The East Carolinian, April 10, 1997







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THURSDAY
APRIL 10.1897
eastr'arol in ian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA

The Rebel wins collegiate equivalent to Pulitzer prize
Marguerite Benjamin
NEWS EDITOR
The Rebei, one of the university's student publi-
cations, has been named a national magazine
Pacemaker for this year by the Associated
Collegiate Press (AGP).
The Pacemaker award is college journalism's
most prestigious prize for general excellence and
has been said to be the collegiate journalism's
equivalent to the Pulitzer Prize awarded to com-
mercial media.
The Rebel, which is ECU's student
literaryarts magazine, was selected as one of six
magazines nationally to receive this honor and
one of two in the state. Windover at North
Carolina State also received the award.
"It's actually last year's Rebd that's winning
Student Union
elects new
president with
new plans
all the awards said the art director for this year,
Tim Jones. "The one for this year is still in pro-
duction Jones added that the credit for the
19 Rebel should go to 19 Art Director,
Jonathan Peedin and Assistant Art Directors
Dana Ezzell and Bryon Hutchens. John Buliard
served as editor of the issue.
According to Jones, The Rebrl is operated and
produced much like ECU's minority magazine,
Expressions.
"It takes a while to get them published, so
while one might be out winning awards, we're
here working on the next one Jones said.
The Pacemaker honor is the second national
award received by the magazine this year, the
Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA)
awarded The Rebel a silver Crown Award recently
during its spring convention in New York.
The CSPA awards its Gold Crown, usually
given to the top two percent of publications
Kristen Afford
lifestyle 7
Julian Bream
comes to campus
opinion5
Being editor-in-
chief can be hard
sports10
Outstanding male
athlete award goes
to Kevin Miller
THURSDAY:
partly cloudy
high 62
low 41
WEEKEND:
partly cloudy
high 70
low 47
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG,
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 lax
e-mail
uutec�ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
evaluated from the prior academic year, and its
Silver Crown, usually given to the next three
percent of publications nationally, each spring.
Ezzell, one of The Rebefs 19 assistant art
directors, said it was a nice honor to know that
something they had.workcd so hard for was
being nationally recognized.
"The magazine does not get a lot of recogni-
tion on campus, so this truly was an honor
Ezzell said. "All three af us (the art director and
assistants) collaborated and worked days and
nights to get it published
Having graduated, Ezzell is now employed
by the university and is assisting in the produc-
tion of the 1997 Rebel by doing the pre-press
work.
The Rebel is a showcase of student artistic and
literary talent. The magazine's content is deter-
mined each year in a competition judged by
School of the Arts faculty, local professionals and
ECU alumni. The art cate-
gories include sculpture,
printmaking, textiles, wood,
painting, metals, ceramics,
illustration, photography and
graphic design. The literary
entries are divided into fic-
tion and poetry categories.
Craig Malmrose of the
School of Arts served as the
faculty an adviser, and Bruce
McComiskey of the English
department served as the
faculty literary adviser. Paul
Wight is the adviser for the
ECU student media.
ECU's Central Printing
and Duplicating printed the
19 edition of the magazine.
1997 Art Director Tim Jones
1996 Asst. Art Director Dana Ezzell
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
KARLA JONES
ORIF.NTATIONGF.NRRAI. c:OI.I.E(iF. ISSUES
STAFF WRITE
Kristen Alford was
elected president of
the Student Union for
1997-98. She is cur-
rently the vice-presi-
dent of Student
Union, but will take
her position as presi-
dent at the Student
Union banquet on
April 27,1997 at 7p.m.
Alford has several
goals she would like to
accomplish while she
is in office. She feels
that there is a lack of
participation by the students to become
involved in the Student Union. She hopes she
will be able to rejuvenate the committees
because some committees have not received
much participation this past year.
For the upcoming year, Alford plans to add
more participation by adding several more
activities and programs. She plans to do many
more things with the cultural awareness com-
mittee.
"Films committee has done outstanding
with the movies they have shown on campus.
The visual arts committee has done an out-
standing job also with the art gallery in
Mendenhall" Alford said.
She feels that all of the other committees
have done excellent jobs and will continue to
do so and make the Student Union improve in
the future.
"There is room for improvement, creativity
and new ideas Alford said.
There will be a survey available for students
to fill out to find out what kind of programs
and activities they would like to have. She
hopes more students will be on the commit-
tees, so they can voice their opinions.
She wishes the students around campus
could be more informed about the programs or
activities that are going to be held. She feels
most of the poor attendance at the programs or
activities was because people and students
were not interested enough to go. In the
future, she hopes to receive more student
involvement. Alford and her Vice President,
Virginia Anderson, also want to stay informed
and involved with each committee.
Alford's main goal is to make the Student
Union better than it has been in the past. She
hopes her efforts will bring more involvement
and more programs to ECU's campus. She also
feels that the chairpersons she has chosen for
1997-98 will work hard in their positions and
make an improvement in the Student Union.
Applications for Student Union committees
are available at the information desk in
Mendenhall or at the Student Union offices.
Students invited to Belize for cultural studies
Application deadine approaching
Marguerite Benjamin
NEWS EDITOR
Due to the efforts of ECU's Department of English and Office
of International Affairs, students have the opportunity to par-
ticipate in a unique program in cultural studies.
The university's recent official signing of the cultural stud-
ies program in Central America makes it possible for students
to receive college credits for classes in African and Caribbean
literature and ethnic studies while studying in Belize over the
summer.
The idea originated with a past visit to Belize by Dr. Gay
Wilentz of ECU's English department. Wilentz said she
became enchanted with the country on her first visit.
"I went to Belize to interview someone Wilentz said, "and
while I was there, I realized it would be a very good place for
an exchange program in cultural studies
Wilentz, who has been visiting Belize for five years and
taught there last year, said Belize was the perfect place for such
a program because it is a very multicultural, African-based but
English-speaking society. Having a program in Belize began to
sound even better when a comparison was made between the
expense of having a program in Belize and having the same
type of program in West .Africa.
"Belize is a different kind of multi-ethnic society with many
cultures like Mayan, Spanish, Creole, and the Garifuna cul-
ture Wilentz said. "The
Garifuna are a unique people
of African descent with very
rich lifestyles. They were
never slaves, and they settled
in Belize in the 1700's
Almost 300 years later,
many of the Garifuna's
African traditions remain
intact. Besides having the
opportunity to interact with
people of different cultures
and take ECU based classes,
participants can also enroll in
classes taught by Belizean
faculty members from the
University College Belize in
archeolopv. Carihhean stud-
ies, and environmental stud-
ies.
Wilentz herself will be
teaching courses in African
and Caribbean literature this
summer. All classes are
mixed, containing both stu-
dents from the U.S. and
Belize.
"One of our goals was to work out a mutual exchange
Wilentz said. "Many Belizean students have expressed inter-
ests in coming to our country to study as well. It is our hope
that the eventual exchange will be with faculty, students and
staff
Other related projects in negotiation include an English as
a Second Language (ESL) internship program, which may
involve marine and coastal studies. Also, Wilentz said the uni-
versity is trying to bring Belizean students to ECU for post-
graduate work.
While the program would be a beneficial experience to all
students, Wilentz said it would be particularly rewarding for
African-American students, in whom Belize is especially inter-
ested.
The $1000 program fee includes airfare, housing and two
meals a day, one night's hotel stay, orientation and one day-trip
to a Mayan village near Belize City. Students will be housed in
groups of two or three, with English-speaking Belizean fami-
lies. Vegetarian diets can be accommodated.
(top) Dr. Gay Wilentz of ECU's English department discusses the cultural studies program with other coordi-
nators in Belize. Both parties hope the eventual exchange will be with faculty, students and staff,
(left) Many Belizean students have expressed interests in coming to the U.S. to study. Here they sign up for
more information about possible study programs at ECU. The university is currently recruiting students in
Belize to do post-graduate work.
PHOTO BY MARSUERITE BENJAMIN
The session planned for this summer is from June 14 to
July 7 and can accommodate approximately 10 to 12 students.
There are still a few seats left, and applications are due April
15 with a non-refundable application processing fee of $10.
Students who are accepted will be required to pay a non-
refundable deposit of $500 by April 30 and the remaining bal-
ance by May 25.
Participants may apply for financial assistance a number of
ways. Students may apply for Thomas W Rivers Awards for
Study Abroad or federal financial aid. Students should inquire,
of the program director questions regarding the possibilities for
enrollment during the first summer term at ECU.
Wilentz said she is confident that the benefits of the pro-
gram will far outweigh the expense.
"Belize is a great place she said. "The people are very
friendly, and the society is truly multicultural. We could learn
something from them
For more information, contact Wilentz at 328-6678 or Dr.
Linda McGowan at the Office of International Affairs, 328-
1937.
HEALTH FAIR OUTSIDE AT REC CENTER
(top) Participants set up outside Mendenhall Student Center for the 1997 Spring Health Fair. The
health fair is an annual event designed to give students hints for healthier Irving. Booths were set up
by many different offices and campus associations including the ECU police and Student Health. A
freestyle biking team was also present.
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
BENEFITS FAIR INSIDE AT REC CENTER
International affairs concerned
over enrollement precentages
Metropolitan (Met) Life Insurance Agency was one of many companies represented at the ECU 1997
Benefits Fair held yesterday in Mendenhall Student Center's Great Rooms One Two and Three.
Education sessions were also held providing tips for easy retirement and financial planning. The
Benefits Fair was presented by ECU Human Resources.
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
Jacqueline D. kellum
ARTS AND STUDIES ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
The Office of International Affairs has been
attempting to increase its number of interna-
tional students�which is significantly low for
a school this size�and become known in the
international studies field as an attractive
choice for exchanges and international study.
There is a difference between an exchange
student and an international student, as
Stephanie Evancho, international admissions
coordinator, explained.
"The international students are degree-
seeking students who fill out a complete appli-
cation form and a confidential financial form
Evancho said. "The exchange students are
part of our exchange agreement, where we're
sending students to their school so they can
send students to us
Other state schools currently have a much
higher percentage of international students
than ECU.
"Our size should have at least two to 500
international students Evancho said. "We
don't even have one percent. One percent is
my first goal, which would bring us up to 170
Evancho says she has been traveling a lot on
recruitment tours, trying to make ECU's name
more well-known, hoping to increase the num-
ber of applications her office receives.
"It can happen, and it should Evancho
said. "We're very marketable. We have so much
to offerthese kids find out we're a Division I
school in athletics, we've got a school of busi-
ness, school of art, school of education, every-
thing they could want
In traveling to the recruitment confer-
ences, Evancho found that ECU is not very
well known as an option for international
study.
"They've never heard of us Evancho siad.
"We don't have the name recognition. State
schools don't usually do a lot of recruitment.
But we're in a situation where we're trying to
internationalize
In addition to the wide range of majors to
choose from, ECU also has the advantage of
being financially feasible. This is an advantage
for international students who usually are not
funded by their government, as arc American
students.
"Our cost is very competitive Evancho
said. "It's a lot lower than the private schools.
The only thing we don't have is scholarships
Once an international student is accepted
at ECU, they have a support system available
both from the international affairs office and
the office of special populations. Dr. Lucy
Wright is the director of the Special
Populations office.
"Once they are accepted, we get a copy of
the letter of acceptance that goes to the stu-
dent, then we write a letter that goes to the
student overseas that is like a welcoming let-
ter Wright said. "It tells them what to bring
with them, how to get here, we let them know
they have a mandatory health insurance
requirement, and immunizations
All international students get cleared
through the Special Ibpulations office when
they first come to campus, and the support
continues during their stay here.
"There's an orientation program for two
days at the beginning of every semester. We
use international students in that program so
they have some peers. We have a host family
program, where those people who don't move
immediately into a residence hall have a fami-
ly that meets them, takes care of them, until
they have housing Wright said.
Once the students are settled in, the
offices of international affairs and pecial popu-
lations are available for whatever help might
be needed, from providing international stu-
dents with a newsletter to help with their tax
forms. These two offices agree that they hope
to see a lot more international students on
campus in the future.






i
2 Thursday, April 10, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
campuses
UN-CH law student arrested for smoking pot in class
The marijuana-smoking incident involving second-year law student Barry
Berman was a "dramatic gesture" to let people know that he needed help.
one of Berman's friends said Thursday.
"It was not a protest or something that was directly a result of stress in
law school said Steve Dunn, second-year student in the School of Law. "Its
clear that the reason he did it was a dramatic gesture to let everyone know
he was out of control and needed help
Wednesday afternoon, Berman was charged with two misdemeanors by
University Police after smoking marijuana in Professor Arnold Loewry's con-
stitutional law class.
Since then, Dunn said Berman's attorney had notified his parents. They
flew from Florida to Chapel Hill and were seeking support for their son.
Berman was unavailable for comment Thursday.
Law school administrators and faculty said they were unable to comment
Thursdav because of the Family Educational Rights Act.
"There are procedures to follow, and they are being followed said Mary
Murray, assistant dean of external relations at the law school.
USF graduates most students
USF has awarded the most diplomas in the least amount of time-a national
record of 150,000 in just 34 years.
In honor of the accomplishment, the first certified graduate of LSE
Evelyn O'Neal, class of 1962, and the 150,000th graduate Felisa Cupps, who
graduated in December, will be honored with a gift of an undisclosed value.
.Assistant registrar for students .Angela DuBose said graduating so many
students in such a short amount of time is a testament to the school's devo-
tion to all its students.
N.C. State professor featured in National
Geographic special
Death rituals create a strange fascination among the living.
That is the experience of Anne Schiller, an anthropologist and sociology-
professor at N.C. State who took a film crew from National Geographic on an
expedition into Petak Putih, Borneo last summer.
Schiller traveled to Borneo because the local family that had adopted her
during her previous three visits to the island nation was preparing for the
death ritual known as tiwah, and they wanted to share the experience with
her and the rest of the world.
The tiwah is important to the Ngaju Dayak people because it fulfills their
faith and gives them a sense of cultural identity.
"We really do need to take care of each other Schiller says and the
death rituals are a way for the people to repay their parents for giving them
life In some sections of Borneo, the dead are believed to rest in peace only
after the tiwah has been performed.
The first quest of the tiwah is to offer food for the dead to eat in the after-
life bv means of animal sacrifice. The blood of the beast is applied to the
faces of familv members and is thought to protect the living from famine and
evil. Bodies of the dead are exhumed and the bones are placed in the family-
tomb.
Need a
this
summer
c�
If you will be a returning .
student in the fall. University Housing
Services will be hiring Facility office assistants'
this summer. Part-time positions available.
For details and applicationsplease come-to
Office Suite I 00, Jones Hall. : .
Direct Deposit of Education Benefits for Chapter 30 Are Now Available
Direct deposit is now available for veterans and serv icepersons receiving chapter 30 education benefits. The bene-
fits of direct deposit to the claimant are faster receipt of payment and elimination of lost or stolen checks. Funds
are deposited directlv into banks, savings and loans, credit unions and mutual savings backs. Not acceptable for
direct deposits are credit cards companies, finance companies, mutual fund companies, brokerage firms and insur-
ance companies. Claimants mav submit their written request for direct deposit to Veterans Administration PO-Bo
54346 Atlanta, GA 30308-0346 or they may sign up for the program by telephone by calling the 1-800-827-1000.
Service Awards Presentations Featured At Alumni Weekend
The presentation of distinguished service awards to three East Carolina University alumni will highlight the festiv-
ities of Alumni Weekend Friday and Saturday on the campus. The awards will go to Lois Bntt, an agricultural exec-
utive and former educator. J. Craig Sotiza. former chair of the F.C.I: Board of Trustees; and Shelby Strother, a retired
music teacher The award is one of the most prestigious offered by the ECU Alumni Association. It recognizes
uncommon and outstanding service to the association or the university. The awards will be presented at a luncheon
at noon Saturday at Mendenhall Student Centra Other Activities scheduled for the weekend include the Golden
and Senior Alumni Reunion Dinner on Fridav and The Reunion Breakfast for the Golden Anniversary Class, a cam-
pus tour the Alumni .Association Board meeting, and the Purple and Gold spring football game, all on Saturday.
Need a
�u
this
summer
If you will be a returning
student in the fall, University Housing
Services will be hiring painters for
the paint crew this summer. Full and -�
part-time positions available. For details and
applications, please come to
� . Office Suite 100, Jones Hall.
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Thursday. April 10. 1997
news
Thi East Carolinian
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Books discounted 10 - 90 always.
Most special orders 15 discount.
State asks court to stop
satellite campus until
erosion curbed
BOONE, N.C. (AP) - The state has
gone to court to stop construction
of a college campus until an erosion
problem that is bringing muddy
water into a nearby stream and
ditch is resolved.
North Carolina attorneys
requested an injunction Monday in
Witauga Superior Court to block
the project. Caldwell Community
College and Technical Institute
wants to build the satellite campus
west of Boone.
In its court filing, the state said
soil from the 12-acre construction
site near North Carolina 105 Bypass
has been running into a stream for
months without the college taking
steps to stop it. A neighbor said her
ditch fills with muddy water from
the site whenever it rains.
The state asked the court to
order the college to stop work
immediately and install storm-drain
inlets, clean out a basin designed to
catch runoff from the site and stabi-
lize the eroded slopes and gullies.
State officials have fined the col-
lege $3,800 since December over
the problem. The college has
appealed the fines.
it c r o s -s
s t a 1 h
Police officer kills pas-
senger in car
CHARLOTTE (AP) - A woman
passenger became the second black
person in six months to be killed by
police during a traffic stop after the
stolen car she was in ran a license
checkpoint.
Two officers fired 22 shots at the
car. Authorities said the victim was
shot in the back of the neck.
Police said the driver of the car,
Robert G. Lundy Sr 55, of West
Columbia, S.C was arrested. He
had cocaine in his mouth and stom-
ach and was hospitalized for a drug
overdose, a police statement said.
The car was stolen in the
Raleigh area, police said.
The shooting occurred Tuesday
after 10 p.m. when the car's driver
refused to stop and drove toward
officers, Charlotte-Mecklenburg
Police Capt. Kathy Nichols said.
The wounded passenger died at
3:22 a.m. today in Carolinas Medical
Center. The woman's identity was-
n't released.
Lundy faces charges, police
spokesman Keith Bridges said, and
"has an extensive arrest record in
North and South Carolina. Previous
charges include auto theft, posses-
sion of cocaine, armed robbery,
forgery and passing fraudulent
checks
VILLAGE GREEN APARTMENTS
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Lawyer says Taco Bell
wage-hour verdict warn-
ing to other fast-food
chains
SEATTLE (AP) - A verdict that
could cost Taco Bell millions of dol-
lars in back wages is a warning to
other fast-food chains that they bet-
ter not take advantage of low-paid
workers, lawyers said.
Dozens of Taco Bell restaurants
violated state wage laws by pressur-
ing as many as 13,000 workers to
pick up trash, prepare food and per-
form other tasks without pay, a jury
ruled Tuesday.
The extra work at 62 of the
restaurants in the state - owned by
PepsiCo Inc. - came before and after
workers' shifts and during meal and
rest breaks over the last five years,
the Superior Court jury said.
A hearing to determine back pay
and damages in the class-action law-
suit was not immediately scheduled,
but the total could exceed $10 mil-
lion.
The 12-mcmber jury, which
required only a 10-vote majority to
reach a verdict, was unanimous on
the two most critical questions,
finding that the violations showed a
pattern of failing to pay overtime
and were committed willfully with
an intent to deprive employees of
pay.
FINISH STRONG
Success at Sunrise
Learn Leadership from Mr. Don Edwards
Owner, University Book Exchange
7:30 - 8:30 a.m.
Tuesday, April 15,1997
Great Room 3, MendenhaU Student Center
Call 328-4796 to register
Registration includes free breakfast, and optional wake-up call and ride service.
Stubcnt Leaber Meeting
Putting Your Experience to Work:
Using Your Leadership Experience in the Job Search
with Dr. Jim Westmoreland
Director, Career Services
5:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 16,1997
244 MendenhaU Student Center
Refreshments Provided
sponsored by Student Leadership Development Programs
109 MendenhaU Student Center
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THE RED
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WILL BE
PERFORMING
IN U.S. MARINE
CORPS
AIRSHOW
Red Baroif Frozen Pizza
proudly presents a special
appearance of the Red Baron
Biplanes. Frying enthusiasts
and the community are invit-
ed to come see the Red
Baron Stearman Squadron
Team perform their aerobic
magic in the sky Saturday.
April 12th at the Cherry Point
U.S. Marine Corps Air Station
Airshow, located off Hwy. 70'
in Havelock. The red and
white, smoke trailing, super
Stearman are original open-
air cockpit biplanes reminis-
cent of aviation's earlier
day's. The Red Baron
Stearman Squadron is the
only formation team flying
authentic antique aircraft.
Their appearance will benefit
the Children's Miracle
Network of North Carolina
ia
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r
Thursday. April 10. 1997
The East Carolinian
eastiftarolinian
BRANDON VDDF.l.t. Edit�
AMANDA ROSS Sports Editor
MATT HKGK Adrsmsing Oiwrat PATRICK 1RKI.AN Photo Editor
MAROI'KRITK BKNJAMIN News Ediror CELKSTE WILSON Production Manager
AMY I. ROYSTKR Assistant News Editor Caroi.E MKHl.E Head Copy Editor
JAY MiER.S Ulestyle Editor ANDY FaRKAS Staff Illustrator
DAI.F. WILLIAMSON Assistant lifestyle Editor .HEATBEft Bl'ROESS Wm Edimr
Srninj the ECU community since I9S the Est Ceroliniw publishes B.WO mums every Tuesday and Thursday the lead ttMonal each edition is the
opinion (H die i�t�ul Bostr) The Easi C�rri�an ��ta�es letters 10 the editor, limned ra 2M iwrdi. wfccti mar be edued for decency a bremiy. P� East
Crrolinun leseines the nght 10 edit or reject tote's tor pubteanon All leners musi be srjnetj Inters should be addressed to opinion ediror. the fan
Caratnian, Publications EkiiMmo, ECU. Gieenville. 2785M353 For miormatirjn. call 919328.6366
oumcw
Too bad, so sad.
This is the message seniors are getting about the new policy concerning graduation. Some
seniors will have enough credit hours to walk across the podium and receive their diploma in
May but still must take a class or two during the summer. But now the university is saying those
seniors can't walk with their peers and will have to wait until December to walk up on stage.
The reason behind the decision was to limit the amount of people in Minges Coliseum in
case of inclement weather, the ceremony would move from Dowdy-Ficklen to Minges. We at-
TEC can understand their reasoning behind the decision but what we can't understand is this:
The deadline to apply for graduation was in January, and these students weren't told they
wouldn't be able to walk until March. And even then a lot of people found out when they went
to pay for their cap and gown and were told, "Sorry, you won't be able to walk until December
Why weren't these people told by university officials about the new policy? Not to mention they
were told just two months before their big day.
A lot of family members have already made hotel reservations and have made plans to be in
Greenville for the special moment, so now they have to wait until December. Many graduates
will enter the work force and relocate to various areas; how many will really want to come back
seven months later to walk across this stage? The whole situation makes no sense and the fact
these people weren't informed until two months after they applied for graduation just adds fuel
to the fire.
As with any student, graduation is a special time and some people have looked forward to
walking across the stage in front of beaming family members and friends and finally getting the
diploma they have worked so hard for. But now they have to wait.
We can understand the officials wanting to implement a new graduation policy and that is
fine, but do it after this graduating class gets out in May. Let's make an exception for these
seniors and implement the new policy beginning.next year. That's the only fair deal. That way
the seniors can still walk, but rising seniors will know the new policy for next year and they can
ake their plans accordingly.
GUEST
Micole
MCMULLEN
C alum nist
We need to believe
GUEST
Keith
COaPER
Columnist
Presidents should apologize for incidents
Recently, four survivors of the
Tuskegee Syphilis Study asked the
honorable President Clinton for an
official apology because black men in
Tuskegee, Ala. were used by the fed-
eral government as guinea pigs in a
syphilis experiment decades ago. The
men who had syphilis were denied
treatment for many years as the feder-
al government was studying the dis-
ease and its implications. Ptniciliin, a
drug discovered by Alexander
Fleming, could have been used to
treat the disease at the time the men
needlessly suffered from the dreaded
illness.
Dr. MarceNus Barksdale, a distin-
guished professor in the African-
American studies department at
Morehousc College in Atlanta, offered
some candid, insightful comments on
the infamous syphilis study: "It was
one of the tragedies of African-
American history. The men were
allowed to live with syphilis all that
time. The men who were pan of the
experiment were all African-
American
The professor continued, "This
really highlights racism that was
involved. It also speaks to how some
of us would just buy into a system that
fraudulently and falsely presents itself
as something legitimate
When I asked about the related
litigations of the 1970s, the professor
suggested, "I assume that people
thought that the experiment would
be detrimental to those involved.
The settlement reached could not
compensate for the suffering
The educator mentioned the
movie Rosewood as another example of
how African-Americans have been
used, abused, accused and confused
for centuries. Moreover, the professor
gave the following closing remarks:
"The Tuskegee experiment shows
our victimization and more than that,
it speaks to a deep-rooted racism visi-
ble in the American fabric
Nevertheless, though Clinton's apolo-
gy will not right the wrongs of the
despicable syphilis experiment, it will
be a major step in the right direction.
I wish former presidents had offered
an apology. African-Americans,
through vigilance, should insure that
similar experiments do not become
future realities.
EDITOR
Brandon
WADOELL
m-Chief
Being editor can be tough
Did you know that football season
starts in less than five months?
Are you ready to support your
mighty Pirates all through out the '97
season? I hope so because this is
going to be one of the most impor-
tant football seasons in Pirate history.
After all, we will be in Conference
U.SA
Do you know what our Pirates
need the most for this season? Yes,
practice is important. They do need
to be physically ready. However, what
they need the most is moral support
from their fans.
That's where we come in the pic-
ture. Or at least we're supposed to.
Remember the catchy phrase,
"We Believe during the 1992 Peach
Bowl game? You know, the one in
which ECU won the game against
N.C. State with a field goal. It's the
game in which all the ECU fans knew
that the Pirates could do it. All they
needed was support. The purple and
gold dressed fans crowded into the
stadium in Atlanta to support their
Pirates. Some painted their faces
purple, while others held up the
famous yellow sword screaming "We
Believe
Now, think back to the winter of
1994 in Memphis, Tennessee. The
town had been taken over by hungry
Pirates ready for Illinois. The tailgate
fields outside of the stadium were
nothing like ours in Greenville.
There was no grass. Mostly just grav-
el parking lots or, if you were lucky;
paved parking lots. This couldn't
stop the Pirate fans from coming.
They piled into the stands and
watched with misery as Illinois tram-
pled on the ECU Pirates with a 21-0
win. Pirate fans started the game off
yelling and supporting their football
heroes. By haif-time, it had started
raining and the fans started to disap-
pear. The ECU students who had
painted their chests with purple let-
ters to get on television were gone.
The fans who wore all purple and
gold were nowhere in sight. In fact,
there were very few Pirates who actu-
ally stayed through the entire game
in hopes of a miracle.
The next year, the Pirates
returned to the Liberty Bowl and
dragged along mostly everybody from
Eastern Norrh Carolina, including
Pee Dee. This time fans had no prob-
lem staying for the entire game
because ECU was winning.
This past November, we had our
latest victory over N.C. State in
Charlotte. The stadium was packed
with Pirate fans.
So, why do we have a hard time
filling up our own stadium in
Greenville? And why do we abandon
our heroes when they need us the
most?
We need to fully believe in our
Pirates, especially during a home
game. To believe in someone, you
need to support them. If we are los-
ing a game by 20 points at half time,
that is more reason to stay. Stand up,
scream, do whatever you have to do
to let them hear your Pirate voices.
During the football season, our
players travel to many places for
away games. They see how much
support other teams get from their
loyal fans. They see the stadium
packed with screaming fans.
Now, stop and think how our play-
ers feel when they run out on their
own field. They look up in the stands
and see their own screaming fans.
Their morale is boosted. They're
pumped and ready to kick some butt.
Then, by the middle of the second
quarter, they iook back up at their
fans and notice something different.
They see that most of the fans are
either not paying attention or have
left the game. Think about what that
does to them.
We're supposed to be their fans.
We're the Pirates. We need to show
them full support through thick and
thin. It's sad when a football player
has to stand on the field waving his
arms up and down to get the fans on
their feet. We should already be
doing that. We should be loyal fans.
So. for the 1997 football season,
let's fill up Dowdy-RckJen Stadium
with proud Pirates. They need us. I
know that this football season, and
everv one to come, I'll believe.
Will you?
As many readers of The Easr
Carolinian are fully aware, the student-
run newspaper at ECU has been per-
ceived as the enemy of SGA But
everyone's perceptions differ as to his
point of view. Newspapers are sup-
posed to the watchdog of govern-
ment. It is the duty of this medium to
report newsworthy events to the stu-
dent body. Sometimes, the most
newsworthy story on this campus is a
lecture by a visiting speaker, some-
times a music concert or intercolle-
giate sports event; depending on your
point of view.
For example, if you're involved
with ECU Athletics, you might think
the acquisition of a new premier ath-
lete should be top of the news. If
you're the Interfraternity Council
(IFC) President, you may think
Greek Week should receive front page
coverage. As a leader in the Residence
Hall Association (RHA), maybe
changes in residence hall fire codes
should run lead. If you're a minority
student leader on campus, ethnic
issues should run above the fold.
But take a look at the flipside of
the coin.
Perhaps an athlete gets arrested;
it's news and is reported, much to the
chagrin of the athletic department.
Maybe an alcohol or drug-related inci-
dent happens in a fraternity house
over the weekend; it's investigated by
the paper. (We were just eliminated
from the IFC Christmas card list.)
What if a fight breaks out between
two rap groups in the campus radio
station? All of a sudden, something
else should have been more important
to report.
The aforementioned scenarios
happen on college campuses every
week.
The job description of an editor-
in-chief is to make decisions concern-
ing the editorial and advertising con-
tent of his publication. If he lives in
the back pocket of the athletic
department, the big game is big news.
To a Greek maybe that incident was-
n't such a big deal afterall. Maybe to
an African-American the fight really
wasn't that much of a rumble.
Everyone loves to second-guess
decisions like these. Everyone is
quick to criticize. But not everyone
sits in our office in front of a comput-
er screen for eight, nine or 10 hours on
a production night trying to figure out
why the front page won't print.
I won't even get started on elec-
tion-time politics, be it federal, state,
county, city or campus.But this year,
both SGA presidential candidates
made "say no to SGA tuition" a major
part of their platforms. Only a handful
of students and administrators knew
about this practice until Tke East
Carokman printed the details in a lead
story last semester. All of a sudden,
everyone who picked up a newspaper
was concerned and several classroom
debates on this issue began.
I've been the editor for one calen-
dar year and today at 5 p.m the
Student Media Board will choose my
successor. Each and every voting�
member of the Board represents a-
special interest group at this universi-
Will someone not vote for the best -
applicant for the job because they
were involved in releasing what one
could perceive as negative publicity in J
their organization to the student
body? �
You should hope not.
a ST
vmwO
.
AL- 60RE SEI5 TO CT PrSSICENTW
h






6 Thursday, April 10. 1997
Lb
The East Carolinian
iiikempusA
THIS WILL BE UWPLf AiANf,
gUT SOPNl YOU'LL Be tft"L
e.te4fi��j
Mirny
so hoj do vou ran, Atoi?
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By Karl Trolenberg
PRIfAlTIVfAAN, FINALY
PtfTW ALL THtSE
YEAR5,REVtNGES
Listen all this week for giveaways
from Extreme, A Matter of Taste,
tickets to the Attic and much more.
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
HEADSiVSJFEDS
ACROSS
1 Ark builder
5 Shade providers
9 Group of lions
14 Bohemian
15 Lopsided victory
16 Russian ruler
17 Fatherhood
19 Popped the
question
20 Type o! skirt
21 LBJ, for one
23 Self-respect
24 Sample
26 Pasture
28 Cassowary's kin
30 Most ancient
33 Citadel's student
body
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36 Hautboy
40 Galena and
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41 �cum laude
43 Tra �
44 Brood
45 "The Greatest"
46 Some beauties
48 Elaborately
51 Fate
52 Taiwan's
capital
55 Right to the
point
57 Kinsmen: abbr.
58 Guffaw
61 Having cup
handles
64 Greeted the day
66 Come to pass
68 Turn
69 One in Bonn
70 � years
(elderly)
71 Bird food
72 Moat dish
73 Carry on
T i ;I I' I1111101213
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O 1997 Tnbune Madia Service, Inc.
All rights reserved
ANSWERS
FROM TUESDAY
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DOWN
1 � Valley, CA
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3 Dispositions
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enger
5 Sea eagle
6 Hang around
7 Speechless
8 Mythical
underground
river
9 Smoothes
10 Legal thing
11 Affixed one's
John Hancock
12 San�,CA
13 Make a grant
18 Bowling alley
button
22 Compliant
25 Australian island
27 Bikini, for
example
28 Sch. subj.
29 Horse
31 On the up and
up
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34 Bar legally
37 Classical dancer
38 Bread spread
39 Bridge position
42 Pie mode
47 Circuit courts of
yore
49 Subleases
50 Refrigerant
52 Golf hazards
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54 � Lucy
56 Flavor
59 Indians
60 Courage
62 Ireland
63 Car damage
65 Earth
67 Unused
STEV1 HAGER EDITOR HIGH TIMES MAGAZINE VS. CURTIS SUWA THE GUARDIAN ANGEIS
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TUESDAY APRIL 22,1997,8PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE
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"S





r
7 Thursday. April 10. 1997
lifestvk
The East Carolinian
CDreviews Campus welcomes Julian Bream
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER

Fluf
Waikiki
Matthew Sweet
Blue Sky on Mars
.
�,
i
$
JOHN DAVIS
STAFF WHITER
Honestlv, sometimes I just don't
know whv I even try. I put Fluf in
again at three in the morning, just to
see if I could somehow reach a level ot
transcendence that would empower
me to understand the record and,
well, I didn't transcend anything. It's
not that that Fluf stinks; they know
how to play guitars. It's not that they
need a few years to grow into their
potential; this is their fourth album.
Perhaps it's because they have "way
cool" printed on the cover of Waikitt.
That's it - it was a jinx. The gods of
alterna-sludge have cursed them to
playing the same old tired crap that
has been oozing out of Seattle's pos-
terior ever since Kurt (God rest his
soul) pulled the trigger.
Only they're not from Seattle;
they're from California, and they
weren't (I don't think) trying to copy
Seattle at all. Perhaps this is really
post-glam drainage that has floated its
way down the sewer of heavy metal to
MCA Records. Maybe they're not
really a band after all. Maybe this is
God's way of saying "OK boys, grunge
is dead. Here's the corpse. Timcto
move on now. The end is at hand
That's it - rock n' roll really is the
devil's music, and this album proves
it. How else could something manage
to sound like hell?
So anyway, I have to review this
album, which means 1 have to listen
to it and give it a fair chance. So I did
that. I'm sitting in my bedroom, lis-
tening to the first track ("Skip Beat")
and suddenly; in the middle of the
song, I have to get up and do some-
thing, which makes me bump the CD
player, which makes the CD skip.
It was a pretty rough bump. The
CD skips to the middle of track two
("Pushin Back Days"), and I realize
how very similar the two songs sound,
almost as if they were identical. I lis-
ten for a moment and then skip back
to track one, noticing that the tempo
does change slightly. But other than
that, the songs do sound the same. So,
forgetting my errand, I decide to
experiment. 1 grab the remote and
proceeded to randomly select songs,
scanning to the middle of songs at
times, and I discover that, for the
most part, all of the songs sound alike.
Now, I can almost forgive a band
like the Spin Doctors, who had one
good idea and managed to make three
albums out of it, or Hootie, who had
several ideas, only they were all bad.
Bm Fluf seems to be one of those
bands that has no ideas which they
repeat throughout their entire album.
This is an unforgivable sin, espe-
cially when the songs have such inter-
esting titles (track 12 is called
"Batwing"). Oh, if only the songs
were interesting. But alas, they are
not. No indeed, they are the spew
which proceedeth from the mouth of
a greatly irritable goat, which
sneezeth upon our dinner and makcth
us angry and anxious.
So, I shall arise as a knight who
stands for all that is true, and I shall
take up my holy sword. Power
Macintosh, which 1 drew from the
Apple and I shall slay this terrible goat
and his mucous shall no longer plague
my people.
Jay MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR

SEE FlUF. PAGE 8
Before 1 begin, let me say that I am a
huge Matthew Sweet fan. I've seen
him live quite a number of times
(always a pleasure), and his last three
albums (Girlfriend, Altered Beast and
100 Fun) arc still in constant rotation
on my CD player. .
Therefore, it was with great antici-
pation that I awaited the release of Blue
Sty on Mars. I bought it the day it came
out and rushed home to spend an hour
or so immersing myself in what I was
sure would be another knockout
album.
Boy was I disappointed.
I couldn't understand why. I could-
n't decide what was so different about
this album. I decided to give it a few
more listens and try to get a lock on the
direction that Sweet was taking with
this particular recording After repeated
listenings, I did strike upon a couple of
things that seemed to be a part of what
turned me off to the distinctively odd
soundscape found on Blue Sty on Mars.
First of all, the album clocks in at
just under 37 minutes, a far cry from
the longer, richer aural tapestries that
Sweet had crafted before. Secondly,
Sweet's longtime collaborators, Richard
Lloyd and Robert Quine, with whom
Sweet recorded those three albums I
like so much, are both missing here.
Where they went, I don't know, but
they are sorely missed and needed.
� It seems that, with their absence.
Sweet has returned to making sugary
sweet pop fluff like that found on his
first two albums. Inside and Earth, both
of which were missteps m Sweet's
career.
Also. Sweet has given producer
Brendan O'Brien (who has worked with
such acts as Pearl Jam, Stone Temple
Pilots and Neil Young) a new place by
his side. O'Brien has a presence on ten
out of the 12 tracks on this album, play-
ing everything from keyboards to guitar
to rneltocron to drums. I truly can't tell
if O'Brien hurts or helps Sweet, but he
can't make up for the absence of Lloyd
and Ouine.
Sweet's songs have always been
about relationships, and here is no dif-
ferent. Sweet is normally a master of
the leve song. Even on this album he
has squeezed in some good tracks, like
the quietrv beautiful "Until You Break"
and the fuzz and strings of "Into Your
Drug
Yet most of what is meant to be
meaningful on Blue Sty on Mars comes
off as doey-eyed .ind stiff. For example,
on "Behind the Smile Sweet sings, "I
haven't been a good friend For a long,
long time 1 haven't been a good friend
While you've been mine Now am I
by vour side Or standing in your way?
'Cause if this is a sign 1 don't know
what it's s'posed to mean I don't
know what it means either, pal.
I'm lost and confused. I've seen
some critics herald this alburn as the
best Sweet's done since Girlfriend. Yet,
to me it is a step backward.
While some believe that Sweet has
gained the confidence to move into
unchartered territory, "to go where no
man has gone before" (which fits with
his Mars theme), I say that Sweet has
taken that dreaded wrong turn at
Albuquerque.
1 don't know what the future will
bring for Sweet, but I hope it's better
than this.
Renowned guitar and lute master
Julian Bream performs tonight in
Wright Auditorium as part of the S.
Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts
Series.
This year marks the 50th anniver-
sary of Bream's first professional pub-
lic performance in his native England.
Since that time, his guitar and lute
skills have won him considerable
international acclaim. Bream has
received six Grammy s and twice has
won the Edison Award for "Record of
the Year
He first toured the United States
in 1957. In the years that have fol-
lowed, he has made more than 40
tours of North America.
Bream bridges the gap between
the past and present in music by
using both the lute and guitar in his
performances. His celebrated lute
skills, in fact, have led to a revival of
that instrument.
After a Bream performance at the
Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena,
the Los Angles Tones raved about
Bream, reporting that he played so
well "that it does not seem possible
that anything more could possibly be
done with either the lute or the gui-
tar
Bream recorded more than 30
records for RCA before signing with
EMI. His recent albums include
Rodrigo's To the Edge of the Dream and
Noaare, featuring 20th-century guitar
music.
In 1986, Bream traced the history
of the Spanish guitar with the four-
part video cassette series Gmtarra!
Composers Benjamin Britten,
Wiliiam Walton, Hans Werner Henze,
t Peter Fricker, Michael Tippett and
Richard Rodney Bennett have all
composed works exclusively tor
Bream.
His skills have also earned him
royal recognition as he was made a
Commander of the British Empire in
1985 through his inclusion on the
Queen's Birthday Honors List.
Bream's appearance in Greenville
is made all the more impressive by
some of the venues where Bream has
previously performed: Washington's
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, New
York's Avery Fisher Hall and St. Paul's
Ordwav Center.
Don't miss your opportunity to
catch this musical legend.
The event is slated to begin at 8
p.m. Advance tickets for the show arc
$20 for the general public, $16 for
ECU faculty and staff and $10 for
ECU students and youths. All tickets
will be $20 at the door.
For more information or for tickets
to tonight's performance, call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788 or
toll free at 1-800-ECU ARTS. For
deafspeech impaired access, call 328-
4736. The Central Ticket Office is
open Monday through Friday, 8:30
a.m. to 6 p.m.
Join guitarist and lute player Julian Bream as he celebrates 50 years of performing, for
the public. He will perform in Wright Auditorium tonight at 8 p.m.
PHOTO COURTESY OF S. RUD01PH AIEXAH0ER PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
Notes from the
Fuel for addiction found on interne
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
I'm an addict. . . .
There, I've said it. They say that admitting it is
the first step towards curing yourself. My only prob-
lem is that I don't wanttobecured. I love my addic-
tion. I thrive on and obsess over it in ways that my
wife believes are truly unhealthy for our life togeth-
er and potentially damaging to my psyche.
No, it's not drugs. It's not smoking. It's not even
caffeine (although I do have that addiction ad infini-
tum). Unfortunately, it's much, much more pathet-
ic than those addictions.
OK, 1 can tell you, you're a friend. Come closer,
so I can whisper it. I don't want it to get around, you
know.
You sec, I'm addicted to old movies.
Alright, quit it. It's not that funny. Enough with
the laughing, already Yes, I know I'm a sad case.
I watch American Movie Classics (AMC) and
Turner Classic Movies (TCM) until my eyes
bleed. Give me a western to watch, especially
one with Randolph Scott or Joel McCrea, and
I'm hooked. Put on a Gene Kelly movie, any
Gene Kelly movie, and I won't move from my
seat. Humphrey Bogart, Ava Gardner, William
Powell, Ingrid Bergman - these arc my fnends.
But it's not just old movies that I crave
night and day. No, 1 have raHcn much deeper
than that. I'm also a fiend about letterboxing
(you know, those black bars and the top and
bottom of the screen on some movies).
Some people find letterboxing annoying,
but as a film fanatic, 1 find watching movies in
letterbox to be the only way to watch.
Letterboxing retains the original aspect ratio
of the film, so that the audience sees it the
way that the filmmakers intended. Cropping a
film for TV (making it "Pan & Scan") is like tak-
ing a rectangular painting and chopping off jhe
sides so that it will fit into a square frame. Ips
painful to watch. But enough about that.
Here's the true extent of my sickness. I
Rod Steirjar and Omar Sharif star in the letterboxed version of
Doctor Zhivago at 8 p.m. tonight on Turner Classic Movies.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES
SEE ADDICTION PAGE 8
Friends of Ginsberg gather for farewell
��(gj s
nun KwfWf
Can't mm hum alonj
0�fJO
T�pe it from a tritito"
Buy it Used
PnFuHPric
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE
The friends of poet Allen Ginsberg
gathered Monday formemorial ser-
vices for the man who was one of the
defining voices of the Beat
Generation.
Poet Gregory Corso, novelist Kurt
Vonnegut, Jr punk rocker Patti Smith
and ex-Velvet Undergroundcr Lou
Reed attended Ginsberg's memorial
at the Shambhala Meditation Center.
Ginsberg, On the Road author Jack
Kerouac and Noted Lunch writer
William S. Burroughs emerged as the
leading figures of the literary Beat
movement that came out of the 1950s
underground. They drew on bebop
jazz, heroin, Eastern mysticism and
sexual liberation for inspiration.
The poet's most famous work,
"Howl was published in 1956, serv-
ing as the voice of the Beat genera-
tion.
The poem's drug-induced verse.
which includes the famous line UI saw
the best minds of my generation
destroyed by madness was labeled
obscene for its street language and
homosexual overtones.
It withstood several legal chal-
lenges against publication, and was
ultimately vindicated by a U.S.
Supreme Court ruling. Bob Dylan has
called Ginsberg "the greatest influ-
ence on the American poetic voice
since Whitman
Lou Reed, speaking at the memor-
ial service, said that without Ginsberg
there would have been no rock group
called the Velvet Underground, and
recalled the poet banging a gong and
ringing bells as the cult '60s group
played its epic "Heroin
Ginsberg was bom June 3, 1926, in
Newark, N.J. He graduated in 1948
from Columbia University in New
York, where he met Kerouac and
Burroughs.
Ginsberg said-he experienced a
series of mystical visions in his early
20s while reading William Blake and
underwent psychoanalysis, followed
by an eight-month stay in a
Rockland, N.Y, State Hospital.
In the '60s and '70s, he turned
his interests to anti-war politics,
and traveled widely in the '80s.
During the summers, he taught at
the Naropa Institute in Boulder,
Colo.
Ginsberg spent the lasr decade
of his life writing and teaching at
the City University of New York's
Brooklyn College.
Ginsberg's doctor had
announced Thursday the poet was
suffering from terminal liver cancer,
and gave him four months to a year
to live. But Ginsberg's health took a
turn for the worse on Friday when
doctors said he suffered a stroke or
another complication.
Ginsberg, who suffered from a
long-running battle against hepati-
tis C and cirrhosis of the liver, is
said to have worksd nearly to the
end, writing his last poem on
Wednesday.
Late, great American poet Allen Ginsberg
�����'�r
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qriO jrtiSPW oenoi
. , NJWW-0
trno'ii ip'iffi )i(Ajiy
JJ0Sl
Jdid-m- 616)
Irie FM Presents:
�Saturday April 12th at the Attic 6:00p.m2:00a.m.
K&&Roily Gray and Sunfire ��QS.
with c
Razor Posse-Reggae from Richmond, Va
Mickey Mills and Steel,
Kimbute-African Reggae, from Queens, ny,
Jah Daniel in the Lion Den
�The Attic 209 E Fifth St, Greenville, NC
�Tickets $6.00 Advance $7.00 at the door
�For more info, call 752-7303
Brown & Brown
vi i ouir. S VI I AW
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123 W.3"St.
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�Free Consultation
752-0952





I
8 Thursday, April 10, 1997
Addiction
continued from page 7
tape everv single letterboxed movie
that AMC and TCM show. Every.
Single. One. (I'm not kidding.) And
trying to find out when AMC and
TCM were going to be showing let-
terboxed movies used to be a right-
eous pain in the butt.
But no longer. Easily accessible on
the internet are the AMC
(http:www.amctv.comamchome.
html) and TCM (http: www.turn-
er.comtcmtcmhome.shtml) Web
pages. They not only give full calen-
dars of upcoming movies (including
which ones are letterboxed), they also
showcase the various special film col-
lections that the channels focus on
each month.
But while I continued searching
through the Web, I came across some-
thing even better than these two
finds. A guy named Steve Martin (not
that Steve Martin) apparently has the
same passion as me. He also has a lot
more time on his hands. He has creat-
ed the Widescreen Movie Center home-
page which gives all kinds of interest-
ing data on every movie that has ever
been released in letterbox.
But better than that, one section
of this excellent site is devoted to let-
terboxed movies on TV (http:
www.cheezmo.comlbx.html). I here
you can simplv enter the cable mm it-
channels that you receive and the
time .one that you're in. and the site
vvill generate a schedule of all the
times that letterboxed movies that
will be showing on those channels for
the month. I'm in heaven.
My wife may hate me, my friends
may be wondering where I m, but
my addiction keeps me very happy.
So, the next time you can't find a
video to rent and none of the crappy
movies at our local theaters interest
you, do like I do and turn on an old
movie. You're paving for the cable, use
it.
Me. I'm setting my VCR to record
the letterbox version of the classic
love story Doctor Ziioagp tonight at 8
p.m. on TCM. If you do the same, be
careful to set the end time at 11:30
p.m.
Although the film is exactly three
hours long, TCM plays the opening
and closing music and has an inter-
mission for the film, just like the the-
aters did when the movie was first
released.
I know. I'm sick. 1 need help. Ain t
it great?
I i i -style
The East Carolinian
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And I shall look unto heaven and I
shall pray this prayer: "O God. who
sendeth us music from the heavens
above, consider now your servants,
who are slaves to the terrible and evil
overlord known as Record Industry.
Free us from our bondage and destroy
this evil beast which hath many
heads and calls itself by many names.
Defeat also its wicked vassals Radio
and MTV and draw us into thy gtace
whereby we shall rejoice in the lis-
tening of much good music and rhe
singing of mighty songs. Or, if thy
mercy only extendeth so far, if we
must pay for our sins, then please
send us another, more bearable
penance. 1 will even listen to
wrath and remove this hotr.ble
album from my listening.
This review is dedicatedto the
memory of Grunge Rock, 1990-199Z.
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T
9 Thuridiy, April 10, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
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PRESENTED IY THE ECU STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 328-6004 OR 1 800 ECU-ARTS
OR VISIT OUR HOME PAGE AT: www.(ij.ecu.eduStudent UnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html.
April
10 Thursday
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series: Julian Bream at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Reception for
Friends of the S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series will be held at
the home of Chancellor and Mrs.
Eakin prior to the performance.
One Fine Day at Hendrix Theatre.
Mclanie Sparks at the Lake Boone
Country Club in Raleigh.
Joe Williams at the Cave in Chapel
Hill.
Tristan Psionic at the Lizard &
Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Raleigh.
Scalliwag at the Cave in Chapel
Hill.
Danielle Howie & the Tantrums
with John Gilicspie and Block at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
The V Rays with Cravin' Dogs at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Bob Mould (solo acoustic) with
Amy Rigby at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Unsane with Kiss it Goodbye and
Sweet Diesel at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
14 Monday
12 Saturday
Kutt Phatt with Slugnut at
Peasants Cafe.
The Bad Dog Blues Band at the
Cave in Chapel Hill.
Lord Hill at the Lizard & Snake
Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Knocked Down Smilin' with
Hipbone and John Thursday at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
University Chorale, Janna
Brendell, conductor, and Chamber
Singers, Rhonda Fleming, conductor,
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Bill Weston III at the Cave in
Chapel Hill.
Deacon Brady with Underwater at
the Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel
Hill.
Roger Manning with Mind Sirens
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
15 Tuesday
13 Sunday
11 Friday
Early Music Ensemble, Thomas
Huener, director, at 8 p.m. in Our
Redeemer Lutheran Church,
Greenville.
The Bivans Brothers at Subs Plus
in Wilson.
Melanie Sparks at the Cave in
Guest Recital: Paul Katz, cello,
from Rice University, with faculty
member Fritz Gcarhart, violin, and
Kelly Mikkelsen, cello, at 8 p.m. in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Lightnin' Wells at the Cave in
Chapel Hill.
30-Amp Fuse with Manos at the
Lizard & Snake Caf6 in Chapel Hill.
The Lily Bandits at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
NC Songwriters Alliance with spe-
cial guest Pat O' Connell at the Cave
in Chapel Hill.
US Bombs with 30 Ft. Tall at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapei Hill.
Richmond Fontaine with The
Gladhands at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill.
Son Volt with Richard Buckner at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro. Also on Wed.
16 Wednesday
The Outhouse Poets at the Cave
in Chapel Hill.
"Food Not Bombs" Benefit
Concert with Hellbender and
Smearcase at the Lizard & Snake
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V
Thursday. April 10. 1997
The 14th Annual
Great Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pig-Out Party
The weekend is a great weekend for activities and
to watch the ECU football team in their annual
spring scrimmage. Below is the list of events for the
weekend. . you �h rUh Ut oM
� c�n'fc hie '
��pjjs
Thursday, April 10
7 p.m.
Golf Classic Social & Auction
Friday, April 11
Pig-Out Golf Classic sponsored by United States Cellular at
Brook Valley
Country Club $2 million Hole-In-One Shootout at Bradford
Creek Golf Club
6 p.m. Carnival opens, rides for all ages
Public invited to walk stadium "midway"
7:30 p.m. Pig-Out Awards Dinner
Live radio shows
7:30-11:30 p.m. Breeze Band "Live Show"
8:30 p.m. Parade of Pigs
9 p.m. Fireworks - sponsored by Toyota
10 p.m. Pig Cookin' Contest begins
11:45 p.m. Activities area closes
Saturday, April 12
7-9 a.m. Judging of pigs
9 a.m.PSC Phosphate Breakfast of 3
Champions 1
9 a.m5 p.m.Greenville Home & Garden 9
Show ($3 for adults, 12 & under free) j
1 10 a.m.Craft ShowSports card show
Carnival- children and adult rides
Military EquipmentVehicle display
1 10:30 a.m.Concessions open j
Barbecue plates served
until sold out ($3.50 advance, j
$5 event day) 1
Jr. Pure Gold Dance Team
1 10:30 a.m6 p.m.$2 million Hole-In-One Shootout at
Bradford Creek Country Club
1 11 a.m.Pig Cookin' Contest winners announced
1 11:30 a.m.Networks "Showtime" Ball
Handling Team
1 11:36 a.m1:15 p.m.ECU Student-Athletes &
Coaches sign autographs
1 noonBangert Elementary Line Dancing Group
Dunkin' Booth
Lady Pk ate soccer s,NC
VTeSBryan
1 12:30 p.m.Ben D. Quinn Elementary
Jump Roping Group
I 12:30-1 p.m.ECU Cheerleaders & Mascot sign
autographs at Toyota Tent
4 1 p.m.Funny Bones Kid ClubCheers
Cheerleading Group
ECU Softball vs. Liberty (DH)
1 2 pm.ECU faasebal vs. George Mason (DH)
I 2:20 p.m.PSN Airtime for Purple
Gold Spring Scrimmage
H 2:30 p.m.Annual Spring Scrimmage kkkoff ($150
advance, $3 at gate)
I 3:30-6 p.m.The Entertainers "Live Show"
1 4:40 p.m.Shag Exhibitions & Lessons
I Sunday, April 131
"M noon-5 p.m.Greenville Home & garden Show ($3
2 p.m.
adults, 12 & under free)
Carnival and Concessions open
$2 million Hoie-In-One Shootout
ECU basebaf vs. Gearge Mason
orts
The East Carolinian
utstanding male athlete
award given to Miller
TRACY LAUBACH
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's 1997 Outstanding Male
Athlete is about as competitive as they
come. Kevin Miller does not like to
play sports for fun; rather, he plays for
the competition.
"If you're not gonna play to win,
there's no use playing at all Miller
said.
Miller began his college career at
UNC Chapel Hill, a university that
offered him plenty of academic but no
athletic opportunities. Eager to play
golf at the collegiate level, he trans-
ferred to ECU in the Spring of 1995,
thus making what he believes to be
"the best decision of his life
"I wanted to play for a school
where 1 could really contribute to the
team Miller said.
A juniot from Erwin, N.C Miller
said that playing golf at this level, hav-
ing academic success and being
awarded for it is like a dream come
true.
"A lot of people don't realize how
For more information call
1-800-DIAL ECU or 328-4500
Barbecue plate and scrimmage tickets
on sale now
No admission charge for band shows
TRMAtime
Name the national league team with the most
road wins last season?
much time athletes put in Miller
said. "Sometimes it's hard to juggle all
of the things I need to do
rbr that reason. Miller feels that to
recognize only two athletes as recipi-
ents for the outstanding athlete award
is unfair. He wishes that all of ECU's
athletes could get the recognition
they deserve.
"I am proud that I am receiving
this award, and I am glad to have been
chosen when so many talented ath-
letes were candidates, but is almost
seems unfair to single out two athletes
because everyone has to work hard to
do well and stay in school Miller
said.
Head Coach Kevin Williams says
this athlete is gifted on and off the
course.
"He is the heart and soul of this
team Williams raid. "As a co-captain
he has been a tremendous leader. With
the young team his leadership has
been instrumental not just on the
course but in the classroom
Miller is hooked on golf because it
is a sport where there is always room
for improvement, no matter how
experienced one is. Golf often draws
the most competitive of all people
because achieving perfection is nearly
impossible.
As the captain of this year's team.
Miller's most memorable experiences
are of the long road trips and hanging
out with the other guys on the team.
As with most of ECU's athletic pro-
grams, one of the joys of being on the
team comes from the strong friend-
ships that are made among team-
mates.
Miller said that he has been
inspired mostly by his father, who is
seen by many as a "workaholic
"I always see my dad working so
hard to keep my brother and I in
school. That inspires me to work
hard Miller said.
Miller is focusing on playing more
consistently and on maintaining a low
average. His long term goal is to even-
tually make it to the NCAA
Championships, but for the near
future, he and his teammates are con-
centrating on the CAA
Championships. The tournament will
be held next weekend at the Lanetrec
Countrv Club in Goldsboro.
Kevin Miller attempts to sink a putt
during the Bradford Creek tourna-
ment. Millar is this years outstanding
male athlete of the year at ECU.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SIO
Players prepare for
PurpleGold game
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
With spring football winding down, the
Pirates will put an exclamation point on
the last practice with the PurpleGold
scrimmage.
Oh Saturday the Pirates will use
their last practice day to show their
progress to fans. For spring ball, teams
get 15 days of practice and this will be
it for the Pirates until regular season
practice begins in August.
In the past, the game has been more
for the enjoyment of the fans, but this
year's game will see a lot of the starters
getting more action.
Starting quarterback Dan Gonzalez
says this year's game will be taken more
seriously by the players than past
PurpleGold scrimmages.
"In the past it's been more ofa thing
for the fans, but seeing how our team
needs experience and needs work,
we're going to take Saturday as serious-
ly as we can and we're going to get in
there Gonzalez said. "It's going to be
a real deal scrimmage
One area that will sec a lot of time is
the starting offensive line. The offen-
sive line lost four players to graduation
last season. With only one returning
starter, this has been an area of concern
for Head Coach Steve Logan.
"Our offensive line has really held
everything hostage Logan said. "It's
been slow, but we've made some
progress and we're a little better off
than we were
The lone returning offensive line-
man is center Danny Moore, who says
the guys on the line are making
progress.
"These guvs have made tremendous
strides Moore said. "These young
guys arc getting better and better
evervday If they continue to get better
like they are. we'll be in good shape
come the season
Moore, a junior, is looking to guide
the guys along and help them in any
way possible to learn their assignments
and the offensive schemes.
"I was fortunate to have a group of
guys with me that helped me along
Moore said. "I'm trying to do that for
these guys. I'm trying to step up and be
a leader for them
The players have been told this
year's scrimmage will give the starters
more playing time, and this wiil also
give the offensive line a chance to play
in a scrimmage that's close to a real
game in front of fans before the season
starts in September.
"In years past a lot of the time the
starters have come out after the first
two series Moore said. "Coaches have
told us this year, starters are going to
play the whole time like it's supposed
to be played. It's going to give these
guys (offensive line) a chance to get a
feel for what the game's really like
Kkkoff is set for 2:30 p.m. in
Dowdy-Rcklen. Tickets can be pur-
chased for $1.50 in advance and $3 at
the gate.
Stadium expansion continues
in preparation for home opener
-
The new addition to Dowdy-fickten continues and is only eight working days behind
schedule, but on schedule for the first game of the season in September.
PHOTO BY AMANDA ROSS
sum ppoj 9p iW pq stapoj (8aq i&S fl
MIKE Daniska
SENIOR WRITER
ECU will present the newly renovated
Dowdy-Ficklen stadium to the football
world next Fall in their opener against
perennial ACC cellar dweller, Wake
forest. A new upper deck on the north
side will add an additional 8,000 seats
and expand the capacity to 43,000. The
main idea behind the upper deck is
ECU's new conference affiliation and
to bring better teams to Greenville.
"The new upper deck will be self
contained Project Manager Joe
Obusek said. "It will have two ramps
and two staircases, plus an elevator. It
will also have a concourse level that will
be 80 feet off of the ground, with its
own bathrooms
Student seating will be split
between the lower level and upper
level, which has raised concern that the
students are being forgotten.
"Good seats wiil not be taken away
from students assistant athletic direc-
tor Henry VanSant said. "We want
them out there
The upper deck is phase one of a
four phase plan. The next step will be
to build club level seating between the
lower and upper decks. Phase three
will include building an upper deck on
the south side as well as a new press
box. The last phase will be to close in
the west end zone with seating. Once
all of this has been accomplished,
Ficklen will seat 53,000-54,000 and be
one of the premier stadiums in the
southeast.
SEE STA0IU PAGE II
This weekend you
can help raise
money for the
Pirate Club and
have fiin in the
process. This
Saturday from 12:00
to 12:20 you will get
your chance to
dunk Amanda, the
sports editor, at the
dunking booth. She
challenges all of you
to come out and
test your ami.
Irates get back on
winning track
The ECU Ultimate team takes time out for a group pose. The Irates have recorded two
consecutive tournament wins.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ULTIMATE TEAM
ANTHONY STANFILL
STAFF WRITER
After poor play at earlier tournaments
in Gainsville, Fla. and Wilmington, the
ECU men's ultimate frisbee team got
back on track. The Irates came back, in
their winning tradition, with two con-
secutive tournament wins and an over-
all record of 18-2.
The weekend of March 22-23 the
Irates traveled to Atlanta, Ga. to play in
"Terminus" along with 19 other col-
lege teams. Coming off their first lost,
at the hands of UGA just the weekend
before at College Easterns, the Irates
had plenty to prove. The Irates
entered Terminus with a 9-1 record
and a number five national ranking,
determined to do well because the
number three ranked University of
Wisconsin was also in the tournament.
ECU cruised through their first day
of play with wins over Williams College
(Mass.) 15-2, Rutgers University 15-6
and Brown University 13-10. Despite
missing two kev players the next day,
ECU dumped Tufts University
(Mass.) 15-6 and FSU 15-5 en route to
the finals. In the other semi-finals
NCSU upset the University of
Wisconsin 15-13, matching the Pack
against the Pirates. The Irates were too
much for the Pack, as they led
throughout, going on to a 17-11 victory
and an overall tournament win.
The Irates' last tournament was on
the 29th and 30th of March, in
Clemson, where they participated in a
35 team "open" tourney (meaning
club as well as college teams were in
attendance). The Irates picked up
right where they left off in Atlanta,
beating Vanderbilt 15-5 and spanking
Virginia Tech 15-2 in their first two
matches.
The Irates' next opponent was
Carleton College (Minn.), last year's
national champion runner-up.
Carleton had never beaten ECU
before, but this time would be differ-
ent. Carleton won 15-12, due to ECU's
inability to solve Carleton's trap zone.
With their backs against the wall and
facing elimination, the Irates played
excellent on Sunday.
The first team they would play was
Columbia, S.C a club team and a tour-
nament favorite. Through inspired
play, the Irates won 15-12, advancing
to the semi-finals against University of
Wisconsin (the team they hoped to
face in .Atlanta). Wisconsin came out
with a quick 4-1 lead, before the Irates
took over in the second half with their
defense, eventually winning 15-12.
In the finals ECU faced a
collegeclub combination team from
Wilmington. ECU was in superior
shape, as they literally "outran" the
opposition on their way to a 15-7 victo-
ry. Not only was this the Irates' second
straight tournament win, it was their
first ever "open" tournament win.
The Irates strong piay is centered
around three players who are in their
fourth year of play. Team Captains are
Sean Howe, Riller Reeves and Liam
SEE UXTmttTE. PAGE 11





)
11 Thursday. April 10, 1997
sf i()i
The East CaroliMM
SS
'ash & Secured Bonds
Statewide rS
fr "Call Collect"
BRIAN MOODY
OWNER
BONDSMAN
(919)856-1221
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
f 1-800-263-4719
Stadium
continued from page 10
"This will he a great help to our
football team VanSant said. "It will
give us seating that v ill he adequate
and a structure that will be aestheti-
cally pleasing
Plans for the athletic complex also
include a new parking lot.
"This stadium will be one of the
monumental structures in eastern
North Carolina VanSant said. "It
also gives us a chance to host other
things
The construction company in
charge of this task is Davidson, Jones
and Beers, which is not a stranger to
stadiums. The company did work on
the renovation at Kenan Stadium in
Chapel Hill, and is presently closing
an end zone for the University of
Alabama. They are also building a
baseball stadium in Memphis for a
Ftuipsfoy, April W
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
at The Spot For o Free T6oz Fountain Drink
with any purchase NEW! Popcorn Will
Be Available at The Spot for All Showings!
Mfoy, April'11
SilupfViy, April XL
"M MOST DELICIOUS
ROMANTIC COMEDY
OF THE SEASON
Bonnie Churchill,
MATIOHAl HCWS
SYMOIUTf
new AY franchise.
So far, construction on Ficklen has
been hampered a little by the wet
winter. But with warmer weather
here, the process should speed up.
Over 3.000 cubic yards of concrete
have already been poured.
"We are eight working days
behind schedule, but we are on
schedule for the football game
Obusek said. "We had some delays
due to the weather, but now that
spring is here, we are doing pretty
good
Another setback the stadium has
faced was being $i million dollars
over the original $9 million dollar
budget, which seems to happen too
frequently in these types of endeav-
ors. The'school was able to collect the
extra $3 million wirh help from state
representatives who got the governor
to kick in a disctetionary fund.
"Being over budget was a miscal-
culation, an overbid VanSant said.
Hie construction market is very hot
right now
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline of 328-6004
All films start at 800 PM unless otherwise noted
and ore FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No FJackpacksBookbdgs Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
ONE FINCDAY
rwmmMfSB, :&' ;a'A
Ultimate
continued from page 10
Doran. The three lead the team with
their experience and credit the teams
offense and teamwork as their best
aspects.
The Irates' next Tournament is
April 20 and 21 in Wilmington. If the
Irates continue playing well, thev'll
go to Regionals on May 3 and 4. If
they place either first or second at
Regionals. they will go to Nationals
on May 30-June 1, at the University
of California at Iavidson.
Elizabeth Bradner, Tracey Kelley
named recipients of Williams "Spirit
of the East" Award; Amy Horton,
Don Douglas also recognized
ECU swimmer Elizabeth Bradner and women's basketball player Tracey
Kelley have beer named winners of the 1997 Waiter and Marie Williams
"Spirit of the East" Post-Eligibility Scholatship.
Bradner and Kelley will be honored along with the other outstanding
scholar-athletes at the 1997 PCS Phosphate Breakfast of Champions
Saturdav, April 12. The "Spirit of the East" honor is awarded to the ath-
lete(s) who demonstrates outstanding commitment to the "spirit" of
ECU.
Bradner, a senior was co-captain of the Lady Pirate swim team this
past season as ECU captured its third consecutive CM championship.
.An elementary education major, Bradner holds the school tecords in the
100 and 200-yard backstroke events.
Kelley, a senior, was an emotional leader and one of the outstanding
performers on the Lady Pirate basketball team which teached the GW
Tournament championship game this past season. Kelley who is major-
ing in special education, has been a co-captain the past two seasons. She
averaged 9.1 points and 7.9 rebounds this season and was named to the
all-tournament team at the confetence championship.
Two other prestigious honors will be handed out Saturday. Amy
Horton, a freshman women's soccer player is this year's winner of the
Kristi Overton Scholar-Athlete Award. The award recognizes an out-
standing ECU female athlete from the state of North Carolina who has
excelled during her freshman year. Horton is from Raleigh.
Men's basketball playet Don Douglas has been named as he recipient
of the Pat Draughon Post-Graduate Scholarship Award. This award goes
to an ECU football, men's basketball or baseball player on the basis of
dedication, loyalty, persistence and the spirit of the competition on and
off the field. The award is an annuai tribute to former ECU athlete Pat
Draughon who exemplified the traits listed in the selection criteria and
is a loval friend of ECU.
Garry's
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
S16-A - Hwy 264-A Greenville, NC
"FINAL SALE OF THE YEAR
Special Payment Plant Available
April 7-11,1997
(Monday - Friday)
9:00am - 4:00pm
Deposit $25.00
"OfficiallyXicensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
PfiHH A
Student Stores
RTQ1RVED
X, COLLEGE JEWELRY
Q
CD
ffc
Margaret Cole Agsten
Beth Anne Aldrich
Leslie Michelle Aldridge
Ashton Michelle Anderson
Qmnton Yutaka Anderson
Joseph Edward Armstrong. Ill
Jennifer Leigh Aycock
Lisa Mane Baggett
Timothy Allen Baize
Laura Ellen Barbour
Knsty Louise Bare
Casey Kyle Barnes
Amber Nicole Baskin
Lesli Alison Batts
Christen Angela Bavero
Jessica Juanita Bearden
Courtney Leigh Bennett
Jennifer Shannon Bennett
Rana Meredith Berryman
Angela Paige Bess
Timothy Clyde Bivans
Catherine Lee Black
Connie Evans Blake
Alison Laura Boone
Shawna Lee Borsz
Andrew Marriott Bnggs
.lame Colie Britt
Amy Lynn Bryan
Tommie Sueanne Bund)
Miriam Shirley Burdick
1 leather Marie Burgess
Stacev Jean Durkhart
Virginia Louise Burroughs
llollv Lorraine Burton
Lisa Mane Buss
The Officers and Faculty Adviser of
PHI ETA SIGMA
Congratulate the following freshmen on their academic success during their freshman year in college
and wish them continued excellence during their academic careers:
I,aura Sue Carr
Iiuren Ashley Carrier
Amber Wren Cartwright
Mary Catherine Cashion
Corissa Anne Cheek
Brandie Daneylla Cole
Chrissy Michelle Cope
Jonathan Will Cray
Angela Lynn Crumpler
Brooke Lindsay Curtis
Julia Mane D'Alo
Mike Forrest Daniska
Angela Mane Davis
Jill Marie Davis
Mary Ruth Davis
Natalie Ann Davis
Tonya Lynn Dean
Erik Stanley Dickerson
Christy Michelle Dunn
Carne Elizabeth Edmunds
Jessica Enn Edwards
Justin Andrew England
Cynthia I .ynn Eytcheson
Stephanie Nicole Fann
Lisa Chnstine Foertsch
Sara Patncia Fountame
Miranda Chalaine Fowler
Ricky Lane Freeman
Amber Christine Gaudreau
Robert Warren Oautier, HI
Airely Gene Gibson
Marv Yvette Gibson
Ouintin I lamilton Gilfus
Silver Guhnelle Gooderhani
Allvson Michelle Graham
Angela Mane Greco
Shawn Patrice Grubb
Kristal Lea Hardison
Melody Monique Hargrove
Robin Nicole Harkey
Richard Overton Harper, HJ
Barbara Lewis Harrell
Gregory Morgan Harris
Tara Joleen Harrison
Anna Louise Hayes
Blake Eason Hildrcth, ffl
Jason Paul Hill
Lisa Michelle Hill
Caryn Leigh Hines
Phong Thanh Ho
Mary Nicole Holcomb
Ann Diane Horton
Crystal Ann Howard
Joshua Ray Howard
Nicole Mane Hudncll
Emmalee Ingrid Iden
Dana Leigh Ingram
Brandon Christopher Jansen
Mist) Hope Jenkins
Ann Mane Jepson
Jereim Scott Johnson
Shaun Christopher Johnson
Ashley Mane Jones
Rodney Tyree Jones
Mary Allison Joyner
Bahrain Rahmean Kamalbake
Eyuphan Karca
Kathryn Vaughan Keicher
April Dawn Kilpatnck
Laura Leigh King
Michelle Ann Kupp
Heather Jo Lee
Susie Allen Leggett
Paulette Ufayee Lofton
Dana Nicole Long
Jennifer Lynn Love
Brandy Ann Lowe
Melissa Yvonne Lyons
Mimosa Natasha Mallemee
Jeremy Edward Mauget
Robert Evan Mayer
Steven Daniele McFadgen
Sonya Yvette McGill
Bonnie Jeanne McGrath
Amy Melissa Meeker
Kodi Ray Michaux
Kelly Lynn Miller
Tamara Kay Miller
Angela Sue Mitchell
James Robert Mitchell
Christopher Ryan Modlin
Robin Leigh Monroe
Sarah Anne Mousaw
Audrey Lynnette Murphy
Glenn Thomas Nethercutt
Trad) 'Ihuy Nguyen
Gwendolin Natasha Nixon-
Carlos
Jennifer Lynn Noe
James Blakely Norman
Michelle Diane Nomngton
Tremavne Doyle Nunley
Jill Mane Odell
Tina Louise Overbee
John Robert Oviedo
Elizabeth Brook Owens
Melissa Mary Owings
Elizabeth Ann Paine
Eric Marshall Payton
Alison Courtney Perdue
Ginger Leigh Perry
Jennifer Lynn Pincoski
Anthony Reid Pipho
Mary Margaret Porterfield
Theresa Jean Price
Beverly Denise Purifoy
Jennifer Ryan Putman
Jennifer Nicole Putnam
Jonna Joleen Reed
Rebecca Maria Rev
Julie Elaine Roberts
David Samuel Rosenberg
Rachel Ann Royall
Laura Beth Satterfield
Barbara Harris Saunders
Gerald Edward Schultheis
Jessica Michele Scruggs
Pheston Gray Shelton
Melissa Diane Sholar
Apnl Shontrese Simmons
Brad Hamblen Simons
Brandie Melissa Smith
Jennifer Lynn Smith
Matthew rjemjis Smithwick
Carrie Lynn Spraill
Erin Mane Stewart
Kobie Christine Stock
Jennifer Diane Stone
Christopher Erie Sutton
Nancy Joy Sweemer
Jennifer Marie Swift
Ashley Dey Taylor
Mary Margaret Tedrow
Paula Weatherly Tisdale
Kevin Paul Touma
Kevin Rhodes Treadway
Laquella Enise Tyson
Virginia Ann Valentino
Cecelia Renee Valne
Nichole Anne Van Houten
Tad Alan Venn
Jennifer Anne Veronica
Andrew Edward Vincent
Daniel William Vitale
Jaime Erin Waicus
Cindy Ann Walker
Takesha Nikole Wall
Jennifer Suzanne Wallin
Stephanie Suzette Waters
Amy Michelle White
Christy Anne White
Jamie Leigh White
Tara Deonne White
David Andrew Whitman
Lisa Sue Wilder
Fred Lauson Willard
Robert Michael Williams
Crystal Lynn Williamson
Amanda Wizniak
Beth Ann Wolfgang
Wayne Curtis Yount
Evon Lynn Zell
Initiation Ceremony Monday, April 14, 1997, 7 p.m in Jenkins Auditorium





r
'irjwiw0 0
i
12 Thursday. April 10.1997
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-286S
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP! Rent is $200 12 phone and
utilities. Must be laid back. Call Aian
@ 551-3871 Wyndham Court Apart-
ments.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM, 1
12 bath apartment in Tar River from
May-August 1st. Good location, on
ECU bus route, close to pool! Call
830-6993 today! Very affordable!
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE.
Great for summer school students! Lo-
cated on campus. One bedroom apart-
ment, big enough for two, and it's fully
furnished $350 a month. Call 754-
8055. Ask for Natalie.
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washerdryer.
Hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of ail amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY
lst-Aug. 1st one bedroom one bath-
room washerdryer 12 utilities 12
phone free water & cable rent $225.00.
No security deposit 551-3168.
SUMMER SCHOOL SUBLEASE
ROOM with two male students in
three bedroom house. Room has pri-
vate bath. House 2 houses from cam-
pus. Rent $233.33 plus 13 utilities.
Available now must sec. Call Chris @
355-6648
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX WITH
all the comforts of home within walk-
ing distance of campus! washerdryer,
dishwasher, central heatair, deck out-
back, off the street paved parking and
a gardener. Call 830-9502.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also prcteasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
ROOMMATE FOR SUMMER
NEEDED: fully furn. duplex, walk-
ing distance from campus. $265mo.
plus 12 utilities, non-smoking, respon-
sible male or female. Contact Monica
at 752-3407 May - August.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
SUBLEASE 4 BEDROOM
APARTMENT in Players Club,
May-Jury with option to renew lease
for next year. Washer dryer, swimming
pool & workout facilities no deposit re-
quired. We will give up ours! Call
ASAP 353-4495.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
BEGINNING May or June; 6 mo. or
1 yr. lease; 2 br 2 bath, washerdryer
furnished; approx. 10 min. drive to
campus; outside pets ok Ig. fenced in
backyard; $175mo, 12 util 12
phone. For inquiries contact 758-6869
(leave message)
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen,
washerdryer and living room with fire-
place. Beautifully landscaped - three
fenced yards. Convenient to campus
& hospital. $1000mo. dep. 524-
4111.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: RE
SPONSIBLE, female 2 br, 1 12
bath, wd, dishwasher, cable, great lo-
cation, Wedgewood Arms. Rent $230,
12 util. Call 321-6381 leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED-
ED TO share large house across from
campus and two blocks from down-
town. Easy access to the new Rec.
Center. Call 758-1152.
WANTED. NEAT, NON-SMOK-
1NG female roommate. Georgetown
Aprs. Call 758-8720. Will have own
room and pay 13 expenses.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED TO share two bedroom apart-
ment mid-April or May. Across from
hospital. Luxury apartment. $292.50
12 utilities. Call 931-0856.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE nice two bdf duplex in quiet
neighborhood. Close to campus. Rent
$230 a month plus 12 utilities. Please
call 353-3909.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT
AVAILABLE NOW THRU August.
$200month plus 13 utilitiesown
bath. 1 block from campus. Rank 353-
00.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
FALL semester 97. Two bedroom.
12 bath townhouse, free water, cable.
$198month, 12 utilities. Own room,
patio. ECU busline. Call Brian at 328-
8932.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share two bedroom apart-
ment in Wilson Acres. $252.50 per
month plus 12 utilities. Available May
7 through July 31. Great for summer
school! Call Brooks 931-0358.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR May! Located at Eastbrook on
the bus route. Own bedroom with
walk-in closet and bathroom. $190 a
month 12 phone, utilities. Call
Jody at 758-9157. Leave message.
FOR SALE - 1990 BAYLINER.20
ft. long, Force motor 150hp and trailer.
All in very good condition. Call
(919)356-2665 after 6 pm.
LEARN TO PLAY THE BANJO.
If interested, please call Kent at 752-
9159.
MOVING MUST SELL PER-
SONALLY hand crafted queen size
waterbed with liner and heater $150
acoustic power logic 260 amplifier 45
watts rms 125 watts bridged mono
$125.00. Call 321-8148.
SOLOFLEX WEIGHTLIFTING
MACHINE EXCELLENT condi-
tion 510 pounds of weigh tstraps. Mov-
ing, must sell. $350.00 obo 758-8364
leave message.
CUSTOM DESIGN ALUM.
FRAMED mtn. bike new XTR
brakes, pilot & deore LX components.
U-lock, baggy, 33ike car rack. Great
cond. Brought new $890. Selling for
$420. Call 830-9347, ask for Clayton.
sana�
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors & Instructors
(or private coad youth camp located in the
beautiful mountains of western N.C.
Over 25 odivilie including all sports, water
skiing, heated pool, tennii, art, horseback,
go- torn 610 to 811earn $1250 -
1650 plus room, meab, laundry & great fun!
Nofrimoksrs col for brochureapplication
M0-U2-SS39
classifieds
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Are you looking for employment? We
are looking for caring, compassionate
individuals who love children to work
as full and part time teachers at our
corporate child care center located in
RTF. If you are interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
DEPENDABLE NON-SMOK-
ING GRADUATE student to care
for 9 mo. old in my home Mon - Ri.
11:30am - 5:30pm. References and
transportation required. 355-0394.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
SZECHUAN GARDEN NEED
PART time or full time wait staff. No
phone calls. Come after 2:00 pm in
person only 909 South Evans, Green-
ville, NC 27834. (10th & Evans)
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh ck Winston-Salem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Wtnston-Salem,
NC27U3.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686,
SEEKING GOAL-ORIENTED
INDIVIDUAL with strong self-ini-
tiative, communication skills, and is
able to work on their own. Position in-
volves finance, volunteer recruitment,
and coordination of activities at all lev-
els. Training will be provided. Merit
pay based on performance. Competi-
tive starting salary with company auto-
mobile. Bachelors degree required.
Relocation required in eastern North
Carolina. For appointment call Nancy
at 522-1521; 9:00am - 4:00pm.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
WANTED FEMALE STUDENT
TO live in my home starting 897 to
care for my 14 year old daughter. Ill be
gone approx. 3 days a week. Must be
dependable and have own transporta-
tion. I'm 20 minutes outside of Green-
ville. Great job for right person. 946-
8754.
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED THIS
SUMMER in Greenville and sur-
rounding areas (Rocky Mount, Gold-
sboro, Smithficld). Call Ashley at 321-
1214 to set up an interview. Don't de-
lay summer is almost here
K&W CAFETERIA ARE now hir-
ing for position of cashier and checkers.
Please apply between the hours of 2:00
pm and 4:00 pm. M-E For more infor-
mation call 756-7577.
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER
Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission.
Call Jeff Mahoney at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR TA-
HITI? OUR MATERIALS UN-
COVER NUMEROUS OPPOR-
TUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO:
1-800-807-5950 EXT.R53626
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
LOOKING FOR SUMMER JOB?
The ECU Tclefund a hiring students
immediately to contact alumni for the
ECU Annual Rind Drive. $5.00 hour.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, come by Rawl Annex, Room 5,
M-TH between the hours of 2-6pm.
WANTED: STUDENT WITH
child development majorminor (or
similar interest) to act as nanny this
summer for 5 12 year old. Safe driving
record: dependable, own transporta-
tion; non-smoker, swimming skills.
Weekly 8:30-5:30 beginning 527. Sal-
ary $270 a weeksocial security benefit.
Also, need you for some afternoon work
before 527. Potential for pert-time
employment during 1997-98 school
year. Please send a letter sating qual-
ificationsinterest together with phone
no. to "Nanny Post Office Box 8080,
Greenville, NC 27835.
WANTED: FEMALE STUD-
ENT TO live in with disabled fe-
male. No physical duties required.
Free room in nice home, located in
Tucker Estates. Call (919)234-2937
after 7pm on Hies. Wed. or Thurs.
night. Collect.
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN), INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, & GOOD
PAY. FIND OUT HOW TO
START THE APPLICATION
PROCESS NOW! CRUISE EM-
PLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL
800-276-4948 EXT. C53629.
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
Wi Need Ttmbcfiand boot
and � hoc! Good Jean.
FOR USED MEWS SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVL GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD at SILVER � Jewelry Corns � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door ring buzzer.
Make $$
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College studente who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per He & Mileage
Mailfa Rnume:
MCSI
HO. Bat 370
Cove City, NC 28529
fin: (919)637-2125
Near CremriOe, Kinalon, New Bern
Hiring Now!
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crew at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. S5.000 salary plus S1.M0
Mantis. Experience preferred. Call 1
800-477-1001 and ask for Mr. Helfrich.
���ARCHREP0IIT8
LrrptrtLfcmvonrJwiwh.iflLI.S
it.tn rones-msoiufcn
ttfltrClttOj Today MM Ms MC or COO
800-35M222
Or. rush $2 00tO mmmwm
11322 Mate A ftOMtR. LOS AngskS. Ok 90025
TYPING SERVICE - DEPEND-
ABLE, CONFIDENTIAL, fast
turnaround. Low rates you can afford.
Call today for Glenda at 919-527-9133
or E-mail me at GScev22480AOL.com
SAIL, GET BLOWN AWAY 35
minutes from Greenville rent, charter,
lessons. Sunfishes, Windsurfers, big
boats. Lessons, racing. On the Pamli-
co, McCotter's Marina, Washington
975-2174.
CONGRATS TO THE NEW sis-
ters of Ladies Elite: Exclusive, N-Ex-
cess, Under Control, Mood Swing, Lit-
tle Miss, Happy race, Peek-A-Boo,
Sunny Delight, Soft Spoken, Initiator,
Mellow Vibe, Cruise Control, Audacity,
B-Sharp, and Nonchalant.
THE NEW SISTERS OF Ladies
Elite send a very special thank you to
our Diva Big Sister, Nicky Coins. We
love you.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
(W3
CalVCatftOfla'S
We are accepting applications for full and part time
seasonal positions in our Catalog Sales Department.
Duties include taking customer calls, placing orders,
and providing information to customers. Customer
service andor previous telephone sales experience
required. Flexible shifts available. Full time seasonal
positions also available in our Distribution Center.
Duties include loading and unloading trucks, pulling
and packing orders, and general warehouse work.
Priority given to applicants who can work a full time
schedule during May, June, and July. Apply at
Overton's Corporate Center Office, 111 Red Banks
Road, Between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M Monday-
Friday. EOE
The East Carolinian
iirs"rNEoTrdRTuNiTrEs-
FULL-TIME, PART-TIME and
information that can change
your life. Check website
WWW.McKeel.comCertified.
Don't delay.
JOB SEARCHING ON THE in-
ternet: Career Services and Joyncr Li-
brary staff will provide instruction to
students on how to use the internet for
job searching and career information
on Tue. April 15 at 3:00 in Joyncr 104.
Since seating is limited, so please sign
up at Career Services or call 328-6050.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities, soror-
ities & groups. Any campus organiza-
tion can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping S5.00VISA application.
Call 1-800-932-0528 cxt. 65 Qualified
callers receive Free T-Shirt.
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding Thousands
of awards available to all students. Im-
mediate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
CONGRATULATIONS BRIE
ON YOUR lavalicr to Mike. Those
Tau Kappa Epsilon's at UCONN
should be proud having someone like
you wear their Setters' Love, Alpha
Phi.
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: THANK
you guys for yet another great social
last Wednesday night. Evcrytime we
get together we have a blast! Let's
"twist" again soon! Love, the Pi Delta
Sisters and Pledges.
ALPHA XI DELTA, WE hada
great time at our social iast Thursday
night, we can't wait until we do it
again. Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
LAMBDA PLEDGE CLASS OF
Gamma Sip You all are doing a great
job! I'm very proud of all your hard
work and dedication. You are almost
through! Good luck. Love, your
pledge mom
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
WOU LD like to thank everybody that
supported our bikini contest last week,
and special thanks to the judges and
the contestants.
BACKPACKING: SHENAN-
DOAH NATIONAL Park,fc join
us for a day of backpacking in Virginia
on April 25. Be sure to register by 6:00
pm on April 11 in the Student Recrea-
tion Center main office. Sponsored by
the Department of Recreational Serv-
ices.
SOFTBALL HOME RUN DER-
BY: join us for a day of softball at the
softball home run derby on April 16 at
4:00pm. Sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS TU-
TOR TRAINING workshop sched-
uled - (Greenville) - Teach an adult to
READ. Literacy volunteers of Ameri-
ca-Pitt County is holding a tutor train-
ing workshop beginning on April 24, ft
7pm. The workshop consists- of five
training sessions. The sessions will be
held on Monday and Thursday even-
ings. Volunteers will team to teach
functionally illiterate adults how to
read. Call 752-0439 today for more in-
formation or to register for the tutor
training workshop. Workshop dates:
Thursday, April 24, Monday, April 28,
Thursday, May 1, Monday, May 5,
Thursday, May 8.
INTERMEDIATE CLIMBING:
N EW river George, WV: Join us on
April 25 for a fun day of rock climbing
in West Virginia, be sure to register by
6:00 pm on April 15 in the Student Re-
creation Center main office. Spon-
sored by the Department of Recrea-
tional Services.
BEACH VOLLEYBALL ENTRY
DEADLINE: be sure to sign up for
beach volleyball by 5:00 pm on April 10
in the Student Recreation Center
main office. Sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.
FIESTA NIGHT: JOIN us for the
opening of the outdoor pool at the
Student Recreation Center with priz-
es, food, games, and much more at
Fiesta Night on April 10 from 5:00pm
to 7:00pm at the Student Recreation
Center. Sponsored by the Department
of Recreational Services.
2ND ANNUAL FLATLAN-
DER'S FLING climbing competi-
tion: come be apart of the indoor
climbing competition here at the
Student Recreation Center on April
19. Be sure to register by 6:00pm on
April 10 in the Student Recreation
Center main office. Sponsored by the
Dept. of Recreational Services.
COME JOIN US FOR a
Scottish Folk Dance Sat. April 12 from
7pm - Midnight at the Methodist
Student Center 501 E. Fifth St. across
from Garrett. Tickets are $6.00 for
students and $8.00 for nonstudents.
They must be ordered in advance but
may be picked up at the door, lo order
call 758-2030. Dance instructions will
be given.
THE GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics is look-
ing for volunteers to help with the
1997 Spring Games. The Games will
be held at JH Rose High School Stadi-
um, on Thursday, April 17, 1997. An-
yone interested in volunteering should
attend the Special Olympics Volunteer
Orientation. The orientation will be
held at Mcndenhall Student Center in
the Multi-Purposc Room on Monday,
April 14 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm. For
more information call 830-4541.
eastcarolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
eastcarolinian
advertising department staff
Tabi GrahamCampus Sales Rep.
Stephen MoodySales Rep.
Chris DelamereSales Rep.
David PomillaSales Rep.
Jeremy LeaSales Rep.
Keith HerronSales Rep.
Mary PolloKClassified Ad Manager
For Information Regarding Advertising
Please Call
328-2000
mmm


Title
The East Carolinian, April 10, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 10, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1201
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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