The East Carolinian, April 3, 1997







V
THURSDAY
APRIL 3,1997
rolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
lan
Candidates for President
Scott R. Forbes
Cliff Webster. Jr.
Candidates for Vice President
Sean McManus
Johnathan Hoggins
James Michael Kaltenschnee
Candidates for Treasurer
Lisa Anne Smith
Myeisha McQueen
Candidates for Secretary
Leslie Ann Pulley
Kelly Spraker
Total
1766
747
1742
774
2555
Sean McManus
SGA Vice President
John Henderson, freshman, casts his vote yesterday for SGAs new leaders.
PHOTO BT MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
Survey raises question of gender equality in UNC
KELLY LASSITER
STAFFFACULTY ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Rnne? from a survey on gender equality con-
ducted by a committee at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill prompted TEC
to look into gender equity among all 16 uni-
versities within the UNC-system, including
ECU. .
Sarah Manekin, chairwoman of the Human
Relations Committee at the University of
North Carolina-Chapel Hill, conducted a sur-
vey and perceived a lack of gender equity in
the faculty. The committee plans to circulate a
petition expressing its concerns about gender
issues throughout classrooms, residence halls,
and Greek houses before sending it to
Chancellor Michael Hooker.
"We are not disputing the study, but are
rather showing our support for gender equity
in the faculty and in the faculty salaries,
Manekin said. .
As of ftll 1995, the number of full-time fac-
ulty in all North Carolina Universities totalled
8,498. 5,790 males dominate the total number
of faculty while women tarried with 2,708.
The numbers showing the academic ranks
for'males and females revealed that women
across the UNC-system consistently landed
the least desirable jobs. At N.C. State
University, for example, the number of male
professors was 591 while the number of female
professors was only 51. Appalachian had 205
male professors and 45 female professors.
UNC-Chapcl Hill had 680 male professors
and 105 females.
In summary, men employed by the univer-
sities of North Carolina outnumbered women
by 2337 to 373
in the rank of
professor,
1664 to 738 in
the position of
associate pro-
fessor and
1151 to 837 in
the assistant
professor cate-
gory.
At ECU,
the workforce
consisted of
2,075 women
and 1,599
men in 19.
Although
women com-
pose 56.5 per-
cent of the
faculty, men have a tremendous lead in the
precentagc of faculty in the highest academic
rank of orofessor. Of ECU's professors, 86.5
percent are men and 13.5 are women.
In the chemistry department at ECU,
there arc three full-time women and 17 full-
time men.
"We try to recruit as many females as pos-
sible said Dr Chia -ya Li, chair of the chem-
istry department. "It has been this way for
many, many years. We would like to have more
females, but there is always an overwhelming
response from males when jobs are adver-
tised L � cAa
The School of Business has a ratio of 49
males to 13 females working full-time, 49:13.
"I don't look at it as an equity issue said
Beth Eckstein, director of economic educa-
tion. ul think they (the department) hire for
qualifications. 1 don't know of females being
Universityof North Carolina
East Carolina
205
33
34
or feeling discriminated against
Dr. Lillian Robinson, an
author and professor of English at
ECU, says otherwise.
"The slippage is that many
believe that female presence is
the same as feminist presence
Robinson said. "Women are usual-
ly perceived as disruptive and
biased. This is where we get the
myth of the feminist takeover
Dr. Mumtaz Dinno, chair
and professor of physics, explains
that there is only one part-time
female staff member in the
department.
"We have one female worker
and she is superb Dinno said. "She is one of
the best we have had
"There are tremendous resources available
ml Ml!
in the academic disciplines for figuring out
something that has an impact on understand-
ing ourselves as women as welt as making
changes in the world Robinson said. "It is not
enough, but it is a beginning
�of North Carolina outnumDcreo women ���� ' ' - �
Rec Center requires access fee from summer school students
���fhmmPr. The outdoor pool is 30 by 40 feet andI is suitable for to
BECKY ALLEY
HOUSING AND CONSUMATORY ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
ECU students who began paying for the new Student
Recreation Center before they could use it will now have to
pay an access fee to use the facilities this summer.
iw students enrolled in summer school, the fees are
included in their tuition. However, students not enrolled in
summer school will be required to pay $60 or $30 per summer
session to use the new recreation center.
"We're trying to accommodate students who may or may
not be in summer school but have been paying regular fees
during the fall and spring semesters Nance Mize, director ot
recreation services, said. �
Seniors graduating in May will also be able to purchase the
summer pass for $60. They will have this privilege until Aug.
1, when they are considered alumni and are required co pay
the alumni membership fee of $240 per year.
After a student pays for their summer pass, they will
receive a membership card similar to the staff membership
cards with an expiration date.
The Rec Center will be open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. dunng
both summer sessions. Before and after the sessions, it will
operate under its breakholiday hours of 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
The facility is planning to continue to operate all ot the
regular services, including aerobic classes during the summer,
as well as planning special events.
"We're working with student focus groups to poll them to
see what special events they would like to have in the sum-
mer Mize said. ,
Though in the past summer programs have failed to pro-
duce much student participation, Mize is hopeful that with
the new facility summer programs will tlounsh.
"We are already planning to have pool parties centered
around the outdoor pool Mize said.
The outdoor pool will have its grand opening April 10 in
conjunction with the recreation center's Fiesta Night.
The pool hours are not finalized yet; Mize expects it to be
open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. for "prime-time sunning.
The outdoor pool is 30 by 40 feet and is suitable for leisure
swimming, water vollevball and water basketball. There is
also a large deck surrounding the pool for sunbathing.
Mize said the recreation center staff is looking forward to
seeing student utilization of the facilities this summer, bven
if the utilization numbers are low, Mize said the recreation
center will not close this summer under any circumstances.
Several vouth sport programs and adventure programs
have also been planned for the new facility. However, these
programs will not interfere with member usage of the recre-
ation center. . .
"There is a lot of opportunity for everyone now that Iw.
not been available in the summers past due to the new facil-
ity Mize said.
THURSDAY
lifestyle 7
Kiss's Criss meows
to us
opinion
Election promises
need to be kept
. sports11
Tennis team
victorious over
Seahawks
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBUCATlOh "
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyriaf 'tow �
Students reap benefits of mentorships, peer involvement
THURSDAY:
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phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uuiec�ecuvm.cis.ecu.8du
COREY ALGOOD
MINORITY STUDENT ISSUES
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Over the past years the Office of Minority Student Affairs has
sought help for all minority students to achieve academic and
social success at ECU. Recently the department of minorities
affairs and the Ledonia Wright African-American Cultura
Center have created a minority Peer Mentoring Program for all
incoming freshman.
The program is designed to aid the minonty students by
providing mentors with academic support, cultural sustenance,
bi-weeklv tutorials, answers to academic and social adjustment
challenges and systematized referrals of minonty students to
appropriate university support resources.
After going through the program the mentees will have
received social and academic support, along with a lasting
knowledge of college living. .
To be a peer mentor one is selected on the basis ot academ-
ic merit, leadership abilities and must be at least a snohomore
student with one completed year of school at ECl.
After meeting all qualifications the peer mentors are
assigned to approximately 5-8 students, with whom they will
work for the entire school year, bi- weekly on a one hourbas.s
Normally, the peer mentor program w.ll hire 30-45 students
who will begin their training prior to their first meeting with
the incoming freshman. Some of their training includes learn-
ing about the location of specific school resources and being
able to answer typical questions raised by ��W�5
Once rheit training is complete the annual ECl Minority
Visitation Day program marks the beginning introduction to the
Pr�Then'peer mentors are introduced during the program and
then they give campus tours to all potential ECl students.
Students are then afforded the opportunity to � .fj
mentors and ask them any questions concerning their merest.
"Most of the students who come to.visit ECLare also look-
ing at other universities as Carolina. Duke, and A& T andUe
hope this will be a strategy to make up their minds, said Peer
Mentor Director Tativ Benson Clayton.
Apparently, the peer mentoring program did leave a last ng
visitors felt that the program v.as way beneficial m creating a
strong foundation to handle problems and challenges of college
Furthermore, regardless of whether incoming minority stu-
dents need mentors or not v.s.tors liked the idea that students
arc all assigned to one mentor in order rhat no one will be for-
SOttThe program also offers many opportunities, not only for
SEE MENTOR AGE 4





"
2 Thursday, April 3, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
UNC System contemplates Internet
registration, grade checks
across the state
Strawberries in several states could be tainted
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Thousands of schoolchildren across the nation may
have been exposed to the hepatitis A virus by eating frozen strawberries
that were shipped to North Carolina and 16 other states, with much of the
fruit ending up in school cafeterias.
So far the onlv reported illnesses linked to the tainted berries are in
Michigan where about 151 students and teachers have been sickened,
apparently after eating strawberries provided at lunch, federal authorities
said Tuesdav. ,
In Los Angeles, as many as 9,000 youngsters and adults may have been
exposed School and health officials determined that fruit cups served last
week in 18 Los Angeles public schools may have been contaminated with
the virus.
Commissioners cut money for Arts council
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Mecklenburg County commissioners today voted 5-
4 to cut county money to arts groups that offer "exposure to perverted
forms of sexuality
The resolution will eliminate county funding for the Arts & Science
Council which this fiscal year will receive $2.5 million to distribute to arts
groups. Beginning July 1, commissioners will consider requests from arts
groups on a case-by-case basis.
The resolution would deny county money to art agencies that promote,
advocate or endorse behaviors, lifestyles and values that seek to undermine
and deviate from the value and societal role of the traditional American
familv j i
For some commissioners, that includes works depicting gays and les-
bians such as the Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Angels in America: A Gay
Fantasia on National Themes which the Charlotte Repertory Theatre
performed last spring. It also would include "Six Degrees of Separation,
which the theater company opens April 9.
r-oss the natior
The 19th Annual Saint Stupid's Day Parade brought
many smiles
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco knows how to do stupid right.
People dressed in pink tutus, bunny ears, Santa Claus suits and hiking
boots strutted Tuesday in the 19th Annual Saint Stupid's Day Parade.
Tony, alias 'Y-Not' (Tony spelled backwards), showed up in a one-piece
purple fur jumpsuit. Purple Haze he called it.
The paraders marched, drummed and kazooed their way through the
city's financial district - paying homage to everything from comet "Hail-
Bopp" to the Federal Reserve Bank.
The April Fool's Day tradition is sponsored by the self-proclaimed First
Church of the Last Laugh, which has little discernible reason for existing
other than the midday march.
Mock Cattle Drive Sends Cows Running Everywhere
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - Perhaps a steak house was not the brightest of
destinations for a mock cattle drive.
Mbre than 100 cattle ran amok Tuesday in downtown Kansas City as rid-
ers attempted to steer them to the Hereford House, which specializes in
T-bones, sirloins and ribs.
The cattle drive was sponsored by a local radio station as a fun way to
relive the old days of the Wfest.
JACQUELINE D. KELLUM
RTS NI STUDIES ISSUES
STFF WRITER
ECU officials are currently juggling
possibly bringing new technologies
to students which would allow them
to register for courses and checkftheir
course grades over the Internet.
While this new service to ECU
students is in the early planning
stages, it has already been imple-
mented by other schools. North
Carolina State University students
have been able to view their grades
Brown & Brown
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on the Web since spring semester of
19.
"We currently have that in place
here. Any student can look at her
grades on the Internet said
Sherwood Brvan, associate registrar
at NCSU.
According to John Snowden of
ECU Computing and Information
Systems (CIS). ECi: students may-
be able to view their grades on the
Web as soon as the end of this semes-
ter.
Both NCSU and ECU are cur-
rently checking into Web registra-
tion.
"The thing that most students
really want, that we're working on, is
being able to register on the
Internet Bryan said.
Though CIS is tryng to imple-
ment Web registration, Bryan says
they want to be sure they are fully
prepared.
"I want to make sure that securi-
ty is sufficient Bryon said. "We have
a good security system�you can't
get in, but I know there is a lot of
concern about how secure the Web
is
There are similar concerns about
security here, in addition to concerns
about whether or not the current sys-
tem can handle the onslaught of reg-
istration.
"The more we advance into this,
the more emphasis will be placed on
network stability Snowden said.
However, though CIS said test
programs for Web registration might
begin as early as this summer, using
orientation students was not con-
firmed by the registrar's office. The
possibility of posting grades on the
Web at the end of the semester also
was not confirmed.
For now. the only official word is
these services are being considered,
and there are many factors to be con-
sidered before any final decisions can
be made.
Professor uncovers mysrery, meaning behind New Age Movement
KARLA JONES
ORIENTTION'(.RNKRl. COl.l.FOF.
ISSI'FS
STVFF WRITER
Many people do not know the mean-
ing behind the New Movement and
its philosophies. Critical questions
about the movement, its positions
and its effects on society will be
dicussed and answered tonight.
Tonight, in Great Rooms One and
Two in Mendenhall Student Center,
a lecture will be given on the Bible
and the New Age Movement.
Dr. Seodial Deena, from the
department of English, will be
answering a lot of questions people
have about the New .Age and com-
pare it to the teachings in the Bible.
He wants to educate people about
the New Age so we will not be vul-
nerable to its teachings.
He uses examples of the cults
that followed one leader to the trag-
ic endings of their lives. The reason
for this is because they believe the
new age of religion they created was
the absolute truth.
"Satan comes to humans and
makes them think they are in touch
with God" Deena said. "In most
cults they have ended in suicide,
because they believe that to lie
absent from the body is to be in the
presence of God, which Paul spoke
about in the Bible. Most New Age
teachings follow rhe Bible but take
things out of context
Deena will be using some scrip-
tures from the Bible to some of his
points across. He also will be some
information from the book. The
Aquarian Conspiracy by Marily
Ferguson.
The basis behind this lecture is
to use the Bible against the New Age
teachings. Then people will be able
to judge for themselves whether its
teachings come from the word of
God.
Deena's main concern in having
this lecture is to answer some of the
questions students have about God.
In some of his classes the students
had a lot of questions about the
SEE NEW AGE. PAGE 4
No arrests, no supects in
near fatal incident
26-51 S3JtdX3
3BS ui papnpu) ion si jaisew xmeqoj
� 'iaiaiepsiQj
j E F F (� F. N T R Y
SVFKM M! TK WM'OK I TIO ISSI IS
STUK WRITE
A fight that started in the balcony
section of BWVs resulted in over
$800 in damage and one person sus-
taining severe lacerations.
According to police reports Jim
Carlyle, 36. of Clearwater, Fla suf-
fered severe cuts as the result of a
falling object (a speaker) during the
altercation. Several people were
involved in the incident, which
occurred around 11:15 p.m. on
March 25. There have been no
arrests in connection with the fight.
Steve Ormiston reported the
incident to the police. Police reports
indicate that several things were
damaged during the fight, including
a 15-foot section of wooden railing
on the balcony, a neon Icehouse sign,
a speaker, and there was also dryvvall
damage. The total damages were
reported at S810.
"Numerous people were
involved in the fight, which did
result in the injurv of one person
said Greenville Police Sgt. Joe
Friday. "We found one person's wal-
let in the building that was appar-
ently dropped during the alterca-
tion, but there are currently no war-
SEE BAR BRAWl. PAGE 4
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r
3 Thursday. April 3. 1997
1
news
The East Carolinian
i
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March 18
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of his bicycle from the rack
south of Garrett Hall.
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of his parking decal hang tag
t from his vehicle.
Harassing phone call - A resident
of White Hall reported receiving
harassing phone calls from a student
during the semester.
March 19
Larceny - A staff member report-
ed the larceny of a VCR from a
meeting room in Mendenhall.
AssistRescue - A staff member
was transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital by Greenville
Rescue after fainting in
Mendenhall.
AssistRescue - A student was
transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital by ECU Police.
The resident of Garrett Hall was
attempting to open his window
when it felt on his finger. The stu-
dent declined to have the rescue
squad called.
Damage to property - A resident
of Greene Hall reported someone
broke a window on her vehicle and
dented her vehicle while it was
parked north of White Hall.
March 21
Annoying notes - A student from
Fletcher Hall reported finding sev-
eral annoying notes on his door.
Damage to real property - A resi-
dent adviser reported that a student
from Garrett tore down a bulletin
board in Fletcher Hall. The student
was issued a campus appearance
ticket.
Accident - A student from
Fletcher reported that a situation
from Jones had backed into her vehi-
cle south of Jones Hall.
March 20
Damage to property - A resident
of Aycock Hall reported someone
scratched his vehicle parked east of
Aycock Hall.
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of his parking decal from his
vehicle parked at Ficklen and
Charles.
March 24
Unauthorized entry - A staff
member icported that someone
entered her office and changed the
settings on ner computers. No evi-
dence of forced entry was found and
nothing had been taken.
Larceny - A Joyner Security
Guard stated that he mispl -ed his
hand held radio and could � locate
AssistRescue - A student fainted
in Joyner Library. Rescue evaluated
her condition and released her at her
request.
transported by Greenville Rescue to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
from Rawl Building after experienc-
ing an asthma attack.
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of her license plate from her
vehicle parked at Curry Court.
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of his license plate from his
vehicle parked at Curry Court.
March 27
AssistRescue - A student was
transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital by Greenville
Rescue after she hit her head on a
piece of equipment in the Howell
Science Complex.
Failure to appear - A student was
served with two orders for arrest for
failing to appear on driving while
impaired and license plate charges.
Damage to property - A student
reported damage to the sunroof on
his vehicle parked east of Aycock
Hall.
March 26
AssistRescue - A student was
March 31
Accident - A student was struck
by a vehicle at Wright Circle. The
student told the driver she was not
hurt, but later realized she was
injured.
Misuse of telephone - A resident
of Fletcher Hall reported that stu-
dents have been using her tele-
phone without her consent.
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of his wallet and books that
were left unattended in the refer-
ence section at Joyner Library.
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i
4 Thursday, April 3. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Researchers announce discovery of cancer "switch" Q3
NEW YORK (AP) - Scientists have
isolated a substance they believe
triggers breast cancer and whose dis-
covery could lead to valuable
advances in early detection and
treatment of the disease.
Researchers at the State
University of New York-Stony Brook
said they found that the molecule
mitogen-activated protein kinase, or
MAP kinase, exists at levels five to
20 times higher in women wirh
breast cancer than in normal breast
tissue.
The discovery is reported in the
April Journal of CRmcal Investigation.
An accompanying editorial calls it
"an extremely exciting finding that
has the potential of identifying an
important therapeutic target
Bar brawl
continued from page 2
cants issued for anyone involved, and
the person whose wallet was found
does not have a local address Friday
said. "At this point I don't know of
Breast cancer strikes about
180,000 American women each year,
and is expected to kill 44,000 this
year.
Dr. Craig C. Malbon, vice dean of
Stony Brook's University Medical
Center and head of the research
team, said Tuesday that migration of
MAP kinase into the nucleus of a
cell signals the cell to begin replicat-
ing itself, causing cancer.
Previous research has shown that
MAP kinase signals cells to prolifer-
ate, Malbon said. The new research
established a link between extreme-
ly high levels of the molecule and
the growth and spread of breast can-
cer, he said.
Elevated levels of MAP kinase
also were found in the lymph nodes
any continuing investigation into the
matter
Various rumors have also been
called into TEC involving the med-
ical condition of Carlyle after the
fight, which were described as com-
pletely untrue by Eric Valera, who is
a co-owner of BW-3's.
"The guy is alive and well, and
the situation was handled as quickly
of breast cancer patients whose can-
cer spread to other parts of their
body; making the molecule a marker
for those so-called metastatic can-
cers, he said.
The discovery could allow doc-
tors to test for high levels of MAP
kinase in breast cells, allowing
detection of breast cancer even
before noticeable tumors develop,
Malbon said.
It also raises the possibility of
introducing special molecules to
cancerous cells designed to "turn
off" the MAP kinase cell.
Such targeted treatment in cases
that are detected early can be
preferable to the more scattershot
approaches of radiation therapy or
chemotherapy, Malbon said.
and as quietly as possible Valera
said.
Police reports indicate that
Carlyle was at the bar when the fight
caused one of the speakers upstairs
to fall, striking Carlyle in the head
and causing severe lacerations.
Carlyle was unable to be reached for
comment.
New age
continued from page 2
Bible and religion that he was con-
cerned about and wanted to answer.
"My job is to share information with
the students, so they can recognize
the true God against the false ones
Deena said.
In the lecture Deena will discuss
different forms of New Age teach-
ings. Pathecism, Reincarnationism,
Relativism and Esotercism are some
of the teachings he wiil discuss.
Deena encourages students and
anyone else who has any questions
about religion, the Bible or God to
come to the lecture.
Mentors
continued from page t
the mentce, but the mentor.
"I didn't have a mentor when I
was a freshman, but as a mentor I got
to meet a lot of people and make an
impact on other people's lives said
sophomore Edwina Mckoy.
Also, the positions that mentors
hold are also called work study so
they may be able to obtain financial
aid.
t
The "peer mentor program
promises to be a strong organization
that will continue ro supplement
the needs of minority students on
campus. If anyone is interested in
becoming a mentor they should con-
tact the Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center before next February when
they began to hire new mentors.
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Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday. April 2 Through April 8,1997 In Our Greenville Area Stores Only.
The Right To Limit Quantities. Norsold To Dealers, We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps
itui ii��i�





T
S Thursday. April 3. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian

-
�I �

eastiSarolinian
BRANDON WADDELL Editor
AMANDA ROSS Spwts Editor
PATRICK IRELAN Photo Editor
CELESTE WILSON Production Manager
CAROLE MEHLE HM Copy Editor
ANDY FARKAS Staff llluitrator
HEATHER BURGESS Win Editor
Sirrt�TOrji�li�riJia rrg,ltrltlltClir
oprtnrt of rr� Edriorial tart It. Eat twmm aakaiMi iiem ta rht idriB. liniart t 29) wde. alKk nar fei Kind fur daancr or tmrtiL T1� Em
CmrWtn mmtt to riora a � or trim Mn kr tttUlm1lmmmiaU10lUBt4)0t0&UtUHK0mmW1m
Cmrfmm. AMcmn Mdnrj ECU. Gmnt.Vm3Si.fitrtoimm.alin3lMM
Matt Hege MMftMiDrrwm
Marguerite benjamin NanEditor
AMY L POYSTER AstrsutitNewsErJrior
Jay Myers Utrwyto Edtim
DALE WILLIAMSON tersnmWisiyllEiliBr
Srrnia to ECU tornmunity vra B35.to it Cwhinii tmtm O.MB
oumew
Editor's note: Due to circumstances beyond our control, this piece was written prior to the
J" ticsults of the SGA election being made public knowledge. Our deadlines conflicted with the
: reporting procedures. For complete election results, check page 1.
; The election is over and the students have spoken�well, the ones who bothered to vote. We
�have several pieces of advice for our newly-elected SGA Executives.
First, be aware that those of us who voted for you did our part. You are in office to accomplish
goals in our best interests�not what will benefit you the most personally. Those of us who have
followed the election process in the last several weeks know where our candidates stand on the
issues that are important to us. That's why we either voted for you or for your opponent.
; j We hope your interests don't shift once you realize you've been elected by your fellow stu-
3 filents to lead. You now have the opportunity to turn all those great ideas into great realities.
' ��: At The East Caroimm, wc believe all the candidates are worthy of our respect for standing up
and running for office. All these candidates are aware of the public scrutiny that will be placed
on them for every decision they make. Who's really benefiting from the decisions made by our
leaders?
This question will be asked of each and every major decision the new administration makes,
just as it was asked of previous administrations.
� One major issue tackled recently by both candidates for president was safety on campus. Both
1 "Scott Forbes and Cliff Webster are in favor of increasing security, especially late night, on cam-
ftes and both have plans. Webster is in favor of researching a blue light system, whereas Forbes
-leans toward physical security. Physical security means more patrols and presence of campus
police.
Can there be an SGA election at ECU without bringing up parking?
Neither candidate can claim to bring a parking deck to campus because they both know they
�Cdbn't have the kind of power it would take to bring a parking deck to ECU in the coming year.
�. Finally, SGA Executives receiving tuition paid from student fees was another voter concern.
I Neither candidate is in favor of continuing the practice of receiving a salary, tuition, fees and
'rjook payment, but this practice still goes on in SGA's administration.
iji The talking is over. It's time for the winners of the election to stand up for us, the students
who elected them, and make the changes they all claim to be so desperate to make.
OPINION
Columnist
Address SGA issues better
To the Editor,
As the election nears and the
debates are, or should be, occurring, I
must admit that I feel quite ignorant
pertaining to my lack of knowledge
surrounding the events do not think
- .that I am alone in saying that I am fair-
ly contused as to what the different
candidates believe inare working
j towards, who all is running, and even
'the exact date of the elections. I know
�that Presidential Candidate Cliff
.�rfebster is strongly opposed to the
im
(primarily crooked equals my opinion
sue me) SGA receiving free tuition,
but is the other candidate, Scott
Forbes?
Has this and other questions like,
for example, dining problems and dorm
quality been asked? As a suggestion to
the student run paper, why not print
out an election info section with: the
various candidates and their stances on
issues; debates; ways to contact the
candidates (for questions); and where,
when and how to vote.
This would seem like an obvious
solution to previous low voter turnout,
and it is a wonder why this was not
really done before. If we, as students,
desire to improve our school and our
SGA (which seriously needs improving
presently) then we should all partici-
pate in the elections and cast our votes
intelligently
Chris R. Newton
Sophomore
Political ScienceCommunications
Wfcore
MCMUtM
Imagine this
You just got out of the most boring
lecture in your Biology class. You
start walking to your next destination
in a cationic state. You don't even
bother to look as you cross the street.
The next thing you know, you're
lying in a hospital bed with a doctor
standing over you. He just finished
explaining to you that you won't be
able to walk across the stage during
graduation. You won't be able to go
downtown dancing with your friends.
And avert worse, you'll never be able
to walk again.
I know; it's a pretty demented
thing to imagine, but if you don't,
then it could happen to you.
ECU's campus is tremendously
busy during the day. It's like rush
hour traffic between pedestrians and
motorists.
And guess what? Both think that
they have the right of way.
A pedestrian will keep walking,
saying to themselves "Pedestrians
have the right of way. You have to
stop What they don't realize is that
motorists are saying "Tall blonde boy,
10 points
It's a power struggle. I have found
myself in both predicaments before.
Wc are all in a hurry. Wc all have some
place to be at a specific time.
Therefore, we go as fast as we can
until something slows us down. Like
MM
PmAXLmA DAILY NEWS
The right of way
n-m
killing a pedestrian because we
rolled through that stop sign. Or
walking out in front of a car on Tenth
Street, causing them to swerve into
oncoming traffic. We don't realize it
until it's too late.
This time it's out of the hands of
ECU authorities. They could put a
traffic light at every corner on cam-
pus. However, I'll bet that some bozo
will still run the light because they
have to drop off a friend in front of
the Genera! Classroom building.
It's up to us. That's right. The
students have some sort of control
over this. We can all do our part to
make sure that no type of situation
like this ever happens on our cam-
pus.
Pedestrians need to be very cau-
tious of their surroundings. That
includes both cars and bicycles.
(Bikes can also do a lot of damage.)
W: need to make sure that we cross
the streets on the cross walks. I know
that it is a lot quicker to cross at
other places, but where is it safer?
After all, that is why cross walks were
invented.
Also, when we're getting ready to
cross, make sure the cars actually
stop. Don't keep walking, thinking
that they have to let you cross first,
because they don't. Motorists are
supposed to stop if you're in a cross-
walk, but it depends if you'd like to
bet your life on it. " �
I also know that driving down
College Hill at 15 MPH can be more
dreadful than that Biology class. And?
I'm not going to preach to you that?
you shouldn't do it because I catch;
myself going 35 down the hill.
However, we do need to stop and!
think for a moment. Yes, we're in aj
hurry to get to class. Wj know how;
hard it is to find a parking space
Now, stop and think about all of the!
students who live on Qotlepc Hijl
There are five residence halls on the;
hill. Each of them having hundreds
of students pouring out of thetrC
everyday to go to class. They dorftj
watch where they're going. Maybe;
you can help by slowing down. �
And motorists, I know that whdn!
you're driving on campus and JaC
pedestrian walks right in front of
your car with their noses stuck up im
the air, you just want to slam on trie!
gas to scare the living hell out (f
them. Just stop and think about what;
could happen. Instead, honk your.
horn as long as you can and scare rife!
hell out of them. Maybe next timeJ
they'll watch where they're walking.�
W: can all do our part to make!
ECU safer. So, be careful on campus!
whether you're walking or driving. Ir
really doesn't matter who has the
right of way. After all, everyone suf-
fers when someone gets hurt.
USA
MY M�M SAft ITS
IMMORAL To GET
ABWCpW.
mfhtmf
Beware the forces of suppression, however
cuddly they may claim to be. They will blindfold
your eyes and muffle your ears - until you can
hardly feel them stealing your brain
Michael Pakenham, journalist, 1996





T
6 Thursday. April 3, 1997
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Primitiv Man
By Karl Trolenberc

.11

f
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ACROSS
1 Bodies of water
5 Titled ladies
10 Croissant
14 Record
15 San Antonio
chapel
16 Early Ron
Howard role
17 Greedy
16 Untidy
10 Twisted
20 Capitol Hill VIPs
22 Towheads
24 Dye
25 Chair
26 Literary work
20 Boxer's
vulnerable point
33 Breathing
34 Actor Jeremy
35 Yale student
36 Caftan
37 Snares
38 Sausage
flavoring
30 � whiz
40 Declaim
41 Type ol code or
colony
42 Appraisal
44 Prejudiced
45 Descartes
46 Gratis
47 Wands
50 Migraine
54 Chester �
Arthur
55 � the bill (pays)
57 Shine
58 Title ol respect
50 Designer Perry
60 Limping
61 Post
62 Frail
63 Slaughter of
baseball
O 1997 Tnbun M�di� SrvioM, Inc
All nghts reMivad
ANSWERS FROM TUESD.
sP ArBJcihE STIS CAN
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ARE �A ROSE1
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The East Carolinian
tin
Pair sg
Vednesday, April 9,1297
3:00 - o:00 pm

Brickyard Area in front of the new Student Recreation Center

I Eastern Bicycle Freestyle Team Qg EC� Cheerleaders Qg) WZ�tB
(G) Duality � Aerobic Demons!ralic; @ SZZP SHOW
Prizes
Mountain Bike Rollerbladcs
8 Holes of Golf
Movies Passes
Barnes & Nobles Gift Certificate
Busch Garden Passes
Hats and T-shirts
Declining Balance Cards
and More
Booths .
Exercise and Fitness
Stress Management
Safer Sunning
Organ & Blood Donor Information
T.B. Testing
Blood PressureCholesteral Screening
Quit Smoking
and More
7th Annual
-L?l KAPPAALPHA
Greek Goddess
at the
ATTIC
M
�-
BR
Monday, April 7,1997
Doors Open at 9pm
HEADSiVS
DOWN
1 Depots: abbr.
2 Roof feature
3 Neat as �
4 Tranquilizer
cousin
5 Singer Vic
6 On the qui vlve
7 Church ritual
8 Printer's mea-
sures
0 Midwest crop
10 Automatons
11 Ajar
12 "Swedish
Nightingale"
13 Allows
21 Fatigue
23 Colleen
25 Incline
26 Top non-com
27 Bitter drugs
28 Lama land
20 Rasp
30 Unisex garb
31 Seaweeds
32 Brandish
34 Miffed
37 Bus offering
38 Erne
40 Augury
41 The � Piper
43 Did a laundry
chore
44 Obstreperous
46 Smelly
47 Singing voice
48 "I cannot tell �"
49 Mountain pool
50 Fissure
51 Tribe
52 Start tor sapiens
53 Lambs' mothers
56 Bullring
encouragement
s STEVE,
i i
H TIMES MAGAZINE VS. CURTIS StIWA THE GUARDIAN ANGELS
f
sm
TUESDAY APRIL 22rWZ 8� IN HENDRIX THEATRE
r&fy PRESENTED BY THE STUDENT IMON LEQURE COMMITTEE. FOR MORE jflffggg htm
HOTLINE AT 328 6004 OR VISIT UuR WEB SITE AT www.ecMuAtudentUn.onAHEnOMEPAGE.html





r
7 Thursday. April 3, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
reviews
Starflyer 59
Americana
��
'
The Make Up
After Dark
Sound Verite
:


if:
. JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Imagine my surprise when I walked
into CD Alley the other day and
found that not one, but two Make Up
CDs, After Dark and SoUndVerOe, had
Seen released within a few short
weeks of each other. After listening to
and loving their first release
(Destination: Love, Livt! At Cold Rice)
last year, f jumped at the chance to
check out their new releases. For
those of you who have not been intro-
duced to the bombastic funk gem
that is the Make Up, let me give you
tome background.
This may sound strange, but the
Make Up are like an old science fic-
tion story. One of those stones where
they pose questions like "What if the
Allies had lost tie war?" or "What if
Kennedy hadn't been assassinated?"
Kdh know, sort of like the perennial
Christmas film favorite It's A
WbmkrfalUfe starring Jimmy Stewart,
or the "Minor, Mirror" episode of
Star Trek where the crew enters an
alternate universe and Spock has a
goatee.
What the hell am I talking about?
I'll explain. The Make Up answers
the question "What if Prince had
begun his career in a punk band
instead of going into pop and soul
music?" The Make Up has the ability
to perfectly combine elements of the
paisley one with punk without
SEE MAXE UP. PAGE 10
John Davis
STAFT WRITER
Take U2s Boy, inject T. Rex's Ekctrk
Himior, sprinkle some Beach Boys on
top and add a dash of AJ Green. Chill
for 45 minutes and serve with a side
of Merle Haggard. What you have
doesn't taste quite like Starflyer 59,
but its pretty dam close.
Starflyer 59 is the brainchild of
boy wonder Jason Martin, who grew
up on both the schlock and the sub-
lime music of the late 70s and early
'80s. Starflyer is also a Christian rock
band, and the surprising thing about
them is that they're an exceptional
band. Unlike fellow God-rockers, like
the cheesy Jars of Clay or the very
unoriginal DC Talk, Starflyer 59 have
been creating some very powerful and
spiritual rock n' roll for a little over
three years.
Since the Christian music scene is
littered with trash, the appearance of
a genuinely good act is a major event,
something definitely worth being
chronicled. While cheese-ballad
bands like 4Him churn out more hon-
eyed smarm and posers like the
Newsboys continue to ape U2,
Starflyer 59 have been recording
some solid albums for three years
now, the latest of which is Amentum.
The bands first two records, each
titled Starflyer 59 and differentiated
only by their covers (the first was sil-
ver, the second gold), represented
the musical and emotional journeys of
Martin and, unlike other religious
acts, were rife with honesty and
power. Both of these were more like
solo projects for Martin, who played
guitar, bass and drums on marry of
those songs. With Americami, Martin
has been joined by two permanent
mates who have allowed Starflyer to
do something it hasn't to date: sound
like a band.
The two additions are drummet
Wayne Everett and bassist Eric
Campuzano. Though Martin is cred-
ited with writing all of the songs on
Americami, the tunes have a much
more organic feel to them, and the
SEE STAKFIVER SI. PAGE S
IT
'�a
Jig
� :

10
: �
f.
The Wbggles and The Pugs at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
4 Friday
April
3 Thursday
"An Evening With New Artist
Showcase featuring the Alison
Brown Quartet, Farmer Not So John,
Greg Howard and Vickie Pratt
Keating, at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre.
Jay Myers and Paul Edwards will
discuss the state of the local music
scene during The Roots Rock Show
On WZMB starting at 8:30 p.m. Be
sure to tune in and call with com-
ments.
Lecture with Dr. Seodial Deena,
"The Bible and the New Age
Movement at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall
Great Rooms One and Two.
Opera Theatre Production with
Stephen Blackwelder, director, at 8
p.m. in AJ. Fletcher Reciral Hall
through April 5.
Musical wonder, John Tesh, at
Walnut Creek in Raleigh.
Cobra Kahn with Plastic Applicator
and The Fly Bitches at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
Bindlestiff and Family Curcus at
the Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chape!
Hill.
5 Saturday
Dizzy Monk at Alive Nightclub in
Raleigh.
Ray Condo at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill.
Reggae Jam with Sunfire, Ark
Band, Razor Posse, Mickey Mills &
Steel, Imani, Ram Band and Jah
Daniel at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
FOR MORE IT'S SHOWTIME. SEE PAGE I
ii

We're Sorry!
Due to an error on our part, an announcement for yesterday's
Thespians of Diversity meeting was left out of Tuesday's
paper. We apologize for this and encourage all interested par-
ties to call Reginald Watson at 328-6684 for more informa-
tion. This is an important and vital group on campus that
needs your support. Please calf
Criss is the cat's meow
Pat reid
STAFF WRITER
When I heard Kiss was coming back
to North Carolina (April 4 at the
Dean Smith Center), 1 decided I had
to go. It was something that I had to
sec. So, I tried to do what I could for
tickets and in the process I managed
to snag an interview with Piter Criss,
the drummer for the rock legends.
After some technical difficulties,
(a snowstorm in New York had
wreaked havoc on the phone lines)
we were up and going.
�Pat Reid: How's the tour going?
Is everything going good for you guys?
�Peter Criss: Everything's going
great. We're in New "fork, we had a
huge snowstorm last night, got in
really lateobviously you can tell I'm
a little cranky because I just woke up
about ten minutes ago and our
phones were all blown outbut other-
wise it's stopped snowing and we're
going to Baltimore,
�PR: I had heard that some of the
original tensions from years ago were
resurfacing, but then you scheduled
al! these new dates. So, was there any
truth to those allegations?
�PC: No, that's ridiculous.
�PR: Everybody's still getting
along okay?
�PC: Yeah, we wouldn't have
rescheduled if we weren't We're
doing these other cities because we
passed them by, we felt bad 'cause
everybody didn't get a chance to see
us. So we rescheduled for our fans, to
let them sec us we play stadiums
up until Jury 5th. And after July 5th
we're going back in the studio and do
another album. Now we definitely
have to be getting along to go do that!
And then we plan on going back out
in 98 so yeah, we're getting along
great.
�PR: You're getting ready to
release another greatest hits (Greatest
KISS to be released April 8), and
there's been the Unplugged, and You
Wanted The BestYou Got the Best. I was
going to ask if any new music was
being developed.
�PC: No, it's not that we're releas-
ing a greatest hits, we're releasing all
new stuff. That's the excitement -
we're really freakin' out because we
haven't gone in the studio in proba-
bly 20 years and recorded together
and this will be all new stuff so we're
excited.
�PR: How did the reunion idea
come to you? Was it a total surprise or
was it alluded to over time or did you
just get a call one day?
�PC: It was a build-up. I was tour-
ing with my guys, and then Ace
(Frehley - guitarist) and I were doing
a couple of tours and having a good
time together.
And I got a call from Gene to drop
down, they were having a convention
and it was a really big thing
and I really wanted to take
my daughter - she's never
really seen all the big stat-
ues and all the stuff they
had laid out, KISStory
books and stuff through
the years ehc never real-
ly got the gist of it.
So I met Gene and Paul
for lunch, had a great time,
and started rehearsing
with them for this thing
and that went great I
said 'Ace, you know, I just
saw the guys, had a really
great time, I was on stage
we had a ball And then
before I knew it, our man-
ager George Suit called us
and asked 'Do you guys
want to do MTV and work
with them?' And we were
like, 'What are you crazy?'
He was like, 'no no, they
really want to do this, it
could be very cool
We walked on stage and the place
went nuts, people were standing up,
and started freaking out screaming
We looked at each other kinda like,
'Wow, this is cool! This is better than
we expected It was like magic
Before I knew it I got back off tour
and my manager's back on the phone
' saying, 'What do you think about a
reunion?' And I'm going, 'You're out
of your mind! The make-up? The cos-
Kiss founding
taw Crist
tumes? I don't think I'm ready for
that
So we did it! you know? We �"
into it, we took it seriously, it was life
we didn't want to be these four old
guys with pot bellies sticking out up
there and ruin everybody's dream
who saw us and maybe now coming
with their kidswhich they do. I see
SEE
PAGE!
O ft & S Jackie Chan kicks high as Supercop
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Jackie Chan, the world's most popular action film star, is back to kick major butt in his new video,
him this time around is the super-tough, super-hot Michelle Khan. Together they make for a martial arts am
PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW IMF. CINEMA
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFF.STYLE EDITOK
Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan has been repeatedly cited as the greatest
action film actor working today, and he definitely deserves this respected title.
Unlike the cliched" Hollywood heroes (Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester
Stallone, Jean-Claude Van Damme, etc.), Chan does not bore with oversized
guns and cornball one-liners. If anything, Chan has made the action genre (a
genre that is constantly choking on actors' egos, bloated budgets and formulaic
scripts) fun again.
While a typical Chan film may not exactly carry the intelligence of a Harrison
Ford or Sean Connery action vehicle, any action fan will not be bothered by this
fact. But of the fun of a Chan film revolves around its hokeyness, its silliness, its
absurdity.
Chan has been a huge box office draw in Hong Kong for a long time. There,
he is the king of cinema. In fact, he is the number one action star in the world.
His films consistently beat out American action films overseas. Despite his
astonishing success, Chan has been struggling to gain recognition here in the
States. His first stab at the American audience was in 1980 when he released The
Big Braid, which turned out to be a disappointing disaster. Instead of allowing
Chan to choreograph his own stunts and use his own stuntmen, the American
studio restrained Chan and tried to make him fit America's idea of what the
Asian hero should be like.
The Big Brawl was followed in '81 by a supporting role in the Burt Reynolds
racing epic, Gmnonball Rim, and, well, I don't need to say how bad a career move
that was.
With things looking grim in America, Chan returned to making Hong Kong
films where he had more control over his product.
Years and years went by and films were made, but mainstream America paid
little attention to Chan, mainly because they didn't know he was out there.
Then in 96, something clicked. Chan, who had been filming in such areas as
Canada and Australia (areas which allowed him to do his own stunts his way),
released Rumble m the Bronx in America. This film had already been a huge hit in
Hong Kong, and America proved to be no different. Rumble opened number one
at the American box office and gave Chan an established footing within the
American mainstream.
Now, Chan is constantly being courted by Hollywood producers to work for
them. As great as this all may sound, Chan's career is now at a tricky crossroads.
If he goes totally mainstream with Hollywood, his films will suffer as a result
simply because he will not be allowed to do many of his own stunts, and the
stunts won't nearly be as spectacular.
However, Chan seems to have learned from his previous mistakes.
Reportedly, Chan's newest potential Hollywood project, an action flick with
Wesley Snipes entitled Confucius Brown, is suffering production problems
because the American studio wants to do things its way Trie studio would rather
put a gun in Chan's hand as opposed to wowing audiences with his physical
prowess. Rumor has it that Chan is not pleased. Chan wants total control over
his American films now, and he will not compromise. He hasn't forgotten his fail-
ures with the American system the first time around. If Hollywood is unwilling
to work with him, then he might have to resort to other options.
If Chan manages to film without interference from Hollywood studios, if he
can film in other countries and import his films, then all should be right with the
martial arts world.
A perfect example of how fun, exciting and mind boggling a Chan film can
be, when Chan is allowed to strut his stuff his own way, is his newest video
release, Supercop. Riding high off the success of Rumble, Supercop was re-released
in American theaters last year. It had originally played in select American the-
aters in 92 as PoBce Story III, and it has been floating around the bootleg video
market for some time. Now even a Greenville fan can enjoy this rollicking romp.
The plot of Supercop is, admittedly, ridicuious. Chan reprises his cop rate
from the PoBce Story series, but this time he is teamed up with a female partner
the amazing Michelle Khan. Together, they go undercover and battle a drug car-
tel lead by the infamous Mr Big. As far as plot and character development goes,
that's all you need to know. The thrusting force here is not deep storylines or
intense character studies; instead, the action, humor and stunts make Suptmp
a definitive Chan flick.
Chan performs all his own stunts here, and the result simply leaves the view-
er awestruck Chan broke several ribs making this film, and he's lucky that is aft
he hurt. Chan makes the likes of Steven Segal and Chuck Norris look like pam-
pered wimps by hanging from a flying helicopter, balancing on the edge of
speeding train, and performing some of the best martial arts sequences you can
find on celluloid.
But Chan is not the only astounding physical presence here. Michelle Khan
almost steals the show as Chan's partner. Her skills as a fighter are on Chan's
level in every sense, and some of the film's best stunts are performed by hec Fn
one sequence, Khan is thrown from a speeding van onto the windshield of anoth-
er speeding vehicle. This is not a stunt person; it is Khan herself.
Director Stanley Tong (Rumble in the Bronx, Jackie Chads First Strike, uses his
camera to great effect, capturing the actors as they leap, fall, flip and crash alt
over the screen. While many die-hard Asian cinema fans prefer Chan to direct
his own films, Tong is a worthy and welcomed substitute.
Another saving grace for Supetrop, and Chan films in general, is the fact that
it doesn't take itself too seriously. Humor abounds, most of it slapstick In many
ways, Chan is the Asian equivalent of Buster Keaton or Charlie Chaplin, two
actors he greatly admires. Chan's ability to blend humor within the action is a
rare skill few have mastered, yet it is an essential ingredient that lifts Supetrop
several levels above karate crap like Chuck Norris' TV show Walker, Texas Ranger.
For all those new to the wacky world of Jackie Chan, be sure to keep the tape
playing during the end credits. A trademark of a Chan film is the fact that he
show� outtakes where accidents occurred during filming. In one outtakc, we wit-
ness Chan nearly falling off a running train. In another, we see Khan actually fall
off the car she was supposed to fall onto.
This is not Chan's way of exploiting the violence in his films. He does this to
illustrate that what he and his stunt crew do is dangerous and that people can,
and do, get hurt when performing these stunts. (Supposedly, Chan, as wdl as
anyone working on a Chan film, is blacklisted from all insurance companies in
Hong Kong.)
Chan is an inspiration to any filmmaker or lover of film. He is a dedicated,
passionate man working in a difficult business. Chan once said that he would do
anything for his movies. Watching Supercop one would have to believe him.
While Supercop is not Chan's best work (check out the first rhhee Sury or
Drunken Master 2 for examples of his best), it still towers above most action films
put out by the American mainstream within the last decade.
If you're bored with Hollywood fluff, give -Asian fluff a shot. Chan is just one
of many great Hong Kong talents pushing cinema to the edge. But that opinion
can be saved for another article.





)
8 Thursday. April 3. 1997
ifc
'style
The East Carolinian
��
4
Criss
continued from page
moms, dads, kids, -it's like a circus
ivjien wc hit town.
! And it'sit'smagic! 1 mean,
Ive're probably getting along better
flow than we ever did when we were
fogether. Not the fact that we're
older - whicfi is true - but we all have
kijfc, we're all majorly straight, I
niean; this is really a big thing for us
and we're enjoying it. We're really
having a good time.
�PR: What is your favorite part of
the show?
PC: When we open it up with
"Deuce I mean, when the curtain
drops and I look out and see this
insanity, it's an adrenaline that I can't
explain. There's never been a drug
that I've taken that can get you there
and I don't think they exist. If there
,were I'd take them again, but it's just
,gqod ol' rock n' roll. It makes you feel
�15 again. It's really cool. I think the
ibeginning. and of course the end, we
really blow the place up! Getting
bajck in the cars it's like, 'Wow! That
,was really something
,� ,PR: So has it gotten at all repe-
titious to you?
�PC: No! (Laughs) No, it hasn't.
And I think about that every night
when we're putting the make-up on
and we're telling jokes and I'm look-
ing at the set list. But I swear to God,
the minute we go up, we start walk-
ing down the ramp or wherever we're
walking to, and you start feeling the
rpaf of the crowd no, I don't get
(laughs), I don't get bored. It's really
pool.
. pPR: I'm coming to the show in
Chapel Hill, NC
, � PC: Excellent!
. "PR: What to you, is the biggest
highlight for the fans?
�PC: I say definitely bring a safe-
ty-belt because you're gonna have a
roller-coaster ride you'll never forget!
With the new technology We've
got a whole new sound system, it's
juSt unbelievable! The drums sound
like thunder, I mean, everything
sounds so clear.
But we've got new stuff, we just
added a really brand-new surprise
inhere Pauly goes flying over the
audience now. I mean this thing
comes out of nowhere and he jumps
on it and the next thing he's in the
back of the house and that's on
Ifwjve Gun It just takes the house
lavn. From where I'm sitting and
Juiatching him he's far away from us at
point and I'm going, 'Holy
ckerel! This is really unbelievable
Is
JAnd then Gene, of course, he's
jhg way above the rafters doing
Of Thunder My new drum
solo is very -1 think it's the best solo
I've put together with Gene. Gene
and I really worked on this and it's
flotljust a drum solo, it's not how fast
it can play � this is a bring-in-the-
irudience solo I'll kinda stand up
and I'll point, I want to hear these
;Heys, these answers back and forth,
and bring them into it, and they love
iif. mean the wfwle audience waits
for their part.
! � Ace is shooting rockets and blow-
ing up half of the top of the rafters
Hth the things he hits. There's dif-
ferent things he hits every night that
fall down by accident or he misses his
mark. It's really cool.
Gene's still spitting fire and blood
and all, but the way the new stuff is all
planned, with the computers and the
new different backstaging there's
this screen we have where no one can
miss us, no matter where you're sit-
ting, you can see us
All I know is we've never given
more. For what you're paying I'll
give them back their money if they
don't feel like they've gotten their
two hours worth. From the beginning
to the end, you don't sit down
unless you're cray! That's what you
tan expect.
Well Pat, now I'm on my third cup
of coffee you got me wide awake!
It's really exciting, you're really
going to dig it.
CONTINUED FORM PAGE 7
6 Sunday
The Accompanied Sonata of J.S. Bach
at 4 p.m. in Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 1800 South Elm Street.
Caedmon's Call at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
7 Monday
Percussion Players and Percussion
Ensemble with Mark Ford, director, at
8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
The Business with War Zone and
Patriot at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
8 Tuesday
Buck McCain with Alejandro
Escovedo and Grand National at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Eagle Bravo and Urinal at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
9 Wednesday
Lecture with Dr. Mary Ellen Soles,
"I, Claudia: Women in Ancient
Rome at 7 p.m. in Speight
Auditorium.
Faculty Recital with Elliot Frank,
guitar, at 8 p.m. at A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming
event that you'd like listed in
our It's Showtime column? If
so, please send us information
(a schedule would be nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
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AFTER 9P.M. DINE IN ONLY
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I
9 Thursday. April 3. 1997
ifestyle
The East Carolinian
Your ad could be here.
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Issuing credit cards to
college students stirs debate
Gene Tharpe
KNIGHT.RiniJF.RTRIBUNE NF.WS
In recent years, some banks have
solicited students heavily with credit
card offers, beginning with high school
seniors.
Estimates are that at least five mil-
lion college students have one or more
credit cards, and many are racking up
debts that might follow them for
years. Students are legal adults at age
18 and can sign contracts.
But is it ethical to market to them?
"I surely think there is an ethics
issue to be considered said Janet
.Adams, associate professor of manage-
ment at Kennesaw State University
"It's somewhat analogous to other
practices, such as tobacco companies'
targeting young people she said.
"Essentially, what they are doing is
trying to get people hooked at an early
age on the credit lifestyle
Nancy Judy, spokeswoman for the
American Bankers Association,
defended the practice of marketing to
college students.
"We are talking about adults, not
kids she said. "At 18 or older, college
students are adults, and although a
few get too many cards and get in
VtSA
trouble, the others should not be
denied the benefits of credit
Adams said she could see "a posi-
tive side" to the issue. They (the
SEE CREDIT. PAGE 10 ' '
Starflyer 59
continued from page 7
loud ones are free to really rip loose
and rock. Though Martin has skills on
the bass and drums, the finesse that
Everett has on the drums and the
melodic quality of Campuzano's bass
add a new dimension to an already
strong outfit.
The album opens with a rapid
drum roll and segues into the not-
quite-glam growl of "The Voyager a
steady rocker about the precarious bal-
ance between God and rock. Martin's
vocals are thin ribbons that almost get
lost in the messy noise pop. The lyrics
are minimalist, leaving much to be
defined by the mood of the music sur-
rounding them.
At times the melody is more evoca-
tive than the actual lyrics, bringing to
mind the sonic textures of My Bloody
Valentine. Take, for example, the
entire lyric to "The Hearttaken" "If
you lead, you know it's hard to be,
Until you go you know it's hard to
know, or just believe, Because the
Hearttaker makes it easier just
believe The Zen-like ambiguity of
the lyrics lend themselves to be inter-
preted by the drone of the moog space
sounds, the echo-drenched guitar and
the marching rhythm. The effect is
subtle (a word that most Christian
bands ought to took up in the dictio-
nary) and severe.
"Harmony" bears strong resem-
blance to early Ocean Blue, or to the
happy concoctions of Blur, with some
spooky falsettos courtesy of Wryne
Everett and a lament about loss.
"AH You Want Arc The Things I
Need" is a smarting slap at the
Christian music industry. Martin's
voice is almost too sweet here, espe-
cially against the scorching guitar
crunch and rhythm behind it as he
laments.
"You Think You're Radical" is a cri-
tique of so-called "alternative culture"
set to an almost-country-westem slide
guitar and a slow jazz beat. The ballad
sounds like it was recorded in a high
school gym, or a canyon.
"The Translator" is a snappy cross
between Smashing Pumpkins and
Motley Crue. The song rocks, but in a
very glam sort of way (there's a tam-
bourine during the chorus) and the
decorative sounds Martin evokes from
his guitar are not quite Billy Corgan
trademarks. "The Boulevard" starts
off like a Nirvana single and folds back
into a more traditional Starflyer sound,
while somehow managing to sound
like a street in the seedier parts of
Vegas.
"Help Me When You're Gone" fea-
tures a gorgeous clean guitar and soft,
crisp mixing of Martin's shy-boy voice.
The soulful Rhodes organ in the back-
ground is smooth, very smooth.
The album closes out with the
Beatles-esque coda "Everyone -But
Me which has an imaginary Rirtgo
bouncing along to the rockabilly belt
and Martin's happy-go-lucky vocals.
It's a shame that Christian record
companies continue to market such
disappointments as Audio Adrenaline
or Jars of Clay. It is understandable
that the secular music business is all
about sales and money; but you'd
think that the Christians would be
aching to encourage superior work in
their artists. After all, they are sup-
posed to be doing this for God aren't
they?
There was a time when Medieval
artists thought that it was a sin to
paint realistically. Perhaps Christians
think its a sin to play well and write
powerful songsPerhaps its time for.
another Renaissance. Perhaps Starflyer
59 is the beginning of that rebirth.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
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)
10 Thursday. April 3. 1997
UK
�ship
The East Carolinian
Make Up
continued Irom page 1
sou
might
bea riing the bin joto
think that could be.
The lead singer, a white guy
med Ian Svcnonius, has his impcr-
ion down, complete svith
strieks, stage mines, and pscudo-
alwfrogyny In fact, he does Prince (or
!AKAI' or squiggle or hieroglyph or
Miatever it is Prince is calling himself
tfitse dass) better than Prince does.
Originally members of a punk
band called Nation of I lysses.
Sscnonius. James Canty (guitar) and
Steve Gamboa (drums) created the
Make Up with the help of Michelle
Mac (bass, vocals), formerly a mem-
ber of the inimpics. The Make-l p
combines punk with funk and soul, all
led b the charismatic Ssenonius.
Their first record. Destination: l.ove;
jf It Cold Rif. ssas an experiment
in stsle. from its groove and punch to
i' "live" setting, The "Cold Rice"
Hfernd to in the title is a recording
sladio, and although the performance
sounded in every say as though it
rere recorded at a small club appear-
ance, in reality all of it svas done at
( old Rice. All of the applause, ambi-
ent crowd noise, addresses to the
audience, and breaks in the "set"
were created in-studio.
Their second release. After Dark.
carries on where Destmat&m left off.
Actually recorded live this time at the
Tine China club in London, the band
pro.es that their first album ssas not a
flash in the pan.
Including song titles that sound
like they're right out of Prince's demo
iloset. Blue is Beautiful "Vs.
Culture' and "Gospel 2000 the
band takes their "Cospel Yeh-Yeh"
music farther than Prince has dared in
a long time. Some of the tracks fea-
tured on After Dark are found on
Destination: "Don't Mind the Mind
We Can't Be Contained" and "(Here
Comes) The Judge But don't fear,
this isn't a retread record, far from it.
On After Dark, the Make Up final-
ly prose they have what it takes to
master a live audience. They blaze
through ten songs in their short 31
minute set, yet there is never a feel-
ing of immediacy in the music. Sure
there's energy aplenty, but the band
never seems to be in too much of a
hurry. They know svhat they svant to
say and exactly how to say it. And the
crowd sounds as if it couldn't agree
more.
Having proved their live chops
were intact, it seems that the band
wanted to step assay from the stage
for a bit and focus on their sound, the
ssas they svork as individuals, so they
svent back into a studio (Dub
Narcotic, to be exact) for Sound Verite.
There are no audience sounds
found on this record, no clapping, no
shouts from the crowd, no MC's intro-
ducing the show. The only extraneous
sounds you hear are the members of
the band talking svith each other in
the studio as the record begins. It is
the Make Up themselves, plain and
simple.
As After Dark included songs from
Destination, Soutul Verite includes songs
from After Dark. And it is svith these
tsvo repeated tracks, "Gospel 2000"
and "Make Up is Lies that the real
difference between the live Make Up
sound and the in-studio sound can be
heard. .After getting used to hearing
the band live, it's kind of eerie to hear
a song fade out and another song
begin svithout any crossd noise ot
applause betsveen.
What stands out in the Make Up's
sound svhen you take that audience
assay is the groove that Gamboa and
Mae lay down. Although you can hear
the groove in their live music, it is
more subtle there and often times it
is drowned out by crossd noise and
Ssenonius' shrieks. Here it sounds
crisp, clean and every bit as good, if
not better.
Sound Verite is a short, sharp and
intense package. Like After Dark, it
clocks in at a mere 31 minutes and
also includes ten tracks. lAickily for
you, both albums are not only good,
they're cheap.
Because the albums have come out
on two different independent labels.
Dischord and K Records, the prices
don't get unfairly inflated like at the
bigger record labels.
For a little more money than a sin-
gle CD from the big boys costs, you
can pick up svhat is essentially a dou-
ble album from the MakeUp. What a
bargain.
It's good to know the Make I p are
just as funky and groovy as they have
ever been. Just listening to the,sc
albums makes you ssveat. You can't
help the urge to get up and dance.
If only Prince could sound as good
as these guys.
Credit
age 9
banks) are helping some students net
needed credit for school and other
expenses they otherwise would not
have, and in that ssas it's something
of a service she said.
But the "service" should not just
end there. "They should help with
consumer education, sshat's involved
svith credit and interest and sshat it
means to be in debt she said.
Several banks do send educational
brochures to students, according to
Judy.
Adams suggested another way to
educate students that credit is not a
"free ride require them to make
larger minimum payments than older
cardholders.
The losv minimum payments usu-
ally required - often 3 percent or less
of the balance - "encourage people to
take on more and more debt than
thev can handle she said.
If you will be a returning
student In the fall, University Housing
Services will be hiring Facility office assistants
this summer. Part-time positions available.
For details and applications, please come to
Office Suite 100, Jones Hall.
Not Available on E-mail, CD ROM, or
the World Wide Web
Move over Eric Clapton,
classical guitar virtuoso
Julian Bream, is in
town. yw;
2WW E. Hth St.
Easigaie Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon. -Fit 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
ELTORO
ton's Hair Styling Shopp$
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Haircut
Say PIRATES &
Get Hair Cut for
$7 Everytime
The . oal TCourtyard
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Yard Party
is Back at Courtyard
lavern
Every Sunday Featuring
Live Music - Rain or Shine!
Tired of ikying Cover Charges?
We never have a cover charge!
-This Week-
The Bivans Brother,
Music Begins at 6p.m.
Across from the Plaza Mall, in the K-Mart Shopping Center)
321-0202
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St -r- fi�' Hours:
Pittman Building - J U U �3 Monday - Friday
Greenville. NC
8:00-4:00
209 E. 5 st.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Thursday April 3
Aquatic Science Club
Meeting
Thursday, April 3 at 5:00pm
Biology North 109
Everyone Welcome
Brilliance
Best in "progressive dance" featuring DJ Quilc
$2 for members before 11 pm
Friday April 4
Listen this week for giveaways
from TN Nails, Chicago Style
Hotdogs, BW-3, the Attic and
much more.
�& Q1.3FM
w East Carolina University
4





'
11 Thursday. April 3, 1997
The East Carolinian
Owner sees IRL as showcase for grassroots racing
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Greg Ellington is the kind of car owner Tony George
had in mind when he founded the Indy Racing League.
Long on enthusiasm, short of cash, Ellington got his start on the small ovals
of the Midwest but was unable to get any closer than the fringes of big-time rac-
ing until George's series came along.
The Indianapolis Motor Speedway owner's break from Championship Auto
Racing Teams last year was designed to draw more participation from drivers
and owners, like Ellington, who might not otherwise get a chance.
"To me, he has put forth a series that will try to showcase more of a grass-
roots-type racing versus the exotic-ness that is CART now Ellington said.
"Drivers are more important in this series than they are in the other series.
"Everyone has similar equipment, and it's the driver and the preparation
that produce a winning effort, not money. .And chat's what's most attractive
about it
Ellington has formed his own race team, Ellington Motorsports, based in
Lafayette, Ind and is making plans to run the full IRL circuit in 1998 with
Indy veteran Phil Krueger as the driver. He has landed several associate spon-
sorships but still is looking for a primary sponsor.
Without the IRL, he said, he wouldn't have gotten even this far.
"To be honest, I don't think I could afford CART he said. "You're looking
at some teams with budgets of $10 million. Some spend less than that but some
spend quite a bit more.
"The IRL is working, and if you caught the race last week in Phoenix, that's
exactly what it's all about. You had a guy (Jim Guthrie) who went, maybe not
from rags to riches but from rags to a little better rags. That's what the IRL is
all about
Cleveland Indians pitcher charged with rape
CLEVELAND (AP) - A 26-year-old woman testified that Cleveland Indians
pitcher Jose Mesa struck her in the mouth with a bathroom door and fondled
her against her will in a motel room.
Cuyahoga County Judge Thomas Curran would not allow the woman to tes-
tify about what happened to her friend, whom prosecutors say was raped by
Mesa during a car ride from a nightclub.
Mesa is charged with rape under an Ohio law that expands the definition to
include penetration other than intercourse. He also is charged with two counts
of gross sexual imposition, felonious assault and theft.
NCAA championship doesn't get the ratings
NEW YORK (.AP) - The NCAA men's championship basketball game between
Arizona and Kenrucky drew a bigger television audience than last year, but still
was the third-lowest ever on CBS in 23 showings.
Monday night's game, won by Arizona 84-79 in overtime, drew an 18.9
Nielsen rating and a 31 share. That was up 3 percent from last year's 18.3 rat-
ing and 29 share for Kentucky's victory over Syracuse.
Tennessee's 68-59 victory over Old Dominion in the women's championship
game Sunday night drew a 4.0 rating on ESPN, meaning it was seen in 2.85 mil-
lion households. Last year's Georgia-Tennessee game had a 3.7 rating.
Robinson season opens with Montreal win; Yankees
lose
(AP)-Montreal was the first team to win in 1997, befitting the start to a season
dedicated to Jackie Robinson.
The Expos scored the winning run in the ninth inning - on a bases-loaded
walk - to beat the St. Louis Cardinals 2-1 in Montreal, the city where Robinson
briefly played before joining the Brooklyn Dodgers.
As a tribute to Robinson breaking the color barrier 50 years ago, special com-
memorative balls were used in each team's home opener Tuesday and players
and umpires wore Robinson patches on their uniforms.
Cincinnati's Deion Sanders made a personalized tribute to Robinson by hik-
ing up his pants like Robinson wore his. And in Seattle, Robinson's daughter,
Sharon, threw out the ceremonial first pitch before the Mariners played the
world champion New York Yankees.
Following a snowout in Boston, a snowstorm in New York and arctic tem-
peratures in both Detroit and Chicago last year, baseball adjusted its schedule
in an attempt to beat the cold weather.
.All five domes in the majors were used Tuesday, and every West Coast club
in both leagues was scheduled to begin the year at home this week.
Sheffield agrees to record $61 million deal
MLAMI (AP) - Gary Sheffield agreed today to the largest contract package in
baseball history, a $61 million, six-year extension with the Florida Marlins.
The contract runs from 1998 through 2003. In terms of total money it sur-
passes the $55 million, five-year contract Albert Belle signed with the Chicago
White Sox. San Francisco's Barry Bonds is third at $43.75 million over six years.
Sheffield hit .314 last season with 42 homers and 120 RBIs.
Florida made the move following an offseason in which the Marlins com-
mitted more than $89 million to free agents, giving the money primarily to
pitcher Alex Fernandez ($35 million over five years), outfielder Moises Alou
($25 million over five years) and infielder-outfielder Bobby Bonilla ($23.3 mil-
lion over four years).
Sheffield. 28, is getting $6.1 million in 1997, the final season of a $24.45 mil-
lion, four-vear contract. His new deal calls for $10 million a season from 1998-
2002 and $11 million in 2003. Florida has an $11 million option for 2004.
In addition, the Marlins will give Sheffield a $2.5 million salary advance on
Jan. 6, 1998 - $500,000 for each of the first five seasons of the new contract.
Sheffield and the Marlins are believed to have agreed to most of the points
of the deal in late February. But because extensions agreed to after opening day
are not counted in calculations for a team's 1997 luxury tax, they held off
announcing it until today.
Still, management's Player Relations Committee may investigate to see
whether the deal should count to the Marlins' current payroll, a management
official said on the condition he not be identified.
In addition to salary, Sheffield could earn a $150,000 bonus if he wins the
NL MVP award, $100,000 if he finishes second, $75,000 for third, $50,000 for
fourth and $25,000 for fifth.
Men's tennis team defeats Seahawks
MIKE DANISKA
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU men's tennis team � trounced UNC-
Wilmington 7-0 in less than favorable, conditions
Tuesday. t
"It was hard, especially because of rhe wind
Brett Rowley said. "The balls were dancing up in
the wind; we had a tough time
Even though it was windy, both teams continued
to fight.
"It was frustrating, but you have got to put it
behind you, it is a part of the game Wes Kintner
said. "You cannot have perfect conditions every
day
The matches also marked the return of Alan
Farfour, who was an assistant coach under ECU's
Head Coach Bill Moore. The victory was the sec-
ond in a row for the Pirates and improved their
record to 9-5 overall and 3-1 in conference play.
"Today (Tuesday) was one of the better team
matches that we have played all year Rowley said.
"Everyone came together and got fired up
The level of play that the Pirates demonstrated
is characteristic of this talented group and justifies
raised expectations.
"Talent wise, this is the best 'earn that ECU had
ever had Rowley said. "We have a lot of talented
players; we just have to come together as a team.
Because we have a bunch of new guys, it may take
another year for us to start kicking butt
The Pirates were led by the play of Roope
Kalajo, who dis-
patched his
opponent in
number one sin-
gles 6-1, 6-3.
Number two sin-
gles player,
Kintner
snatched a
remarkable 6-2,
2-6, 6-4 victory
away from his
Wi Imington
opponent.
"It was four
all in ihe third
set and he was
serving Kintner
said. "It went to
deuce, but I won
the game. I then
served out to win
the match
Wilmington
native Kenny
Kirby continued
the Pirates' dom-
ination by
defeating a close
friend and long time rival, Chase Hodges 6-3, 7-5.
"The second set got close towards the end and
it could have gone either way Kirby said. "I had a
couple of breaks and some shots just went my way.
The home court advantage also helped a lot
Nils Alomar, playing number
four singles mastered his opponent
en rout to a 6-1, 6-2 victory. The
win, his 12th, ties him with Kirby
for most individual wins on the
team. Number five singles Brett
Rowley ended a personal slump by
outplaying his opponent to a 6-2, 6-
4 victory.
"Overall it was a good match
personally because I had struggled
the past two matches Rowley
Doubles partners Wes Kintner (L) and Kenny Kirby (R) won their doubles match against UNC-
W.on Monday, 8-3. Tommorow the tennis team hosts Elon.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAVDOSH
said. "I was in a bit of a slump, but this win gave me
more confidence
Stephen Siebenbrunner completed the Pirates'
sweep of singles matches, winning straight sets 6-1.
6-1.
In doubles play, Kalajo and Alomar teamed up to
capture an 8-3 victory. Kintner and Kirby won their
double's match by the same score of 8-3.
"We played pretty well Kintner said. "We pret-
ty much controlled the whole match, which was
pretty good because it was only the third time that
Kenny and I had played together
Rowley and Derek Slate, the number three duo,
concluded doubles play, also winning 8-3.
"Derek and I played pretty good Rowley said.
"UNC-Wilmington fought hard, but we played
harder from the mental aspect
Miles Alomar, who was paired up with Roope Kalajo, hits a return shot.
The pair won their match 8-3.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAYOOSH
rSEASONAL INDIVIDUAL RESULTS
NAMENO. 1 NO. 2N0.3N0.4N0.5N0.6
RooDe Kalaio5-7
Wes Kinter2-0 4-7
Kenny Kirby1-0 3-14-23-0
Nils Alomar2-04-35-0
Brett Rowley1-00-1442-0
Stephen Siebenbrunner2-12-02-2
Daniel Prevelic0-10-2
Derek Slate1-0
Track team continues on right foot
TRACY LAl'BACH
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's Track and Field teams com-
peted at the Raleigh Relay
Invitational last weekend. The meet,
which was held at North Carolina
State University, hosted athletes
from 80 different schools.
The Pirates posted second place
finishes in the 4x100 and the 4x200
meter relays and a tie for first place in
the 4x400 meter relay race. The N.C.
All-Stars were the only sprinters at
the meet to outrun ECU's squads.
In the 4x100 meter, Chris Rey,
Brian Johnson, Vaughn Monroe and
Bevan Foster crossed the finish line at
40.55, while the All-Stars came in at
39.47.
"We ran our fastest time so far this
season, but our hand-offs weren't as
clean as they should've been Rey
said. "We are still looking to break the
40-second barrie
Rey said running against a profes-
sional team makes his relay team
stronger. The N.C. All-Stars are more
experienced, but ECU's squads still
headed into the events looking for a
win.
"Of the 36 teams out there, we
were definitely the most dominate
college team Rey said.
In the 4x200 meter relay, Johnson,
James Alexander, Darrick Ingram and
Dwight Henry finished in 1:25.23,
while the All-Stars came out once
again on top with a finish time of
1:22.94.
Although Alexander agrees with
Rey, in saying that competing against
a professional team is often benefi-
cial, he feels it is unfair that the All-
Stars were able to participate in the
meet.
"The N.C. All-Stars should have a
league of their own. You never see a
professional football team playing a
college team, and the same should be
true for track Alexander said. "That
would be like me going back and run-
ning against high school athletes
ECU's 4x400 meter relay squad of
Alexander, Ingram, Damon Davis and
Mike Miller tied for first place with
"He ran our fastest time so
far this season, but our hand
offs sreren't as clean as they
shoutfie been
Chris Rey
ECU track
team member
the University of North Carolina in
3:07.23. Upon further review (after
the meet), officials
awarded first place
honors to UNC.
"We have not run to
our potential yet this
season Alexander
said. "We will probably
run faster this weekend
at the Texas Relays
To prepare for this
weekend's meet, the
men have focused on
cleaning up their hand-
offs, and always, on
maintaining a positive
tude.
"We are heading into the Texas
Relays with confidence Rey said.
"In track and field, anything can hap-
pen
The meet will be held in Austin,
Texas at the University of Texas and
will feature several nationally ranked
teams, including the University of
Oklahoma. Oklahoma currently car-
ries the 1995-96 indoor and outdoor
titles, and recently became the 1996
mental atti-
indoor champions. ECU's first run-
ning is scheduled for Friday at 9 a.m
with finals scheduled for
Saturday.
The women's 4x200
meter relay squad also
finished second at the
Raleigh Relays. Rasheca
Barrow, Amanda
Johnson,
CarmenWeldon, and Kai
Eason finished in
1:40.18, while first place
honors were awarded to
the girls from Seton Hall,
who finished in 1:37.29.
Michelle Clayton dominated the
field events with a third place finish
in the hammer throw, an 11th place
finish in discus, and 12th place finish
in the shotput.
The men's and women's track
teams are well on their way to estab-
lishing themselves as dominant
teams in the CAA Motivation, deter-
mination and the ability to work with
one another is leading the teams
down the pathway of victory.
ECU SPORTS BRIEFS
The baseball team is currently one game behind Virginia Commonwealth
(7-2) in the conference standings with a 6-3 conference record and overall of
19-15. (This does not include last nights game with N.C. State, results were
not available.) Richmond, ODU and William & Mary all stand with 5-4 records,
while James Madison is 4-5. George Mason and UNC Wilmington are both 2-
7.
This weekend the golf team will travel to Tennessee for the Tennessee
State Intercollegiate. The tournament will feature 13 teams including
Cincinnati, Austin Peay and host Tennessee State. Iast weekend the golfers
finished a tie for 11 th at the Furman Spring Intercollegiate. Ohio State took top
honors in that tournamenr with an overall team score of six under par.
The women's tennis team lost its second consecutive non-conference
match on Tuesday afternoon at the Nisbet Center at Campbell, 5-3.
Sophomore Gina MacDonald defeated Wendy Goyctte at No. 5 singles in
straight sets. 6-1, 6-1. No. 6 singles player Catherine Morgan also won as she
easihj dismissed Jennifer Weathers, 6-0, 6-2.
The lone doubles victoiy belonged to the team of Rachel Cohen and
Morgan as they defeated Weathers and F.rica Rascov 8-3.
The loss brings the Pirates record to 8-6 overall. ECU is undefeared in con-
ference play 2-0.
The next match is set for Friday in Raleigh as ECU takes on in-state rival
N.C. State at 2:30 p.m.
Injuries haunting Hornets' players
FORT MILL, S.C. (AP) - This is not
what coach Dave Cowens had in mind
for the Charlotte Hornets' stretch run.
Charlotte went into the final
month of the season with its magic
number to clinch a playoff berth hav-
ing been stuck on three for more than
a week.
The Hornets have lost two in a row
- their worst slide since early January -
heading into tonight's home game
against Atlanta.
Charlotte is without injured
Anthony Mason, who leads the team
in rebounding and is second in scoring
and assists, and top scorer Glen Rice is
sick and may also be unable to play
against the Hawks, who have won
seven in a row.
"You want to peak at the right
time Cowens said, "but right now
we're kind of beat up, so it's sort of
hard to tell where we are
The Hornets told Rice to skip their
practice Tuesday after he exhibited
flu-like symptoms, and he was listed as
questionable for the
Atlanta contest.
"My guess is
since he's coming
off being sick, he's
probably going to be
weak Cowens said.
"Even if he plays,
he's probably not
going to be able to
play the minutes
that he has been
Rice is averaging
43 minutes per
game this season
and is scoring 26.4
points, the third-highest figure in the
NBA. He has averaged 30 points over
"You want to peak at the
right time,but right mm
we're kind of beat up, so
it's sort of hard to tell
where we are
Dave Cowens
Charlotte Horneis
head coach
the last 43 games, including 41 games
of 20 or more. 20 games of 30 or more
and five of 40 or more.
Rice's surge has helped rhe
Hornets play themselves
into contention for what
would tie the third playoff
berth in franchise history,
but Charlotte has stum-
bled in recent days. The
Hornets are 1-2 since
Mason suffered a partially
rorn tendon in his right
foot, an injury that is
expected to keep him
sidelined at least through
next week.
"Other guys just need to
step up Cowens said.
Rice's playing time would
likely go to Rafael Addison and Donald
Roval. Addison has appeared in 32
games this season and has averaged 8.5
minutes and 2.9 points. Royal,
obtained in a midseason trade, is aver-
aging 3.7 points in 13.8 minutes.
Without Mason in the lineup, the
Hornets' rebounding average has
dropped by four per game. In
Charlotte's two most recent games, a
pair of one-point losses, the Hornets
have allowed their opponents to shoot
a combined 54.1 percent.
Cowens put the Hornets through a
2 12-huur workout Tucsduv at their
Fort Mill training complex. A substan-
tial portion of Charlotte's practice was
devoted to fundamentals, especially
on defense.
"Just because it's the last month of
the season Cowens said, "doesn't
mean we don't want to continue to
improve





r"
�.
12 Tnarsriay. April 3. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
Wildcats return home to 40,000
cheering fans
i.�
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Al
Coxon, a retired sports writer and
editor, always wanted a team to root
for. He had to remain neutral for
professional reasons.
Now he's got the Arizona
Wildcats, the nation's basketball
champions.
Coxon and his wife Marty were
decked out in red Arizona Final
four T-shirts as they and about
45,000 others welcomed the team
home Tuesday from its triumphant
Final four victories over North
Carolina and Kentucky that gave
Arizona the NCAA tide.
"I always wanted to have a team,
root for 'em, act nuts, but I couldn't
do that working for a paper said
Coxon, who worked for the Chicago
Daily News and then the
Waukegan, III News-Sun before
retiring in 1985.
The Coxons started following
the Wildcats that year, when they
began spending winters in Tucson.
He said they haven't been disap-
pointed. Nor were the thousands of
others who took off work, or played
hooky, to join in the citywidc cele-
bration.
Then too, neither were the
Wildcats players and coaches, when
their motorcade pulled into Arizona
Stadium to find a sea of red-shirted,
wildly demonstrative fans filling
most of the 57,000 seats, screaming
like Beatles fans.
"It's unbelievable, it's unbeliev-
able said Miles Simon, who was
named the Final four tournament's
most outstanding player. "Thank
you all for coming
Arizona coach Lute Olson told
the crowd, "You're the No. 1 fans in
the world. If anyone doubted that,
they needed to be with us as we
drove into the stadium. This is un-
BE-lievable!
"Every street corner, every
street, people were there with
signs, red shirts on, welcoming us
Olson said.
An airplane towed a "Congrats
Cats" banner while helicopters cir-
cled intermittently outside the sta-
dium.
As the motorcade entered the
stadium, deafening cheers erupted.
And as the team worked its way
across the field to where risers were
set up, hundreds of red and blue
balloons were released into the
bright blue sky while kids of all ages
clamored for autographs or high-
fives.
The noise and enthusiasm
prompted Arizona football coach
Dick Tomey to compare it with the
atmosphere in Arizona Stadiurh
when his team defeated then-No. 1
Washington in 1992.
"I didn't expect this many peo-
ple. It just shows all the support we
have center AJ. Bramlett said.
"It's a credit to our fans
Added backup center Donnell
Harris, one of the heroes of the
game against Kentucky: "It was a
wonderful feeling to see everybody
come out and supporting us
The team, escorted by a phalanx
of police officers and security per-
sonnel, had to make its way off the
field through fans lined up diago-
nally across the grass. �
forward Michael Dickerson col-
lapsed in the dressing room after
the celebration. He was treated for
dehydration and was given oxygen,
but wasn't hospitalized, officials
said.
About the same time, President
Clinton called to invite Olson and
the team to the White House,
though no date was set. Olson said
Clinton joked about playing for the
team once his injured knee healed,
and Olson offered tongue-in-cheek
o send the team's trainer to assure
that the president's knee received
proper attention.
Police encountered severe prob-
lems Monday night and early
Tuesday when rowdy revelers who
flooded Fourth to Avenue near cam-
pus created a disturbance. Among
other things, an undercover police
car was flipped, officers used a pep-
per gas to disperse a crowd that
began throwing rocks and bottles,
and six people were arrested.
Additionally, a police officer and
a television cameraman were
injured, one by a rock and the other
by a thrown glass. A TV broadcast-
ing truck was damaged extensively,
and a vehicle belonging to another
station was battered.
TTWIAtime
wmmmmmmmmmsmi
Name the American and National
league leaders in stolen bases for the
1996 season.
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'uatftrj iutuyi - jy -�C ifjuu sxpoy opvaopj '3unoj juj - jtf
GAME REMINDER
Today the ECU baseball team will take on the Kinston Indians
in an exhibition game at Grainger Stadium (Kinston) at 7 p.m.
The men's tennis team will host Elon at the Minges tennis
courts today at 2:30 p.m. Friday the softball team hosts a dou-
ble header with UNC Greensboro beginning at 1 p.m.
"FINAL SALE OF THE YEAR
April 711,1997
(Monday - Friday)
9:00am - 4:00pm
Deposit $25.00
aOfficiall)Llicensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
'Special Pijmeul Plant Available
i
ti
East Carolina University Department of Recreational Services
' qO Natural Life Event
� Let's set ready to Party!
Thursday April 10 at 5:00 pm
at the SRC Outdoor Pool Area
4
Q
K(

GAMES
FREE FOOD
PRIZES
MUSIC c
FUN p
qut6oqr PO
GRAND OPENING!
o
Po
Prizes Provided by:
Pargos , r
CD Alley
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream 4 4
Krispy Kreme
Busch Gardens
Aztec Tanning
.
For more information call RECREATIONAL SERVfCES at 328-6387.






T
13 Thursday. April 3.1997
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also preleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
DUPLEX FOR RENT: SUF
LEASE large duplex on third street
beginning in Mid-May. Two large bed-
rooms. Two full baths, large kitchen
and living area. Rent $525.00mo de-
posit $200.00. Call 758-7531.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR May! Located at Hast brook on
the bus route. Own bedroom with
walk-in closet and bathroom. $190 a
month 12 phone, utilities. Call
Jody at 758-9157. Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
E�: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
M sherDryer, use of all amenities,
sf it cable, phone and utilities 4 wavs.
C II Today 321613. Very Affordable!
.0 JE BEDRObM APARTMENT
F R $275.00. includes: watersewer,
bic cable, full Ttitchenbath, and pri-
vate balcony. Need to take over lease
ASAP. Call 752-7934.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT
AVAILABLE NOW THRU August.
$Z00month plus 13 utilitiesown
bath. 1 block from campus. Frank 353-
0096.
SUMMER SCHOOL SUBLEASE
ROOM with two male students in
three bedroom house. Room has pri-
vate bath. House 2 houses from cam-
! pus. Rent $233.33 plus 13 utilities.
� Available now must see. Call Chris @
' 355-6648
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY
Ist-Aug. 1st one bedroom one bath-
room washerdryer 12 utilities 12
phone free water &rtable rent $225.00.
No security deposit 551-3168.
j�MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
BEGINNING May or June; 6 mo. or
1 vr. lease; 2 br 2 bath, washerdryer
furnished; approx. 10 min. drive to
campus; outside pets ok Ig. fenced in
backyard; $175mo, 12 util 12
phone. For inquiries contact 758-6869
(leave message)
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
$239 month 12 utilities own room
upperclass or graduate student only
new apartment. Call 353-3918 and
leave message.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
AVAILABLE for summer sublease at
Ringgold Towers $450month May's
rent paid, furnished, location conveni-
ent, free parking, lease ends July 31.
PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY. Walking distance
from campus and downtown. Laige
room (15x15) Private phone linecable
in room. Washerdryer included. $175
per month utilities. Call Mike: 752-
2879.
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX WITH
all the comforts of home within walk-
ing distance of campus! washerdryer,
dishwasher, central heatair, deck out-
back, off the street paved parking and
a gardener. Call 830-9502.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share two bedroom apart-
ment in Wilson Acres. $252.50 per
month plus 12 utilities. Available May
7 through July 31. Great for summer
school! Call Brooks 931-0358.
NICE, NEW 3 B"IT
ROOM3BATH Dockside duplex for
sub-lease with option to renew. Big
back yard, clean, wd, close to campus
& bus route. Call 754-2993.
"EL, ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen,
washerdryer and living room with fire-
place. Beautifully landscaped - three
fenced yards. Convenient to campus
& hospital. $1000mo. dcp. 524-
4111.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE.
Great for summer school students! Lo-
cated on campus. One bedroom apart-
ment, big enough for two, and it's fully
furnished $350 a month. Call 754-
8055. Ask for Natalie.
SUMMER DISCOUNT AT-
TRACTIVE SIZABLE 3br 2 12
bath townhouse at Twin Oaks. Avail-
able in May. No Pets. Only $575
month discounted to $500 month
through July. Fireplace, patio, pool,
washerdryer hookup. Please call 752-
2851. Thank you.
LOOKING FOR TWO FEMALE
roommates for summer and fall '97.
Must be non-smoking and responsible.
Nice place to live Call 752-2262 An-
gela.
DO YOU LIVE IN a three or four
bedroom house or apartment and plan
to move out? We want to take over
your space. Call 328-7983 Mary, 328-
8433 Jennifer.
LOOKING FOR A FEMALE
roommate to share a two bedroom apt.
Pay half rent and utilities. Pets are
welcome. Please call at 752-9335 ask
for Emily.
�frfrr
MOVING MUST SELL PER-
SONALLY hand crafted queen size
waterbed with liner and heater $150
acoustic power logic 260 amplifier 45
watts rms 125 watts bridged mono
$125.00. Call 321-8148.
TAKE OVER MEMBERSHIP TO
Club For Women $29mo. 8 months
left. Call 321-1496.
U2 TICKETS FOR SALE for the
Clemson show on May 16! Two seats
available. Won't find anything better
anywhere else. Call for info. 757-2952.
LARGE ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH large TV space,
glass door stereo compartment, CD
and VCR tape storage. Very nice, price
negotiable. Brian at 752-1891.
1995 CHEVY CAVALIER. LT.
blue ac auto, CD $9,800 or take up
payments. Call Jennifer 328-3514.
Must Sell.
1994 HONDA NIGHTHAWK
CB250R red, like new, 1,316 miles,
with helmet XXS $3,000 566-4662 af-
ter 6 pm.
BUNK BED, DORM REFRIG-
ERATOR. excellent condition. Call
757-2679 after 5 pm leave message.
CUSTOM DESIGN ALUM.
FRAMED mtn. bike new XTR
brakes, pilot 6c deore IJi components.
U-lock, baggy, 3-bike car rack. Great
cond. Brought new $890. Selling for
$420. Call 830-9347. ask for Clayton.
WANTED FEMALE STUDENT
TO live in my home starting 897 to
care for my 14 year old daughter. I'll be
gone approx. 3 days a week. Must be
dependable and have own transporta-
tion. I'm 20 minutes outside of Green-
ville. Great job for right person. 946-
8754.
ILlwn, INC. HWfl
Contractors & Relief Drivers Small Parcel Delivery Greenville Area Roadway Package System. Inc the fastest growing small packet- delivery compaby in the U.S has openings lo full and part-time relief drivers and contractors
VVF GFTFR
� Excellent income potential and incentives; � Aceaaa to group Insurance ; � Equipment and financing; �Training
cr��ou are at least 21. have a dean MVR, 1 ireomercial driving experience and good Ma" 1-800-235-8668
I II
CAM
� aa Jtsty
000
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors & Instructors
(or private co-ed youth camp located in the
beautiful mountains of western N.C.
Over 25 activities including all sports, v.ijler
skiing, heated pool, tennis, art, horsebock,
go-karts. 610 to 811earn $1250-
1650 plus room, meals, laundry & great fun!
Non-smokers call for brochureapplication:
800-832-5539
Make
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per Hr. & Mileage
Mail lax Resume:
u:si
PO Bm .170
love Cm. NC 2a5�
lax: 919)687-2123
Near Greemille. Ktnsttm. New Bern
Hiring Now
classifieds
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN), INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, & GOOD
PAY. FIND OUT HOW TO
START THE APPLICATION
PROCESS NOW! CRUISE EM-
PLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL
800-276-4948 EXT. C53629.
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
RESPONSIBLE SUMMER SIT-
TER FOR girls ages 7 and 4 from
7:30am to 5:30pm. Must have trans-
portation and references. Call 752-
0748 and leave message.
S20.K TO $30.K PER vear earning
potential with the most respected
name in fitness. Send sales resume' to:
World Gym, CO Chris Farrell, 110 Pa-
trick Ct Rocky Mount, NC 27804.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE MAY 23-September 1. Certi-
fied Red Cross Lifeguard Training &
CPR required. Pleasant working con-
ditions in a recreational environment.
Phone Twin Lakes Resort. Chocowin-
ify, NC 946-5700
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC 27113.
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER
Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission.
Call Jeff Mahoney at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR TA-
HITI? OUR MATERIALS UN-
COVER NUMEROUS OPPOR-
TUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO:
1-800-807-5950 EXT.R53626
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
LEEWAY PRODUCTIONS IS
CURRENTLY accepting applica-
tions for summer session interns. Get
valuable hands-on music industry ex-
perience while gaining ECU course
credits. Call 753-8566 for more infor-
mation.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn plavmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill. NC 747-7686.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL A1T3
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
WANTED: PART-TIME ware-
house and delivery. License required.
Apply in person at Larry's Carpetland,
3010 E. 10th. Street, Greenville, N.C.
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED THIS
SUMMER in Greenville and sur-
rounding areas (Rocky Mount, Gold-
sboro, Smithfield). Call Ashley at 321-
1214 to set up an interview. Don't de-
lay summer is almost here
WANTED: FEMALE STUD-
ENT TO live in with disabled fe-
male. No physical duties required.
Free room in nice home, located in
Tucker Estates. Call (919)324-2937
after 7pm on Tues. Wed. or Thurs.
night. Collect.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards.
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAclanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
KlNSTON INDIANS ARE CUR-
RENTLY looking for gameday staff
for the 1997 season (411-830). Posi-
tions available arc: ushers, concessions
workers, ticket takers, waitstaff, and
vendors. Apply at Grainger Stadium
M-F from 9am-5pm.
MASSAGE SOUND GOOD?
Kind musician gentleman wback prob-
lems will sharetrade backrubs for heal-
ing & fun. Send ph & problem de-
scription to: Donald, POB 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
WANT SOMETHING FASCI-
NATING, INTELLECTUAL,
and cheap to take to bed? Try a book
fr ,n the ECU Student Stores! 40 off
many titles. Clearance books added
daily. Wright Bldg.
SAIL, GET BLOWN AWAY 35
minutes from Greenville rent, charter,
lessons. Sunfishes, Windsurfers, big
boats. Lessons, racing. On the Pamli-
co, McCotter's Marina, Washington
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of lnformHor in U.S.
19.279 T0KS � ALL SU&JtCTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC o- COO
B 800-3510222
Or, rush $2.00 to: Rwwrcri Atwtanca
?1322 Idaho Ave ?06-PIR. us Angelas. CA 90025
SIGMA PI THANKS DELTA
Zeta for the good time at our social.
Congrats to the richest girl!
ALPHA PHI THANKS ALL those
who participated in singled out. We
couldn't have done it without you. A
special thanks to Lauren and ail sisters
who helped with the preparations, you
all did a great job! Kelly and Warren,
you guys were awesome! Love Alpha
Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI, THANKS for the
great predowntown Wed. We had a
blast! Love, Alpha Phi.
fiffiijjL fjJJMiiil�J 1
I �� e 9 xxW SLaBBBal
aaaaaaaafe i n ��' ; '
BROWN LEATHER C"OAT
LOST in February, $50 cash reward,
contact Josh at 919-752-7280, leave
message with service.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sparta
(9X9) 46-24
"GETTING A GOOD NIGHT'S
SLEEP" April 7, 1997. Free program
sponsored by Pitt Co. Chapter Ameri-
can Diabetes Association. Gaskin-Les-
lie Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial
Hospital @ 7 pm. Refreshments
served following program. For more
info call 816-5136 8-4 pm Mon-Fri or 1-
800-682-9692.
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
VOLLEYBALL CHALLENGE
AT MINGES April 5th for Easter
Seals. All teams, individuals welcomed
$175.00 per team. Co-sponsored by
Phi Sigma Pi. Call 1-800-662-7119.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities, soror-
ities & groups. Any campus organiza-
tion can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00VISA application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified call-
ers receive Free T-Shirt.
Wy;
-
GOLF SINGLES ENTRY
DEADLINE: Be sure to enter for
the golf singles by 5:00pm on April 9 in
the SRC main office.
SENIORS AND GRADUATE
STUDENTS graduating in May or
the Summer may still register with Ca-
reer Services for help in your job
search! Come to our Orientation on
Thur. April 3 at 2:00 or Tue. April 8 at
3:00pm. Learn how to use the many
services available to you such as inter-
views on campus, resume referral to
employers, reference (credentials) file,
internet job searching, job listings and
much more!
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS
AND ALLIES FOR Diversity. Our
next meeting will be April 3 at 7:30pm
in room 244 of Mendcnhall Student
Center. Hope you had a good wee-
kend. Hope to see you all there. Take
care.
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
We Need TimberUnd boob
and shoes! Good Jean.
FOR USED MEttS SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS, JEANS. ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry at Coins � Also Biaten Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
S2mfiP?�ifeLPark'ng lot lmnt of Wachovta downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
The East Carolinian
BEACH HORSEBACK R1UIINO:
CEDAR Island, NC; join us for horse-
back riding on April 13 at Cedar Island.
Be sure to register by 6:00 in the SRC
main office by April 4.
THE 1997 SPRING HEALTH
Fair will be held Wednesday April 9
from 3-6 pm in the backyard area in
front of the Student Recreational Cen-
ter. There will be booths from organi-
zations of health related interest like
the American Lung Association and
Project Assist. Many activities are
scheduled including vocal duo Duality
and prizes are to be given away. Call
the office of Health Promotion and
Well Being at 328-6793 or stop by 210
Whichard for more information.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS
AND Allies for Diversity meeting
April 3rd. at Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter 7:30pm. All members need to at-
tend for officer nominations. Nation-
ally known speakers at Thursday meet-
ing. Come and show them your ECU
support. See you there!
GREENVILLE NOW (NATION-
AL ORGANIZATION for Women)
will meet Wednesday, April 9, 5:30 pm
at the Szechuan Garden Restaurant.
ECU women and other Greenville area
women are invited to attend. For in-
formation. Call 756-8973.
RESUMEINTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS - A work-
shop on writing a professional resume
for employment will be held in the Ca-
reer Services Bldg 701 E. Fifth St.
Wed. April 2 at 10:00 and Mon April 7
at 3:00 pm. Tips on professional inter-
viewing skills will be presented on
Tue. April 1 at 4:00 pm and Wed. April
9 at 3:00 pm. Seniors or graduate stud-
ents who will soon enter the job mar-
ket or students seeking internships or
co-op experiences are invited to at-
tend.
THE GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics is look-
ing for volunteers to help with the
1997 Spring Games. The Games will
be held at JH Rose High School Stadi-
um, on Thursday, April 17, 1997. An-
yone interested in volunteering should
attend the Special Olympics Volunteer
Orientation. The orientation will be
held at Mendenhall Student Center in
the Multi-Purpose Room on Monday,
April 14 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm. For
more information call 830-4541.
STUDENT DIETETIC ASSO-
CIATION: Our featured speaker is
Dean Helen Grove. Come join the fun
- HESC Rm. 248, today at 5:00pm.
New members welcome!
TiTH ANNUAL FIESTA
BIATHLON for Special Olympics,
April 20th at 12:30 pm, Bicycle Post
downtown. For more information, call
756-3301 or 757-3616.
UN 1 E.K VICW3 jviii.uu
AT CAREER services: There is still
time for students graduating in
MaySummer, 1997 to participate in
� Campus Interviews on the following
dates. Some have immediate dead-
lines to submit your resume for pre-
screening. Please come by Career
Services to get the details. April 8 -
Northwestern Mutual Insurance (all
majors interested in sales: April 9 -
Pleasants Hardware (CMGT, ITEC,
MGMT, MKTG majors for technical
sales): April 15 - Nationwide In-
surance (Bus, Law-related, health-re-
lated for claims rep.) and The Boston
Market (Hosp. Mgt. and others with
restaurant experience); April 16 -
MBFAKC Dog Shows (Bus. Mktg,
Acct, MBA for management): April 17
- US Navy (all majors for officers: Itcc,
Biol Chcm Math, Phys. for engi-
neering) and Bright Horizons Child-
care (Child Dev Elem. Ed. or Psyc for
teachers).
WED APRIL 2 - TuesdayThurs-
day Jazz Ensemble, Peter Mills, Direc-
tor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm
FriVSat April 45 - Opera Theatre Pro-
duction, "Gods Among Us featuring
Cockshott's Apollo and Persephone
and Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, Ste-
phen Blackweldcr, Director, tickets
available at ECU ticket office, or 1-
800-ECU-ARTS, or at the door, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm Sat
April 5 - Senior Recital, Patrick Kirby,
horn, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 2:00pm
Sun April 6 - Junior Recital, Angela
Suggs, piano, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
2:00pm Sun April 6 - Faculty RecjtS:
"The Accompanied Sonatas of;J$.
Bach Fritz Gearhart, violin, K0�y
Mikkelsen, cello, John B. O'Briengia-
no, Our Redeemer Lutheran Chiiscji,
1800 South Elm Street, Greenvijfe,
4:00pm Sun April 6 - Senior Recrjal,
Megan Gray, violin, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00pm Sun April 6 - Graduate
Recital, Cesar Marimon, piano, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm Mon
April 7 - Percussion Players and Per-
cussion Ensemble, Mark Ford, Direc-
tor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm.
For additional information, call
ECU6851 or the 24-hour hotline at
ECU-4370.
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
C
All Greek organizations must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad for libel, obscenity andor
bad taste.





)
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Seen In:
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Muscle & Fitness
Playgirl Magazine
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Xanadu
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Seen On:
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Proudly Presents
Ultimate Utobia In A
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every Friday from 8-9:30 p. m. with
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J


Title
The East Carolinian, April 3, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 03, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1199
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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