The East Carolinian, April 15, 1997







r
TUESDAY
APRIL 15, 1997
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROUNA
Students' near-fatal drug use
reflects designer drug popularity
Jeff gentry
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Two students hospitalized after collapsing at a late-night party are
evidence of the popularity of a new and dangerous "designer drug
A 22-year-old ECU student, and a 21-year-old Pitt Community
College student were found unconscious on the front lawn of 506 E.
10th St. on April 4. Several members of the Sigma Pi Fraternity, who
were sponsering a late-night party, notified the Greenville Rescue
Squad when they found the students on their lawn, unable to
breathe.
Rescue personnel arrived on the scene at 3:46 a.m. and found the
students in a coma-like state. The students were taken to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital and placed on respirators. Both students
were released from the hospital on April 5.
Greenville Police found a Coke bottle filled with a clear liquid at
the scene. Analysis by the State Bureau of Investigations revealed
the liquid to be gamma hydroxy butric, or GHB. GHB, also known as
scoops and liquid ecstasy, is a clear, oily liquid which, when ingested,
gives users a quick high, followed by heavy sedation.
Using alchohol as a chaser to GHB is potentially deadly. The mix-
ture may cause extremely slow breathing or total respiratory collapse.
GHB can be made at home using chemicals, but officials warn that
unskilled "kitchen chemists" could produce samples with unknown
side effects.
Pitt County Memorial Hospital has documented several cases
involving GHB in the last 30-60 days. While this drug is not illegal to
possess, police are still investigating where the students obtained it.
Jeff Yurfest, president of Sigma Pi, expressed concern that GHB
is becoming too popular and people were associating it with fraterni-
ties.
"They were downtown drinking and they came here during a late
night Yurfest said. "They apparently took the GHB, but I have no
idea if they took it here or not. I got home from work and there were
two people passed out in our yard
Yurfest said he fears the incident will cause people to associate
the drug with the Greek system.
"Neither of them were members of this fraternity or of the Greek
system Yurfest said. "They just happened to be here when they
collapsed. It could have happened anywhere, but it kind of sucks
that it happened here
Yurfest also emphasized that the house on 10th Street is the
home of a few fraternity members and not the Sigma Pi fraternity
house.
"We have never had this kind of problem here Yurfest said. "It
isn't like someone was passing it GHB out from the fraternity. It's
a shame after all the effort that the Greeks have put in to clean up
our image on this campus that something like this happened
Students said the incident reflects the popularity GHB has
gained in the Greenville area.
"It's big on campus said ECU student Rebecca Ann Reynaud.
"It's all around. It's at the bars and its in the parties
There have been conflicting reports over whether or not GHB
can be detected in a drink. The high absorption rate of the drug
often prevents it from being detected in the emergency room.
"It does have a very strong taste said another student Ted
Rowell. "It's very salty
Donna Walsh .director of the Office of Health Promotion and
Well-being, said GHB is not classified as a date-rape drug because it
does have a taste.
"It has a slightly salty taste that people are overcoming by mixing
with cinnamon Walsh said.
Chris Arline, president of the Inter-Fraternity Council at ECU,
also had some comments on the incident regarding possible sanc-
tions against Sigma Pi.
"At this time I have seen no documentation that would indicate
Sigma Pi had anything to do with this Arline said. "I think that it
was just bad luck that it happened at a late night where a lot of their
brothers live
Arline also said the Greek system would try to arrange for speak-
ers on the subject to come to try to inform people about the dangers
of using GHB.
"I have done research on this drug since this happened and the
Greek system will be trying to spread the word that this stuff is a bad
thing Arline said.
Greenville Police said that they were put on full alert after the
incident. The Food and Drug Administration had been supplying the
department with information about the drug.
Above is a representation of the molecular structure of gamma hydroxy buturic. Also known as GHB,
scoops, or liquid ecstasy, the drug has been gaining popularity in the Greenville area and nearly claimed
the lives of two local students earlier this month.
Effects of GHB scare reach
farther than ECU campus
Designer drug proves
deadly
GREENVILLE (AP) - An unapproved
bodybuilding drug that nearly killed two
East Carolina students earlier this month is
having a resurgence in North Carolina, a doc-
tor said.
Gamma hydroxy buturic (GHB), illegal in
two states, cannot be legally marketed
nationwide, the Food and Drug
Administration has said.
But in the past eight months, a Texas
teen-ager was killed and a Georgia woman
lapsed into a coma after ingesting the drug,
according to the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDCP).
The two college students collapsed April
4 after mixing the drug with alcohol at a
party near East Carolina. Both needed respi-
rators to resuscitate them.
But Dr. Sven Normann, of the Florida
Poison Information Center, said word has
gotten out that GHB produces euphoria,
increased sensitivity to touch and drowsi-
ness. It's also been hyped as an aphrodisiac,
he said.
The side effects include breathing prob-
lems and - when the drug is mixed with alco-
hol and other depressants - vomiting,
seizures, loss of bladder control and amnesia,
SEE GHB. PAGE 3
HOGGING THE BALL DURING PIGSKIN SCRIMMAGE
Summer graduates allowed to walk in May
Officials change position
on commencement rights
AMANDA AUSTIN
STAFF WKITF.R
STI'DF.NT ORGANIZATIONS
Graduating seniors with courses to be com-
pleted in summer sessions will now have the
choice of graduating in either the spring or fall
Commencement ceremonies.
The decision was made and announced by
university officials on Friday, April 11.
"We need to carefully examine our policies
to make sure that we are being fair to all our
degree candidates Chancellor Richard Eakin
said. "ECU's size makes it virtually impossible
for us to hold just one graduation ceremony
during an academic year
The decision was made in hopes of avoid-
ing problems for students whose families had
already made plans to attend the May 10 cer-
emony
"The December ceremony was established
specifically to recognize students who com-
pleted their degree requirements during the
summer and fall Eakin said. "But we under-
stand that many students who plan to finish
their courses in the summer would rather par-
ticipate in the May ceremony because it would
be inconvenient for them to attend in
December
The only stipulation for seniors finishing
their course requirements in the summer is
that their names will be printed in the
December program rather than the May pro-
gram.
The decision applies to those students who
will be finishing in summer sessions this year.
University officials are reviewing the situa-
tion and trying to devise a plan that will
accommodate all students when it comes to
time to graduate.
A recent resolution was written by the stu-
dent government association (SGA) in support
f those seniors fulfilling their course require-
ments during the summer.
The resolution state that no summer grad-
uation is available to those students complet-
ing their course requirements during the sum-
mer. It also said that undue hardship is creat-
ed for those students and their families who
would have to participate in the Fall
Commencement.
Since most students will leave the
Greenville area to follow their careers or con-
tinue their education elsewhere, the resolu-
tion listed this as another reason for reversing
the decision.
Another point of importance to SGA which
was included in the resolution was that seniors
should leave ECU on a positive note.
This resolution gives all seniors lacking
summer school credits the full support of the
SGA. The SGA would like to see a policy
allowing all seniors to participate in Spring
Commencement.
Student activists organize bike rally for Greenway
Jamie Wilson carries the ball in Saturday's scrimmage. Wilson rushed for 70 yards on IS attempts.
PHOTO BY CHRIS 6AYD0SH
ANGELA KOF.NIO
HEAI.THENVIRONMENTAI. ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Several ECU and community organizations
have teamed up to hold the Third Annual
Earth Day Bike Rally.
ECU Environmental Awareness Club
(GALA), ECU Natural Extremes, Pamlico Tar
River Foundation (PTRF), the Cypress
Chapter of the Sierra Club and Unitarian
Universalist Congregation of Greenville are
organizing the event which will take place
April 20.
"Basically what we're trying to do is raise
money to extend the Greenville) Greenway
said Bike Rally Chairman Jeff Yurfest.
The Greenway is a paved path through the
wetlands in Greenville for people to walk and
ride bikes along while touring the wetlands.
The rally will con54clude with a five mile
bike ride. This will start at the Town
Commons, go through the Greenway, along
the bottom of College Hill, to Dogwood
Hollow, then past St. Peter's Church and fin-
ish at the Town Commons.
Participants in the bike ride will include
members of the community ranging from boy
scouts to ECU students.
After the bike ride there will be a family
picnic, eco-scavenger hunt, entertainment and
prize give-aways.
Mayor Nancy Jenkins and ECU Geology
Professor Dr. Stan Riggs will also speak.
The entertainment wiil include music from
members of Purple Schooibus, Hipbone,
Midnight Blue and the felly Smith Band.
The groups will raise money for the
Greenway througn the sale of T-shirts. 76 buy
a T-shirt people r-u.jt register for the rally. The
cost of registration is $10, which covers the
cost of the T-shirt.
"We got sponsors to cover the cost of the
T-shirts so the money we get will be profit for
the Greenway Yurfest said.
According to GAIA Secretary Sarah
McConnell, 80 percent of the proceeds will
benefit Greenway, TO percent will go to GAIA
and 10 percent will go to Natural Extremes.
Last year's rally raised over $1,000.
"We are currently in the process of putting
up fliers across campus about registering
McConnell said.
The bike ride will begin at 3 p.m. At 1:30
p.m. there will be a nature walk down the
Greenway guided by Biology Professor Dr.
Vince Bellis. At 2:30 the ECU Police
Department will talk with participants about
bike safety.
Interested participants may preregister or
register at the rally. To register or for more
information contact Yurfest at 758-1348 or
McConnell at 328-3434.
TUESDAY
bsintoMyrrie t g�"
opinion5 low41
Congrats. Rebel! WEDNESDAY:
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Pirate baseball loses p high 65
over weekend low 47
Presidential panel considers aspects of human cloning
the east Carolinian
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ARLINCiTON, Va. (AP) - Stuart Orkin, a developmental biologist at Harvard Medical School
says human cloning has "inherent risks that I think are unacceptable But that does not mean
lie thinks research into it should be banned.
"We may miss the boat in a sense" if all study of human asexual reproduction is outlawed,
Orkin told the National Bioethics Advisory Commission on Sunday. "There is some advantage
for research to go on
President Clinton formed the 18-member commission to study implications of human cloning
after a Scottish scientist in February presented Dolly the sheep, the first-known successful clone
of an adult mammal.
As the panel mulls over the ethical, scientific and policy ramifications of human cloning,
Clinton has banned use of federal money on such experimentation and suggested a moratorium
on private studies.
Both Orkin and Janet Rossant, a professor of molecular and medical genetics at the University
of Toronto, appeared to pique the committee's interest when they agreed that human cloning
may be premature while so much is left to study in animals.
"Is it possible that we can do most of the basic science on animals without ever creating an
entity which many people find offensive?" asked commission member Thomas Murray, director
of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
Orkin did not advocate widespread cloning of animals. Plenty of research is left to do that
would not necessitate further cloning of any kind, he said. But researching human cloning could
lead to major advancements in such fields as organ transplants, he said.
"I'm not comfortable with the notion of banning any kind of research Orkin said. "However,
I am comfortable with moratoria on the implantation" of cloned human embryos because of the
"inherent risks that 1 think are unacceptable
Rossant said because not all animal research is directly applicable to humans, the board should
"avoid prohibiting legitimate research into animals or humans (because) it really has big poten-
tial for immense benefits in the future
The panel's mandate takes it beyond scientific ramifications of cloning into the hazy realm of
ethics.
Religious groups already have testified before the commission, which is now dealing with
whether to incorporate religious beliefs into the recommendations to Clinton.
"It's one thing to respect their beliefs but it becomes difficult to incorporate that to make
public policy Murray said.
Commission member Bernard Lo, director of the medical e tin. program at the University of
California, San Francisco, questioned whether scientific review boards should ask the motives of
laboratories seeking funds for future cloning projects. Others inwlved in genetic studies are not
required to answer such questions.
SEE CLONING. PAGE 3





)
2 Tuesday, April 15 1997
iH
The East Carolinian
- .
II &
State, local governments
compete for jobs
across 'the state
Unity and prayer service attracts 1,000
CHARLOTTE (AP) - About I,(KM) people attended an interdenominational
prayer service promoting unity and harmony in a city divided by recent
events.
This month alone, Charlotte has seen a controversial city council vote
halting arts funding and the killing of a black woman by two white police offi-
cers near a traffic checkpoint.
During the service Sunday at Memorial Stadium, government officials
gave words of encouragement and representatives of the Baha'i, Buddhist.
Christian, Hindu. Jewish and Muslim faiths offered prayers. Gospel choirs
sang rousing hymns.
Organizers had doped to fill the stadium with 24,000 people after send-
ing invitations to all 726 houses of worship in Mecklenburg County.
More than once, speakers urged participants to take their concerns for the
city and use them as a call to action.
State offers grants for pollution prevention
RALEIGH (AP) - A deadline of June 13 has been set for business and indus-
try to apply for up to $20,000 in matching pollution prevention grants from
the state.
The state Department of Environment, Health and Natural Resources
expects to award the grants in July, the department said.
Grants offered this year will favor projects that reduce water consumption
through efficiency improvements or reuse of water. More than SI million has
leen awarded for 110- grants since 1985.
The grants are for projects that can be duplicated.
across the nation
Harris Poll finds most believe smoking is addictive
NEVV YORK (AP) - The overwhelming majority of Americans believe smok-
ing is addictive, and most of them believe the tobacco company executives
share that belief, according to a Harris Fbll.
According to the poll being released Monday, 90 percent of the public
believes smoking causes cancers. Among smokers, 79 percent also believe
that, it said.
The nationwide poll of 1,006 adults was conducted by telephone by Ixiuis
Harris and Associates Inc. during March 26-April I. The results have a mar-
gin of sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.
The pollsters found that 95 percent of the public, including 92 percent of
the smokers, believe smoking is addictive.
And 92 percent, including 88 percent of smokers, believe the tobacco
company executives also think their product is addictive.
However, the poll found that 40 percent agreed that tobacco is a legal
product and the companies should be allowed to sell and advertise their
HICKORY, N.C. (AP) - More and
more cities and counties are offering
tax rebates to companies that build
or expand plants - raising the stakes
in the fierce competition for new
industries and their jobs.
"You don't do it because you
want to. You do it because you have
to said Union County economic
development director Lee Correll,
whose county lost a S.V5 million Wal-
Mart distribution center to
Pageland, S.C in 1995 after that
state offered twice as much in
incentives.
Local and state officials across
the country are wrestling with the
complex issues of whether to sacri-
fice potential tax revenues in order
to get more, and to whom they
should give them.
The fight heated up in North
Carolina after the state Supreme
Court last year ruled it constitution-
al for local governments to offer
incentives. Winston-Salem lawyer
William Maready had sued aftet his
city and Forsyth County gave more
than $13 million to 24 companies,
and a lower court ruling in his favor
had chilled local government
recruiting efforts.
Cabarrus County was among the
first to try something different: It
used tax rebates to get Corning Inc.
to build a massive fiber-optics plant
that will create more than 600 jobs.
Other recruiters took note of
Cabarrus' success, and dozens of
local governments have adopted or
are considering similar policies.
In 1996. the N.C. General
Assembly approved a reduction in
the corporate income tax; job-cre-
ation tax credits for all 100 counties:
and worker training, machinery and
equipment tax credits. The compa-
ny could get $19 million from newly
approved state tax credits by 2000.
The county promised to return
85 percent of the company's proper-
ty tax payments for the first five
years.
Corning won't say how much it is
investing, but county officials esti-
mate the company would get S8 mil-
lion in tax breaks if it invests $300
million.
Cabarrus Economic
Development Director Maurice
lvv ing said the county offered more
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after losing a major AMP Inc. elec-
rronics plant to York County, S.C
u here a menu of state tax breaks can
reduce a company's property taxes
43 percent for 20 years.
"We couldn't compete with
South Carolina because they were
fjivinp away the stars he said. "We
had to have something on the table
to be in the game
The grant policies work like this:
A company that builds a new plant
and pays property taxes for five years
can get much of that money back in
the form of a grant. The grants are in
addition to more traditional assis-
tance such as land, site work, water
and sewer line extensions and roads.
North Carolina local govern-
ments are requiring minimum
investments ranging from $500,000
under a proposed Union County
policy to S3 million in Cabarrus
County. Many localities have set up
sliding scales that tie the size of
grants to the amount companies
invest, although Catavvba has also
linked them to factors such as jobs
created and type of industry.
Competing for industry used to
be a game played largely by the
states.
North Carolina pioneered the
idea M) years ago by developing a
highly regarded community college
system, offering free job training and
helping with utilities, roads and tax
credits.
Other Southern states responded
by sweetening their financial pack-
ages, and now North Carolina's
incentives pale in comparison.
In the early 1990s, North
Carolina couldn't match the esti-
mated �300 million in incentives
that South Carolina offered BMW to
locate in Greer.
Many economists think govern-
ments should stop competing.
"It's very rare you ever get back
enough in taxes to make up for w hat
you gave up said James Smith, a
professor of finance at I NC Chapel
Hill's Kenan-Flagler Business
School. "The argument is everybody
else does it and we should do it. too.
That might make sense if you're in a
state that has a hard time attracting
industry. In North Carolina we
just don't need this
East Carolina Playhouse
ARISTOPHANES
MUSICAL COMIC BATTLE
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LYSI STRATA
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THE PLAY CONTAINS BAWDY PHYSICAL HUMOR!
APRIL 17,18,19,21 AND 22 ,1997 AT 8:00 P.M.
APRIL 20, 1997 AT 2:00 P.M.
GENERAL PUBLIC: 8.009.00
ECU FACULTYSTAFF: 7.008.00
ECU STUDENTS: 5.006.00
CALL328-6829
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CORNER OF FIFTH AND EASTERN STREETS
Era
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
WEEKEND
UNIVERSITY
An experience to last a lifetime.
Summer Course Schedule
All sections open - see your adviser for
approval to add a section.
Fi-idav (6-10 pm)
SOCI 2110-004 Introduction to Sociology (3)
PSYC 3221-099 Social Psychology (3)
Saturday (8 am-12 noon)
ELEC 2054-099 Introduction to Electricity (3)
ENGL 2000-099 Interpreting Literature (3)
MATH 1066-003 Applied Mathematics for Decision Making (3)
Saturday (1-5 pm)
DESN 2036-099. 2037 Computer-Aided Design & Drafting (3,0)
MATH 0001-004 Intermediate Algebra (2)
MUSC 2218-099 (1:00-3:40) Orchestral Music (2)
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Weekend
classes begin
May 16-17
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August 1-2
An oquaf opponunilWaltirnutive action
university, which accommodates the needs
of individuals with disabilities.
Contact vour adviser or the
Weekend University
vyi The Weekend University
� Division of Continuing Studies
East Carolina Univcrsit)
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
m Telephone: 919-328-4696
1-800-328-6567 (toll tree)
j�j I ax: 919-328-6540
C3 E-mail:
��i ceweeknd(S ecm rn.cis.ecu.edu
HENDRIX FILM
Thursdoy, April 17
Thirsty Inursdayf Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For 0 Free 16oz Fountain Drink
with any purchase. NEW! Popcorn Will
Be Available at The Spot lor All Showings!
Friday, April 18
Saturday, April 19
All lilms start at 800 PM unless otherwise noted
and Ore FREE to Students, faculty, ond Stall
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID. .
LOSMWSmiS
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TUESDAY APRIL 22,1997,8PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE
FREEH! TICKETS FOR STUDENTS, STAFF, AND FACULTY. $5 FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC. $8 AT THE DOOR. FREE
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WO SPECIAL S'JESTS
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
$15 in advance for studentsfacultystaff
52c in advance for the public
all tickets at the door are $25
tickets available from the central ticket office
in mendenhall student center. for more information
call 328-6004 or 1 800 ecu-arts.
mastercard and visa accepted
disabled individuals should call 919 328-4802
to receive assistance in order to participate.
PRESENTED IT THE ECU STUDENT UNION P0PUUB ENTEITtlNMENT COMMITTEE
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V
3 Tuesday, April 15, 1997
IM3 WS
The East Carolinian
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GHB
Student research on display today
ECU's Annual Graduate Research Day starts at 11 a.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center. The program will include presentations by graduate stu-
dents on their research projects in chemistry; physics, biology, art, anthro-
pology; nursing, geology; psychology, political science and human perfor-
mance. The presentations are open to the public.
Human Resources addresses workplace issues
The best ways to communicate in the workplace will be dicussed at noon
on Wednesday, April 16, at the Lunchtime Learning program in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Gregory Miller of the Office of Human
Resources will lead the program.
Career Services offers job search workshop
Jim Westmoreland, director of ECU's Career Services office, will offer
advice to students about finding jobs. His Leadership Development
Program is titled "Putting Your Experience to Work" and begins at 5 p.m. in
room 244 of Mendenhall Student Center.
Cultural Center sponsors Heritage Fest
The Ledonia Wright African-American Cultural Center will present "
Celebration of African American-Culture" on Thursday; April 17, 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. at the Bloxton House and Rear Patio. The public is invited to come and
enjoy music, food and art displays.
Cloning
continued from page 1
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Even if the motive were ques-
tioned, private clinics that do not
use federal grants would not face
such scrutiny. That, commission
members suggested, would create
another moral dilemma.
While the panelists seemed to be
asking more questions than provid-
ing answers, many did agree that
whatever is recommended now will
come under scrutiny again as sci-
ence speeds along.
"Once the science is out of the
bag, somebody is going to do it
said panel member Lawrence
Miike, director of Hawaii's
Department of Health.
continued Irom page 1
and a deceleration of the breathing
rate that can lead to a coma, he said.
Hospiul officials in Pitt County-
said they have seen at least six cases
of GHB overdoses since February.
"The possibility exists that the
person could use GHB and be left in
what we call a persisting vegetative
state said Dr. William Meggs. "F
would go on record unequivocally
and say; 'Stay away from this stuff
In December, the State Bureau
of Investigation released a report
about GHB warning of its develop-
ing reputation for causing hallucina-
tions, heightened sexual desire and
euphoria. The report also said the
drug has started popping up in
nightclubs, college campuses and
areas where high school students
congregate.
The ECU students said GHB is
considered en vogue in college cir-
cles.
"It makes you feel like you're
really drunk without the dragging
effect. It kind of pumps you up
said the 21-year-old male student.
"It makes you want to stay out
late. You don't want the night to end
until it wears off the other student,
a 22-year-old female, said.
The federal Drug Enforcement
Administration wants to have GHB
classified as an illegal narcotic, simi-
lar to cocaine. Rhode Island and
Georgia have already outlawed it and
five others - California, Florida,
Texas, Massachusetts and Hawaii -
have bills banning the drug in differ-
ent stages of enactment.
At ECU, the overdoses were a
wake-up call to university officials,
who are planning a program next fall
on GHB and other trendy drugs.
The Inter-Fraternity Council, a
student association of fraternities,
will help organize the event, presi-
dent Christopher Arline said.
"It scares the hell out of us, and
we don't want to lose any of our
friends to this he said.
Already, the office of Health
Promotion and Well-Being at ECU
has information on GHB available,
according to Karen Boyd, associate
dean of students. Officials took fur-
ther action after the overdoses, con-
tacting the student newspaper
about doing a story and passing
information to residence halls.
Greenville police are trying to
find the supplier of the GHB that
led to the two overdoses, Lt. John
Teel said.
A young man who said he lived
out-of-town told police he brought
tr - GHB-filled Coca-Cola bottle to
the parry, offering it free to anyone
who wanted it. By the time police
confiscated the bottle, it was virtual-
ly empty, Teel said.
In the meantime, education
aixiut the drug's potential effects
needs to get out, Meggs said.
"These people could have quite
possibly died Meggs said. "These
are people who should really know
better. The ones I've seen have
been college-educated, employed
people
1931 N. William Street �Goldsborro. NC
DANOTS (tNlffilAiNKS
The East Carolinian is currently hiring a range of
positions. Writers, copy editors, assistant editors,
production assistants, advertising representatives,
photographers, opinion columnists, movie critics and
more! Applications for all positions available at the
paper's office in the Student Publications Building.
(Across from the library)
Ofticp Of
ADMISSION
Open Every Tues Wed Thur Fri. & Sal. Night
Non- Stop from 8 P.M. Til 2 A.M.
830-4950
John to. Savage
�Criminal Ta: Practice
� Civil "iridi Practice i
1 ra�.c ut'enses
Porsun.n'injury
u- s , on With Ad
K$
i&srtf
TEXAS-2-STEP
507 N. GREENE St. 757-0265
DANCE
LESSONS
ON THE COUNTRY SIDE
WITH BECKY &
MARVIN AS INSTRUCTORS
"25 YEARS EXPERIENCE
LEARN ALL THE
LINE DANCES & COUPLE DANCES
EVERY FRIDAY 8-9:30 P.M.
A Cocktail Hour With
Dance Aerobics
FREE LESSON WITH THIS AD
LOOK
No Doctor Bills
That's What You Can Expect
When You Eat Healthy At The
We IntroduceOthers Copy
706 S. Evans St.
1 Block West of New Rec. Center.
Phone: 752-3753 or 752-0326
Fax: 758-8811





T
TiT r�a�e�a�awr, tm
I 'f
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3 Tuesday. April 15. 1997
ilM
The East Carolinian
ORGANIC CLOTHING
STAND-UP
SHORTS�
Five styles in a tried-
and-true organic cotton
canvas, built to last.
GHB
Student research on display today
ECU's .Annual Graduate Research Day starts at 11 a.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center. The program will include presentations by graduate stu-
dents on their research projects in chemistry, physics, biology, art, anthro-
pology, nursing, geology, psychology, political science and human perfor-
mance. The presentations are open to the public.
Human Resources addresses workplace issues
The best wavs to communicate in the workplace will be dicussed at noon
on Wednesdav, April 16, at the Lunchtime Learning program in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Gregory Miller of the Office of Human
Resources will lead the program.
Career Services offers job search workshop
Jim Westmoreland, director of ECU's Career Services office, will offer
advice to students about finding jobs. His Leadership Development
Program is titled "Putting Your Experience to Work" and begins at 5 p.m. in
room 244 of Mendenhall Student Center.
Cultural Center sponsors Heritage Fest
The Ledonia Wright African-American Cultural Center will present "A
Celebration of African American-Culture" on Thursday, April 17, 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. at the Bloxton House and Rear Patio. The public is invited to come and
enjoy music, food and art displays.
Cloning
continued (torn page 1
THE MEN'S STORE
Stop The Plaza daily 10-9: Sunday i-6pm
Shop Carolina East Mall daily 10-9: Sunday 1-5 30
Enjoy the convenience ol a Brody s charge account!
pafagonia
�1996 Patagonia Inc.

Even if the motive were ques-
tioned, private clinics ihat do not
use federal grants would not face
such scrutiny. That, commission
members suggested, would create
another moral dilemma.
While the panelists seemed to be
asking more questions than provid-
ing answers, many did agree that
whatever is recommended now will
come under scrutiny again as sci-
ence speeds along.
"Once the science is out of the
bag, somebody is going to do it
said panel member Lawrence
Miike, director of Hawaii's
Department of Health.
continued from page 1
and a deceleration of the breathing
rate that can lead to a coma, he said.
Hospital officials in Pitt County-
said they have seen at least six cases
of GHB overdoses since February.
"The possibility exists that the
person could use GHB and be left in
what we call a persisting vegetative
state said Dr. William Meggs. "I
would go on record unequivocally
and say, 'Stay away from this stuff
In December, the State Bureau
of Investigation released a report
about GHB warning of its develop-
ing repuration for causing hallucina-
tions, hc.ghtened sexual desire and
euphoria. The report also said the
drug has started popping up in
nightclubs, college campuses and
areas where high school students
congregate.
The ECU students said GHB is
considered en vogue in college cir-
cles.
"It makes you feel like you're
really drunk without the dragging
effect. It kind of pumps you up
said the 21-year-old male student.
"It makes you want to stay out
late. You don't want the night to end
until it wears off the other student,
a 22-year-old female, said.
The federal Drug Enforcement
Administration wants to have GHB
classified as an illegal narcotic, simi-
lar to cocaine. Rhode Island and
Georgia have already outlawed it and
five others - California, Florida,
Texas, Massachusetts and Hawaii -
have bills banning the drug in differ-
ent stages of enactment.
At ECU. the overdoses were a
wake-up call to university officials,
who are planning a program next fall
on GHB and other trendy drugs-
The Inter-Fraternity Council, a
student association of fraternities,
will help organize the event, presi-
dent Christopher Arline said.
"It scares the hell out of us, and
we don't want to lose any of our
friends to this he said.
Already, the office of Health
Promotion and Well-Being at ECU
has information on GHB available,
according to Karen Boyd, associate
dean of students. Officials took fur-
ther action after the overdoses, con-
tacting the student newspaper
about doing a story and passing
information to residence halls.
Greenville police are trying to
find the supplier of the GHB that
led to the two overdoses, Lt. John
Teel said.
A young man who said he lived
out-of-tewn told police he brought
the GHB-filled Coca-Cola bottle to
the party, offering it free to anyone
who wanted it. By the time police
confiscated the bottle, it was virtual-
ly empty, Teel said.
In the meantime, education
about the drug's potential effects
needs to get out, Meggs said.
"These people could have quite
possibly died Meggs said. "These
are people who should really know
better. The ones I've seen have
been college-educated, employed
people
v$HMGiH$
1931 N. Uilham Street � Goldsborro. NC
DANCKS (ENP1AINEK
The East Carolinian is currently hiring a range of
positions. Writers, copy editors, assistant editors,
production assistants, advertising representatives,
photographers, opinion columnists, movie critics and
more! Applications for all positions available at the
paper's office in the Student Publications Building.
(Across from the library)
;ftiCH Of
ADMISSION
Qperv Every Tues Wed Thur Fri. & Sat, Nishf
.Non- Sfop-from 8 P.M. nl 2 A.M.
� Z � 1W
830-4950
John M. Savage
�Cnmiiia.i T. .a: Practice
� Civil Tridf Practice
1 r3" c u'enses
Persons intiry
- ij"sin on With Ad
yruDE lot tT1
g TEXAS-2-STEP
507 N. GREENE St. 757-0265
DANCE
LESSONS
ON THE COUNTRY SIDE
LOOK
No Doctor Bills
That's What You Can Expect
When You Eat Healthy At The
We IntroduceOthers Copy
706 S. Evans St.
1 Block West of New Rec. Center.
Phone: 752-3753 or 752-0326
Fax:758-8811
WITH BECKY &
MARVIN AS INSTRUCTORS
"25 YEARS EXPERIENCE"
LEARN ALL THE
LINE DANCES & COUPLE DANCES
EVERY FRIDAY 8-9:30 P.M.
A Cocktail Hour With
Dance Aerobics
FREE LESSON WITH THIS AP





s
4 Tuesday. April 15, 1997
V,VllllVyKj
The East Carolinian
Spare Time
By Furkas
RIGGAN
SHOE REPAIR
Rivergate East Shopping Center
3193-A East 10th St.
Greenville, NC
Phone 758-0204
S4m JajA� t fu � �m
4�m 6 - Wit 2�tUt
Our Speri.hy ii Sole & Heel Repair
All Rockport Soles - $25.00
Men's Rubber Heels � $6.00
rg-51 � saiidvg . 3(PS u) wnpu) ion. S .issr.v'w 033"pqoi
f V 19? '616.
Nyw D
ncPW niPHOi
JiOSI
Hid: 195"(616)
30
!�
Need a
JOB this
summer
If you will be a returning student in the fall and are looking
for a summer job, UHS will be hiring Students to assist
with our Summer Internship Program for Residence Hall
Renovation to inspect, repair and renovate residence hall
rooms. Marriott Plant Maintenance will provide training
and supervision. General knowledge of basic carpentry
skills, painting, installation of hardware, measuring and
fitting components is required. The program will be
approximately 10 weeks. This is an opportunity to have
I personal training and learn successful skills in a hands-on
experience. Full-time, 39 hours per week, and part-time,
20 hours per week, positions will be offered. To submit an
application, please come by University Housing Services,
Office Suite 100 Jones Hall.
JILL MElflf
fKunsnuY
ftJJA;Y f
��'� flfl -�i H �i - ��' H �� KB�� -alB 'r
i
' flttSLV 'Trfl
ACROSS
1 Kerry's 'possum
5 Bible book
9 Farm structure
13 State strongly
14 Pillage
15 Bike part
16 Remit
17 Delightfully
pretty
18 Make amends
19 Place for
sparrows
21 Terrapins
23 Mississippi, e.g.
25 Greens gadget
26 Stick
29 Honored
34 Belief
35 Party snack
36 Store event
37 Edge
38 Certain hunters
41 Cantor or Lupino
42 At any time
44 Neat
45 Pleasure cruise
boat
47 Lawmakers
49 Cafe patrons
50 Chaney of the
silents
51 Henri's aunt
53 Swordsman
57 Foremost
61 Up to now
62 Icon
64 Division word
65 Nips
66 Fiendish
67 Pasta dish
68 Jeanne et
Bernadette:
abbr.
69 Shopper's place
70 Lat. abbr.
V
r r r rBBT i-r r � � to tt
w- j- iu �7T'
Jr Wk
ts w pui pr
PPIPaX PPPP
Pi PC.
" ill" r PTti
w frP44 rP 1
ii"3jli
TlPIT
Ju IT da
�h V'
m to
e 1997 Tfeun Madia Saniaaa, Inc.
AH ridnte (Marwd.
ANSWERS
FROM THURSDAY
NOAHELMsPR1DE
ARTYROUTLEN1N
PATERN1TYAsKED
AI1NETEXA M�AEGO
TAST IE0OW
EMUE ITarTpEST
cA0EE ON0BOE
OREsMAQNALALA
NEsTAL1� b eTTr YLLES
ORNATLOT
TA1pe IT1 AT ERsE
RELUQHEARED
AAO8ETRANsP1RE
P1vO TE1NE10N1N
sEEdsIsTEWaANT
DOWN
1 Gone by
2 Above
3 Stoke or Wilder
oornmanoeo
5 Secluded spot
6 Car type
7 Wee one
8 Let It stand
9 Lounges
10 Pedestal figure
11 Country road
12 Corrida cheers
15 Gay �
20 Outer space
rocket
22 Say
24 Practical person
26 Farm measures
27 Energy
28 Muscled males
30 Stop
31 Bangofs state
32 Church official
33 Sweet ones
35 Young salmon
39 British collars
40 Listof candi-
dates
43 Gatherings
46 List
48 Works hard
49 Enter
52 Spring month
53 Names
54 Single entity
55 Diminutive suffix
56 The others
APMISSI0N
9:00-10:001.00
10:00-11:00100
11:00-1100.00
1100-1004.00
SPECIALS
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P�'S JUST HIREP THE EAST COAST'S PEST WSK JOCKEY TEAM
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Strar jn a Party Yard'
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WEDNESDAY
WUNK'N WITH
LINCOLN"
FOR MORE INFO 757-3778





r
5 TMttfiy. April 15. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
t&arolinian
BRANDON Waddkll Editor
MATT HEGE Advertising Director
Marguerite Benjamin NtwsEdi'or
AMY L RovsteR Awsttni NewsEditor
Jay MYERS Litmtyfafcdiiof
Amanda Ross Spore Editor
PATRICK IREI.an Photo Editor
CELESTE WILSON Production Manaje:
CAROLE MEKLF. Hud Copy Editor
ANDY FARKAS Staff Illustrator
Dale Williamson Annum iiiesryie Editor Heather Burokss Win Editor
Strom mt ECU wMmrt tact ��. ittt Ear. Cmman Mnm 12 000 copae tan aaaler and Thortdw Tm leal ertwiti �i rtach ettaa it da
otmai d � Eaonal Hurt, The tat Cartman wtomt, tann ra rht ria. limad a 2S0 �miti. �idi ma b� uliirt tor iKtnct - ixmn Tt� E�
a da riraat a aft a reject MM far taaaaam M arterj mat at tonal, utan ttaM la aakesail n: ooinan ediar. the Eat
I. ECU beeaafe 27KMS1 Fa rtcnariea. cat 98 3H 6366
oumcw

W: would like to take a moment out of our busy lives to spread a little sunshine. (We know,
that's not realty like us, but we're in a giving mood today.)
Our fellow student medium, The Rebel, has recently won two prestigious awards for their work
on the issue that came out last year. Our other colleagues over at Expressions also garnered
national recognition and praise last semester for their efforts on their publication.
In case you don't know, and shame on you if you don't, The Redeis ECU's student literary and
arts magazine and Expressions is our school's publication focusing on minority issues. Both mag-
azines are totally created by students. The submissions are all by students, and the editorial
staffs of both are comprised of students, as well. The Rebel is only published once a year and
Expressions comes out twice every semester, which is often a reason that knowledge of their exis-
tence is somewhat limited on campus.
?Ye would like to see 'hat situation change. We would like for more people to open them-
selves up and read these superior productions of our fellow students. We would like for more
students to try and actively participate in the creation of these publications.
And with the accolades that these two magazines have recently been given, perhaps more
focused attention can be brought to bear on them.
rfe at TEC applaud the staff and contributors of The Rebel and Expressions for a job well done.
Both magazines deserve all of the recognition that has come their way. Good luck in the future.
EiFFRS ro THE EDITOR
B-GLAD mad about ads
lb the Editor
We write this letter in response to
;dte two ads placed in your paper on
I0 April by Another Way Out, that
; seek to portray gays as living lives of
sexual promiscuity and lesbians as
(victims of abusive relationships with
:men. The statement by the "ex-gay"
man spying "AIDS was one of the
�beat things that could have hap-
pencd-to me is one of the most
ignorant remarks any person could
make with regard to issues of HIV
j end AIDS . AIDS is not some pun-
ishment from God upon homosexu-
als. If it were, why would lesbians
have a lower risk of infection than
heterosexual men or women? Why
wouidfhemophiliac children be
terosexual
Miidhem
JL
infected by the blood products they
must have to induce normal clotting
of blood?
- Many mainline Christian church-
es do not share this group's narrow-
minded opinion of the issue of orien-
tation. They affirm our relationships
and support the spiritual growth of
gays, lesbians, bisexuals and individ-
uals'who are questioning their orien-
tation. Lesbians do not pair up
with other women out of emotional
dependency rather than true love
We all form relationships with
those of the same sex because they
are who we truly love. Portrayals of
our lives and relationships as not val-
ued, intentionally or unintentionally,
give license to those who would
attack us in the name of some hate-
ful interpretation of Christian
Scriptures.
We question the judgment of the
editorial staff of The East Carolinian
for publishing such an offensive mes-
sage in its pages. Would you also
accept an advertisement from the
members of the Neo-Nazi party or
other groups which practice discrim-
ination in our society? Would you
publish an ad from this same group
that says Jews must repent or burn
in Hell? Or do you only accept ads
which target non-heterosexual indi-
viduals?
Lota Josey, President B-GLAD
Rich Elkins, Treasurer B-GLAD
1
i
Climbing on the backs of artists
; lb the Editor i
. � Congrat ubttonsyo The RtM maga-
ine for their recent Pacemaker
Award. However, The Rebel, which is a
showcase of the best student artistic
end literary talent, should be ashamed
of the way they treat die artists and
jtvriters whose work they publish.
Writings and art works were pub-
lished a award-winning work from
students who paid entry fees to sub-
Jnit their work for judging Out of over
� j hundred entries, only a few works
-were accepted in arid published,
published in the 19 issue
hired w enrer fry �fcn ind
monetary awards. As of April 1997,
over a year after the work was select-
ed, the winners have not been paid,
and many of the works submitted
were damaged and one is partially
missing The Student Media secre-
tary, Yvonne Moye, said, "The budget
for these awards had to be spent on
the printing of the magazine Mr.
Wright, the faculty media adviser, was
informed that the winners had not
been paid their promised awards in
October.
The action taken by the ECU
Student Media has been to cut in half
the already low budget for awards in
1997 and pay both years winners. The
awards are an insulting $35 for first
place, $25 for second place and Si 5
for third place. The Rebel manage-
ment offended these creative people
who make the magazines award-win-
ning existence possible by paying
such meager awards. We are also out-
raged because no action was taken to
pay the award winning entries from
last year until the student media
adviser was threatened with this com-
mentary.
Jonathan Mugmon
President
Graduate An Alliance
I
OOffTTES
I �aa W ReM YWl
DRUGS:
ALCOHOL:

OPINION
Columnist
John
DAVIS
Can't we all just get along:
?
Recently, The East Carolinian ran an
advertisement from a group called
Another Way. The group is a Christian
organization of ex-homosexuals who
maintain that God fulfilled their
needs and therefore healed them of
their h�"noscualit. I've heard a lot of
talk about the ad, mostly criticizing it,
but I figure, "Hey, this is America.
They can say what they want
While exiting the offices of The
East Carolinian yesterday, I ran into an
acquaintance of mine who happens to
be a very active member of B-GLAD
(Bisexuals, Gays and Lesbians
Advocating Diversity). He was a little
ruffled under the collar about this ad,
and informed me that he was going to
write "screaming letters to the editor"
and launch a massive counter-ad cam-
paign.
Now, I have nothing against the
counter-ad campaign. Like I said, this
is America. But when I got to thinking
about the "screaming letters to the
editor" bit, I realized that the fellow
has no grounds for them. Actually,
they might undermine his position,
and that of B-GLAD's, severely.
So I asked him, "Well, have you
called this 1-800 number in the ad?"
"I checked out their Web site (also
in the ad) and I decided that anyone
who says that AIDS was the best thing
that ever happened to them (homo-
sexuals) isn't worth talking to he
said.
Now, I'm not sure I'd agree that
AIDS is the best thing that might ever
happen to me, but I did know a fellow
who had a high possibility of being
HIV positive. Strange as it might
sound to us normal folks, this fellow
did count that as a blessing. He saw
even the possibility as a sign that he
ought to pursue a career helping AIDS
victims. I bet all those people he's
helping right now are thinking his pos-
sibility of having the disease was the
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
best thing that ever happened to
them. (He graduated and I never
found out if he was truly positive or
not.)
More importantly, this conversa-
tion made mc realize three things
a!xut the actions of B-GLAD in thi�
situation which are quite revealing I
hope they're not an example of how
the members of B-G1.AD normally
conduct themselves.
First, I'm all for diversity, and I
thought that B-GLAD was too. It would
seem to me that if the members of B-
GLAD were really advocating diversity
(as their name suggests), that they
ought to be celebrating the fact that
there are homosexuals out there who
hold a view opposing theirs. That is
what diversity means, after all. If B-
GLAD does not support diversity, but is
rather just another bunch of political
whiners (and I hope this isn't the case),
then perhaps they ought to change their
name.
Secondly, if B-GLAD is successful in
their campaign to have the editor refrain
from printing ads pertaining to people's
beliefs in sexuality and religion, then
they are shooting themselves in the foot.
The same First Amendment rights that
allow B-GLAD to print ads for Blue
Jeans Day and Pride Week allow the
people at Another Way to run ads as
well.
And third, given die lack of research
done by members of B-GLAD, and
given the snap judgment of my friend in
the offices of The East Carolinian, I
would have to say that this Christian
group is a victim of stereotype and big-
otry. 1 felt like I had stepped into an
alternate dimension - the Christians
were promoting love and the gay rights
group was being prejudiced. Perhaps
once a member of Another Way has been
contacted and a dialogue is opened
between the two groups, then some
judgments can be made.
I once read a Peanuts comic strip in
which Snoopy was writing a book. It was
a book of theology and its title was Has
It Ever Occurred To You That You
Might Be Wrong? I could plainly see
from my friend's expressions that it had
not, in the least, occurred to him that he
misfit Ik- wrong. I think he rruv bet e
been afraid to consider that possibility.
I can understand why. The world
view of Another Way, if it is right, would
mean my friend would have to do some
changing in the way he thinks. It might
mean he'd have to be uncomfortable for
a while. But isn't that what diversity is
for? Isn't the main benefit of diversity
that the presence of other ideas and
beliefs challenges us to understand our-
selves and our own beliefs, as well as
considering the opinions of others?
Diversity is a two (or three or four) way
street.
In closing, I would like to comment
that 1 do understand why the members
of B-GLAD feel as hostile as they do.
The Christian groups on campus have. .
not acted in a way that is very loving
toward homosexuals. In my Bible there
are lot of commands about not judging
others and loving one's neighbor.
Last week, during Pride Week, I
overheard quite a few hateful and hurt-
ful conversations from people who are
supposed to be God's representatives.
Only yesterday I heard about an inci-
dent at the Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship where a female student was
driven to tears because she wanted to
point out that the attitude of some
Christians was inconsistent with their
claims that God's love is in them. She
was harshly treated and, as stated, dri-
ven to tears.
"vfc don't all have to agree. America
isn't about agreeing. But if we can't talk
to each other and team from one anoth-
er's ideas, then somebody needs to call
up George Washington and Thomas
Jefferson and let. them know their
"grand experiment" has failed.
It's unfair to let non-grads walk
lb the Editor,
Recently, we, the student body of
East Carolina University, have been
subjected to the whining of a group of
students who feel that they should be
allowed to graduate this spring even
though they still have one or two
classes left to complete. This group of
students feel that it is unfair that they
were not at least told they would be
unable to graduate at the next cere-
mony.
However, if said students will con-
sider the definition of graduation,
they will then realize that it is both
reasonable and fair to prevent them
from graduating at that time and,
moreover, that any notification of this
fact is simply unnecessary.
Graduation is a ceremony at which
students who have successfully com-
pleted an entire course of study are
recognized for their accomplishment.
Thus, if a student lacks even one class
from said course of study, he is not eli-
gible for graduation. This fact is so
obvious that it should not need stat-
ing. The inability of the students in
question to comprehend this fact says
to me that they have not learned
much from their time here at ECU
and should not be allowed to graduate
anyway. In conclusion, it would unfair
to the many students who have com-
pleted their studies (and deserve the
recognition of their achievements
that a diploma represents) to force
them to share their special day with
those who have not.
William A West
Junior
'Words are things, and a small drop of ink, Falling like dew,
upon a thought, produces that which makes thousands,
perhaps millions, think'
Lord Byron, English poet, 1819





6 Tyesday. April 15, 1897
lifestyle
CD
review Laura Kipnis politicizes pornography
.A rO C A L Y P T !cM

LaK LaW4l
"BkiggiM ���i.
" �
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Ajrocalyptica
Ptays Metalllca by
Four Cellos
Life In General
One Door Down
Pat reid
STAFF WIITCI
Soifje things are just plain strange.
Oife of these would have to be the
ideW of playing MetaUica on cellos.
However the strangest thing of all
about this is that it works, and sur-
prisingly well.
-4c seems that in 1993, four cellists
at the Sibelus Academy in Helsinki,
Finland, got the idea of playing
MetaUica on their cellos. So, they
raked through their MetaUica records
searching for playable songs. Due to
the ohysical demand of cellos, songs
with, ast solos were out of the ques-
tion. So, they sorted through the
playable ones to find songs that would
beHbn and entertaining. They even-
tually narrowed down the list. But the
question remained, "Would people
reajh like it?"
$�, after three years of practicing
and, honing their skills, Apocalyptica
ploved their first show at a local metal
clqb, The crowd got so into the show
tha&chey actually concluded the show
by- singing along to "Master Of
Puppets Shortly after the quartet
was, signed and began recording an
album.
-Now, after two more years, the
fhm of those recording sessions has
been released in the VS. In the
mejtotimc, the band has been opening
forsuch acts as The Sex Pistols, Bad
Religion, and Sepulture on their tours
irvnnru Maybe with this break on
American soil, they will bring their act
to us. In the meantime, we still have
the CD.
The CD contains material span-
ning MetaHka's entire career. The
opening song is their hit from a few
years back, "Enter Sandman The
quartet tries to cover every facet of
the song, so there's one cello giving
the deep rhythm beat while others
play various leads and "vocal" arrange-
ments. The rhythm part takes a few
moments to get accustomed to, but
once the other cellos join it, it
becomes a tight song that flows
smoothly.
A seemingly unusual song for the
group (is there a usual MetaUica song
for cellists?) is the second track,
"Master of Puppets It would seem
that classically trained musicians
would more likely stick to songs like
"Nothing Else Matters or "fade to
Black However these young players
back down from no challenge and fry
SEE CHIOS. PAGE 7
Derek T Halle
SENIOR WHITE
Life In General, the dynamic duo that
seems to be making their mark in the
studio, are back with another release
called One Door Down. The album
starts off with a song cajled
"Goodbye Rom this, I was able to
already catch a grasp of what I was to
hear - a unique acoustic sound that
followed a progressive maturity all in
its own.
This record is something that the
guys in R.E.M. would love. The next
song, "Better Off flows just like the
first. They aren't the same song, they;
just move with respect to each othet
Sort of the way that Jason leVasseur
and Jerry Chapman do. They both
write, play acoustic and sing; however,
they're not onto anyone else's sound.
It's easy to tell that these guys are
doing their own thing.
As the album roils on you'll hear a
really powerful tune called "Skin
Where the lyrics for this song ("Rip
me open, peel me down from side to
side 1 am you ate time has tried to
wander") are coming from. III never
know. The most amazing thing about
the lyrics is that they don't fit into
context with the music that is being
played. The lyrics move in 3 totally
different direction. And although they
move in separate ways, they find their
way back to one solemn purpose. At
the end of the song, the message is
complete.
The next track on the record is
called "Eagle It's an acoustic song
set to a slower pace than the rest of
the record. There's a big buildup the
first time around. It's sore of a tease,
they don't take you anywhere else,
just right back to the verse. This is
good writing and a descent display of
dynamics. You aren't let down that the
song doesn't pick up. It actually helps
you appreciate it a bit more. As a
result, the listener is positioned for
listening to the tunes that follow on
the record. Like I said, it's good writ-
ing.
The song on the record that I
believe holds the most promise is
"Cow Tipping Anybody that's a
good 'ol country boy will understand
the true meaning behind a song like
this. What's funny about it is that
leVbsseur puts himself in the cow's
position: "I hope you're happy now .
Cause I'm a lonely cow Chewin' my
cud dear Alone in the field here
SEE UK PAGE 7
� Of
"1
Can't tvH hum atentj
Til t from a fntnd
BtyitIM
PtyFiN ftiet
health
minute
Circumcised men have varied sex
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE
'Circumcision offers virtually no health
benefits but men who are circumcised
-tend to have more varied sex, a recent-
ly published study said.
The report by University of
Chicago researchers found no signifi-
cant differences between circumcised
and uncircumcised men in their likeli-
hood of contracting sexually transmit-
ted diseases. But the study in the
Journal of the American Medical
Association did find "significant differ-
ences between circumcised and uncir-
cumcised men in terms of their sexual
practices
"The difference was greatest for
masturbation - ironically a practice
that circumcision was once thought to
limit the study said. It said 47 per-
cent of circumcised men reported
masturbating at least once a month vs.
34 percent for their uncircumcised
peers.
The difference in frequency can-
not be explained but it does "cast
doubt on the Victorian-era notion that
circumcision reduces the urge to mas-
turbate the study said.
In addition, circumcised men were
found to be nearly 1.4 times more like-
ly to engage in heterosexual oral sex
than uncircumcised men. They were
also more likely to have had homosex-
ual oral sex and heterosexual anal
intercourse.
The study was based on an analysis
of data collected from a sample of
1,410 men, aged 18 to 59, in the
United States, which has one of the
world's highest non-religious circum-
cision rates.
SEE CIRCUMCISED. PAGE 7
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Larry FTynt, the porn king who first gave life to Hustler magazine, has received
a lot of publicity lately. When acclaimed film director Milos Forman released his
controversial movie. The Peopkvs. Larry Flynt, everyone from critics to talk show
hosts had Frynt on their tongues. Even Mr. Fhnt himself went public, boasting
to the world that he, like the film claims, is a symbol of American free speech,
no matter what you think of him or his questionable publication.
Pornography has been a hot issue for feminists for a long time, and this
Thursday ECU will get the rare opportunity to engage in the issue when Laura
Kipnis, one of the most vocal feminists dealing with pornography gives a talk
entitled "National tomographies; Transnational Bodies
Kipnis has actively studied the social complexities of pornography long
before Woody Harrclson portrayed Frynt on the big screen. She is possibly best
known within the academic world for her 1992 essay entitled "(Male) Desire
and (Female) Disgust: Reading Hustler
Now that Frynt has been somewhat embraced by Hollywood and main-
stream media, Kipnis is more active than evet She is currently one of the most
cited scholars when discussing the controversy of pornography.
While much of the Larry Flynt debate has revolved around the issue of free
speech, Kipnis has moved beyond that. Her current work examines pornography
as culture, specifically a transgressionai culture that has connections with the
avant garde aesthetic
Kipnis' professional and academic history has more than qualified her as an
appropriate voice for such a controversial issue. She was trained in the arts, earn-
ing her M.FA at the Novia Scotia College of Art and Design in 1982; is cur-
rently an Associate professor of radio, television and film at Northwestern
University in Chicago; has published two books on sexual politics, Bound and
Gaged: Pornography and the Politics ofFantasy in America mA Ecstasy Unhmted: On
Sex, Capital, Gender & Aesthetics; has written and directed several short videogra-
phics; and has presented talks on an and sex at many conferences.
Laura Karris
Her interests with pornography stem from both her
interests with the avant garde and a concern for social
justice.
"I don't come out of a traditional academic disci-
pline Kipnis stated during a phone interview. "The
study of pornography) is not just accepted across the
board. However, my approach doesn't get much eye
rolling because it is so political, dealing with class
Coming out of the art world, Kipnis didn't expect to
have a career turn as an academic. However, it was her
artwork that lead her into the academic circle and
allowed her to become a lively voice in the academic
dialogue.
"I would get invited to show my videos at academic conferences she
reflected. "Then someone asked me to write essays. So, I ended up with a
career that was split between me being a video artist and an essayist
When Kipnis allowed her scholarly skills to sink into the muddy waters of
pornography, she decidedly took a different approach than most traditional fem-
inists, instead on focusing on how pornography oppresses women, she asked,
"What other meanings circulate within pornography?"
What she discovered was that pornography illustrates gaps between social
classes. Focusing on the idea of class within pornography, Kipnis began to use
pornography as "a vehicle to talk about social issues that aren't talked about in
other media
Kipnis will deal with questions on how to talk about pornography within a
national context, addressing such topics as gender, class and politics.
In a nutshell, Kipnis will be talking about "the politics of pornography in the
current national politics
Kipnis' talk is sure to be an informative and engaging experience that wiU
spark some lively discussion. The lecture will be presented by the English
department as part of its Theory Colloquium Lecture Series on Thursday, April
17 at 4 p.m. in Room 2014 of the General Classroom Building. A reception will
follow in the English faculty lounge of the General Classroom Building. All are
welcome to attend.
Blues in the House at ECU
May calendar for
House of Blues
IkMay 4 Grand Opening with
" Jfcf Tht Blues Brothers b Jams Brown
vtk VLmL" Lar flPHOTO COURTESY OF MOOSE OF SLUES
uW7- - B
J
Mav5Inner Circle with King Ghango
May6Little River Band with Roomful of Blues
May 7ZZTop
May 8The Wallflowers
May 11Members of the Jerry Garcia Band
May 12Leon Russell & David Allan Coe
May 14Spearhead with Camp Lo and Coolbone
May 15Koko Taylor & Her Blues Machine
May 16Little Feat with the Blind Boys of Alabama
May 17John MayaU's Bluesbreakcrs
May 18The Fabulous Thunderbirds with Luther "Guitar"
Johnson
May 19Erykah Badu with Eric Benet
May 20Buckwheat Zydeco
May 22The Doobie Brothers
May 23Collective Soul
May 24-25 WAR
May 28Yellowman
May 30-31 Johnny Cash
Tickets for all shows go on sale Friday, April 18. They can be obtained
through Tickcrmaster at 864-233-2525 or the HOB Ticket Hotline at
Jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
To promote the grand opening of their
new club in North Myrtle Beach, S.C
the House of Blues is bringing the
jazz-influenced soul of the band Lake
Trout to Mendenhail's Brickyard from
Noon ur i! 1 p.m. tomorrow.
Lake Trout finds their home in the
Baltimore area, where they are one of
the premiere bands in the local music
scene. Lake Trout's sound is hard to
pin down. Not only does the band list
jazz greats Miles Davis, John Coltrane
and Grant Green as influences, but
also funksters The Meters and Curtis
Mayfield and current rap groups The
Pharcyde, Digable Planets, A Tribe
Called Quest, and The Roots. Sounds
like a great time for all.
The North Myrtle Beach House of
Blues itself has an impressive lineup
scheduled for their inaugural month
of May. The club will be christened on
May 4 with a performance by the
Blues Brothers (Dan Akroyd, Jim
Belushi (replacing his brother John)
and John Goodman) and the
Godfather of Soul himself, James
Brown. To say that James Brown is not
to be missed is an understatement.
Besides that amazing opening bill,
the club has booked quite a number of
other stellar performers to visit within
the first month. Names such as
Spearhead, Koko Taylor, John MayaU's
Bluesbreakcrs and Erykah Badu don't
just trickle off the tongue, they
impress greatly. Add Johnny Cash to
that list (yes, Johnny Cash), playing
not one date but two, and you've got a
schedule that can't be beaten.
If the House of Blues can keep this
up, and I feel quite certain that they
can, then this club should become one
of the main live musk attractions of
the Southeast.
It is to their credit that they recog-
nize the potential mass audience they
can draw from Southeastern universi-
ties, and that they have chosen ECU
as representative of the people the)'
hope to attract. So given their respect
for this university, it is only right that
we should support their appearance
on campus tomorrow by going to see
Lake Trout. Ill definitely be there.
For your convenience, we have the
May calendar for the House of Blues:
UMass offers all-gay housing option
Cindy Sher
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
Chris Savastano faced housing prob-
lems that most students at the
University of Massachusetts in
Amherst, Mass never have to deal
with.
When students in his dorm discov-
ered he was gay, they tampered with
his mail, broke into his room and even
threatened his life.
When Savastano heard about "2 in
20 a floor of all gay, lesbian and bisex-
ual students and their heterosexual
allies, he signed up immediately.
The first successful program of its
kind, "2 in 20" works to end hoirto-
phobia and to provide a supportive
environment for gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transgender students.
"When you're first coming out, it's
nice .and reaffirming Savastano, a
junior said. "You're not alone and iso-
lated. It's exactly what other people
are going through
Students asked the housing admin-
istration to initiate the floor in 1992
after many had faced problems similar
to Savastano's.
"It provides a sense of support and
comfort in a society that doesn't
always provide that to them said
Michael Gilbert, the director of hous-
ing services at UMass.
The floor began with ten residents
and has grown each year. It now has 33
residents and may expand to another
floor this fall.
The name "2 in 20" refers to sex
researcher Alfred C. Kinsey's claim
that one out of every ten people is gay.
Residents preferred the name "2 in
20" because 1 in 10" sounds lonely
the floor's resident assistant Donnie
Roberts said in an article that
appeared in Tie Chronicle of Higher
Education on Feb. 21.
Located on the fourth level of the
Mary Lyon dormitory, the floor also
provides unique programming for its
students. Residents have a drag bail
each semester in addition to an open
house for university faculty, staff and
students to learn about "2 in 20
The floor also has a Response
Room, otherwise known as a "safe
room which is available to any stu-
dent living in university housing who
is being harassed because of his or her
sexual orientation. The student may
use the "safe room" as a temporary
housing assignment.
"We adapt our programming to be
quite specific said Julie Robbins, res-
idence director of the floor, which has
the same housing fees as other dorms
at UMass. "Whereas they might have a
program on 'Homophobia 101' at
another dorm, they might have
'Racism Within the
Diversely-influenced jazz a soul band Lake Trout win" perform for The House of Blues
tomorrow from Noon until 1 p.m. on the Brickyard in front of Mendenhall.
PHOTO COURTESY OF HOUSE OF HUES
Fbetry Forum continues
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The ECU Poetry Forum has brought
many talented, acclaimed writers to
the Greenville area, most recently
Gerald Barrax on April 2. While the
semester may be winding down to an
end, the Forum has not slowed down
in its efforts. Today, R.S. Gwynn v:H
give a poetry reading at 8 p.m. in the
General Classroom Building, Room
1031.
Gwynn, who teaches at Lamar
University in Beumont, Texas, has.
R.S. Gwynn
the
G
Fletcher
Award for Poetry, the University of
Missouri Press Breakthrough Award
and the N.E.H. Summer Fellowship.
lover of poetry should make
iwhile
programs to
going home, which can be stressful for
students who may be at the beginning
SEE HOUSING PAGE 7
'SeVefaf cdrteeflbrts,
American Poets Since World War II series
(1991 & 92) and The Advocates of Poetry
(1996); has written a book entitled The
Drive-In (1986) and several chap-
done
much to make Greenville's fiterary tra-
dition a thriving force.
For further information, contact Dr.
Peter Makuck at 328-6046.
books, includ-
ing Bearing &
Distance (1977)
zndNoWordof
Fa reweII
(1996); and
has won many
literary awards
and distinc-
tions, such as
John
u I d
��
- sjBsaaMsnvim
: JU
a





r
7 Tuesday. April IS. 1997
lies
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St pm am mm ��� Hours:
Pittman Building S-IIIIII Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC �J JJJJ8:00-4:00
i�k
The East Carolinian
Housing
continued from page 6
Underwater Qfe
Tue.
12 Price Pitchers
stages of the coming-out process.
Although resident assistants say
that the majority of the university
appears to support "2 in 20 there are
members of the community who say
they disapprove of it.
"This university claims to pro-
mote diversity said Raul Ferro, the
treasurer and former president of the
Republican Club at UMass. "You are
supposed to have contact with people
who are not like you
Ferro said he doesn't think it is
right that gay couples can live togeth-
er while heterosexual couples cannot.
At Northwestern University in
Evanston, 111 an all-gay floor isn't
necessary, said Danny Nolan, a sopho-
more and the acting co-president of
the Bisexual, Gay and Lesbian
Alliance. If problems arise, Nolan said
he would encourage students to first
confront the administration.
"When you have to segregate to
form a community, that's a good sign
that things are wrong Nolan said.
Savastano, though, said living in "2
in 20" has helped him fulfill his main
purpose for attending college: to get
an education.
"We can concentrate on being stu-
dents he said. "That's why we're
Cellos
continued from page 6
&LKaw BarJ ff �
COTANCME T GREENVILLE, NC
Wed.
"DOLLAR NIGHT
$1.00 Domestic
$1.00 Well Liquor
Newcastle
u
Thurs.
MUG NIGHT
Fill your Mug or Ours
with Bud light
for$t.M
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
-Please Kegs aren't classified as Mugs
Circumcised
continued from page 6
The study also found circumcised
men have a slightly lower risk of sexu-
al dysfunction, especially later in life.
Circumcision rates reached 80
percent in the United States after the
Second World War but peaked in the
mid-1960s and have since fallen off
amid debate over whether the prac-
tice has health value or adversely
affects male satisfaction, the study
said.
"The considerable impact of cir-
cumcision status on sexual practice
represents a new finding that should
further enrich such discussion the
researchers wrote. "Our results sup-
port the view that physicians and par-
ents be informed of the potential
benefits and risks before circumcising
newboms
No, Coyer for Ladies
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through "Master" with an ease and a
grace that makes any listener truly
appreciate their skill.
The slower side of Metallica does-
n't go unnoticed, though. "The
Unforgiven" is played with a hauntingr;
beauty that is enchanting and totally
enthralling.
This album does not have a lcw
point. From beginning to end, it is a j
solid work that demands no song be
overlooked. However, a particular
highlight is "Harvester of 'Sorrow
Originally from Metallica's And
Justice For All! album, "Harvester" is a j
favorite of Metallica fans worldwide
and a song that is always included in !
the band's live set. However, '�
Apocalyptica actually seems to come -
through with a more powerful ver
sion, if that's possible. The she?;
power of the cello as an instrument
combined with the fluidity it give.�
the lead parts, make "Harvestera '
gem above all others.
Other songs on the CD inclutlTj
"Wherever I May Roam "Welcome
Home (Sanitarium) "Creeping
Death and a powerful rendition of
"Sad But True No matter what your
background, if you have any interest
in Metallica or classical music, this
CD will become a favorite. And while
I can't even began to guess under
what category you'll local record storey
will stock this one, I can say that it i�
worth asking for (at, if you can't find
it, worth ordering as well). Chance
are you won't be disappointed. ��;��.
Life
� f
.1.11.1
- w
as,
ECU $1 admission
9:00-9:30 p.m
Bill
D.D.
Matt
1.50 HiBalls
.150 Bottle
Beers
COMING AprIL 23
MIKE MEsMEr EYEs"
WEDNESDAY AprIL 2i
oNE BIG SHOW � oNE BIG NIGHT
continued from page 6 ,cv,
Why don't you knock me over while
I'm sleeping
Either le'vasseur is making a syrrPlr
bolic gesture to something or another1
in his life, or he really feels for all ttile
cows that have ever actually beefo"?-
tipped over. In a way I think it'lnf"
song about being branded a slate.
Not a slave in general, just a slave in1
their own minds. Knowing that youf'�
only purpose in life is to be houndefr-
for food is probably very unpleasant
and we don't appreciate the crca-
tures. (Then again, maybe not. I jus
thought that would be a cool compar
ison.)
Songs later, as One Door Do6n
comes to a close, I realize the puripf
of this record. It's two guys making
living doing what they live to ks
doing what they feel to be right. It's"
music for a meal. It's life on the road
You know, your basic Life In Geneml
� kind of stuff. -J �"��
�; to JVlendenhall Student Center
:
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
"YOU'VE GOT TO KICK A LITTLE"
LITTLE TEXAS with special guests
THE KENTUCKY HEADHUNTERS in
concert. Friday, April 25 at 8 p.m. in
Williams Arena.
Advance-priced tickets now on sale
in the Central Ticket Office.
$15 for ECU studentsfacultystaff and
$20 for the general public. All tickets are $25 at the door.
COMING JOON
Scream (R) April 17-19 at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre
Free admission with valid ECU I.D.
Attention Student Leaders
"Putting Your Experience to Work"
featuring Dr. Jim Westmoreland, Director of Career Services
Wednesday, April 16 from 5-6 p.m. in Room 244


. i
M
i ��
�' �:�
A CELEBRATION OF
AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE
i
� 1
M
; I
MllflttW

�t
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL
Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from
8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the games
you can bowl, plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of discounted
bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m.
Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
'
Ml
Come join this annual tradition of
TheLedonia Wright African American Cultural Center
with DJ, food, art displays, stepping, musical performances
and fun IFF
APRIL 17, 1997
5-Sp.m.
in the
BLOXTON HOUSE AND REAR PA TIO
� a
�jws"
� ill Ji
I
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER � "Your Center of Activity"
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
� Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand �
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.ml 2 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
"BE A PART OF THE CENTER THAT'S ON THE MOVE'
r�r-





5
8 Tuesday. April 15, 1997
The East Carolinian
Woods breaks Augusta records on way to victory
AUGUSTA. Ga. (AP) - Tiger Woods' victory walk up the 18th fairway was
detoured by a wild hook off the final tee at the Masters, which was probably just
as well.
It is hard to imagine anyone capable of following in these footsteps.
His romp over Augusta National Golf Club evoked memories of the cold
stare and hardened heart of Ben Hogan, the charisma of .Arnold Palmer and the
sheer power of Jack Nicklaus.
Shortly after he drained a bending 4 12-foot putt for par on the final hole
Sunday that gave him the lowest score in the 63-year history of the Masters,
Woods choked back tears as he embraced his parents.
"Every time I hug my mom and pop after a tournament, 1 know it's over he
said. "I've accomplished my goal
His 3-under-par 69 gave him a 270, breaking by one stroke the record that
Nicklaus first set in 1965 and Raymond Floyd matched in 1986.
His 12-stroke victory over Tom Kite was not only a Masters record by three
strokes, but the greatest winning margin in any major since Old Tom Morris
won in the 1862 British Open by 13 strokes.
He also became the youngest Masters champion at age 21.
Woods wasn't thinking about any of these records when he teed off Sunday
afternoon with a nine-stroke lead, or when he made his final climb to a spec-
tacular salute at the 18th green.
Instead, Woods said a prayer of thanks to other blacks in golf who paved the
way - Ted Rhodes, Charlie Sifford and Lee Elder, the first black to get invited
to plav at the Masters in 1975.
Elder stood by politely as Woods chipped onto the practice green, then said
hello and wished him well.
Gordan edges Wallace on final lap
BRISTOL, Tenn. (.AP) - His list of product endorsements includes milk, he is
unfailingly polite with his fans and he's not afraid to cry in public. That does
not, however, mean that Jeff Gordon is a softie.
"I want everybody to know that when it comes down to the finish, I'm not
going to quit. I'm going to do whatever it takes Gordon said after he bumped
his wav past Rusty Wallace 600 feet from the checkered flag and won the Food
City 500.
. tip until Sunday's victory. Gordon had relied on superior speed by his
Chevrolet and his pit crew to win 21 Winston Cup races. But in No. 22, he
showed he could do it with muscle as well.
� "There's sometimes when pure desire takes over and you do whatever you
have to do to cross the finish line first he said.
No one was injured, but the 20 yellow flags tied NASCAR's modern-era
record. The 132 laps run under caution represented the third-highest total in
the modern era, which began in 1972.
Gordon stayed free of all the contact. But on the last part of the last lap, he
initiated it.
"It was definitely the most exciting finish I think I've ever had in my career
he said.
� Wallace, the pole-sitter, kept his Ford up front four times for 240 laps. He
took the lead for the last time on lap 415 and built a comfortable edge before
(iordon, with teammate Terry Labonte on his rear bumper, closed to within
inches of Wallace with 20 laps remaining.
Wallace hobbled up high as he fought to control his car, and Gordon slipped
past. While Gordon went on to a two car-length victory, Wallace held off
Labonte for second place by about five feet.
UNC lacrosse player stabbed at club
CHAPEL HILL. N.C. (AP) - A University of North Carolina lacrosse player was
in good condition after being stabbed in the abdomen at a dance club early
Sunday.
Police charged Robert Pratt, 26, of Mebanc, with felony assault with a dead-
ly weapon in the attack on Peter Murphy, 11. Pratt was released after his moth-
er posted a $15,000 bond.
Moments before the stabbing, a fight on the dance floor prompted the disc
jockey to alert bouncers over the microphone.
Pratt was arrested at a nearby restaurant and told police he had fled to elude
Murphy's friends.
Pratt said Murphy and a group of his friends jumped him on the dance floor
because of a dispute over a woman. Others who witnessed the fight said that it
consisted simply of shoving and pushing and then Murphy was cut.
' Pratt said he was crouching on the dance floor and that Murphy had him by
the throat while others beat and kicked him.
Pratt said he was able to reach into his pocket, grab a pocket knife that was
attached to his key chain and stab Murphy in the abdomen to free himself.
: Key ahead in the count ail day, helped by Erickson
�The two home runs by Jeffrey Hammonds sure helped. So did the solo shots
by�Cal Ripken and Chris Hoiles on Sunday.
'jTbc player who really gave Jimmy Key room to finish his first shutout in four
sejRons. however, was pitcher Scott Erickson.
� Erickson was sitting on the Baltimore bench, charting pitches. And when
Oiiples manager Davey Johnson asked how many Key had thrown through eight
infitngs, he was told 97.
'Trouble was. Erickson forgot to count 10 or so.
Johnson let Key continue, and the left-hander wrapped up a 9-0 win Sunday
at Camdcn Yards for his first shutout since May 28, 1993.
.We had the big lead so he allowed me to go out in the ninth. If the game's
clr�e, I don't go out there Key said.
�Key finished with 122 pitches. Johnson said that if he'd known the true
couht through eight innings, he might have gone to the bullpen.
He was throwing nice and easy, but it's not the type of game you want to
weir out your pitcher on Johnson said.
TRIVIAtimo
Name the golfer who has the most Masters'
wins and in what years did this golfer record
the victories?
HIW�.IIIWIIWIIIWIIIIl III1IM�"IWIIK�IWW�HWW���1�W�f IIIW
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Patriots sweep Pirates over weekend
STEVE 1.0SEV
STAFF WRITF.lt
The Pirates came out of this weekend with hurt
pride and a damaged record. They lost all three of
their baseball games against the George Mason
Patriots. The Pirates come out of the weekend with
an overall 21-21 record and now fail to 7-8 in the
CAA.
A doubleheader was scheduled for Saturday, but
the rainy weather caused the second of the two to
be postponed until Sunday. The game that was
plaved that day was a rough one for both sides.
Both teams were chalking up hit after hit as they
came up to bat. The pitching staff of either team
could not stop the batters from blasting fiery
grounders and soaring flies. The defense of each
team had difficulty keeping the runners from
advancing.
"Poor defense was Lhe answer to our loss said
Pirates Head Coach Gary Overton.
Saturday's game was played in pouring rain and
at times had to be postponed for minutes because
of the driving rain. In the end and 44 runs later,
ECU had lost 17-27.
The first game on Sunday began with a promis-
ing start. The score remained 0-0 until the third
inning. Macon Jones hit a shallow fly to center field
that earned him a single. When Kevin Monroe
came up to bat, the Patriot pitcher tried to pick off
Jones leading off at first. The second time the
pitcher threw to first, Jones slid headfirst into the
bag. The ball ricocheted off his helmet and rolled to
the deep end of right field foul territory. Jones got
up and ran to second. A slow reaction by the Patriot
right fielder allowed Jones to steal third.
Right fielder Antaine Jones was hit by a wild
pitch while on first and quickly stole second base.
The Patriots' catcher threw the ball in an attempt
to get A Jones out. The second baseman missed
the ball and it went past the
center fielder. M. Jones
seized the opportunity and
bolted for home. A. Jones fol-
lowed suit and made it to
third. Left fielder Steve
Salargo stepped up to bat and
was thrown out at first, which
allowed A. Jones to score.
Mason stayed off the
board until the fifth inning.
.After a walk and a single,
Overton pulled pitcher John
Payne and put Conrad Clark
on the mound. The next bat-
ter hit a fly ball that was
caught in deep left field. The
leading runner scored and
made the game 2-1. ECU.
In the next inning.
Mason's batters dominated
the Pirates' fielders and pitch-
ers. The firsr batter walked
and stole second. The next
batter hit a single and was
advanced by the following batter, who was thrown
out at first. The next man up hit a line drive over
the shortstop's head that scored the two already on
base. .After a fly out and a single, Clark was pulled
and Kevyn Fulcher was put in. A hit to right field
scored two more runs and Fulcher was replaced by
Travis Thompson. Thompson walked his first bat-
ter and was pulled for Mike Daniels.
"The bullpen has somewhat struggled through-
out the year Overton said.
A hit to center scored another two runs, and
before the Pirates could get their last out. the lead-
ing runner for Mason stole home. The final score
was 8-2. Mason.
"Losing the first game the way we lost it cer-
tainly had an effect on the second Overton said.
The second game on Sunday was similar to the
Antaine Jones (L) and
against George Mason
Steve Salargo (R) prepare to step up to bat on Sunday
ECU lost all three games this weekend to the Patriots.
PHOTO BY AMANDA ROSS
first. It remained scoreless until the fourth, when
ECU took the lead with one run. Mason gained the
lead with two in the next inning and took another
in the seventh to make it 3-1. In the eighth they
scored three, two of which were from a fly to center
field. ECU raised the crowd's hopes a bit when they
scored two runs in the bottom of the ninth, but
were unable to score any more. The final score was
Mason 6, ECU 3.
"We weren't making the plays during these
games. That is the mistake that hurt us through the
year Overton said.
The Pirates have a week off before their next
game at L'NC-Wilmington this weekend. The game
against ECU is considered a big one by L'NCW
"They are playing better than usual and we're
not playing as well. We'll have to find a variety of
ways to w in Overton said.
PurpleGold Pirate scrimmage highlights
(Clockwise from top left) Dan Gonzalez looks for a receiver in Saturday's scrimmage. Gonzalez finished with 213 passing yards including a long throw of 27 yards. Damon Dav'?
(No. 34) gets some blocks from his offensive line on his way to his 20 net rushing yards for the day. Fans sit through rainy, windy conditions to watch their Pirates play. (0u ei
notes) Jamie Wilson rushed for a team high 70 yards and Scott Harley finished with 27 yards and one touchdown. Marcellus Harris was the days leading pass receiver wit 86
yards and one touchdown. Buck Collins caught six passes for 77 yards, while Jason Nichols caugh: four passes for 54 yards and Lamont Chappell had 44 yards on three puises
and one touchdown z Quarterback Bobby Weaver threw for 44 yards and one touchdown, while the other quarterback Ernest Tinnin finished with 55 yards and one touchdc.vn.
PHOTOS BY CHRIS GAYDOSH
Golfers prepare to tee off at CAA championships
ANTHON'YSTXNFILL
STVFWRITKR
The ECU Golf Team is heading to
Goldsboro on April 18-20 to partici-
pate in their last, and most important
tournament of the season. The tour-
nament is the Colonial Athletic-
Association Championships and will
be played at Lane Creek Country
Club. The Pirates are coming off their
best tournament of the spring, with a
fourth place finish at the Tennessee
State Intercollegiate. Even though the
Pirates had their best finish. Coach
Kevin Williams felt they should have
done better.
"I was disappointed in a way,
because I felt that there was only one
team last week that could have beat
us, and that was Jacksonville State
from Alabama Williams said. "But it
was our best finish of the spring, so
that's still better than we've been
doing
The CAA Championships are for
bragging rights, and the Pirates will be
facing all nine of the conference
teams, including VCU. who's ranked
14th in the nation. Williams believes
that they have a good chance of being
in the top four, hopefully finishing sec-
ond behind VCU. The Pirates have
defeated Wilmington three out of the
five times they've met this year. Both
times ECU met James Madison they
lost, but thev were narrow margins of
loss. VCU, UNCWand JMU were the
top three teams that Williams thinks
will be the best competition.
"We need to play consistent and do
well two of the three days in order to
take second place Williams said. "If
we want to win, and upset VCU, we'll
have to play good all three rounds
The five Pirates Williams chose to
go to Goldsboro are Marc Miller. Kevin
Miller. Richie Creech, Steven Satterly,
and either Daniel Griffis or Robbie
Perry. Williams says that they'll find
out for sure this week.
"Perry's been real consistent in
tournaments, but not in qualifying
Williams said. "In fact, he was our low-
est score in the Furman tournament.
Then again. Griffis has been consis-
tent qualifying and not in the tourna-
ments. So the fifth spot will be decid-
ed this week, between these two
Griffis and Perry
The Pirates have won the CAA
seven out of the last 10 years. Two
vears ago they placed second, and last
year finished a disappointing seventh.
Since this is the Pirates last tourna-
ment of the year. Williams summa-
rized this season's play.
"I think that is was disappointing
in certain ways, because of the incon-
sistency Williams said. "We're basi-
cally a young team, starting three
freshmen at some tournaments.
Maybe this youth had something to do
with the inconsistency, but thee
had plenty of tournament experience.
We did secure a winning record
though, which we haven't had in two
years, so that's a positive
The Pirates, going into the CAA
Championships, have an overall record
of 91-65-3. If every thing goes as
planned and the Pirates take second,
they'll finish the season with '8 wins.
Even though Williams was disappoint-
ed, congratulations are in order for the
Pirates winning season, and once
again to Kevin Miller, who was named
Outstanding Scholarlv Athlete.
Customer Service
Representatives
Bowen Cleaners is seeking individuals to fill part-time
positions as customer service representatives. Hours will be 3p.m.
to 7p.m. ana Saturday.
Qualified individual must have a positive & quality conscious
attitude, sales personality, basic computer skills, some college
preferred. High School graduate required.
Top-End Salary.
Applications Will Be Accepted Monday thru Thursday
from 12:00-4:00p.m. at Belks Fork Location.
Ma
Jfieaners
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TOtripifnf o the 1996 Qddea A Awhd
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Truth, Equal ity, Justice
123 W.3Si.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
ir-





r
9 Tuesday. April 15. 1997
spoils
The East Carolinian
WAREHOUSE
SALE
ECU SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
vvea. I nuts.
Fri &.Sat
onnection
Division Of U.B.E
ECU thrower Michelle Clayton
led the Pirates' performance amid
the rainy conditions at the Duke
Invitational this weekend. Clayton
finished fourth in the hammer with a
throw of 176-02. This distance was
good enough for NCAA qualifying
standards and also was a new person-
al record for Clayton and an ECU
record. Two of the top three finish-
ers in the hammer were former.
Olympians.
"I was very pleased with
Michelle's performance ECU
Women's Head Coach "Choo"
Justice said. "Her distance this
weekend is top ten in the country
this year
Lave' Wilson finished third in the
triple jump with a distance of 39-
08.75. Fellow Lady Pirate Leana
Anding fu ished eight in the event
355-2946 � Located in WINN DIXIE Market Place, on corner of Greenville Blvd & Arlington Blvd.
"Rock the Ballpark"
Major League Baseball
on Wednesday Night.
Rolling Rock $1.50
Half Price
Appetisers
after 9:00
with a jump of 37-01. R)r Anding, an
ECU freshman, it was the first time
she had made the finals in college.
In other women's competition,
sophomore Kerri Hartling placed
ninth in the 10,000 meters in
37:59.25, fast enough to qualify for
the ECAC's. Lady Rrate sophomore
Missy Johnson finished third in the
400-meter hurdles (developmental)
in 1:05.22, a personal best time for
her.
Johnson also placed fifth in the
100-meter hurdles (developmental)
with a time of 15.14, a season best for
her. The Lady Pirates did not
attempt to compete in many of
Saturday's events including the
relays because of the rainy condition.
"I was proud of the performances
for out athletes that did perform
Justice said. "The weather got so
bad that we knew we weren't going
to run well, and we didn't want to
risk injury before the CAA champi-
onships next week
in the men's competition, ECU
finished fifth in Saturday's 4x100
meter relay with a time of 42.19 as
the wet condition played a part,
slowing all the sprinters in the com-
petition. The Pirates team consist-
ing of Dwight Henry, James
Alexander, Christian Rey and
Darrick Ingram were in second place
just before the final leg when a
missed hand off spoiled its perfor-
mance. The Pirates fastest time this
season is 40.55 run on March 29 at
the Raleigh Relays.

The women's tennis team upped
their record to 13-9 overall after win-
ning a pair of non-conference match-
es on Sundav. In the morning match,
ECU defeated NC A&T by a 6-0
score and dealt Belmont a 6-0 toss in
the afternoon match.
Against NC A&T, sophomore
Anne Svae paced the Lady Pirates
with a 6-0,6-1 victory at No. 1 singles
over Darlene Speas. Sophomore
Rachel Cohen defeated A&Ts Penda
Dickey 6-1, 6-2 at No. 2 singles.
Mona Eek, Hollyn Gordon, Gina
MacDonaid and Catherine Morgan
were each 6-0,6-0 winners at Nos. 3-
6 respectively
The Lady Pirates cruised to their
second win of the day against
Belmont in the afternoon match, los-
ing just three games among the sin-
gles players. Eek and Morgan posted
their second 64), 6-0 wins of the day
at No. 3 and No. 6 singles while Svae,
Cohen, Gordon and MacDonaid were
also winners.

The ECU softball team (40-18,
12-2) swept a double header from
conference rival Liberty (26-17, 8-4)
on Saturday Despite adverse weather
conditions, ECU knocked around the
Lady Flames fro a combined 23 runs
in the two games. The Lady Pirates
won both games in five innings due to
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(919) 355-5758
the eight run rule 14-1, and 9-1.
ECU jumped on the board first,
scoring three runs in the first inning
of game one. Amy Hooks scored the
games first run off a wild pitch by
Katie Phillips. Dana Hulings and
Sharolyn Strickland both ripped
pitches in the second to put the game
away.
Nicki Andrews was hit by a pitch
to lead off the second inning. Dawn
Conrad and Tonya Oxendine then
each laid down bunt singles to load
the bases. Isonette Polonius then
ripped a one out single to left, scoring
Andrews and Conrad. Rhonda Rost
then drew a base on balls to load the
bases again. Strickland then hit a one
in the gap in left center to score two
more runs. ECU scored six runs off
five hits in the second.
Game two saw the ECU bats just'
as livery as game one. With two outs
and Hulings on third, Andrews
ripped a double down the third base'
line to open the Lady Pirates scoring
in the second inning. Andrews would
advance to third and then score off
two wild pitches from Inge,
ECU added three runs in the'
third. Oxendine lead off with a single
and scored on a Polonius double
Polonius would come around to score '
a Flames throwing error which
allowed Rost to reach base safely. Rost
would be driven in by Strickland on a
sacrifice fly to left. The Lady Pirates'
would score two runs in each of the
final two innings.
Jami Bendle picked up wins 22
and 23. She started game one and
pitched a two hit game allowing one
run. Bendle came on in relief in game
two during the third and shut down '
any rally that the Lady Flames tried i
to put together. Bendle allowed two
hits in eight innings of work on the
day.
On Sunday the softball team trav.�
eled down to Wilmington to take on
the Lady Seahawks. ECU split a doii-
blchcader losing the first game 3-11
and caking game two 9-2. The win
assures ECU at feast a share of the'
Big South regular season champi-
onship. n"
Richer Christi Davis improved!
her record to 7-5 overall in the 9-2
win. She pitched 12 complete games
on the season only allowing three
hits.
The Lady Pirate offense was lead
by the long ball in game two. Polonius
hit a two run homer in the first to get
the Lady Pirates rolling. Strickland
ripped a single to left to score Rost
from second. With runners on second
and third and two outs Andrews
smashed a two run double off the
centerfield wall.
ECU has completed conference
play. Coastal Carolina is currently tied
with ECU in the loss column with.
three. Coast has ten conference.
games reaming and one loss would,
give the Lady Pirates their first ever
outright Big South regular season.
Books discounted 10 - 90 always
The softbali team will be in
action today at 3 p.m. against
North Carolina. The women's '
tennis match slated for today -
at 2:30 p.m. has been forfeited
by Louisburg College and there-
fore will not be played.
EM B8ulfc
You Will Every Tuesday At Chicos!
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Only $4.50 Every Tuesday.
ALL DAY
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE - ALL ABC PERMITS - 757-1666

it n





V
10 Tuesday. April 15.1997
Tht East Carolinian
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen,
washerdryer and living room with fire-
place. Beautifully landscaped - three
fenced yards. Convenient to campus
& hospital. $1000mo. dcp. 524-
4111.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also preleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
LEASE MAY TO AUGUST Tar
River Estates $375.00. Call Shea 758-
3524. Call today! Come See!
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. $775.00 mo.
AVAILABLE NOW One 2 bedroom
above Uppercrust Bakery AVAILABLE
NOW. (New carpet) for $475.00 mo.
Another available above Uppercrust
June first. One 2 bedroom apt. avail-
able June 1st above Percolator Coffee-
house $500.00. Luxury apartments.
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
take over lease in 3 bedroom in Wilson
Acres. Rent begins Aug. 1st. Call Marc
at 757-2952.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE FOR
SUBLEASE. May-Aug. rent
$285mo. Kingsarms apartments. Call
754-2576.
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE.
Great for summer school students! Lo-
cated on campus. One bedroom apart-
ment, big enough for two, and it's fully
furnished $350 a month. Call 754-
8055. .Ask for Natalie.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM, 1
12 bath apartment in Tar River from
May-August 1st. Good location, on
ECU bus route, close to pool! Call
830-6993 today! Very affordable!
ROOMMATE NEEDED: RF
SPONSIBLE, female 2 br, 1 12
bath, wd, dishwasher, cable, great lo-
cation, Wedgewood Arms. Rent $230,
12 util. Call 321-6381 leave message.
2 BEDROOMS FOR SUBLEASE
during entire summer close to campus,
downtown, and Coffeeshop. Please
contact Bianca ASAP. Call 561-8178.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
SUBLEASE 4 BEDROOM
APARTMENT in Players Club,
May-July with option to renew lease
for next year. Washer dryer, swimming
pool & workout facilities no deposit re-
quired. We will give up ours! Call
ASAP 353-4495.
PARKING ONE BLOCK FROM
campus. Two roommates need to share
three bedroom one bath house. Fully
furnished except for bedrooms. Wash-
erdryer, central heat and air. Rent plus
13 utilities. Call Katie today 931-
0348.
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washerdryer.
Hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT
AVAILABLE NOW THRU August.
$200month plus 13 utilitiesown
bath. 1 block from campus. Frank 353-
00.
FOR RENT: 2 br duplex with 2 full
baths large kitchen and living room,
fireplace, rent $525mo deposit $300.
Available May 10. Call 758-7531.
MAY THRU AUGUST 2 bedroom
1 bath. Wyndham Circle, $100 off each
month's rent, You keep security dp-
posit. Call 754-2434, ask for Matt or
Rusty.
WANTED: THREE BEDROOM
HOUSE to rent for fall semester.
Please call Carrie: 757-8711 or Mary
Ruth: 752-7337.
i
i
i
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
(net waM w� any ottttr coupon)
f and 2 Bedroom Range. Reft Idgtrator.
Washer. Dryer Hookups. Dads and Patios
in most units. Laundry Facility.
Sand fleyba� Court
Located 5 Mocks from campus.
FREE WATER. SEWER
TVruUUm gmt
2 BEDROOMS
StoveHefridaer sum Dishwasher
Washer. Dryer Hookups
ratios on First Floor
Loaned 5 Blocks from Campus
sitnManriT ejeeef
bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable. S blocks f
campus. New ownership
New Landscapini.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITTPHC�ITY
MANAGEMENT
IOSAdWOVVNUA DRIVE
758-lttl Offer Expires 4-Ji.�7
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SUBLEASE large room in a three
bedroom house for $200 a month for
1st summer session. Call 561-8178 for
additional information.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP! Rent is $200 12 phone and
utilities. Must be laid back. Call Alan
@ 551-3871 Wyndham Court Apart-
ments.
GOOD DEAL FOR RESPONSI-
BLE male during July and August
1997. Free room and board for house
and pet setting, while I am on vacation
in Europe. References required. Seri-
ous inquiries. Call 321-1848 after 6:00
pm.
ROOMMATE FOR SUMMER
NEEDED: fully furn. duplex, walk-
ing distance from campus. $265mo.
plus 12 utilities, non-smoking, respon-
sible male or female. Contact Monica
at 752-3407 May - August.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP!
2 bedroom 1 12 bath on ECU bus ro-
ute. Rent is $190 12 utilities and
phone. Call Pat at 757-2725.
ATTENTION CYCLISTS 97
470 trek road bike. 250 miles. Shima-
noRSXergo-shifters. 52" fits 5'4"5'6"
suture. Excellent! Firstupgrade!
Qualify. $575, negotiable. 752-6993
whenever!
DO YOU LIKE BEER? Well, you
can have your favorite keg on tap in
your own house every day of the week.
The keg frig, holds one keg; comes
with cleaning kit, co2 tank, and two
taps lyr. old. $500neg. Call Anthony
@ 830-9347
FOR SALE - 1990 BAYLINER.20
ft. long, Force motor 150hp and trailer.
All in very good condition. Call
(919)356-2665 after 6 pm.
95 CHEVY CAVALIER, LT. blue
AC CD must sell ASAP $9,500. Call
Jennifer Wheeler 328-3514 leave mes-
sage.
NEED A COMPUTER? DESK-
TOP? LAPTOP? UPGRADE?
ONLY BUY WHAT YOU NEED!
PERSONALIZED SERVICE! CALL
MIKE P1PPA AT 794-3555.
MOVING MUST SELL PER-
SONALLY hand crafted queen size
waterbed with liner and heater $150
acoustic power logic 260 amplifier 45
watts rms 125 watts bridged mono
$125.00. Call 321-8148.
300W ROCKWOOD AMP, 4-
channel, mosfet, wcrossover. 400w
futtron amp, 2-channcl, mosfet,
wcrossover. 10" jensen, 375w sub.
Best offers. Call 328-8733.
LARGE ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH large TV space,
glass door stereo and CD compart-
ments. Wood grain finish. Take best
offer. Brian at 752-1891.
CUSTOM DESIGN ALUM.
FRAMED mtn. bike new XTR
brakes, pilot & deore LX components.
U-lock, baggy, 3-bike car rack. Great
cond. Brought new $890. Selling for
$420. Call 830-9347, ask for Clayton.
SOLOFLEX WEIGHTLIFTING
MACHINE EXCELLENT condi-
tion 510 pounds of weights traps. Mov-
ing, must sell. $350.00 obo 758-8364
leave message.
FOR SALE: MOVING drafting
table, $85, gas grill $35, cannondale
bike $100, ceiling fan with light $15,
and kitchen items dishes, glasses,
pans, toaster oven, $45, Call 758-
7531.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4wd's. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-
3726 for current listings.
SPECIALIZED HARD ROCK
WITH trek DS2 shock $150.00 JBL
bookshelf speakers $100.00. Speakers
are brand, new bike was purchased in
1993. Ask for Todd 830-2870
COMPUTER! INTEL 120MHZ
CPU, 14" monitor, 1.2GB hard drive,
16mb SRAM, 12x CD, 33.6 modem,
floppy, sound card, speakers, Win 95,
mouse, more! $1099 delivered! JVC
CD recorder! $369. All new! 321-
3897
FOR SALE: PROMETHUS pro
modem for Macintosh. 14.4bps, all in-
structions, hardware, and software in-
cluded. Comes with 10 free hours of
AOL! $75 obo. Call Tabi 757-3566.
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN), INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, & GOOD
PAY. FIND OUT HOW TO
START THE APPLICATION
PROCESS NOW! CRUISE EM-
PLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL
800-276-4948 EXT. C53629.
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
DEGREE IN HAND, NO career in
sight? Looking to grow a business in
Eastern, North Carolina. fullPart-
time positions. Call 551-6749 for con-
fidential interview.
PROFESSIONAL LAW FIRM IS
seeking an experienced paralegal with
bachelors degree and additional train-
ing at a recognized paralegal training
center. Experience in bankruptcy
andor litigation can substitute for the
educational requirement. Excellent
fringe benefits package included.
Please contact Lisa Willis at (919)355-
3030 for further information. All inqui-
ries will be handled in confidence.
CUSTOMER SERVICESALES:
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for part-time positions in the following
departments: Customer Service, Ju-
nior Sportswear, Fuller Figure, Men's
wear. Scheduling options may include
10am-2pm, tpm-6pm, 6pm-9pm. All
positions include weekends. Part-time
offers merchandise discount and up to
29 hrsweek. Please apply Tuesday,
4pm-7pm or Thursday lpm-4pm, Bro-
dy's The Plaza.
1 RANKED FUNDRAISER.
YO U R group, club, frat.sor. can raise
up to $200 $500 $1000 in one
week. Minimal hrseffoft required.
Call 800-925-5548, access code 22.
Participants receive free sport camera
just for calling.
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR TA-
HITI? OUR MATERIALS UN-
COVER NUMEROUS OPPOR-
TUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO:
1-800-807-5950 EXT.R53626
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
WANTED: STUDENT WITH
CDFR, EDUC. PSYC, NURS major to
care for 5 year old boy this summer.
Own transportation, non-smoker, and
swimming skills. Access to 2 local
pools. Hours: Mondav-Thursdav 8-5.
Call Sherrie at 328-2009, (after 5) 355-
7597.
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER
Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission.
Call Jeff Mahoney at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
READERS WANTED! SORRY
this isn't a job, but we're offering big
discounts on a variety of books! 40
�off many titles. Visit the general read-
ing dept ECU Student Stores, Wright
Building.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Saiem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC 27113.
DANCERS (ENTERTAIN-
MENT) SID'S SHOWGIRLS
Goldsboro 919-580-7084.
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED THIS
SUMMER in Greenville and sur-
rounding areas (Rocky Mount. Gold-
sboro, Smithfield). Call Ashley at 321-
1214 to set up an interview. Don't de-
lay summer is almost here
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crews at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. 55,000 salary plus $1,060
mhibus. Experience preferred. Call I-
800-477-1001 and ask for Mr. Helfrich.
Make $$
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per Hr. & Mileage
MailFex Resume:
ma
RO. Bos 370
Cove City, NC 28529
Fas: (919)637-2125
Near Greenville. Kinaion, New Bern
Hiring Now!
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
WANTED: FEMALE STUD-
ENT TO live in with disabled fe-
male. No physical duties required.
Free room in nice home, located in
Tucker Estates. Call (919)756-6939
after 7pm on Tues. Wed. or Thurs.
night. Collect.
K&W CAFETERIA ARE know hir-
ing for position of cashier and checkers.
Please apply between the hours of 2:00
pm and 4:00 pm. M-V. For more infor-
mation call 756-7577.
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Arc you looking for employment? We
are looking for caring, compassionate
individuals who love children to work
as full and part time teachers at our
corporate child care center located in
RTP If you are interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
FULL-TIME SUMMER NANNY
to help mem with 2 and 4 12 year old
toddlers and twins arriving this sum-
mer. Must have experience with
infants. References required. Call
321-1663.
NOW HIRING PLAYV.VTi
MUST be 18 years old. Eau. eat
money while you leam playmates i. s-
sage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
LOOKING FOR SUMMER JOB?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
immediately to contact alumni for the
ECU Annual Fund Drive. $5.00 hour.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, come by Rawl Annex, Room 5,
M-TH between the hours of 2-6pm.
WANTED: FEMALE GARDEN-
ER PULLING out ivy (by the roots)
from flower bed, weeding, separating
Liorope (monkey grass) and generally
working in flower beds. Prefer some-
one who has done this type work be-
fore, especially someone that enjoys
this type work. $6.00 per hour, work at
your own leisure, come and go whenev-
er you want, must have car, location is
in Lyndale adjacent to BB&T main of-
fice. Please call 756-2496.
THINKPAD 340 LAPTOP
DEMO model, with color printer:
$595. Z-station computers, 100 mhz.
16mb ram, 1.2gb, 15" monitor, MS of-
fice, games internal fax modem, war-
ranty: sale price $1399. ECLTStudent
Stores: 328-6731.
SEEKING GOAL-ORIENTED
INDIVIDUAL with strong self-ini-
tiative, communication skills, and is
able to work on their own. Position in-
volves finance, volunteer recruitment,
and coordination of activities at all lev-
els. Training will be provided. Merit
pay based on performance. Competi-
tive starting salary with company auto-
mobile. Bachelors degree required.
Relocation required in eastern North
Carolina. For appointment call Nancv
at 522-1521; 9:00am - 4:00pm.
R��ARCHREPORTS
Largnt Ubtwy of Intonaton in U.S.
wnmestu sugars
OrderCMog ToMy with Visa MC o' COO
B800-3510222
CAMP FIREWOOD
-H9BS3
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors & Instructors
for private coed youth camp located in the
beautiful mountains of western N.C.
Over 25 activities including all sports, water
skiina, heated pool, tennis, art, horseback,
go- karri. 610 to 811earn $1250 -
1650 plus room, meols, laundry & great fun!
Non-smokers call for brochureapplication:
M0-S32-S539
GREEKS OF THE WEEK Alpha
Delta Pi Carolyn Teel, Emily Bowen,
Alpha Omicron Pi Gina Larson, Heath-
er Otto Alpha Xi Delta Karen Webb,
Karen Kushner, Heidi Schmidt Alpha
Phi Laura Benfield, Kathryn Dengler,
Delta Zeta Kelly Pruitt, Kelly Woodall,
Kirsten Napier, Brandy Peal, Zeta Tau
Alpha Sala Ray, Trisha Sheperdson, Pi
Delta Kelly Goodman, Sigma Sigma
Sigma Toni Huntsinger, Hillary Wat-
son, Chi Omega Lori Sherman, Col-
leen Dunn, Jen O'Connor, Kate Smith
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE NEWEST sisters of Alpha
Omicron Pi: Christina Abbott, Lindsay
Arndt, Amy Hinnant, and Tracy Mc-
Lendon. We're proud of you! Love,
your sisters.
THANK YOU HEATHER KING
and Sarah Garriques for all your hard
work. We really appreciate alt your ef-
forts. Love your Alpha Omicron Pi
Sisters.
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS!
THANKS for your whopping support
at our Band Party! Greek week really
rocks! Greek Unity is alive! Lick em.
The TKE's
CONGRATULATIONS MERl
SPENCER ON winning the Dia-
mond Jubilee Scholarship. We are so
very proud of you! Love your Alpha
Omicron Pi sisters.
SIGMA NU WE HAD a blast Tues-
day night. The roller skating social was
lots of fun. Love the sisters of Alpha
Omicron R.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA
OMICRON PI on once more being
the Greek Week Mud Football Cham-
pions. Way to go girls! Love your Al-
pha Omicron Pi Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
V r � INA LACY on your lavalier to
iviik �' We are so happy for you!
Love a Sister.
�Mo $2,361mo.
Looking for 3 ECU students to work with
UNC students in a summer intern.
Travel! Chataitgl lam!
Min. GPA 2 5
Or, rush $2.00 to� �.�
11322 kftho Ave 806-1. Los Angeles. CA 90025
TYPING SERVICES AVAIL-
ABLE, $2.00 per typed page, fast
and accurate. Call Debra Rhodes, 757-
0495.
ADULT TOY PARTY - for women
only! Earn free products just for host-
essing a patty. Call a romance special-
ist today! 752-5533 and ask for Jenn.
TYPING SERVICE - DEPEND"
ABLE, CONFIDENTIAL, fast
turnaround. Low rates you can afford.
Call today for Glenda at 919-527-9133
or E-mail me at GStcv22480AOL.com
ALPHA OMICRON PI ALL-
SING team we are very proud of you.
Your hard work paid off and you looked
really great! Love, your sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
TRACY MAURER on becoming a
Chapter Consultant. We are very
proud of you! Love your Sigma Sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI WILL be
having a Pi Party on Wednesday April
'16th at 6 pm. Fot more information
and rides call JD Hall at 757-0769.
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like
to thank Alayne McNeal for represent-
ing us with looks and class in the biki-
ni contest last Wednesday at Pantana
Bob's!
ALPHA DELTA PI THE senior
banquet went great! We are definitely
going to miss our seniors! Emily B.
thanks for all of your hard work! lovo,
your sisters.
1.4E BROTHERS OF PI Kappa
Alpha woulr1 like to rank everyone
who participated in Greek Goddess
and
congratulations to the winner Sage Hu-
nahan! Great job girls! PIKES
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like
to thank Sigma Sigma Sigma, Alpha Xi
Delta, and Sigma Phi Epsilon for NC
State for a great time with the Quad
last Friday!
ALPHA XI DELTA WE had a great
time at the All-Sing. Way to go .Allison!
Love your sister sorority, .Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
OUR GREEK Goddess Sage Huni-
han and to Kristina Lacy for second
runner up. We are so proud of you.
l,ovc your Sigma Sisters.
THE LADIES OF ALPHA Kappa
Alpha would like to thank everyone
who came out and supported us at the
cookout last Thursday. A special
thanks goes out to the Brothers of Phi
Beta Sigma. We had a great time!
Love, the sisters of Alpha Kappa Alpha.
KAPPA ALPHA SORRY IT'S late
but we wanted to thank you for the
Hall Crawl last Thursday. We had a
great time. Iove Alpha Delta Pi.
CAROLYN, TRACY AND MEG-
AN you did a great job representing
AD Pi and Sig Ep at Greek Goddess.
Love your Alpha Delta Pi
LOST SET OF KEYS in front of
Mendenhall, Tuesday night around
7:30pm. If found please call Erika at
328-8340.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent
tax, Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll
Free 800-218-9000 Ext. H-3726 for
current listings.
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS,
AND Allies for Diversity meeting
April 17th 1997 Mendenhall Room 244
7:30pm. All members need to attend!
Topic to be discussed recent Anti-Gay
incidences occurring on Campus. This
concerns all members. Refreshments
will be served. Sec you there!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
WILL MEET April 17 at 6:00 pm in
the Underground in MSC For more infor-
mation contact David at 353-0808.
"MARKETING YOURSELF IN
TODAY'S Job Climate will be pre-
sented by Dr. Ed Wheatley. The In-
vestment Club is hosting this event on
Tues April 1st at 3:30 in GCB 1010.
Refreshments provided. File your tax-
es before coming. Open to anyone who
wants to attend.
TO ALL B-GLAD members thank
you for your support over the past two
years. Let's continue to strive for
equality and respect! Your President
Lora. You've been great!
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS TU-
TOR TRAINING workshop sched-
uled - (Greenville) - Teach an adult to
READ. Literacy volunteers of Ameri-
ca-Pitt County is holding a tutor train-
ing workshop beginning on April 24, at
7pm. The workshop consists of five
training sessions. Trie sessions will be
held on Monday and Thursday even'
ings. Volunteers will learn to teach
functionally illiterate adults how to
read. Call 752-0439 today for more in-
formation or to register for the tutor
training workshop. Workshop dates:
Thursday, April 24, Monday, April 28;
Thursday, May 1, Monday, May 5;
Thursday, May 8.
PSI CHI WILL HAVE ITS net
meeting on April 16 at 5:00 pm in P" I
302. Speaker will discuss careers in
Psychology. Refreshments served!
INTERMEDIATE CLIMBING;
NEW river George, WV: Join us on
April 25 for a fun day of rock climbing
in West Virginia, be sure to register by
6:00 pm on April 15 in the Student Re-
creation Center main office. Spon-
sored by the Department of Recrea-
tional Services.
SOFTBALL HOME RUN DER-
BY: join us for a day of soft ball at the
softball home run derby on April 16 at
4:00pm. Sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.
TUES APRIL 15 - junior recital;
Whitney-Cole Kleinschustsr, voice and
Senior Recital, Theresa Stone, voice
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 phi
Wed April 16 - Sophomore Recital,
Matthew King and Allan Rascoe, voice,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm
Thurs April 17 - Friends of the School
of Music Scholarship Showcase Recital,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm Fri
April 18 - Senior Recital, Julius Mc-
Adams, saxophone, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hal 7:00 pm Fri April 18 - Graduate
Recital, Susan A. Voges, cello, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hail, 9:00 pm Sat
April 19 - Senior Recital, Ralph Ste-
wart, horn, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
1:00 pm. Sat April 19 - Graduate Re-
cital, Jonathan L. Askey, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hail, 5:00 pm Sat
April 19 - Senior Recital, Kelley L. Wil-
liams, violin, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall.
7:00 pm Sat April 19 - Senior Recital,
Richard Ramirez, composition, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm Sun
April 20 - Sunday at the Galley Con-
cert: String Concert, Fritz Gearhan,
Conductor, Greenville Museum of An,
802 S. Evans St Greenville, 2:00 pm
Sun April 20 - Junior Recital, Jurij
Brewer, piano, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 2:00 pm Sun April 20 - Graduate
Recital, Natalie Stroud, voice, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4:00 pm Sun
April 20 - Graduate Recital, Greg
Stisuber, trumpet, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 9:00 pm Mon April 21 � Trom
bone Ensemble, GeorgeBroussard, Di-
rector, AJ Fletcher Recital Hail, 8:00
pm Tues April 22 - Freshman Recital,
Jon Johnson, organ, First Presbyterian
Church, 1400 S. Elm St. Greenville,
7:00 pm Tues April 22 - Guitar En-
semble, Elliot Frank, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. For
info call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour ho-
tline at ECU-4370.
THANK YOU TO THE volunteers
at the REAL Crisis Center for their
time and dedication to the center:
Cornelia Anderson, Paige Armstrong,
Mary Boccaccio, Brande Bowers, Ni-
cole Cox, Sally Dew, Rusty Earl, Katina
Faulkner, Becky Ftnelli, Sean Forney,
Greta Graves, Steve Green, Christine
Harrington, Matt Holder, Angie John-
son, Heather Lynch, Brian Matthews,
Margaret Mayo, Drew McMillcn, Dal-
las McPherson, Teresa Muldra, Connie
Palmer, Susan Price, Tootie Raynor,
Fran Sankowski, Raquel Torres, Aman-
da Tyson, Jonni Wainwright, Susan
Walls.
SAM: TUESDAY, APRIL 15 in
GCB 1011 at 3:30 pm. Sam will be
having Ray Brown speak. He will be
talking about his experiences with 3M.
Food and refreshments will be served.
TUE APRIL 8 - GUEST REC1-
TAL, John Michael Parris, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm Wed
April 9 - Faculty Recital, Elliot Frank,
guitar, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00pm Fri April 11 - Early Music En-
semble, Thomas Huener, Director,
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 1800
S. Elm St Greenville. 8:00pm Sun
April 13 - Guest Recital, Paul Katz, cel-
lo, from Rice University, Houston,
Texas, with faculty Fritz Gcarhart, vio-
lin, and Kelley Mikkelsen, cello, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm Mon
April 14 - University Chorale, Janna
Brendeil, Conductor and Chamber
Singers, Rhonda Fleming, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 8:00pm Tues
April 15 - Junior Recital, Whitney-Cole
Kleinschuster, voice and Senior Reci-
tal, Thereas Stone, voice, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00pm. For additional
information, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370.
PHI ALPHA THETA PRES-
ENTS special guest speaker - Dr. An-
nette Fmley-Croswhite. She will prcs-
enr a paper entitled "Women at War -
Encounters with women as spies, com-
batants, leaders and camp followers in
the French Wars of Religion Tuesdav,
April 15 at 8:00 pm in GCB 1032.
iu


Title
The East Carolinian, April 15, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 15, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1202
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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