The East Carolinian, April 8, 1997







TUESDAY
APRIL 8,1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
New SGA Executives full of ideas
Increasing student involvement
high on agenda
Amanda Austin
STAFF WRITER
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Recent Student Government Association elections have not only brought in a
new group of executives, but an abundant amount of fresh ideas and long antic-
ipated changes to improve ECU.
The foremost issue for SGA is to increase how they impact the students'
lives.
"I would like to restore professionalism and consistency to the SGA by estab-
lishing and implementing a basic system of governance for basic functions such
as cabinet, judicial board and attorney general selection, as well as other pro-
jects said SGA President-Elect Scott Rrbes.
One of the major concerns of the SGA is the lack of involvement from the
student body as a whole.
"The students can exist without the SGA, but the SGA can not exist with-
out the students Forbes said. "I want to establish a working relationship with
the media in general. This will help the students heighten their awareness
because they will know what is going on between the SGA and their student
lives. It will hold me, the executive council and the SGA accountable for our
actions
SGA Treasurer-Elect Lisa Smith is ecstatic about her new position and
determined to increase the awareness of student organizations.
"The main goal is to make organizations aware that they can get funding
Smith said. "To do this we need more information sessions
"We want to concentrate on groups that normally don't know how to get the
proper funding they need and to dispel the rumors that you have to ask for
$ 100,000 to get1,000 Forbes said.
During the past semester only two information sessions were held about stu-
dent organization funding. The new SGA council proposes to
hold more sessions, post flyers around campus and have
announcements nTEC.
"We are also going to try to focus more on minority organiza-
tions Smith said. "We will work closer with them so they feel
like they are getting the attention they deserve
Another issue SGA will take on is the safety and well being of
students.
"I would like to increase the patrols on campus Forbes said.
"Being from the judicial branch (public defender and attorney
general), I am aware of a lot of the attacks on students here on
campus. These attacks are unexplained. I would like to see the
police do more to heighten awareness
The SGA will hold meetings with the campus police to dis-
cuss increasing student patrols as well as installing more blue
lights around campus.
In addition to patrols and blue lights, the SGA wants to put
into effect a program for the victims of crime.
"There is a program that a lot of the administration has been
talking about for some time Forbes said.
"It is a victims awareness program, to where when someone
has a problem on campus, they have been a victim of a crime or
they have been injured from a crime they will have somewhere
to go for immediate help. I want to really get the ball rolling on
this
Among the many improvements the SGA intends to make is
a solid working relationship with The East Carolinian.
"I am not afraid of the press Forbes said. "I respect and
need them so they will report to the students my actions or our actions of the
executive council and SGA and thus hold me accountable to my position as a
trustee in their interests
The situation of limited parking for students on campus is being taken into
consideration. Actions arc being taken by the SGA and Parking and Traffic
Services to find the seemingly unobtainable solution to this problem.
"Jim Midgette with Parking and Traffic has informed me that the immediate
Lecture focuses
on image of
muslim Women
Jacqueline D. Kellum
KIS AND SI I DIKS IS I F.SS 'f. I M.
POPULATIONS ISSUES
In an attempt to clarify what they feel are mis-
conceptions held by the general public, the
Muslim Student Association (MSA) is brining
Sister Ama Shabazz to lecture on the topic
"Progressive Women in Islam
According to Rania Abdel-Rahman, presi-
dent of the MSA, many people have the impres-
sion that Islamic women are oppressed, and that
is not true.
"I think it was that way in the past, way back
in the past, and there are some people who still
believe in it, believe that women arc supposed
to stay home Abdel-Rahmen said. "But it's not
like that anymore. Women are starting to get
out
Abdel-Rahman said massive amounts of
media publicity focusing on the negative treat-
ment of Muslim women may be responsible for
the misunderstanding.
"With all that's been going on in the news in
the past year about women, especially in the
Middle East, everyone thinks that women are
so underneath men, they can't do anything
except stay in the house Abdel-Rahman said.
"So Ama Shabazz is going to clarify those issues
and misconceptions
Shabazz herself converted to Islam in 1976
and is now the associate editor of The Message, a
national Islamic magazine. She teaches writing
and literature at Durham Technical Community
College.
The purpose of this lecture is not only to
address the issue of women in Islam, but also to
heighten awareness of the Muslim presence
here on campus. Abdel-Rahman said one of the
primary purposes of their organization is to edu-
cate about the Islamic religion.
"We want to make people aware that there
are Muslims on campus Abdel-Rahman said.
"Hopefully, we'll get more people aware of it, so
they can come to the meetings and see what it's
all about. MSA's not just for Muslims, it's for
anybody- who's interested.
"I feel that it's important for them to be
aware that there are people like us on campus
Abdel-Rahman said. "This is a diverse campus,
and they should be aware of what the different
kinds of diversities arc
The lecture will be held in Room 244 at
Mendenhall Student Center on Wednesday,
April 9th at 7:30 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to
attend.
TUESDAY
(L-R) Sean McManus, Vice President-Elect; Leslie Ann Pulley, Secretary; Lisa Ann Smith, Treasurer
Scott Forbes, President
situation is going to have to be handled by what they call parking lots, by paving
new parking lots Forbes said. "The parking deck, if we had started digging yes-
terday, according to Jim Midgette, it would take about three years to build. By
the fall they should have almost 800 more parking spaces, according to my meet-
ings with Parking and Traffic. There is also a proposed plan for the addition of
2000 parking spaces by the year 2000
The new SGA Executive Council is working in high gear to demonstrate to
the students the improvements and changes they plan to make for ECU.
lifestyle 7
Previos Lifestyles
Editor rehashes
roots rock
opinion5
We're watching
you, SGA
sports10
Pigskin Pig-out
details inside
the east Carolinian
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INFORMATION EXCHANGE DAY
Senior Ken Laws finds out more about Health Point, one of the companies represented at Information
Exchange Day, from Documentation Specialist, Tammy Carter Benfield. The yearly exchange is an oppor-
tunity for field experts to share ideas with students and show them how to bettt- prepare themselves
for a job after graduation.
PHOTOS BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
The fourth annual Information Exchange Day, sponsored by the ECU Student Chapter of STC and the
Department of English, was held Monday. The first and second floors of the General Classroom Building
were abuzz with over 230 students, adminisrtators, and company representatives who attended the
exchange.
PHOTOS BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
RJ. Reynolds faces civil trial in
smoker's death
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) - Jean Connor
was 15 when she began smoking. She thought
it made her look glamorous and grown up.
More than 30 years later, she learned she had
lung cancer, two months after she quit the
habit.
She sued R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co
accusing the nation's second biggest cigarette
maker of causing her cancer and failing to
inform her of the dangers of smoking.
Connor died in October 1995, but her
estate, acting on behalf of her three children,
pursued her lawsuit, which is set to go to trial
Monday in Jacksonville.
It is the first suit against a tobacco giant
that alleges conspiracy and the first to seek
punitive damages, said Virginia Steiger, legal
assistant to Norwood "Woody" Wilner, the
Jacksonville attorney who represents the
estate and about 500 other smokers with
health claims.
Last August. Winer won a $750,000 judg-
ment against Brown & Williamson Tobacco
Corp. for another smoker who contracted lung
cancer.
Connor's suit claims that when she began
smoking there were no warning labels on
packs of cigarettes and no cancer warning
iabels until 1984. She smoked two to three
packs a day.
"My sister, when she got addicted, did not
make an adult decision. She made a child's
SEE REYNOLDS PAGE 4
i
Therapeutic recreation
majors plan adaptive outing
Angela Koenig
HF. I.THF.N IRONMKN"Ml. ISSUK.S
STAFF WRITER
Six therapeutic recreation majots are taking
people with spinal cord injuries on a camping
trip as their practicum for this semester.
The campers will stay at Goose Creek
National Park outside of Washington the
weekend of Apr 19.
The participants will play adapted games,
cook their own food and go canoeing.
The therapeutic recreation majors must do
a practicum every semester. This year they had
the option of working at the hospital or orga-
nizing this trip.
"The goal of the trip is to have an enjoyable
experience and feel like we're having a good
time said therapeutic recreation major Cara
Larocca.
Iarocca and Sheri Burnett, also a therapeu-
tic recreation major, became involved with
people with spinal cord injuries after working
with an adaptive water-ski program.
"The people there were really great and it
was a great experience Larocca said. "We
thought it would be fun to work with them
again and get to know them better Larocca
said.
This is the second year for the trip, but the
first for the students who are running it.
"We are in charge of raising the money for
the trip and organizing all the activities we will
do while we're there Burnett said.
The trip will provide work experience for
the therapy recreation majors, as well as recre-
ation for the participants.
"Therapy recreation majors work with a lot
of populations spinal cord injuries is just one of
them Larocca said. "We work with getting
them back into the community and to do
things for recreation and leisure so that they
don't have to be dependent on others
The trip is open to students and the public
who have spinal cord injuries.
"Anyone is welcome. Most of the people are
in their twenties and there are some who are
older Larocca said. "So far everyone (partici-
pants) has been very excited about going
The cost for the overnight trip is $5 and the
deadline to register is Friday.
For more information or to register call
Kathy Fletcher with the Independent Living
Program at 514-4806.
FORBES REELS IN A LANDSLIDE CATCH
SGA President-Elect Scott Forbes is pictured here fighting with a king mackeral 20 miles off the coast of
Wrightsville Beach during 1996 fall break. Forbes is also looking forward to the many challenges that he
will face in the coming year.
PHOTO BY BRANDON WAODfll





5
"�
2 Tuesday, April 8. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
across
campuses
N.C. State student charged with pregnant former
girlfriend's murder
The Raleigh Police Department charged NC State student Edwin
Christopher Lawing Wednesday with the murder of his former girlfriend.
LaCoy McQueen.
McQueen was reported missing on May 17, 1996, Raleigh Police Sgt. J.M.
Lynch said. She was last seen at NCSU's Bel! Tower.
McQueen was pregnant at the time of her disappearance, Lynch said.
Last Thursday, McQueen's body was discovered by a construction crew in
Vance County, Lynch said.
Lynch said Lawing was not arrested until Wednesday because there was
still a possibility that McQueen was alive.
"There was speculation that she had gone off to have her baby alone
Lynch said. "We had to prove she was dead
However, Lynch said the RPD were near charging Lawing in McQueen's
alleged murder when McQueen's body was found.
"We were preparing our case to present to a Wake County grand jury, even
though the body had not been found he sa J
Raleigh Police Sgt. Kent Scolar said Lawing has always been the prime
suspect in McQueen's disappearance.
"From the initial statements to when the body was found, he s bo the
main suspect Scolar said.
Lawing was transferred from the Raleigh Police Department to the Wake
County Detention Center at 11:15 Wednesday morning.
Before his arrest, Lawing resided in North Hall.
McQueen was a student at Shaw University in Raleigh.
Random drug tests rejected at UNC-CH
Despite the threat of random drug tests raised In a recent report by the
Chancellor's Substance Abuse Task Force, UNC students are safe from being
accosted in the Pit for urine samples.
Due to constitutional issues of illegal search and seizure, officials said ran-
dom drug testing was not likely to be implemented at UNC-CH any time in
the near future.
"It's certainly not anything that we want to do, or something that is immi-
nent said William Jordan, chairman of the task force and a member of the
Board of Trustees.
"There are issues of constitutional rights, how you would do it, and who
do you test he said.
The rise of substance abuse among teenagers triggered discussion of ran-
dom drug testing of UNC students.
"There are issues of constitutional rights, how you would do it, and who
do you test he said.
The rise of substance abuse among teenagers triggered discussion of ran-
dom drug testing of UNC students
"There is an increasing number of students coming to college with sub-
stance abuse problems Jordan said.
Pi Kappa Phi pledges at NC State investigated for haz-
ing involvement
Eight fraternity pledges are being questioned about their alleged involve-
ment in a hazing incident that took place outside of the Pi Kappa Phi house
on Feb. 11.
The pledges allegedly used Saran Wrap, a popular brand of plastic food
wrap, to bind another fraternity pledge to a tree after he missed a fraternity
house cleanup session, NC State Public Safety Officer Ben Franklin said.
"The subject was saran-wrapped to the tree from his ankles to his neck
Franklin said in a crime report. "He was lifted slightly off the ground where
only the tips of his toes were touching the ground
The victim could not move any part of his body except his head because
of the wrapping. The wrapping also restricted the circulation of the victim's
blood to his legs, Franklin said. The victim's back was against the tree and he
was fanng the road in front of the fraternity house.
The fraternity pledges allegedly placed a number of items under the
Saran Wrap in order to make the victim look like a woman.
"They had placed clear plastic cups on his chest to imitate the breasts of
a woman and they had placed leaves over his crotch area to imitate the pubic
area of a woman Franklin said.
Pi Kappa Phi was already on social probation before the hazing incident
occurred.
The incident is being reviewed by NCSU's Office of Student Conduct.
st ate
New phone cards with scratch-and-win games
become hot sellers
LONGWOOD, N.C. (AP) - Wfeh no lottery to play, some North Carolinians
are trying to cash in on new long-distance telephone cards, with scratch-and-
win games attached.
For $1, customers get two minutes of long-distance calling and the
chance to win up to $50,000.
Brunswick County store owners say customers are buying the cards
almost as quickly as they're placed on the counter.
Reed's, which had a $50,000 winner in January, has been selling about 700
to 800 cards a week and often runs out before a new batch arrives.
The cards have attracted the eye of law enforcement authorities, who
question whether they're legal in a state that forbids gambling.
Treasured Arts Inc an Anderson, S.C phone company, pulled the cards
from convenience store counters for a short time because N.C. Alcohol Law
Enforcement officials gave store owners a hard time.
After the company's lawyer looked into the situation, the company
returned the cards to the stores.
Man working with chemicals injured in blast
CHARLOTTE (AP) - A maintenance worker refinishing a hardwood floor
was severely burned when chemical vapors reached the pilot light on a stove
and caused an explosion.
The man, who apparently was blown through a window, has not been
identified, and his condition is unknown.
A spokesman for the Charlotte Fire Department says the man suffered
third-degree burns, serious lacerations and respiratory trauma. He was taken
to Carolinas Medical Center and later transferred to the bum center at U-
N-C Hospitals.
The man was believed to be in his middle-40s, and was found in the front
yard of the apartment where he worked. Fire department spokesman Rob
Brisley says the man's injuries are similar to a person being blown through a
window.
His partner in the research was Rutgers professor Beverly Whipple, who
in 1982 wrote the book The G-Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About
Human Sexualities
Through experiments with lab rats, the researchers determined that the
brain can receive signals of sexual response through a parhway other than the
spinal cord.
Komisaruk found an alternate pathway through the vagus nerve, which
goes directly from the cervix, through the abdomen and chest cavity, into the
neck and to the brain stem.
The professors then studied 16 women paralyzed by spinal cord injuries,
and found that three of them were able to have orgasms through sexual stim-
ulation.
Bankers Trust to buy brokerage Alex. Brown
NEW YORK (AP) - The Bankers Trust New York Corp. has reportedly
agreed to buy the nation's oldest stock brokerage firm in a deal that shatters
the division between banks and brokers.
The bank will purchase Alex. Brown & Sons, Inc for $1.7 billion in stock,
according to reports today in The New York Times and The (Baltimore)
Sun.
In allowing the deal, federal regulators have rendered virtually meaning-
less a Depression-era law to prevent the merger of banks that lend money
and Wall Street brokers that offer corporate securities to the public.
Congress has been debating the repeal of the 1933 Glass-Steagali Act,
which prohibits banks from underwriting stocks. The law was enacted to
prevent banks from taking fatal risks in the markets.
However, recent court cases and liberal rulings by bank regulators have
let commercial banks perform almost all of the functions of stock brokers.
Rutgers researchers believe they've isolated orgasm-
producing chemical
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) - Two researchers believe they have isolated
a chemical that produces orgasms in women even if they have suffered spinal
cord injuries.
The finding could lead one day to a pill that would give the same sensa-
tion as an orgasm and also might have use in treating pain, said Barry R.
Komisaruk, a professor at Rutgers University.
Many Haitians, disgusted with legislators, electoral
process; don't vote
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) - Seven years ago, nearly everyone who
could vote did. Over the weekend, hardly anyone did - a sign of voters' dis-
gust with lawmakers and lack of faith in the electoral process.
Sunday's parliamentary eiecrions were a referendum on President Rene
Preval's austere economic plan, which is hated by most Haitians but is tied
to tens of millions of dollars in foreign aid. The voting also could clear the
way for former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to return in 2000 elections.
While the electoral council said there were areas with 30 percent and 50
percent turnout, international obseners and reporters who visited hundreds
of polling stations doubted it was much more than 5 percent.
Correction
In Thursday's edition of TEC, a story
reporting an occurrence at BW3's
downtown ran with the headline
"No arrests, no suspects in near
fatal incident Follow-up on the
situation showed that while the vic-
tim's injuries (head lacerations)
were potentially serious, the victim
was not. at the time, listed in critical
condition. Therefore, the headline
was misleading.
Correction
In last Thursday's edition of TEC, the wrong photograph appeared with SGA Vice
President-Elect Sean McManus's name. TEC apologizes for the error and any result-
ing inconvenience to the two parties involved.
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FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Tuesday April 8
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Stop by and see the new
Tracker and Metro
in the MSC Brickyard
Pick Up Passes at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Day of Show
Presented By
The Student Union - Films
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DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
news
Tat East Carolinian
Microsoft to acquire Web TV
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(b� su�� to get yon Sequent Qim dad
to i�ci�v� o jee meat)
H oweay-frteay, 890 ajn.S:0O p.m.
Recipient o ik� (996 Qotoen u4ua�d
757-f7f6 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
LAS VEGAS (AP) - Microsoft
Corp. is betting that its $425 mil-
lion planned purchase of WebTV
Networks Inc whose devices let
people cruise the Internet from
their TV sets, will spur the merging
of personal computers and televi-
sions.
"Through their efforts we
hope to dramatically accelerate the
merger of the Internet and televi-
sion said Microsoft's senior vice
president, Craig Mundie, announc-
ing the deal Sunday at the National
Association of Broadcasters con-
vention, f
Microsoft, which already has a
$5 million stake in the Palo Alto,
Calif company, intends to operate
it as a separate subsidiary, Mundie
said. "You can expect some
Microsoft technologies to show up
in the future of WebTV" he added
in an interview.
Microsoft's announcement
comes as the computer industry
and existing TV set makers race to
define what the next generation of
digital TV sets will look like.
The prize: Si50 billion in
spending needed to replace the
existing 220 million analog TV sets
in the United States.
The computer industry's vision
is essentially a large-screen com-
puter in living rooms that people
use not only to get a crystal-clear
TV picture, but to surf the
Internet and send e-mail as well.
TV set makers have a different
vision: a wide-screen TV with
superior picture and sound quality
but little, if any, computer capabil-
ity.
For the computer industry's
vision to work, broadcasters would
have to transmit programs in a dif-
ferent format than they now use to
display pictures on TV sets. Thus
far, broadcasters have not shown
any signs of doing so.
Microsoft, Intel Corp. and
Compaq Computer Corp which
have jointly developed technical
specifications for digital PC-TVs,
are at the NAB conventiqn trying
to woo broadcasters.
"This is TV central said
Robert Steams, Compaq's senior
vice president. "We're hoping to
open a dialogue with broadcasters
for what we think would be a more
effective model of digital TV"
Microsoft, Intel and Compaq
executives predict that by next
year there will be PC-TVs on the
market, capable of receiving digital
television, and will not be much
more expensive than existing per-
sonal computers.
Phillip Fanner, president of
Harris Corp one of the biggest
makers of broadcasting equipment,
disagreed with the computer
industry's vision. "I think TV is an
entertainment medium and the
TV in the home will continue to be
a separate device he said.
SEE Wft TV. PAGE 4
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Psi Chi collects items for Adopt-A-Sherter project
Throughout April, the East Carolina chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology will be collect-
ing items to benefit their national service project, Adopc-A-shcltec
The Greenville Community Shelter, a local homeless refuge, needs products common to everyday life. Rr exam-
ple, they need: household cleaners, garbage bags, paper products (plate and cups), plastic cutlery hand and body
lotio, air freshener, toilet paper, first aid supplies, copy paper, stamps, diapers, fry tras, sponges and buckets, towels
and washcloths, AA batteries, tissues, and personal care products. However, no food is necessary.
Bright pink boxes are located in Raw! 302 and in the lobby of Scott Hall. Psi Chi encourages all students who wish
to help to place ail donated items in these boxes.
ECU Conference slated to explore children's homes
National and regional authorities on group care for children will participate in a conference at ECU on April 10 and
11. The conference is the inaugural symposium on child and family issues established with a grant from the Duke
Endowment. The annual event will rotate among graduate programs in social work at ECU, UNC-Chapel Hill and
the University of South Carolina.
John Powell, assiciatc professor of social work, said the conference has been designed to increase the knowledge
and impacts of modem group child-care programs.
Speakers and their topics and times include:
Carol Levine, executive director of the AIDS Orphans Project in New York, "Long-Term Group Care for Historical
and Present Day Orphans 1 p.m Thursday, April 10.
James Whit taker, professor of scial work at the University of Washington, Thinking Creatively about Group Care
Resources 2:45 p.m ThursdayApril 10.
John Turner, dean emeritus of the School of Sock) Work at UNC-Chapel Hill, "Our Challenge: Uniting family.
Community, Church, State, and Philanthropic Resources on Behalf of Troubled and Needy Children 10:45 a.m
Friday, April 11.
All sessions will be in Hendrix Theater of Mendenhall Student Center The public is invited. More information
may be obtained from the ECU School of Social Work at 328-1447.
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to Mendenhall Student Center
YOUR CENTER OF AC T I V I T Y 55


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f)tUan "BteaiH
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One of the world's most renowned guitar and lute virtuosos.
A living legend. S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series.
Thursday, April 10 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Advance tickets are $10 atihe Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m. the
night of the event. All tickets are $20 at the door.
:
"YOU'VE 60T TO KICK A LITTLE"
LITTLE TEXAS in concert. Friday, April 25 at 8 p.m. in Williams Arena.
Advance-priced tickets now on sale in the Central Ticket Office.
$15 for ECU studentsfacultystaff and $20 for the general public.
All tickets are $25 at the door.
m
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:
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m
iS
:
COMING SOON
One Fine Day (PG) April 10-12 at 8 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre
Free admission with valid ECU I.D.
Attention Student Leaders
"Putting Your Experience to Work
featuring Dr. Jim Westmoreland, Director of Career Services
Wednesday, April 16 from 5-6 p.m. in Room 244
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Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from
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plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of discounted
bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m. Only $1 per
game (shoe rental included)
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I
4 Tuesday, April 8. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Between the hours of 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 21 and 8
p.m. Monday, March 24, someone entered 328 Flanagan
Building and stole computer equipment, two VCR's, a fax
machine, a camera, a video camera, and a tape recorder.
Anyone with information about this crime or any other crime
should contact the PittGreenville Crime Stoppers at 758-7777
or the ECU Police Department at 328-6787. Rewards are avail-
able for information leading to the arrest of the person(s)
responsible. You do not have to give your name.
WebTV
continued from page 3
Harris is selling equipment chat
will let TV stations broadcast in
digital and an even sharper format
called high definition.
To whet both consumers' and
TV stations' appetite for digital
television, Harris and the Public
Broadcasting Service arc putting
together a "road show" featuring
demonstrations for the public and
technical training for TV station
engineers, farmer said. The first
show will be this fall, and officials
expect to hit 50 major cities over
the next two years, he said.
Joe Flaherty, senior vice presi-
dent of science and technology for
CBS, said TV stations will each
have to spend from $1 million to
$2.5 million for new equipment to
provide digital television, includ-
ing high definition.
"If you don't do it, you'll go out
of business he told TV executives
and engineers.
Last week, the Federal
Communications Commission
cleared the way for broadcasters to
begin offering movie-quality digital
television to the American public.
Most importantly, the action
means that after 2006 the existing
analog system of broadcasting dies.
That means people will either have
to go out and buy new pricey digi-
tal TV sets or converters for exist-
ing analog sets to work.
Because it is more efficient than
existing analog technology, digital
gives broadcasters the ability to
cram more services in their same-
sized slice of the airwaves � for
instance, a pay-per iew sports
channel or stock quotes to laptop
computers.
That is the route Microsoft,
Intel and Compaq are pushing TV
stations to take. "Digital TV has
got to be more than pretty pic-
tures Mundie said.
But stations that provide the
next step up from digital television
- high definition - will not have as
much extra space.
Guiselle s Beauty Care
� Professional hairstyling -t�
Welcomes Patty Dauqherty
formerly of Georges Hair Design's
cut�,wi a0d
Body"
peri8'
alng
T'k
'�
Hi

���
133 Qakmont Dr. �
(across from GraenviHa AVjfptic Club)
756-3713

'�
Correction
In last Thursday's issue of 7F�the below graph that ran on the front page ran with the
lines not matching up. We apologize for any inconvience in reading the graph.
Professor
University of North Carolina
205
25
45
9
250
34
MMMMM
t SfxcuU 76ut& to tiom Sctfifionteru
ttnouqfaa tk Sfy4 Executive (fatHril Skctto&
Brenda WebsterBrad Stroud
Cliff Webster, Sr.Matt Mills
Mr. and Mrs. SprakerDan Santarsiero
Bertha Wilson
Yvonne McQueenJason Day
Mr. and Mrs. KaltenschneeTony Raynor
Gamma Sigma SigmaJennifer Goodman
Taffy BensonJenny Wilson
Kathrine BudrowChrissie Watts
Vince MercuriTara Cerveny
John LynchJohn Kerns
Amy McCoyAmanda Worsham
Kurt LaButtiDave Bigelow
EricLaButtiDoug Smith
Erin StoverCary Cann
Jessica WiegandDavid Garner
Keith KulowieTy Frazier
Chris ParisiChandra Goodson
Brian FerroneKatie Osborne
Mark JacobsonLeigh Voncannon
George BulginJohn Fulghum
. Pat WixtedBrad Fink
Lee PierceRasta
Dino Stanbolitisand to all the students
� � , who believed in changing V.nnyNgo SGA. our voters
Chad King
Melvin Siaki Sincendcf.
0UHU, fane, WUfeiAfa,MtCKeMcf,
Tomorrow!
Wednesday April 9, 1997
3:00-6:00 p.m.
Student Recreational Center Brickyard
See over 35 booths, Eastern Bicycle Freestyle Team,
ECU Cheerleaders, WZMB, Vocal Duo DUALITY,
and Step Show! Win a Mountain Bike,
Rollerblades, golf, movie and Bush Garden passes,
T- shirts and $50 on you declining balance!
theck





r
5 Tuesday, April 8, 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
(
astt!arolinian
BRANDON WADDEI.L EditOt
AMANDA ROSS SowtsEditor
MATT HECK MwrtismjDirector PATRICK IREI.AN Photo Erjitot
MARGl'ERITE BENJAMIN Nws Editor CELESTE WILSON Production M-uor
AMY I. ROVSTER Assistant New Editor CAROLE MEHLE Head Copy Euof
JAY MYERS LilestyleEditor ANDY FARKAS Stall Illustrator
Dale Wili iamson Assistant Liltstyto Editor tHRA215'U!iiLiiLssJl!J.di'L.�-
S��i St KU otbimiiiy wet SB Hit far Cartfron pubhsrm I? 000 am �wf Tu��y ml Hibi n �) MM II �i eiMiw s if
ooinm o( �� Ew d Board Tl� tat Cuotaim rt�w tM I itw �rtro w�im to SO muds. �rtk m� b; edrwl lot decmc, a lnwt�. � E�l
Csraiww rewm it ngM to edit�tfjaci MM loi iwotaatm W Mtm moil be signed letters should be eflmaed to oomoe lAw. die Eut
Ctrakniw PirttaaMns Swhhng ECU. Greem. 2�5W383. For udotmenw :�� 9B 3M 8386
oumcw
; The elections are finally over! The voters have spoken.
� No more sheet banners on the mall, no move flyers being thrown in your face, no more signs
dluttering the landscape, no more political debates and no more broken promises, hopefully.
1 The new Student Government Association officers have been selected. We've watched you
if the past, SGA, and we will continue to watch you.
I We want to make sure you will give us what we were promised: no more SGA Executive Board
tjiition paid from student funds, better parking, more safety patrols, 24-hour visitation in dorms
ayid 24 hour computer labs. These are issues that concern us, the student body, greatly because
tiiey affect us on many levels and on a daily basis. We hope those flyers you shoved in our faces
weren't just lies trying to get us to vote for you. We hope it means some changes are on the way.
j This year, the students of ECU would like to see some action taken and we plan to make sure
�jhis happens. We will be attending more meetings and letting our voices be heard. We plan to
Ijfet you know where we stand, so be prepared to listen. Seek us, your constituents, out to learn
$ow we feel on the issues. Remember who you have to answer to. We, the students, elected you
to be our voice in the government process. Listen to what we have.to say before you speak for
Us. After all, this is our school and we have a say in what goes on too.
' In case you are unaware, approximately 400 more students voted this year than last year. This
one of the biggest increases we have seen in years; perhaps this is because so many students
want to see change. We at TEC are hoping that this means students are finally beginning to care
about what is happening with our government and where our money is being spent. We're glad
to see students taking an interest and casting a vote. We know the SGA has been plagued with
lhany problems in the past. It is our hope that with the increase of the voter turnout and the
new administration, operations will begin to run smoother and work more effectively.
' No more voting scandals and no more wasteful or unnecessary spending of student fees
would be a welcome changes. We, the students, would aiso like to be notified when important
issues arc going to be discussed and voted on. These pages are here for you to use, SGA, so do
it. After alT We are the students here; we pay for these programs and we should know what is
going on.
We're not saying the SGA was run poorly this year, we are just looking forward to a promising
fear when the new administration comes on board and starts serving. We want to see changes
that will make for a better year and many more to follow. It is our greatest hope that student
: involvement will continue to grow beyond the elections and students will begin attending SGA
meetings and become a part of the SGA community.
We, the students, your constituents, want to help you make a difference, SGA. We'll try to do
'� our part in this deal Will you?
GUEST
Keith
COOPER
Columnist
Make hospital privatization talks public
Recently, there have been heated
debates about whether Pitt County
Memorial Hospital (PCMH) should
become a citizen-comroHed, not-for-
profit hospital. Pitt County
Commissioners have hosted forums
during which the issue was discussed
conrentiousry. Speaker after speaker
addressed the pros and cons of the
proposed plan to reorganize PCMH.
There is not unanimity in support
of one position over the other.
However, too many people are still
confused about the implications and
ramifications of reorganization.
The official position of PCMH's
Board of Trustees is that it should be
convened to a citizen-controlled, not-
for-profit hospital the Board believes
that the change will level the playing
field between PCMH and other
health care systems. Moreover, the
board and other supporters maintain
that the change will increase PCMH's
competitive position and reduce the
possibility of too much revenue being
lost. The Board frequently alludes to
a 1983 law in which the N.CState
Legislature suggested ways to make
public hospitals more competitive
with private hospitals while they
remain locally controlled
At a recent meeting during which
the privatization was discussed, many
concerned citizens complained about
a lack of specific information on the
matrer. They believe that hospital
officials are engaging in deception and
using misinformation tactics to
achieve their wish. By the way, coun-
tycity officials are divided over the
controversial reorganization proposal
Some want more time to contemplate
the ramifications of endorsing the
reorganization plan.
Last but not least, county commis-
sioners are elected to serve die public.
Everyone, regardless of racial, eth-
nic or financial persuasion, should be
heard and fairly represented, many
questions such as what the proposed
hospital change will mean for indigent
patients and vulnerable employees
could be answered in a massive infor-
mation campaign before the plan
becomes a done deal.
What about African-Americans in
security, housekeeping, and food ser-
vice positions with outside contrac-
tors? Will they, typically the last hired
and first fired, have to seek employ-
ment elsewhere?
The privatization question should
be part of a referendum in the near
future. After voters are inundated
with both sides of the issue, they will
be able to make: � informed decision.
After all, PCMH ' not belong to a
privileged few it belongs to the Pitt
County residents and others who wish
to patronize the business.
ETURS TO THE EDITOR
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
B-GLAD for blue jeans
�� To the Editor
- Over the past three years or so, I
have witnessed this ridiculous "Blue
can Day Why do I find this so
ridiculous? Well, before some of you
Ifp jumping to conclusions and
;sumc that I am some fascist pig,
�Bead what 1 have to say.
�; It seems down right silly to use
� blue jeans as a symbol of support (or
whatever it was for). I remember a
previous instance of this day. when it
�was 40 degrees outside, and raining.
� How many people wore jeans that
j day because of the weather? I would
; like to think that a good number did.
But all the members of B-GLAD
were able to go around and say that
there was an exuberant amount of
support for their causes. B-GLAD
creates a false sense of security so
that they can feel that they fit in to
our society, and thus solve their inse-
curity.
If there is one thing about
America, it is that everyone has the
right to do, within reasonable limits,
what they want. I do not care what
anyone does, it is nobody's business
but their own. So don't,go around
trying to make sure that it is accept-
ed into society. If it is necessary for
B-GLAD to resort to these measures
to feel good about themselves, then
maybe they have a problem that out-
weighs those of society in this regard.
I did not wear jeans on Thursday-
not because I support the hate of
these people, but because of the
lack of logic behind the whole
scheme. Oh yeah, I also wore shorts
because it was 70 degrees outside.
One more thing: I'd like to
remind the members of the Neo-
Nazi party and other supporters of
our organizarion to wear shoes on
.April 16th.
Can't you just feel the sarcasm?
Jeff Ely
junior
Business Administration
femffl op k cower
voja&
COfAk
Tail
6AS
Fringe
x. �.
.x .

7 -
M$r

V
Outdated registration process needs revamping
To the Editor,
I would like for someone to explain
to me why ECU still has an outdated
registration process. This university
ranks top in the nation, yet we con-
tinue to use an absurd registration
process. Why don't they install tele-
phone registration like most other
universities? Even the community
college down the road has a telephone
registration system! I attended
UNC-Chapel Hill last semester and
they have "Caroline" telephone regis-
tration. It's nice to be able to call a 1-
800 number to register while sitting
at home warm and comfortable.
Students could even register out-of-
statc with a 1-800 number. The sys-
tem assigns each student a pin num-
ber which allows students to only reg-
ister for classes they qualify for, there-
fore, the administration has control
over who takes what courses depend-
ing on the student's major.
This system should be installed
here at ECU because it would save a
lot of time, headaches and MONEY!
ECU would no longer need to hire all
the extra help during registration
time which would save money. Abo,
it would be beneficial to die staff
because they could continue their
daily work without the chaos of regis-
tration.
Needless to say, this telephone
system would be most beneficial to
students. The telephone registration
could be scheduled over two week-
ends so students would not have to
skipidass during the week. For exam-
ple, seniors could register on Saturday
and juniors could register on that
Sunday. Then, sophomores and fresh-
men could register the following
weekend. Most students currently
skip class to register, which is not ben-
eficial to our education � right?
Telephone registration would also
eliminate the ridiculously long lines at
computer terminals.
I got in line to register at 6:15 a.m.
on Wednesday, which. I thought was
crazy. I had to wait outside almost
two hours in the freezing cold just so
I could possibly get the classes I need.
I thought 6:15 a.m. was early until the
girl in the front of the line said she
had been there since 4 a.m.1 When
the door finally opened at 8:00 a.m
there was more pushing, fighting and
arguing than I had ever seen at one
time. I thought some of those people
were going to get violent.
My whole point is that all of this
headache and chaos can be eliminated
by telephone registration. Why does-
n't a school as advanced as ECU have
telephone registration? Maybe some-
day (hopefully before I graduate)
ECU will invest in a new registration
system that will save time and money
But until then, we students will have
to continue standing in long lines
before daylight, skipping classes and
fighting for computer terminals.
Bridget Buck
Freshman
Undeclared major
Are we really aware of parking rules
To the Editor.
I am writing this letter in hopes of
saving a lot of people a $35 parking
ticket and to bitch a little about ECU
parking.
A few weeks ago, a visitor of mine
received two parking tickets, both of
which were $35 tickets. He was given
these tickets while parked in the staff
parking across from Garrctt dorm.
The sign posted there states "Staff
Parking 7 a.m 7 p.m It says nothing
about parking after that time period.
He was parked there around 9:00 p.m.
and received a ticket on two separate
occasions. Little did we know, that in
order to park on campus anytime,
your vehicle must be university regis-
tered. Where is that stated? I was
totally unaware of this policy until it
was cleared up for me while at the
ECU Parking and Traffic Services try-
ing to clear up the matter. So, if, visi-
tors cannot park on campus during off
hours in staff parking then where can
they park?
So, until my appeal comes back,
I'll have to be careful of where I park.
And, for all of you out there inaware
of this policy, take note and be careful
of where you park.
Priscilla Collinson
Major-Undecided
"As a society in turmoil, we are going to see more, and
more various, attempts to simulate order through repression;
and art is a historical target for such efforts
Adrienne Rich, poet, 1985






)
6 Tuesday. April 8. 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
Wednesday, April 9,1297
3:00 - o00 pm
Brickyard Area in front of the new 5ydent Recreation Center
QD Eastern Bicycle Freestyle Team () EC0 Cheerleaders (g) W
((B) Duality @ Aerobic Demonstrates �) Step SHOW
Snowman's Land
By Rob Chapman
Everyday Life
By Michael Litwin
?r LM AT US WMVFtfoP&
i ia�e SfXJp
inttsnrac
BY AUDRf GtRMAIM
ACROSS
1 Robert or Alan
5 Serpents
9 Cupid
13 Superman's girl
14 County capital
15 "A Bel for�"
16 Musical group
18 Divulges
19 Wide width
20 Flower feature
21 Wrong
22 Reject
23 Lariat
25 Comes to terms
28 � and dandy
29 Singer Co'e
32 Across: pref.
33 Reagan and
Howard
34 Meadow female
35 Diplomacy
36 � of the crime
38 Play the lead
39 Devoured
40 Additional
41 Relating to the
early part of day
42 Cheering word
43 Gobi-like
44Shooting stars
45 Beginning
47"�of Fools
48 Fairy tale
monsters
50 Brainchildren
52 Actress Farrow
55 Outworn
56 Interrogates
58 Assists
59 Distinct entity
60 Venetian
magistrate
61 More or �
62 Punta del �
63 Section
1 9 S 4 H � 14 wi'ii�f 4fl 11 12 lit
iipp 32 WM 35 i � �Ko II43 9 WR 1�pjn 13 r so lea�20 30 31 �34
PrizesBooths ,
Mountain BikeRollerblades,Exercise and Fitness
8 Holes of GolfStress Management
Movies PassesSafer Sunning
Barnes & Nobles Gift CertificateOrgan & Blood Donor Information
Busch Garden Passes&T.B. Testing
Hats and T-shirtsBlood PressureCholesterol Screening
Declining Balance CardsQuit Smoking
and Moreand More
01997 Tribune Madia Servtoei, Inc.
Mfttfttsr
SEA S"B0 A M E SHR O L L
TAP eIa LAM OHO P 1 E
A V 1 OHM ESS rfllB E N T
S E N A VO R SB LONOS
� T 1 M TllS E A TB
ISAT 1 n W� L A S SlJ A W
A L 1 V EHl RON SHE L 1
ROB EJT RAP SllS ACE
C E EBO RAT eJBP E N A L
E S Tjl MAT ElBB 1 A S E 0
� r e n Pf R p. si
BATON SH E A D A C H E
ALA NF 0 0 T SG LOW
s i r eIe l l i sIl A m e
SEN DR E E D rE N 0 S
DOWN
1 Medicinal plant
2 Learning
3 Chop
4 Shade of blonde
5 Items of value
6 Argument
7 Near pref.
8 Mare's mate
9 � annl
10 Puppet on a
string
11 Dollar bills
12 Singer Diana
15 Shames
17 Swords
22 Opening
24 Jackson or
Bancroft
25 Perfume source
26 Persona non �
27 Track creatures
28 Liberated
30 Expect
31 Aquatic birds
36 Kind of loser
37 Review
38 Coarse hominy
40 Common people
41 Damp
44 Pure
46 Hotbeds
47 Now you �,
nnw vm i Mnn't
48 Milky stone
49 Actor Kaplan
51 Importunes for
IMVITMnf
52 Anchor
53 "Picnic" author
54 Floundering
57 Actress Linino
FINISH STRONG
Success at Sunrise
Learn Leadership from Mr. Don Edwards
Owner, University Book Exchange
7:30 - 8:30 a.m.
Tuesday, April 15, 1997
Great Room: 3, Mendenhall Student Center
Call 328-4796 to Register
Registration includes free breakfast, and optional wane-up coll
ana ride service.
Student Leaders
Meeting
Putting Your Experience to Work:
Using Your Leadership Experience in the Job
Search
with Dr. Jim Westmoreland
Director, Career Services
5:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 16, 1997
244 Mendenhall Student Center
Refreshments Provided
sponsored by Student Leadership Development Programs
r. � � 109 Mendenhall Student Center
ULL MElflf
APM1SSI0N
9:00-10:001.00
10:00-11:00.00
11:00-1100.00
l�00-�00s4.00
SPECIALS
n.oo domestics
1.00160Z PRAFT
1.00 PRINK ANP
SHOT SPECIAL
00 ICEHOUSE
MASON MRS
PONT K FOOUP Y FAKE LINES!
PTS JUST HIRES? THE EAST COAST'S &EST PISK JOCKEY TEAM
"Strap on a Party Yard
"Beach is open"
Special Appearance by
Juquid
The Only Appearance this Semester





r

Tuttdiy. April 8. 1997
The East Carolinian
Jumpstarts win the Battle of the Bands

Pat Reid
STAFF WRITE
In a continuing effort to provide quality entertainment to the students of ECU while being totally fair to area
bands, the Student Union held the Fourth Annual Battle of the Bands on Thursday, to decide who would get
the sacred opening slot for the 18th Annual Barefoot on the Mall. Five bands battled it out, playing three songs
each to decide who was the best in the land.
Traditionally a local event drawing from Greenville bands, this year it featured bands from as far away as
Chapel Hill and Lexington.
Slow Children Playing kicked off the contest with a southern rock style. Drawing on a sound straight from
the Allman Brothers, Little feat, and the like, Slow Children Playing got the battle off right. It seems they
brought their own fan club as well, as one group of people huddled around the stage cheered them on with par-
ticular enthusiasm. The band ended their set with the Allman Brothers' "Midnight Rider a tribute to one of
their influences. This simple song allowed the band to shine as they picked up the pace of the song and did an
extended ending jam.
Third of Never was up next. With two independent releases under their belts, I thought Third of Never
would do better than they did. They were obviously all very talented musicians, but together they had no real
groove or chemistry. They ran through their three songs wirh little audience support as well.
Audience reaction wasn't a problem for Lexington's Glasgow Kiss, though. With only three and 2 half years'
experience under their belts, they played like pros. Plagued by sound problems and feedback, they persevered
and gave the battle a much needed kick in the butt. Mixing the sounds of Rage Against the Machine with 311
to form a funky, hip-hop style, Glasgow Kiss had the crowd moving and ready for more.
The Jumpstarts picked up right where Glasgow Kiss left off. This Chapel Hill group played a fusion of reg-
gae and ska that got people on their feet and dancing. While the Jumpstarts also seemed to come with fans
already in place, they won over a lot of people as well. The singer exhibited a great talent for working off the
crowd and actually came down into the crowd for part of one song.
Possible World, from nearby Ayden, also seemed to be a disappointment to me. This four-piece band didn't
seem to have the unity a band needs. Their songs included long instrumental jams that didn't have much "jam"
to them. The best thing about Possible World was their originality. Mixing keyboards with a saxophone, while
excluding guitars altogether, gave Possible World a sound full of potential. If these guys stick to it, there could
be big things in their future.
So, who will be the opening band for Barefoot? The Jumpstarts.
They will bring their reggae stylings to the Barefoot stage to try to win even more tans. Possible World came
in second and won a $100 check for their efforts. My personal picks were Glasgow Kiss and the Jumpstarts who
were a tie for first with Slow Children Playing coming in a close second. But what do I know.
Chapel Hill's own ska band. The Jumpstarts, took home top honors at this year's Battle of the Bands. The battle was held Thursday
night, and for winning the Jumpstarts wilt be the opening act for Barefoot on the Mall on Thursday, April 24.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THt JUMfSTARTS WH PACE
CD
review Vertical Horizon show missing previous intensity
Farmer not so John
Farmer not so John
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITF.R
People are coming around to the idea
that Nashville is not the place to look
for the best country music these days.
Everyone from Rolling Stone to USA
Today is touting the alternative coun-
try revolution. Areas such as the
Midwest, New York and even this
state's Triangle region are hotbeds of
the twang takeover.
The Triangle, in fact, boasts a
stacked roster of honky-tonk heroes:
Trailer Bride, The Backsliders,
Whiskeytown, Wake and numerous
others. Nashville, despite its short-
comings, is still home to some damn
good musicians, including BR5-49 and
The Delevantes (granted they're orig-
inally from New Jersey).
Farmer not so John can certainly be
added to that list; they beat the
boogers out of the pretty boy stylings
of Bryan White and the rest of the
country crap that Nashville often spe-
cializes in. Of course, that's not saying
much.
, farmer not so John's self-titled
debut album offers Hope for Music
City. The third track, "Every Street in
Nashville should be playing on every
street in Nashville. It's a beautiful
song, ideal for anyone driving around
at four in the morning with their heart
broken in two. Nowhere else on the
album does lead singer Mack
Linebaugh sound as desperately lone-
some as he does on this song He
moans, "Now I'm stuck here with my
key locked in my heart and you
believe him.
But oh how quickly they turn on
you.
The next track, "Of Angels
DEREK T. HALLE
SF.NIOR WRITF.R
On April 1,1 rolled into Peasant's Cafe
at midnight. Little to my surprise,
Vertical Horizon was on stage playing
in support of their new album live
Stops. After hearing that album and
the excellent live sound on it, I was a
bit disappointed by what I heard
Tuesday night at Peasant's.
Not only did I hear the same songs
that had been on both their records,
which didn't bother me, but I heard
more sounds from the Dave Matthews
Band than I heard at Walnut Creek last
summer. I know the sound is good, but
come on. find your own pie to slice off.
The band opened up the second
half of the show with my favorite,
"Heart in Hand As the song started
up, I noticed that everyone seemed to
be having a good time; however, there
has been more intensity at their previ-
ous shows.
The band seemed tuckered out. All
except bass player, Ryan fisher, who
played an impressive 15-minute bass
solo which blended rock and funk. It
was a good bass sound. The image was
a bit closer to Stefan Lessard's of the
DMB (except, of course, for the base-
ball cap that Fisher had turned around
backwards). I kept looking for the Red
Man chew. Didn't find any, though.
After having a few beers, and with
the crowd growing in their response, I
pulled up to the stage to get a closer
look. Without a doubt, the lead guitar,
played by vocalist Matt Scanncl, was a
delight to see. He knows exactly when
to accent. That skill could prove to be
their savior on later dates in the tour.
The band continued to play and
decided that it would be a good idea to
close with "Wash Away It's a song off
their Running On Ice record in which
Keith Kane screams, "He's gonna wash
it all away right before Scannel wails
off into a 20-minute solo. Building
dynamics up and down, the band final-
ly had their sound together, unfortu-
nately, it was the last song and the end
of the night.
I got a chance to speak with vocal-
istacoustic guitar player Kane after the
show. He old me that they had been
working real hard. He seemed very
proud that an electric
sound was now a pan
of the act. (Strangely
enough, this is noth-
ing new. An electric
sound has been a part
of the act since
December of '95.
Why was he so
proud?)
Anyway, he
seemed to be as nice
as the last time our
paths crossed, just
with a little bit more
confidence. That was
impressive. Confi-
dence is key to this
business. Even
though he had no
idea what I was going
to write in my article,
he was bound to a
purpose anyway He
had to get on the road and play anoth-
er show.
Judging by what I heard on Ijve
Stags, Vertical Horizon have a lot in
store for the next audience they play
for.
The usually excellent Vertical Horizon disappointed our critic
with a lackluster performance last Tuesday.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE VERTICAL HORIZON WEI PACE
Judging by the performance at
Peasant's Cafe, they have a lot to make
up for.
Sure, it was a good show. But I
know, somehow, they've seen better
days.
SEE FARMER. PAGE 9
fimtomt CWt m km tttn T�p� it from� frimd BuyitUiri
PiT Fun Priet
Dean Dome gets Kissed
scream
atthe
WALL
Tkrrr is miking men ��ite than siTmrn-
ingat a vail. It's;tst sfiintr andbriits.
briih and spittle. Hamtvrr, if yon put
emngn voirrs 'ogrtktr. that isallmightjust
be Mom aver. So jam m amtket futile
attempttormngetkr staastmaawi
iisuntaa "Srrnm at rite Wat
Roots rock is the cause of the pop music apocalypse
Aging rockers Kits can still wow the crowd with fire. Mood, explosions and flying
stunts, not to mention good of rock n' roll. Way to go, kids!
PHOTO COURTESY OF POLYGRAM RECORDS
Pat reid
STAFF WRITF.R
"You wanted the best you got the
best. The hottest band in the world.
Kiss I had heard these words for so
long that they had become mere talk.
However, those words took on a whole
new meaning on Friday, April 4. That's
the night the Dean E. Smirh Center
got "Kissed
After having played Greensboro,
N.C. last fall, Kiss decided to come
back one more time before going into
the studio. Chapel Hill was the spot,
and by 9 p.m. Friday night the stage
was set, the people were in their seats,
and Kiss was ready.
To get the crowd ready there were
the usual pre-show recordings playing
over the loudspeaker. But during The
Who's "Won't Get Fooled Again the
show began to get interesting. Right
as The Who began to kick into the big
ending of the song, a Kiss banner
dropped in front of the stage. The
crowd was on their feet and ready.
Next, the band came out and
waved to the audience just before the
lights went out. Spotlights panned
through the crowd and a voice
boomed out, "You wanted the best,
you got the best the hottest band in
the world. Kiss And with that the
curtain dropped, the explosions start-
ed, and the original Kiss in full make-
up were there on stage playing
"Deuce" as if they had never split up
years ago.
SEE KISS. PAGE 9
Mark Brett
Former Lifostyle Editor
Tk'is iirt'klr has brn
broagkt to you by
tkelrttrr'Q"
the ward "Xmt"
and tilt number 666
Editor's note: After the Thursday night debate with downtown
club manager Paul Edwards on WZMB's Roots Rock Show (which
was tuns o 'fun; thanks Paul and R. V), I decided to put a final nail in
the coffin of this topic. One listener asked me how I could be a music fern
in the '90s and not like the Dave Matthews Band. This is an unbeliev-
ably naive question to me, one that begs addressing in full.
Although I think they are talented musicians, I can't stand the music
the Dave Matthews Band makes. Neither can my good friend and for-
mer boss Mark Brett. A while back in TEC Mark wrote the follow-
ing piece about the topic and I don't think I can say it any better. So I
asked Mark if I could reprint it here for your benefit.
This will be the last word that I have to say in this paper about
roots rock and the direction of the local musk scene. It is a dead issue
'Nuffsaid.
Mark Brett
FORMER LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Man, I really hate roots rock.
There are many reasons for this hatred, ranging from per-
sonal taste to genuine artistic deficiencies I see in roots as a
musical style. There's a lot to say on this subject, so strap in
for a long haul.
Where to begin? Well. 1 guess the best thing to do would
be to explain what the root of the roots rock problem is.
Basically, roots is just horribly derivative. It's really nothing
more than a melding of the San Francisco folk-jazz move-
ment (popularized by the Grateful Dead) and mid80s alter-
native rock (as practiced by REM) than it is a style all its
own.
There's nothing inherently wrong with either of these
styles; they've both produced some really good music. But
the Dead's folk-jazz stylings were really only a vital musical
force for a few years in the very late '60s and very early '70s.
By the time Jerry Garcia and his pals had become famous,
their music had lost a lot of the spark that made it interest-
ing. As the cultural phenomenon of "The Dead" grew, the
real power of their music died. It's almost like one choked
the other off.
REM has faced similar problems, but handled them bet-
ter. They realized that their style was getting stale as long
ago as 1986 with their IJfe's Rich Pageant album. That's why
every REM release since that one has sounded markedly dif-
ferent from the last. While ir's led them into some unwise
territory on occasion (the Beach-Boys-inspired Out of lime
comes to mind), anything is better than stagnation.
The roots guys (Dave Matthews being the worst offend-
er here) don't seem to be able to make that distinction. They
take the stalest elements of folk, jazz and alternative and
blend them together into a bland paste of a musical style,
occasionally spicing things up with a little blues-rock.
Of course, blues-rock itself died a long time ago, despite
the way its stinking, desiccated corpse clings with sticky
muck-fingers to radio life. But I guess that's just par for the
course for roots rock. It's zombie music, realty, an animated
corpse of a style that needs to be put down before it devours
anymore helpless rock fans' brains.
Maybe that's too harsh, but when I listen to roots I hear
music that I got tired of in high school (and for me, that was
a good ten years ago). A friend of mine calls roots new music
for people who hate new musk. I can't think of a better
description.
Roots is really trying to appeal to people who really wish
that Bad Company had never gone away Rock radio has used
it to pull back all those 70s rock fans who had strayed into
country after Nirvana broke. It's a step backward for rock
music, and that's never a good thing.
I suppose what really upsets me most about the roots
movement is that most of the people in it have talent, bi
it's talent that's being wasted on musk that's already been
done. Having influences is fine, but it's what you do with
those influences that makes your own work worthwhile.
Take Primus, for example. Primus obviously takes their
inspiration from '70s progressive rock, most specifically from
the band King Crimson. But you won't hear Primus simply
paying lip service to those bands. Primus takes the work of
their predecessors and puts their own spin on it, forging their
own brand of prog rock that's distinctly different from what
has gone before.
The roots people (especially Phish) could learn a lot from
Primus.
Likewise, they could do worse than to look at the work of
Tom Waits. Ostensibly a blues artist. Waits has taken that
venerable style into completely new and bizarre territory by
mixing in European folk musk sensibilities and a kind of
metallic tribal beat that makes his work more a sort of tin-
pan industrial than anything else. But with his solid jazz
roots, Waits is making unclassifiable music out of the styles
of the past.
In the end, it's the lack of that kind of creative spark that
makes roots rock suck. In playing it safe with its influences,
in holding bands like the Grateful Dead in far too much of an
exalted position, roots rock is just plain boring. Just once, I'd
like a roots band ro surprise me. Just once, I'd like to hear
something from them that doesn't sound quite like anything
else I've heard before. Just once, I'd like them to show a lit-
tle originality.
But as it srands, jusr like the paint-by-numhers punk crap
being churned out by Green Day and their ilk, roots rock is
nothing but another lame pop music styte practiced by musi-
cians who are too lazy to try something truly innovative.
It's a security blanket for the Me Generation, and they're
way too old for security blankets. .And it's doubly appalling
that people of the current generation are buying it up. Can't
we figure out a musical style of our own?
Fah! I need to put on some Sonic Youth just to cleanse
myself of this topic. Excuse me while I take a noise bath
IpW p
�mmmum





8 Tuesday, April 8 1997
s
Ml
minute
HIV-suppressing cells found
I.mi vsowk
i�: I h,l PRESS SKRVIC1
In what could prove t. be j major new
weapon against acquired immune
deficiency syndrome, researchers
Wednesday reported the discovers of
certain immune system cells that sup-
press the reproduction of the II)S
viftis within them.
The cells, called naive (1)4 T
cells, mount the body's initial
response to infections such as with
the human immunodeficiency virus.
HIV which causes )S. the investi-
gators said in the .hum, (liniuil
Investigation.
Finding that HIV cannot replicate
in these cells and therein cause them
direct harm could lead to new
weapons against the deadK plague.
said lead study author Mario Roederer,
a genetics researcher it the Stanford
I niversirv School of Medicine
Additionally, the discover, adds r
i he evidence that something other
than viral infection destroys the dis-
ease-fighting T cells in HIV patients,
said l.eonore Herenherg. genetics
professor at Stanford.
"I ntil now. marry researchers
believed that the (.1)4 T cells disap-
pear because IU gets into them and
kills them. But since HIV doesn't kill
naive I cells, something else must he-
causing the loss ot these cells in peo-
ple with HIV disease1 Roederer said.
"Our current theorv is that it's the
destruction of the tin mi is thai iv.uis-
ing the abnormally low levels of T
cells, but we don't really know
The chestnut-sized gland at the
base of the throat is the teaching cen-
ter for T cells, which originate in the
hone marrow, then migrate to the tin
mus. There, they are taught" to rec-
ognize foreign molecules, or antigens,
then released into the bloodstream to
lie m wait for am foreign invaders
I nnl their tlrsi real encounter on
the battlefield, thc are referred to as
"naive Once having gamed their first
experience on the war front, the naive
I cells proliferate. No longer com-
prised of novices, the new arnn num-
bers specific "memory" T cells that
protect the both against any subse-
quent attack In the same invader.
The mam warriors in the immune
system's mission to seek and destroy
foreign molecules belong to two T cell
;vpes C)4 and CD8, said co-
researcher Dipcndra Mitra of
Stanford.
In 1995, Roederer and his ream
found the first evidence that IIIV-
infected patients had ver few naive
CD8 I' cells, a finding that surprised
most researchers who had thought
these cells were unaffected by HIV
infection since they were impenetra-
ble to the virus. ci. despite the cells'
resistance to direct HIV infection, the
(.1)8 I cells were vanishing in people
with HIV
Intrigued b these curious find-
ings. Roederer began to explore I ll s
ability to replicate in different types
nl I ceils. In rest tube studies, the
researchers separated HlV-infected
naiveTeells from HlV-infected mem-
ory I i ells and stimulated them in
divid)
"What was interesting w.is mat the
memory cells produced vims under
rhis stimulation, but the naive ceils
produced none Roederer said.
" I he virus did not replicate in the
naive cells, although it was there The
cells divided like mad. but the virus
did not come out. That's interesting
because it breaks the paradigm of viral
replication being tied r�i cell replica-
tion Now, w: know there are wavs of
activating cells that do not activate
virus
ke implication of the srud is
that somehow naive cells suppress
v iral replication.
"It we could figure our how che
suppress replication, thai could lead
to a therapv Roederer said.
I he finding is boosted b results
from a government studs reported last
month showing that HIV replication is
impaired in wealth stimulated naive
CD4Tccils
The latest evidence sheds light on
a surprising finding reported hist June
by a team from the Naval Medical
Research Institute in Bethesda Md
In that studv. researchers had trig-
gered lll infected TMTcclls, both
naive and memory types, to divide
repeatedly in a culture, increasing in
number oue-milhonfold. fter the
divisions, the scientists found a com-
plete absence of the virus.
Natural Ufe I �
;�Ar
About 55 of fast-food restaurant customers are under 35.
-The Oregonian i'SElSi
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
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"�i)oied �est Woi Q)og and
rlENQFIX FILMS
Thtwsday, April 10
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
ot The Spot For o Free 16oz Fountain Drink
with my purchase. NEW! Popcorn Will
Be Available at The Spot tor All Showings!
Friday, April 11
gatertay, April 11
AH films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and ere FREE to Students, Faculty, and Start
(one guest allowed) with vohd ECU 10
STEVE HAGER EDITOR HIGH TIMES MAGAZINE VS. CURTIS SUWA THE GUARDIAN ANGELS

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TUESDAY APRIL 22,1997,8PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE TICKETS FOR STUDENTS, STAFF AND FACULTY. $5 FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC. SS AT THE DOOR. FREE
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WITH SPECIAL y
FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 8PM
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
S15IN ADVANCE FOR STU0�NTS FATUITY STAFF
$20 IN ADVANCE FOR THE PUBLIC
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Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Coll
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
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r
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We
The East Carolinian
hn biffsst threat
duress ion is your
awareness of it.
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Ittil islanl l'lii'iinn
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; ,��;�, ��(�K.ili !� ' ii'i ' s
i' issistiirtls
Kiss
continued from page 7
From "Deuce" they tore right into
"King Of The Night Time World
another classic cut for the Kiss-hungry
crowd. After "King Paul Stanley
made a little speech about how North
Carolina was so cool they had to come
back again. "Now Chapel Hill, I have
one question for you. Do ya love me?"
And with that they tore through "Do
Ya Love Me?" with an energy and a
force that is unmatched.
Kiss proved themselves to be the
ultimate showmen as they posed for
press pictures from the stage and
danced and pranced for the crowd.
Stanley particularly stood out as he
played his guitar on his shoulder,
between his legs and wherever else he
thought would get a good reaction.
After another song or two, Stanley
looked at the crowd and remarked, "If
you guys make it just a little hotter in
here we're going to call out the fire-
house Another cute intro for the
song by the same name, "Firehouse"
ended with what is now Kiss tradition.
Gene Simmons walked onto stage
with a burning sword and breathed
fire like a circus pro. Then thrusting
the sword into the stage he grinned
evily as the crowd roared with
approval.
After a while it was Ace Frehley's
turn at the mike for "Shock Me That
song ended with the band leaving
Frehley on stage for his guitar solo.
Tearing through riffs and leads with
amazing speed and agility, Ace took
the crowd from awe to delight when
his guitar began to glow and spew
forth smoke. Eventually he played a
lead that got fed into a delay loop so
the guitar continued to play as he took
it off, attached it to a hook, and then
watched it carried up and away into
the lighting trestles. No sooner had
his first guitar reached it's destination
when he was back with another play-
ing Beethoven. Then Ace ended his
performance with a bang as he knelt,
took aim, and fired a rocket that blew
up one of the lighting units.
After a while Stanley, Simmons and
Frehley all met at center stage and
began to rip open "Shout It Out
Loud Probably the band's most
loved song behind "Rock and Roll All
Nite "Shout" had the crowd doing
just that.
Stanley stepped up the mike and
said, "You people know that it wasn't
that long ago that I was out there
wishing I could be up here. You people
put me here and I want to thank you.
Can I come see you people out there?
Bringdown my transporter And with
that a rope pulley whisked Paui away,
flying above the crowd to the sound-
board at the back of the house where
he performed "Love Gun As if this
wasn't enough, there were fireworks
accenting every beat of the drum riff
that lead to the chorus.
"God of Thunder" was another
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highlight for all. Simmons walked
onstage and was illuminated by one
green spotlight underneath him while
all the other lights were blood red.
Soon one little trickle of blood began
to flow from his mouth. The crowd
approval incited Simmons as he shook
his head back and forth spewing blood
from his mouth at every shake. Fire
pots situated above the stage on the
lighting trestles shot out flames mak-
ing Simmons seem (he ruler of the
world. Then with a pose worthy of the
Phantom of the Opera, he was hoisted
to the top of the lighting trestles to
sing "God of Thunder Later in the
same song, Peter Criss got his chance
to shine with an amazing drum solo.
After shouting "We love you, good-
night Kiss left as quickly as they
appeared. The giant video screen
showed the member's faces morphing
from one into the other, and then they
were back taking bows and asking to
play another one. With the crowd's
overwhelming approval, they slide
into "Detroit Rock City This was fol-
lowed bv Criss' signature song, the
ballad "Beth
Finally, it was the time everyone
had been waiting for. After telling the
crowd to sing along one last time. Kiss
slid into the anthem, "Rock and Roll
All Nite Complete with fireworks,
confetti and total audience participa-
tion, the song was given a life of its
own. But before the show could end,
they had one last finale of fireworks as
Stanley smashed his guitar and threw
the parts out to the crowd.
With a final bow and wave, Kiss dis-
appeared into the tunnels of the Dean
Smith Center for the last time. No
one went home disappointed.
Farmer
continued from page 7
makes you want to slap each band
member's hand and ask, "What the
hell are you doing? Did the Dave
Matthews Band show up in the damn
studio and force you to do this?" "Of
Angels" is of the reheated roots rock
variety, tripping along on a boring
Dave Matthews "groove" thing.
Experimentation is fine and peachy,
but this, this is simply godawful. "Do
you want me to get Merle Haggard to
come and kick the roots out of your
ass?" (Hag'll do it now.)
Other songs also slip into the
stinky groove trap including 'Sacred
Crow "Paperweight of the Wrld"
and a good half of the final track,
"Travclin' Fool Seeming out of place
on the album, they don't go with the
rest of what is a very good album.
They lack the heart and honesty of
songs such as "This is Our House"
and "Rusty Weathervane These two
songs are sent from jangle heaven.
Anyone familiar with the similar
sounding country of Blue Mountaift.7
will love "Rusty Weathervane It's
driving music Not the four in the
morning variety, this is what you listen- '
to while you're traveling the back-
roads with your windows down on vi'
perfect afternoon, sipping on a cold-
beer (just one, or maybe two). �ti
From critics. Farmer not so Johnr-i
have received numerous comparisons.
to Uncle Tupelo because of their occa-?;
sional attempts to reach the guitar
gloryland. Those critics must be talk-M"
ing about a different Uncle TupelcwU
Farmer not so John never equals the. :i
feedback fury that UT specialized in'
and perfected. 1 don't think they eve �
even try; their guitar workouts owfi:J
more to classic rock and blues than to
the punk rock that inspired Unclr
Tupelo. h
The angel-voiced Iris Dementi
sums up Farmer not so John accurate
ly, 'They're pretty darn good They.
are. There are songs on this album
that'll make your daddy cry. But ther��
are also songs that make me cry fte
entirely different reasons. �
Make the bad roots rock man go-�-
way, daddy. ��'���
din
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y�






The 14th Annual
Great Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pig-Out Party
The weekend is a great weekend for activities and
to watch the ECU football team in their annual
spring scrimmage. Below is the list of events for the
weekend. 0 yoy �Th riJh lvt oM
cfln'fc hi

H
Thursday, April 10
7 p.m.
Golf Classic Social & Auction
Friday, April 11
Pig-Out Golf Classic sponsored by United States Cellular at
Brook Valley
Country Club $2 million Hole-In-One Shootout at Bradford
Creek Golf Club
6 p.m. Carnival opens, rides for all ages
Public invited to walk stadium "midway'
7:30 p.m. Pig-Out Awards Dinner
Live radio shows
7:30-11:30 p.m. Breeze Band "Live Show"
8:30 p.m. Parade of Pigs
9 p.m. Fireworks - sponsored by Toyota
10 p.m. Pig Cookin'Contest begins
11:45 p.m. Activities area closes
Saturday, April 12
7-9 a.m.
9 a.m.
9 a.m5 p.m.
10 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m6 p.m.
11 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.ml:15p
noon
2 p.m.
2:20 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:30-6 p.m.
4:40 p.m.
Sunday, April 13
noon-5 p.m.
2 p.m.
Judging of pigs
PSC Phosphate Breakfast of
Champions
Greenville Home & Garden
Show ($3 for adults, 12 & under free)
Craft ShowSports card show
Carnival- children and adult rides
Military EquipmentVehicle display
Concessions open
Barbecue plates served
until sold out ($3.50 advance,
$5 event day)
Jr. Pure Gold Dance Team
$2 million Hole-In-One Shootout at
Bradford Creek Country Club
Pig Cookin' Contest winners announced
Networks "Showtime" Ball
Handling Team
m.ECU Student-Athletes &
Coaches sign autographs
Bangert Elementary Line Dancing Group
Dunkin' Booth
Lady Pirate soccer vs. NC
Wesleyan
Ben D. Quinn Elementary
Jump Roping Group
ECU Cheerleaders & Mascot sign
autographs at Toyota Tent
Funny Bones Kid ClubCheers
Cheerleading Group
ECU Softball vs. Liberty (DH)
ECU baseball vs. George Mason (DH)
PSN Airtime for Purple
Gold Spring Scrimmage
Annual Spring Scrimmage kickoff ($1.50
advance, $3 at gate)
The Entertainers "Live Show"
Shag Exhibitions & Lessons
Greenville Home & garden Show ($3
adults, 12 & under free)
Carnival and Concessions open
$2 million Hole-In-One Shootout
ECU base ball vs. George Mason
For more information call
1-800-DIAL ECU or 328-4500
Barbecue plate and scrimmage tickets
on sale now
No admission charge for band shows
BBBBUE����
TRIVIAtime
Name the three Atlanta Braves pitchers who
placed in the top five in the NL in ERAs, starts,
and innings last season.
The East Carolinian
Clayton selected as top female athlete
TRACY LALBACH
SENIOR WRITER
(Editor's rwte:This is the first of a turn part series.
Kevin Miller, the male athlete of the year, tcill lie featured in
Thursday's sports section.)
Excellence and athletics go hand in hand for
Michelle Clayton's family. Following in the foot-
steps of her parents, both of whom competed for
ECU in their respective college careers, Clayton
has made her mark in the history of Pirate athletics
by being selected as ECU's 1997 Outstanding
Female Athlete.
The honor, based on academic and athletic
achievement, leadership qualities and service to
ECU and the community, is awarded each year to
one female and one male athlete.
Clayton, a junior from Kernersville. is a three-
year member of the ECU women's track and field
team. A competitor in the hammer throw, the shot
put and the discus, Clayton said being selected as
the recipient of the award came as quite a surprise
to her.
"I didn't expect to win the award as a junior,
especially with so many qualified seniors Clayton
said. "It means so much to me to have this honor
because I have put so much time and effort into my
studies and my athletics. It's nice to see all of my
hard work pay off
Clayton's favorite event is the hammer throw.
She concentrates mostly on the event because
since she started throwing, she knew the hammer
throw would be the event to make her shine.
"I am more apt to have a future in the hammer
throw than the other events Clayton said. "My
long term goal is to someday compete internation-
ally and to get to the Olympics in either 2000 or
2004
Last year at the CAA Championships. Clayton
qualified provisionally for the NCAA
Championships. She also made the All-East team
at this year's ECAC Indoor Championships for her
shot put performance. For the future, she is deter-
mined to improve her technique.
"Technique is what throwing is all about
Clayton said. "Once a strong foundation is built, all
vou can strive for is perfect technique. That's
something that everyone wants, but no one has
Clayton started throwing in the seventh grade
under the direction of her own father, wfio played
football for the Pirates years ago. .After competing
for two years in middle school and four years in
high school. Clayton came to ECU to be part of a
team in the process of growing and learning.
"I knew that 1 could be an asset to the team
immediately Clayton said. "I didn't want to go to
a school where I would be just another person on
the team
Clayton has gotten tremendous support from
her family. Her father trains with her at least once
a week and is her faithful numbet one fan at all of
ECU's meets. Her younger sister is currently a
senior thrower in high school, and may join her out
on the field to represent ECU next year.
"My family is always behind me 100 percent of
the way, through good times and bad Clayton
said.
Lynda Uipson. a former thrower at L'NC-
Chapel Hill, is Clayton's role model. Lipson quali-
fied for the 1996 Olympic team, but did not meet
the qualifying standard required to compete.
Determination and will power, qualities highly
admired by Clayton, are keeping Uipson in con-
tention for a spot on the team in 2000. Clayton met
Michelle Clayton has been selected as the university's
outstanding female student-athlete of the year.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU MEDIA GUIDE
her "big sister" at a track camp after her freshman
year of high school, at which time the two athletes
became rhe best of friends.
Clayton hopes to find herself in Indiana for this
year's NCAA Championships, to be held June 4-6
at the University of Indiana. She's got the strength,
power, and definitely has the right mental attitude
Lady Pirate serves up success on court
STEVE LOSEY
STAFF WRITER
Tennis has been Anne Svae's calling
for a long time. Ever since she was a
voung girl growing up in her native
Norway, she was drawn to the rackets
and courts. Her uncle had a tennis
court next to his house and he
bought Svae her first racket. Her par-
ents, who also played tennis, helped
and supported her growing interest
in the sport.
Svae played soccer for a while and
cross-country skied, but when she
was 12, she decided to focus on her
skills as a tennis player. There were
no high school teams in Norway, but
she was able to play on a private
team, on which she will play when
she goes home for the summer.
According to Svae, the person who
had the greatest influence on her as
an athlete was Eric Unnebrag.
Unnebrag was Svae's coach in
Norway. He taught Svae not only the
fundamentals of tennis, but the
proper attitude to have toward the
sport.
"Eric had discipline, but he could
loosen up Svae said. "He was a very
motivating person to play for. We
were having fun and we were working
hard"
Her team reached its pinnacle
when it made it to the
Norwegian championship.
Unfortunately, they lost in
the semi-finals.
Svae left Norway in
August of 1995 to attend
ECU. She is majoring in
marketing. When she gradu-
ates, she hopes to either
play tennis, get her masters,
or find a job.
At ECU, she quickly
showed herself to be a dom-
inating presence on the
court. Svae felt that her per-
formance this spring is
much better than the way
she played in the fall.
"Iast fall, I played some
games where I lost mental-
ly Svae said.
The camaraderie
between each of the players
on the team binds them all
together.
"We always have fun on
trips Svae said. "That's
what keeps the team going
Head Coach Bill Moore
said there was more than
just one reason why the tal-
ented player was recruited for the
Pirates.
"We recruited her because she is a
good player but she's also a good per-
son to have around Moore said.
One of Svae's oldest friends is on
Anne-Birgitte Svae hails from Norway and is a stand-out on the women's tennis team.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SID
the team. Mona F.ek was one of her
first teammates in Norway. Svae and
Eek have played together since they
were 14 and both were coached by
Unnebrag when they were growing
up. They both came to ECl and are
roommates. Katherine Morgan,
Svae's other roommate, is another
one of her teammates.
"When you have a good friend on
the team, it keeps you going Svae
said.
Relay teams finish strong at meet
ZIMA BRII.EY
STAFF WRITER
ECU's men's sprint team lit up the track in Austin.
Texas, this past Saturday, finishing among the top
five in the 4x400 meter and 4x200 meter relays.
ECU's sprint team proved hard work and prac-
tice pays off. The Pirates' 4x400 meter and 4x200
meter teams burned up the track at this weekend's
Texas Relays. Both relav teams finished fourth in
each event, competing against teams such as
Kansas. UTEP, Ohio State, Florida State and
Arkansas.
The 4x400 meter relay team of James
Alexander. Darrick Ingram. Mike Miller and
Damon Davis finished with the time of 3:04.58,
behind Oklahoma, who took the top spot (3:01.21)
followed by Baylor and Southern.
The Pirates' 4x400 relay time was a new school
record, replacing rhe former time of 3:04.65, set in
1991. This team, composed of freshmen and
sophomores, competed soundly against nationally
ranked Oklahoma and Baylor, two of the top men's
track programs in the U.S many believe each has
a chance of breaking the NCAA reco.d in the 4x400
meter relay.
"I am excited for rhe guvs, finishing fourth in
both relays is outstanding Head Coach Bill
Carson said. "Breaking the school record in the
4x400 is great for the young guvs, they've worked
hard for it
A total of 29 collegiate teams participated in the
event and the Pirates' outstanding performance
was good enough to meet 1997 NCAA provisional
qualifying standards.
For Alexander. Davis and Ingram, Saturday
proved to be twice as sweet. These three, along
with Dvvight Henry, the lone senior of the 4x200
meter relay team, represented ECU well by finish-
ing fourth in this event their time. 1:23.36. This
time the Pirates finished after first place LSI
(1:21.78). Southern (1:22.27), and Texas-El Paso
(1:22.31).
In other relay events, the Pirates 4x100 meter
relav team consisting of Vaughn Monroe. Chris Rev,
Brian Johnson and Bevan Foster finished 14th with
a . ne of 40.89. in Friday's preliminaries. The team
missed qualifying for Saturday's finals. Only the
top eight teams move on.
In the 100 meters, ECU standout freshman
Titus Haygood finished 16th among a field of 39
other sprinters - his time, 10.55. Haygood missed
qualifying standards bv the narrowest margins and
fellow teammate Monroe, who also competed in
the 100 meters, crossed the finish line in 10.88
The Pirates competed with over 140 of che
finest track programs in the nation, representing
both themselves and ECU respectively.
ECU SPORTS BRIEFS
The ECU women's tennis team lost
its third consecutive match Friday to
N.C. State, 5-2. The lone Pirate vic-
tory was by Gina MacDonald in the
No. 5 singles spot as she defeated
Elizabeth Perry 6-1, 2-6. 6-4. The
other point came after the Wolfpack
defaulted at No. 6 singles. ECU falls
to 8-7 overall, with a 2-0 CAA
recordOn Saturday the softball
team swept a doubleheader from
UNC-Grccnsboro 6-0 in the first
game and 2-1 in the second. The
Uady Pirates move their record to 35-
17 and 9-1 in the Big SouthThe golf
team finished the Tennessee State
Tntirnev on Saturday in fourth place.
junior Kevin Miller was the top fin-
isher for the Pirates in the tourna-
ment shooting a 71 and 73 and fin-
ished tied for seventh place. The
baseball team split a doubleheader
with conference rival Old Dominion
University The Pirates won the
afternoon game 7-5 and the
Monarch won the nightcap 4-3
Then on Sundav the Mqnarchs hand-
ed ECU a 3-2 defeat. ECU drops to
20-18 overall and 7-5 in the CAA.
ECU women's track and field pro-
gram has faired well in recent track
and field polls. Among the 80 schools
which compose the Fast Region ot
collegiate track and field, the Uadv
Pirates are represented with seven
athletes among the top ten place fin-
ishers in nine different events.
Leading ECU's performance this
outdoor season are seniors Lave'
Wilson and Amanda Johnson, junior
Michelle ClayUHl and freshmen
Rasheca Barrow and Carmen Weldon.
Wilson currently had the second
lest long jump distance in the K.ist
with 20-0 14; she also ranks eighl
liest in the triple jump with a dis-
tance of 38-7 34 at the Rateigfi
Relav s.
Johnson has the seventh best time
during the (7 outdoor season in the
100 meters with i time of 12:18.
Johnson also is a member of the Uadv
Pirates' 4x200 meter relay which
holds the third fastest time in the
region (1:40.18).
Clavton has top 10 finishes in
three events. In the hammer. Clayton
has the fifth longest throw (165-61.
In the shot put. Clavton has the sixth
best throw (43-1 34) and in the dis-
cus she ranks ninth with a distance of
15K-�.
Barrow has times in tour separate
events in the top seven in the East.
In the 100-meter dash. Barrow ranks
third with a time of 12.05. In the 200
she h;is the seventh fastest time with
24.7�. Barrow is also a member of
both the Uadv Pirates 4x100 and
4x200 meter relav squads which rank
third in their respective events.
Weldon ranks ninth in rhe 20(1
meter sprints with a time of 24.95.
Weldon :ilso joins Borrow op the l.adv
Pirates" third ranked 4x100 and
4x200 meter rclavs.
The Department of Recreational Services -
Intramural Sports Wallyball season recent-
ly came to a close after its first official
season at ECU. Wallyball involves playing
volleyball in a racquetball court, allowing
the ball to be hit off of the walls.
An impressive number of participants
from a total of seven teams were repre-
sented this season. The seven teams
included three women's teams and four
co-rec teams The champions m the co-
rec division were the "Bad Mamma
Jammas" and teammembers included
Paulette Evans. Kan Brown. Jon
McChesney. David Adam, Bryan Wolfe and
Allison Kemp
The women's league champs included
Dusty Whitehurst. Allison Kemp, Shelley
Tear.hey, Ellen Da and Je " 'doch of
rhe "Wahoos Because of the growing
interest and popularity, and because ot
the impressive turnout m its first season,
wallyball will remain an intramural sport
in the future.





r
T
11 Tuudiy, April 8, 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
Greenville. NC
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
355-2946 � Located In WINN DIXIE Market Place, on comer of Greenville Blvd & Arlington Blvd.
"Rock the Ballpark"
Major League Baseball
on Wednesday Night.
Rolling Rock $l.$o
Halt Price
Appetizers
after otoo
TEXAS-2-STEP
507 N. GREENE St. 757-0265
DANCE
LESSONS
ON THE COUNTRY SIDE
WITH BECKY &
MARVIN AS INSTRUCTORS
"25 YEARS EXPERIENCE"
LEARN ALL THE
LINE DANCES & COUPLE DANCES
EVERY FRIDAY 8-9:30 P.M.
A Cocktail Hour With
Dance Aerobics
FRHK LESSON WITH THIS AD
PSC PHOSPHATE ALL-ACADEMIC TEAM
Tcir River Estates
Is the place to be on Wednesday, April 9th for our
2nd Annual "Have a Heart" Blood Drive
Join us from 12 noon until 4 at our clubhouse
for tons of fun, food and prizes!
Don't forget that we're now leasing for
Fall 1997
Plan to tour one of our roomy apartment homes
when you come by to give the gift of life
Move in before May 1st and you'll be registered for
REE VACATION
'� � T





T
12 Tuesday, April 8.1997
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE.
Great for summer school students! Lo-
cated on campus. One bedroom apart-
ment, big enough for two, and it's fully
furnished $350 a month. Call 754-
8055. Ask for Natalie.
ROOMMATE FOR SUMMER
NEEDED: fully furn. duplex, walk-
ing distance from campus. $265mo.
plus 12 utilities, non-smoking, respon-
sible male or female. Contact Monica
�t 752-3407 May - August.
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
YAILABLE for summer sublease at
nggold Towers $450month May's
rent paid, furnished, location conveni-
ent, free parking, lease ends July 31.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
DO YOU LIVE IN a three or four
bedroom house or apartment and plan
to move out? We want to take over
your space. Call 757-0441 Kerri, or
758-3633 Erika.
EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen,
washerdryer and living room with fire-
place. Beautifully landscaped - three
fenced yards. Convenient to campus
& hospital. $1000mo. ,dep. 524-
4111.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE nice two bdr duplex in quiet
neighborhood. Close to campus. Rent
$230 a month plus 12 utilities. Please
call 353-3909.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT
AVAILABLE NOW THRU August.
$200month plus 13 utilitiesown
bath. 1 block from campus. Frank 353-
00.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE
MAY 1: 1 brlbath. Private balcony,
ceiling fans vaulted ceilings, dishwash-
er. Near hospital. $345mth watet in-
cluded. Pets allowed. Call 757-1943.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share two bedroom apart-
ment in Wilson Acres. $252.50 per
month plus 12 utilities. Available May
7 through Jury 31. Great for summer
school! Call Brooks 931-0358.
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY
lst-Aug. 1st one bedroom one bath-
room washerdryer 12 utilities 12
phone free water Sc cable rent $225.00.
No security deposit 551-3168.
SUMMER DISCOUNT AT
TRACTIVE SIZABLE 3br 2 12
bath townhouse at Twin Oaks. Avail-
able in May. No Pets. Only $575
month discounted to $500 month
through July. Fireplace, patio, pool,
washerdryer hookup. Please call 752-
2851. Thank you.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED TO share two bedroom apart-
ment mid-April or May. Across from
hospital. Luxury apartment. $292.50
12 utilities. Call 931-0856.
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED-
ED TO share large house across from
campus and two blocks from down-
town. Easy access to the new Rec.
Center. Call 758-1152.
DO YOU LIVE IN a three or four
bedroom house or apartment and plan
to move out? We want to take over
your space. Call 328-7983 Mary, 328-
8433 Jennifer.
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washerdryer.
Hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY. Walking distance
from campus and downtown. Large
room (15x15) Private phone linecable
in room. Washerdryer included.
$175month utilities. Call Mike:
7522879
r " 12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
not vtU wNfi mr odwr coupon)
tVuUf (fimtmnu
I and 2 Bedroom Ranee, Refno�ralor.
Washer, Dryer Hookupi. Decks and Pattos
in most units. Laundry FacHrcy.
SandVroNeybaN Court.
Located S blocks from campus
FK WATER. SEWER
2 BEDROOMS
Stove efndferatorDishwasher
Washer. Dryer Hookups
Patios on Rrtt Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
I 2 bedroom, appliances, water, beak cable. S blocks from
' campus. New ownership.
New Landscaptnt
THESE AND OTHER FrNE rROPERTIES
! MANAGED BY
wtt nonrtrr
MANAGEMENT
IMA BROWNLEA DRIVE
7SS-I9II Oder Expires 4-3l-�7
I
L
il
SUMMER SCHOOL SUBLEASE
ROOM with two male students in
three bedroom house. Room has pri-
vate bath. House 2 houses from cam-
pus. Rent $233.33 plus 13 utilities.
Available now must see. Call Chris @
355-6648
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
FALL semester '97. Two bedroom.
12 bath townhouse, free water, cable.
$198month, 12 utilities. Own room,
patio. ECU busline. Call Brian at 328-
8932.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX WITH
all the comforts of home within walk-
ing distance of campus! washctdryer,
dishwasher, central heatair, deck out-
back, off the street paved parking and
a gardener. Call 830-9502.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
BEGINNING May or June; 6 mo. or
1 yr. lease; 2 br 2 bath, washerdryer
furnished; approx. 10 min. drive to
campus; outside pets ok Ig. fenced in
backyard; $175mo, 12 util 12
phone. For inquiries contact 758-6869
(leave message)
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR May! Located at Eastbrook on
the bus route. Own bedroom with
walk-in closet and bathroom. $190 a
month 12 phone, utilities. Call
Jody at 758-9157. Leave message.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also preleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP! Rent is $200 12 phone and
utilities. Must be laid back. Call Alan
@ 551-3871 Wyndham Court Apart-
ments.
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT
FOR $275.00. Includes: watersewer,
basic cable, full kitchenbath, and pri-
vate balcony Need to take over lease
ASAP Call 752-7934.
classifieds
The East Carolinian
$20.00 - STUDENT DESK w2
minishelves excellent for a cozy apart-
ment. Call 752-7621 Shin.
U2 TICKETS FOR SALE for the
Clemson show on May 16! Two seats
available. Won't find anything better
anywhere else. Call for info. 757-2952.
ATTENTION CYCLISTS '97
470 trek road bike. 250 miles. Shima-
no RSXergo-shifters. 52" fits
5'4756" suture. Excellent! Firstup-
grade! Quality. $575, negotiable. 752-
6993 whenever!
COMPUTER FOR SALE: IBM
compatible. 20 meg hard drive. 5 14
floppy disk drive. Keyboard, 13" moni-
tor. Great for typing papers! Asking
$150. Call Mimi at 756-8266.
MOVING MUST SELL PER-
SONALLY hand crafted queen size
waterbed with liner and heater $150
acoustic power logic 260 amplifier 45
watts rms 125 watts bridged mono
$125.00. Call 321-8148.
LEARN TO PLAY THE BANJO.
If interested, please call Kent at 752-
9159.
FOR SALE - 1990 BAYLINER.20
ft. long, Force motor 150hp and trailer.
All in very good condition. Call
(919)356-2665 after 6 pm.
CUSTOM DESIGN ALUM.
FRAMED mtn. bike new XTR
brakes, pilot & deore LX components.
U-lock, baggy, 3-bike car rack. Great
cond. Brought new $890. Selling for
$420. Call 830-9347, ask for Clayton.
CUSTOM MADE QUEEN SIZE
waterbed! Modern, black, padded
rails, mattress, heater, lining. Great
buy $200. Large eff. fridge with freez-
er (holds ice cream!) Great for dorms.
$50 Call Tracey at 752-8266.
inWIrE Wow for sUMMer
Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission.
Call Jeff Mahoncy at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
WANTED: FEMALE STUD-
ENT TO live in with disabled fe-
male. No physical duties required.
Free room in nice home, located in
Tucker Estates. Call (919)234-2937
after 7pm on Tues. Wed. or Thurs.
night. Collect.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
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DESTINATION RESORT EM-
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WANTED: STUDENT WITH
child development majorminor (or
similar interest) to act as nanny this
summet for 5 12 year old. Safe driving
record: dependable, own transporta-
tion; non-smoker; swimming skills.
Weekly 8:30-5:30 beginning 527. Sal-
ary $270 a weeksocial security benefit.
Also, need you for some afternoon work
before 527. Potential for part-time
employment during 1997-98 school
year. Please send a letter stating qual-
" ificationsinterest together with phone
no. to "Nanny Post Office Box 8080,
Greenville, NC 27835.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
1 RANKED FUNDRAISER.
YOUR group, club, frat.sor. can raise
up to $200 $500 $1000 in one
week. Minimal hrseffort required.
Call 800-925-5548, access code 22.
Participants receive free sport camera
just for calling.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE MAY 23-Scptember 1. Certi-
fied Red Cross Lifeguard Training &
CPR required. Pleasant working con-
ditions in a recreational environment.
Phone Twin Lakes Resott. Chocowin-
ity, NC 946-5700.
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED THIS
SUMMER in Greenville and sur-
rounding areas (Rocky Mount, Gold-
sboro, Smithfield). Call Ashley at 321-
1214 to set up an interview. Don't de-
lay summer is almost here
SZECHUAN GARDEN NEED
PART time or full time wait staff. No
phone calls. Come after 2:00 pm in
person only. 909 South Evans, Green-
ville, NC 27834. (10th & Evans)
$20.K TO $30.K PER year earning
potential with the most respected
name in fitness. Send sales resume' to:
World Gym, CO Chris Farrcll, 110 Pa-
trick Ct Rocky Mount, NC 27804.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING out circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
QMPPWEW00D
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors A Instructors
for private co-ed youth camp located in m
beautiful mountain! of western N.C.
Over 25 activities including all sports, water
skiing, heated pool, tennis, art, horseback,
go-korts 610 to 811earn $1250 -
1650 phis room, meals, laundry & great funl
Non-smokers call for brochureapplication
�00-S32-3539
cusTOMim yUKVItJWUF'Hck
SUPPORT - Brof s is seeking ap-
plicants for part time hours. Assist
management with returns, customer
inquiries, and various office duties.
Requires organization skillsability to
handle a fast-paced environment.
Scheduling options include: 10am-
2pm, 12pm-6pm, and 5pm-9pm. Posi-
tions include weekend hours. Apply
Tuesday - Wednesday, 12pm-3pm, Bra-
dy's The Plaza or Carolina Eat Mall
locations, or call Becky Vaughn, 756-
3140.
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Are you looking for employment? We
are looking for caring, compassionate
individuals who love children to work
as full and part time teachers at our
corporate child care center located in
RTP. If you are interested, please call
(919)549-4802.
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN), INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, & GOOD
PAY. FIND OUT HOW TO
START THE APPLICATION
PROCESS NOW! CRUISE EM-
PLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL
800-276-4948 EXT. C53629.
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL is seeking qualified in-
dividuals to teach aerobic classes
through its Employee Recreation and
Wellness Department. Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time basis.
Interested candidates should contact
Gilian Tyndall Between Sam- 4:30pm
at (919)816-5590.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC 27113.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
Men are accepting applications for ad-
ditional Part Time Sales Associates.
Applicants must be committed to con-
tinuing our effort to make Brody's
famous for its excellent customer serv-
ice. Scheduling options include:
10am-2pm, 12pm-6pm, and 5pm-9pm.
Positions include weekend hours. Ap-
ply Tuesday - Wednesday, 12pm-3pm,
Brody's The Plaza or Carolina East
Mall locations, or call Becky Vaughn,
756-3140.
WEEKEND (PART-TIME) SE-
CURITY Officers needed for large in-
dustrial site in Greenville, Pay starts at
$6.60 per hour. Must be 21 yrs old and
have no criminal record. Qualified ap-
plicants will be subject to a buck-
ground investigation. Apply Tues -
Thurs. 9am - 5pm. EOE. (Previous
applicants need not re-apply) Guards-
mark Inc 3219 Landmark St Suite
9B, Greenville, NC
DEPENDABLE NON-SMOK-
ING GRADUATE student to care
for 9 mo. old in my home Mon - Fri.
11:30am - 5:30pm. References and
transportation required. 355-0394.
LEEWAY PRODUCTIONS IS
CURRENTLY accepting applica-
tions for summer session interns. Gc:
valuable hands-on music industry ex-
perience while gaining ECU course
credits. Call 753-8566 for more infor-
mation.
WANTED FEMALE STUDENT
TO live in my home starting 897 to
care for my 14 year old daughter. I'll be
gone apptox. 3 days a week. Must be
dependable and have own transporta-
tion. I'm 20 minutes outside of Green-
ville. Great job for right person. 946-
8754.
KELLY SPRAKER YOU ARE a
True Friend I could not have gotten
through the SGA campaign without
you! No matter what obstacles stood
in our way, wc overcame them! Your
persistence towards Monkey, J.E J.P
Skinnyboy, and the greek girls arc only
another chapter in our book We
stood up for what we believed in and
the students lost. Love ya Always,
CLIFFIE! Get ready to prepare for
Spring '98.
ALPHA PHI AND CHI OMEGA:
We haven't forgotten about yon guys.
We hope that this semester has been
going well for both of you and can't
wait to get together before the end of
the year! From you sister sorority, Pi
Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE NEWEST sisters of Alpha Phi!
Kristen Kecley, Brooke McKeei, Janet
Sharpe, Chandrea Triplett and Kaki
Winstead. Welcome to our sisterhood.
Love, your sisters.
DELTA ZETA WOULD LIKE to
congratulate Scott Forbes, Sean Mc-
Manus, Lisa Smith and Leslie Pulley
on being elected to SGA. Wc know
you will do a great job.
ZETA WOULD LIKE TO thank
all the guys that helped us celebrate
Mardi Gras for our 10th annual cele-
bration. We had a great time with our
masks and beads as wc danced the
night away! Love, the sisters of Zeta
Tau Alpha.
PI DELTA SOFTBALL PLAY-
ERS: great job last Monday night!
Hopefully this means we're on our way
to softball championship 2. Keep it
up! Love, the sisters and pledges.
CONGRATULATIONS LEIGH
ANN WATKINS on your engage-
ment to Nelson Jones. We wish you
the best! Zlam, Your Zeta Sisters.
ALPHA PHl CONGRATU-
LATES ERIN Kulbiedaon being ac-
cepted into the Occupational Therapy
program. Good Luck! Love Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
MARIAH CHEEK on president of
order of Omega. We know you will do
a great job. Love your Delta Zeta
Sisters.
TO PI DELTA'S LAMBDA
pledges: You guys are really doing a
fantastic job! Never give up and keep
those heads high because we love you
guys! The Big surprise is vet to come.
Do you have any clues yet? Love your
sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS LEIGH
ANN ON your engagement to Nel-
son. I'm so happy for you both. Iove
PRODUCTION MANAGERS needed
to run paint crews at local apartment
complexes in Wilmington, Raleigh, and
the Greensboro areas during the sum-
mer. S5.000 salary plus $1,000
bounus. Experience preferred. Call 1-
800-477-1001 and ask for Mr. Helfrich.
More- than ZOpOO
poT&rTfiaf cA$0Mor
ooid &o this ad.
Wouloln't how fifce- H" h
bo for ww Mne&?
328-2000
Make
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per He & Mileage
MailFax Resume:
�tea
PO. B� 370
Core City, NC 28529
Fax: (919)637-2125
Near Greenville, Kinston, New Bern
Hiring Now!
We are accepting applications for full and part time
seasonal positions in our Catalog Sales Department.
Duties include taking customer calls, placing orders,
and providing information to customers. Customer
service andor previous telephone sales experience
required. Flexible shifts available. Full time seasonal
positions also available in our Distribution Center.
Duties include loading and unloading trucks, pulling
and packing orders, and general warehouse work.
Priority given to applicants who can work a full time
schedule during May, June, and July. Apply at
Overton's Corporate Center Office, 111 Red Banks
Road, Between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M Monday-
Friday. EOE
your Little Sis, Marti
CONGRATS ZETA TAU AL-
PHA on your softball victory Keep
up the good work and Trudy watch out
for those flying balls! Zlam, Your Zeta
Sisters.
TO THE BROTHERS OF Sigma
Nu, thanks for a great time Wednesday
night and thank-you for coming out
the bikini contest to support us. Love
the sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
KELLY WOODELL on winning the
Sigma Alpha Epsilon bikini contest.
You did great! Wc love you! Love the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS kTR
STEN NAPIER FOR receiving a
scholarship in art. Wc all know how
hard you work and are glad you are be-
ing rewarded! Love your Delta Zeta
Sisters!
BEACH VOLLEYBALL ENTRY
DEADLINE: be sure to sign up for
beach volleyball by 5:00 pm on April 10
in the Student Recreation Center
main office. Sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.
GREENVILLE NOW (NATION-
AL ORGANIZATION for Women)
will meet Wednesday, AtJril 9, 5:30 pm
at the Szechuan Garden Restaurant.
ECU women and other Greenville area
women are invited to attend. For in-
formation. Call 756-8973.
TUE APRIL 8 - GUEST RECI-
TAL, John Michael Parris, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm Wed
April 9 - Faculty Recital, Elliot Frank,
guitar, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00pm Fri April 11 - Early Music En-
semble, Thomas Huener. Director,
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 1800
S. Elm St Greenville, 8:00pm Sun
April 13 - Guest Recital, Paul Katz, cel-
lo, from Rice University, Houston,
Texas, with faculty Fritz Gearhart, vio-
lin, and Kelley Mikkelsen. cello, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm Mon
April 14 - University Chorale, Janna
Brendell, Conductor and Chamber
Singers, Rhonda Fleming, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 8:00pm Tues
April 15 -Junior Recital, Whitney-Cole
Kleinschuster, voice and Senior Reci-
tal, Thereas Stone, voice, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00pm. For additional
information, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370.
FIESTA NIGHT: JOIN us for the
opening of the outdoor pool at the
Student Recreation Center with priz-
es, food, games, and much more at
Fiesta Night on April 10 from 5:00pm
to 7:00pm at the Student Recreation
Center. Sponsored by the Department
of Recreational Services.
GOLF SINGLES ENTRY
DEADLINE: Be sure to enter for
the golf singles by 5:00pm on April 9 in
the SRC main office.
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS TU-
TOR TRAINING workshop sched-
uled - (Greenville) - Teach an adult to
READ. Literacy volunteers of Ameri-
ca-Pitt County is holding a tutor train-
ing workshop beginning on April 24, at
7pm. The workshop consists of five
training sessions. The sessions will he
held on Monday and Thursday even-
ings. Volunteers will learn to teach
functionally illiterate adults how to
read. Call 752-0439 today for more in-
formation or to register for the tutor
training workshop. Workshop dates:
Thursday, April 24, Monday, April 28,
Thursday, May 1, Monday, May 5,
Thursday. May 8.
THE 1997 SPRING HEALTH
Fair will be held Wednesday April 9
from 3-6 pm in the backyard area in
front of the Student Recreational Cen-
ter. There will be booths from organi-
zations of health related interest like
the American Lung Association and
Project Assist. Many activities arc
scheduled including vocal duo Duality
and prizes are to be given away. Call
the office of Health Promotion and
Well Being at 328-6793 or stop by 210
Whichard for more information.
ADULT STUDENT FAMILY
FUN Day will be held Saturday, April
12, 1997 at the Mendenhall Student
Center. Bring picnic lunch for your
family plus two. RSVP by 4997 to
328-6881. Children and students free
admission to SRC. Adult guests $5.00.
Come Join The Fun
AMA MEETING: THE american
Marketing Association is having a gen-
eral meeting tonight in GCB 1029 at
6:00. Guest speaker Don Boldt, Direc-
tor of the Business Graduate Program.
New officer nominations will be held.
You'll be surprised what we're doing
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
C919)
RESEARCH REPORTS
Uf$lLAfifyoflrrlorm�ti�?riinU.S.
ti.27i rones-�x susvars
Oder Catalog Today with Visa ' MC v COD
raSaV 800-3510222
Or, rush S2.00 �: rMwe�i MMMN
11322 Ware ve 206-RR. Los Angeles CA 90025
TYPING SERVICES AVAIL-
ABLE, $2.00 per typed page, fast
and accurate. Call Debra Rhodes, 757-
0495.
ADULT TOY PARTY - for women
only! Earn free products just fot host-
essing: a party, f a a romance special-
ist t(�i 752-5333 and ask f r Join.
ITS NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands
of awards available to all students. Im-
mediate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES -
FULL-TIME, PART-TIME and
information that can change
your life. Check website
WWW.McKeel.comCcrtified.
Don't delay.
advertise with us.
3ZB
YADS
PSX COLUMN INCH
RATEe$5.50 PER COLUMN INCH
THE GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics is look-
ing for volunteers to help with the
1997 Spring Games. The Games will
be held at JH Rose High School Stadi-
um, on Thursday, April 17, 1997. An-
yone interested in volunteering should
attend the Special Olympics Volunteer
Orientation. The orientation will be
held at Mendenhall Student Center in
the Multi-Purpose Room on Monday,
April 14 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm. For
more information call 830-4541.
2ND ANNUAL FLATLAN-
DER'S FLING climbing competi-
tion: come be apart(of the indoor
climbing competition here at the
Student Recreation Center on April
19. Be sure to register by 6:00pm on
April 10 in the Student Recreation
Center main office. Sponsored by the
Dept. of Recreational Services.
BACKPACKING: SHENAN-
DOAH NATIONAL Park, Va: join
us for a day of backpacking in Virginia
on April 25. Be sure to register by 6:00
pm on April 11 in the Student Recrea-
tion Center main office. Sponsored by
the Department of Recreational Serv-
ices.
SENIORS AND GRADUATE
STUDENTS graduating in May or
the Summer may still register with Ca-
reer Services for help in your job
search! Come to our Orientation on
Tue. April 8 at 3:00 or Mon. April 14 at
2:00pm. Learn how to use the many
services available to you such as inter-
views on campus, resume referral to
employers, reference credentials) file,
internet job searching, job listings and
much more!
i


Title
The East Carolinian, April 8, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 08, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1200
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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