997
12:00 PM
700 E. 10th Street
(beside Darryl's restaurant)
For info about Tickets or the Bikini Contest call 757-1005 or 752-543
.
$





I
15 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
lit
style
The East Carolinian
Lake Trout
continued from page 13
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
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! Men's Rubber Heels - $6.00
more and more groups forsaking the
traditions of the past and instead
focusing on those small fast-and-fad-
ing fads that can make them the most
money. Luckily for me, Iake Trout
has decided to return to the roots of
what makes music soulful.
The band itself is from Baltimore,
where they have become well-known
for their infectious and entertaining
live shows. Made up of five members
including Woody Ranere (lead vocals,
guitar), Ed Harris (guitar, vocals),
James Griffith (bass, vocals), Matt
Pierce (saxophone, flute, percussion,
vocals) and Mike Lowry (drums),
Lake Trout has made a name for
themselves based on their varied
musical sensibilities.
"We listen to hip-hop, jazz, rock
and soul Harris said. "It all figures
into our music
Their sound is a complex mish-
mash of late '60s Blue Note jazz and
early-to-mid '70s James Brown com-
bined with a spice of Marvin Gave and
a smidgen of Django Reinhardt. As
diverse as the elements may sound,
Lake Trout manages to combine them
into a seamless whole, even jjoing so
far as to include some hip-hop ele-
ments.
"We're inspired by hip-hop in that
the beats and rhythms are often incor-
porated into our songs; we listen to
bands like Digable Planets, A Tribe
Calied Quest and The Roots Pierce
said.
However, their sound is very retro
with none of the over-produced, sam-
ple-laden stuff that ruins many of
today's rhythm & blues acts. As warm
and relaxing as it is grooving and shak-
ing, Lake Trout's sound has a timeless
quality, yet never seems to be stuck in
the past.
"We all like really raw, organic
sounds Ranere said. "We don't want
a lot of extra effects and guitar pedals.
It's gotta have an edge to it
Well, this album certainly does
have an edge to it. From the laid-back
instrumentation and smoky lyrics of
"Stuck in My World" and "What to
Do to the jump-kick sounds of
"Polis" and "Nuetro Ivenus Lake
Trout have crafted a fine piece of work
for their self-titled debut. I expect to
hear more from them in the future.
They certainly deserve a big label
record contract.
But until that happens, I'll be glad
to have this album in my player. Right
now, I'm going to kick back to the
beat of "On My Way to Work a tune
that owes its backbone to James
Brown's "Giving Up Food for Funk
and the perfect song for hanging out
on the porch and downin' a cold brew.
Ah, life.
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Ben Folds
continued from page 13
Here Folds shows a more emotional,
tender side while not losing his wit
for a moment.
The band is tight throughout the
whole album. The arrangements are
fun and clever, and the choruses are
littered with "doo-wops" and
"ahhhs" that send you back to the
70s. The roadhouse piano licks and
foot-stomping grooves are just darn
tasty. Despite the fact that entire
thing was recorded in Ben Folds'
house, the recording and mixing arc
just this side of heavenly.
This is a perfect album for long
drives on a sunny afternoon, or a to
play video games to. And the hidden
rrarlc g pmhahly my favnriff sinrf
the whole hidden track trend
became popular.
Lysistrata
continued from page 14
est devotion to her work or a person-
al decision to have a good time to
spite the play. Either way, she was a
lot of fun to watch.
Alayna Hamilton was an impres-
sive Lysistrata, and her superior
singing voic is probably what
stopped me from walking out in the
middle of the how. Ever since hear-
ing her in Durk of the Moon, I'll grab
any excuse to listen to her sing.
I can honestly say the iw bright
spots in this production were not
enough for me to recommend that
anyone else waste their time seeing
it. In fact, the only recommendation
I can give out is for the cast.
As much as I love you guys, I'd
leave this one off my resume.
Pantana Bob 's Fresents
i
i
11
i
HALF PRICE ADMISSION PASS
FOR RESERVATIONS 757r-$77
FOOP ANP PRINK SPECIALS
" mil im�m.i . �.





)


ECU
'�
3
Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians
Celebrating 3 years educating and si
I
Because gasmen, lesbians and bis�
housing anomployment and because
if we get harassed it is our problem and if we get attae
we're flaunting ourselves and if we enjoy sex were pe
march with pride we're recruiting children and if we w
stand up for our rights we're over-stepping our bound
question our own worth as human beings and if we dc
opposite sex we haven't given it a chance and if we hs
is not recognized and we are told our love is not "real
'through a phase and because lesbian and gay history
homophobia is sanctioned by the supreme court and
lesbian, gay, bisexual civil fights movement.
This ad was supported by manygays, lesbians, bisexuals and our
others supported,this ad, but wjere unable to have their names lis
Club Image-Rocky Mount, Donna Mitchell, Dave Cuilom, Mid"
Steven Hovis, Chad E. Rarker, Valerie & Glass & Chicora KMartH
Tiffany L. Cook, Ashley Glenn, Elizabeth Lamm Lancaster, Emily
years as a couple), Khryz Staton, Paula Edwards, Mary Duel
Dr. Roberta C. Martin, Jeff Durham, Jeffrey Gersh, John Holder!
Crystal G. Watson & Jayean R. Thomas, Felicia S. Mayo, Gamefli
Maureen Prendergrast, Debbie Rice, Stacy Barrett, E. Jay l
Dr. Donna Walsh, Caryon E. Mathis, James Hampton, Janet G
Kate Jarrell, Cliff Hill, Jessika Hunt;
"Our freedom was not won a century ago, it is
in our hands, and we are marching no longer!
convinced now it cannot be de
Dr. Martin Lut
"






r
lpiwe act is more" imp
provoked it and ifwe raise out voic
d if we have AIDS we deserve it af&d if
Tave children we're unfit parents anil if we
and because we are forced constantly to
aye a relationship with someoneof the
we aYe1ationsp with someone of the same sex it
�: andjf we cqout of the closet we're just going
is vnfcfly atfrait friliterature and because
lots of offlr reasons, I am part of the
m
ft.
.only apportion ofhich ar listed h
ibte discrimination they might face:
eal Wi Mourning, Brian Pearson, Dameon Locklear,
, Kelly Faith Graham, S. Reilly, J. Marshall, Amanda Canady,
if, John B. O'Brien DMA, JoAnne Riemer & Donna C�(2.
" Craig Andrews, Drew Mc!iHef, Jacob Antone Berna
ch Elkins, Arthur Trawick Baugh IH,Cortney L. E
. Richardson, Kete Foy, Alexander mlth, CarltohSm
riani, Veronica Lopez, Lora JoSey, Aaron F. Lucier,
er, Nancy Hammond, James thomasJammie Price,
Greg Buck & Jeffery Durham
lwon today, but somfe small part of it i
es and twos but legions of thousand
nieqfby any human force
:herKing, Jr.
1
m 1
r





1
18 Tuiidty. April 22. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
Duke wins 10th consecutive ACC women's tennis title
NORCROSS, Ga, (AP) - Duke captured its 10th consecutive Atlantic Coast
Conference women's tennis championship Sunday with a 5-2 victory over
Wake Forest.
The streak of titles set a conference record for most consecutive crowns in
any women's sport. It was Duke's 91st consecutive victory in ACC matches.
Karin Miller, who won all three of her No. 2 singles matches, was named
the tournament's Most Valuable Player.
Miller beat Wake Forest's Maggie Harris 6-0, 6-0 and Vanessa Webb won
the No. 1 singles for the Devils, 7-5,6-3 over Amy Jensen.
Wike Forest got singles victories from Nicola Kaiwai and Anniemarie
Milton, forcing Duke go to doubles to clinch the crown, that coming when
Luanne Spadea and Karen O'Sullivan beat Lule Aydin and Kaiwai 8-3.
Carolina reaches terms with 17 free agents
CHARLOTTE (AP) - The Carolina Panthers expanded their Nebraska con-
nections Sunday night by agreeing to terms with 17 collegiate free agents,
including three Comhuskers.
Nebraska fullback Brian Schuster, halfback Damon Benning and defensive
end Jeff Ogard agreed to come to Charlotte to join Cornhusker safety Mike
Minter, taken by the Panthers in the second round of the draft Saturday.
Also agreeing to terms Sunday night were halfback Fred Lane of Lane;
offensive tackles Brian Estes of Presbyterian, Todd Hunter of Tulane and
Jamile Wilson of Marshall; wide receiver Maurice Staley of Tennessee; outside
linebacker Jon Evjen of Hofstra; inside linebackers Myron Newsome of
Virginia Tech and Ratcliff Thomas of Maryland; kicker David Akers of
Louisville; safeties Mitchell Palmer of Colorado State, Eric Vance of Vanderbilt
and Nakia Reddick of Central Florida; and defensive ends Brian Jurewicz of
Wisconsin and Waverly Jackson of Virginia Tech.
The 17 arc to join the Panthers' six draft choices and selected Carolina vet-
erans at a three-day minicamp the team is holding Friday through Sunday at
Ericsson Stadium.
New short track ace Gordon wins again
MARTINSVILLE, Va. (AP) - Jeff Gordon says short tracks were the one area
where he was truly short of answers when he arrived as a regular in NASCAR's
Winston Cup series in 1993.
Hit overpowering victory in the Goody's Headache Powder 500 on Sunday
at Martinsville Speedway - his second straight win and fourth in eight starts
this season - was simply the latest example that the precocious 25-year-old
teams his lessons fast and well.
"It means a lot to me and to Ray (crew chief Ray Evcmham) to win on the
short tracks because this has been the toughest thing for me to adapt to, par-
ticularly at a place like Martinsville Gordon said.
"A couple of years ago, we came here and tested and I ran lap after lap after
jp. Then I went home and watched hours of tanc on guys who ran well here.
1 learned a lot from that, and days tike this are the payoff
A week earlier, Gordon had to bump his way past Rusty Wallace on the last
turn of the lust lap to win. This time, he led a race-record 432 of 500 laps on
the .526-mile oval, IrWwot even being spun out in an incident with Jimmy
Spencer could slow his Hendrick Motorsports Chevrotet for more than a few
moments.
!� The previous mark for the spring race was 427 laps led by Cale arborough
� ip 1974, Richard Petty holds the Martinsville rccord with 480 laps led in the
Stall race in 1970.
!S "It takes a lot of patience to win at Martinsville, and that's the hardest
thing said Gordon, who also won here last September. "But when you've got
i car that drives as good as this thing did today, it's easy to be patient
Million dollar bonus still waiting to be claimed by
American marathoner
�BOSTON (AP) - There's a $1 million payoff waiting for an American
Jmarathoner to claim. Nobody, however, appears capable of taking it.
Before the start of the year, New Balance Athletic Shoe, Inc offered the
�whopping bonus to the man or woman who breaks the U.S. record by the
"largest margin in the marathon between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31.
" � So far, no one has come close to the men's mark of 2 hours, 8 minutes, 47
�seconds, by Bob Kempainen at Boston in 1994 or the women's record of
��21:21 by Joan Benoit Samuelson at Chicago in 1985.
S ' Americans get another crack at the money in Monday's 101st running of
Jthc Boston Marathon, and neither the men's nor women's record is expected
�to fall. That, despite the presence of some of the nation's elite runners.
The men's field includes 1996 Olympian Keith Brantly and 1993 world
�champion Mark Plaatjes, and the women's entries include 19 Twin Cities
Marathon champion Olga Appell, 1991 and 1993 Boston runner-up Kim Jones
Jand 1994 Chicago Marathon champion Kristy Johnston.
s
S Jordan wins another scoring title
JSEW YORK (AP) - Michael Jordan won an unprecedented ninth scoring title
�with an average of 29.6 points, the first time in those nine seasons that the
Stihicago Bulls star failed to average at least 30 points.
2 � Utah guard's John Stockton's nine-year run as the NBAs assists leader came
Jo an end as he finished second to Indiana's Mark Jackson. Jackson averaged
�11.4 assists - one more per game than Stockton.
3 Chicago's Dennis Rodman, who missed the final 13 games because of a
Stnee injury, won his sixth straight rebounding title with a 16.1 average.
� i The playoffs begin Thursday night with Charlotte at New York, Orlando at
miami, the Los Angeles Clippers at Utah, and Minnesota at Houston. On
�Friday night, the Washington is at Chicago, Portland at the Los Angeles
lakers, Detroit at Atlanta, and Phoenix at Seattle.
� �
TRMAtime
Name the 1996 MVP of the NHL playoffs and
what team did he play for?
uuoq syi yA3 fujouoif mm Jtfp$ sop uwjJt xnwjMy ofmuopj

The baseball team will host the
��Wolfpack of N.C. State tomorrow night

:jat Harrington field beginning at 7 p.m.
liGames are tree to students. This is one
iiof two last home games for the season
jj for the Pirates.
Burns only ECU selection in draft
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
This past weekend's NFL Draft saw
only one selection from ECU �
offensive guard Lamont Bums.
Bums was selected first in the fifth
round by the New York Jets. He was
the 131st pick overall. He is the first
ECU offensive lineman to be selected
in the draft since 1993 when Tom
Scott was chosen by the Cincinnati
Bengals in the sixth round.
Burns was a two year starter at
offensive guard despite coming to
ECU in '92 as a defensive lineman.
He played defensive end in '93 and
moved to tight end during the 94
spring drills.
During the '94 season he was
switched to offensive guard and saw-
action against Cincinnati, Auburn,
Memphis and Illinois. It was at this
position he finished out his playing
career at ECU. In 95 he was named
the most improved offensive player
for the season and started all 12
games.
Bums was a bit surprised when the
Jets selected him because, according
to Bums, the Cincinnati Bengals were
looking to draft him in the third round
but ended up selecting Rod Payne, a
center from Michigan.
When asked about what his biggest
adjustment will be going to the NFL,
Burns laughingly said it had nothing to
do with football, but with New York
itself.
"My main concern isn't the foot-
ball aspect Bums said. "Coach (Jeff)
Connors has prepared me for the
physical part of the game and Coach
(Steve) Logan has prepared for the
mental part. I'm more worried about
heading to New York City
When Head Coach Bill Parcells
traded away his first selection in the
first round to the St. Louis Rams,
many people criticized his move. But
Parcells' strategy was to gain as many
picks possible to help the ailing Jets
who went 1-15 last year. Bums agreed
with the move.
"Parcells has been
known to come in and
make things better
Burns said. "You can't
build a team off one or
two people. You need
the 11 guys to con-
tribute. If the odds are
11-2, I'll take the 11
Bums feels he can
contribute a positive
attitude to his new
"ECU athletes in the pros have been
known to be hard workers
From the way Bums played his
career at ECU, he will carry on the tra-
dition of hard workers in the pros.
Since Bums was the only player
selected in the draft, he was a bit sur-
prised that more of his teammates
didn't go.
"I was surprised. Our class was one
of the most talented
However, some of Burns team-
mates are in the process of signing
free agent deals with various teams.
Bums heads to New York on Friday
for three days then will return to ECU
for graduation.
(Top) Lamont Burns, no 64 helps protect quarterback Marcus Crandeli, no. 5, on the line, during the
Southern Miss game. Below. Bums takes par in the action during the Arkansas State game.
Flit PhQTOS
Golfers finish season third in CM tournament
Tracy Lai'bach
SKNIOR WRITKR
ECU's golf team brought in a third
place finish in the CAA
Championship Sundsrv at the Lane
Tree Golf Club. The finish was the
best the Pirates have seen at the con-
ference tournament since 1995-
Richie Creech, a senior from
Wilson, led ECU throughout the
tournament to become the first
Pirate since 1994 to win first place
individual honors. Creech finished
with a total tournament score of 212,
and was followed by Reg Millage of
Virginia Commonwealth. Millage fin-
ished just one stroke behind Creech,
with a total score of 213.
ECU Head Coach Kevin Williams
is extremely pleased with the perfor-
mance of the team at the champi-
onship. After finishing seventh at last
year's tournament, the first year
coach has obviously done a tremen-
dous job with the team.
"We headed into the tournament
ready for a battle among the rop four
teams Williams said. "The guys
really battled it out and gave it their
all
Williams said Creech's victory will
turn a lot of eyes to Pirate rerritory,
and will give the program the credit
and recognition it deserves.
"It was so exciting to see Richie
pull it all together and play so well to
end his career Williams said. "His
win was a very emotional victory
because he deserved it so much
As the
defending
CAA champi-
ons, VCU
came back
once again to
post the best
team score of
the tourna-
ment, with a
Richie Creech total of 871.
U N C -
Wilmington
came in second at 886, just five
strokes ahead of the Pirates.
"I would have liked to have seen
us play with a little more consistency,
but regardless of whether we finished
first or dead last, the effort would
have been the same Williams said.
"I can't ask for any more than 100 per-
cent, and that's what I saw out
there
Coming in 17th place with a total
tournament score of 226 was ECU's
Stephen Satterly, while Kevin Millet,
the recipient ECU's 1997
Outstanding Male Athlete Award,
finished tied for 19th with 227. Marc
Miller and Robbie Perry finished
closely behind in 22nd and 28th place
respectively
For next season, Williams is confi-
dent the players will be able to use
their experience from this year to
help them improve.
"I can foresee us being very suc-
cessful next year after ending this
season on such a high note Williams
said. "We have already grown so
much, but we still striving to be even
better
Track team runs well at championship meet
ZlNA BRILEY
STAFF WRITER
ECU's women's track & field team
captured second-place honors at the
CAA Track & Field Championships
Friday and Saturday at the Harold
Greene Track and Field Complex at
UNC-Wilmington. The Lady Pirates
finished the competition behind
George Mason, scoring a total of 112
points, their highest score in several
years. The Pirates stayed on track by
sweeping all five sprint competitions,
finishing fourth overall in the men's
standings, scoring 80.5 points.
It was a fantastic weekend for
ECU's Lady Pirates, who concluded
the CAA Championships with second-
place honors. To get things started,
the Lady Pirates racked up 26 points
to give them an early lead over the
competition and a six point advantage
over George Mason.
Stepping into the spotlight first for
ECU were senior sensations Lave
Wilson and Amanda Johnson and
junior dynamo Michelle Clayton.
In the jumping events Wilson fin-
ished with top honors in the women's
long jump with the distance of 19' 2
earning 10 points for the Lady Pirates
and Johnson received eight points for
herjumpofl8'3"34.
Clayton contributed eight more
points to the Lady Pirates' score in the
hammer throw, helping ECU gain
their carry lead. Clayton's throw of
176' 10" was a new personal and ECU
record. Her previous distance was 176'
2 set last weekend at the Duke
Invitational.
In other events. Lady Pirates junior
Karen Reinhard, sophomore Kerry
Harding and seniors Dava and Tara
Rhodes finished among the top 15
distance runners in the women's 5,000
meters, but were unable to score any
points.
In the men's distance competition.
ECU's Jamie Mance finished 11th in
the men's 5,000 meters with a time of
15:17.10, while running mates Justin
England and Brain Beil placed 13th
and 15th, with their times of 15:23.10
and 15:44.80.
On Saturday both ECU squads set
out to dominate the field and that's
exactly what they did. ECU's women
led Saturday off with a first place fin-
ish in the 4x100 meter relay This
team composed of Kai Eason, Amanda
Johnson, Nikki Goins and Rasheca
Barrow, finished in a time of 45.42, a
new school record. The four sprinters
came back later in the day and ate -up
the top-four spots in the women's 100
meters.
In other running events. Barrow
placed second in the 200 meter
sprinrs, with a time 24.60, while
Johnson came in fourth in a time of
24.90. In the 4x400 meter relay, Lady
Pirate squad of Keisha Johnson, Leana
Anding, Cindy Syzmanski and Missy
Johnson placed fifth in a time of
4:00.27 and Missy Johnson finished
individually in fourth among the other
400-meter hurdlers, with a time 1:04.
60.
In the jumping events. Lave
Wilson placed second in the triple
jump with a distance of 39' 10 34"
and Anding came in third jumping 37'
3 12
On the field, Clayton finished sec-
ond in the shot put with a toss of 43' 8
12 ECU senior thrower Darlene
Vick placed third in the discus her dis-
tance, 133'0
"The level of competition in the
CAA has really improved in recent
years and for our team to do this well
is outstanding said ECU Head
Coach "Choo" Justice. "Normally, in
past years, George Mason has scored
over 22 points leaving everyone else
behind. But this weekend we were
able to take some points away from
them. Everyone on the squad ran
SEE TRACK. PAGE 21
Rugby season concludes with another winning season
ANTHONY STANFILL
STFF WRITER
The ECU rugby team concluded their spring season two weekends ago at
Radford University on a good note by winning the tournament. The win is noth-
ing new for the Pirates, considering this semester is their 20th winning season
in a row, finishing with a 14-5 overall record. Fbr the last decaoc the ECU rugby
team has ended the season with more wins than losses.
The last tournament was at Radford University, in Blacksburg, Va. on April
12-13. Including ECU, there were four teams who participated in the round-
robin tournament. ECU first played North Carolina State, shutting them out
19-0. They then defeated the host, Radford 15-7. The Iirarcs lost their last
game to Wake Forest 14-7, but still won the overall tournament because they
scored the most points.
The Pirates' only other tournament of the spring was in Savannah, Ga. at a
St. Patrick's tournament. There they finished fourth out of 12 teams, losing to
the number two, nationally ranked, Penn State Nittany Lions.
The Pirates also competed in the state playoffs on Feb. 22 to qualify for
Nationals. The Pirates lost this time to NCSU, who later lost to the Tar Heels
of Chapel Hill. Since the Tar Heels beat State, and State beat ECU, they went
on to the Nationals.
The Pirates are hoping to do even better next season, since they're only los-
ing three of their 30 players to graduation. Matt Oathout. a grad student and the
club's president, is one of the three departing. Eric Kunkell, the current team
captain, will be returning and is optimistic about the coming season.
"Teams in the past have had more experience, but we're learning quick
Kunkell said. "We'll be better next year than this one because we'll have so many
returnees. We lost a couple of guys before this season, but we still finished with
a winning record, so hopefully we'll be even better next season
Anyone who is interested in playing rugby; is a full-time student and meets
the academic requirements, is encouraged to come out. Eeryone makes the
team and participates in every game since it's a club sport, whether it's on the
A team or the B team. .Also, rugby is played over the summer, as well as in both
the fall and spring.
The team would also like to extend their gratitude to Gray Hodges, the
director of club sports. Thanks to Hodges the Pirates had money, transportation
to the tournaments and places to stay for every tournament.
"He's Hodgesl super to work with and he's part of the reason we're so suc-
cessful Oathout said. "Every collegian rugby team is a club sport, and out of all
the schools we play, in terms of school support, we're spoiled. So we appreciate
everything Gray has done
If interested, call the Recreation Services desk and leave your name and
number, Oathout will be in contact with you with more details.






r
Tlii East Carolinian
19 Tuitdiy, April 22, 1997
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Offer Valid 42397 Only. With Coupon & Valid Student ID
1997 First Round
NFL Draft
Selections
NEW YORK (AP) - Selections from the 1997 NFL draft with team,
player, projected position and college (x-compensatory selection):
1. St. Louis (from New York Jets). Orlando Pace. t. Ohio State.
2. Oakland (from New Orleans). Darrell Russell, dt. Southern California.
3. Seanle (from Atlanta), Shawn Springs, cb. Ohio State.
4. Baltimore. Peter Boulware. de, Florida State.
5. Detroit, Bryant Westbrook. db, Texas.
6. Seanle (from St. Louis through New York Jets and Tampa Bay), Walter Jones, t. Florida State.
7. New York Giants, Ike Milliard, wr, Florida.
8. New York Jets (from Tampa Bay), James Farrior. lb, Virginia.
9. Arizona. Tom Knight, db. Iowa.
10. New Orleans (from Oakland), Chris .ueole, g, Colorado.
11. Atlanta (from Chicago through Seauie). Michael Booker, db. Nebraska.
12. Tampa Bay (from Seanle). Warrick D jnn, rb. Florida State.
13. Kansas City (from Houston), Tony Gonzalez, te, California.
14. Cincinnati, Reinard Wilson, lb, Florida State.
15. Miami, Yatil Green, wr, Miami.
16. Tampa Bay (from San Diego). Reidel Anthony, v . lorida. ,
17. Washington, Kenard Lang, de, Miami.
18. Houston (from Kansas City), Kenny Holmes, de, Miami.
19. Indianapolis, Tarik Glenn, t, California.
20. Minnesota, Dwayne Rudd, lb, Alabama.
21. Jacksonville, Renaldo Wynn, dt, Notre Dame.
22. Dallas (from Philadelphia), David LaFleur, te, LSU.
23. Buffalo, Antowain Smith, rb. Houston.
24. Pittsburgh, Chad Scott, db, Maryland.
25. Philadelphia (from Dallas), Jon Harris, de. Virginia.
26. San Francisco, Jim Druckenmiller. qb, Virginia Tech.
27. Carolina. Rae Carruth, wr, Colorado.
28. Denver, Trevor Pryce, dt, Clemson.
29. New England, Chris Canty, db, Kansas State.
30. Green Bay, Ross Verba. t. Iowa.
I
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SORORITY RUSH
FALL 1997
AlphaVeltaPi
Alpha Omicron PO
AVphfr phi
AlphaKvVMa
VeJUtaZetas
Zeta Toaju Alpha
ChiOvn&&a
S Lama S i&vw S ima
ASA
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Together Complete !
i
REGISTRATION
eaftt Carolina University
�1fT Pufth Po,itration
Your registration must be accompanied
with a check for $30, non-refundable made to
ECU PanheHcnic Association. Rush dates arc on
Thurs. August 13th-17th. You must also supply
eight (8) photos of yourself at the start of rush.
Registration deadline is August 8,1997. For
questions call 919-328-4235.
Return to:�ast Carolina University
204 Whichard Building
Greenville, NC 27858

I
Last Name First
Off Campus Address
Social Security
Is there a Sorority affiliate in your family? Y N
Relationship:Name
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Activities:
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In compliance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of
1974,1 hereby grant the Dean of Students at ECU the nghl to release
I the needed academic information for sorority pledging and initiation
. to Panhellenicor the appropriate sorority when ncccssary.My tcrmi-
I nation from Rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
STUDENT SIGNATURE
Date:
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r
Tuesday, April 22, 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
Alomar faces off with ump � again
BALTIMORE (AP) - Roberto
Alomar and umpire John Hirschbeck
have no intention of sharing any-
thing more than the same field
Tuesday night at Camden Yards.
The game between the
Baltimore Orioles and Chicago
White Sox will put Alomar and
Hirschbeck on the same baseball
field for the first time since the sec-
ond baseman spit at the umpire
Sept. 27 at Toronto.
Alomar repeatedly has apologized
and expressed his desire to put the
incident behind him. Hirschbeck,
similarly, said he wants to do his job
with as few distractions as possible.
Both have rejected the idea of
meeting before the game to bring
further closure to the incident.
"I'm just going to play baseball
Alomar said this weekend in Boston.
Hirschbeck refused to talk
Sunday in Cleveland about the
upcoming Orioles game. Crew chief
Jim McKean cut off an approaching
reporter outside the umpire's room
and said, "We as a crew will have no
comment on the situation. We are
not talking about it
Hirschbeck said Saturday, "It was
over for me a long time ago. I have a
lot more things in my life. I try to
get every pitch right; I try to get
every play right. That's hr,v I'll
approach going into Baltimore
As far as Alomar is concerned,
enough has been said on the subject.
He has been hounded by reporters
this spring, even though he issued a
written apology last October and
said he would donate $50,000
toward research on the disease that
killed Hirschbeck's son.
Alomar also served a five-game
paid suspension at the beginnii. of
this season, and revealed over the
weekend that the money he earned
during that span - his pay over that
seven-day span was S232.0OO - will
be given to charity.
The seven-time All-Star is still
booed when the Orioles are on the
road. He signed autographs before
Baltimore's game at Kansas City two
weeks ago, then was jeered every
time he walked to the plate.
The fans are entitled to their
opinion let's leave it at that he
said. Believe me, I would take it
back if I could. What happened was
totally out of character for me
After being ejected from the
game and then spitting at
Hirschbeck, Alomar compounded
his troubles by suggesting that the
umpire was still "bitter" over the
tragic death of his 8-year-old son.
Days later, the Orioles released
an apology in Alomar's name. But AL
president Gene Budig's decision to
suspend Alomar for only five games -
after the postseason - caused
umpires from both leagues to
attempt a strike. They were stopped
only by a federal court order.
Hirschbeck accepted the apology
and asked the issue be put to rest.
"Maybe, that's the way it ought
to be, with everything back to nor-
mal Orioles owner Fteter Angelos
said. "I think both men will do what
is required and sooner or later, peo-
ple will recognize Roberto Alomar
solely for what he is - a great baseball
player
Kosar says goodbye to football
DAVIE, Fla. (AP) - Quarterback
Bernie Kosar said yesterday that he
has decided to retire so he can focus
on business interests. Which might
soon include part ownership of the
expansion Cleveland Browns.
Kosar, who played in Cleveland
for 8 12 seasons, leads an invest-
ment group seeking to own the
expansion team that will debut as
the Browns in 1999.
"I'm definitely interested in pur-
suing that. I have people up there in
Ohio and people in New York work-
ing on the Cleveland situation
Kosar said. "That is part of what I'm
thinking about There is no ques-
tion those fans, that area, deserve a
football team
Kosar, 33, announced his decision
today after meeting with Miami
Dolphins coach Jimmy Johnson over
the weekend. There was little emo-
tion as Kosar said he was quitting
football with his wife. Babette, and
two daughters in the audience.
'The day comes for evcrylxxly
Johnson said. "He had a great, great
career, both in professional football
and in college
Kosar played in the NFL for 12
years, spending his final three sea-
sons with the Dolphins as a backup.
For a quarterback whose losses were
as memorable as his victories, Kosar
said winning a Super Bowl with
Dallas and his last pass as a Brown
were his most memorable moments.
"It's a tough decision to make
Kosar said. "I still have that compe-
tition inside of me, I still feel I can
play football. It just would be
increasingly difficult to give my full
attention to football
Kosar had been expected to re-
sign with the Dolphins this year as
their third-string quarterback
behind Dan Marino and Craig
Erickson. Last season, he came off
the bench in three games and threw
for one touchdown.
He said he had been looking for-
ward to playing the coming season,
but once he took a good look at his
business commitments he knew it
would be half-hearted.
Besides trying to bring back the
Browns, Kosar is executive director
of a telemarketing business and
owns a new line of greeting cards
and a chain of fast-food restaurants.
The telemarketing business,
Precision Response Corp went
public last fall with a stock offering
of S14.50 per share. It reached a 52-
week high of $46.
In addition, Kosar and Babette
are expecting their third child this
-summer.
"There's a certain sense of sad-
ness that he will no longer be in the
National Football League said
Kansas City coach Marty
Schottenheimer, who coached Kosar
in Cleveland. "He was an outstand-
ing player for us. We had a lot of
wonderful experiences together
Johnson coached Kosar when
both were with the Miami
Hurricanes, Dallas Cowboys and
Dolphins.
"We go back a long way Johnson
SEE KOSAR. PAGE 21
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)
21 Tuesday. April 22. 1997
; I 9
01
i
The East Carolinian
Wednesday
Attic
China 10
Wilson Acres
Tar River
Student Stores
Target
& student
day
The businesses listed here are offering you
special discounts on Wednesday, April 23
just for showing your student I.D.
Texas Two Step
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Look for their ads elsewhere in this issue to
see their appreciation day specials.
Take advantage of these special discounts
tomorrow just by flashing your I.D. card.
SPONSOR ED BY
the east Carolinian
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WITH BUS SERVICE
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Kosar
continued from page 20
said. "He is an outstanding person in
all areas of his life
Kosar led the Hurricanes to the
first of their four national champi-
onships in 1983, but he is most
closely identified with Cleveland.
He became a starter for the Browns
as a rookie in 1985 and remained
with them until 1993. when he was
waived at midseason in a move that
angered many fans.
The Ohio native led the Browns
to the AFC Central title in his first
three seasons, and again in 1989.
Three times, the Browns were
stopped one game shv of the Super
Bowl.
Kosar joined the Cowboys in
November 1993 and won a Super
Bowl ring that season as their back-
up quarterback.
His career totals include 1.994
completions in 3,365 attempts for
23,301 yards with 124 touchdowns
and 87 interceptions. His intercep-
tion percentage is the third-lowest
in NFL history.
"1 enjoyed the mental aspect of
playing quarterback Kosar said.
Being a quarterback gave me a
chance to lead and make decisions
and go with them and make adjust-
ments
Track
continued from page 18
with a lot of heart and did very well
which I'm very proud of
On the men's side, freshman hot
shot Darrick Ingram won both the
200 and 400 meter sprinters and w as
named Athlete-of-the-Meet.
Ingram took first-place in the 200
meters in a time of 21.20 and in the
400 meters, he crossed the finish
line in 46.73. Both times were per-
sonal bests for the ECU freshman.
Fellow ECU freshman Titus
Haygood finished with top honors in
the men's 100 meters in a time of
10.84. Other finishers in the event
were Brian Johnson, Bevan Foster,
Vaughn Monroe and Marcus
Cladden.
In the relav events, the Pirates
set one for the record books by
sweeping all relay competitions, a
fate that has never been done in
conference history. The 4x100 team
of Haygood, Foster. Chris Rev and
Monroe set a time of 40.85, the sec-
ond fastest time in the 97 outdoor
season. The 4x400 meter relay team
of Henry. Alexander. Miller and
Davis dominated the field with the
time of 3:09.10.
In other events, sophomore
Rashawn Deans placed fourth in the
110 meter hurdles in a time of
14.90.
"The guys had remarkable per-
formances this weekend Head
Coach Bill Carson said. "For these
guys to come out and sweep the
relay events and for Titus earning
Athlete-of-the-Meet honors was just
fantastic
Watch for the Pirates as they pre-
pare for ECC's.
Apply now for summer
employment with us at
TEC.
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floor of the student duds.
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V


Title
The East Carolinian, April 22, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 22, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1204
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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