The East Carolinian, March 27, 1997







THURSDAY
MARCH 27.1997
eastcarolinian
EASTCAROUNAUMVERSiTY
GREENVUE. NORTH CAROUNA
Candidates make most of limited funds
SGA hopefuls must
spend $250 or less on
campaigns
AMANDA AUSTIN
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
STAFF WRITER
Candidates running for Student Government
Association (SGA) offices arc making prepara-
tions for their campaigns and learning that it's
going to take a lot more than a dazzling speech,
a firm handshake and a friendly smile to secure
a victory. These candidates will need a notably
large sum of money.
ECU has a set spending limit of $250 per
candidate, hoping to make the race accessible
to all students interested in running.
The limit was raised from 200 to $250
prior to last year's elections.
The increase from $200 to $250 last year
was because it was not reasonable with what
the cost for campaigning is today said SGA
Vice President Eric Rivenbark.
Candidates are responsible for keeping an
account of what they spend. The Monday
National fraternities work
on eliminating alcohol from
-r 'lMk-
AMY L. ROVSTER
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The national chapters of two fraternities
adopted controversial regulations which
. would ban alcohol in all chapter houses by the
year 2000, affecting one local Greek organiza-
tion and creating a stir among the others.
Phi Delta Theta's and Sigma Nu's nation-
al chapters want to stamp out alcoholic bever-
uges from their houses. ECU's chapter of
Sigma Nu is located at 501 E. 11 th St.
Robert B. Deloian, president of Phi Delta
Theta's General Council, said in a press
release that abuse of alcohol threatens the
principles on which Greek life are founded.
"Vk want to give renewed strength to the
core principles of our founder Deloian said.
"Our objectives arc friendship, encouragc-
: of academic achievement and develop-
in of leadership and community service
Phi Delta Theta plans to eliminate alcohol
i its houses by Jury 1,2000. There are cur-
11 alcohol-free chapters across the
The ban has caused concern among other
k organisations on campus. Jonathan
Mips, Lambda Chi Alpha member and SGA
rcr, said his fraternity has discussed the
ibility of their national chapter instating
alcohol ban.
"We knew about it, and we have talked
t it and we hive seen it coming Phillips
"A lot of schools up north have banned it
fraternity houses. They are phasing them
out
Phi Delta Theta said their decision was
based on research which pointed to increasing
alcohol abuse among undergraduates. Citing a
PH0T3 ST fATAICK IftELAN
study by the Center on Addiction and
Substance Abuse at Columbia University
which found alcohol to be a factor in 40 per-
cent of all academic problems and 28 percent
of dropouts, as well as the Astin Study, which
found the number of freshmen who do not
drink increased to 47 percent in 1994 up from
21 percent in 1981, the national chapter said
the decision was based on numbers.
Phillips said he is concerned that decisions
are being made on the national level without
consulting individual chapters.
"I'm disappointed that Sigma Nu and Phi
Delta Theta probably did not consult with
individual chapters Phillips said. "I think
they made a decision which affected thou-
mrmvmy, no.�
Student Health, FDA educate
students about morning after pill
Angela Koenig
HEALTHENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
With the recent approval by the Food and
Drug Administration (PDA), pharmaceutical
companies across the country may legally
prepackage six brands of birth control pills to
be used as emergency contraceptive pills.
Although the emergency contraceptive
pills, commonly known as the "morning-after"
pills, have been available by prescription to
women since the 1970s, the FDA did not
declare certain brands safe and effective until
February of this year.
The emergency contraceptive pills are use-
ful to people whose birth control may have
failed, was not used or for women who are
raped.
Student Health Center Health Educator
Heather Zophy warns students not to use this
as a primary means of birth control.
"It is more of an emergency method like,
for example, if a couple is using a condom as a
means of birth control and the condom breaks,
or if a girl who is on birth control pills has sex
lifestyle 7 M
New musicians m r
shown off by JsSfc
Student Union �WHBk
opinion5
Candidates, don't
make empty N
promises
sports11
Track off to running
start
THURSDAY:
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WEEKEND:
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the east catolinian
STUDENT PUSUCAftQN BUG.
GflEfNVItLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutecfiscuvm.cis.ecu.edu
while taking an antibiotic and forgets that that
may make the birth control pills noneffee-
rive Zophy said.
According to Dr. John Nichols, a reproduc-
tive endocrinologist at the ECU School of
Medicine, the "morning after" pills alter the
lining of the uterus to prohibit implantation of
a fertilized egg in the uterus. The pills are like
birth control pills and the large doses of the
hormones estrogen and progesterone do not
allow implantation to occur.
Although the pills taken are essentially
birth control pills, Zophy 'warns students
against self-medicating.
"There are specific instructions which
must be followed when taking these (pills)
Zophy said. "There are specific pills which
must be taken to be effective. Students
should not just look at their birth control pills,
punch out the next eight and take them
According to Nichols, certain oral contra-
ceptives could be used as emergency contra-
ceptives if taken in the correct doses. He
advises that women get the prepackaged pills
or make sure their oral contraceptive contains
the right kinds of pills if they do self-med-
icate.
Nichols has patients who do administer the
pills to themselves.
"This may be the kind of thing that women
can do themselves Nichols said.
Zophy advises that women consult their
health care provider before taking any action
themselves because there are many specific
instructions which relate to using the "morn-
ing after" pills.
This emergency contraceptive device has
been available at the Student Health Center
for more than six years and can be obtained by
prescription for $8.
The pills need to be taken within 72 hours
of the sexual act. Under these conditions, the
"morning after" pill is 75 percent effective.
Therefore, females should make appoint-
ments with their health care providers as soon
as possible.
"The student is usually asked when the
sexual act occurred to be sure it was within 72
hours and when their last menstrual period
was Zophy said. "If there is some doubt
about their last menstrual period they may be
SEE FDA. PAGE 4
before elections candidates submit a record
sheet of their expenses. These expense
reports are submitted to SGA's secretary, com-
plete with receipts. If candidates fail to do so,
they risk the chance of disqualification.
Popular items purchased by most candi-
dates are banners, flyers, buttons, table toppers
placed in campus dining halls, ads in The East
Carolinian and World Wide Web sites.
"I think the limit set is good said James
Kaltenschnee, candidate for vice president
"I'm glad I can't spend more because I know I
would. It is very beneficial running together
with people; you can do a lot more with a lot
less money
"You can do a lot with $250; it's just a mat-
ter of how you spend it said Johnathan
Huggins, candidate for vice president.
Cliff Webster, candidate for president, said
he plans to spend up to the allotted amount.
"The limit is very accessible and allows for
more students to run Wsbster said. "It pre-
vents people from spending too much on a
campaign
Scott Forbes, candidate for president,
claims he will spend between $225 to $240.
"The spending limit keeps the race fair and
at a level that is adequate for all students to
compete Forbes said. "The limit keeps peo-
ple who are financially well off from caking
advantage of that status
"The spending limit keeps the playing field
flat and does not lean in anyone's favor said
Sean McManus, candidate for vice president.
Campaigning for SGA is not all about what
you spend. There is a lot more to it. It is what
you stand for and how you present the issues.
It's all about change and improving our cam-
pus.
"I feel like you can go to an extent with
spending said Kelly Spraker, candidate for
secretary. "There are a lot of other forms of
campaigning you can do
MEETING OF THE MINOS
Last Thursdays meeting at the minds at the Ledonia Wright African American Cultural Cneter 1st conscientious students of all nets voice "What America
Means to me The program, headed by English and Womens' studies professor Gay Wilentz was designed to spawn heathy discussion about race relations
in the ULfc anal ECU
HOT! BY MARGUERITE SERJAMIK
Gray Gallery exhibits wide variety of art works
Undergraduate shows open
until April 19
jACQl'Ef-INE D. KELLUM
ARTS AND STUDIES ISSI'fS
STAFF WRITER
The annual undergraduate show of the Schooi of Art opened on
Wednesday and will continue through Apr. 19.
This show is being exhibited in the Wellington B. Gray Gallery in
the Jenkins An building. Gallery Director Gil Leebrick said this show
has over 250 pieces representing a wide range of disciplines.
"Everything that we teach in the School will be included�painting,
drawing, sculpture, ceramics, graphic design, photography, computer
design, foundations, printmaking, illustration, and environmental
design Leebrick said. "It shows the diversity of teaching approaches
by the different teachers and the diversity of our programs
The works are mostly by juniors and seniors and were chosen by the
area coordinators in each of the disciplines.
In addition to the completed works on display, there will also be a
section dedicated to foundation work, which shows artwork in its begin-
ning stages and attempts to demonstrate the process that results in a
completed work of art.
Leebrick said he felt the foundation's section might be particularly
beneficial for the General College st'tdent who may be considering a
major or minor in an an field, or simply doesn't know much about the
artistic process. Many students don't consider themselves to be artisti-
cally talented, he said, and don't realize that many artistic techniques
can be taught.
"If one has the passion, there arc skills that can be learned
Leebrick said.
Prizes were awarded for excellence in 26-30 categories, judged by
Mark Sloan from the College of Charleston. The winners were
announced last night and the prizes included both monetary awards
and an supplies. Winning students also have the satisfaction of know-
ing their work has been recognized.
"It's an affirmation to that student that their work is being seen by
a national professional in tlie art worldLeebrick said. "That should
certainly give that student an impetus to continue to create
The winners in the category of communication arts were Km
Kuiers, Tim Jones, Kristen Wall and Chris CardelH. In fabricsurface
design, Kristen Woodruff, LeAnne Burgess, Denise Pope, Ginger Clark,
(Catherine Kelly and Kathleen Nolan were recognized. The winners in
printmaking were Javier Marquez and Charles Smith, and the winners
in sculpture were William Chad Davis and Rank Norris, Jr. In digital
imaging, Joshua Frichtl and Sabrina Malpass were awarded. Recipients
in the metal category were Jennifer Cash, Kelly Redfem and Allison
Cherry. The winners in ceramics were Tim Fiery, Benjamin Davidson,
Jennifer Dulaney and Sony K. Smith. In the wood category, Greg
Minerva and Michael Ripper were recognized, and in drawing,
Kathcrinc Kelly. The winners in painting were Patrick Moser, Derrick
Cruz, Jcanette Little and Jennifer Ganzel. Awards in the foundation
category were given to Heather Stuart and Hannah Overman.
The prizes given in each category were funded by student guilds.
There were also prizes given by three outside organizations, which all
categories were eligible to win Those prizes are listed in the
charttable.
The hours of the Gray Gallery are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday
through Saturday, and on Thursdays until 8 p.m. It will be closed the
Friday and Saturday of Easter weekend.
Student Stores
Greenville
Museum of Art
The Beryl Fountain
Leebrick Award
Excellence in the
Arts Awrd
Excellence in the
Arts Award
Award �
Excellence in the
Arts Award
Andrea Freeman
Kristen Wall
Kirk Davis
James Worsley, Jr.
� i i Mi
r �





2 Tharsdiy, March 27. 1897
news
The East Carolinian
Democrats' fund-raising
efforts come info question
Vandals strike two hog farms,
cut pipe carrying waste
CHOCOWINITY, N.C. (AP) - A hog farm manager says the vandals who
attacked his farm and another one in Beaufort County carry Tuesday morn-
ing were experts on hog operations.
The vandals smashed pipes at Van Guard Farms that sent 75,000 gallons
of hog waste into a nearby swamp. They also damaged pipes and fired shots
at hog houses on Wlmar Items, a few miles away. The pipes that were dam-
aged at Wlmar Farms carried no wine.
Vim Guard Farms manager and co-owner Hunter Clark said the damage
was the second suspicious act in recent days. Last week, someone entered
the hog buildings and opened the gates, allowing the hogs to run free, he said
An environmental official was dismayed by the incidents.
Crane said a farm manager at south of Chocowinity discovered the dam-
age about 5:30 a.m.
The Beaufort County Sheriff's Department and State Bureau of
Investigation are investigating. Investigator Matt Sopher of the Beaufort
County Sheriff's Department said there are no suspects at this time.
N.C. Medical Board among the worst
DURHAM (AP) - The N.C Medical Board, which regulates 17,000 state
doctors, ranks among the worst in the nation, according to a report by the
Public Cititen's Health Research Group in Washington, D.C.
In the number of serious disciplinary actions per 1,000 physicians, the
board tied with Tennessee for the 48th-lowest rate of actions out of 51 med-
ical boards, Public Citizen said.
North Carolina took 38 "serious" actions against physicians in 19 � a
rate of 224 actions per 1,000 physicians, according to the organization.
Mississippi's board, the nation's moat active in 1996, took 45 serious
actions for a rate of 10.83 actions per 1,090 physicians. Public Citizen report-
ed.
Public Citizen's report is � misleading aauge of how well medical boards
are protecting the public said an official with die Federation of State
Medical Boards of the United States.
Public Citizen uses the federation's annual compilation of boards' disci-
plinary actions to rank state medical boards. But in its report, the federation
counts actions that result in a tenttmand or fine as a "prejudicial action" and,
therefore, a disciplinary action. Public Citizen does not count such actions.
eaten mouse.
Club manager James Reck said Tuesday the distasteful incident was a
prank between two friends. But Lee isn't laughing. He has filed a $500,000
lawsuit against the club and Shawver.
Ever since the "highly offensive contact Lee claims he's suffered emo-
tional pain from knowing dead rodents carry potentially fatal diseases.
Calls to Shawver's home were not returned.
Ten-year-old struck, killed by 100-pound roll of art
paper
MIDWAY, Ga. (AP) - A fourth-grade pupil was killed when a 100-pound roll
of art paper requested by her teacher fell on her head.
Christina Aliffi, 10, and a classmate were sent by a teacher at Liberty
Elementary School to a garage behind the school Monday to get the paper,
Liberty County Sheriff Don Martin said.
Christina was supposed to catch the 8-foot-long roll as her classmate
pushed, but Christina missed and was struck in the head, Martin said.
Barbara Aliffi, Christina's mother, questioned why school officials allowed
the children in the garage without supervision.
Schools Superintendent Don CNeil said he didn't know any details
about the accident, which is being investipted by the sheriff's department.
sues over mouse sandwich
WALKERSVILLE, Md. (AP) - A golfer whose clubhouse snack turned out to
be a mustard-slathered mouse in a bun is demanding a half-million dollars for
the alleged practical joke.
Terry Lee was waiting to start a round at the Glade Valley Gotf Club in
December when maintenance worker Charles Shawver handed him a foil-
wrapped sandwich.
Lee thought it was a hot dog and took a bite, learning only then he had
Strong quake hits southwestern Japan
TOKYO (AP) - A strong earthquake caused landslides, damaged homes and
roads and injured at least 19 people today on japan's southern main island.
Police said falling objects hurt some people, and one man suffered bums
while cooking The most serious injury was a broken arm, they said.
At least five houses were damaged, roads were torn up in four places, and
the quake caused 17 landslides, stud Masami Nomoto of Kagoshirna prefec-
tural police. Ke said no one was hurt in the landslides.
In stores, merchandise tumbled from display shelves.
The Central Meteorological Agency said the quake, with a magnitude of
6.2, struck at 5:31 p.m centered ncarSendai, 565 miles southwest of Tokyo.
Its focus was about 12 miles underground, the agency said.
A series of moderate quakes, believed to be aftershocks, followed the
strong tremor.
Papua New Guinea's prime minister steps down
PORT MORESBY, ftipua New Guinea (AP) - Prime Minister Sir Julius Chan
resigned Wfednesday after facing an army mutiny, riots and nine days of pub-
lic uproar over a plan to use foreign mercenaries to crush a rebellion.
His defense minister and finance minister also agreed to resign while an
interim government runs the country until national elections are held.
Chan said he would convene the Cabinet within 24 hours to appoint an
acting prime minister.
This will guarantee public confidence into a government-ordered judicial
inquiry into the country's mercenary contract with Sandline International, a
British mercenary firm, he said.
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - The con-
troversy about Democrats' fund-rais-
ing efforts is beside the point - Bill
Clinton was re-elected president,
former Democratic National
Committee Co-chairman Don
Fowler said Tuesday.
"We won the election That was
the big piece of this campaign.
Whatever my legacy is, or is not, is
very secondary to that Fowler told
reporters who questioned him at a
meeting where South Carolina busi-
ness people hobnobbed with state
and national political leaders.
Fowler, a communications execu-
tive and college teacher in his home
state, said he was confident
Democrats' fund-raising efforts
would be exonerated in congression-
al hearings.
"There is a great body of informa-
tion that's yet to come he said. "We
raised a great deal of money that was
totally and 100 percent legitimate
New documents released this
week show that Fbwler and other top
DNC officials urged Clinton and
Vice President Al Gore to ask major
donors for more money.
Iast week, Fbwler denied allega-
tions that he pressured a National
Security Council aide not to oppose
White House meetings with an oil
financier who was wanted on embez-
zlement charges in Lebanon. He
refused to answer questions about
that on Tuesday.
Congressional committees also
are investigating how a Chinese arms
dealer, a convicted stock manipula-
tor and an Israeli businessman linked
by the CIA to Russian organized
crime were able to attend White
House events with Clinton.
Fbwler and Haley Barbour, a for-
mer Republican National
Committee chairman, stayed away
from the campaign-finance issue in
their speeches to the state Business
and Industry Political Education
Committee. P it Fbwler joked bitter-
ly about the s mdal.
"In Washi ;ton, if you need a
friend, get -og he said, quoting
President Harry Truman.
Questions from the audience
were few.
"People are more interested in
the issues of taxes and the environ-
ment, for small businesses said
Randy Gelzer, vice president of a
Florence molding company.
Barbour said existing campaign
finance laws would be adequate, if
they were more vigorously enforced.
Barbour, who was GOP chairman
during Clinton's first term, said he
thinks people are more interested in
other issues.
"What people are really con-
cerned about is government policy,
taxes and spending entitlements,
economic development and educa-
tion he said.
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i� iiri-iuM
The East Carolinian
Census data shows more
Americans marry outside of race
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DETROIT (AP) - Interracial mar-
riage has grown considerably, with
military people more likely than
others to marry outside their race,
according to an analysis of Census
data.
University of Michigan
researchers found that 8 percent of
black men between the ages of 25
and 34 in 1990 were married to
someone of another race, compared
with fewer than 2 percent in the
1940s and '50s.
Among white men in the same
category, about 4 percent were mar-
ried to someone of another race,
compared with about 1 percent in
the '40s and '50s.
Military people had a high rate of
interracial marriage, which
researchers said may be a key reason
for the overall increase, said
Reynolds Farley, the lead researcher.
White men who served in the
military were three times as likely to
marry black women as white men
who never served, the study said.
White women who served were
seven times more likely to marry
outside their racial group as those
who never served.
Some people say the rcsus sim-
ply show greater tolerance oi mixed
couples since the years when many
states outlawed interracial mar-
riages.
"Hopefully people are just more
enlightened - their social circles are
broadened said Kimbcrly Crafton,
40, a black woman whose husband is
white.
The study's conclusions were
drawn from the number of interra-
cial marriages listed in the 1990
Census compared with those in pre-
vious decades. It analyzed Census
data on marriages between whites,
blacks. Native Americans and
native-bom Asians and Hispanics.
Gender also appeared to be a fac-
tor in marrying someone of another
race, Farley said.
For example, among Asians,
women have married outside their
race at a much higher rate than men,
and black men were more likely to
marry a non-black woman.
Farley also noted that there is a
higher rate of interracial marriages
in California and Hawaii than in
areas of the South or Midwest.
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FTC staff say
Joe Camel
campaign
targets young
consumers
NEW YORK (AP) - Saying the Joe
Camel campaign targets children,
federal investigators are urging an
unfair-advertising case against RJ.
Reynolds Tobacco Co The Wall
Street Journal reported today.
Jodie Bernstein, the Federal
Trade Commission's director of
consumer trade protection, recom-
mended that the FTC go after the
nation's No. 2 cigarette maker, the
newspaper said.
The FTC staff reopened the,
investigation of Joe Camel ads last!
summer, after a bipartisan petition
from 67 House members approved
the new inquiry.
RJ. Reynolds spokeswoman
Peggy Carter said the FTC hasn't
asked for any new information since
it voted against bringing a case"
against Joe Camel two years ago.
"They looked at tens of thou
sands of pages of our documents
and concluded there wasn't any evi-
dence to support the allegations
about this campaign Carter said.
"The commission is being pre
sented new evidence and will-
respond to it accordingly FTC-
spokeswoman Victoria Streitfcld!
told the Journal. "The company will j
be given a full opportunity to meet �
with commissioners before they-
vote
An FTC memo, dated two
weeks ago, cited an extensive
amount of new evidence about the
tobacco industry's advertising tac-
tics that wasn't available in 1994
when the commission voted 3-2 not
to bring a case against the highly
successful Joe Camel cartoon char-
acter.
The Journal said a new vote
could come within two months.
The commission was expected to
reverse its decision on the ads,
according to the report.
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ANTH 4400 Human Skeletal Analysis
ANTH 5125 Historical Aitl�e�!ogy
ANTH 6102 Com Course: Cultural Anthrofjology
ANTH 6103 Cow Course: Physical Anthropology
INTL 6005 Conununieation Across Cultures
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY
BREWSTER A-214
� �





4 Thurtday, March 27. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
FDA
continued from page 1
given a pregnancy test to make sure
the girl is not pregnant
The prescription given at the
Student Health Center includes
eight pills. The first four must be
tken within 72 hours of the sexual
activity and the second four must be
taken 12 hours later.
"When the students pick up
their prescriptions, the pharmacist
gives them specific instructions on
how to take the pills Zophy said.
Side effects from the emergency
contraceptive pills include nausea,
vomiting and fatigue. According to
Nichols, this occurs because of the
high doses of hormones which are
taken into the system.
"The nausea is a response to the
estrogen in the pills so a person
would have to have enough in their
system to make them nauseous
Nichols said. "I would say that if you
throw up within the first hour after
taking the dose it may need to be
taken again
Zophy advises students to con-
sult their doctors if they do not get
nauseous and vomit to determine if
the dose should be repeated.
Nichols warns women who take
this that they need to be aware of
the complications that could arise
due to taking these if the female
does get pregnant.
"There have been births to peo-
ple who took the "morning after"
pill with no adverse side effects to
the feius, but the numbers are too
small to know for sure Nichols
said. "It is important to know that it
("morning after" pill) is not 100 per-
cent effective. The question is what
kind of effect would this have on the
fetus
The restrictions for people who
cannot take the "morning after" pills
are similar to those for people want-
ing to take birth control pills. They
are not recommended for people
with high blood pressure, cardiovas-
cular disease or cancer.
The emergency contraceptive
pills are different than the contro-
versial abortion pill, RU-486.
According to Nichols, RU-486 is an
anti-progesterone which counteracts
the hormone. It is used after
implantation has occurred in the
uterus to expel the fetus.
Rr more information on emer-
gency contraception students can
contact Zophv at the health center
at 328-6794.
Mammograms should begin at 25
CHICAGO (AP) - Wsmen as young
as 25 should get annual mammo-
grams if they have certain genetic
mutations that hike the chance of
getting breast cancer.
While the American Cancer
Society urges women to begin annu-
al mammograms when in their 40s,
researchers at a University of
Washington center said women with
mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes
need them sooner.
"I think the biggest problem is
that these people are fairly unique
in their high risk and their risk at an
early age said Dr. Wylie Burke
director of the Women's Health
Care Center.
"We did feel that we could make
certain recommendations, as long as
people are counseled appropriately
that there is uncertainty surround-
ing these she said.
Women with mutations in the
BRCA1 gene face about an 85 per-
cent lifetime risk of breast cancer
and a 65 percent risk of ovarian can-
cer. Women with BRCA2 mutations
have a breast cancer risk similar to
women with BRCA1, but only a 10
percent or less risk of ovarian cancer.
The group recommended annual
Fraternity
continued from page f
sands of people without consulting
those thousands of people. I think
it's ridiculous that a man in college,
over the age of 21 can't drink a beer
in his own house
Local organizations anticipate
that their national chapters will
adopt similar regulations in the near
future. Any chapter that did not
comply with regulations would have
to create a new name and operate as
mammograrm between 25 and 35
for women with either mutation. It
left a wide age range so doctors
could consider contributing factors,
such as a woman's lifestyle and fam-
ily background, before recommend-
ing mammograms, Ms. Burke said.
In patients with the BRCA1 flaw,
the group also recommended annual
or semiannual ultrasounds begin-
ning between ages 25 and 35 to
detect ovarian cancer.
However, Dr. Anne McCall, co-
director of the Breast Care Center at
Loyola University Medical Center,
cautioned against making recom-
mendations for an age to begin
mammography until more is known
about the link between genetics and
cancer.
"We are very limited she said.
"Patients should be counseled and
should be entered into clinical tri-
als
Ms. Burke said the breast cancer
risk is high enough to warrant early
mammograms, even though there
have not yet been clinical trials
because the link between genetics
and cancer is so new.
The recommendations were
based on a 14-month review of pre-
an independent fraternity.
"Nationals offer insurance
Phillips said, "so, nobody's strong
enough to withstand without them
According to Phillips, sorority
houses do not allow alcohol in their
houses now. Even fraternities are
currently not allowed to have kegs of
beer in the houses. Given the
research which indicates that under-
graduate drinking is on the rise, the
question of how national chapters
will enforce the ban arises.
"It's enforceable one week out of
the semester for sure- when your
nationals (national officers) visit
Phillips said.
vious research and issued by the
Cancer Genetics Studies
Consortium. The results were pub-
lished in Wednesday's Journal of the
American Medical Association.
The American Cancer Society
projects 180,200 women will be
diagnosed with breast cancer this
year. The mutated genes account
for an estimated 5 percent to 10
percent of all breast cancer cases.
Brown & Brown
VITOR XI YS VI I AW
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Greenville
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Sun: 4p.m9p.m.
Place: Marathon Restaurant,
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Come as you are and bring a friend.
For more information calk 752-3753. or 752-0326.
astcarolinian
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last year when the Prize Patrol
came looking for me. I lost out
�Sam the Snoozer
To advertise with utl call us at
328-2000
Bu
BAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Be sure to go to class April 2 to see if The Prize Patrol
has your winning ticket You could win one of the seven
fabulous prizes that will be given away. Don't gamble with
off-campus living.
Mark your calendar now. Go with a sure thing
campus living.
university Nwsini an dixi services
fjsstions? call ecu-home (328-4683)





6 Thursday, March 27, 1887
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastforolinian
BRANDON WADDKLL Editor
AMANDA ROSS SporaEAro
Patrick Irelan nmoMm
cklkstk Wilson tafce
Carole mehi.k h�jcopyf�.
ANDY Farkas Stilt Hhotntw
Matt Hrgk AtwnixmDukw
Margueritr Benjamin HtwHiMr
AMY L Royster kantm Nm Ekk
Jay Myers utMiytotttw
WMll�(MMtM.nE�teMMlnMMMIIl�NlK
CwMM m i . n nh � am MM Ik MMk M Mm mi t, � laaa MM to MM mutt to ha
tmmm. Mlnmi. Ma� 101. M WtMStl� RtJRMijR 1 WJSUatt
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oumew
Editorial Board Note: In order to goiter
the full effect of tm following message, you
shouldhave read Tuesday's TEC or at least
been a student at ECU during the 1900s.
Spring 1997. The phrase sounds so
nice when we say it aloud. It sounds new
and hopeful. Now that the semester has
reached and passed its halfway mark, we
can't rightly say it's a brand new semes-
ter that offers a brand new start.
About the only thing we can think of
that is new is this semester's Student
Government Association (SGA) election
and speaking of which
Please let no one attach the senti-
ments of past "Our Views" to our view of
today because we truly are hopeful for
this election. Wj realize there has been
much�may we stress MUCH�controversy surrounding SGA elections of the past, but like we
said-this is Spring 1997. No need to dwell in the past. Because of our concern for the student
body and our hopefulness for the current candidates for student body leaders, we would like to
offer these candidates a few words of caution and advice.
Ws at TEC are students ourselves and, as such, we know what phrases turn students on.
Parking deck ooh 24-hour dorm visitation ooooh No SGA Tuition ooooh oooh!
Enough of that, lest we be censored.
In other words. Candidates, we already know what we want to hear. W; know what makes us
tick. What we need to know now is what you can honestly do about it. Let us be the first to say
that unkept promises are poor morale boosters. We are in no way making light of students'
predicaments on campus.
We know the problems are real.
However, we-as students-also know what the candidates know. Conceptualizations like a
parking deck are not new ideas to us. We know university officials have already dealt with the
idea, and our chances at solving the parking problem in that way (before the year 2010) are-to
paraphrase them-slim to none. And though it's not always evident from our behavior downtown,
we are rational people. We know that when providing any campus service 24 hours a day,
whether it be computer lab hours or dorm visitation, certain problems arise. rbr example, what
student do you know who is willing to work the 3 a.m. to 7 a.m. shift in the computer lab for
the sake of monitoring a bunch of procrastinators? Whenever you think of a 24-hour anything,
you also have to think of that many more people to man stations around the clock. And we don't
even have the time, space or ink to discuss the SGA tuition situation. (Catch us later.)
In other words, Candidates, attaching your names and campaigns to empty promises and
catchy phrases do not increase your chances of getting our votes. Concentrate instead on small-
er goals you can reach. It may not be banner material, but we'd appreciate the honesty.
Don't blame the theaters
Tb the Editor,
I would like to address jay Myers'
comments on the quality of Greenville
movie theaters made in the Tuesday,
March 25 edition of TEC. this past year
I worked in a Greenville movie theater
and, since my family moved here in
1990, I have been to each and every
independentforeign film that has
come to Greenvile. Therefore, I know
that the people of Greenville do not
support these movies as much as you
like to think they would, if only given
the chance.
Greenville has been given the
opportunity to support
indspendentforeign films and has con-
sistently failed to do so. From my own
personal experience of sitting with 5 to
10 other people in a movie and from
working in the box office, I have all the
proof I need to conclude that not
enough people in Greenville want to
see independentforeign films.
The Greenville theaters are not
responsible for the choices of movies
brought here. Distributors choose
based on demographics of Greenville
audiences, the theaters and distribu-
tors are not trying to stunt your growth-
they are out to make money by provid-
ing a good. The goods (movies) that
Greenville residents buy are not inde-
pendentforeign films, but main-
stream, Hollywood pictures. Which
movie do you truly believe would have
the highest level of entertainment for
the general Greenville audience, there-
fore, making the most money: Liar,
Liar or Seems andLies?
Greenville theaters are like the
majority of businesses-they are provid-
ing a good that people will buy.
Unfortunatery, it is you and I, who go to
see these movies, that are in the minor-
ity of Greenville residents. Just this
weekend I went to StkgBJaik and only
10 other people were there. However, 1
realize why the choice of movies is lim-
ited. Until you can change the tastes
and preferences of the general
Greenville audience, things will not
change. Stop blaming the theaters ki
the selection�-go out and invite your
friends and neighbors who would not
normally go to these movies to go with
you next time.
Stephanie A. Russell
Junior
English and Math
Natural life
Br
The amount of alcohol consumed by
???ltM!?ents. annually is enough to
fill 3300 Olympic sized pools.
- NWSA NmuoI High NMHM
m
tmtnm kmgkmymtfRnrnlmmlSavmmi'HimmtSirtm
CPHMOM
iMir.ole
MC MULLEN
New registration process needed
March 31 is a very critical day for
ECU students.
Now, for graduating seniors, it's
just another Monday.
For everyone else, it's one of the
most important days after Spring
Break. It's the day that you wake up
extra early; and, in a cheerless slum-
ber, head toward Whichard in search
of the shortest registration line. You
wait for hours to at leut get inside
the building. When it's finally your
turn to register, not only are all the
good classes taken, but you also have
an unpaid library fine which keeps
you from registering. So, you leave
Whichard and head toward the
library to pay that 35 cent fine. The
librarian gives you a quick thank-you
and you run out and go back to
Whichard, only to find the line twice
as long as before. You have to settle
for the important Underwater basket
weaving course instead of the classes
that are necessary' for your major.
What can be done to solve this
problem that has been plaguing ECU
students for marry years? After
chaotic years of registering, isn't it
time for a change?
There are many solutions to heip
the registration process move
smoothly.
One solution is called on-line reg-
istration. It sounds complicated, but
it's actually very simple. ECU admin-
istrators would need to design a com-
puter program to make this process
possible. Why not have snirienr no-
isier through their voice mail? After
all, voice mail is available to students
and faculty.
The week before registering, stu-
dents should go see their adviser.
During this time they will decide
upon a schedule, the first one being
the classes that they want and the
second being the alternative sched-
ules. (Just like you're supposed to do
now.) The only difference is that you
go to a computer terminal yourself
and type in the classes that you
would like to take. The students
would have limited access to a regis-
tration program allowing them to
sign up for various classes approved
by their advisor.
Now of course, there must be
some exceptions, the first being if
you need special permission for a
class, then you must register with �
professor. Also, the registration pro- '
gram should be designed so that stu1
dents can't sign up for whatever class
they want. In other words, if a so
dent wanted to take a class that has a .
pre-requisite that they haven't
already taken, then the pn&nm will,
not let the class be added.
Another solution is telephone regJj.
istration. Many universities use this
system. During registration week, all '
you would have to do is call the uni
vcrsiiy to sign up for classes. Of 7,
course, you would need to have some'L'
son of verification.
Now, these two different proce- '?
dures seem to be a lot easier then the
one we have now. Yes, there could be
a few quirks to them both. Like the
telephone line being busy or not
being able to find a computer to reg-
ister. However, if we would use all
three of these systems, then the reg-
istration process would be a lot easi-
er for ECU students and for the fac-
ulty.

.LETTERS TO-TH.� EDITOR
Forbes responds to article
To the Editor,
In the article by Mr. Gentry,
which appeared in the Mar. 25 issue
of TEC, he failed to mention that I
am adamantly opposed to SGA exec-
utives receiving tuition.
Another aspect of the campaign is
that my esteemed opponent and I
have similiar campaign issues. The
largest difference is that we intend
to achieve them by vastly different
means.
I want the minutes of all SGA
meetings printed in TEC following
the meeting and having an SGA
Homepage at a cost of $74.
My esteemed opponent plans to
launch a homepage and publish and
distribute a newsletter.
The homepage is free for stu-
dents to use, however, his newsletter
would cost $510 at $.03 per copy and
$2,040 postage ($.17 is bulk rate).
The Fbst Office laughed when I
inquired about it.
I personally want to know who is
going to foot the bill for this narrow-
sighted venture.
The second issue on which I was
ignored was the 24-hour visitation
plan. I have spoken to the UNC-
Chapel Hill Assistant Housing
Director Lottie Riley and she
explained that the complaints came
from the parents. The students sign
contracts with one another and abide
by them. There has been no increase
in crime nor decrease in security in
these residence halls.
Since 1994,14of the 29 residene
halls have 24-hour visitation, thr
are 24-hour weekend visitation and
12 are regualar 9 a.ml a.m. hours
wceknights and 9 a.m2 a.m. on the
weekends. This clearly works and is
also a choice available to accomodate
all students. Treat the students like
adults.
I have shown some problems we
have and illustrated viable, simple
methc Is to acquire them.
Si wt 'brbes
Senior
SGA Presidential Candidate
Guest columnist application for Campus View
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you
think about a certain topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian
office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
Nome
Fr Soph Jr Sr ?
Phone number
Topic(s) about which I would like to write
Please consider me for a posbon as guest columnist for TEC. Iagree to allow TEG's
staff to edit my submission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other
than those changes I will be notified of any changes that may affect the length or
content. I understand TEG reserves the right to reject my submission. If I am select-
ed, TEG will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline
for submission will be assigned by the editor.
1
T
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6 Thursday. March 27, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
LaieniPUSA
Mttpny
��. 1fns out's ttetrrmtiK
if WAS FUG SC�6 OtB
COtLE&e &AAK?
mr� SIMPLE L06C W
$iW A TMtf6i� I
A a cumous taunt
(StMDC V�l SHOULD
LWT IT , iAAIIOKI.
AA4ST- RlDDCV, W.l�6�

3
Jiisr Pu�-se act
IV TW WTUS4T�
&�y �Mtf s- ��tfWA&
K�S PSOTtST
BtfeHr-�lNfr�t
tW HOW�ZJK 4t ��
a�ot toueue. bawb?
Everyday Life
By Michael Litwin
Arr0V TMTJLi.
Primitiv Man
By Karl Trolenberg
ACROSS
5 Farm bukSno
10 Dutch treat
14 it watte for no
15 Broad spreads
16Hoap
17 Lotapojooza
18 Dogia catcher
19 Spanish
pronoun
20 infloxWy
22 Dud
23 Dinner dish
24 Creature of myth
28 Pleasant
29 Young chM
30 Tennis need
33 In a group
37 Irk
39 Sign
40 Strange
42 Inter �
43 Stocking band
45 Abroad
47 Type of
wresting
48 Ripen
50 First person
�1 Fixes
54Morodocs
58 Category
80 Botch
63 Acting Gray
64 Motsed horse
65 Some savings
accts
66 Ms. MinnslU
67 Wrath
66 Page
69 Vatieinator
70 Singing Delia
71 Egg container
� 1SS7 Triton Mart 9wom, me.
01 rttfiti waamwl-
ANSWERS
FROM TUESDAY
�� QaQD QDQQ
QBQUU QQaDQDDQ
agapaa aaacj Saa
aoaaaaaa ?????
auua
oMA"
L1HE
D�Eo
DOWN
1 Greek
colonnades
2 Actress Evans
3 Standard of
excellence
4 Salon offering
5Nee
6 Touched ground
7 Sphere of
influence
Slater
9 Govt.org.
10 Swords
11 Take apart
12 Countertenor
13 Paltry
21 Mine entrance
22 Pear-shaped
instrument
25 Puton
27 � d'affaires
28 Sniggier's victim
31 Learned Lamb ,
32 Social functions
33 Roman robe
34 � Khayyam
35 Make Teutonic
36 �Grande
38� devil
41 AGabor
44 Has a meal
46Pro �
49 Fine fur
52 Of the moon
53 Scorch
55 � Antoinette
58 Old oaths
57 Adjust
58 Coiioids
58 Great Lake
61 Sanctified .
women: abbr.
62 Additional
64 Golf term
997 Spring Health
Wednesday, April 3 331
3:00 - &QO pm
Prizes include:
Mountain Bike, Rollerblades,
IS hoes ef golf,
S50 Declining Balance, Sports Apparel and more!
Brickyard Area in font cftha new ��5 Student fcecrecrion Center
Information (�) Activities (jg) Jridizs
($S).food @ Music @�p��ovy VHwefj
For more information please call 32S-�753
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce the following
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER SERVICES
Holy Thursday Services (March 27): 7:30p.m. at St. Peter's Church
Good Friday Services: 12:15p.m. - Stations of the Cross at St. Peter's
7:50p.m. - Good Friday Liturgy Service at St. Peter's
Saturday Easter Vigil Service (March 29): 7:30p.m. at St. Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses: 11:30a.m. & 8:30p.m.
- Newman Center, 953 E.10th St.
( St. Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th St.)
For further information, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-1991
Careers Require Leadership Experience.
Experience Leads to Success.
Don't Wait Until You Graduate to
Learn from Experience.
Learn Leadership from Successful, Experienced Leaders
Join these leaders for lunch,
from 12 noon - 1:00 p.m and learn their
success stories and leadership philosophies
Call 328-4796 by noon, the day before each lunch, to attend.
There is no cost to you but your time.
Isn't your success worth it?
For More Information, Contact the Student Leadership
Development Programs Office,
109 Mendenhall Student Center, 3284796





��ttiiiiiiiaiiii ii�-�; kmmmmmam
7 THataday, Man 27. 1997
The East Carolinian
Student Union showcases new musical artists
JOHN DAVIS
STAFF WRITE
Given the current attitude of Greenville's club owners and operators, it might
be a long time Before any good music comes through downtown. I think 1 vc
counted two good acts this past academic year, Wilmington's Rodeo Boy and
Chapel Hill's Squirrel Nut Zippers. Other than that, the club owners know that
drunk people wiR Hwen to anything, so they're perfectly content to book the
same crap thefve booked for the past ten years. It is clear then, that if you are
� music lover that downtown will not provide what you're looking tor.
i Fm normal! no big fan of the musical presentations the Student 1 n.on
djfcrs either, but with their upcoming "New Artist Showcase, they may have
Ife a StmreAreg promising I've never actually heard any of these artists hut 1
Nave heard Putpte Schoofous one too many times, and frankly, anything sounds
more interesting than yawning through another set of drab originals and
Grateful Dead covers. Besides, these four artists actually do sound ,ntercsrinK,
id the idea of an eclectic LoHajpalooza-style concert is almost too clever for the
mmtity iim O" the Student Union.
r-He Afcse Brown Quartet performs original mustc blending several styles.
Hatm die banfo httO genres of music often thought to be beyond the mstru-
merrfs ftrnftitfpfts. Brown's fascination with the banjo began when she heard
Lester flat and Earl Scruggs (a well-known group to banjo enthusiasts) at the
aae of ten. She already knew how to play guitar, and she took to the banjo east-
tffer debut album, Simple Pkasms. received a Grammy nomination fwrneh r
�Jways better than an actual award) in 1990. She is considered to be a pioneer
�f banjo playing fey those who know, and her style is jazzy, reminiscent of Beta
Fleck.
Greg Howard plays the only instrument weirder than a banjo. Its called a
Chapman Stiek, and k h a ten-string combination of a bass and guitar. Howard
- Utlform original compositions, as well as covers of Miles Davis, The Beatles
itMf Schabet. He's hot famous, but he has opened for the Dave Matthewsi Band,
i rVmer &M fc John a a NashvMIe band that isn't quite country music. Cn t ics
have erjmpared the group to Wilco and Son Volt. They have recently released
their debut afbum and will feature songs from that recording, which has been
described as sounding like NerJ roung, due to its musing lyrics.
Vickie Pratt Keating has one of those compound names which mates
sound like she one ofthose normal people you meet everyday (If yon were ro
"meet her somewhere other than a concert, she might be one of those normal
people) Her musical focus is said to resemble the foik stylmgs of Dylan. Joan
Jlaez and Jerri Mitchell. She's from Washington DC, and has received much
i WdtfttalalMk fffrlnFlf -
' The New Artist Showcase will be presented by the hardworking (if some-
times misdirected) Student Union at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 2 m Hendrts
"theatre. Tickets are on sale at the ticket office for $12, unless you're a student
faculty member. Then you only have to pay $6. If you don't go, then you for-
'�fort yotif right to eomplam about the bad musk downtown.
CD reviews
i� ���-����
' V
jViftical Horizon
Itive Stages
Aerosrnith
Nine Lives
DEREK T. Halle
SENIOR WIITM
After hearing Vertical Horizon's last
release, RmnmeOn la, I was absolute-
ly positive th� band had an album that
truly captured their intensity and
sound. After all. Carter Beauford of
the Dave Matthews Band played on
11 of the 14 tracks.
However, after listening to the
new album, Um Stop, my opinion
changed. Nat only does the album
tarry the message straight through
the recording, but the intensity of the
live show has been captured better
here than oft touting On la. In fact,
the r md is better than what I've
heard in most recent live albums from
other bands.
Vertical Horizon's leading charac-
ters are Matt Scanneil ami Keith
Katie. The two started playing songs
in their dorm together in college, and
the sound just grew. One of the most
important things that these two real-
teed was that the message had to be
there before the band could. You can
tell that they have waited their turn.
Jeaving town after town with smiles
on their faces. Those smiles should
now turn into screams of joy as
Vertical Horizon's music takes off to a
new level in form.
Ijvt Stops starts off with one of
,the hits from Running On la called
'The Man Who Would Be Santa a
long that explains the relationship
between father and son. It's a tela-
tionship that we all would like to
have. It's a song of hope, which brings
me to my next point. The songs are
�fcasy to relate to. It's not hard to find
?our own experiences being put forth
n Vertical Horizon's lyrics.
The band then seems to take a
turn on the record to a more rootsy
type of feel. It's more Dave
Matthews, but with respect to the
j man. They're not trying to copy any-
thing but let you know where home
jb. Theirs is a natural sound, some-
i thing that they've always stuck with
Stt YlRTtCM. PAGf in
I,
rid
)f
the
1 got
lylei
rfing
turn
nod.
The Alison Brown Quartst (left) and
Greg Howard (right) will bs part of
the New Artist Showcase of i
talent on Wednesday. April 2.
PHOTOS C0URTF.SY OF THE STUOtaT
i
I
ferrax speaks through poetry
Or i
Cm'l tvm hum itong
M
Pat Rf.u)
STFF WRIT F. R
When Sony Records signed tefwsi I
a few years ago to a multi million do!
lar contract, everyone" m musit
they were crazy. Aerosrnith. after all,
are not the youngest guys In roi
any means. But, the 40-something
ubad boys from Boston" have never
listened to critics anyway.
So, after 3 years of writing, record-
ing, fighting, group therapy, and then
recording some more Aerosrnith have
finally released their first album
under the new contract, A;
The title is not only the first son
a good way to describe the bam I
Aftet riding atop the rock w
the '70s, trie machine
Aerosrnith crashed undet rl
drugs and excess. A failed stteti
restarting their careers in tin
Dour With Mirrors) almost V!
band in the "Where are the,
file.
Luckily for them. Run-
wanted to do a rap version of
classic hit "Walk This W
Joe Perry (guitar) and Steven
(vocal) to help with fht
The two acts then toun
and Aerosrnith recaptun rl tl
light again with their album lh
Unainn.
The ten vcars since that
have seemed golden foi the
until work began for Nim I -
Pressure from the record label
management, ;ind everydir
built and led ton oti? sph' D
Joey Kramer left the band h �
and Steve Ferrone, who has !
Tom Petty and Knc Cfaptot
others, filled in. Later. Kn
returned and rerecorded Rsrrone's
work. All was l-ctter until Tyler's per
fectionism caused tempers to flail
The band returned ro m
had gone for rehab nw
to seek group therapy, tor
mer manager accused til-
ing to drugs.
SB AtROSMITH
hed a very
. � .irioiis puWi-
�eae resume
Agamst the Sun,
(or the National
Tllitzer Prize),
�it'i ihmr.i and
mole) and rnag-
Jomrml of Rfark
lirtm Ijlfffiturf
for Barrax,
Hi unusual
in high
I iit to the
ration. A friend
RIl n rrte me
back. I
jKKt oth-
H.II in
! ven
i l.lkti since
ifgotten the
scover.
"f-ed into
one type of
writer or
another,
but Barrax
refuses to
simply
label him-
self.
Ha work is
as complex
and all-
encom-
passing as
the man
himself.
"History
plays an important part fin my writ-
ing be says. write about personal
and cultural history, religion, faith,
doubt, family, love and nature. I enjoy
writing about my relationship with the
natural world and my historical past as
it affects the present
Although raised in Alabama and
Pennsylvania, Barrax has found North
Carolina to be a welcome home, par-
Geratd Barrel
ticutarty as a writer. Barrax stresses that
Nonh Carolina is vibrant area for writ-
ers.
"1 read once that there are mo
writers per capita in North Carolina
than any other state.� I was astonished
in 1969 when I rust apt here how
oicktymy work was noticed and posi-
thwh reviewed.
Such paesHve response has only
fueled his drive to make North
Carolina the literary pulse of the
South.
Barrax, like all effective poets, has
insights, visions and life experiences
that readers find inspiring and enter-
When ashed to make a few com-
ments about his views on life in gener-
al, Barrax shnph replies, "EverythmI
want to say I say through my poetry
Barrax will speak his mind and soul
on AprH 2 at 4 p.m. in the General
Classroom Building, Room 1031.
rw further information, contact Dr.
Peter Makuck at 328-6046.
ug
hs up more little gold men
me with
ve:ir. but
i value, I
his to be
but the
n films are-
do

Tpe H from a frifnd
Buy it l.)s�tl
impact on certain filmmakers' careers,
so ! continue to watch.
Before the network broadcast of
the Oscars last Monday night, Barbara
Walters interviewed Harrison ftird,
who stated that one can't simply say
that one movie, actor or director is
better than another. In Hord's view,
movies are a big
business where big
money is spent
and earned. De-
termining who's
better at the job b
unnecessary and
unde finable.
While I would like
to see the film
industry as more
than just a busi-
ness out to make a
quick buck, Ford
has a valid point.
What determines
that Geoffrey Rush
gave a better per-
formance in Stone
than Billy Bob
Thornton did in
Sting Blade Ulti-
mately, the entire
issue boils down to
opinion, so I won't
waste anymore
time critiquing the
idea of an awards
ceremony.
I will, however, cri-
tique the produc-
ers, wrirers and
director of Mon-
day's broadcast.
Once again, the
event dragged at a
slug's pace and
lasted over three
and half hours. The
Academy Awards
show itself will
my Blade, which he adapted
nrvetl moments in the show.
never win a best editing award, that's
for certain.
The evening began delightfully
enough. Billy Crystal (a saving grace
for the show) returned as host. His
witty, on-the-spot humor kept things
as lively as they could be. Before
Crystal graced the stage with his pres-
ence, a montage of scenes from the
nominated films were shown with
Crystal spliced in for comic effect.
The audience, as did I, laughed loud-
ly watching such moments as a
spliced-in Crystal stoically demanded
from Jerrj Magma's Tom Cruise, "1
want you ro explain to me the plot of
Mission: Impossible
Once the actual awards started to
be handed out, I prepared for three
hours of boring speeches. Howevei;
Cuba Gooding Jr. delayed the
inevitable boredom when he won best
supporting actor for Jerry Magmre.
Filled with the same energy he dis-
played in the film, Gooding powerful-
ly gripped his award, repeatedly
bounced in the air, and confidently
thanked ail those special people in his
life.
Gooding earned a standing ovation
for his acceptance speech, and as
tacky as that may be. I'm glad. He's a
gifted young actor whose career
deserves to skyrocket. Adding in
Gooding's win, you actually might
need to use both hands to count the
number of African-American actors
who have won an Oscar, another rea-
son to feel distaste for these awards
ceremonies. But 111 save that thought
for another day.
When the joyful Gooding left the
stage, so did all the energy and joy.
Even Crystal's momentary quips did-
n't improve the quality of the show.
Most of the acceptance speeches
were typical ("I'd like to thank my
SS OSCARS. PAGE 9
w �
, If III
� L-t1 �





Thursday. March 27, 1997
li lit style
The East Carolinian
March
27 Thursday
Zimpano with Gumption at the
Lizard & Snake Caff in Chapel Hiil.
Wbrricd Sick with Idle at Local
506 in Chapel Hill.
28 Friday
Ben Folds Five with Shark Quest
at the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Electrolux with Grasshopper
Hiway and johnny Irion at the Lizard
& Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Cigar Store Indians at Local 506
in Chapel Hill.
29 Saturday
WXYC Benefit Concert at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Dry White Toast with Tread at the
Alive nightclub in Raleigh.
Tbnebenders at the Lizard &
Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Chevy Heston at Local 506 in
; Chapel Hill.
sponsored by the English department
and the Foreign Languages depart-
ment.
"Chew on This" Lecture at noon
in Mendenhall Underground. TBA
Contemporary Jazz Ensemble,
faul Tardif, director, at 8 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
"Best of the Underground Tour"
featuring Jungle Brothers, M.O.P. and
Hyenas in the Desert at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
April
1 Tuesday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Darwin's
Patagonia df Tirrra del Fuego at 4 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
There will also be a theme dinner at 6
p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room.
ARC Benefit Concert featuring
John Thursday, Trout Band, Hipbone
and Beat the Reaper at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Fry Bitches with Cobra Kahn and
All American Breast Diner at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Karma to Burn at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
2 Wednesday
TuesdayThursday Jazz Ensemble,
Fteter Mills, director, at 8 p.m. in AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
Jazz Mandolin Project at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Glorv Fountain at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
SEND US INFO!
Oo you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our It's
Showtime column? If so, please
send us information (a schedule
would be nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC
27858
30 Sunday
Bedhead with Mayflies USA and
Ch'rora at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Railroad Jerk with Spcedball Baby
and Wingnut Supreme at the Lizard
& Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
63
BAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Summer
School
31 Monday
The Theory Colloquium Lecture
Series presents Paul Smith of the
Cultural Studies program at George
Mason University and his lecture,
"The Continuing Need for Cultural
Studies" at 4 p.m. in GCB 2014. A
reception will follow in the English
faculty lounge. The lecture is co-
Sit up and take notice
early registration for
ECU summer sessions
begins March 311
L
Contact your
adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
An equal oppominitytffinnative action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities
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WHEN:
Thursday, March 27 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Making Breakfast a Better Meal
Monday, March 31 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
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Thursday, April 3 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Get Adequate Protein, Inexpensively
Monday, April 7 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
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9 Thursday, March 27. 1997
�il style
The East Carolinian
High-caffeine products cater to jumpin' generation
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"There's no question, Americans
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trend with a capital T says Tom Krko.
president of the New York-based
Bevmark, a consulting firm to the food-
and-bevcrage industries.
Once found primarily in coffee, caf-
feine is being pumped into everything
from plain water to sweet ice-cream
treats. And Americans are eating and
drinking it up. That's why you'll soon
s-e Surge, the "fully loaded citrus
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which promises "power unlimited Or
down the aisle from Jolt, "America's
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"There is no doubt that the con-
sumers today are showing a dramatical-
ly increased demand for caffeine-
enhanced products andor products
that contain a boost says C.J. Rapp,
president of Global Beverage Co the
producers of Jolt Cola, who announced
they are adding XTC, a caffeinated
power drink, to their beverage lineup.
"Exhaustion is a part of everone's life,
and the desire for exhilaration or a boost
is quite natural
And so, increasingly, the beverage
industry is packaging that boost in a
bottle. Take, for instance. Water Joe, an
odor-free, flavor-free, acid-free, carbon-
ation-free blend of artesian water chock
full o' caffeine. Conceived by a former
.Arizona college student who needed
help pulling all-nighters, it hit Midwest
markets in late 1995 and is today selling
400,000 bottles a week nationwide.
The 16.9-ounce bottles contain 70 mil-
ligrams of caffeine, about the same as a
five-ounce cup of instant coffee.
"When I was in college, I didn't like
the taste of coffee or colas but I needed
to stay awake to study says David
Marcheschi, the creator of Water Joe
"When it's hot out, the last thing
you want is a cup of coffee. You want
something cool and refreshing
Marcheschi says.
His idea has caught on. Global
Beverage Co. put Krank 20, another caf-
feinated water product, on the market
months ago. The Pepsi-Cola Co.
Oscars
continued from page
wife, my producer, blah, blah, blah)
and all of the musical numbers were
unnecessary. I actually feel sorrow for
the four young men who had to dress
up as an early 60s rock band and lip-
svnc the theme song from That Thing
You Do.
Making matters more disgusting
were the actors and actresses who had
to wear their egos to the show. Debbie
Reynolds joked about being a member
of a club for the women who weren't
nominated (Barbara Streisand is prob-
ably the club's founder and presi-
dent), fashion designers pushed their
products on the bodies of the nomi-
nees, and every introductory speech
thut was read from an off-camera cue
card carried some residue of "We are
successful people who entertain and
change the world
As unappetizing as all this may
seem, the Oscars did have some
worthwhile moments. And, ironically,
these moments centered around cer-
tain people winning awards.
Billy Bob Thornton and the Coen
Brothers, who all use their talents out-
jumped on the caffeine bandwagon last
May when it began test-marketing
Rspsi Kona. a coffee-cola product, in
Philadelphia.
.And Coca Cola has a new addition to
its family. Surge, a bright-green caf-
feinated citrus soda, started hitting
select stores Jan. 13. Inirial shipments
were sent to Texas, Colorado, Ohio,
Missouri, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota
and Wisconsin. Coca Cola admits that it
created the product in hopes of being a
hit with its prime market: "active
youths and hardworking young adults
"There are a lot of people that enjoy
having just a little bit extra and this is
one way they can get that says Mart
Martin, a company spokesman.
It remains one of many. Starbucks
Coffee Co. teamed up with the Red
Hook Brewery last year to produce
Double Black Stout, a "coffee-
enhanced" dark beer. Baskin-Robbtns
offers two coffee beverages, the
Cappuccino Blast and the Mocha Blast,
both introduced in 1994. (And with
each containing 235 milligrams of caf-
feine, they contain a hefty blast of the
stimulant about the equivalent of four
cups of instant coffee.)
Even Gatorade. best known for its
sports drinks, toyed with caffeinated
drinks for a time. It sold its SunBolt
Energy Drink for little more than six
months in Boston, New York and
Washington, D.C before discontinuing
SEE WIRED PftGE 10
side the Hollywood mainstream, each
won awards for best original and
adapted screenplays; Francis
McDormand, who empowered one of
last year's best female roles in Fargo,
won best actress and called for better
female roles; and filmmakers Leon
Gast and Taylor Hackford took home
the gold in honor of Muhammed Ali
for their labor-of-love documentary
When He Were Kings.
If you've got tc give somebody an
award, I'm glad this group shared the
spotlight.
I have to give the Academy of
Motion Pictures credit, though. It is
increasingly opening itself up to less
commercial films and giving many
underdogs who weren't financed by
big studio money a chance to reach a
larger audience. .As silly as I may find
awards ceremonies, at least the Oscars
have given films like Sling Blale and
Seirets � lies national promotion that
they otherwise would not have
received.
Proof of this can be seen in the
simple fact that Sling Blade is current-
ly one of the top ten money-making
films in the U.S. and it's playing in
Greenville. The best picture winner.
The English Patient, will reportedly be
in Greenville in a few weeks.
Although a little late, obviously some-
one out there is paying attention.
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10 Thursday. March 27. 1997
Wired
continued rrom page 9
the product. It wasn't that it tasted bad
or wasn't selling, says RJ. Sinopoli,
director of communications for
GatoradeCo.
"It was not even close to a sports
drink says Sinopoli. "It was very high
in carbohydrates and very high in caf-
feine, both of which would not be rec-
ommended for a sports drink"
So when is the beverage industry
expected to slow down the caffeine
craze? Not any time soon, says
Bevmark's Pirko.
"It's a generational change, it's not a
fad. it's coming into full bloom, and it's
really accelerating
Aerosmith
continued from page 7
Vertical
continued from page 7
and should be commended for. It's
hard to keep the sound real at all
times, but with this band it doesn't
seem to be a problem.
The album rolls on, and the band
keeps the crowd screaming all night.
Obviously, everyone at this show is a
big fan. The album's audience knows
the words to nearly every song on the
card. Although Vertical Horizon plays
mostly old tunes on Live Stages, they
insert improvs to make the sounds
that much more real. This gives the
songs a new life. And after long
introductions, the audience is
repeatedly surprised to hear the next
on.
or instance, the tenth track on
the record is "Heart In Hand
which is personally my favorite song
the band has ever shewn us. It starts
with an upbeat melody on a solo
ctric guitar. Nothing like the last
ilbum. The songs on live Staga are
I and straight to the point, which
akes this album over the top. It
shows you that the band has done a
9t of rehearsing. They really have
their sound together, in fact, they
needed to. After adding drummer Ed
Hth and bass player Ryan Fisher to
the act, they knew a fresh sound
3uld definitely evolve. Believe me,
: result is amazing.
Instead of a sell-out performance.
Live Stages shows us two nights of laid
ck, straight-in-your-face entertain-
snt. The album makes for an all
jnd good time, and it gives the
listener a feeling of rejuvenation. It's
a unique sound from both the band
and the crowd. The recording is
amazing, and the relationship
between the technicians and the
band is right. Everybody knows what
everybody wants and, in the end,
Vertical Horizon is shining from all
sides.
Finally, after making nice with
each other and convincing critics they
were still clean, they were ready to
release the album. That's when Sony
decided it didn't sound "Aerosniith-y"
enough and sent the band back to the
studio to record three more songs.
Finally, AW IJves was finished and
made available for Aerosmith fans
everywhere. Unfortunately, it's not
quite worth the wait.
The CD starts off with the title
track, a raw, feedback-induced tune,
that has potential but falls short. The
band recently played the song on
MTV's Spring Break and Saturday
Night Live, and it came through very
well live. However, the recorded ver-
sion is not mixed well and ends up
being a little annoying.
"Falling In Love (Is Hard On The
Knees)" comes up next. The first sin-
gle, "Rilling" is typical Aerosmith. A
story of love gone bad, "Falling" has
classic lines like "We was making love
when you told me that you love me. I
thought ol' Cupid he was taking aim.
I was believer when you told me that
you love me but then you called me
someone else's name
The rest of the CD is a mix of
mediocre and excellent. At least
someone had enough insight to
spread the good songs out, so that the
album is a little better as a whole.
Unfortunately, the mixing and pro-
duction of the album makes even the
good songs seem a little flat. Songs
like "The Farm" and "Pink" stand
out, but were even better in pre-pro-
duction than they are here. The ener-
gy that makes Aerosmith special
doesn't carry through quite as well as
it could have with a little more work.
There are enough highlights to
make this album a good addition to
any CD collection, but the real
achievement will be when the songs
are played live, in an interview, Tyler
remarked that a show they played for
some record executives got the band
excited about touring. "It's like being
behind the wheel of a Ferrari after not
driving for two years was Tyler's way
of describing playing live again. Songs
like "Taste of India" and "Rill Circle
while good on album, should really
get a chance to shine on tour.
So, until then, we're left with AW
Lives to hold us over. A mix of good
and bad, it's not quite worthy of full-
price but still deserves a listen.
The East Carolinian
Chrisrinnes invites you to lunch at its
new Ironwood location!
� Spectacular lunch buffet -just S7.95. A la cute Items also available.
� Enjoy the view of Lee Irevinols signature golf course.
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4





j
Tbareity, March 27. 1997
Smith will honor contract through 2001

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) - Dean Smith says he plans to honor his contract
tocoach North Carolina's basketball team through 2001.
I Smith, who became the game's all-time winningest coach two weekends ago
in'the NCAA tournament in Winston-Salem, laughed Tuesday when a reporter
asked him about speculation that he would retire if the Tar Heels win the title
in 'Indianapolis.
"If you win something will you quit?" Smith joked. "Ifyou like what you're
doing, would you quit?
I take each year as it comes and I won't make that decision in April, because
evfery April I am probably (tired). So, you wait to sec how excited you are in
August. For 36 years I guess I've bee" excited in August and September. If that
ever changed up until 2001 then I would make that decision
I Smith, 66, then threw in a political barb.
I "They didn't ask Reagan - How old was he? - if he was going to retire after
thfc first term Smith said.
; Smith, with a record of 879-253 at North Carolina, had said for years that he
had no desire to break Adoiph Rupp's all-time victory mark and that he might
retire before reaching the milestone.
I However, that decision never came.
"Friends had convinced me, former players and former coaches, that that
would have been the wrong reason to make a decision and that was true Smith
said. "So, nothing has really changed
�Smith, whose team plays Arizona on Saturday in a semifinal game, will coach
his tlth Final Four team this weekend in Indianapolis, including four this
decade.
Widow of former Dodger sues ball club
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The widow of former Los Angeles Dodgers infielder
Jim GilKam has sued the team, claiming it is profiting from his image on posters,
madia guides and other products.
'Edwins Higgcnbotham also sued major league baseball and acting commis-
sidher Bud Setig in Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday, seeking unspeci-
fietlgeneral and punitive damages.
JThe Dodgers' legal department did not return messages.
jGilliam played for the Dodgers in Brooklyn and Los Angeles from 1953-66,
belting out Jackie Robinson at second base during his first year with the team.
pie was one of the league's first black coaches, and worked with the team
frofn 1966 until he died Oct. 8,1978.
fgenbotham claims the Dodgers have sold advertising and profited from
's picture, including a poster with an Anheuser-Busch logo on it and
edia guide pages with LA Cellular advertisements,
claims Gilliam signed a player's contract allowing the league to use his
likeness during the season when he played, but didn't give permission to use it
in the offseason or after he retired.
JAs the result of these combined activities, defendants have literally "
in fnillions of dollars in profit from the sale and licensing of Jim Gilliam's
anjl likeness the lawsuit contends.


f
I tverson says he deserves Rookie of the Year award
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Anyone expecting humility from Allen Iverson when
he� talks about the NBA's best rookies this season hasn't been following the pro-
gram.
'Iverson, the brash, trash-talking point guard for the Philadelphia 76ers,
believes he deserves the league's Rookie of the Year award.
iTd vore for myself Iverson said Tuesday. "I'm real close friends with
Stfephon Marbury and Marcus Camby, all of those guys. I want to see them do
wdJJI, but I don't think any of those guys performed better than me
ut he also thinks he's in trouble if it comes down to a popularity contest,
'ough Iverson, the No. 1 choice in the June draft, leads all rookies in scor-
linutes and steals per game, he's not had a smooth transition to the pros.
Steady tarnished by his role in a high school brawl that led to jail time in his
re Virginia. Iverson's rookie season has been marred by a fight with team-
ntttfjetry Stackhousc, his admission that he carries a gun and a steady stream
of criticism from some of the league's best-known veterans.
J"He thinks he's G-O-D God Dennis Rodman said. "I didn't want to hurt
hifi, just moke sure he knows he shouldn't come in here talking all that trash
fCharles Barkiey said Iverson's fundamentals were shaky, terming him the
"playground rookie of the year
Even Michael Jordan has criticized Iverson.
Iverson said he doesn't know why he's become a target considering there are
"a:to� of guys who did a lot more worse things than 1 have. I don't understand
where the criticism came from. I guess a lot of people wanted me to come into
this, league and not do so well. It's bad that I think that, but the way I see it,
it's true
Some critics have focused on Iverson's undisciplined game, but many have
taken him to task for not being deferential enough to the game's stars. Iverson
said he doesn't care.
"Because I'm a rookie, that doesn't mean I'm supposed to try to perform as
haid as I can?" he said. "That means I'm not supposed to play every game like
it'$ my last? That means that ifyou say something to me, I'm not supposed to
say anything back? I don't think that's fair
Iverson, who turned pro after only two years at Georgetown, said he's always
stood up for himself, and that won't change.
"I'll be hated all my career in the NBA if they want me to become some soft
basketball player that bows down to everybody he said.
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sports
The East Carolinian
Outdoor sprinters
on right track"
Tracy Laubach
SENIOR WRITER
In most cases, collegiate athletics are
dominated by a team's veterans. A
team's strength almost always lies in
the hands of those who have been
around for years and who have experi-
enced playing their sport at such a
highly competitive level. The men's
and women's outdoor track teams
very well may be the exceptions to
that rule.
In their second meet of the 1997
outdoor season, ECU's freshman
faces brought in countless victories at
the Cape rear Invitational. The com-
petition was held last weekend at
UNC-Wilmington.
The men's meet was highlighted
with first place finishes by freshmen
James "Eli" Alexander and Darrick
"Stick" Ingram. Alexander won the
400 meter dash in 47.64, while
Ingram was the first to cross the fin-
ish line in the 200 meter race with a
time on 21.31. The Pirates swept first
through fifth place honors in the 200,
with Alexander, Bevan Foster, Chris
Rey and Titus Haygood coming in
closely behind Ingram.
Alexander, Ingram, Rey and
Haygood put their talent together to
win the 4x100 meter relay with a time
of 40.71. The victory was the second
consecutive win for the squad, as they
won the event in the Seahawk
Invitational March 15-16.
"A win like this just pushes me to
work even harder Alexander said. "It
keeps me motivated and confident,
but at the same time, I know that
there arc always other people out
there who arc training hard to catch
up
Alexander's goal for the future is
to run professionally. In being a mem-
ber of a relay squad, he has focused a
lot on the importance of teamwork.
"It is my job not to let my team
down. I need to run the best I can,
not only for myself, but also for three
of my teammates Alexander said.
Ingram agrees that a team win is
more valuable than a personal win at
ECU.
"I especially enjoy a team win
because in high school I won an indi-
vidual state title, but I never got to
experience being pan of a winning
team Ingram said. "My goal going
into this meet was to win everything I
participated in. That's my goal for
every meet
Both athletes joined the Pirates
after spending four years as the stars
of their respective high school track
teams. Like most freshman athletes,
running for a Division I program has
br-n a new experience for each of
tb. m.
"Running for ECU is different
because, at this level, the sport is so
SEE TMCK PAGE 13
SAFE!
H lejIBJl
Sophomore Amy Hooks slides into base during Tuesday's double-header with Md -
Baltimore County. The Pirates lost the first game 4-5 and won the second. 7-3.
PHOTO BY PATRICK IREIM
Catcher adds power, leadership to baseball team
STEVE LOSEY
STAFF WIITKR
"Tim Flaherty contributes to the
team both tangibly and intangibly
said Head Coach Gary Overran about
ECU's powerhouse catcher. "On the
tangible level, he adds power, experi-
ence, and of course, he's a great hitter.
Most importantly, though, he also pro-
vides leadership
Flaherty has been playing baseball
since the age of nine, when he began
playing Little League in his home
town of Williams town, Mass.
"I was just doing what all my
friends were doing. My older brother
was also playing, so I was just follow-
ing in his footsteps Flaherty said.
He played Little League until
high school, when he began playing
baseball on both his high school team
and the local Babe Ruth league. He
stayed behind home plate for all four
years of high schooi. When Flaherty
was a senior, he helped his high school
team win the Western Massachusetts
Championship. Flaherty also played
football and basketball, but he truly
shincd when he stepped on the ball-
field. His big brother also played foot-
ball in high school.
When Flaherty first came to ECU,
Ovenon recognized the potential the
young freshman had.
"It took u while to get each of his
facets going. Since then, he's made
steady progress and improved in every
aspect. I think that's a credit to him
"Coach Overton is great to play foe
He really knows what he's doing
Flaherty said.
One of the best memories
Flaherty has from being on the team
was when the team beat N.C. State
his freshman year. Each member of
the ECU baseball team gets along
well, Flaherty said. Pan of the reason
they are all close is the youth of the
team. There are no seniors on the-
bascbali team. Flaherty, a junior, is
one of the older members of the
team.
Flaherty is majoring in communi-
cations. When he graduates, he hopes
to teach communications.
Flaherty leads the team in home
runs, having hit 11 so far this year. He
also has one of the teams highest bat-
ting averages with a .353 average. He
was named CAA Player to Watch by
Baseball America and already has pro
scouts looking his way.
"I feel I'm playing well this year.
This is definitely the best season I've
had Flaherty said. "I'm playing the
best I can, as hard as ! can, and what-
ever happens, happens
Tim Flaherty steps up to bat in the Pirates recent home games against the Citadel. The
junior catchers making his mark with the team.
PH0T0 BY PATRICK IfiEUN
Ca silend Mir of T 1 Men's tennis vs. UNC-W 2:30 p.m.Even w 2 Men's tennis vs. Campbell 3 p.m.ts fie TH 3r Ap ,F 4 Men's tennis vs. Elon 2:30 p.m.ril S 5 Softball vs. UNC-Greensboro 1 p.m.
6789 Women's tennis vs. UNC-W 2:30 p.m.10 Men's tennis vs. Richmond 3 p.m.1112 Baseball vs. George Mason 2 p.m. - Softball vs. Liberty 1 p.m.
13 Baseball vs. George Mason 2 p.m.1415 Softball vs. UNC-Chapel Hill 3 p.m. -Women's tennis vs. Louisburg 2:30 p.m.16171819
202122 Softball vs. Hampton 2 p.m.23 Baseball vs. N.C. State 7 p.m.242526
27282930
m� � f "��
� mi





Smith works with young
Carolina team
CHAPEL HILL (AP) - Dean
Smith has always placed a premium
on experience.
That's why the all-time win-
ningest coach is feeling a bit uneasy
heading into his 11th Final four at
North Carolina, considering he
starts three sophomores and uses a
freshman point guard for about 30
minutes a game.
"We still have a fine line between
victory and defeat Smith said
Tuesday about his team, which is
riding a 16-game winning streak but
hasn't lost since Jan. 29. "It's hard to
convince anybody, but I am watch-
ing practices closely.
"Perhaps every coach teds every-
body else is better became you see
your own players every day - all the
bad plays they make as well as the
good ones. Consequently, everybody
is surprised tc be in the Final four
he added. "You have to be lucky and
you have to be good (ro get there)
North Carc!ina was expected to
get to Indianapolis in 1997. Only
the Tar Heels were supposed to do
it with guys named Jerry
Stackhouse, Rasheed Wdlace and
Jeff Mclnnis.
But with the NBA draft gutting
the team the last two seasons, the
Tar Heels head to the nation's heart-
land this week with one of the pro-
gram's youngest Final four teams.
Stackhouse, Wallace and
Mclnnis would have all been seniors
on this 1997 team had they stayed
in school four years. However,
Stackhouse and Wallace left for the
pros after just two seasons and
Mclnnis bolted last year, forcing
underclassmen such as Antawn
Jamison, Vmce Carter and Ed Cota
into prominent roles.
The growing pains for the Tar
Heels (28-6) began to show in early
January, with criticism abounding
across campus, around town and
throughout the Atlantic Coast
rcrencc.
North Carolina was off to a pro-
m-worst 0-3 league start. In the
jsimc, at home against North
ina State, the Tar Heels trailed
nine points with 2:23 left before
lying for a three-point win.
"ft little confidence came from
that game because we played tike we
had the world on our shoulders
Smith said. "fc played like we had
to win it and you should never have
to be in that situation.
"How would you like to keep
hearing, 'Well, if they only had
Stackhouse and Wallace and
Mclnnis or this could be the worst
Carolina team in so many years I
tried so hard to get it across that this
is this year's team, this is whom we
have on the team and we can do the
best we can - that is all that is
expected
Jamison said he even went as far
as getting his ring size before coming
to North Carolina for what he
believed would be a national title
chance with the talent the Tar Heels
had compiled to go along with
Stackhouse, Wallace and Mclnnis.
But in two yean, the depth and
skill level had evaporated.
"It was very hard because I was
expecting those guys to be here and
once I got here they weren't said
Jamison, who as a sophomore is now
the team's star and second-team Ail-
American.
"What I experienced iast year was
very hard, losing in the second round
of the (NCAA) tournament and the
way we started off this season. I was
up there saying, 'Why me, why now?'
All of the sudden things changed and
this team has come together
In addition to his share of Xs and
Os on the sideline, the team's 16-
game winning streak hasn't come
without a few words of wisdom from
Smith.
"I knew we could improve if
everybody understood their role
Smith said. "When I said role, I
meant do what you do well but only
do that, and hide what you don't do
well. Don't try to be something you
are not.
"I sat down with each of them
and explained what was expected of
them - and do your part. They have
done that really well i
Just a reminder for this
weekend in ECU athletics.
Today the women's tennis
team will host UNC-
Greensboro at 2:30 while
the softball team takes on
Charleston Southern at 1
p.m. Saturday the baseball
team will host a double
header with Richmond
beginning at 2 p.m. and
then play the Spiders again
on Sunday at 2 p.m. The
men's tennis team hosts
UNC-Wilmington on
Monday at 2:30.
3umm
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Accelerate toward graduation by,
skating through a
ateeui
Earfy registration
begins March 311
The Division of Continuing Studies,
328-632
An equal opportunityaffirmative action university, i'
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities
TRIVIAtime
The recent trade between the Indians
and Braves has put Kenny Lofton with
Atlanta. Last season with the Indians he
ted the league in this, with 75. What it
is? Stolen bases, hits or RBI's?
-�- fm sjt�ism Mpvtjwti-flvutnpui ffmaq
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Independent Study Courses: By arrangement
Program Director: Professor John Sort, 328-6136
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English 4510
Program Director: Professor Richard Taylor, 328-6687
International 2400
Program Director. Professor Juhang Shi, 328-1064
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Program Director Professor Gay Wilentz, 328-6678
School of Art to FINLAND, ESTONIA, RUSSIA. POLAND
Ceramics - Graduate & Undergraduate courses, all levels
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Drawing - 3561, 3563, 5560 & 5561
Art History - 4970
Art Appreciation -1910, open to General College
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Independent Study � 3500 & 5500 by arrangement
Program Director Professor Carl Billingsley, 328-6270
School of Business to GLASGOW. SCOTLAND
(University of Strathclyde)
International Management 3352
International Management 6322
Strategic Management 4842
Strategic Management 6722
Program Director: Professor Roy Simerly, 328-6632
School of Nursing to FINLAND. ESTONIA, and RUSSIA
(Oulu Polytechnic University)
International Health Care 5620
Program Director: Professor Mary Kirkpatrick, 328-4311
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
An equal opportunityaffirmative action university, which accommodate the needs of individuals with disabilities
,�






�Vi-i�. � � , - �
13 Tlwrsisy. Mitch 27, 1997
spoils
Thi East Carolinian
CORRECTION
OH NO WE MADE AN ERROR. IN TUESDAY'S
TEC'S HOUSING GUIDE WE LISTED WHAT APTS.
AROUND CAMPUS INCLUDED AND DID NOT
INCLUDE. WE INCORRECTLY PUT INFO ABOUT
FAIRLAINE FARMS. THEIR 1.2.3 BR APT. DO NOT
INCLUDE CABLE AND UTILITIES.
Happy Easter!
To all the sports writers have
a safe and happy Easter and
may the bunny be good to you
this holiday.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St HCH AAA1 x-a
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8:00-4:00
Track
continued from p�8� "
much more competitive
Alexander said. "Other schools have
people just as good as you at the col-
lege level. In high school, winning
was easy
The Lady Pirates were led by
freshman Rasheca Borrow, who won
the 100 meter dash in 12.10, the
200 meter, and was also part of the
first place 4x100 meter relay squad.
Barrow said her strong finish at the
Cape fear Invitational will give her
confidence and push her to improve
herself for the next meet.
Barrow has been running since
her freshman year of high school
and chose to come to ECU because
she felt Pirate ground is where she
could truly make a difference in a
program's success.
"I wanted to be an. addition to
ECU's program Barrow said. "I
came here to be pan of building a
strong foundation for taking the
track program to the next level
Barrow said with a lot of hard
MENDENHALL
5:30-73O
rtQ!NIIVIlUALLt UNIQUE &K
& TD(THEIiaWPLETE 3
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, The East Carolinian
Editor, Rebel
for the 1997-98 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
FRIDAY, MARCH 28 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
work and dedication, she can see
the Pirate track team competing at
the national level within a couple
years. According to her, the only
weakness the team has comes from
nagging injuries such as weak knees
or reoccurring hamstring pulls,
which puts a damper on the team's
ability to train as hard as they would
like at times.
"Every one of us does our own
part. The team is balanced out so
that we on all help each other out
and complement each other
Barrow said.
The team' next meet, the
Raleigh Relays, will be hosted by
NC State and is scheduled for this
weekend. Top teams including
UNC-Chapel Hill, South Carolina,
and Clemson have been invited to
participate in the meet and will
force the Pirates to pick up their
pace in search for more first place
finishes.
1t the Cape Fear meet, we won
the 4x100 relay race in 40.71. That
time will get us nowhere when we
arc facing tougher teams Rey said.
"Wfe are looking to break the 40-sec-
ond barrier and finish somewhere in
the 39 second ranee
Rey said the Raleigh Relays is an
important meet because from here
on out, the team's success at each
competition will determine how
they will finish at the end of the
"Being on this team is all about
taking it to the next level Rey
said. "We need to focus on going
into every meet determined to run
faster than we did the rime before
Only two meets into their sea-
son, it is not easy to predict exactly
how the outdoor team will finish in
the line up when their season closes
in June. But one thing is for sure:
these athletes have sorted out on
the right foot.
w
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-��






W � W V 9
.���-�
Sk
9i migmn �1r"
f - ������ J1S"
$
14 Thursdsv. March 27.1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
� ��
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP!
RENT is $195 plus 12 utilities.
Three blocks from campus call
551-3862.
SUBLEASING ROOM FOR
MAY lst-Aug. 1st one bedroom
one b�tthroom washerdryer 12
utilities 12 phone free water A ca-
ble rent $225.00. No security de-
posit 551-3168.
SUMMER DISCOUNT AI-
TRACTIVE SIZABLE 3br 2 12
bath townhouse at Twin Oaks.
Available in May. No Pets. Only
$575 month discounted to $500
month through July. Fireplace,
patio, pool, washerdryer hookup.
Please call 752-2851. Thank you.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997.
One, two, and three, bedroom
apartments on 10th Street, Five
blocks from ECU, now preleasing.
Call Wainright Propertv Manage-
ment 756-6209.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank
: Lloyd Wright architecture. 4 bed-
rooms, 3 baths, large dining room,
kitchen, washerdryer and living
room with fireplace. Beautifully
landscaped - three fenced yards.
Convenient to campus & hospital.
$1000mo.dep. 524-4111.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
; FOR May! Located at Eastbrook
on the bus route. Own bedroom
; with walk-in closet and bathroom.
� $190 a month12 phone, utilities.
Call Jody at 758-9157. Leave mes-
sage.
Available immediately
1 BEDROOM 12 block from cam-
pus. $325month. Heatair
comLwater inoluded. Call Jamie
4134)615.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12
bath townhouses. On ECU bus
route $400-$415. Call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209
preleasing for fall also.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: PLAYERS Club
Apartments. WasherDryer, use of
all amenities, split cable, phone and
utilities 4 way. CaB Today 321-
7613. Very Affordable!
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER.
RESPONSIBLE non-smoker
wanted to share house 3 blocks
from campus. Master bedroom
with own bathroom. $260. 13
utilities. Call 758-7762.
MALE ROOMMATE WANT-
EDj PLAYERS Club
Apartments. WasherDryer, use of
all amenities, split caole, phone and
utilities 4 ways. Call Today! 321-
7613. Very Affordable.
DUPLEX FOR RENT 3 bed-
room 2 bath dockside area pets ne-
gotiable. Call 752-8737 or 752-
9650 after 6 pm $750 monthly.
ROOMMATE WANTED
QUIET RESPONSIBLE female
to share 2 bdrm 1 bath apt. Start-
ing in May. $197.50month 12
utilities water and sewer included
Towerhill Apts. 2 mi. from cam-
pus. Call Becky @ 328-3636.
LOOKING FOR A FEMALE
roommate to share a two bedroom
apt Pay half rent and utilities.
Pets are welcome. Please call at
752-9335 ask for Emily.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED FOR summer school for a two
bedroom two bathroom apartment.
Only $190 a month. May's rent
only $90. On ECU bus route.
752-3643.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street Free basic cable, water and
sewer also preleasing for die fall
$415.00. Call Wainright Property
management 756-6209.
APARTMENT FOR SUB-
LEASE. AVAILABLE May
through August 2 bedroom. Wes-
ley Commons. Rent $400.00 per
month. Cable included. Call 830-
5314.
FOR SALE SOLOFLEX EX-
CELLENT condition all parts and
extras $750. Firm will trade for
cannondale race bike. Serious in-
quires only. Call Randall 746-
8643.
WEIRD STUFF, COOL
STUFF, fiction, non-fiction, refer-
ence. Many at 40 off! Clearance
tides added daily to make room for
new stock. ECU Student Stores.
Wright Building.
1994 HONDA NIGHTHAWK
CB250R red, like new, 1,316 miles,
with helmet XXS $3,000 566-4662
after 6 pm.
1995 CHEVY CAVALIER, LI.
blue ac auto, CD $9,800 or take
up payments. Call Jennifer 328-
3514. Must Sell.
PART-TIME PERSON NEED-
ED to help busy mom take care of
two toddlers and manage house-
hold. Prefer non-smoker with
good organization and swimming
skills. Must have a good driving
record. Some overnight stays and
week-end travel. Please send letter
of introduction and personal his-
tory to PO Box 1574, Greenville,
NC 27835.
SUMMER POSITIONS
AVAILABLE MAY 23-Septem-
ber 1. Certified Red Cross Life-
guard Training & CPR required.
Pleasant working conditions in a
recreational environment Phone
Twin Lakes Resort. Chocowinity,
NC 946-5700.
SOMEONE INTERESTED IN
HELPING with children after
school and through summer, per-
haps fall approximately nine hours
per week. References required.
Call 931-6904 leave message.
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUM-
MER Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission. Call
Jeff Mahoney at Northwestern
Mutual. 355-7700.
SWIM COACH NEEDED FOR
age group team. Early evenings M-
F some weekends salary depends
upon education & experience. Call
321-6210.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info
call 301-429-1326.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Court�lor�4 instructors
for private cod you camp located in Ihe
BamiKfuf mountains of witern N.C.
Om 25 adivHtet including alt tporti, water
skiing, heated pool, tennis, art, horsabock,
go-Tor. 610 to 611tarn $1250 -
1650 plus room, moots, laundry & groat fun!
Non-smokors cat tor brochureapplication
�00-U2-SM9
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL
SERVICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS. AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MON-
EY FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR
TAHITI? OUR MATERIALS
UNCOVER NUMEROUS OP-
PORTUNITIES WITH EX-
CELLENT BENEFITS. FOR
INFO: 1-800-807-5950
EXT.R53626 (WE ARE A RE-
SEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
RIVER PARK NORTH, PARK
Attendant and Camp Counselor
positions available for summer em-
ployment Apply at Greenville
City Hall, Personnel Department
For information call 830-4562.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons In-
structors, Swim Coaches. Sum-
mer positions available in Char-
lotte, Greensboro, Raleigh, NC,
Greenville, and Columbia, SC ar-
eas, call Carolina Pool Manage-
ment at (704) 541-9303. In Atlan-
ta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Manage-
ment at (770)992-7765.
NEEDED WEEKENDHOLI-
DAY KENNEL HELP 10
hours() available per week. Call
758-9971 for more information.
Must not be afraid of large dogs.
SWIM COACHES. MANAG-
ERS, INSTRUCTORS, Life-
guards needed for Raleigh & Win-
ston-Salem pools May-Sept Con-
tact David 1-888-246-5755 for ap-
plication or mail resume to PPC,
PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem, NC
27113.
PART-TIME YOUTH M1N-
ISTER to lead young people to a
greater understanding of following
Jesus Christ in their lives through
Bible Study, special activities and
recreation. Send resume to Bethel
Baptist Church, co Youth Coun-
cU. PO Box 910. Bethel, NC 27812
or call 825-1281. Fax to Gray Peel
825-4751.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150
per month housing allowance.
Largest rental service on the Outer
Banks of North Carolina (Nags
Head). Call Dona for application
and housing info 800-662-2122.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
OFFICIALS some experience
needed some training. April thru
June. Pick up application Elm
Street Gym 2:30 � 7:00 pm.
WANTED: PART-TIME ware-
house and delivery. License re-
quired. Apply in person at Larry's
Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th. Street
Greenville, N.C.
PART TIME PRODUCTION
ASSISTANT needed to work
nights and weekends or morning
news. Television Production
background helpful, duties include
operating studio cameras, tele-
prompter, audio board and charac-
ter generator. Send resume to
Production Manager, WNCT-TV
PO Box 898 Greenville, NC
27835. Pre-employment drug test
required. We are an equal oppor-
tunity employer MF.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn
great money while you learn play-
mates massage, Snow Hill, NC
747-7686.
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY
OFFERS TRAVEL (HAWAII,
MEXICO, CARIBBEAN), IN-
COMPARABLE BENEFITS, &
GOOD PAY. FIND OUT HOW
TO START THE APPLICA-
TION PROCESS NOW!
CRUISE EMPLOYMENT
SERVICES PROVIDES THE
ANSWERS. CALL 800-276-
4948 EXT. C53629. (WE ARE A
RESEARCH 4 PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
$20.K TO $30.K PER year earn-
ing potential with the most respect-
ed name in fitness. Send sales re-
sume' to: World Gym, CO Chris
Farrell, 110 Patrick Ct, Rocky
Mount NC 27804.
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED
THIS SUMMER in Greenville
and surrounding areas (Rocky
Mount, Goldsboro, Smithfield).
Call Ashley at 321-1214 to set up
an interview. Don't delay sum-
mer is almost here.
.LIFEGUARD BAPTIST
CHILDREN'S HOMES of NC,
Inc Kinston Campus is seeking to
employ 2 part-time and 1 full-time
certified lifeguards for the summer.
You may inquire about these posi-
tions by calling Jamie Godwin,
919-522-0811 before April 4.
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to
thank Tri Sig for the great time at
our redneck social. You'all come
back again ya hear!
DELTA SIGMA PHI WOULD
like to thank ZTA for coming out
last Wed. We had a great time.
AFRIL 2, VOTE FOR the only
SGA Presidential candidate who
has supported Greek Funding!
Vote Cliffie Webster for President!
Say no to SGA tuition, vote Web-
ster, Kaltenschnee, McQueen and
Spraker.
GAMMA ALPHAS OF ALPHA
Xi Delta - We love our Lil's! Love
your Big Sis's
�"� 'tH3y t?
n
B35SBSJS5S3!
iMf$ �
BROWN LEATHER COAT
LOST in February, $50 cash re-
ward, contact Josh at 919-752-
7280, leave message with service.
HELP! LOST COCKER SPAN-
IEL last seen 13 Feb. light buff
wgreen collar "Jordan" If you
have seen him, please call 756-
6556 Andrew or Julie. We love
and miss him very much!
RESEARCHREPQRTS
Unjut Ubnry at IsJuiirtun to U.S.
nxttimm-MitrnMcn
Or(Ca8T�d�f���VHiMCorCOO
888-351-6222
Jr.nahS2.00lo:
CA900B
JTfltilira na' hrrr1 - t r- - -inr'f t - � �w Jw-rfw�jKesjiafarfiiasitfftnAj.Jfai
MASSAGE SOUND GOOD?
Kind musician gentleman wbock
problems will sharetrade back-
rubs for healing & fun. Send ph
& problem description to: Donald,
FOB 8663, Greenville, NC 27835.
SAY NO TO SGA tuition! April
2 vote Cliffie Webster for Presi-
dent James Kaltenschnee for VP,
Myeisha McQueen for Treasurer
and Kelly Spraker for Secretary!
Make $$
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdo
tt
loors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours & Overtime
$5.75 Per He & Mileage
MaiVFax Resume:
BJEB1
HO. Bos 370
Cove City, NC 28529
Fax: (919)637-2125
Near Greenville, Kinston, New Bern
Hiring Now!
KINSTON INDIANS ARE
CURRENTLY looking for game-
day staff for the 1997 season (411-
830). Positions available are: ush-
ers, concessions workers, ticket
takers, waitstaff, and vendors. Ap-
ply at Grainger Stadium M-F from
9am-5pm.
advertise with us.
328-2000
WANTED: A FEW GOOD pi-
rates-The Telefund is looking for
students to contact alumni for the
ECU Annual Fund Drive. $5.00
hour. Make your own schedule. If
interested, come by Rawl Annex,
Room 5, M-TH between the
hours of 2-6pm. �
Doctors Vision Center
is currently seeking a full-lime front deskreceptionist for the
Greenville office. Individuals must be professional, outgoing, have
excellent people skills, be able to assist in patient needs, and have
strong multiple line telephone skills. Billing and insurance experience
a plus. Must be motivated and team oriented. Willing to train.
Send resume with salary requirements to:
DocforsVision Center
499 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
Attn: Shari James
'iwM iAii &
TUWor&sfaftetWater $�&Dm&s
We are accepting applications for full and part time
seasonal positions in our Catalog Sales Department.
Duties include taking customer calls, placing orders,
and providing information to customers. Customer
service andor previous telephone sales experience
required. Flexible shifts available. Full time seasonal
positions also available in our Distribution Center.
Duties include loading and unloading trucks, pulling
and packing orders, and general warehouse work.
Priority given to applicants who can work a full time
schedule during May, June, and July. Apply at
Overton's Corporate Center Office, 111 Red Banks
Road, Between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M Monday-
Friday. EOE
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(�19)
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities,
sororities h groups. Any campus
organization can raise up to $1000
by earning a whopping
$5.00VISA application. Call 1-
800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified
callers receive Free T-Shirt.
ITS NO LONGER NECES-
SARY to borrow money for col-
lege. We can help you obtain fund-
ing. Thousands of awards avail-
able to all students. Immediate
qualification 1-800-651-3393.
TUES MARCH 25-JUNIOR
Recital, Stephen Stelmaszek, saxo- '
phone, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00pm Tues March 25 - Junior
Recital, Jason Pickard, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall 9:00 pm
Wed March 26 - Concert Choir,
Brett Watson; Conductor, Men-
denhall Student Center, Room
244, 8:00 pm Mon March 31 -
Contemporary Jazz Ensemble,
Paul Tardif, Director, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. For more
information, call ECU-6851 or the
24-hour hotline at ECU-4370.
OPEN REGISTRATION-
CHILD SWIM lessons: sign-up
your child for swim lessons Mar.
24-28 from 9:00-6:00pm in the
SRC main office.
ECU LAW SOCIETY - Our next
meeting will be held on Monday,
March 31st at 5:15 pm in Ragsdale
room 130. We will have a guest
speaker and discuss the re-schedul-
ing of our volunteer project. The
society is open to all majors.
WHITE WATER CANOE:
James River, V A: come join us for
white water canoeing April 11-13.
Be sure to register by 6:00pm on
March 28 in the SRC main office.
SEA KAYAKING DAY TRIP:
Wilmington, NC: join us for a day
of kayaking in Wilmington on
April 12. Be sure to register by
6:00pm on April 4 in die SRC
main office.
ADVISORY COUNCIL: THE
DEPT. OF Recreational Services
is presently seeking two individuals
to fill vacancies as at-large repre-
sentatives on the Advisory Coun-
cil. These individuals may be stud-
ents, faculty, or staff and should
submit an application to David Ga-
skins at 128 Recreation Center.
Applications may be obtained from
the main office at the SRC.
INDOOR SOCCER REGIS-
TRATION MEETING: register
for soccer intramurals at the regis-
tration meeting on March 25 at
5:00pm in the MSC 244.
BEGINNER CLIMBER: PT
LOT MT NC: come join us for a
fun-filled weekend of mountain
climbing at Pilot Mt. on April 4-6.
Be sure to register by 6:00pm on
March 28 in the SRC main office.
TEAM TENNIS REGISTRA-
TION MEETING: register for in-
tramural tennis at the registration
meeting on March 27 at 5:00pm in
the SRC classroom.
TO CHI OMEGA. DELTA Zeta,
and Delta Chi: We had a great
time last Thursday at O'Malleys.
Hope we can all get together again
soon. The Phi Psis
DELTA ZETA: CONGRATU-
LATIONS on your house dedica-
tion on Sunday. We are very
proud of you. The brothers and
pledges of Phi Kappa Psi
ALPHA SIG: THANKS FOR
the PJ social last Thursday. We
had a great time and we are look-
ing forward to the next time we
can get together! Love, the Sisters
and pledgee of Pi Delta.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON,
CHI Omega, and Kappa Sigma,
Friday nights quad was awesome!
It was great having everyone to-
gether. We hope you all had as
much fun as we did. Love, Alpha
Phi!
eastcarolinian
advertising department staff
Tabi GrahamCampus Sales Rep.
Stephen MoodySales Rep.
Chris DelamereSales Rep.
David PomiliaSales Rep.
Jeremy LeeSales Rep.
Keith HerronSales Rep.
Mary PollokClassified Ad Manager
For Information Regarding Advertising
Please Call
328-2000
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
We Need Timberland boot
and shoes! Good jeans.
FOR USED MEN3 SHIRTS, SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILF1GER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVL GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Bicker Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) - TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home. Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & nng buzzer.


Title
The East Carolinian, March 27, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 27, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1197
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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