The East Carolinian, April 17, 1997







T
THURSDAY
APRIL 17 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Eastern NC residents reveal greatest concerns
ECU research lab survey
explores the issues
ANGELA KOENIG
HM1.THENVIRONMIN-MI. I SSI F.S
STAFf WHITF.R
ECU's survey research laboratory recently con-
ducted a survey of the leading concerns for res-
idents of eastern North Carolina.
The survey, which was conducted in July
1996. asked residents if they felt issues such as
quality of schools and stricter hog farm regula-
tions would have a positive impact on the qual-
ity of life in eastern N.C. They were then
asked to rank the issues beginning with which
have the most positve impact.
The most positive impact was found to be
the widening of roads to handle more traffic.
Stricter regulations and the quality of schools
were ranked as the second and third most pos-
itive impacts.
The survey also asked residents to follow a
similar procedure for issues considered to be a
threat to the quality of life in this area. This
included issues such as over-fishing, increasing
pollution and lack of management of natural
resources.
Increasing pollution of rivers and sounds
was ranked as the having most negative impact
on the qualitv of life. More hog farms, plant lay-
offs and closings and higher state and federal
taxes were also among the top responses of
threats to the quality of life.
The researchers were surprised at the
results of the survey due to the greater con-
cerns people feel toward environmental factors
over increases in taxes or crime rates.
"The findings surprised me because
issues like crime and higher taxes get so much
more coverage from the media and in political
debates said sociology professor Bob
Edwards. "Even with all the recent media
attention given to hog farms I didn't think they
would rank over things like crime and taxes
The results of this survey were reported by
Edwards and fellow sociology professor John
Maiolo. According to Edwards, this survey is
part of a larger study the school has been con-
ducting.
"This piece of research was part of a larger
project we've been conducting to look at the
socio-economic and environmental process of
roads and bridge projects in eastern N.C
Edwards said. "We did it (this survey) to assess
what people thought about road transportation
projects in eastern NC
The funding for the multi-year project was
received through a grant fom the N.C Center
for Transportation and the Environment. The
ECU department of sociology provided addi-
tional support.
The survey was done under the direction of
Dr. Ken Wilson of the survey research laborato-
ry. The survey was done by random digit dial-
ing of 998 adults living in 41 eastern N.C.
counties.
HOUSE OF BLUES ROCKS THE BRICKYARD
Campus dining areas
scheduled for cosmetic
surgery
Students enjoyed sunny weather and jau music Wednesday performed by the House of Blues on the lawn in front of Mendenhall.The brickyard concert was
an effort to promote the new House of Blues club in North Myrtle Beach, S.C
PHOTO ST MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
Mendenhall to face
biggest change
Becky alley
HOUSI NO & CONSUMATORY SUV I CSS ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
ECU Dining Services is planning a busy
summer by updating, remodeling and reorga-
nizing five of the campus dining areas.
"The biggest, most visible change will be
the renovation of the Mendenhall dining cen-
ter said Frank Salamon, director of dining
services.
Plans to remodel the seating area, expand
and replace the carpeting, install a new light-
ing system and replace the wall coverings will
all start in the Mendenhall dining center July
1.
"We're going to give it a whole new look to
brighten the dining area and create a more
relaxing environment Salamon said.
Mendenhall will also expand its dinner ser-
vice hours to alleviate overcrowding problems.
"Since we can't make it physically bigger
Salamon said, "we are going to expand the
dinner hours to 4:30 to 7:30, seven days a
week to help with the crowding issue
The Wright Place will also undergo some
changes this summer.
Salamon said the coffee bar is going to be
relocated and expanded. In the rail, it will
include more types of coffee, including more
gourmet flavors and cappuccinos.
The soup bar will also have several new-
additions, including more vegetarian and low
fat soups. They also hope to add several new
refrigeration units to hold more salads and
pre-packaged meals.
The Croatan and Todd Dining Hall will
both receive gas-wok appliances this summer.
"These new gas-woks will allow us to cook
more fresh, fast combinations of wok foods
which have been very popular with the stu-
dents Salamon said.
The kitchen in the Galley will also receive
new appliances this summer.
There will be all new kitchen equipment
installed, including some gas appliances for
flame-broiled foods, to make the food flow
from the kitchen faster and more efficient.
Dining Services also plans to expand the
Galley's already diverse menu.
"This is going to be a very interesting sum-
mer with all our changes Salamon said.
Dining Services is also changing the
amounts of money in the built-in declining
balance with the meal plans.
The 19-meal plan will have a $100 declin-
ing balance, the 14-meal plan will have a $125
declining balance, and the 9-mcal plan will
now have a $150 declining balance.
Salamon said there should be no major
changes in variety of foods or prices over the
summer.
"Of course ARAMARK's always going to
experiment with new food varieties and
options Salamon said, "But there should be
no price surges. We're very sensitive to our
market. We know we have to stay competi-
tive
Student wins book grant from adviser survey
Karla. Jones
ORIKNTVTION VNI) CKNFKM COLLIOl ISSI Is
srFF WHITER
On April 15. Travis Thompson was notified that he was the winner of
$300 for textbooks donated by the ECU Student Stores as an incentive
to complete the adviser surveys. Thompson is a sophomore from
Charlotte.
An adviser evaluation survey was conducted during ECU's early reg-
istration period. The purpose of passing out the surveys was to select
two advisers of the year for general college and declared majors.
All advisers were given survey packets to pass out to their advisees.
There were separate packets passed out to general college and declared
major adviSees.The advisers of the year are chosen from the evaluation
the advisees complete.
There was a total of 8,950 surveys passed out and 3.046 were turned
in. The awards committee will meet to declare a winner at a later date.
The award for the winners is $500.
"General college awards will be given out first, and the declared
majors will be done at a later date, because they have until April 31 to
turn their evaluations in said Jo Ann Jones, assistant dean for gener-
al college.
For generaj college advisees there was something extra for the ones
who turned in their evaluations. Every year when the adviser evalua-
tion surveys are passed out there is an extra incentive for the students
who turn their evaluations in. Over the years, the prizes have changed.
In 19 there was a giveaway from the Student Stores and from din-
ing services. They gave away sweatshirts and free dinners. This year
the people in charge of the surveys collaborated with the Student
Stores and decided to give away $300 toward Ixiok money. The main
(Left to Right) Dean of Undergraduate Studies Dorothy Muller, Travis
Thompson, the winner of a S300 book grant from ECU Student Stores.
ECU Student Stores Manager Wanda Scarborough and Assistant Dean for
General College JoAnn Jones
PHOTO BY KAIHA JONES
purpose of hav ing the prizes is to get more students to turn in the eval-
uations.
"Before we started giving out extra incentives, a lot of students did
not turn in their evaluations said Jones.
"The idea of the $300 toward book money was given to us by the
generosity of the Students Stores said Jones.
Next year they hope to make the prizes given away larger, if they
have the cooperation and money to do so.
The main dining area at Mendenhall will receive the most changes this summer when the renovation and
remodeling to campus dining areas begins. The changes made will hopefully make for a more pleasant and
relaxed eating atmosphere.
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
THURSDAY
lifestyle 7
Lysistrata closes
out Playhouse ,
season
opinion5
Don't lake GHB
lightly
sports11
Teams look to
tourneys at season's
end
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOC
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
acioss (torn Joynet libimy
THURSDAY:
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WEEKEND
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Exchange students point out differences between ECU, home
phone
328 6366 newsroom
3287000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uuiBC0ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
J W Ol 1.1.INK I). KIM. 1.1 M
vhi i ITUDISS isst is
s I UK URI I I'R
To most students, the end ot the school vcar
means going home tor the summer, or at least
a break before summer school. Hut tor EC! 's
exchange students, the end of the school c.ir
means the end of their experience abroad, and
going home requires a longer trip than a car
ride of a few hours.
Exchange student Patrick I'crsson is from
Sweden, and recently discussed with F.(. his
impressions of the past year and how American
and European schools differ.
I'crsson is from Katrineholm, Sweden and
attended the I 'niversity of Oreliro there.
Some of the ways in which Swedish schools
differ from American is an emphasis on lec-
tures in class, no mandatory attendance rules,
and fewer exams.
"We have one or two tests a semester, and
the tests, I think, are usually more difficult
hack home I'crsson said.
Swedish students don't get the opportunity
to ask questions during lecture time, but
instead are expected to reserve them for the
once a week seminar which focuses more on
discussion. The students are expected to
Stud) a lot on their own. anil learn the materi-
al by whatever means necessary.
"The only thing that matters is if you pass
the test or not. That's the only thing they care
about IVissun s.nd.
Viih a lot of emphasis placed on self-disci-
pline in pursuit of academic excellence, it is
er uncommon for Swedish students to work
while going to school.
For the majority of Swedish students, work-
ing is not a necessity. College tuition is free for
the students who pass the rigorous entrance
tests. Housing and other expenses are taken
care of through government grants and loans.
The college housing in Sweden is also very
different from the US. The majority of stu-
dents live off campus.
"People usually are a little bit older when
they go to college Persson said. "I isually they
have worked for a couple of years and so they
want to live on their own
For those who do live in the dorms, accom-
modations have about eight people to each
hallway, each with their private tK-droom and
bathroom, and a communal kitchen. Some of
the dorms have a small pub in the basement.
Persson says the pub is not really the equiv-
alent of an American bar, but rather the kind of
place friends would go to have a few drinks
before going somewhere else.
Other than the easy accessibility of pubs on
campus, Persson says Swedish students spend
much of their time the same way American
students do. He said he encountered few
shockers about American culture when he
arrived, although a fascination with American
culture apparently is not a trademark of most
Swedish students.
"It kind of surprised me that very few peo-
ple actually apply to go abroad, which I think is
very strange localise it's something I've really
wanted to do for a long time Persson said. "I
reallv wanted to go abroad, especially to
America
Reason did have a bit of a misadventure
getting to ECU. When he and a friend arrived
on the plane they found that the hotel reser-
vations they hail made were nowhere on
' Stt EXCHANGE PAGt 4





T
news
Tht East Carolinian
Drowning leaves fraternity brothers devastated
RALEIGH (AP) � Counselors and ministers visited a North Carolina State
fraternity still mourning the loss of a newly initiated member who drowned
last weekend.
Steven Velazquez, 19, of Goldsboro died when as many as 18 Tau Kappa
Epsilon members went for a midnight dive off the docks at Lake Johnson on.
Sunday night. Earlier in the evening, six new members were initiated into
the fraternity.
The executive director of the international fraternity traveled to Raleigh
from the organization's Indianapolis headquarters to help the N.C. State
University students cope.
The students, who rode to the lake in several vehicles, told police that no
one noticed until later that Velazquez hadn't returned with them to the
chapter house. His body was found in the lake about 12 hours later.
Raleigh police said they do not suspect that hazing or any other crime
occurred.
Mother pleads guilty in baby's scalding
DURHAM (AP) - A teen-aged mother charged with fatally scalded her 7-
week-old baby by putting her in a tub of hot water pleaded guilty to volun-
tary manslaughter.
LaKesha Michelle Johnson, 19, who had been charged with murder, will
be sentenced June 2. Under the state's structured sentencing laws, she could
receive a maximum of 98 months in prison.
Johnson gave conflicting accounts of how her daughter, Tia Christina
Jones, was burned over 55 percent of her body after the March 20,19 inci-
dent, said prosecutor Elizabeth Armstrong.
The girl died five days later at the UNC Hospitals bum center in Chapel
Hill.
According to Armstrong, Johnson first told police that her older child,
Shenell, who wa : at the time, had knocked over a boiling pot of water that
spilled on the infant. Later, Johnson said she had left Tia in the bathtub,
went to the kitchen and heard a scream from the bathroom. She said Shenell
had turned the hot water on in the tub, scalding the baby
But autopsy and medical reports did not support any of those scenarios,
Armstrong said.
Johnson initially was charged with felony child abuse but that charge was
upgraded to murder when Tia died.
Company offers fife insurance to people with HIV
CHICAGO (AP) -AIDS advocates are cheering the decision of an insurance
company to offer life insurance to people with HIV a move seen by many as
a recognition of the significant advances made in treating the illness.
Gimmnrrw Trust Life Insurance has become the first in the nation to offer
life insurance, albeit expensively, to people infected with HIV The
Glenview-baaed company specializes in insuring high-risk individuals and is
test-marketing the coverage in Illinois.
The treatment that has helped prolong the lives of people infected with
the AIDS virus involves an expensive combination of drugs that includes a
new kind called a protease inhibitor.
State Rum and Allstate, two of the nation's largest insurers, said they have
no plans to offer life insurance to HIV-positive individuals.
The Guarantee Trust policies cost about 1300 a month for $50,000 of cov-
erage. That compares to $55 a month for a fairly healthy 30-year-old man who
doesn't smoke.
Salazar of AIDS Action noted the cost would be prohibitively high for
most people.
Escaped inmate kills wife, later kilted by deputies
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - An inmate broke out of jail Tuesday, shot and
killed his wife and kidnapped her 6-year-old daughter before sheriffs
deputies shot him to death outside a relative's home.
Stallworth, who was serving a one-year sentence for abusing his wife and
fleeing arrest, would hue been released Nov. 1, Craig said.
Stallworth, who worked a kitchen job reserved for the most trusted
inmates, somehow slipped out of his cell, got a gun and went looking for his
wife, who had visited him just two days earlier.
A witness said Stalrworth was waiting on a neighbor's lawn for his wife,
who drove up with her 6-year-old daughter in the car. When the woman saw
Stallworth, she tried to mike a U-turn, said the witness, who was in another
cat
Stallworth fired several shoes at the car, then ran to the passenger side
door and grabbed the girl, Craig said, it was not clear whether Stallworth was
the girl's father.
A neighbor, believing there had been a car crash, ran outside to offer help.
Stallworth pulled the gun on the neighbor and forced him to drive Stallworth
and the little girl to suburban Rio Linda.
Campus ministry group, SGA embroiled in funding
fiasco after miscommunication
Corey Aloood
MINORITY STUDENT ISSUES
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Recently, SGA has been accused by
ECU's New Generations Campus
Ministries of withholding approved
funds for a collegiate Christian con-
ference they attended on March 27-
30. The donated funding was to
cover half the bus and registration
fee, which came to an estimated
total of $1,000, said junior and
NGM President Bruce Stevens.
Moreover, NGM representatives
were told by appropriation heads on
March 17 that SGA would cover the
$1,000 amount and pay this sum
before or soon after the conference.
After receiving SGA's verbal com-
mitment, NGM went on to raise
$1,300 to pay the remaining balance
of the estimated $2,200 bus charge.
The next day, however, on March
18, SGA President Angela Nix,
vetoed the request because it was
not turned in at the designated time
two months prior to the conference.
Also, if SGA decided to pay the
money after the conference, it
would be considered a reimburse-
ment, which SGA was unwilling to
give.
It was not until a week later on
March 25, two days before the con-
ference, that NGM was notified
SGA had denied to pay their half of
the bus fee.
Immediately, NGM representa-
tives went to Dean Speier and Dr.
Brian Hanes of Minority Student
Affairs for help, only to find out SGA
was the sole organization to handle
problems concerning the student
body.
On April 9, Stevens met with
Nix, who told :hem nothing could
be done to improve their situation .
She also told them on March 31,
the legislature decided not to
review it anymore.
However, later NGM found the
legislature never voted on the
request, which permitted them to
go before legislature on April 14 to
override the president's veto with a
two-thirds vote.
It was at that SGA meeting that
the legislature was supposed to pay
the amount due because NGM had
already been told they would
receive the funding. SGA members
then voted 27 to 5 in favor of paying
the money due to the group.
"Government policies should be
checked and reviewed along with
what is communicated to the repre-
sentatives Stevens said.
Nix argued at the April 14 meet-
ing that giving the money to NGM
would' be a reimbursement.
Nonetheless, since all of the bus
fare money was not paid to the bus
company, it was not truly consid-
ered a reimbursement.
"Since reimbursement is not
defined clearly, we were able to give
the money said SGA member and
freshman Jamar Wright.
Several attempts to contact SGA
officials for further comment were
unsuccessful.
Six charged in massive health fraud scheme
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Six people
were charged Tuesday with running
a phony Medicare claim-filing
scheme that yielded them more
than $2 million, authorities said.
The charges against the six, who
allegedly operated in both North
and South Carolina, were unsealed
Tuesday, authorities said.
They are accused of filing more
than $13 million in false claims for
reimbursement from Medicare for
medical services and supplies during
1995 and 19.
They face charges of conspiracy,
mail fraud, wire fraud, tax fraud and
money laundering, authorities said.
They also are charged with mail
fraud and money laundering for
allegedly filing hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars worth of false claims
with private insurance companies
during 1996 and 1997.
Charged are: Raymond R.
Mederos, 54, of Tega Cay, S.C
Diana M. Cutrone, 27, and Anthony
Cutrone, 29, both of Fort Mill, S.C
Michael A NichoLir 34. of Fort
Mill, S.C and William N. Reyes, 33.
Customer Service
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and Pedro J. Rodriquez, 29, both of
Charlotte.
Also unsealed were a civil com-
plaint and other court documents
allowing federal agents to seize
assets in North Carolina and South
Carolina.
The defendants are charged with
creating more than 30 fictitious cor-
porations in North Carolina to sub-
mit and process claims for reim-
b'Tscment for medical expenses.
The shell companies received
the medical reimbursements at
commercial post office boxes
throughout western North Carolina,
the documents alleged.
The defendants also are accused
of establishing numerous bank
accounts in the Charlotte area where
they deposited the payments.
The court documents charge that
since about November 1994, the
defendants submitted more than
11,000 false claims to Medicare for
fictitious medical services and sup-
plies.
The defendants received more
than $2 million, of which half is
being held in escrow at
various financial institu-
tions in Mexico, accord-
ing to the court docu-
ments. The other claims,
totaling almost $11 mil-
lion, were disallowed,
the documents said.
After many of the
Medicare claims were
disallowed, the defen-
dants began submitting
false claims to private
insurance providers,
authorities said.
The claims were filed
to at least 70 companies
and involved at least sev-
eral hundred thousand
dollars, authorities said.
The charges carry the following
maximum penalties:
- conspiring to submit false
claims for Medicare payments, 10
years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
- submitting false claims, mail
fraud and wire fraud, five years in
prison and a $250,000 fine each.
- money laundering, 20 years in
The charges carry the following
maximum penalties:
- conspiring to submit false claims for
Medicare payments, 10 years in prison
and a $250,000 fine,
submitting false claims, mail fraud and
wire fraud, five years in prison and a
$250,000 fine each.
- money laundering, 20 years in prison
and a $500,000 fine.
- filing false tax returns, three years in
prison and a $250,000 fine.
prison and a $500,000 fine.
- filing false tax returns, three
years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
In addition to the civil forfeitures
and the criminal fines, the defen-
dants, if found guilty, are subject to
more than $3 million h damages,
plus a separate penalty or $10,000
for each false claim submitted,
authorities said.
Greenville Student ad 44 - Composite
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3 Thursday. April 17, 1997
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news
The East Carolinian
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April 8
Larceny - A faculty member
reported the larceny of his license
plate from his vehicle parked in the
C-lot at the Brody Building.
Domestic Dispute - A resident of
Greene Hall reported receiving
harassing phone calls from her for-
mer boyfriend. Both were referred
to the Counseling Center.
Larceny - A faculty member
reported the larceny of his backpack
from his office in the General
Classroom Building.
Financial Services.
AssistRescue - A student was
transported from the Howell
Science Complex to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital by Greenville
Rescue after she fainted, fell and hit
her head.
April 9
Larceny - A non-student report-
ed the larceny of a drill from a con-
struction site south of Joyner
Library.
Larceny - A staff member report-
ed the larceny of a fax machine from
April 10
Larceny - A staff member report-
ed the larceny of a VCR from the
General Classroom Building.
Harassing Phone Calls - A resi-
dent of Tyler Hall reported receiving
harassing phone calls in her room.
Worthless Check - A resident of
Tyier Hall was served a criminal
summons for a worthless check.
mons for a worthless check.
Larceny - A staff member report-
ed the larceny of a VCR from a room
in Rawl.
Breaking and entering - A resi-
dent of Fletcher Hall reported the
breaking and entering of her vehicle
parked in the Reade Street parking
lot.
April 14
April 11
Worthless Check - A resident of
Slay Hall was served a criminal sum-
Attention ail Students:
Be sure to pick up next Tuesday's issue of Tfor
important news from Dean Speier and Facilities
Services about the prohibition of in-line skates and
skateboards inside buildings.
lash & Secured Bonds
Statewide tijz
$�& "Call Collect"
frP (919)856-1221
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
hp� 1-800-263-4719
BRIAN MOODY
OWNER
BONDSMAN
Possession of firearm on campus -
A staff member reported an irate stu-
dent near Belk Hall. The student's
vehicle was in the process of being
towed for unpaid parking citations.
The student drove the vehicle off
the tow truck and left the area. The
staff member reported the student
had a handgun in the vehicle.
Larceny - A staff member report-
ed the larceny of the computer from
her office in the Howell Science
Complex.
Meeting
Announcements
Tonight at 8 p.m. in the lobby of
Fletcher Hali, The Dwayne Show pre-
sents: "Interratial Oating The
Dwayne Show is a series of student
issues forums sponsored by FAB
"tudios. AH students are invited to
attend and participate.
On Saturday. April 19, Allied Blacks
for Leadership and Equality (A.B.LE.)
will be hosting a party in Mendenhall
form 10-2 p.m.
Monday, April 21, at 7 p.m. electio.
for new executive council members
will be held at A.B.LEs last sched-
uled meeting for the semester at the
Bloxton House.
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I
4 Thursday, April 17. 1897
news
Thi East Carolinian
Kidney Foundation looking for old cars
The National Kidney Foundation of N.C. is looking for used, unwanted and hard to sell cars. The Kidney Foundation
is asking people to donate these vehicles to the organization and help save lives.
The organization plans to sell the cars at statewide auctions or have their parts recycled and used for scrap metal,
plastic and valuable parts.
The funds raised will be used for the foundation's drive programs.
The cars will be picked up free of charge. Donors will receive a letter for tax purposes and will determine the
value of the vehicle because it is a charitable contribution.
For more information or to donate a vehicle call 1-888-288-CARS.
Exchange
continued from page I
record, and ended up sleeping in
the airport before catching a ride to
ECU the next day.
Once he arrived at ECU, fersson
said his transition was actually very
easy, thanks to good support ser-
vices from International Affairs, who
organized an orientation so the
exchange students would know
what to expect.
Once classes end, Fersson is hop-
ing to stay in the U.S. for a while
longer to do some traveling, then go
back to Sweden to finish his degree.
He eventually hopes to come back
to the U.S. and work for a European
company based in the US and gain
more international experience to
add to the past year.
K
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T
5 Thursday, April 17. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastlSarolinian
BRANDON WADDEI.I. Editor
MATT Kege Advtnisin; Dinar
MARGUERITE BENJAMIN NtM Editor
AMY L ROYSTER Assistant Kim Editor
JAY MYERS Lifastyte fcdirof
AMANDA ROSS Spons Fditot
Patrick irki.an Photo tim
CELESTE WILSON Production Manager
Carole Mkhi.k Mm Cow Erttot
Andy Park as Stiff Ma
Dale Williamson AssmmLifntyttEditor Heather Burgess WirsEditor
Stmrq tra ECU crjrrmvm am MS. � E� Carolinian pubhthts 12.000 nnw irr, toldn wo Ttwsan. Da M adrnnal m aach ttam a rla
opmnn or rra E��h Beard. Tr� Em Carolinian aafctma MM n a tttt raMt�2Harxar.ar�caii�bttihrJiMnr�(r�TIaE�i
Caronman raaanti tht najht to �i w man altars tar oubtaaion �attars mas; bt ��� litan tta l� �lroaa � cswwn �f.ni p� ;�,
Caronnian. PuMuMn fauns. ECU. Grama. 27JSM353 Fa mtanaairun. tat n 321.63M.
oumcw
Drugs are not just a Greek problem, they are a societal problem.
, The near fatal overdoses of two students reported in the April 16 edition of TEC are a reflection of a problem
indicative of the entire ECU community.
. Editors at TEC met the two students who were found lying unconscious and not breathing on the 10th Street
� lawn of several fraternity members. While we chose to withhold the students' names from the article, it occurred
to us they were perfect images of the "average" ECU student. Walking to classes everyday we pass hundreds of stu-
o dents similar to them. These two students are symbolic of everyone and the problem they represent is everyone's
problem.
The drug which these students ingested, GHB, is being labeled by authorities as a new designer drug. Some
ople may wonder how educated, sane people could consciously ingest a drug and then dare to call themselves
victims. For example, heroin and crack users are often considered to be pariahs of society; few people would say
hat users are victims, except of maybe themselves. How, then, are the two anonymous students any different?
"sll, the drug they took is different. GHB is illegal to sell but it is not, at least for the time being, an illegal drug
North Carolina.
' As a matter of fact, it is a "bathtub" drug. Users purchase a substance from a nutrition store and manipulate it
' as they please. There is no set recipe and consequently, there is no continuity of strength. Taking GHB one Friday
before you go downtown may prove to be an "enjoyable" experience, but taking another batch of GHB the follow-
; ing Friday, before a late night party, may prove deadly.
The ugliest part of GHB is that even students who shy away from marijuana and alcohol may be led to believe
GHB is a harmless thrill. After all, GHB users aren't being arrested and the drug produces euphoria as well as
increased sensitivity to touch. With a nickname like scoop, how bad could it be? Apparently, given the case of the
, two anonymous students, pretty damn bad.
(' What the students told us was they were lucky to be alive, free from brain damage and able to return Monday
to find their place among thousands of other students. The potential side effects include vomiting, seizures, loss
of bladder control and amnesia. When mixed with alcohol as is commonly done, GHB effects a users' ability to
breathe. At best, a user who experiences one of these side effects just urinates all over themselves. At worst, they
die, as in the case of a Texas teenager who died several months ago.
The ECU community has a real problem on its hands. This drug isn't imported from some South American
country. Local people, including students, are making this drug in their homes and selling it or giving it to friends.
Although GHB has a salty taste, it can be mixed with various spices such as cinnamon in order to be undetectabie
in a drink. GHB can be used as a date rape drug as potentially devastating as Rohypnol or "roofies
A drug which is easy to concoct and potentially deadly, yet perceived by many as harmless, is a nasty problem.
TEC would like to encourage students who may be manufacturing GHB in their homes to stop before they pass
i" along a bad batch to friends.
Pass along the word: GHB, or liquid ecstasy, or scoops is not, as rumor has it, a harmless drug which can be bought at local
nutrition stores.
OPINION
iMtroln
:MUI.LEN
Off-campus living worth extra cost
Wt all know that living on campus
is cheaper than living in an apart-
ment. When you live in a residence
hall, you do not have as many bills as
you do in an apartment. Therefore,
you save money. If you think about all
the money a student spends each
semester while living in an apart-
ment, you'll be surprised at the figure
you come up with. Living on campus
also provides you with easy access to
your classes.
However, sometimes it's worth
sacrificing your money for your happi-
ness.
University Housing does have its
quirks. Yes, there needs to be rules so
that everyone can live peacefully
beside each other. However, some-
times the rules get to be a little
ridiculous.
First of all, when you live in an
apartment, you do not have to worry
about who's in your room and at what
time. (Unless you get a lot of surprise
visits from Mom and Dad.) There are
no visitation hours. You don't need to
"escort" your guest when they leave.
And guess what, you can also have
more than 6 people in your apartment
without it being considered a "party
Another positive aspect of living in
an apartment is the bathroom. Think
about how many people use the bath-
rooms in the residence halls. You have
to wear shower shoes to the bathroom
to keep your feet clean after you take
a shower. If you live in an apartment,
and provided that you do keep it
clean, you don't have to worry about
shower shoes, or who was in the show-
er before you were. All you have to do
is share it with one or two people. Not
bad, considering that in the residence
halls, you share it with over 20 people.
And guess what? You even get to pick
out your very own shower curtain.
The residence halls also have a
problem with holidays. For some rea-
son, most of the dorms close during
the holidays, leaving some student
abandoned. What happens to the stu-
dents who have to stay in town and
work? That's when apartments come
into the picture. All you do is sign a
lease and put down a deposit. That
way, you can stay as long as you want
over the holidays and over the sum-
mer.
One last thing that apartments
give you is privacy. You have more
room in an apartment. If you want to
go into your bedroom and close the
door to relax, you can. It's your room.
Now, you may have pesky neighbors
while Irving in your glorious apart-
ment. But, think about how many
times all of your friends down the hall
came banging at your door at 3 a.m. to
play a game of spades. Or, how every
night after down town, all the drunks
gathered in the hall for a hollering
contest.
On campus living is important for
a student's first year at college. It
gives them an opportunity to meet
people, become adjusted to the uni-
versity, and to save money. However,
after the first year, it's time for a stu-
dent to gain more responsibility.
When you live in an apartment you do
have a lot of responsibilities. You have
bills to pay by a certain date. You have
to clean and keep up with your apart-
ment. But, at least you are finally on
your own. You can do what you want
whenever you want to. You don't have
to worry about Resident Advisors or
parents. The only things you need to
do are pay your bills on time, be con-
siderate to your neighbors and to your
roommates, and most importantly,
you have to be that responsible per-
son that your parents brought you up
to be.
Greek takes GHB incident too lightly
lb the Editor,
I am writing to comment on the
article printed in the April 15 issue of
TEC. The article covered the GHB
incident that occurred on April 4.
Actually my commentary is not on the
article itself, but on the views put
forth by Sigma Pi President Jeff
Yurfest. Rw those of you who aren't
familiar with the article I am referring
to I'll bring you up to speed.
On April 4, a 22-year-old ECU stu-
dent and a 21-year-old PCC student
were found on the lawn of 506 East
10th Street at a Sigma Pi late night.
The two students were not breathing
and were taken to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital (PCMH) near
death, where they were revived with
the aid of respirators. Both students
were released the next day. The East
Carolinian printed an article regarding
the incident and the following is what
Mr. Yurfest had to say about it:
"Jeff Yurfest, President of Sigma
R, expressed concern that GHB was
becoming too popular and people
were associating it with fraternities.
They were downtown drinking
and came here during a late night
Yurfest said. 'They apparently took
the GHB, but I have no idea if they
took it here or not. I got home from
work and there were two people
passed out in our yard
"Yurfest said he fears the incident
will cause people to associate the drug
with the Greek system.
Neither of them were members
of this fraternity or of the Greek sys-
tem Yurfest said. 'They just hap-
pened to be here when they col-
lapsed. I could have happened any-
where but it kind of sucks that it hap-
pened here
"Yurfest also emphasized that the
house on 10th Street is the home of a
few fraternity members and not the
Sigma Pi fraternity house.
We have never had this kind of
problem here Yurfest said, it isn't
like someone was passing it GHB
out from the fraternity. It's a shame
after all the effort that the Greeks
have put in to clean up our image on
this campus that something like this
happened
I can appreciate Mr. Yurfest's con-
cern regarding the image of his and
other fraternal organizations on this
campus, especially after "all the effort
that the Greeks have put into clean
up our image on campus and I am in
no way laying blame on Mr. Yurfest,
Sigma Pi or the Greek system for the
incident.
The problem I have is that two
people, two of our peers, almost died.
They almost died. They almost died
and all Mr. Yurfest can say is that "it
kind of sucks that it happened here
Not a word of concern about the two
students.
My point is, if you want people to
respect you, if you want your peers'
admiration, then when a situation like
this arises, be concerned with the
welfare and health of the two stu-
dents who almost died and not with
your image. If you do this with com-
passion and integrity, then you will
get the respect and image you so des-
perately desire.
Jason Stanley
Senior
Communication Arts
Editor puts wrong words in writer's mouth
lb the Editorial Board,
Thank you for running my column
about B-GLAD. However, as I read
over the article as it was printed in the
paper, I noticed that an editorial 'cor-
rection" has been made to it which
changes the meaning of my state-
ments. In the fifth paragraph, I am
quoting an acquaintance of mine as
saying " I checked their feb site and I
decided that anyone who says that
AIDS is the best thing that ever hap-
pened to them isn't worth talking to
The word "homosexuals" was
added by the editor after the word
"them which gives the impression
that I am discussing homosexuals in
general. I was not. I was using the word
"them" as a neuter pronoun to refer to
the specific person mentioned by
Another Way's Web site. I do not think
.AIDS is the best thing to happen to
homosexuals (or to most anyone).
AIDS is a horrible disease and a tragic
affair. I would not wish it on anyone. I
offer my apologies to anyone who
received the impression that I desire
homosexuals to have AIDS. That is
not, and never has been my position.
Thank You,
John Davis
Senior
English Writing
Lifestyle choice isn't right, Christians say
To the Editor,
In his article Can't we all just get
along?" John Davis first points out that
the members of B-GLAD shouid have
contacted a member of .Another Way so
that "Dialogue is opened up between
the two groups, and then some judg-
ments can be made I agree with Mr.
Dims an rhar noirr
But I couldn't help but notice that
Mr. Davis was making some judgments
To the Editor,
This area of your paper is for us to
state our opinions, and as long as it
doesn't offend or attack another per-
son I have no problem. But after
weeks of students attacking one
another on a topic no one completely
understands, I was finally offended.
In the April 15 article written by B-
GLAD's president and treasurer no
tonry was I surprised but shocked by
what was said.
I feel that gays and lesbians all
have rights that are no different from
heterosexuals. However, when you
bring in religion, Christianity, and a
To the Editor,
I am writing this letter in response
to Lora Josey and Rich Elkins' article
on Tuesday, April 15. First I want to
let everyone know that I am a bom
again believer and a follower of Jesus
Christ, my personal savior. In spite of
comments Lora and Rich made, they
are inaccurate. The comment, "Many
mainline Christian churches do not
share this group's (Another Vfoy Out)
narrow-minded opinion of the issue of
orientation. That they affirm our rela-
tionships and support the spiritual
growth of gays, lesbians, bisexuals and
individuals who are questioning their
orientation, is not true. In the Bible
(NIV), I Corinthians 6:9 says, "Do
you not know that the wicked will not
inherit the Kingdom of God? Do not
be deceived; neither the sexually
immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterer,
nor male prostitutes, nor homosexual
offenders, nor thieves will inherit
the Kingdom of God
Before you think I am bashing
of his own. At the end of his article,
when he relates an incident he "heard
about" concerning InterVarsity
Christian Fellowship, he seems to make
a fairrv strong judgment of their actions
by stating that the girl was "harshly
treated If this is an incident lie only
heard about, and did not research, then
I hardly rhintr ir if fair far htm to ht
making that sort of judgment call. Not
only that, but he is doing the very thing
part of my life that I feel very strong-
ly about, it bother me that you feel
something is true that is completely
wrong. Therefore I would like to clear
up a statement that was made that
could confuse someone struggling
with their religious stance. If they are
stating that they are Christians and
that the church they attend supports
their homosexuality, then their
church is mislead and so are they.
First of all, I attend a Southern
Baptist Church and I know that the
Southern Baptist Association does not
support the act of homosexuality or
bisexualiry. I feel, as they stated that
someone, let me explain. I believe in
the Bible and I am a God-fearing man.
It says in God's Word that homosexu-
ality is a sin, and anyone committing
this act will not be part of God's
Kingdom. I do not hate or disrespect
a homosexual.
I believe that what they do is
wrong and is a sin. The Christian
church does not support homosexual-
ity, as B-GLAD has you to think.
There are numerous verses in the
Bible that point out that homosexual-
ity is a sin. Hebrews 13:4 says,
"Marriage should be kept pure, for
God will judge the adulterer and all
the sexually immoral
Revelation 21:8 sas, "But the
cowardly, the unbelieving, the vile,
the murderers, the sexually immoral-
their place will be in a fiery lack of
burning sulfur So this shows God is
against homosexuality and Christian
church does not, I repeat, does not
support the sexual immoralities of
this world. I love all people and I want
for which he chastised B-GLAD, that
is, coming to a snap decision. While I
agree with Mt Davis' idea that we
should all be willing to talk with each
other and learn about one another, I
feel that he might want to exercise
some of the same wisdom he seems to
want from everyone else.
jay Paul
Junior
English
they do need spiritual growth and
guidance. A homosexual relationship
is not recognized as "True Love" in
God's eyes nor should it be for
Christians. If it was, then we would ail
be of the same sex. God would have
created Adam and then Bill.
I believe that by our modem day
society you have the right to love who
you want. However, please do not use
my religion and the true Christian
Church as a back up for something
that we do not support.
Sarah Wjrrell
Freshman
Pre-Veterinarian Medicine
all of the B-GLAD individuals to real-
ize that God loves you, but if you are
living in sin, you will not make it to
heaven. I urge you to think about
Another Wiy Out.
Jesus Christ is real and is coming
back soon. So please repent of your
sins and turn from these wicked ways.
"For God so loved the world that he
gave his only begotten son, that
whosoever believes in Him shall not
perish, but have everlasting life"
(John 3:16).
All you have to do is ask Jesus into
your heart and make Him Lord of
your life. Here is a repentance prayer
"Jesus, I repent of my sins and confess
that You are the only way of salvation
for me. I want to ask you into my
heart and be my Lord and Savior.
Help me in this life and when I die,
take me to Heaven to be with you.
Amen
Rodney A Jones
Freshman
Undecided major





)
6 Thursday. April 17. 1997
The East Carolinian
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Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. "J3. 7cmci Of Class" ��
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. TCtA A97Q
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country & Western Night
FRI. & SAT: Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
10 OR MORE GIRL
DANCERS EVERY
NIGHT!
Male Dancers
Available For
Jacheloreite Parties
Snowman's Land
By Rob Chapman
STv- W� Wt�D
To GET Jobs
f cool what
ABE v)o6S J
Primitiv Man
By Karl Trolenberg
Simre Time
By Furkus
Located 5 Miles West of Greenville on 264 AIL (Behind Aladdin Taxi & Limo Service)
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Need a
JOB this
summer
If you will be a returning student in the fall and are looking
for a summer job. UHS will be hiring students to assist
with our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to inspect, repair and renovate residence hall
rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance will provide training
and supervision. General knowledge of basic carpentry
skills, painting, installation of hardware, measuring and
fitting components is required. The program will be
approximately 10 weeks. This is an opportunity to have
personal training and learn successful skills in a hands-on
experience. Full-time, 39 hours per week, and part-time,
20 hours per week, positions will be offered. To submit an
application, please come by University Housing Services,
Office Suite 100 Jones Hall.
HEADSiVSJF.EPS
ACROSS
1 Verdi opera
5 Fall flower
10 Relative position
14 Crisscrossed
framework
15 Flying honkers
16 Verve
17 Hodgepodge
18 Not fitting
19 Legendary
knowledge
20 Forefather
22 For each
24 Raise
25 Serious
26 Say again
29 Impart new vigor
to
33 � mode
34 Iron or tin
37 Arms
39 Small
depressions
41 Small coin
42 Readies for
publication
44 Marble
46 Dry, as wine
47 Grow smaller
49 Go back to an
original state
51 Comfort
52 Masculine
53 Sharp weapons
56 Dew
60 Damage
61 Giant hunter of
myth
63 Singles
64 Otherwise
65 Light wash
66 First garden
67 Forest creature
68 Carried
69 Shoe bottom
i21 15&7'16111213
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1 Muslim prince
2 Iraq's neighbor
3 Plate
4 Remain
attached
5 Stirred up
6 Mexican title
7 Rip
8 Intuitive letters
9 Keep
10 Eased pain
11 Uly plant
12 Certain officer
13 Leg joint
21 Stitch together
23 Stage object
25 River mouth
deposit
26 Stormed
27 Get around
28 Extreme fright
29 Stove
30 Flavoring
31 More docile
32 Choose
35 Pester
38 Banner
40 Put through a
sieve
43 Burn slightly
45 Congers
48 Classify
50 Presidential
"noes"
52 Antler carrier
53 Throw off
54 Wan
55 Gaelic
56 Money maker
57 Rip apart
58 Spool
59 Feudal serf
62 � Grande
STEVi HACER EDITOR HIGH TIMES MAGAZINE VS. CURTIS SUWA THE GUARDIAN ANGEIS
I
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TTTTiTTTi
frmj:i

TUESDAY APRIL 22,1997,8PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE
PRESENTED BY THE STUDENT UNION LEOURE COMMITTEE. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL OUR
HOTLINE AT 328-6004 OR VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html





r
7 Theridsy, April 17. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
?j?r?y.�yy� Bot or not? Debate answers question
Underfoot
Still Green
INXS
Elegantly Wasted
Dgrck T. Halle
SENIOR WHITER
Under the realms of reality and into a
new Mazing light of mystery,
Underfoot takes their music for a ride
of its own on Stitt Green. Jim Morrison
called it "Testing the bounds of reali-
ty; shall we say and I think that
description fits for Underfoot.
Although the group doesn't hint at the
sounds of the 60's, the message could-
n't be clearer.
It was hard to get a fix on the sound
of Underfoot. It's naturally all over the
place. From the depths of Seattle to
the hierarchy of roots improv, the
sound is everywhere. One thing that
does remain intact is the acoustics. It
lives somewhere in each song.
Sometimes the prominent melody of
the song is strictly acoustic in origin;
however, technology of our new age
proves itself worthwhile again and
raises the sound to new levels of digi-
tal height.
After hearing the reflective rhythm
of Digital Underground on the fourth
John Davis
STAFF WHITE
SEE
MGE9
The thing about INXS is that they
have always been better at being rock
stars than they have been at being
musicians. Pretty boy Michael
Hutchence has that decided arro-
gance which carries an air of assumed
importance. He knows how to strut
and how to pose but, in the long run,
he just doesn't have the creativity nec-
essary to be a songwriter.
There was a point, in the late '80s
and early '90s, when INXS were actu-
ally developing as a band. Under the
tutelage of producer Chris Thomas,
the band released a trio of danceabte
and enjoyable albums, Kid, X, and
Welcome to WkereverYou Are. The inter
of those actually had the Australian
sextet breaking new ground and
exploring something a little deeper
than getting laid. (Well, not really.
They wrote songs about the five min-
utes before and after getting bid.)
The group then released the high-
ly disappointing Full Moon, Dirty
Harts. Perhaps because of the success
SHBTO.PAK9

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April
17 Thursday
"National Pornographies; Trans-
national Bodies a lecture by Laura
Kipnis will be given at 4 p.m. in
General Classroom Building Room
2014.
East Carolina Playhouse: Lysistrata
by Aristophanes at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre through April 22.
Friends of the School of Music
Scholarship Showcase Recital at 7
p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
The Teuostcrtones at the Cave in
Chapel Hill.
Kaia at the Lizard St Snake Cafe in
Chapel Hill.
18 Friday
Russell Henderson at the
Percolator Coffeehouse from 9:30-
10:30 p.m.
The Btvans Brothers at the Kress
Care in New Bern.
The Connells with Lustre at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Nymbus at the Cave in Chapel
Hill.
Squirtgun with Teen Idols and
The Scaries at the Lizard & Snake
Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Soccer with Sticky at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
22 Tuesday
19 Saturday
Family Fare Series: Heidi at 2 p.m.
in Wight Auditorium.
Kernal Goat at the Kress Cafe in
New Bern.
Jump Little Children at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Hipbone at the Cave in Chapel
Hill.
Dismemberment Plan at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
The Honeydogs with Tweaker at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Do you smoke pot? Would you like it
to be legal?
Do you hate potheads? Do you
wish they would grow up and take on
some responsibility?
Will, whichever way you stand on
these issues, it should be worth it for
you to attend "The Heads vs. The
Feds: The Debate to Legalize
Marijuana a live debate sponsored by
the ECU Student Union Lecture
Committee at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April
22, in Hendrix Theatre.
The debaters aren't just a couple of
know-nothings like your pal "Jerry the
Deadhead" or "George the conserva-
tive student politician No, they're
nothing like that. In tact, the lecture
committee has outdone themselves
with their selection of contestants for
this battle.
On the side of legalization is none
other than Steve Hager, the editor-in-
20 Sunday
Sunday at the Gallery Concert:
String Orchestra, Fritz Gearherr, con-
ductor, at 2 p.m. in the Greenville
Museum of Art.
Melanie Sparks at the Courtyard
Tavern.
Hobex at the Cave in Chape! Hill.
Elliot Smith, Perer Krebs and Clair
Holley at the Lizard & Snake Cafe in
Chapel Hill.
21 Monday
Trombone Ensemble, George
Broussard, director, at 8 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
Dr. Patrick Bizzaro and Dr. Peter
Makuck of the ECU English depart-
ment will give the last spring readings
of the Reading and Performance
Series at 8 p.m. in the Upper Crust
Bakery. An open mic session will fol-
low trie readings.
Better Than Ezra with Boo
Radleys at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
chief of High Times magazine. Even if
you're not a pothead, you're sure to
have heard of this prestigious and
enduring publication that has served
as the voice of alternative culture for
many years. Hager is also the author of
High Times Greatest Hits: 20 Years of
Smoke m Your Face, a best-selling book
from St. Martin's Press.
Hager's belief is that hemp can be
used for other things than just roiling
and smoking. He contends that hemp
is a versatile product that can be used
for fiber, food and fuel. But its illegali-
ty keeps it from being used for these
purposes.
Opposing Hager's viewpoint is
Curtis Sliwa, the founder and presi-
dent of the Guardian Angels, a crime-
fighting organization run entirely by
private citizens. Currently, branches of
his organization can be found in about
300 cities worldwide in such diverse
countries as America, Poland, Australia
and the former USSR.
Sliwa is unflinchingly dedicated to
wiping out all drug use. He is known
for coining the motto, "Drug Free or
Steve Hager
Die No mat-
ter what the
potential bene-
fits are from
hemp, if there
are any, the real
dangers and
harm that
result from the
use of marijua-
na outweigh
them, according to Sliwa His is a posi-
tion of intolerance for drugs in what-
ever form they present themselves.
Considering how divergent Hager
and Sliwa are in their opinions on this
issue, and how actively prominent
they are in the public forum, this
debate should be well worth attend-
ing.
Maybe they'll even open the floor
for questions. Taking into considera-
tion the fact that the debate is sched-
uled to be three hours long, they
might need to hear from the audience
in order to fill up time.
I know that this issue is a big one
for many people on this campus. It
Curtis Sliwa
just goes to
show that the
Student Union
is listening to
what students
want. And they
didn't skimp
on the guests
either.
These are
some power
players, people. And what they say is
heard the world 'round. Let's give
them the proper ECU respect that
they deserve and hear what they have
to say.
The debate is free for all ECU stu-
dents, faculty and staff and $5 for tfce
general public, but only if you get ybui
tickets in advance. After that, all tick-
ets (student and public) will be $8 at
the door. Tickets are now available a;
the Mendenhall Central Ticket Office
or by calling any of the following num-
bers: 919-328-4788, 1-800-ECU-
ARTS or TDD 919-328-4736 from
8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m Monday through
Friday. �
Lysistrata closes out season for ECU Playhouse
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTVLE EDITOR
Ever since the sexual revolution of the late '60s, popular media has increasing-
ly become more liberal with its use of sexual themes. Now, the days of separate
beds popularized by such classic TV situation comedies as Love Lucy and The
Dick Km Dyke Shorn are absurd. When you turn on the tube on any given evening
these days, sex flourishes all over the screen. Comedies like Friends and Seinfeld
pride themselves with sexual humor, and audiences can't get enough of it.
But sexual comedies arc not a new thing. No, they've been around long
before the rebellious '60s ever dawned. In tact, sexuality was a favorite topic for
many ancient playwrights, most notably Aristophanes.
Aristophanes is the author of the oldest surviving sex situation comedy,
Lysistrata, and Greenville is in for a night of laughter when the East Carolina
Playhouse brings this uproarious play to life, beginning today and running
through Tuesday, April 22.
While Lysistrata is a hilarious story, its narrative beginnings are not so humor-
ous. Aristophanes wrote the play as a passionate response to the Petoponnesian
Wat, a war which had plagued Athens and its citizens for over 20 years. Lysistrata
was Aristophanes' way of begging for a cease to the mindless carnage that was
lirtering the land. But, as opposed to striking the senses of people through
straight drama, Aristophanes used satire.
The plot of the play, translated for the contemporary stage by Nicholas
Rudall, revolves around a woman named Lysistrata and her desire to get the
women of Athens to revolt against the men in power. The women want an end.
to war, but the men will not listen. Having no power in the military or in poli-
tics, the women use the one power they do possess - their bodies. The women
all agree to deny men any sex until all the needless bloodshed is put to a stop.
Comedic conflict develops when not only the men become restless with lack
of intimate pleasure, but the women do as well. Lysistrata soon finds herself in
the very difficult position of being the one who can keep her female followers
from giving in to their earrhry desires.
In addition to a lively story powered by the direction of John Shearin,
Lysistrata will treat its audience with singing and dancing to new music written
by staff music director Mort Stine.
After the success of Suburbia, Lysistrata should prove to be an appropriate way
for the ECU Playhouse to close out its 1996-97 season, a season filled with many
daring and energetic productions.
Any lover of theater should make every effort to support the ECU Playhouses
especially since they are striving to bring an eciecric array of drama into our com-
munity.
Lysistrata is rated PG-13, due to some risque material.
Individual tickets are on sale now from $8-$9 for the general public; $7-$8
for ECU faculty and staff; and $5-$6 for ECU students.
Tickets can be purchased in person Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m at the McGinnis Theatre box office; bv calling 328-6829 or 328-
1726; or by mail. East Carolina Playhouse, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
Tickets are available for late-comers on the night of the shows until 8:15 p.m.
Performances begin at 8 p.m with the exception of Sunday which only has a 2
p.m. production.
O tt'C S J0111 Sayles digs up gold with Lonestar
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The Heads vs. The Feds: The
Debate to Legalize Marijuana
between Steve Hager, the editor-in-
chief of High Times magazine, and
Curtis Sliwa, the founder and presi-
dent of the Guardian Angels, will take
place at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Guitar Ensemble: Elliot Frank,
director, at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Olivia Tremor Control and Aha at
the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Bryce Landes at the Cave in
Chapel Hill.
Gladhands with Long Stem
Daisies at the Lizard & Snake Cafe in
Chapel Hill.
23 Wednesday
Symphonic Wind Ensemble,
Concert Band, and Symphonic Band,
Scott Carter and Christopher
Knighten. conductors, with lack
Stamp, guest conductor, at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Third World at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Carolyn Wonderland and the
Imperial Monkeys at the Cave in
Chapel Hill.
Whim Driven at the Lizard &
Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
DALE WILLIAMSON
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Last summer, a film called Courage Under Fire
played Greenville theaters. It was a solid piece of
cinematic escapism and an acting showcase for
stars Denzel Washington and Meg Ryan. The
basic plot revolved around one man's quest for tac-
tual truths, truths that seemed to be twisted
depending on who told their own version of the
same story. While Courage was not what I would
consider a masterpiece, it intelligently touched
upon important issues of history. What this film
struggled to illustrate is the fact that history is a
narrative written by those who tell the story. Many
critics, including myself, praised the film. It was a
good movie destined to be a Hollywood block-
buster.
Another film dealing with the similar theme of
history as narrative was released around the same
time last year, but it was lost in the debris of big-
ger, highly publicized hits. This film was noticed
by the critical community and was cited by many
as one of the best films of 19. It was the latest
masterpiece by independent filmmaker John Sayles, who once
again proved that well-told stories backed by strong actors por-
traying believable characters can carry a much greater punch
than any number of special effects, grand explosions or big-
name stars.
While Sayles 'Sor oi Pas ' 'rely put a dent in the
national box office t hen compa. u . likes c other major
Hollywood releases), .i still -arrieo so much arti�: c itegrity
and originality that it is destined to secure a ptee in history as
a modern-day classic.
This small independent wonder was known as Lonesmr, and
even though it missed our local theaters, it is now available on
video for all to enjoy.
On the surface, the plot of Lonestar is simple enough. The
skeletal remains of a human are discovered in the wasteland of
Frontera, a small Texas community plagued with racial and
class divisions, impending poverty and legal corruption.
Eventually, the skeleton is revealed to be the remains of
Charley Wade (Kris Kristofferson), a corrupt sheriff who ruled
the town with an evil fist some 30 years earlier. The current
sheriff, Sam Deeds (Chris Cooper), is determined to find out
who murdered Charley, especially since he suspects his father.
Buddy (Matthew MCConaughey).
Apparently, Buddy and Charley had a confrontation the
night Charley disappeared along with $10,000. Shortly after
Charley's disappearance, Buddy became sheriff.
While Buddy was not a saint of a sheriff, he was highly
respected by his community. Corrupt or not. Buddy was a wel-
come substitute for Charley. This fact only complicates Sam's
search for the truth because the community seems determined
to bury its tainted history.
Sayles (who served as the film's writer, director, producer,
editor, caterer, chauffeur, dishwasher, etc etc.) conjures up a
classic mystery narrative, but, like all his films, Lonestar is not
so easily categorized. Several subplots flow throughout the
story, all concerning the truths of history.
In addition to Sam's story, we are witness to the lives of Col.
Delmore Payne (Joe Morton), an aspiring soldier who is forced
to confront a father he never had; Delmore's son, Chet (Eddie
Robinson), who goes behind his father's back to learn about his
family's past; and Pilar Cruz (Elizabeth Pena), a school teacher
�!
Kris Kristoffersofi throws his weight around in a bravura performance as the corrupt
sberrif Charlie Wade in John Sayles' new film Lonestar.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CASTIE ROCK FILMS
whose buried personal history is brought back to the surface by
the reemergence of an old love.
Sayles' ability to create complex stories that all connect
thematically is unsurpassed here. He explores such themes as
familial divisions, racism, corrupt power and destiny, and he
does so with the controlled, expert precision of a professional.
In lesser hands, this film would be a muddled mess; with
Sayles, it is an exercise in craftsmanship.
For example, Sayles breathlessly transcends his narrative
from the present to the past and back again with a simple pan
of the camera. No flashy jump cuts, no cheesy fade-outs and
fade-ins. Instead, he crosses time by simply moving his camera
from one fixed point to another, a simple technique that has
grand results.
As much as this is Sayles' film, he must share credit. The
compositional cinematography by Stuart Dryburgh perfectly
captures the bitter heat and sweat of the decaying Texas
desert, which is given a mythic presence by the indigenous
music of Mason Daring.
And no Sayles film can be critiqued without mentioning the
actors. Sayles is cne of a handful of directors who truly under-
stands the art of acting. Time and time again, he pulls career-
making performances from his cast, and this is no exception.
Everyone has their moment to shine, but standing tall are
Cooper and Kristofferson, who portray polar opposites of jus-
tice.
As Sheriff Sam Deeds, Cooper carries with him a sense of
emotional drain, someone who has had everything he cared for
ripped from him. Sam's determination to dig up the truth is
impenetrable, but so is his sense of isolation.
On the flip side, Kristofferson turns in the best perfor-
mance of his long career. A simple wink of ins eye and cocky
curl of his lip is enough to fill his corrupt sheriff with the wrath
and violence of pure evil. Kristofferson's physical presence
makes Charley an icon of fear, even without a pistol at his side.
It's a bravura performance with minimal screen time.
For the longest time, I have boasted that Martin Scorsese,
the creator of such masterpieces as Raging Bull and The Lust
SEE LONESTAR PAGE 8
i V





I
The East Carolinian
8 Thursday. April 17, 1997
CD reviews
Richard Buckner
Devotion Doubt
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
&���m2z& �� "sixw,i,i"8 � -�
"FV ?"�' �K3j?�SISsSrSit � J , cnn, music k.been etching
stre� ThSe's thinI that buwS in the heat of true love, but some nights remam and ,ust burn one mght too
ing of who we were Though I may be miles away from her.
Damn good.
Lonestar
continued from page 7
Temptation of Christ, is the greatest liv-
ing American director. Scorsese has
since gone more mainstream with his
films and, as a result, lost some of his
independent spunk. Sayles is still,
and has been for a very long time, a
faithful child of independent film-
making. He finances and makes his
films his way with little or no obliga-
tion to a major studio.
With Lonestar, Sayles may very
well have pushed Scorsese to the side
and secured himself as the greatest
living American director. All hail the
king!
Or better yet, rush out and rent
his films.
IflYOUTS tOft ECU
PUJH COLD DANCE TEAM
" of the top 10 dance teams"
of the nation
Dates: Friday, April 18th 7-9pm
Saturday 19th 3-6pm
Sunday 20th 12 pm
Williams Arena at Minges Collesium
Now accepting applications
for Executive Staff and General
Staff positions. The deadline is
Friday, April 18 at 5 p.m. Apply
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in Mendenhall.
Exec Staff Positions
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i
9 Thursday. April 17. 1997
style
The East Carolinian
East Carolina Playhouse
ARISTOPHANES
MUSICAL COMIC BATTLE
OFTHE SEXES
LYSI STRATA
RATED: PC-13
TH E PLAY CONTAINS BAWDY PHYSICAL HUMOR'
APRIL 17, 18, 19, 21 AND 22 , 1997 AT 8:00 P.M:
APRIL 20, 1997 AT 2.00 P.M.
GENERAL PUBLIC: 8.009.00
ECU FACULTYSTAFF: 7.008.00
ECU STUDENTS: 5.006.00
CALL-328-6829
MCCINNIS THEATRE�ECU MAIN CAMPUS
CORNER OF FIFTH AND EASTERN STREETS
Underfoot
continued from page 7
track, I found the band to be in differ-
ent places all at the same time. The
song is called "Bridges Burn It con-
cerns the abnormal values of family
life after the familial connection is
broken. It's not a problem. It's just
another demon that graces a few of our
sheltered lives. It's like taking "securi-
ty" out for a drive and dumping it into
a nearby river. After listening to the
emotional impact of this song, just
remember to breathe.
My favorite song on the record was
"Beautiful Life A song that ironically
places its setting in grime, passes the
bill as a negative uplift. Which simply
means that the mood is dark, the lyrics
are dark, but the song is just damn
cool.
The last song to be heard is called
"Castaway I know what you're think-
ing. Another soft rocker talking about
yesterday's love wish. Nothing could
be further than the truth.
Would vou believe stretched out
jazz? That's the way the ball swings
on the closing of this record - nothing
too fancy, nothing too commercial to
leave an impression, just a laid back
groove with tons of accompaniment.
It's funny, you would think after
putting so much time into a song to
make it into a hit record that a band
would feel most comfortable when
that song's energy was around. But I
find it all the more real when a band
plays a solid riff and an hour of improv
just happens.
That kind of playing is intelligent.
It shows just how much chemistry
there is between each band member.
It's something to think about when
you're getting started, learning how to
speak to each other on a different
level.
I don't know why Underfoot wait-
ed until the last minute to put on a
jam like "Castaway Maybe it's
because the good things in life are
worth waiting for. That's the story of
my life. Patience, oh' how frustrating
thou can be.
This Saturday night you don't have
to wait anymore. You can hear
Underfoot at the .Attic. The show
starts around 10:00 p.m.
INXS
continued trom page 7
of such bands as U2 incorporating
techno and electronic music into
their songs, INXS felt necessary to
try their hand at this. Unfortunately,
it failed miserably. It was the first
INXS album in ten years without a
hit single.
Atlantic Records and INXS parted
ways after that album, and so, when
INXS recently signed on with
Mercury, they were teamed up with
producer Bruce Fairbairn, who has
gained the most notoriety for moving
Van Halen from being merely silly to
actually sucking. (You know, he was
the guy who produced Balance.) Well,
sorry to say, on Elegantly Wasted
Fairbairn has managed to reduce
INXS to nothing more than a group
of has-beens.
There are a few good songs on the
disc, but they're nothing special. The
best song on the album, "Don't Lose
Your Head might actually chart, but
it's really nothing more than a tribute
to early John Cougar. It even has the
drum machine handclaps in it.
For the most part though, this
album is a nostalgic trip to the days
when Kuk and X were all over the
charts. The album's opener, "Show
Me is a horrible song. It sounds like
a song by Izzy Stradlin and the Ju Ju
Hounds, except, of course without
Stradlin's trademark crudeness. The
second track, also the first single
"Elegantly Wasted is a blatant rip-off
of "Need You Tonight Songs like
"Searching" and "fe Are Thrown'
Together" are also rip-offs of oloV
INXS, sounding like carbon copies oS
"Never Tear Us Apart" or "The?
Stairs but without any of the emo-
tion that made those songs enjoyablejj
One of the most disappointing
aspects of this album is that INXS is fe
band of six guys, and it sounds lik
most of it was programmed with syrry
thesizers and drum machines. Kirk
Pengilly, who has always filled INXS
songs with saxophone solos, doesn't
play his sax on this disc at all, except
for a smattering on "I'm Just A Man
The band has three guitarists and
barely any guitars on the album. If I
didn't know any better, I'd say that
the whole album was just a marketing
trick to give Michael Hutchence a
reason to prance around and show off
his butt.
The best thing you can do is go
find used copies of old INXS albums,
and buy those. For the price of a new
copy of Elegantly Wasted, you can pror
ably buy cheap used copies of Kitk. X
and Welcome To Wherever You Are and
still have enough money left over for a
cup of coffee when you're done.
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i
10 Thursday. April 17, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Madonna to come under academic scrutiny
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE
Pop star Madonna, one of the world's best-known celebrities, is to come
under academic scrutiny.
The University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands said it was beginning a
course of study titled "Madonna: the music and the phenomenon
The course will run for ten weeks with four hours of lectures per week,
examining Madonna's work and articles about her controversial career. So far,
63 students have enrolled.
"We think it's high time that pop music is studied. Madonna is the most
famous female pop artist of the last 15 years and has expressed interest in
many social issues said one of the course instructors, Mark van den Berg.
Van den Berg, who holds a doctorate in computational linguistics, said
Madonna's examinations of racism, sexuality and feminism provided ample
material for academic investigation.
But there were no plans to invite the star to make a personal appearance.
Madonna, above in bunny suit, is now the topic of scholarly discussion. Go figure.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE INTERNET
Natural life I �
The germs in a sneeze travel up to 12 feet at
100 miles per hour.
-McCalls Good Health
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
Correction:
In the last issue of TEC
the phone number for
the House of Blues
Hotline was cut-off.
This is the full House
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803-272-3000.
We're Celebrating
Our 1st Anniversary.
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T
II �i'
Thursdsy, April 17. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
Heals' Jamison to stay in school, his dad says
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) - North Carolina sophomore Antawn Jamison
wrfl spam the NBA draft and stay in school for another season, his parents
told two newspapers.
Jamison, a 6-foot-9 forward, led the Tar Heels in scoring (19.1 points per
game) and rebounding (9.4 rpg) and was named a second-team Ail-American
last season.
"Everything should be finalized by Friday Albert Jamison told The
Charlotte Observer. "It's going to be his (Antawn's) decision, But my under-
standing is - and I hope he goes through with this - that he wiH stay in
school
"In the back of my head, I think he is going to stay Kathy Jamison told
the Durham Herald-Sun.
Jamison was scheduled to meet with North Carolina coach Dean Smith
today to discuss his plans, the Herald-Sun reported.
Jamison has until May 11 to mate up his mind. He was (he ACC's third-
leading scorer arid second-leading rebounder as a sophomore.
Yadkin County commissioners want out of stadium ref-
erendum
YADttNVILLE, N.C (AP) -ftdkin County officials warn the county taken
out of a IZ-county district (hat would support the building of a major-league
baseball stadium in the Triad.
The state Senate approved a bill last week to have a referendum in the
12 counties on raising the sales tax by I cent to help pay for a stadium for
professional baseball. The state House has not voted on it yet.
The Yadkin County commissioners have asked state Reps. George
Holmes, R-Yadkin, and John Brown, R-Wilkes. to introduce an amendment to
rake Yadkin County out of the proposed N.C. Triad Metropolitan Baseball
Par District
Hurt would mem that Yadkin residents wouldn't have to vote on (he
CenWmssioner Arthur Winters said he thinks most Yadkin residents are
opposed to paying t higher sales t� for a stadium.
It wSf hi a rip-off for Yadkin County residents Winters said, "1 hate to
see fefrythmig that gives money to the rich and takes it front the poor
Commissioner Richard Miller said that the House Finance Committee is
scheduled to discuss the bit April 24,
Yadkin residents will get little of no economic benefits from a stadium
newly 40 miles away, Milter said,
Baseball honors Jackie Robinson, retiring his number
forever
NfcW YORK (AP) - Fifty years after Jackie Robinson became the first Mack
player in the majors, baseball retired his number in tribute Tuesday night,
siyiflg No. 42 will belong to the sports pioneer "for the ages
With President Clinton and Robinson's widow, Racherstanding at home
plate, acting commissioner Bud Selig announced that baseball was retiring
the number the late Hall of farrier wore throughout his career.
"The day Jackie Robinson stepped on a major league field will forever be
remembered as baseball's proudest moment Selig said. "Major league
baseball is retiring No, 42 in tribute to his great achievements and for the sig-
nificant contributions he made to society.
"No, 42 belongs to Jackie Robinson for the ages
No other major professional sport has honored one of its players in a sim-
itar fashion r
The game between the New York Mets and Los Angeles Dodgers was
halted after the fifth inning for 35 minutes as Clinton, using two canes,
waited to home plate with Selig and Mrs. Robinson. He waved to the near
capacity crowd and gave a thumbsup sign as Secret Service men ringed the
field.
"It is hard to believe that it was JO years ago at Ebbets Held that a 28-
year-old rookie changed the face of baseball and the face of America forever
he said. "Jackie Robinson scored the go-ahead run that day and we've ail
been trying to catch up ever since
With players from both teams standing in front of their dugouts, Clinton
saluted Robinson's contribution to his game and his country.
Revamped greens at Pinehurst's famed course subtle
as ever
PINEHURST, N.C. (AP) - The U.S. Open will be played in the South for
only the second time in its long history when the golfing major comes to
Pmehurst's No. 2 course in 1999. 7
The region's summer heat and what it can do to greens has been the main
reason the famed tournament has steered clear of Dixie in the past.
That's also why Pinehurst has spent the last 10 months renovating the
greens at Donald Ross' world-famous design, including the reseeding of all
the putting surfaces with a heat-resistant form of bentgrass that is supposed
t0 55?"the nrmneM and health of thc greens in the summer.
"We have been close to insistent that we wanted assurances that these
greens would stand out because they are so important to No. 2 said United
States Golf Association executive director David Fay, who inspected the
course Tuesday. "Thankfully, the ownership felt the same way
�Agronomically, in the eyes of some of the USOA members, it's a bit of a
reach, Pat Gorso, president of Pinehurst Resort and Country Club said of
tournament coming South. "But I think more and more as every day goes by
there is confidence in the ability of the course to stand the test - both in
terms of the payability and the climate
Pinehurst used the same bentgrass on its No. 8 course, which opened last
year.
City Council passes new financing plan that could
clinch arena
RALEIGH (AP) - The City Council's passage of � new financing plan clears
the way for construction of a proposed $120 million multi-purpose arena, said
the chairman of the group charged with managing the arena.
The 5-3 vote Tuesday followed months of contentious negotiations
between Raleigh and Wake County leaders.
"This is a tremendous, historic day for this city and this region said
Steve Stroud, chairman of the Centennial Authority. "We have five very
courageous City Council members who put their political differences aside
to vote for the future
The deal would provide revenue from the county hotel tax to finance the
final 148 million needed for the $120 million project.
The deal now requires the approval of Wake County commissioners, who
would have to sign off on new conditions attached by the council.
Those conditions include more local representation on the authority and
a requirement that the arena pay the city and county about $1.5 million
annually instead of property taxes. They also include a provision requiring $1
million in hotel tax revenue to go to the city and as much to the county for
tourism and entertainment related projects.
TRIVIAtime
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmvmmmm
Name the national league team that ranked
first in batting, clutch, slugging, on base,
runs, home runs and stolen oases stats in the
NL last year.
JWKwy ofmaofo:) mix
First place in eyes of softball team
Tracy laubach
SENIOR WR1TFR
ECU's softball team has finished
their regular season and is currently
tied for first place with Coastal
Carolina in the Big South
Conference. The Lady Pirates (13-3
in the Big South) may be heading
into the tournament as the number
one seed, a position that will earn
them a bye m found one of the con-
ference battle to be held May 2-4.
Coastal Carolina's team has 10
more conference games scheduled
within the next two weeks. One loss
will move Coastal Carolina our of the
tie for first place and will hand a con-
ference sweep to ECU.
Rhonda Rost, a senior member of
the I�ady Pirate tribe, said it's a relief
to have the conference games over
with and to be in such a apod position
at this point of the season.
"We can focus now without so
much pressure Rost said. "We are
concentrating on staying consistent
and continuing to move forward
The team has broken the ECU
softball record for the most seasonal
wins with a 43-18 overall record. Prior
to this year, the record was held with
42 wins. According to Rost, the Lady
Pirates have learned a lot this year
through playing a diverse mix of
teams.
"We have played so many differ-
cnt teams at so many different levels,
which has helped us grow Rost said.
"We have played top 25 teams, as
well as teams that aren't even recog-
nized at all. It's a great thing to win
but we also know how it feels to
lose
Last year, the Lady Pirates fin-
ished in second place in the Big
South Conference. Heading into the
tournament as the conference new-
comers and, therefore, underdogs,
ECU had to beat UNC Greensboro
twice in order to sweep the title.
They set out in thc right direction,
with a 19-3 victory in game one, but
lost game two 4-3, thus handing thc
19 conference title over to UNC-
G.
Rost said the team is in a much
better position now than tl were at
this point last season.
"W: did okay last year, but we
weren't the team everyone out there
was looking to beat Rost said. "I
knew we had a good chance to domi-
nate this year because we are a very
solid team with so many experienced
players. Everyone has really pulled
together and done their job
The team's ultimate goal, to make
it to the NCAA Championships, is
one that can obviously be reached by
maintaining the same mental atti-
tude that has been held since the
girls first stepped out on the field in
August. At thc rate the Lady Pirates
arc going, it is more than likely this
goal can and will be reached. The
championship is scheduled to be
held in Oklahoma in late May.
Netters prepare for conference matches
Wfoneifs tennis team heads to CM
Conference ChampkHiships
ANTHONY 9TANPM.L
STAFF WRITS
The ECU women's tennis team bid their regular season farewell as they
prepare for this week's CAA Championships. The Lady Pirates ended thc
regular season with five consecutive wins, two from forfeited matches.
Appalachian State forfeited its match on Friday, April 12 and Louisburg
College did the same for the match whkh was scheduled to be played in
Greenville on Tuesday.
The last match in whkh the Pirates actually faced opponents was
Sunday, April 13. The ladies took care of business in Hickory, defeating
N.C. A&T in the morning match and Belmont Abbey later that same after-
noon, Both of the victories were shutouts, winning by the score of 6-0 each
time.
ECU finished thc regular season with a 13-9 overall record and a 3-2 con-
ference record. The conference losses were dealt to the Pirates in back-to
back blows by James Madison and Old Dominion. On April 5 thc Pirates lost
to JMU 1-8 and to ODU by the same score the very next day.
Or' the seven ladies on the team, five finished with individual winning
seasons. Mona Eck, a junior transfer student from Norway paved the way
with a 14-5 records, going 2-0 at the No. 2 position, and 12-5 at the No. 3
spot. Anne-Birgjttc Svae, who is also from Norway, wasn't far from Eek's
position a 12-7 finish. Svae was the only Pirate to play in the No. 1 spot all
year long.
Thc other Pirates who had a winning season were Catherine Morgan
(10-9), Gina MacDonald (11-7) and the lone freshman on the team, Corissa
Cheek (4-2).
Holfyn Gordon, the only senior on the team, finished with a 9-11 record.
Gordon completes her career at ECU with an overall winning record of 32-
28. junior Rachael Cohen finished 7-8 and played the No. 2 position in
every one of her matches this season.
The CAA Championships will begin tomorrow April 18, and go through
Sunday April 20. The tournament will be held on the campus of Old
Dominion University in Norfolk.
ECU hosts martial
arts tournament
The First East Carolina Universtiy Open Martial Arts Toumment
was held in the Student Recreation Center on Saturday, April 5. The
purpose of the tournament was to increase awareness of martial arts and
to encourage participants to sharpen their skills by inviting martial arts
clubs to participate from all over North Carolina, Virginia, and South
Carolina. The tournament was hosted by the Department of
Recreational Services. Four divisions competed in various ranks and ages
with the participants competing in forms, weapons, and fighting. The
competitors ranged in age from six to 44 yean old. Sensei Kevin
Gurganus from Durham won Grand Champion in Black Belt Kara and
fighting.
The clubs recieved much support from the region's surrounding
schools, as well as support from the business community. A local martial
arts instructor, Sensei Charles June, and his black belt team members
judged the competition.
This tournament will be an annual event, and could grow to be one
of the largest of its size on the East Coast.
The mariiii arts club recently held a tournament in the Student Recreation
Center. This tournament will now be an annual event.
MM" COURTESY OF ASM KITCHM
Lady Pirates hope to
sprint to victory
ZINA BRi LEV
STAFF WRITER
The Lady Pirate track and field team has had an incredible season this year,
rewriting the record books in several running and field events. This weekend
they travel to UNC-Wilmington for their conference meet, where they will
try to recapture their second place title.
If the Lady Pirates continue with their hot streak, they might give the
"hard to beat" George Mason squad a run for their money and hold off the
rest of thc pack who are trying to knock thc Pirates out of their three year
second place standing.
Coach "Choo" Justice has faith in his girls d with performances earlier
in the season from veterans Amanda Johnson, in the long jump, Lave Wilson
in both the long and triple jump, and Michdle Tunic" Clayton in the shot
put, hammer throw and discus, it's easy to le optimistic
Last weekend, despite bad weather, a few Lady Pirates competed at
Duke Invitational and their performances can only intensify the excitement
building up for this weekend's big meet. Clayton, who placed fourth in thc
women's hammer throw with a 172'6" throw, which was an NCAA qualifying
distance, was one of the top finishers. The toss was also a new school record
and personal best for Clayton. She finished among two former Olympians.
Wilson finished third in the triple jump, leaping a distance of 39'8 34
while up-and-coming freshman Leana Anding finished eighth with a jump of
37 1 It was the first time Anding had reached the finals.
Kerri Harding put in a star performance in the women's 10,000 meters.
Harding crossed thc finish line in ninth place with a time of 37:59.25, meet-
ing ECAC qualifying standards.
Finishing up the weekend Missy Johnson hurdled into third place with
her season's best in the women's 400 meter in a time of 15.14.
Look for the Pirates this weekend along with the jumping duo of Johnson
and Wilson and the throwing genius of Clayton, along with Darlene Vick,
Leigh Brannon, Theresa Donovan, and Jennifer Prevatt, freshman sprinting
hopefuls Rasheca Barrow, Nikki Goins, Carmen Weldon and Kai Eason and
the rest of the Lady Pirate gang as they prepare to dominate the competition
at the CAA
Lacrosse team posts tournament win
SEAN SULLIVAN
. CONTRIHTIM. WRIIKK
The ECU Lacrosse team, ranked
seventh out of 80 teams in the
National Collegiate lacrosse league,
won the Camp Lejeune
Tournament this past weekend.
However, ECU didn't just win; they
won most decisively, outscoring their
opponents 68-10 overall.
The first game ECU played was
against N.C. Wesleyan. Marked by
thc historic first goal of B.W, the
Pirates stomped Wesleyan 24-0.
This was the team's final step
towards the playoffs
and gave them the divi-
sional title with a
record of 9-0 in league
play. The next game,
played during a torren-
tial downpour, was
another close one; here
the Pirates walked away
with a 17-3 victory over
UNC-Charlotte.
After staying at thc
tournament party just long enough
to ruin Clemson's run by embarrass-
ing them in the pull-up competition
16-8 (good job John "The Real Deal"
"They were a good
team but we showed a
lot of heart and just
wanted it more
Captain Johnny Provost
, ECU Lacrosse Player
Conway), the Pirates faced a much
tougher Sunday
schedule.
ECU opened the day
against Camp
Lejeune, who would
provide the toughest
game ECU would play
over the course of the
weekend. Regardless,
the Pirates came back
from a two goal deficit
to defeat an unhappy
squad of Marines 7-5.
"They were a good team, but we
showed a lot of heart and just want-
ed it more said Captain Johnny
"War Buff" Provost.
The fourth game the Pirates
played on the weekend was quite an
enjoyable one. Once again ruining
Clemson's fun, the Pirates walked
over the Tigers almosfeffortlessry in
a 10-1 victory. This win put ECU
into the championship game against
a tough Charleston Men's Club
team.
Charleston's goalie as a wall in
the beginning of the game and gave
the Pirates some trouble. However,
once they got going they were
unstoppable and ECU pulled off a
SEE LACROSSE PAGE 13
:





V
:
league
NEW YORK (AP) - Rfty yean after
Jackie Robinson became the first
black player in the majors, baseball
retired his number in tribute
Tuesday night, saying No. 42 will
belong to the sports pioneer "for the
ages7
With President Clinton and
Robinson's widow, Rachel, standing
at home plate, acting commissioner
Bud Setig announced that baseball
was retiring the number the late
Hall of Runer wore throughout his
career.
"The day Jackie Robinson
stepped on a major league field will
forever be remembered as baseball's
proudest moment Setig said.
"Major league baseball is retiring No.
42 in tribute to his great achieve-
ments and for the significant contri-
butions he made to society.
"No. 42 belongs to Jackie
Robinson for the ages
No other major professional sport
has honored one of its players in a
similar fashion.
The game between the New brk
Met and Los Angeles Dodgers was
halted alter die fifth inning for 35
minutes as Clinton, using two canes,
walked to home plate with Selig and
Mrs, Robinson. He waved to the
new capacity crowd and gave a
thumbs-up �ga as Secret Service
men ringed the field.
"It is hard to believe that it was
50 yean ago at Ebbets field that a
28-year-old rookie changed die fine
of baseball and the face of America
forever he said. "Jackie Robinson
�cored the go-ahead run that day and
we've all been trying to catch up ever
since
With players from both teams
standing in front of their dugouts,
Qinron saluted Robinson's contribu-
rion to his game and his country.
"Today 1 drink every American
should say a special word of thanks
�o Jackie Robinson, Branch Rfckey
and members of that Dodgers team
made him one of their own and
America is a better; stronger,
country when we all work
ither and give everyone a
chance he said.
"I can't help thinking if Jackie
was here with us tonight, he would
say we have done a lot of good, but
we can do better
Mrs. Robinson called the celebra-
tion "a great moment for all of us
"I believe that the greatest trib-
ute that we can pay to Jackie
Robinson is to gain new support for a
more equitable society. And in this
heady environment of unity, it is my
hope that we can carry his living
legacy beyond this glorious
momentshe said.
After Selig's announcement,
scores of red, white and blue bal-
loons soared from behind the right
field fence. On the left field wsH
Robinson's No. 42 appeared next to
three previously retired New Tfork
Mets numbers -Casey Stengel's No.
37, Gil Hodges No. 14 and Tom
Seaver'sNo.41.
The 12 players who currently
wear No. 42, like Butch Huskey of
the Mets and Mo Vaughn of the
Boston Red Sox, will be permitted to
keep the number until they leave
the game, Selig said.
But no one will be given die num-
ber from now on, he added.
"I have a lot of pride now
Huskey said. "I can walk anywhere
and they'll say 'He's one of the guys
who can wear No. 42 IK walk
alone
There were tributes to Robinson
at other major league ballparks
Tuesday night, with the Shea
Stadium ceremony being shown on
video screens and his number flash-
ing on scoreboards.
In Cleveland, Seattle's Ken
Griffey Jr. wore No. 42, instead of his
usual 24, in a game against the-
Indians.
"He worked hssd for each and
every one of us. 1 had a chance to
wear his number. Now III hang it on
my wafl. It's something I wiB cherish
forever Griffey said.
Robinson's grandson, Jesse
Simms, threw out the first ball for
the game between the Mets and
Dodgers. Simms, who will play foot-
Nesd a summer
What about working with us this
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bail at UCLA this foil, following in
the footsteps of his grandfather,
shook hands with home plate umpire
Eric Gregg, who is Made, as he went
out for the pitch and again as he left
the field.
Before the game, both teams
lined up on the foul lines and a half-
dozen of Robinson's old teammates,
including Hall of ftmer Sandy
Koufax, were introduced.
Also on hand was Larry Doby,
who followed Robinson to the
majors, joining the Cleveland
Indians 11 weeks later as the first
black player in the American
League. "Jackie was first, and I think
what's happening tonight should
be his Doby told ESPN, which
televised the game.
On the main scoreboard was a
photo of Robinson in his classic
white Brooklyn uniform coming
down the third base hire, daring a
pitcher to do something about it.
New to that wasa message: "He was
the handsome, heroic giant of our
youth who taught us determination,
taught us perseverance and finally,
he taught u� justice
When Robinson broke into the
majors on April 15, 1947, there was
no civil rights movement in America.
It was a year before President
Truman dcrefftgatcd the armed ser-
vices. The Brown vs. Board of
Education decision by the Supreme
Court was still seven years away.
Martin Luther King Jt had not yet
graduated from Morehouse College.
It was in that environment that
Robinson embarked on his lonely
odystcy, one made more difficult by
his pledge to Dodgers boss Branch
Rickey not to answer the fusillade of
abuse triggered by his arrival.
"He was die right one to do it
said Buck CNed, who played with
and managed the Negro League
Kansas City Monarch. "I don't know
if others could have done it
Joe Black, a genial pitcher who
roomed with Robinson, remembered
seething on the mound at the insults
that still poured down when he was
a rookie, five years after Robinson's
debut.
"Jackie came in from second
base and said 'forget it. Just pitch
Black said.
Don Newcombe, another old
Dodgers pitcher, said teams were
careful about what they said to him.
"I had the baseball and I could
throw it doggone liard he said.
Tommy Lasorda, who has spent
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)
13 Thursday, April 17, 1997
,s
The East Carolinian

tfl
Each way with imnaWp purchase
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PHILADELPHIA
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HARTFORD
FT. LAUDERDALE
TAMPAST PETE
SPORTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
Larry Morrisey, generally regard-
ed among the top high school back-
court prospects in the state, has
singed a national letter of intent to
continue is academic and basketball
career at ECU according to ECU
Head Coach Joe Dooley.
Morrisey, a 6-2 175 pound prod-
uct of Seventy-First high School in
Fayetteville helped lead the Falcons
to 48 victories in his two seasons
there as a point guard. As a senior,
he averaged 16.8 points and 4.2
assists as Seventy First reached the
championship game of the North
Carolina 4-A eastern Regionals in
Greenville last month.
Morrisey, who connected on 39
percent of his three point goals and
70 percent from the free throw line,
choose ECU over Oklahoma and
Pittsburgh.
He earned Player-of-the-Year
honors in the Class 4-A Mid-South
Conference and also was tabbed to
the Pepsi .All-State team.
'We are excited to have Larry
joins our program Dooley said.
"Larry possesses a wide range of
skills and is an excellent backcourt
addition for us
Morrisey becomes the first
signee of the spring signing period
for the Pirates and the fifth overall
since last November to ink with
ECU. He joins previous signees:
randy Barnes, 6-5, 220 forward,
Wilson (Winchendon, Mass.
School); Steven Branch, 6-7, 210
forward, Newark N.J. (St.
Benedict's Prep); Quincy Hall, 7-0,
215, center, Cleveland, N.C.
(Northland Pioneer, Ariz. JC); and
Vinston Sharpe, 6-5, 185, guard for-
ward, Durham, N.C. (Hillside HS).
Robinson
continued from page 12
virtually all of his baseball life in the
Dodgers' organization, called the
anniversary a fitting tribute.
"But it shouldn't stop with base-
ball he said. "Remember the man.
Remember his philosophy.
Remember how much he meant to
this country
Black echoed that sentiment.
"Young people should take time
to ask who Jackie Robinson was,
what he did and what he stood for
Black said. "It's more than being
the first guy that played. That alone
doesn't mean anything.
"He tried to improve life for
everybody. He was always doing
things for other people
Lacrosse
continued from page 11
10-1 victory. This provided the
lacrosse team's first tournament win
in years.
"It's great to see another trophy
said veteran attackman Howie
Taylor.
MVP Brendan McLaughlin said
this win was good heading into the
playoffs.
"This was just what we needed
to gear up for the playoffs said
"The Enforcer" McLaughlin.
Goalie sensation Brian Trail"
said, "That was the easiest weekend
I've had yet. Everybody played awe-
some
The Pirates will prepare for their
first game of the playoffs, this week-
end, against the Western
Conference Champs. Once again,
the team would like to thank the
fans who have supported them all
season. They hope to see everyone
out this weekend watching the
Pirates repeat as State Champions.
Just a reminder:
Once you graduate, you'll only get
10 vacation days a year.
Take advantage of summer vacation while you still have it. For reservations,
call your travel professional or 1-800-44-MIDWAY.
FEEL
LIKE
F L Y I
A G A I
Restrictions: All fares are each way from RaleighDurham in Coach, based on a round-trip purchase and are subject to change without notice. Tickets must be purchased
rit leasl days in advance, and within 24 hours of making reservations, but no later than 51897. Fares valid for travel every day thru 82797, except from Florida,
42497 42997. Sat. night stay required in all destinations. Seats are limited and may not be available on every flight, every day. Tickets are non-refundable,
however, changes can be made for $50, plus applicable fare difference. Up to $3-$6 Passenger Facility Charges per person, not included. Other restrictions apply.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9795
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com





i
Thursday. April 17.1997
classifieds
Tha East Ccrolinian
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
GOOD DEAL FOR RESPONSI-
BLE male during July and August
1997. Free room and board for house
and pet setting, while I am on vacation
in Europe. References required. Seri-
ous inquiries. Caii 321-1848 after 6:00
pm.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SUBLEASE large room in a three
bedroom house for $200 a month for
1st summer session. Call 561-8178 for
additional information.
ROOMMATES WANTED TO
SHARE 4 bedroom house near cam-
pus and downtown. $200 monthly in-
cludes: Power, water, heat, AC, washer
dryer. Lease is negotiable. Prefer non-
smoker 328-6938.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP! Rent is $200 12 phone and
utilities. Must be laid back. Call Alan
@ 551-3871 Wyndham Court Apart-
ments.
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washerdryer.
Hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
2 BEDROOMS FOR SUBLEASE
during entire summer close to campus,
downtown, and Coffeeshop. Please
contact Bianca ASAP. Call 361-8178.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease in 3 bedroom in Wilson
Acres. Rent begins Aug. 1st. Call Marc
at 757-2952.
2 ROOMS FOR RENT close to
ECU. Large comfortable well kept
home. Laundry, and off street parking.
Grad students preferred. Call 830-
0505.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen,
washerdryer and living room with fire-
place. Beautifully landscaped - three
fenced yards. Convenient to campus
& hospital. $1000mo. dep. 524-
4111.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM, 1
12 bath apartment in Tar River from
May-August 1st. Good location, on
ECU bus route, close to pool! Call
830-6993 today! Very affordable!
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Centerl 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. $775.00 mo.
AVAILABLE NOW One 2 bedroom
above Uppercrust Bakery AVAILABLE
NOW. (New carpet) for $475.00 mo.
Another available above Uppercrust
June first. One 2 bedroom apt. avail-
able June 1st above Percolator Coffee-
house $500.00. Luxury apartments.
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
FOR RENT: 2 br duplex with 2 full
baths large kitchen and living room,
fireplace, rent $525mo deposit $300.
Available May 10. Call 758-7531.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also prclcasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED TO share 2 bedroom apartment.
May or June. Luxury apartment ma-
ture or graduate student $292.50 12
utilities. Call 931-0856.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP!
2 bedroom 1 12 bath on ECU bus ro-
ute. Rent is $190 12 utilities and
phone. Call Pat at 757-2725.
LEASE MAY TO AUGUST Tar
River Estates $375.00. Call Shea 758-
3524. Call today! Come See!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
FREE PARKING ONE BLOCK
FROM campus. Two roommates
need to share three bedroom one bath
house. Fully furnished except for bed-
rooms. Washerdryer, central heat and
air. Rent plus 13 utilities. Call Katie
today 931-0348.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SUBLEASE two bedroom apartment
across from campus. Awesome location
pay only half rentutilities. Pets wel-
comed. Call now 752-4039.
TWO PERSONS NEEDED TO
sublease apartment from May 1 to July
31. Cheap, close to campus and down-
town. Call Bryan or Mike at 754-2835
rent $184 per person.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE FOR
SUBLEASE. May-Aug. rent
$285mo. Kingsarms apartments. Call
754-2576.
FEMALE NEEDED TO SUB-
LEASE room for summer: share nice
3 br. duplex, close to campus. Rent
$200, 13 util. Call 752-8695. Leave
message.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
TWO bedroom one bath apartment
$200 a month and split utilities. Per-
son must be mature responsible and
Kind. Lease starts in May. Contact
Matt 328-3866.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: TV,
reclincr, sofa and table. Call Tiffany at
353-7046.
FOR SALE - 1990 BAYLINER.20
ft. long. Force motor 150hp and trailer.
All in very good condition. Call
(919)356-2665 after 6 pm.
95 CHEVY CAVALIER, LT. blue
AC CD must sell ASAP $9,500. Call
Jennifer Wheeler 328-3514 leave mes-
sage.
SALE! A FULL SIZE POOL
TABLE. GOOD CONDITION AND
FUN TO PLAY. ASKING $300.00 OR
BEST OFFER. CALL EMILY OR
SCOTT AT 561-7808.
FOR SALE: MOVING drafting
table, $85, gas grill $35, cannondale
bike $100, ceiling fan with light $15,
and kitchen items dishes, glasses,
pans, toaster oven, $45, Call 758-
7531.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chcvys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4wd's. Your
area. Tbll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-
3726 for current listings.
DO YOU LIKE BEER? Well, you
can have your favorite keg on tap in
your own house every day of the week.
The keg frig, holds one keg; comes
with cleaning kit, co2 tank, and two
taps lyr. old. $500neg. Call Anthony
@ 830-9347
YOU LIKE PIER ONE, World Ba-
zaar stuff? Then you'll love our moving
sale. Check us out Saturday 19th just
off 10th Street 1002 Forbes.
LARGE ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH large TV space
glass enclosed stereo and CD storage
compartments. Very nice will take
best offer Brian @ 752-1891.
THINKPAD 340 LAPTOP
DEMO model, with color printer:
$595. Z-station computers, 100 mhz,
16mb ram, 1.2gb, 15" monitor, MS of-
fice, games internal fax modem, war-
ranty, sale price $1399. ECU Student
Stores: 328-6731.U2 TICKETS (3)
CLEMSON May 16. Best offer 830-
1821.
COMPUTER! INTEL 120MHZ
CPU, 14" monitor, 1.2GB hard drive,
16mb SRAM, 12x CD, 33.6 modem,
floppy, sound card, speakers, Win 95,
SWIM CoAcHKii. SfflrTOHB!
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salcm pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPCS PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC 27113.
WANTED: STUDENT WITH
CDFR, EDUC, PSYC, NURS major to
care for 5 year old boy this summer.
Own transportation, non-smoker, and
swimming skills. Access to 2 local
pools. Hours: Monday-Thursday 8-5.
Call Sherrie at 328-2009, (after 5) 355-
7597.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER
Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission.
Call Jeff Mahoncy at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
PROFESSIONAL LAW FIRM IS
seeking an experienced paralegal with
bachelors degree and additional train-
ing at a recognized paralegal training
center. Experience in bankruptcy
andor litigation can substitute for the
educational requirement. Excellent
fringe benefits package included.
Please contact Lisa Willis at (919)355-
3030 for further information. All inqui-
ries will be handled in confidence.
WANTED: FEMALE STUD-
ENT TO live in with disabled fe-
male. No physical duties required.
Free room in nice home, located in
Tucker Estates Call (919)756-6939
after 7pm on Tues. Wed. or Thurs.
night. Collect.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
ATTENTION ARTISTS ASP1R-
ING CLOTHES company seeking
individual to design logo. Will pay for
best one. For more info call 754-2466.
HELP WANTED CLEARING
OUT tradebook dept. to make room
for new titles! 40 off specially
marked books. Not a job but great
deal! ECU Student Stores, Wright
Building.
ATTENTION! ASSISTANT
WANTED to help with male fresh-
man who has cerebral palsy for the fall
semester 1997. Minimal assistance re-
quired. Hours and payment to be de-
termined. Call 919-732-4748 for an in-
terview.
LEAD GUITARIST & KEY-
BOARD1ST needed immediately.
Southern RockCountry playing East
Coast Club Circuit. Good pay! Call
Mike at (919)237-3688.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAI LING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
SAIL. IJIJ'I1 bTown1 AwAV 35
minutes from Greenville rent, charter,
lessons. Sunfishes, Windsurfers, big
boats. Lessons, racing. On the Pamli-
co, McCottcr's Marina, Washington
975-2174.
TYPING SERVICE - DEPEND-
ABLE, CONFIDENTIAL, fast
turnaround. Low rates you can afford.
Call today for Glenda at 919-527-9133
or E-mail me at GStev22480AOL.com

MASSAGE SOUND GOOD?
Kind musician gentleman wback prob-
lems will sharetrade backrubs for heal-
ing & fun. Send ph & problem de-
scription to: Donald, POB 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
. �� :� � �� ��� �-���
PI LAMBDA PHI WOULD like to
congratulate the newly initiated broth-
ers! Worley Smith, Jarett Allen, Anup
Patel, Delvin Vick, and Kenneth Ennis!
Go Kappas!
THE FORGET-ME-NOT formal
that the Alpha Phi's through brought
together the sisters both old and new.
The night was magical, and we had
such a blast remembering the good
times from the past. We danced and
laughed and spent the evening togeth-
er making memories to remember for-
ever!
JULIE LINDER: CONGRATU-
LATIONS on your engagement to
Grey! We wish you both lots of happi-
ness. You both helped make our formal
a night to remember! We're very hap-
py that we got to be a pan of your spe-
cial moment. We love you! Love, your
Gamma Sig sisters.
THANK YOU TO THE volunteers
at the REAL Crisis Center for their
time and dedication to the center
Cornelia Anderson, Paige Armstrong,
Mary Boccaccio, Brande Bowers, Ni-
cole Cox, Sally Dew, Rusty Earl, Katina
Faulkner, Becky Rnelli, Sean Forney,
Greta Graves, Steve Green, Christine
Harrington, Matt Holder, Angic John-
son, Heather Lynch, Brian Matthews,
Margaret Mayo, Drew McMillen, Dal-
las McPhcrson, Teresa Muldra, Connie
Palmer, Susan Price, Tootie Raynor,
Fran Sankowski, Raquel Torres, Aman-
da Tyson, Jonni Wainwright, Susan
Walls.
REGISTRATIONORIENTA-
TION TO CAREER SERVICES -�
The Career Services office will hold
orientation meetings in the Career
Services Building for seniors and
graduate students on the following
dates: Thur. April 24 at 4:00 pm.
Students will receive instructions on
registering with Career Services, es-
tablishing a credentials file, and the
procedures for campus interviews.
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS TU-
TOR TRAINING workshop sched-
uled - (Greenville) - Teach an adult to
READ. Literacy volunteers of Ameri-
ca-Pitt County is holding a tutor train-
ing workshop beginning on April 24, at
7pm. The workshop consists of five
training sessions. The sessions will be
held on Monday and Thursday even-
ings. Volunteers will leam to teach
functionally illiterate adults how to
read. Call 752-0439 today for more in-
formation or to register for the tutor
training workshop. Workshop dates:
Thursday, April 24, Monday, April 28,
Thursday, May i, Monday, May 5,
Thursday, May 8.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORK-
SHOPS, SPONSORED by Career
Services, will be held on Thur. April 17
at 3:00 pm and Wed. April 23 at 5:15
pm in the Career Services Building.
Open to all students, especially those
preparing for the job search, the work-
shops are designed to help you learn
professional techniques in presenting
yourself to employers.
TUES APRIL 15 - junior recital.
Whitney-Cole Klcinschuster, voice and
Senior Recital, Theresa Stone, voice,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm
Wed April 16 - Sophomore Recital,
Matthew King and Allan Rascoe, voice,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm
Thurs April 17 - Friends of the School
of Music Scholarship Showcase Reci-
tal, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm
Fri April 18 - Senior Recital, Julius
McAdams, saxophone, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7:00 pm Fri April 18 -
Graduate Recital, Susan A. Voges, cel-
lo, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm
Sat April 19 - Senior Recital, Ralph
Stewart, horn, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 1:00 pm. Sat April 19 � Graduate
Recital, Jonathan L. Askey, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 5:00 pm Sat
April 19 - Senior Recital, Kelley L. Wil-
liams, violin, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00 pm Sat April 19 - Senior Recital,
Richard Ramirez, composition, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm Sun
April 20 - Sunday at the Galley Con-
cert: String Concert, Fritz Gearhart,
Conductor, Greenville Museum of An,
802 S. Evans St Greenville, 2:00 pm
Sun April 20 - Junior Recital, Jutij
Brewer, piano, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 2:00 pm Sun April 20 - Graduate
Recital, Natalie Stroud, voice, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4:00 pm Sun
April 20 - Graduate Recital, Greg
Streuber, trumpet, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall. 9:00 pm Mon April 21 - Trom-
bone Ensemble, GeorgeBroussard, Di-
rector, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00
pm Tues April 22 - Freshman Recital,
Jon Johnson, organ. First Presbyterian
Church, 1400 S. Elm St. Greenville,
7:00 pm Tues April 22 - Guitar En-
semble, Elliot Frank, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. For
info call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour ho-
tline at ECU-4370.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS,
AND Allies for Diversity meeting
April 17th 1997 Mendenhall Room 244
7:30pm. All members need to attend!
Topic to be discussed recent Anti-Gay
incidences occurring on Campus. This
concerns all members. Refreshments
will be served. See you there!
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(�19)
$1099 delivered!
$369. All new!
JVC
321-
mouse, more!
CD recorder!
3897
HUSKY. . AKC REGISTERED.
BLACK arid white male with blue
eyes. Has all shots, 9 months old.
Needs a loving owner. $75.00 obo.
Call 757-2447.
NEED A COMPUTER? DESK-
TOP? LAPTOP? UPGRADE?
ONLY BUY WHAT YOU NEED!
PERSONALIZED SERVICE! CALL
MIKE PIPPA AT 794-3555.
.esurss�.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors Instructors
lor private coed youth camp located in the
beautiful mountain of western N.C.
Over 25 activities including all sport water
skiing, healed pool, tennis, art, horseback,
go-torts. 610 to 811earn $1250-
1650 plus room, meals, laundry & great fun I
Non-smokers call for brochureapplicalion:
�00-S32-5539
Make
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
SS.75 Per Ht & Mileage
MailFax Resume:
MCSI
RO. Box 370
Cove City, NC 28529
Fax: (919)637-2125
Near Greenville, Kinaton, New Bent
Hiring Now!
FULL-TIME SUMMER NANNY
to help mom with 2 and 4 12 year old
toddlers and twins arriving this sum-
mer. Must have experience with
infants. References required. Call
321-1663.
DANCERS (ENTERTAIN-
MENT) SID'S SHOWGIRLS
Goldsboro 919-580-7084.
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Are you looking for employment? Ws
are looking for caring, compassionate
individuals who love children to work
as full and part time teachers at our
corporate child care center located in
RTR If you are interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
DEGREE IN HAND, NO career in
sight? Looking to grow a business in
Eastern, North Carolina. FullPart-
time positions. Call 551-6749 for con-
fidential interview.
3 PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
POSITIONS open starting first
summer session. Asst. Prod. Manager
& Prod. Asst. 1 positions require Mac
Based Quarkxpress knowledge to be
able to design ads. Production Assis-
tant 2 positions requires no experi-
ence. Position start first summer ses-
sion. Applications are being accepted
as of today until Tuesday, April 29. Ap-
ply at our office, The East Carolinian
on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building (across from
Joyner).
Advertise in the
classifieds
See, it works.
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. Afe can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on SI. Delinquent
tax, Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll
Free 800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for
current listings.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities, soror-
ities & groups. Any campus organiza-
tion can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.007VISA application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified call-
ers receive FreeT-Shirt.
eastcarolinian
Classifieds
BUILDING HOMES WITH
GOD'S people in needanyone inter-
ested in organizing a campus chapter
of Habitat for Humanity, to start this
fall, call Toni at the Pitt County Habi-
tat office, 758-2947.
FRISBEE GOLF DOUBLES;
COME join us for frisbee golf from 3-
6:00 pm on April 23 & 24 at the frisbee
golf course.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
WILL MEET April 17 at 6:00 pm in
the Underground in MSC. For more
information contact David at 353-
0808.
TO ALL B-GLAD members thank
you for your support over the past two
years. Let's continue to strive for
equality and respect! Your President
Lora. You've been great!
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next.
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Intortnrton in U.S.
19,271 TOPICS � ALL SUB-cCTS
Oder Catalog Today with Visa MC or COD
tUfr 800-3510222
Or. rush $2.00to: Ruawh AuMinct
11322 Idaho Ave 206-flR. Los Anoses. CA 90025
Main $2.361mo.
Looking for 3 ECU students to work with
UNC students in a summer intern.
Travail Chalangel tarn!
Min. GPA 2.5
call 919-942-M76
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crews at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. $5,000 salary plus $1,000
bounus Experience preferred. Call 1-
800-477-1001 and ask for Mr. Helfrich
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
We Need Timberland boots
and shoes! Good Jeans.
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS, SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also BlQlsen Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
easferolinian
advertising department stall
Tabi GrahamCampus Sales Rep.
Stephen MoodySales Rep.
Chris DeiamereSales Rep.
David PomillaSales Rep.
Jeremy LeeSales Rep.
Keith HerronSales Rep.
Mary PoliokClassified Ad Manager
For Information Regarding Advertising
Please Call
328-2000
i i ii m m ii mi '


Title
The East Carolinian, April 17, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 17, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1203
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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