The East Carolinian, March 25, 1997







TUESDAY
MARCH 25.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Commencement rights denied to summer school graduates
Emily little
STAFF WRITER
SPECIAL GUIDANCE ISSUES
Terry Best will not be at commencement May
10. When he passes his last three courses in
summer school he will have completed a mas-
ters in accounting, but he must wait until Dec.
13 before he can wear the cap and gown and
find his name in the program.
For the past five years C.C. Rowe, director
of Commencement, has sent a letter to advis-
ers restating the standing policy that only
those students who have completed all of their
course work are permitted to participate in the
activities, but he has always received no
response. This year he sent his message
Second annual
bone marrow
typing held
Daughter of ECU
employee seeks a match
ANGELA KOENIG
HEALTHENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
On Monday ECU students had the opportuni-
ty to have their bone marrow typed as part of
the second annual marrow-thon.
The ECU American Marketing Association
held the event for ECU employee Marlene
Anderson's daughter, Cornelia, and other peo-
ple in North Carolina who need a marrow
match. Cornelia is a 17 year-old high school
senior who plans to attend ECU when she
graduates. She has aplastic anemia, a foul
blood disease in which the bone marrow is not
producing what it needs.
Last year's event did not find a match for
Cornelia, although the event broke a N.C.
record and tissue typed 753 people in one day.
According to Ona Bishop, the bone marrow
recruiter for the apheresis and bone marrow
recruitment department of the American Red
Cross, tissue typing involves having four table-
spoons of blood drawn from donors. The donor
is then entered into the national bone marrow
bank.
The chances of an ill person finding a match
are one in 20,000, and this can be even greater
depending on ethnic background.
"It only takes one person Anderson said.
If the donor matches with a recipient, the
donor is admitted to the hospital for one night
to have the bone marrow removed. The donor
does receive anesthesia and remains asleep
while the bone marrow is removed from the
upper area of the hip.
"(The doctors can only take seven percent
of a person's bone marrow and that is enough to
save someone's life Bishop said.
This procedure is paid for by the recipient
or the recipient's insurance company, not the
donor.
Although donors do not have to donate
their bone marrow if they are a match. Bishop
strongly encourages only people who are will-
ing to continue with the process to be typed.
"You never have to give, but I would think
that if they got through the process and were a
match that they would want to continue
Bishop said.
"Think about how devastating that would
be to someone to know that they got a match
but the match would not donate Anderson
said.
Although this year's event was free for
African Americans, there was a charge for other
students due to a lack of sponsorship to defray
the cost. The $19 fee is less than the $45 fee
normally paid by donors for tissue typing.
"When you really think about it, $45 or $19
is not a lot of money to save someone's lifc
Anderson said.
Anderson is grateful for all the support she
has received from ECU and the community.
"Even though the turnout was not as great
as last year I'm still grateful for the people who
did come out Anderson said. "I would like to
thank the school for the use of Mendenhall,
SEE BONE. PAGE 3
il)AY
lifestyle 6 Jt TUESDAY:
It's 3 gray day for J&jjJLX afternoon
art students. �W� showers
Opinion5 high 65
Gangstagetsa low 42
bad rap. J
sports11 jlVVEDNESDAY:
Football springs into 4H Ha paniy cloudy
practice. ' high 68
low 43
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION 8L0G,
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutec@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
through e-mail on Mar. 14, insisting that this
time the policy will not be overlooked, and he
intends to keep his promise.
That's why Best was shocked when he
heard from a Student Stores employee that he
could not wear his cap and gown to the com-
mencement exercises even though he had
already paid his $25 graduation fee.
"It doesn't make sense to tell us less than
two months before graduation Best said.
Rowe said that he sent the message in
March to call attention to the situation.
"Commencement was not on their minds
in September Rowe said. "Any time you've
got a change there's always a little turmoil.
People need to understand what graduation is
intended to be Graduation is intended, he
explained, for only the roughly 2300 names on
the list, each of whom received a letter detail-
ing the rules and schedule of the event.
In the past, students who have only needed
one or two courses have been overlooked, but
gradually more have taken advantage of the
leniency until some graduates still lack full
summer school course loads. At one point a
student participated in the exercises three
times without graduating because of failed
courses.
Some of the students have called Rowe's
office to complain that their names are not
included on the program. After this alerted
him to the problem, he began to see other
complications involved. If the weather is fair,
the occasion will take place in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium, but in the event of inclement weath-
er commencement will be split into morning
and afternoon shifts and held in Minges
Coliseum, which can hold far less than the
13,000 people expected to attend each section
if the summer school students are included.
Conceivably, in this situation, parents of
the summer school students could come early
and take seats from the parents of actual grad-
uates.
"I envision this happening and I have no
defense Rowe said.
"I agree with the reasons but if the policy
were to be changed, it should have been done
in the fall and we should have been given prior
notification Terry said.
The business school has expressed interest
in allowing him to participate in its own com-
mencement events. He can still get his cap
and gown if he shows the employees at the
student store his receipt from paying gradua-
tion fees, but they are not giving them out
again until Apr. 9.
Rowe said that at the last fall graduation,
which he created for students in a similar situ-
ation, the attendance was low due to the
absence of summer school graduates. He
hopes the new policy will make the fall com-
mencement a bigger event. He would like to
improve on commencement further by making
a full weekend of it, as some universities
already do, having the individual schools pass
out diplomas on the spot at their own com-
mencement ceremonies. Currently, the regis-
trar's office mails them to the graduates
Terry would have to pay his graduation fee
eventually, but he looks on it as a $25 interest
free loan for a year, multiplied by the number
of students who paid it before the Jan. 22
deadline. Unfortunately this is the year all of
those students got hit with the reality of a pol-
icy that is finally being enforced.
SGA Candidates prepare for debate
Presidential hopefuls to face off
JEFF GENTRY
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTAT-ION ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
With Student Government Association (SGA) elections nearing, candidates for president of
SGA will begin their race for office with a debate tomorrow night.
Cliff Webster and Scott Forbes will meet to discuss the issues relevant to the campaign in
Mendenhall Student Center at 8 p.m.
Webster has served on many different committees at ECU, and has also worked in the sports
information department and is a liaison to Appalachian State University He has also served on
the Appeals Committee and served as the sophomore class president.
Forbes is the former Public Defender and current Attorney General of the Honor Board. He
said decided to run after being approached by various Greek and non-Greek organizations late
last year.
Webster and Forbes both agree that one of the main goals this year should be making park-
ing less of a chore for students who live both on and off campus.
"hrking on campus is just terrible. Getting a park g deck started on campus is one of my
main goals if I'm elected Webster said.
"Parking is a big problem Forbes said. "I support what they are doing, but there are rough-
ly 20,000 students on campus and only 6,793 spaces to park. A parking deck would be great, and
I think it is inevitable. And we can afford this. We took in $1.46 million dollars in parking and
traffic services last year, with $446,000 of that coming" from fines alone. The University of
SEE SGA. PAGE 3
Banners waving on the mall are evidence that SGA elections are underway. Tomorrow night there will be a
debate between the two presidential candidates in Mendenhall at 8:00 p.m.
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
BETTER THAN A CLASSROOM
Sarah Evett. a senior nursing major, enjoyed studying in front of the fountain in Wright Circle Monday afternoon.
PH0T0 BY 0AVID FINCH
Halogen lamps
create safety
concern
Students encouraged to
be cautious of fires
BECKY ALLEY
STAFF WRITER
HOUSING AND CONSUMATORY SERVICES ISSUES
When ECU students return to campus in the
fall, there will be a new addition to the list of
things not to bring to campus � halogen
lamps.
With the recent string of fires caused by
halogen lamps, ECU has been prompted to
take action to ensure the safety of students in
on-campus housing.
"We have not banned halogen lamps or cre-
ated any rules against them. Right now we are
just encouraging people to be very careful with
them and not place anything flammable near
them Inez Fridley, associate director for facil-
ity management in university housing said.
Students are going to be strongly encour-
aged not to bring them to campus next semes-
ter, Fridley said.
"Students won't be in trouble for having
them, but they will be told they really don't
need them and shouldn't bring them. We are
suggesting that any light a student brings to
campus use no more than a 150 watt bulb
Halogen lights have
been directly implicat-
ed in at least 30 fires
this year. The most
dangerous and popular
lamps are the open-
ended or torchiere
style lamps.
This style lamp
leaves the bulb
exposed to anything
that may fall across the
top of the light. A
standard halogen bulb
is from 300-500 watts
and can reach temper-
atures up to 1200
degrees farenheit.
That is approximately
four times hotter than
a standard 75 watt
lighr bulb.
WRAL-News
recently aired a report
showing a demonstra-
tion by the Charlotte
Fire Department
where a tee-shirt was
placed against a 500
watt halogen light
bulb and caught on
SEE HALOGEN PAGE 3
Halogen lamps have
been identified as the
cause of several fires.
Faculty encourages
students to use
extreme caution when
using the lights.
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE
'





Tuesday. March 25. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Escort services may need police OK soon
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Mice want an ordinance that will make it more dif-
ficult for escort agencies to advertise in the yellow pages.
Such a law, scheduled for a vote tonight before the Charlotte City
Council, would police combat prostitution and other crimes that often
accompany the escort industry, officials say.
More than 100 escort agencies are listed in Charlotte's 1996 yellow
pages. BellSouth allows the ads because the agencies have city business
licenses, said spokesman Curt Peters. �
The proposed ordinance, scheduled for a vote at tonight's Charlotte City
Council meeting, would force escort agency owners to register for a permit
with the police department. Applicants would have to give police proof of
identity, Social Security number and a legitimate business address in addi-
tion to registering each employee.
Police would check the information before issuing the permit. The
agency owner would have to show the police permit when applying for a city
business license.
Negotiators down to final week on redistricting, as
expected
RALEIGH (AP) - House and Senate negotiators have wrestled for two
months over how to redraw the state's congressional districts, but with a
week to go before a federal deadline, no agreement is in place.
Nobody, including the negotiators, is surprised.
By a week from Tuesday, legislators have to submit new boundaries for
the state's 12 congressional districts to a panel of three federal judges. If
they cannot reach an agreement by the deadline, the judges will redraw the
districts themselves.
It is uncertain whether the judges would take into account the wishes of
the state's incumbent congressmen, six Democrats and six Republicans.
Two aeaortwo more injured after robbery at
McDonald's
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Two McDonald's employees were found shot to
death early today and two others critically wounded in an apparent robbery
attempt.
An officer responding to a 911 call just after midnight found the
McDonald's in suburban Hermitage closed and locked. She broke a window
and found the four victims inside, Metro Police spokesman Don Aaron said.
Robert Allen Sewcll, 23, of Old Hickory and Ronald Santiago, 27, of
Hermitage were found shot to death, police said.
Jose Alfredo Ramirez Gonzalez, 30, appeared to have been stabbed and
underwent surgery. Both he and Andrea Brown, 17, who was shot, were in
critical condition this morning at Vanderbilt University Medical Center,
spokesman John Houser said.
Police believe it was Gonzalez who called 911 and was speaking in
Spanish, but the operator didn't understand him. He was found near the
telephone.
Police said money appeared to have been taken from the restaurant, but
investigators refused to specify how much. The restaurant had closed at 11
Shop at Food Lion today to support Easter Seals
Today is the last day to buy food at Food Lion stores and have proceeds
benefit the Easter Seals Society of N.C.
"Easter Seals makes a difference for the disabled in N.C. every day,
and Food Lion is proud to be a catalyst for the generosity of our cus-
tomers and our communities said Tom Smith, president and CEO of
Food Lion in a press release.
For the sixth consecutive year Food Lion stores and food manufac-
turers and brokers across N.C. have helped raise money for the organi-
zation. This year's effort will raise more than $1 million for the organi-
zation making the Shop and Care promotion the largest fundraising pro-
motion for a sure Easter Seals affiliate in the country:
To participate in the Shop and Care promotion consumers must pur-
chase some of the 257 products identified as supporting Easter Seals.
Easter Seals is a non-profit organization which has been helping chil-
dren and adults with disabilities since 1945.
Blood slated for today
Lamda Chi Alpha will be sponsoring a blood drive today at Mendenhall
Student Center from noon to 6 p.m.
"Donating really is the gift that keeps on giving said SGA
Treasurer and member of Lamda Chi Alpha Jonathan Phillips.
Recently ECU's blood donations have decreased.
"There is a shortage of blood in N.C Phillips said. "Usually East
Carolina is really good about giving blood donations
The goal of each blood drive is to collect 75 pints of blood.
Students may donate if it has been at least 45 days since their last
donation.Students who have had tattoos or body piercings may not
donate for one year after this activity.
Environmental Health Club to hold raffle
The UBE Book Store and the Environmental Health Club (EHC) are
collaborating to raffle off three prizes to be awarded May 9. The prizes
will be gift certificates to UBE to be used toward the purchase of text-
books, school supplies, or merchandise. First prize will be $250, 2nd
prize will be $150 and 3rd prize will be $100. These will be redeemable
at UBE through Sept. 15,1997.
Individual members of the EHC will begin selling tickets on April 1.
There will also be sales on several days in front of Mendenhall Student
Center and in front of UBE. The tickets will be $2 each and the num-
ber of tickets is limited. The drawing will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, May
9 in front of Mendenhall Student Center. Winners will be posted at
UBE and at Mendenhall.
There arc plans in the making to offer additional raffles in the future,
both with UBE and hopefully with ECU Student Stores. Students
should look for future announcements for the back to school raffle.
��
DTI
EAST
CAROLINA
uiwvERsmr
School
Sit up and take notice
early registration for
�5jf ECU summer sessions
p4Ly" begins March Si!
Contact your
adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
An equal opportunityaffimianve action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.
p.m.
No arrests have been made.
In the next TEC:
� How federal regulations
concerning the "morning
after pill" will affect stu-
dent health
� SGA election updates
� Will ECU Greek organi-
zations go alcohol-free?
� How alleged sexual
harrasment has affected
campus recently.
News writers should
check the assignment
board as well as generate
ideas from contacts within
their beat
The News DepL is look-
ing for students who
want to write. Appty in
person Wed. 12 - 5 p.m.
J
Need a
" this
summer
1 you -will- be a returning
student, in the fall; University Housing
Services will be hiring painters for
the paint crew this summer. Ful and �
part-time, positions variable For details and
applications, please cornet�
Office Suite 100 Jones HalT. r7
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3 Tuesday. March 25. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
ADVANCED VEGETARIAN
COOKING CLASS
TRY COOKING WITH ALL NATURAL INGREDIENTS
PLEASE CALL AND PRE-REGISTER
CALL 757-0930
If no answer, leave name and number of attendees
There is no fee for this class-absolutely free
WHEN:
Thursday, March 27 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Making Breakfast a Better Meal
Monday, March 31 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Planning a Balanced Menu
Thursday, April 3 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Get Adequate Protein, Inexpensively
Monday, April 7 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Simple, Healthful Deserts
General Class Bldg 2015
General Class Bldg 2014
General Class Bldg 2015
General Class Bldg 2014
FREE COOKBOOK!
FREE TASTY SAMPLES!
Mon -Thurs.
11:00 am-10:00pm
Fri & Sat
11:00 am-11:00pm
aSUffS-S
Stanton Square Shopping Center
757-7756
Specialty Pizzas -
Stone Oven Baked
30 Toppings
Create Your Own Pasta Dish
March Is For Lovers Of Spring
Lovers of Pizza Lovers Of Pasta
� Appetizer - Spring Veggie Focaccia
� Pizza - "Pizza Primavera" including fresh
plum tomatoes, mushrooms, vidalia onions & fresh basil
�Pasta - Roma tomatoe sause with Porcini mushrooms tossed with Farfalle pasta
Featuring complimentary samples of our specialty
pizzas & CPW Wingers � Plus $2.oo Hi-Balls & $1.50 Domestics
SGA
continued from page
Alabama recently constructed a
parking deck that cost about $6800
per space. The only problem is that
it would take three to three-and-a-
half years to build it
Another issues which both
Forbes and Webster are expected to
agree upon is extending hours in the
library, and the computer labs open
on campus.
"I think it is a travesty that there
is not a 24-hour lab open on cam-
pus Forbes said. "We don't have
enough terminals for everyone to
use and a lot of non-traditional stu-
dents have to work during the day
There are issues which either the
candidates disagree on or are not
both addxssing. Webster said that
one of his issues which Forbes has
not addressed is his desire to have
24-hour visitation in a few of the
dorms.
"We see this popping up all over
the UNC system, and no one else
seems to be having a problem with
it. I think ECU can handle having
one or two dorms with 24-hour visi-
tation Webster said.
Another issue which Webster
said will be central in his campaign
is his suggestion to eliminate the bill
which allows for the turition and
books of several members of SGA to
be paid with student fees.
"Its time for a change Webster
said. "The students deserve some-
one who is working for them. I feel
that the pay which they receive is
compensation enough for the job
which they do. Remember, these are
students and other students should
not pay their tution
Forbes also would like to see
more metered spaces on campus, as
well as printing the minutes of SGA
meetings in TEC.
"A lot of the students don't know
whati's going on on campus, and
rather than put out a newsletter
informing students of what is going
on, I propose to run a quarter page
ad in the newspaper to print the
minutes of the weekly meetings
Forbes said. "And that's beneficial
because it puts money back into a
student organization
To hear a full list of both candi-
dates' ideas and plans for ECU's
future, attend the debate being held
Wednesday night in the Great Room
at Mendenhall. It is free to the pub-
lic and scheduled to start at 8 p.m.
"Travel-Adventure
Theme Dinn�r
Film and
Series
Film: Darwin's Patagonia
& Tierra del Fuego
Tuesday, April 1, 1997
4 & 7:30 pm
Hendrix Theatre
WtSfe-
Dinner 6t00Sc i
Or��t Room. jGl you can
1 eat aonxmmt buffat '
ineludaat chmf-cmrvmd
I�eb, ttutfmd rollmd
with fruit, and morm
D�.dli�. to �5er &.
flfi tick�t�: Mar. 27,
mxm. '�� whan ECU ID la
BhoJT? 8 thm Cantral
Tickat Offica.
Halogen
continued from page 1
fire in one minute and 30 seconds.
Captain Michael Branch,
Greenville fire marshal said there
have been no reported incidents of
halogen lights causing fires in or
around the Greenville area.
"The majority of the halogen
light fires have started because cur-
tains or drapes were near the lamp or
something was placed over the light
to dim it Branch said.
To avoid the risk of fire, halogen
lights should be placed away from
any flammable material. Do not
place any combustible material,
including paper or cardboard, over
the light. Also, make sure the light is
not left on unattended.
Branch also suggested that the
light should be placed on a stable,
flat surface where it is not in danger
of being tipped or knocked over.
"If your lamp has a dimmer
switch, you should operate it on a
lower setting than normal and always
keep an eye on it Branch said.
N.C. State, Purdue University,
Dartmouth College and Brown
University are just a few of the col-
leges who have already banned the
use of halogen lights in on-campus
housing.
ECU is not currently planning to
ban student use of halogen lights,
but Fridlcy said if the need arises,
they will be banned.
Several local businesses say they
have not seen a decline in halogen
light sales yet but they have noticed
that manufactures are starting to put
warnings on the boxes.
"As long as the lights have a glass
cover or glass plate over the top they
will be allowed Fridlcy said. "The
desk lamp style lights are safe too.
We just want to educate people
about the dangerous ones to avoid
Bone
continued from page 1
and King's Bar-B-Q and Harris
Teeter for all the food
A similar event was also held in
Harrisburg, NC on behalf of
NASCAR owner Rick Hendrick, who
is also seeking a bone marrow match.
Last year's event won AMA's Best
International Project of the Year
award among similar associations as
well as two other awards. The AMA
does marketing for medical events
and services.
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The E��l Caroiinitn
Wednesday, April 9t B2H
3:00 - oOQ pm

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Snowman's Land
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14 Skeleton part
20Thought
22 Doozy
24'�.Nanette"
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28 Handed (out)
28Chorea
30 Map portion
31 Court concerns
33 Attic, e.a.
38 Tavern brews
41 RoB call word
43 Shake� (hurry
upl)
44 Aborigines
46 Deep loathing
48 Sting
50 Scarlett's, home
51 Shape
52 Girlfriend, m
Pane
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54 Frosts a cake
55 Title
55 Director Kazan
57 Coteries.
60 Health farm
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S TMiity. March 25, 1997
opinion
Till East Carolinian
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eastlfarolinian
BRANDON WADDELL Editw
AMANDA ROSS SpomEdiroi
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OUfti&N
: The violent deaths of Tupac Shakur and Christopher Wallace (a.k.a. Biggie Smalls or
�Notorious B.I.G.) have sent America into controversy over gangsta rap. These prominent and
1 vocal performers were both gunned down in drive-by shootings within the last year.
Most of the controversy over gangsta rap centers around the question of what purpose it
serves. Is it violent for the sake of being violent, or is there more to it? Of course, as with any
hot debate, there is more to the picture.
First of all, who owns the record companies? Sure, Death Row Records and a few other labels
are run by minorities, but for the most part the record industry itself (the major labels, the dis-
tribution of merchandise, etc.) is run by upper-class white guys. What do these guys know about
�p?
Well, one thing they know is that it makes money. Big money. And that seems to be the moti-
vating factor behind the direction in which rap is heading. With more and more money being
ispent on developing and promoting gangsta rap performers, and more and more gangsta rap
records being sold each year, the chances are likely that gangsta rap is here to stay (and will pos-
sibly dominate).
Is this such a bad thing? Gangsta rappers have legitimate reasons for speaking out, and their
voices need to be heard. One of the reasons that they have gained so much recognition is
because they are not afraid to talk about issues of race, economy, prejudice and injustice that,
until fairly recently, were often ignored. They're angry, they're loud, and audiences usually lis-
ten to angry, loud people.
But we've got to look beyond the gangsta rappers and their audience to see the people at the
top, the people who benefit the most. The record industry continues to encourage gangsta rap-
pers to be harder, tougher, meaner and more violent. They know that street credibility for gangs-
ta rappers (usually bought with blood) equals good record sales. The more vicious the public
persona, the faster the money will flow in.
What effect does this have? Well, two prominent performers are dead. If things continue as
they are it seems that more are guaranteed to die. The voices of gangsta rap may be silenced
! by greed. The responsibility is in the hands of the record industry.
FRS ra'THf EDITOR
Wake up! Cloning is evil
To the Editor,
I can sec the ad on TV now-FronT
Life Unlimited comes the amazing
new Home-a-clone kit!
"Yes, in the privacy of your own
home, create the brand new you.
First create your own jblone with our
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your brains overnight into the brand
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Just attack it at night before you
go to bed and the next morning you
will already have already moved into
the healthy and vibrant new you.
It's as simple as falling asleep. If
you are not completely satisfied just
return it and we will refund your
money, no questions asked.
Order right now and we'll throw
in at now extra charge our greatly
expanded inventory of previously
owned genes.
With your purchase, we will send
yhou free of charge our Gene
Supplements Catalogue so you can
choose up to 10 items absolutely
free if you order right now.
Imagine supplementing your
brain with cells from the top Nobel
Prize winners in their fields. And for
the sportsmen and sportswomen,
genes from top Olympic athletes.
Plus much much more!
So what are you waiting for? Pick
up the phone and order right now!
Dial 1-800
Wake up America. Man has now
thrown down the gauntlet, he is now
challenging God Almighty and his
son Jesus Christ.
he is saying, "We want to live our
lives our way! We want eternal life
our way! Not your backward, brain-
drain way
However, there is just one prob-
lem. In the bible, there is a promise
that the scriptures cannot be bro-
ken. And if you really know God, He
has enough power to back up what
He promises.
If the bible says eternal life
comes through Jesus Christ, then
you can take it to the bank, god's not
going to let a bunch ow dim-wit egg
heads defeat his plan of salvation for
ail mankind.
The handwriting is on the wall,
America!
Wake up! God is going to cut
short our United Babylon of doing it
our way. Our days are numbered as a
nation and as a world.
Again, I say, wake up! Return to
God before it is too late.
Donald Raymond Wheatley
Greenville resident
Can't we all get along:
?
To the Editor,
I am writing in response to
Aerian Heath's article, which
appeared in the March 20 issue of
The East Carolinian. First, I want to
clearly state this tetter was not writ-
ten in support of Mr. White's per-
sonal betters, nor was this letter
written in support of Aerian Heath's
personal beliefs. Everyone is enti-
tled to their own opinion, so now, I
will express mine.
In regard to the Rodney King
incident, Los Angeles policemen
involved in the brutal beating exhib-
ited a rage that held no regard for
humanity. Each police officer
involved in the incident should have
been relieved of hisher duties per-
manently. As far as your accusation
of the Klan being involved, Ms.
Heath, I wish you would inform me
when the Klan formed in Los
Angeles, a city whose population is
more ethnically diverse than any city
in America, and a city located well
over 2,000 miles away from where
the Civil Rights Movement first
occurred. The ECU Housekeeping
incident was indeed shameful. Not
only should Mr. Nichols publicly
apologize, he should also lose his job.
But to say blacks are always looked
upon as "evil" or "wrong" is an
extremely biased statement, many
of my closest friends are black, and I
have never looked upon them as
evil. No matter the color of our skin,
Ms. Heath, someone else can per-
ceive us all as wrong or evil, being
ashamed of one's own color, whether
white, black, Indian or Hispanic is
unfortunate, but if you haven't
noticed, the news is built on tragedy,
crime and controversy, not on skin
color. Incidents like these grab
attention and make headlines.
Unfortunately, many of these inci-
dents are beyond our own control.
In closing, I fee! sorry for Mr.
White and Ms. Heath. Where racism
is concerned, their beliefs are on
opposite ends of the spectrum. For
our world to unite, we all must put
aside our negative views and live as
one.
Stephen Moody
Graduate student
Marketing and Management
Natural life I
'�Ar
Each year, "college beer cans" could litter every Federally
assisted highway in the U.S. at a rate of one can per foot.
-NIRSA Natural High Newsletter "
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
OPINION
Mans
DIBUDUQ
Four year degree vital for norrtrads too
Going back to school when you are
older, or what is typically termed as
"non-traditional student" is difficult.
At age 25 one is considered a non-tra-
ditional student. It is out of the flow
of the normal order of American life's
undertakings.
Just walking around campus and
sitting in class is difficult when your
age is closer to that of the instructors'
than to the students It feels awk-
ward and unnatural. Although this
feeling of uneasiness is ever-present
with the older student, it is a small
when compared to other hurdles that
the non-traditional-student must
overcome.
Often times, the older student has
a family of hisher own. If it is hard
getting yourself up and ready for class,
just imagine having to get children up
and get their breakfast, driving them
to school or making sure they board
the schoolbus. Only after considering
alt these factors can you begin to pre-
pare yourself for school.
We older students often dream of
stumbling out of bed, leaving it
unmade and going of the cafeteria
where someone else has prepared
breakfast for us. Older students who
are parents never get the weekends
off. It is a never-ending routine of
schoolwork and caring for the chil-
dren.
When I first started out on my
four-year-degree, I not only had a
child to send to school, but an infant
still in diapers to care for in addition
to working 30 hours per week. I had to
get up in the middle of the night to
care for my son when he would cry
and need me.
Lack of sleep was an everyday
occurrence for me.
Occasionally the sitter could not
come. I had to make a choice between
missing classes or taking my youngest
child to a drop in day care. I was
uncomfortable taking my son to
school with me.
Top all this off with a learning dis-
ability that means I would have to
study longer and harder than the aver-
age student and you have more than
a full load. The stress is extreme: Add
court and custody battles, a physical
illness draining my energy level, mood
and overall ability to function , and
you have an almost impossible task of
completing your degree.
The one quality I do possess is
persistence. I would not give up. I
kept trying no matter what.
Going to school full rime, i
through, for four consistent years in a
row was not possible for me.
Sometimes, I had to go part time and
even skip a whole semester occasion-
ally.
Why would anyone go through all
this just to get a degree?
If most work available out there is
beyond reach because of the needed
physical strength needed to do the
job, then the only answer for someone
who wants employment is education.
I concluded a long time ago the
more education one has, the better
chances the person has at employ-
ment. The pay will be higher and the
hours will be more reasonable. The
work will certainly be leas physically
demanding.
I am proud to announce that I am
graduating this May.
I am sure it is always more difficult
to go back to school later in life than it
is when you are first out of high
school.
Unless you have a very special tal-
ent or technical expertise, a four year
degree is vital. That is unless, at
course you would prefer to use your'
strength and body to earn a living.
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Guest columnist application for Campus View
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what
you think about a certain topic, Please return this form The East
Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
Name
FrSophJr Sr ?
Phone number.
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
Please consider me for a postion as guest columnist for TEC Iagree to allow TEC's
staff to edit my submission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content Other
than those changes I will be notified of any changes that may affect the length or
content I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submission. If I am select-
ed, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline
for submission will be assigned by the editor.
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"The real heart of a university is freedom to
express and to criticize
- George W. Starcher, universtiy president, 1968
1





6 Tuesday. March 25. 1997
The East Carolinian
Undergrad art exhibited in Gray Gallery
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
The best of the best of student art will be recognized tomorrow night at an
awards ceremony and gala reception, kicking off the annual ECU School of Art
Undergraduate Exhibition.
The ceremony and reception, sponsored by the Art Enthusiasts of ECU, will
befein at 7 p.m. in the Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery inside of the Jenkins Art
'This year's exhibition, which runs through April 19, features 260 works.
Triese works were selected from submissions from more than 600 undergradu-
ate students. The show will feature works from various curriculum areas includ-
ing art foundations, ceramics, communication arts, drawing, fabric design, metal
design, new technologies, painting, printmaking, sculpture, textile design,
weaving design and wood design.
Gil Leebrick, director of the Gray Art Gallery, said the exhibition always pro-
vides an excellent showcase of student artwork, and this year is no different.
"We're very proud of our students and their accomplishments Leebrick
said. "The work is always outstanding in all the different areas
Mark Sloan, director of the Halsey Gallery at the College of Charleston, will
select the awards for this year's exhibition. Sloan is a former assistant director of
the Camerawork Gallerv in San Francisco and former director of the North
Carolina Center for rhe Arts' Fine Arts Center. The event is free and open to the
public.
ECU's School of Art, the only state university accredited by the National
Association of Schools of Art and Design, features the largest studio art program
in North Carolina.
Recipients of the Taevlor Supply Award will also be recognized at the recep-
tion. The Taevlor Supply Award, to be presented by Professor Ron Graziani, is
given to deserving graduate students who have submitted portfolios. The grad-
uate art exhibition will open April 28 and continue through May 23.
Those who attend the exhibition will not be disappointed for lack of diver-
sity, Leebrick said.
"The work across the disciplines has great diversity in their approach to
problem solving he explained. "It exemplifies a fresh, creative approach
The Jenkins Fine Arts Center is located off of 5th Street and Jarvis Street.
The Gray Art Gallery is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The hours are extended to 8 p.m. on Thursdays.
For more information about the exhibition or other gallery events, call 328-
6336.
English dept. hosts North Carolina scholars
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Two active North Carolina scholars
will be showcasing their latest
research this week, courtesy of the
English department.
On Wednesday, March 26, C.W.
Sullivan III, an ECU professor of
English, will delve into Celtic
mythology and legend and its
impact on our modern culture in a
talk entitled "Celtic Myth and
Legend: Things Your Mother
Should Have Told You The lecture
will be in the General Classroom
Building, Room 1028, at 4 p.m. A
reception will follow in the English
Faculty Lounge of the GCB, Room
2136
The very next day, March 27,
brings Dr. Karla EC. Holloway, the
director of the African and African-
American Studies Program at Duke
University. Dr. Holloway's talk, enti-
tled "Passed On: African-American
Mourning Stories promises to be
original and enlightening. Focusing
on death within the African-
American community. Dr. Holloway
will examine African-American
mourning through cultural rituals
and ceremonies. Dr. Holloway's lec-
ture is sponsored in conjunction
with the programs in Women's
Studies and Ethnic Studies and will
be held in GCB. Room 2014 at 4
p.m. A reception will follow in GCB,
Room 2136.
For further information, contact
Dr. Lillian Robinson at 328-6681.
mOUiereview
Greenville shows good independent film?
jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Greenville theaters are not known for their
taste in cinematic fare. Sure, we get all of the
mainstream blockbusters, but chances of
actually finding a good film in that lot are
about the same as winning the lotto. Mostly,
film fans are left to scouring local video stores
for items of interest. And unless you've got
the money to pile into a home theater sys-
tem, it's not going to come anywhere near
the experience of seeing a film in a theater
(although some home theater systems are
probably better than the screens at the
Plaza, Carolina East and Buccaneer the-
aters).
That's why it amazed me to see that Sling
Blade had opened in town. The film original-
ly 'appeared nationwide in November of
19, so we're four months late receiving it.
The most likely reason we got the film at all
is that it has been nominated for several
rrtajor Oscars. This is an ongoing trend for
Greenville theater. We didn't receive
Srhmdler's List or Poslino (The Postman) until
after they had both received nominations (in
fact, flPostino was over a year late arriving in
Greenville). And I haven't even mentioned
the quality films like Trainspotting, Fargo or
The English Patient that never, ever get played
heie. Fbr a city that likes to think of itself as
the up-and-coming cultural mecca of eastern
North Carolina, we sure do have a ways to go.
But I guess it's better that we got Shttg Blade
late than never.
I whole-heartedly recommend this film
to fcach and every person who is reading this
article. Billy Bob Thornton has created a
masterpiece.
tor me, as a Southerner, this film res-
onates with cultural truth, something that
most films about the South severely lack.
(Probably because most of them are written
by non-Southerners. Case in point. Prince of
Tides, a wonderful novel whose film version
was completely botched by a non-Southern
director and star.)
Thornton, who also wrote and directed
the film, stars as Karl Childers, a 39-year-old,
mentally handicapped man who committed
an atrocious act when he was 12 and was sent
to the state mental hospital (the "nervous
hospital as Karl calls it) to be cured. When
the film starts, he has been cured and is
being set free.
Life on the outside is an open, interesting
and somewhat frightening experience for the
gravelly-voiced, man-of-few-words Karl, but
he soon finds his own way. When he begins
to interact with other people is when we see
the genius of Thornton open up.
Karl returns to his hometown that he left
when he was 12 years old and quickly finds a
friend in 12 year old Frank, played by Lucas
Black. Frank and Karl hit it off immediately
and the film centers much around the rela-
tionship between these two chatacters.
However, I don't want to go into too much
detail. The film's plot is too beautiful and
too engrossing for me to go into without
spoiling the experience of seeing it. Suffice it
to say that friendship and the sanctity of
childhood are two major themes in the film.
Sling Blade is good for the small parts, as
well as the whole. In the details of life that
Thornton gathered to put into this film, he
seems to have left nothing out. I became
totally enveloped in the world that Thornton
created on the screen. The dialogue was riv-
eting - at times funny, at others inspiring and
most often gripping with its emotion. The
characters that Thornton creates to deliver
these lines are also vivid and interesting and
are played by some unusual personalities.
Country superstar Dwight Yoakam, Three's
Frank and Karl's touching friendship is central to Sling Blade's beauty
PHOTOS 9Y PATRICK IRELAN
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Sk it for fftt
fwftt it on Vww
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Pay Fun Price
Compfmy star John Ritter, Col.
Bruce Hampton of the band
Aquarium Rescue Unit, film
director Jim Jarmusch and
extreme character actor Robert
Duvall all appear in roles in the
film. And all of them are dis-
tinctly different, unlike the
many stereotypical roles that are
open in Hollywood today.
Thornton, who for 16 years
has tried to make it in
CD reviews
James
Whiplash
Hollywood, has really come into
his own with this film. His
understated performance as Karl
is truly captivating. It is impossi-
ble to take your eyes off of him
when he's on the screen.
Sling Blade is a marvel of
directing, acting and writing. Go
see it while you can, because
who knows when we will see
another film this good in
Greenville.
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, The East Carolinian
Editor, Rebel
for the 1997-98 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
FRIDAY, MARCH 28 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
Need a
v
w
summer
If you will be n returning
strident uvtlic finUniversity Housing
.ervtces will be hiring Facility office assistants
this summer. Part-time positions available
For details and applications, please come to
Office Suite 100. Jones Hall
Pat Reid
STFF tt'RI TK.H
Over the Rhine
Good Dog, Bad Dog:
The Home
Recordings
Wasn't Oasis enough? I guess you
could say I'm no fan of British pop,
and to say I dislike Oasis would be the
understatement of the year. But, just
when you think the .American public
has gotten their British longings satis-
fied, here comes James from across
the big pond.
James (which, by the way, is com-
posed of six guys none of whom are
named James) has actually been
around since 1983, but they never
reached much ground in the U.S.
until 1994 with their album liid.
That album actually did respectably
in the U.S. market, and the single by
the same name exploded across the
radio, earning the boys in rhe band a
spot on the bill of Woodstock '94.
There, in the rain, playing between
Uve and The Cranberries, is where
they started laying down ideas for a
new album.
Of course, a lot can happen in
three years. One day in late 1994, the
tend hit rock bottom. They were
informed they owed five years of back
taxes, and founding member larry
Gott would no longer tour with them.
But. the band stuck their ground and
forged on.
So, what do we. the record-buying
public, get for their hard work and
devotion? We get short-changed.
Whiplash is at best a decent album, at
worst a CD worthy enough to only be
a coaster on a coffee table. Of course,
personal opinion will decide which
side you lean towards, but I personal-
ly found a new coaster.
The CD starts off on a good foot
with "Tomorrow This is best
described as reminiscent of Oasis only
without the attitude. Real'y strong,
driving acoustic guitars and drums
with swooping electric guitar slides
for effect make "Tomorrow" a dose of
Brit pop that will get anybody tapping
their foot. "Iost A Friend" and
"Waltzing Along" are also both decent
songs, although not as good as
"Tomorrow "Uost A Friend"
explores the hypnotic and corrupting
factions of television. A little more in
depth than Bruce Springsteen's "57
Channels (and Nothing On) "lost
A Friend" stands well as a song and a
statement. "Waltzing Along" uses
hypnotizing guitar loops and stag-
gered vocal melodies to create a
sound that invades your mind and
relaxes you whether you want it to or
not. "She's A Star" does pretty much
the same thing, only not as well.
This brings us to the fatal down-
ward spiral of the CD. For some rea-
son, after four songs James decides to
become an industrialtechno band.
"Greenpeace" and "Go To The Bank"
both combine rave-type techno with a
Nine Inch Nails sort of industrial
sound, even down to the vocals. The
SEE JAMES. PAGE 8
John Davis
STAFF WRITER
There's nothing quite like standing on
a foot-wide window ledge in the Hyatt
in downtown Chicago watching
passersby while listening to quiet music
turned up loudly. The speakers are very
tiny, the sublime piano gets distorted
just a bit, and the melancholy beauty of
the female lead singer's voice takes
power over the lives of the people walk-
ing by on the street. When the Chopin-
like piano intro fades a bit to accommo-
date her voice singing, "What a beauti-
ful piece of heartache this has all turned
out to be the heartache of each person
on the sidewalk below becomes appar-
ent.
Chicago is cold, very cold in March,
and though the room is warm, breath on
the window fogs it anyway. The fog
seems like a part of the music. Only the
most beautiful music can do this, envel-
op the environment, absorb the world
into itself. Beautiful music changes the
way the world is seen.
That's just "Latter Days the first
song on Over The Rhine's new album
Good Dog, Bad Dog, released on their
own label. Imaginary Records. It's been
almost two years since the Cincinnati
quartet's last album. Eve. That album
was just like its namesake: very femi-
nine, yet dark and spontaneous, almost
primitive in its wash of electric guitars
and muddy blues.
Good Dog, Bad Dog is quiet, like the
river Eve must have found after being
ejected from the Garden. The title sug-
gests the simplified version of the
Lutheran doctrine of total depravity
that circulates Sunday school classes:
"There's a good dog and a bad dog
inside each of us, and we must choose
to make the good dog win Of course,
no one ever tells how to make the good
dog win, and that is where this album
sits, with its eyes toward heaven and its
feet in the mud, Eve remembering life
before the apple.
Good Dog, Bad Dog is a collection of
tunes that bassist Ltnford Detwieler
describes in the liner notes as a "bare-
boned mess of songs which had been
outlined after dark in my third story
bedroom The band had plans to
record the album earlier until they
unexpectedly parted ways with IRS
Records, their label at that time.
So they piled into Linford's apart-
ment and recorded the album there
instead. (If you listen closely, you can
hear kitchen sounds behind the music.)
The result is probably their most pow-
erful work to date. Reminiscent at
times of R.E.Ms powerful Automatic for
the People, or the Innocence Mission's
Glove, GotxJ Dog, Bad Dog surges with
deep, still emotion that swells to fill
SEE RHINE. PAGE 8
Run Away Cw I ev�n hum alonj Taps it Irom a Intml Buy it ittt Ply M
Arowatketrinf
��i
Christinne's invites you to lunch at its
nev Ironwood location!
� Spectacular lunch buffet -just $7.95. A la carte items also available.
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1
lifestyle
Tha East Carolinian
review
Jedi makes a lukewarm return to theaters
i
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Accelerate towa
skati
Dale Williamson
ASII8TANT UIKITYt,K KDITOK
By now, many people are probably
sick and tired of hearing about Star
fMrr. When George Lucas reissued
his space trilogy, movie goers flocked
to the theaters and the media wrote
story after story about the phenome-
non.
While all the initial hoopla has
died down a bit, Stwr Hkrs is still hot
at the theaters. The first two films of
the trilogy (which includes Star Mm
and lit Empire Strife Bart) are still
making money at movie theaters
across the nation, and the latest re-
addition to the craze landed the num-
ber one spot at the box office on its
re-opening weekend. Despite the fact
that most fans and critics insist that
the final part of Lucas' trilogy is the
weakest, Rrturn of tit Mi has once
again pulled in the crowds eager to
experience a blast from the past on
the big screen one more time.
Like the other reissued films. Mi
has been "touched up" by Lucas and
his creative team at Industrial Lights
and Magic in an effort to make the
movies as good as they possibly can
be.
As huge a Star flan fan I am, 1
must say that the onlyway to make
Jnjfi as good as it possibly can be is to
simply rewrite the entire film, but
that's me.
JhH is the weakest link in the SW
chain for many reasons. First of all, the
film is simply too cute for its own
good. While the first two movies were
fun, they also had a darker edge to
them that made them more than
child's play. Unfortunately, Lucas
decided to play it safe the third time
around and eliminate those dark
edges. It's been said a million times
before by better critics than myself,
but the Ewoks (which, if you don't
know, are teddy bears that our heroes
team up with to defeat the evil galac-
tic Empire) ruin the film. They are
too cute, too silly, too commercial, too
stupid and too fake to add anything to
the Star Wan epic.
But the problems with Mi can not
all be blamed on midgets in fuzzy cos-
tumes. Disappointments abound.
The actors, for instance, all seem to
have their minds on other things.
Harrison ford gives an almost embar-
rassing portrayal of his roguish charac-
ter, Han Solo. Instead of imbuing Sob
with the sarcastic wit that has made
� 1
Til
mmj Cutl aVua
him one of the
series most popular
characters, Ford
results to playing
goofy comic relief
with overdone body
gestures and quirky
racial expressions.
ford shouldn't
be blamed, though.
His character is
completely under-
written and left
with nothing to do.
In fact, most of the
major players in the
series are pushed
to the side so the
central storyline,
which centers
Skywalker's final confrontation with
Darth Vadcr and the evil Emperor,
can be wrapped up.
Making matters slightly worse is
the fact that most of the added
footage that, according to Lucas,
improves fttti only makes the film
worse. A scene in Jabba the Hutt's
palace featuring a bizarre, otherworld-
ly pop band has always been severely
lacking. Using state-of-the-art com-
puter technology, Lucas and company
have revamped the scene with new
creatures and new musk. In a nut-
shell, the new creatures are more car-
toonist) than creative and the music
sounds too much like earth-bound
top-40 spittle to be taken seriously.
As for all you Boba fctt fans out
This nawly addtd
ing girls, it just on
PHOTO
around Luke
Early refbtraHon
begins March 311
The Division of Continuing Studies,
328-6324
opporMBitySfltnnMiv Mton untvmny,
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DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
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RI6GAN
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Greenville, NT
Phone 750204
Our Specially it Sol St Httt Rtptfr
All Rockport Soles � $25.00
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Brli thU coupon with youi ahoei
Mon-Fri 7:30 �.m. � 6 p-m.
Sat ftOO �m � 2 p.m.
ftatwing thras outH�Mtiitf�rld dine,
of tha problsms with Bttutn oftmJtm. �
courtist or �th ewrruwr fox
there, you should be disgusted to,
know that there is more of him in Mi
now. Thanks to computer bit map-
ping, you can see Boba Fett hanging'
out in the background of Jabba'
palace and hitting on women
Additions like this really flesh out
such an intriguing character. Too bad
Lucas didn't bit map Billy Dee
Williams downing a Colt 45 Matt
Liquor while explaining to Jabba the
benefits of using the psychic hot line.
As disappointing aa Mi is, and
despite all the trashing I've dealt it, I
can't say that it is a terrible film.
There is much to like and admire
about Lucas' concluding chapter
especially when compared to othejr
modern science fiction films. A scene
involving a flying motorcycle chase
through a dense forest is still just as
thrilling aa it was in 1983, and the
final space battle is so amazingly
complex and fast-paced that it makes
the climax of IwtqmAmt Day tame
and Doting. The action and special
effects of Mi, just like all the other
films in the trilogy; demand to be
seen on the big screen, thus making
this film well worth the money and
time to at least catch as a matinee.
Admittedly, Jeefi works well for a
mainstream audience that doesn't
view it in relation to the other Star
Him films. However, for those of us
who see the three films as one long
film divided into three chapters, Jm
just doesn't fit neatly in the rest of
the puzzle.

�4Y
APMISSI&N
9:00-10;00�n.00
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ll00-1100-100
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SPECIALS
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PI'S JUST HIRE? THE EAST CO AST'S KST PBK JOCKEY TEAM
Opportunities for 1st and
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PEACH PARTY
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POORS OPEN AT 6:00PM
frAMESANPWEAWAYS
ALTERNATING
wkklLIVECOMEPY
weeki.UYE�EWAE
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p
ToUgfe of Arts & Sconces to COS1
(Unrversklad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa 1
Anthropology 2020 Biology 3400 Geology"
Spanish 1040 Spanish 2108
Independent Study Courses: By arrangement
Program Director: Professor John Bort, 328-6136
rnllfryp of Arts & Sritmc to ENGLAND
(2nd Summer Session only)
English 4510
Program Director. Professor Richard Taylor, 328-6687
International 2400
Program Director. Professor Juhang Shi, 328-1064
Q of Arts A S fences to BELIZE and GUATEMALA
(Central American opportunities for 2nd Summer Session)
A focus on Africa Culture in the Americas
Program Director Professor Gay Wilentz, 328-6678
School of Art to FINLAND. ESTONIA. RUSSIA. POLAND
Ceramics - Graduate A Undergrade e courses, all levels
Sculpture - Graduate & Undergrad' e courses, all levels
Drawing - 3561, 3563, 5560 A 55
Art History - 4970
Ait Appreciation -1910, open to General College
Hypermedia - 3070
Independent Study - 3500 & 5500 by arrangement
Program Director: Professor Carl BiUingsley, 328-6270
School of Business to GLASGOW. SCOTLAND
(University of Strathclyde)
International Management 3352
International Management 6322
Strategic Management 4842
Strategic Management 6722
Program Director: Professor Roy Simerly, 328-6632
School of Nursing to FINLAND. ESTONIA, and RUSSIA
(Oulu Polytechnic University)
International Health Care 5620
Program Director Professor Mary Kirkpatrick, 328-4311
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
An equtl opportunitytOinnMivc ection university, whreh accoqiBiodticj the needs of indmdutU with diubihlia
-f





�� � �,
8 Tws.ay, Mirch 26, 1997
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
James
continued from page 6
verses of "Greenpeace" have a Trent
Resnor edge to diem while the chorus
has extended wails over a techno beat.
Have a couple of Exccdrin readily avail-
able before playing this one.
"Homeboy" appears a few songs later
and constitutes a slight return to actual
instrument playing and singing What's
more, it's actually a catchy song, which
is a welcome change from the crap that
had been dominating the album.
"Wrtering Hole" and "Blue
Pastures" are both bass driven songs,
with "Fastures" being the better of the
two. "WKering Hole" seems to drag on
and on with no real merit while "Blue
Pastures" manages to flow smoothly.
If techno and industrial music is
your thing, then you might want to
check out Wkptesh. But be forewarned,
it's not necessarily good techno and
industrial music. It's simply an
attempt. Rr the rest of you out there
who prefer bands to rely less on
machines and more on themselves,
steer as far clear of this one as you can.
Rhine
tmtiavsd from pigi 6
whatever room it happens to be played
in.
It's net all quiet, soulful piano,
though. The second track, "All I Need
ia Everything is a moving, unplugged
rock sttflf about rebirth. VbcaKst Karen
Bergquiat's voice has never been more
subtle arid powerful. She showed her
stall at bringing jazz and blues vocal
technique into rock music on Eve, but
here she adds a range of quieter skills to
her arsenal.
When she emotes, "I've been fin-
gering the flame like tomorrow's mar-
tyr her voice breaks just enough and
then fattens with a full melancholy that
makes Morrissey seem like the happi-
est feltaw in merry England. The
refreshing thing is, the mood never
stays sad. WI I Need is Everything" is
a song of jo of rebirth, and Bergquist
directs the mood to that joy as easily as
she tugs at the sadness.
Each song ia its own world of emo-
tion. "Etcetera Whatever" is a gor-
geous, wotMngcfcn love song, while "I
WM Not Eat The Darkness" is a puls-
ing instrumental, no doubt referring to
both Eve, the biblical figure, and Eve,
the album.
"Ruthfully Dangerous" surely could
be Adam singing to his Eve: "No mat-
ter what they say you'll ahvays be faith-
fully dangerous, lost and lovely, so beau-
tiful to me "The Seahorse" finds the
couple longing for perfect love again,
and for eternity. ���
"Everyman's Daughter" is a striking
ballad that twists the Beatles' M is
One" idea into something actually
interesting and true: "Who am I and
whose invention? This armour's full of
dust. There's so much of us in each
othet If I hate you you're my best
reminder of all I wish I was
"A Gospel Number" is, well, just
that, while "Rjughkeepsie" rings in the
ears like an old Lutheran hymn.
Beigquist's voice soars and dips into
canyons here. She proves that white
girls can sing with true soul when she
elates, "I ride on the backs of the angels
tonight. I take to the sky with all their
might.
The album segues into a classical
acoustic solo piece by Ric Hordinski,
the band's skilled guitarist on
"Willoughby and then romps through
the jazzed-up spoken word serenade,
"Jack's VUentine
The record closes out with two love
songs, one to God and then one to a
human lover. "Happy to Be So" has Eve
yearning for the former closeness of the
Garden, "If I try to pray, it's like a game
of red rover. I take a real good run at it,
but I can't break through. Don't matter
anyway I'm so redhanded Still, hope
is not lost as she realizes, "I know a love
that will not let me go The song
reaches chill-bump perfection when
the French hommellotron movement
mixes with Beigquist's sullen voice to
close the number. Then the album
fades out with the airy, happy-go-lucky
country ballad, "Go Down Easy"
With Good Dog, Bad Dog, Over the
Rhine have achieved what few bands
da They have created a work that dips
into the region of the soul and inspires
new sight, inspires new life, and
inspires creativity. This is an album to
fall in love, or find God, with.
Unfortunately, since they've released it
on their own label, it takes a bit of work
to get.
It is definitely worth that work.
Good Dog, Bad Dog can be ordered
through CD Alley, or by mailing the
band at: Over the Rhine, PO Box 2572,
Cincinnati, Ohio, 45201 (e-mail:
OTRhine@aol.com).
321-4862
315 SE Greenville BLVD
Bonus Buvs
w any purchase
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RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL752-2M5
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR summer school lor a two bedroom two
bathroom apartment. Only f 190 a month.
May's rent only HO. On ECU bus route.
752-3643.
CANNON COURT AND CEDAR
Court two bedroom I 12 bath townhouses.
On ECU bus route $400-1415. Call Wun-
rght Property Management 756-6209 ore-
leasing for fall also.
r-
i
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I md21
VMr, Or, Hsatast. Oscta mt Mm
r,mtmnu.umntrrfte�V.
Sv4VM�)lM Court
mt vwmsc
WMMftOrjW Htasupt
ft-l
TMKAND
0 OTHfa WTrVofHTaB
MANrVSCOBY
75S-IV2I Ofrfc�l(i�MI-W
WANTED. NEAT, NON-SMOKING
female roommate. Georgetown Apts. Call
758-8720. Will have own room and pay 13
expenses.
EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, SPA-
i CIOUS example of Prank Lloyd Wright ar-
� chirecture. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, large din-
ing room, kitchen, and living room with fire
; place. With washer, and dryer. Beautifully
landscaped with three fenced in yards.
" Convenient to campus and the hospital.
:J J000mo deposit. 524-4111.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR sublease over the summer, in Players
Club, Will not need to pay deposit. Call an-
ytime 353-0966.
if ROOMMATE WANTED QUIET RE-
SPONSIBLE female to share Z bdrm 1
S bath apt. Starting in May. ll97.S0month
� 12 utilities water and sewer included
� Tbwerhill Aprs. 2 mi. from campus. Call
Becky @ 328-3636.
jj SUBLEASING ROOM FOR MAY 1st-
I Aug. 1st one bedroom one bathroom wash-
" erdryer 12 utilities 12 phone free water eV
cable rent 1225.00. No security deposit
' 551-3168.
�(
; GLADIOLUS
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY U99?. One, two,
and three, bedroom apartments on 10th
Street, Five brocks from ECU, now proteas-
ing. Call Wainright Property Management
756-6209.

MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
i WasherDryer, use of all amenities, split
cable, phone and utilities 4 ways. Call
1
Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
; FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
; PLAYERS Club Apartments. WaaherDry-
; er, use of aft amenities, split cable, phone
' and utilities 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613.
fery Affordable!
, SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS new
Rec. Center! 5th street Square - Uptown -
Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2 12 bath. Sun-
ken LR apt. $775 mo. , One 2 bedroom
above Uppercrust Bekfry AVAILABLE
1 NOW. (New carpet) for 475 mo. Luxury
Apartments. Will lease for May first with
deposit Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
TAKE OVER LEASE: TWO bedroom
two bath. Dogwood Hollow Apts. on 10th
Street. Washer, dryer, dfehwashct, disposal.
1500month. Great Apartments. Call 758-
3323.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP!
' RENT is 1195 plus 12 utilities. Throe
blocks from campus call 551-3862.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE AT
RINGGOLD Towers for summer sub-
lease two bedroom, lease ends July 31,
May's rent will be paid for. Call 752-5304.
FOR SALE SOLOFLEX EXCEL-
LENT condition all parts and extras $750.
Firm will trade for cannondale race bike.
Serious inquires only. Call Randall 746-
8o43t
95 FLEETWOOD EDGEWOOD 14 x
76 3 br2bath garden tub, dishwasher, shed
defence: Payoff $17400. Located in Birch-
wood Sands Eat Greenville. Call
(919)465-8711 or (919)778-4207 owner.
MOUNTAIN BIKE! 1995 GT Temp-
est, green. Excellent condition. Has been
kept inside apartment and been taken care
of. Asking $375.00 neg. Must see! 758-
6444Adam.
1994 HONDA NIGHTHAWK
CB2S0R red, like new, 1,316 miles, with
helmet XXS $3,000 566-4662 lfter 6 pm.
COMPUTER FOR SALE: IBM com-
patibte. 20 meg hard drive. 5 14 floppy
disk drive. Keyboard, 13" monitor. Great
for typing papers! Asking $150. Call Mimi
at 756-8266.
iw! CHEVY CAVALIER, LT. biueac
auto, CD $9,800 or take up payments. Call
Jennifer 328-3514. Must Sell.
CUSTOM MADE QUEEN SIZE wa
terbed! Modern, black, padded rails, mat-
tress, heater, lining. Great buy $200. Large
eft. fridge with freezer (holds ice cream!)
Great for dorms. $50 Call Tracey at 752-
8266.
GOLF CLUBS PALMER AXION 112-
pw excellent shape. Only used 3-4 times.
Price $100. Contact Karl 8304626.
MACINTOSH IIX OOOD CONDI-
TION 200 megabit hard drive 8 megs of
Ram software included. $700 or bear offer.
Call Greg 757-8724.
I NEED MONEY! CANNONDALE
M700 bike for sale. Only six months old
barely used. Only $150.00. Call right away
758-6575. Ask for Lee.
KINSTON INDIANS ARE CUR-
RENTLY looking for gameday staff for the
1997 season (411-830). Positions available
are: ushers, concessions workers, ticket tak-
ers, waitstsff, �nd vendors. Apply a: Graing-
er Stadium M-F from 9am-5pm.
STUDENTS NEEDED TO CON-
DUCT surveys at the malls on Saturdays.
Flexible hours. Please call Maurice at 355-
3565 after 8 pm.
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK sum-
in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring Life-
guards and Beach Concession Workers.
Earn good money while working on the
Beach! $$Salary plus bonuses $$ Dis-
counted Housing lb apply or for further
information, call North Myrtle Beach Life-
guards at (803)272-4170.
$20.K TO $30.K PER year earning po-
tential with the most respected name in fit-
ness. Send sales resume' to: WmW Gym,
CO Chris Farreli. 110 Patrick Ct Rocky
Mount. NC 27804.
LIFEGUARD BAPTIST CHILD-
REN'S HOMES of NC. Inc Hnston
Campus is seeking to employ 2 part-time
and 1 full-time certified lifeguards for the
summer. You may inquire about these posi-
tions by calling Jamie Godwin, 919-522-
0811 before April 4.
PART TIME PRODUCTION ASSIS-
TANT needed to work nights and wee-
kends or morning news. Television Produc-
tion background helpful, duties include op-
erating studio cameras, teleprompter, audio
board and character generator. Send resume
to Production Manager, WNCT-TV PO Box
898 Greenville, NC 27835. Pre-employ-
ment drug test required. We are an equal
opportunity employer MF.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID STUD-
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DESTINATION RESORT EfcT
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU LIKE
WORKING AT 4-STAR TROPICAL
RESORTS IN THE CARIBBEAN,
MEXICO, OR TAHITI? OUR MA-
TERIALS UNCOVER NUMEROUS
OPPORTUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO: 1-
800-807-5950 EXT.R53626 (WE
ARE A RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL OF-
FICIALS some experience needed some
training. April thru June. Pick up applica-
tion Elm Street Gym 2:30 - 7:00 pm.
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER in-
ternships in sales. $1,000 guar-
anteed plus commission. Call Jeff
Mahoney at Northwestern Mutual.
355-7700.
WANTED: PART-TIME warehouse
and delivery. License required. Apply in
person at Larry's Csrpeiiand. 3010 E. 10th.
Street, Greenville, N.C.
SZECHUAN GARDEN NEED PART
time or full time wait staff. No phone calls.
Come after 2:00 pm in person only. 909
South Evans, Greenville, NC 27834. (10th
At Evans)
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 per
month housing allowance. Largest rental
service on the Outer Banks of North Caroli-
na (Nags Head). Call Dona for application
and housing info 800-662-2122.
SUBLEASE ONE BEDIOOM APT.
at Kings Arms. $28" month. May - August
ac. Free basic cable. Call Cindy 758-5473
leave fneswgs.
LOOKING FOR A FEMALE roonv
mate to share a two bedroom apt. Pay half
rent and utilities. Pets are welcome. Please
call at 752-9335 ask for Emily.
NEEDED, FEMALE TO SHARE 2
bedroom, 1 12 Wth townhouse across from
campus! Close to Raw. Center and down-
town! Rent it $225.00 12 bills. Please
call 757-3789.
GREAT SUMMER PLACE. AVAIL.
May. Sublease groat 2br 1 12 bath East-
brook Apt. $380mon. (includes water, sew-
er, cable) Pool, laundry facilities. Over 900
sq.ft. Call Tracey or Mimi. 752-8266.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO BED-
ROOJM apartments on 10th street. Free
bask (kbit, water and sewer alto proteasing
for the fall $415.00. Call Wainright Proper-
, ry management 756-6209.
SUMMIt CAMP STAFF
Cournaiocs a "�
for private eoed you comp toeotad in t�
baavHM nounsains of western N.C.
Over 25 otfMhN inekng ad seem, was
ikilno, heated pool, MM�, art, horseback,
no he
S.fcom. 610 lo'8t 1eom $1250 �
0 pU room, mem, laundry & groat tal
NoMMCwm ct for brodairooplleollon:
More frian W,000
potential cfotwr
oM &c TrViS ad.
Wouldn't tjev Ite if -b
be for mow pvtfnc?
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Doctors Vision Center
is currently seeking a full-time front dealsreceptionist for the
Greenville office. Individuals muat be professional, outgoing, have
excellent people skills, be able to assist in patient needs, and have
strong moltipie line telephone skills. Billing; and insurance experience
a plus. Muat be motivated and team oriented. Willing to train.
Send resume with salary requirements to:
DoctorsVision Center
499 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
Attn: Shari James
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EMPLOY-
MENT INDUSTRY OFFERS TRAV-
EL (HAWAII, MEXICO, CARIB-
BEAN), INCOMPARABLE BENE-
FITS, & GOOD PAY. FIND OUT
HOW TO START THE APPLICA-
TION PROCESS NOW! CRUISE
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL 800-
276-4948 EXT. C53629. (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING COM-
PANY)
SWIM COACH NEEDED FOR age
group team. Early evenings M-F some wee-
kends salary depends upon education & ex-
perience. Call 321-6210.
PART-TIME YOUTH MINISTER to
lead young people to a greater understand-
ing of following Jesus Christ in their lives
through Bible Study, special activities and
recreation. Send resume to Bethel Baptist
Church, co Youth Council, PO Box 910,
Bethel, NC278U or call 825-1281. Fax to
Gray Peel 825-4751.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MUST
be 18 years old. Earn great money white you
learn playmates massage, Snow Hill, NC
747-7686.
WANTED: A FEW GOOD pirates-The
Tetefund is looking for students to contact
alumni for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.00 hour. Make your own schedule. If in-
terested, come by Raw! Annex, Room 5,
M-TH between the hours of 2-6pm.
1 RANKED FUNDRAISER. YOUR
group, club, fmjtot. can raise up to $200
$500 $1000 in one week. Minimal hisef-
fort required. Call 800-925-5548, access
code 22. Participants receive free sport
camera just for calling.
RIVER PARK NORTH, PARK Attend-
ant and Camp Counselor positions available
for summer employment. Apply at Green-
ville City Hail, Personnel Department. For
information call 830-4562.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS, IN-
STRUCTORS, Lifeguards needed for
Raleigh & Wmtton-Salem pools May-Sept.
Contact David 1-988-246-5755 for applica-
tion or mail resume to PPC, PO Box 5474
Wmston-Salem, NC 27113.
$1500 WEEKLY
MAILING our circulars.
429-1326.
POTENTIAL
For info call 301-
OCEAN LIFEGUARD
aaa
SUMMER JOB
"On the teach In the Sun"
Mmi km ot oeooto Corrcawri
VVaisBSBSRB ssiasjsV we ������sBFt ww s asas w �
runnjriQ and swimming avar hem
and out of lie area, stay in tap
shape, get some graat Wiring, and
gat paid doing ?
? Internships are available ?
Lifeguard Beach Service, Inc.
In KW Devil Hill and Dare Co.
la hiring motivated people
for ocean lifeguard posi-
tions. Bonus and incentive
pay. To request application
Call: �19-441-4SJ.00
mmmmm mm
Lnn your name, address and onons
Osaan Usguards a Ocaan Amous sinca 196S
Msmbar Unasd Saw Ussavlng ajajaasjjai
THANK YOU HICKORY HAMS, Har-
ry's and Dr. Schnider for sponsoring us in
the walkathon last Saturday. It was greatly
appreciated. Love Alpha Delta Pi.
GREEKS OF THE WEEK Alpha Delta
Pi - Tracy Jones, Candace Grey Alpha Xi
Delta - Jill Alfeder, Alpha Omscron PI - Taw-
ni Hines, Theresa Donovan, Alpha Phi -
Carrie Peters, Laurie Godrey, Delta Zeta -
Julie Webb, Sue Clarke, Zr.ta Tau Alpha -
Sara Leahy, Erin Ritey. Pi Delta - Shelly Mc-
Curchen, Sigma Sigma Sigma - Lee Jordan.
Sage Hunihan, Chi Omega - Jen Buckley
PHI TAU - THANKS FOR the social
Friday night. We had a great time. The sis-
ters and new members of AZD.
LAMBDA CHI - WE HAD a great time
breaking it down in our boxers test Thurs-
day night! Can't wait to get together again.
Love Alpha Delta Pi
ALPHA OMICRON PI - Thanks for
coming out and supporting us at the game -
Alpha Xj Delta
MARCIE SHELTON - CONGRATU-
LATIONS ON your recent engagement
to Robert! Love the sisters of Alpha Xi Del-
ta!
ALPHA DELTA PI WANTS to thank
Brian and Neil for coaching our basketball
team, sou guys did a great job and we love
you! Love all the sisters. �
SIGMA PHI EPSILON THANK you
for the great social Thursday night. We had
a blast! Love Alpha Phi
THANKS TO CHI OMEGA, Phi Kap-
pa Psi, and Delta Chi for Thursday night's
social at OMalteys. It was great! Love, the
sisters and new members of Delta Zeta.
THANKS THETA CHI FOR the social
Friday night. We had a great time. Looking
forward to many more. Love the sisters and
new members of Delta Zeta.
KAPPA ALPHA - EVEN THOUGH
we are black and blue, we had a bbat at the
Rolterskating social Saturday night! Thanks
Alpha Delta Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI WILL behoat-
ing a hazing workshop with speaker Martha
Wisby March 25th on the Mall. For info, call
757-0769.
ALPHA XI DELTA - CONGRATS for
winning the Basketball Championship -
Love, the sisters and new members.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA XI
DELTA on winning the basketball cham-
pionship! You did a great job! Love Alpha
Delta R.
DELTA ZETA SISTERS AND new
members support Scott Forbes from Tau
Kappa Alpha tor Student Government Asso-
ciation.
DELTA ZETA SISTERS AND new
members would like to thank everyone that
attended our house dedication service on
Sunday. We appreciate your support and
hope that you will visit us again.
CONGRATULATIONS LORI WALL
ON your engagement to Kevin Hickey
(Doogie). Best of luck to both of you in the
future! Love your sisters in Alpha Phi and
the new members.
SEA KAYAKING DAY TRIP: Wilming-
NC: join us for a day of kayaking in
Wilmington on April 12. Be sure to register
by 6:00pm on April 4 in the SRC main of-
fice.
ECU LAW SOCIETY - Our next meet-
ing will be held on Monday, March 31st at
5:15 pm in Ragsdale room 130. Vife wil! have
a guest speaker and discuss the re-schedul-
ing of our volunteer project. The society is
open to all majors.
PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
STUDENTS advising. Early registration
for summer and fall semesters will be Wed-
nesday March 26, 1997 from 5:30-7:30 in
room 203 of the Belk Budding. Other advis-
ing hours will be posted in the department.
MTH ANNUAL FIESTA BIATH
l ON for Special Olympics, April 20th at
' 2:30 pm, Bicycle Post downtown. For more
information, call 756-3301 or 757-3616.
OPEN REGISTRATION-CHILD
S WIM lessons: sign-up your child for swim
lessons Mar. 24-28 from 9:00-6:00pm in the
SRC main office.
WED MARCH 19- ECU Horn Ertscm-
bte, Mary Burroughs, Director, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 9:00pm Wed March 19 -
Graduate Recital, Kathleen Burnesky,
voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm
Thurs. March 20 -Premiere Performances of
Works by ECU Composers, Mark Taggart.
Director, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall. &0Q pm
Fri March 21 - Jazz at Night. Carroll V
Daahiett Jr Director, The Great Room,
Mendenhail Student Centex. 8:00 pm Fri .
March 21 - Senior Recital, Karen Buck
flute, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall. 9:00 pm Sat
March 22 - Junior Recital, Jonathan N. Bu-
nag, trumpet, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 1-i
pm. Mon� March 24 - Graduate Rccic
Hyoung Joo Song, organ. First Presbyteria
Church, 1400 S. Elm St Greenvilli
7:09pm Mon March 24 - Junior Rccit,
Joey Ikner, guitar, AJ Fletcher Recital Ha
9:00pm Tucs March 25 - Junior Rccit:
Stephen Stelmasznek. saxophone,
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm Tucs March
25- Junior Recital, Jason Rckard, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall 9)0pm. For addition-
al information, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL have a
meeting March 25 at 6:00 pm in Speight
Auditorium in Jenkins Art Building to elect
new officers. Any question - contact Mike
752-4075.
ADVISORY COUNCIL: THE
DEPT. OF Recreational Services is pre-
sently seeking two individuals to fill vacan-
cies as at-large representatives on the Advi-
sory Council. These individuals may be
students, faculty, or staff and should submit
an application to David Gaskins at 128 Re-
creation Center. Applications may be ob-
tained from the mam office at the SRC.
PART-TIME PERSON NEEDED to
help busy mom take care of two toddlers
and manage household. Prefer non-smoker
with good organization and swimming skills.
Mutt have a good driving record. Some
overnight stays and week-end travel. Please
send letter of introduction and personal his-
tory to PO Box 1574. Greenville, NC 27835.
Make $$
This Summer!
Enjoy The
Outdoors!
College students who are
conscientious, honest, reliable.
We want you to
monitor cotton fields.
We train!
Full-time hours 6V Overtime
$5.75 Per He & Mileage
an
RO.Bm370
Cow City. NC 28529
F�: (91937-2125
Near Greenville, Kinton. New Bm
ADULT TOY PARTY - for women only!
Earn free product; just for hostessing a par-
ty. Call a romance specialist today! 752-
5533 and ask for jenn.
TYPING SERVICES AVAILABLE.
42.00 per typed page, fast and accurate.
Call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
nTtroKSMitutMn
(Mat Caasj To a VHa MC er COO
1183511222
y, rush $2.00 to: ruaartliMs�ttaci
1 U3?2 � � fHHW. Ua�rcas�,CA�aa
LOST ANTIQUE PIN WITH purple
stone. Sentimental value. Reward offered!
Call 328-4316.
BROWN LEATHER COAT LOST in
February, $50 cash reward, contact Josh at
919-752-7280, leave message with service.
HELP! LOST COCKER SPANIEL
last seen 13 Feb. light buff wgreen collar
"Jordan" If you have seen him, please call
756-6556 Andrew or Julie. We love and
miss him very much!
LOST GLASSES. OVAL WIRE rims.
The rims are lavender. Please call Shelly at
328-7984. Reward will be offered upon re-
turn.
Hiring Now!
RESUMES - 50
Provan Rcaurtsl
Call The Wordsmiths at
321-7441
Pager: (888) 233-7395
(PIN) 191-4267
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY to
borrow motley for college. We can help you
obtain funding. Thousands of awards avail-
able to all students. Immediate qualifica-
tion 1-800-651-3393.
CHI OMEGA WE HAD a great time at
our St. Patrick's Day Social. We can't wait
until next year to do it again. Sigma Alpha
Epsilon.
ALL GENERAL COLLEGE STUD-
ENTS who intend to major in the Depart-
ment of Communication Sciences and Dis-
orders and have Mr. Robert Muzzardh' or
Mm. Men Downes as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 26 at 5:00 pm in
Brewstcr C-103. Advising for early registra-
tion will take place at that time. Please pre-
pare a tentative class schedule before the
meeting. Freshmen, bring Taking Charge,
Your Academic Ptennet, and use the work-
sheets to develop your schedule.
BEGINNER CLIMBER: PILOT
MT NC: come join us for a fun-filled
weekend of mountain climbing at Pilot Mt.
on April 4-6. Be sure to register by 6:00pm
on March 28 in the SRC main office.
TUES MARCH 25-JUNIOR Recital,
Stephen Stetmaszek, saxophone, AJ Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 7:00pm Tucs March 25 -
Junior Recital, Jason Pickard, guitar, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hal! 9:00 pm Wed March
26 - Concert Choir, Brett Watson, Conduc-
tor, Mendenhail Student Center, Room 244,
8:00 pm Mon March 31 - Contemporary
Jazz Ensemble, Paul Tardif, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. For more in-
formation, call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour
hotline at ECU-4370.
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE
NOW for the 27th annual Grifton Shad
Festival Craft Show, Flea Market, An Show
and CanoeKayak Races scheduled for the
weekend of April 12-13. Write to Grifton
Shad Festival, Box 928, Grifton, NC 28530
or call 919-524-4934 or 919-524-4356. Ap-
plications are also available at the Grifton
Town Hall.
TEAM TENNIS REGISTRATION
MEETING: register for intramural tennis
at the registration meeting on March 27 at
5:00pm in the SRC classroom.
WHITE WATER CANOE: James Riv-
er, VA: come join us for white water canoe-
ing April 11-13. Be sure to register by
6:00pm on March 28 in the SRC main of
fice.
i
Overtoil's
We are accepting applications for full and part time
seasonal positions in our Catalog Sales Department.
Duties include taking customer calls, placing orders,
and providing information to customers. Customer
service andor previous telephone sales experience
required. Flexible shifts available. Full time seasonal
positions also available in our Distribution Center.
Duties include loading and unloading trucks, pulling
and packing orders, and general warehouse work.
Priority given to applicants who can work a full time
schedule during May, Juneand July. Apply at
Overton's Corporate Center Office, 111 Red Banks
Road, Between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M Monday-
Friday. EOE $
INDOOR SOCCER REGISTRA-
TION MEETING: register for soccer
intramurals at the registration meeting on
March 25 at 5:00pm in the MSC 244.
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
eastcarolinianff
advertising department statt
TaW GrahamCampus Sales Rep.
Stephen MoodySales Rep.
Chrie DetamereSales Rep.
David PomlllaSales Rep.
Jeremy LeeSales Rep.
Keith HerronSales Rep.
Mary PollokClassified Ad Manager
For Information Regarding Advertising
Please Call
328-2000





mr
V 'V
Registration
Terminal Locations
School of Anlce ntini
Total-6
School of Art
Total -3
School of
Total -6
School of
Total -10
School of lad Tech.
Total -7
Total-4
Total!
Total!
Total!
Total -3
Total-2
Geography
Total-2
Geology
Total
History
Total -3
Mathematics
Total-4
rHIIOSOpiiy
Total -1
Physics
Total � 1
Political Science
Total -2
School of Health Total -4
School of HESC Total-2
School of Mask
Total-3
School of Social Work
Total -2
9dMjM)MJ W lwlMMFM,
Total-5
Total � 1
Anx 1CSDI Office
310 EHLBIOS
306 OCa Office
Anx 3PTHEOfflce
308 CLSCHIMA
312 REHB Office
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
BW Senior Gallery
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
3rd floor Media Center
GCB 3209
GCB 3411
GCB 3413
GCB 3422
GCB 3105
GCB 3203
Speight 10A
Speight 109
Speight 134
Speight 137
Speight 203
Speight 230
GCB 2318
Flanagan 357
Joyner 215
MC 171
MC177
MC174
Chrlstenbury 203
HESC 130
Flanagan 103
Flanagan 105
Rawl 328
Rawl 327
Rawl 346
Rawl Ann. 139
Wright Ann. 307
Fletcher 102
Fletcher 119
Fletcher 134
Ragsdale 102
Ragsdalel34
Rivers 108
Rivers 119
Rivers 157
Brcwster A214
BN-108
BN-108E
Flanagan 204
Hoars
8:00-12:
8:00-10:
8:00-12:
8:00-12:
8:00-12:
8:00-10
8:00-12
Erwlnll3
Brcwster A429
GCB 2201
FL Reception Area
GCB 3324
Brewster A227
Brewster A229
Graham 101
Brewster A311
Brewster A314
Brewster A316
Austin 129
Brewster A327
Howell 209
Brewster A124
Brewster 126
Rawl 104
Total!
'
Sociology
Total-2
Theatre Arts
Total-1
Undergradaate Studies
(ATPoaly)
Total -10
Registrar's Office
Total -16
Honors
Total-2
Brewster A411
Brewster A414
Messick 106
Brewster B101
Brewster A102
Brewster B103
Whichard 100
Whichard 101
Whichard 102
Whichard 104
Whichard 105
GCB 2026
00
002:00-4:00
00
002:004:00
002:00-4:00
002:00-4:00
001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-3:00
8:00-3:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-4:45
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:00-4:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:004:00
8:004:00
8:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-10:002:004:00
8:00-1:002:00-5:00
8:004:00
8:00-11:001.004:00
8:00-11:001:004:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-12:001:00-3:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-11:001:004:30
8:00-12:003:00-5:00
Spec. PermissionProblems
8:00-12:003:00-5:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:302:004:30
8:00-11:301:004:00
8:00-11:002:004:00
8:00-12:003:004:00
8:00-12:001:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-2:00
8:00-12:002:00-5:00
8:00-11:001:304:30
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-12:002:304:30
8:00-12:002:004:00
8:00-5:00
8:00-12:30
8:00-12:001:004:00
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8:004:00
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8:00-5:00
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8:00-5:00
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North Carolina, Arizona set up rematch at Final Four
AP)-North Carolina and Arizona, which met in their season opener, will play a
tematch at the Final Four.
The top-seeded Tar Heels beat sixth-seeded Louisville 97-74 Sunday in the
feast Regional to advance to their 13th Final Four. Fourth-seeded Arizona recov-
ered after blowing a big lead and edged No. 10 Providence 96-92 in overtime at
Jhe Southeast Regional to reach its third Final Four in nine years.
3 Shammond Williams scored 22 points for North Carolina (28-6), which will
ftay Arizona (23-9) in the national semis next Saturday in Indianapolis. The
Wildcats beat the Tar Heels 83-72 in the Hall of Fame Tipoff Classic on Nov.
12.
North Carolina, which has won 16 straight, turned around its season follow-
ing an 0-3 start in the Atlantic Coast Conference.
"This was a great feeling to cut down those nets after the way we started the
JwCC season forward Antawn Jamison said. "We came together as a team and
but all our differences aside. It shows how hard we worked and that hard work
fays off
3 Arizona, which finished fifth in the Pac-10 with an inexperienced lineup,
a 10-point deficit in the final 3 12 minutes of regulation before
nding to beat Providence. Miles Simon scored 30 points for the Wildcats,
knocked off top-ranked Kansas in the previous round. .
Certainly this was not expected said coach Lute Olson, whose team
the season with four new starters and has no seniors in the playing rota-
Evcrybody kept saying, 'Next year, they're going to be pretty good Will,
year got here a attic early"
The other rtrtaf Four matchup on Saturday is defending national champion
(34-4) vs. Minnesota (31-3). The semifinal winners will ptay for the
on Monday night.
Skating's reflection: Lipinski mirrors
Kwan of two years ago
MJ8ANNE, Switzerland (AP) - Before Tare Lipinski, there was Michelle
Kwan.
Wwe the 14-year-old Kwan of two years ago to be superimposed on the 14-
-okl Lipinski of today, the similarities would be remarkable clean, consis-
t jumpers, well-rehearsed routines, tireless skaters.
In real time, 16-year-old Kwan, displaying a maturity matching her technical
lity wasn't been able to match Lipinski' unflinching confidence to repeat
1996 world title. She finished second.
Lipinski, master of her 4fbot-8 and 75-pound frame, hit the magic seven
pie jump Saturday and reached for a sophistication beyond her years, to
xwne the youngest woman to win the world figure skating title.
Lipinski of Sugar Land, Texas, is one month younger than Sonja Henie when
4he won the Arse of 10 world titles in 1927 - and it'll take a rules change for any-
co beat that.
The International Skating Union this year raised the age limit for imema-
champiortships to 15, but Lipinski was grandfathered in by her participa-
in last year's worlds.
But Lipinski's leap from 15th in 19 to -women's champion was beyond her
imapnmg.
Hingis beats Williams at Upton
KEY BiSCAYNE, Ft. (AP) � Martina Hingis lost the first three games and then
rallied to win a battle of 16-year-oWs Sunday, beating Venus Williams 6-4,6-2 in
tne trara rouno at tnc upton insmpransnips.
Tne match - the first between the two talented teen-agers - may hove been
tne start of a rivalry.
Hingis will become rhe youngest No. 1 player ever when the new rankings
are released March 31. Shell supplant Steffi Graf, who has been No a record
3?74 weeks.
Williams, who beat Jennifer Capriati on Saturday night, will climb to about
100th in the new rankings- The California native has played in just 11 pro tour-
naments.
After leading 3-0, Williams won only two points in the next three games. She
pulled ahead 4-3, but Hingis then won the next six games to take command of
the match.
Hingis improved to 22-0 this year.
In men's play Mark Philippoussis overpowered Wayne Femera 6-3, 6-3 to
reach the fourth round.
Practice pays off for Mickelson at Bay Hill
&RLANDO, Fla. (AP) - Phil Mickelson practiced on the putting green until
dark on the eve of the final round and then made it pay off Sunday pulling away
Item the pack with a silky stroke to win the Bay Hill Invitational.
Mickelson rolled in a 40-foot eagle putt from the fringe on No. 12, the key
Mole of his 7-under-par 65 that gave him a three-stroke victory over Stuart
Appteby
Mickelson finished at 16-under 272. He earned $270,000 for his 10th PGA
Tour victory along with the gray blazer and Scottish-styled sword that comes
trith winning Arnold Palmer's tournament.
j "Going into today I was trying to think that this was Amie's tournament and
what would he do?" Mickelson said. "He'd put on a charge, so that's what 1 tried
Jtodo
; Mickelson's cool confidence during a decisive four-hole stretch - three
birdies and the eagle - didn't look anything like the dashing style Palmer dis-
played during his patented charges.
In fact, Mickelson didn't even look like he would be the one to make a
charge when the final round began with 17 players within five shots of leader
Omar Uresti.
; Cloudy calm conditions took a lot of the bite out of Bay Hill Club and
allowed for low scoring, but Mickelson wen out in 1-under 35 and was three
strokes off the lead until a birdie putt from about 10 feet on No. 11.
, Then he hit two drivers to get to the fringe of the 570-yard 12th hole. His
putt died on the left edge and dropped in to give him a share of the lead with
Appleby Payne Stewart and Uresti.
J
I
i


LOOKING TO PASS
ultimate member Fuller Reeves looks for an open man in a scrimmage against Ysle.
PHOTO BY MTmCK IMIM
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
The first football game of the season may be over six months away but already
the football team is gearing up for the fall games.
Spring practice began last week, and with it came some new concerns for
Head Coach Steve Logan. His biggest concern is the offensive line.
"The whole mission will be to create an offensive line Logan said. "That
will basically be the concentration at the beginning, middle and end. We only
have one returning starter among the offensive linemen (center Danny Moore)
and there is also no experience the rest of the way"
But this kind of rebuilding is nothing new to Logan. He compares the prob-
lems they are facing in this spring practice to the 1994 season.
"This is 1994 all over again where we really didn't have the line and the line-
backers ready to play" Logan said. "But we just threw them out there and made
them play. Probably what is going to happen is that we will be real slow starting
and, hopefully by midseason, we will improve to the point of being functional.
I'm afraid we're going to take our lumps early because we're just going to have
too many guys out there making too many mistakes
Logan isn't necessarily concerned with the talent he will be working with to
rebuild the line. He says the talent is there; it just has to be developed.
"Ws've got talent. We just have to coach. We've got to show the kids a thou-
sand different things in a short period of time. I'd be very anxious if I didn't
think we had the talent, but we've got some talented young men; they just have
to find out who to hit
One area Logan can breathe a little easier about is the quarterback position.
After Marcus Crandell went down with a season-ending knee injury in the sev-
enth game of the season, junior Dan Gonzalez got the starting nod. Gonzalez
was thrust into the quarterback position and averaged 284 yards per game in
four starts, and went 3-1 in those starts.
It was an unfortunate injury for Crandell, but it allowed Gonzalez to get
some experience for his starting role the year as a senior.
"If he hadn't played any last year that would be a real anxious area Logan
said. "Danny Gonzalez has proved he can win games for us at the quarterback
Women storm to another
conference victory
MiKE DANISKA
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU women's tennis team con-
tinued to shine Sunday as they blew
past George Mason 5-1. The Lady
Pirates, who were playing a rare home
game on the weekend, jumped out to
a quick lead and never looked back.
"We did very good Junior co-cap-
tain Mono Eek said. "It was our sec-
ond conference win, so this is a good
start for us
This was the Lady Pirates' fourth
consecutive dual match victory and
improved their record to 8-4 overall
and 2-0 in CAA play.
Sophomore Anne Svae led the
charge with a 6-2, 6-4 decision over
her opponent.
"Anne is doing a great job for us at
No. 1 singles Coach Jamie Holt said.
Junior Racbae! Cohen suffered
BCU's only setback, losing a tough
match 6-2,6-4.
"Rachaet just got off to a slow
start Holt said. "If she gets off to a
strong start, she will be hard to beat
Eek and her fellow co-captain,
senior Holiyn Gordon, both had to
slug it out for three sets before they
captured wins. Eek came back from a
4-6 setback and won the next two sets
64), 6-2.
"I played weli, but I lost the first
set Eek said. "I killed the girt in the
next two sets, but it took a while
though
Gordon's win was even more dra-
matic, and sent the message that no
opponent should ever count these
Pirates out. Gordon pulled out s close
first set 7-5, but then faltered losing
the second set 4-6.
"I had the match of my life
Gordon said. "By the time I started
the third set, ail of the other matches
were done. 1 was so nervous because
the third set was so tight
She then managed to come back
from down 3-4 in the deciding set to
capture a 6-4 nail biter.
"When it was 3-4 in the third set
Coach Holt told me that if I won the
game, that I would win the match
Gordon said. "My opponent was very-
good and consistent, but I had more
experience than her
Because of Gordon's victory the
Lady Pirates captured the team win
and did not have to play doubles
against the Patriots,
"That win was good for her
(Gordon), and for the ream Holt
said, "She got the team a lot of confi-
dence
Sophomore Gina MacDonakl dis-
patched her opposition 6-2,63 while
fellow sophomore Catherine Morgan
breezed past her opponent 6-2, 6-1.
But it was winning those close, three
set matches that made all of the dif-
ference in the world.
"It is important for us to win three
sets Eek said.
One of the reasons for the Lady
Pirates' success in winning those close
matches has been that they are in
great physical condition.
"Our trainer, Jack Midvette, has
been working really hard with the
girls Holt said. "Not too many reams
that we play work harder than we do.
I realize, and the girts realize, that a
large part of our success has been due
to the conditioning
The Lady Pirates will get to test
their hard work ethic again Thursday
in a home contest against UNC-
Greensboro at 2:30 p.rn.
Disappointing weekend for
ECU solf team
ANTHONY STANPILL
STAFF WRITER
The ECU golf team didn't get the finish they had hoped to get this weekend
when they hosted the PepsiBradford Creek Classic.
The poor performance left the Pirates and Head Coach Kevin Williams dis-
appointed, especially since they were on their home course.
"I wasn't expecting to win the whole thing, but I was surprised we did so bad
on our home course Williams said, "lb be honest with you, it was probably our
worst tournament of the year
Williams expressed, like he has ail year long, his concern for the team's lock
of consistency. Usually the Pirates get good, consistent play out of their top
three players, and not as consistent play from the four and five spots. Williams
was bothered that this time, nobody was consistent.
"We're not good enough for any of our top three players to play bad, and
when they do, we can't cover them Williams said. "We're just not getting good
scores out of the four and five spots
Marc Miller and Kevin Miller were the Pirates' best performers. M. Miller
finished tied for 41st, and shot 77-70-78 over the three rounds. K. Miller fin-
ished tied for 46th, shooting a 74-78-74. ft Miller was only one stroke away from
M. Miller's score. The other Pirate finishes were Stephen Sattcrry who finished
tied for 54th, Daniel Griffis tied for 64th and Shane Robinson tied for 70th.
Williams, for the first time in the spring, played three freshmen in this tour-
nament. He said he doesn't regret his decision, and they had nothing to do with
the team's loss. Williams said missing Richie Creech in the line-up probably had
something to do with the team's performance.
"Not having Creech in the line-up is what hurt Williams said. "Even
though he hasn't been playing well, he's a leader. Anytime you don't have one
of your leaders in the line-up, I think it can hurt
The Pirates' next tournament is the Furman Spring Intercollegiate at
Furman University's Golf Course in Greenville, S.C. They'll be there Mar. 28-
30 Williams hasn't decided yet, which five Pirates are going to represent ECU.
"I told the team that we played so bad that everybody has to qualify for the
Furman tournament Williams said
Usually the three lowest scores from the previous tournament automatically
earn a spot. This week all nine of the Pirates will be playing for a spot. Williams
is hoping this will motivate his players to play better at Furman than they did at
Bradford Creek.
position and that's a comfort. It's kind of one of those left-handed blessin
which came our way with Marcus's injury and Danny was abie to get some expe-
rience
Offensively the Pirates will be returning two NCAA leaders with Scott
Harley and Irry Shannon.
Hariey, a junior, is the nation's leading returning rusher since Iowa State's
Troy Davis and Texas Tech's Byron Hanspard declared themselves eligible for
the NFL draft. Last season Harley averaged 158.6 yards per game and gained
1,745 yards and scored 14 touchdowns. Against N.C. Srate, Harley rushed for
351 yards which ranks as the ninth best single game performance in NCAA his
tory and the best ever by a sophomore. I
"It's going to be interesting to sec how Scon Hariey responds to see if last
year was a flash in the pan or if he is going to be a consistent performer Logan
said.
Shannon caught 39 passes last season for 834 yards and was the national
leader in in yards per reception with 21.4 per catch. Shannon already holds
the ECU record for touchdown catches with 20 in just three years.
This season also marks the inaugural seasons as a member of Conference
USA. ECU is no stranger to playing teams in C-USA, but this season they wilt
get a chance to play for a conference championship. The last time the Rrates
won a conference championship was in 1977, the last year ECU was in the
Southern Conference before becoming a major Division I Independent.
Logan doesn't want his players to forget about the non-conference games
since they are equally important. f
"What I don't want it to do is make it where the kids say 'Well that's not a
conference game, that's not important 1 want every game to still be important
like we've always done. Winning the conference - that's going to be out there
but I want to make sure every Saturday is a big deal to us
Being affiliated with C-USA will also allow Logan to talk with quality piayt
ers who might not have otherwise been interested in playing football for ECUl
"One of my good friends in this profession is Frank Beamer at Virginia Tecri,
which joined the Big East recently. He told me about the number of homes het
abie to get into, and their program hat changed dramatically I know we'll abl$
to get into more living rooms of players who wouldn't have been interested ift
us before. If you have perseverance, that's the greatest quality And Ease
Carolina has that quality V
i
GOING FOR A BIRDIE
Scott Leonard takes advantage of the
phots ir m
r am ptevs fratw golf.
Virginia Commonwealth complet-
ed a three game sweep of the Pirates
this weekend in Richmond. The
Rams took the first two games 3-2 and
4-1 on Saturday and 14-6 on Sunday
In the 3-2 loss, Tim Flaherty hit his
10th home run of the season for the
Pirates. Flaherty was again a force on
Sunday getting three hits, while Steve
Salargo slugged his fifth home of the
season, but it wasn't enough as the
Pirates dropped to 3-3 in the CAA and
14-14 overall.
o
The ECU softball team lost in the
second round of the Winthrop
Invitational at Winthrop University
losing to Illinois-Chicago, 3-8, on
Sunday Saturday the Lady Pirates
defeated Eastern Illinois 8-1 and Kent
Stare 4-2. The highlight of the first
game was when Isonette Polonius hit
a homer to break the ECU record for
most home runs in single season by
hitting her sixth of the season.
Polonius hit a two-run homer in the
first inning to surpass Lisa Corprew,
who previously held the record with
five. Fblomius is now only five home
runs from tying Corprew's mark for
home runs in a career with 11. During
Friday's action ECU beat Eastern
Illinois 3-2 in eight innings and lost to
UNC-Chapel Hill 0-1. The Lady
Pirates now begin a three game home
stand against Big South rival
Maryiand-Baltimore County. The first
game is scheduled to begin today at 2
p.m.
a
ECU freshman sprinter Rasheca
Barrow highlighted the Lady Pirates'
performance on Saturday capturing
first-place honors in three sprint
events: the 100 meters, 200 meters
and the 4x100 meter relay. In this
their initial meet of the outdoor sea-
son, the Lady Pirates had a total of six
first-place finishers.
In the 4xl0C meter relay the Pirate
team of Barrow, Kai Eason, Nikki
Coins, and Carmen Weldon was victo-
rious in 46.89.
In the 100-meter dash, ECU swept
the first, second, and" third place fin-
ishes, barrow sprinted to first place in
12.10, followed by Eascn in 12.46 and
Coins in 12.47.
In the 200 meters, Barrow won in
24.78, with feUow freshman Weldon
taking second in 24.92. In the 800
merer dash, ECU senior Cindy
Syzmanski placed third and in the
hurdles, sophomore Missy Johnson
took second place. It was Johnson's
first race of the year since returning
from an injury
In the field events, the Lady
Pirates also had three first place fin-
ishers. Senior Lave Wilson won the
long jump with a distance of 21-0 14
with fellow Pirate Leana Anding tak-
ing third place. Wilson also was victo-
rious in the triple jump winning wrh
38-6 14.
In the shot put, ECU junior
Michelle Clayton outdistanced the
competition with a throw of 42-9.
Clayton also placed second in the
Discus with 133-0.
In men's competition, freshman
sprinter James Alexander captured
first place honors in the 400-meter
dash the 4x100 meter relay and sec-
ond place in the 200 meters.
ECU's full squad competed in the
15 team meet, its second outdoor
competition of the season, with most
of the Pirates running in ar least two
or three events. In total, the Pirates
sprinted to first place finishes in the
4x100 meter relay the 100 meters,
200 meters, and the 40 meters.
In rhe 400-meter dash, Alexander
was victorious in a time of 47.64, while
Dwight Henry and Brian Johnson fin-
ished fourth and fifth respectively in
48.80 and 49.02.
ECU's "B" team of Alexander,
Johnson, Chris Rey and Darrick
Ingram won the 4x100 meter relay in
SEE SID "AGE 12
' W '�





12 Tufid.y, M.rcti 25, 1997
sport
S
The East Carolinian
Are you looking for an
organization to join?
Would you like the opportunity
to share your talents?
What about the chance to
learn new skills?
Do you think you have what it
takes to write a play or be on
stage?
If so, ther the
ECU THESPIANS OF
DIVERSITY
is the group for you!
Come see what we're all
about!
Date Wed March 26
Time: 5 p.m.
Plies: The Ledonia Wright
African-American Cultural
Center (The Bloxton House)
Everyone is invited to attend.
TRIVIAtime
mm wmmmm tm
Name the American League team to lead
in triples and placed last in home runs
last season?
Mltfmwf MM inq sqdiu ip ytm pq mmj vtoswawj �
SID
conimuad from page 11
40.71. It was the "B" team's second
consecutive victory, after winning
last weekend at the Seahawk
Invitational in 41.01.
In the 200 meters the Pirates
HI MINIM R
swept first through fifth place hon-
ors. Ingram won in 21.31 followed
closely by Alexander. Bevan Foster,
Rey and Titus Haygood.
In the 100 meters, the Pirates
dominated also taking first five place
finishes. Sophomore Vaughn Monroe
sprinted to victory in 10.79. Foster
took second while Marcus Gladden,
Rey, and Haygood placed third,
fourth and fifth respectively.
The baseball team will host the Citadel today at 3 p.m. at
Harrington Field while the softball team hosts Maryland-
Baltimore County in a double-header at 2 p.m. at the softball
field. Tomorrow the baseball tarn will host Duke at 3 p.m. and
the softball team will host Ohio in another double header
beginning at 2 p.m.
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce the following
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER SERVICES
Holy Thursday Services (March 27): 7:30p.m. at St. Peter's Church
Good Friday Services: 12:15p.m. - Stations of the Cross at St. Peter's
7:30p.m. - Good Friday Liturgy Service at St. Peter's
Saturday Easter Vigil Service (March 29): 7:30p.m. at St. Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses: 11:30a.m. & 8:30p.m.
- Newman Center, 953 E.lOth St.
( St. Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th St.)
For further information please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-1991
i
Ca! te
IASJ�.
II -� 5 , i � .
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
�ffi� 757-0003 Monday
GrcenvilleNC
8:00-4:00
Careers Require Leadership Experience.
Experience Leads to Success.
Don't Wait Until Yon Graduate to
Learn from Experience.
Learn Leadership from Successful, Experienced Leaders
Be and ECU Peer
Health Educator
Peer Health Educators present
educational programs in classes,
residence halls, Greek houses,
and for clubs and student
organizations.They also help with
health fairs and awareness events on
campus. Take the class for
1,2, or 3 Independent Study
hours, timeTBA. Join us
this Fall Semester.
For more
information,
calf 328-6793,
Health
Promotion
and
Well-Being.
210Whichard
m
5 to Mendenhall Student Center
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIV1T Y 2T
��?
5
Ml
Ride shotgun with Darwin through his voyage of Patagonia. 4
Travei-Adventure Film and Theme Dinner Series v
Tuesday, April 1 in Hendrix Theatre fcS
Theme Dinner tickets are $12 for students at the Central Ticket Office. j�
JK The deadline to order dinner tickets is March 27.
� AN EVENING WITH .NEW ARTIST SHOWCASE
RACING CUPS
RICKY
RUDD
FREE T-SHIRT
�Collect 15
Racing Paints
�f Paint In
Every Collector
Card Package
LIMITED EDITION
pinnAoe
RACING CARDS
With Large-Large
Value Meal
Purchase
Collect Altai
C1M7 Checkers Orlve-ln Restaurants, Inc.
I
I
1 Get one free
Buy one Bacon Cheeseburger
-ir
11
� i
Buy one Sirloin Steak Burger
Otfm empires
Notatui with any other offers.
Good at participating More only
Checkers
' Get one free
8n�rf"oupon per person
I
,IL
expires
ior visit
alid with any other offers
participating stores only
Checkers
I
I
I
I
I
:
:
m
���
s
m
�3
:
m
;
Catch some of the newest sounds featuring The Alison Brown Quartet,
Farmer Not So John, Greg Howard, and Vickie Pratt Keating.
April 3 at 8 p.m. Advance student tickets are $8.
Tickets go on sale March 3 at the Central Ticket Office.
SACRED SPACE
PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA
Black and white photography on loan from the Southern Arts Federation
on display through March 28 in the Mendenhall Gallery.
35
in
ATTENTION STUDENT LEADER! S
"SGA Made Easy"
Wednesday from 5 until 6 p.m. in Great Room 3
Mi
5
�a
Glory Days
The Pedagogy of Bruce Springsteen
with School of Education professor Dr. David Gabbard
Free beverages and desserts
Tuesday, April 1 at 12 Noon in the Underground.
e
Ml 41HW
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL
Bow! the night away �very 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month from
8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the games you can bowl,
plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of discounted
bowiing. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m. Only $1 per
game (shoe rental included)
m
m
�a
Ml ILMZ'&miim �!fc:f & Mf Mill 5 Wlfci
���' r �"





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the east Carolinian
March 25, 1997
Housing Guide
A look at housing on campus
and in the surounding area
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When a landlord can enter your property
A landlord doesn't always
2 jiave an absolute right to
enter your apartment
, , wihout permission
ua
NOD PRESS EDITORS
Here are answers to fre-
quently asked questions on a
JjWKflord's right to enfrjt
1 j. Does my landlord have
the right to enter my apart-
1 memwhenever he or she
waits?
It depends on the state. In
all states, a landlord or manager
may enter rented premises
wMIe the tenant is living there
without advance notice in the
case of emergency, such as a fire
or serious water teak.
And, of course, a landlord
Buy enter when a tenant gives
pefrraaakm. Beyond that, laws
m marry states guarantee ten-
�to reasonable privacy rights
against landlord intrusions.
2. What art examples of
when s landlord.
may enter, lr-t only after
giving the tenant reasonahie
mike?
Typically, a landlord has the
to enter rented premjam
giving tenants reaaoMbfe
notice in aider to make needed
ftpftrt $m mmthe need for
diem) and to show the property
pfeapeetiveriewtenantaor
pwfcnaaeft. In addition, a land-
lord may enter rented premises
in instances of abandonment
(that is, when the tenant moves
out without notifying the land-
lord) or by court order. A land-
lord may not enter just to check
up on the tenant.
3. Assuming it is not an
emergency, hut the landlord
has a void reason to enter
�for example, to mate re-
pairs�what kind of notice
is required?
States typically require land-
lords to provide a specific
amount of notice (usually 24
hours) before entering a rental
unit.
In some states, such as Cali-
fornia, landlords must provide a
reasonable amount of notice, le-
gally presumed to be 24 hours.
Landlords can usually enter on
shorter notice if it is impracti-
cable to provide the required
amount of notice.
4. May a landlord enter a
rental urn any time of day,
ashmgashe'sffomthere-
qutr ad amount of notice ?
No. In meat instances � ex-
cept emergencies, abandonment
and invitation by tenant �
states allow a landlord to en-
ter only at reasonable times,
without setting specific hours
and days. However, some states,
such as California, require that
landlords may enter only during
normal business hours.
5. What are dte landlord's
options if a tenant refuses to
tdkwentryevenwhena
iy houv Apart nn-nt
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landlord has given adequate
notice and has a vaki rea-
son to enter?
A landlord should not force
entry except when there is a
true emergency, such as a fire
or gas leak. However, if a ten-
ant is repeatedly unreasonable
in denying the landlord access,
the landlord can legally enter
anyway, during reasonable times,
provided he does so in a peace-
ful manner. However, in no
case should the landlord enter
if the tenant is present and say-
ing "stay out
If a landlord has a serious
conflict over access with an oth-
erwise satisfactory tenant, a sen-
sible first step is to meet with
the tenant to see if the problem
can be resolved. Often, neigh-
borhood mediation programs
will, for a low cost, help work
out an agreement.
If these attempts at com-
promise don't work, a landlord
can usually evict the tenant for
violating the lease or rental
agreement, assuming it contains
an appropriate rignt-of-entry
provision.
6. What should a tenant do
tf a tanatord repeatedly
ts
(unit
with no good reason andor
advance notice?
As a first step, the tenant
will usually first meet with the
landlord to ask for assurance
that this conduct Won't be re-
peated. If this doesn't work, the
tenant (depending on the laws
of her state) may be able to
simply move out, claiming that
the landlord's repeated violation
of her privacy amounts to a
"constructive eviction Finally,
if the landlord's conduct seri-
ously interferes with the
tenant's peace of mind, the ten-
ant may have grounds for a
successful lawsuit, asking for
damages. Typically, a tenant will
file suit in small claims court
without a lawyer. Rr details on
small claims court procedures
and the maximum amount for
which someone can sue, see
Everybody's Guide to Small Claims
Court (National or California
Edition), by Ralph Warner
(Nolo Press).
7. How can 1 find out the
specific laws on privacy in
my state?
Find your state's statutes at
a law library or large public li-
brary.
If possible, look for the larger
annotated version which will
also contain brief notes as to
key court decisions. Look in
the index under Landlord-
Tenant and then for the sub-
heading Privacy. You may also be
able to get information from a
local apartment association or
tenants' rights group.
Tfour state Attorney
General's Office or Consumer
Protection Agency can also pro-
vide advice.
Nolo Press publishes two
books on the subject for Cali-
fornia: The Landlord's Law
Book, by Brown and Warner and
Tenants' Rights, by Moskovitz
and Warner.
� imNobPress
Looking for
a place to
hang your
hat?
Look no further than
The East Carolinian
classifieds.
YOUR HOUSING OPTIONS
may be as close as The East Carolinian classifieds!
i;
Sastbtoofc dkpatitmmts
"The Best Value in Town"
As Low As
� FREE Cable TV
� FREE Water & Sewer
� FREE Gas Heat (Townhouses) $135.00 Per PerSOfl
� BIG 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartment The Best Value Period.
� BIG Mirrors and Vanity Light s &�&?�&
� BIG Modem Kitchen SffmeoMaAaemam
� Central AC & Heat &ateoMamye
� Stove (Sum
� Refrigerator WeuSbptecmpie
� Nice thick carpeting cw
� Nice Mini Blinds
� Sparkling Clean Bathrooms
� 1 A Baths
� Freshly Painted
� Lots Of Closet Space
� Walk in Closet
� Private Balconies
� ECU Bus Service
� Walk or Ride Your Bike To Campus
� Plenty Of Parking
� Swimming Pools
204 Eastbrook Drive
752-5100
-p�-





How to set neighbors to turn down the loud noise
CORA JORDAN
It's 2 in the morning. You're
lying in bed trying to sleep be-
cause you have a big meeting to-
morrow morning. You feel a
pounding sensation in your
head.
At first, you think it's a head-
ache. But then you realize that
it's the funky disco beat blasting
from your next-door neighbor's
stereo, reverberating through
your bedroom and rattling your
windows.
� Before you pound on the
neighbor's door and yell some-
thing you'll regret, or, even
worse, resign yourself to living
with the noise, try some more
constructive alternatives.
noise. For example, many local
ordinances prohibit unreason-
able vehicle noise (like honking
the car horn early every morning
for a carpool) or dogs barking all
night long every night. Noisy
neighbors are in for a warning or
even a fine.
You can look up your local or-
dinance at city hall or the public
library. Make at least two copies
of it, one for your neighbor and
one for yourself.
mediation a chance.)
!
I
1. Talk to your neighbor
Your first step is to talk to
your neighbor and try to resolve
your differences in person. It's
hard to believe, but sometimes
neighbors are not aware that
they are causing a disturbance.
Even if you're ready to punch
somebody's lights out, try a little
sugar instead.
2. Get a copy of your lo-
cal ordinance
Your next step is to get a
copy of your local noise laws.
Most cities and counties have
ordinances that control the
times, types and loudness of
3. Warn your neighbor in
writing
If things don't improve, ask
your neighbor again � this time
in writing� to quiet down.
Don't make threats, but state
that if the situation doesn't im-
prove you'll be forced to notify
the authorities. Enclose a copy
of the noise ordinance. Keep a
copy of your letter, you'll need it
if, as a last resort, you later st
your neighbor.
4. Suggest mediation
Most cities offer free or low-
cost mediation services, which
means they provide an impartiai
mediator who will sit down with
you and your neighbor and try to
help you resolve your differ-
ences.
Just call the mediation ser-
vice; someone there will contact
the neighbor and suggest media-
tion. (These people are very
good at convincing others to give
5. Call the police
If you have done all of the
above and your neighbor has re-
sponded by turning up the vol-
ume, now is the time to call the
police (or the Animal Control of-
ficer if the problem is a barking
dog). Try to get the police to
come while the noise is occur-
ring.
Of course, you can call the
police on a noisy neighbor the
first time the music gets too
loud for your taste. But the po-
lice will be more sympathetic to
your situation if they see that
you have tried to solve the prob-
lem on your own.
�There is excessive and dis-
turbing noise.
�Your enjoyment of your
property is diminished.
�You have asked the person
to stop the noise (your letter
should be enough to prove this).
To prove your case, you can
use police reports, witnesses, re-
cordings, your own testimony
and the testimony of neighbors
or other witnesses.
6. Sue for nuisance
If all else fails, you can get
your neighbor's attention�and
maybe some money�by suing
in small claims court. You can
sue your neighbor for nuisance if
your neighbor's noise unreason-
ably interferes with your enjoy-
ment of your property. In the
lawsuit, you ask for money to
compensate you for the interfer-
ence with your right to peace-
fully enjoy your home.
Small claims court is easy
and inexpensive, and you don't
need a lawyer. You will need to
show the following:
The amount you'll want to
ask for will depend on how
much the noise bothered you.
Did you lose sleep? Were you
unable to carry on your usual ac-
tivities, such as reading, playing
music or talking to friends?
Decide on a reasonable dol-
lar amount per day, and multiply
that figure by the number of
days you've been seriously both-
ered. The amount of money you
can ask for in small claims court
is limited, between $2,000 and
$5,000 in most states.
If you're in an apartment
Noisy neighbors are always
bad news. But when you share
walls with the insensitive neigh-
bor, the problem is especially
vexing. The good news for rent-
ers is that, in addition to all your
other options, you have built-in
allies in the battle to keep your
apartment livable: your lease or
rental agreement and your land-
lord.
Remember the lease or
rental agreement you signed?
Chances are your neighbor
signed one too. Standard leases
wW timss, pocH f ooi nrsat f risa
r
BAIT
CAKOLIWA
UNIVERSITY
Han, I am SO relieved I forgot to reserve a room for next year.
I called University Housing Services to explain my situation and those kind
folks told me I could have a SECOND CHANCE! All I have to do is drop
by Jones Residence Hall (ground level) Monday through Thursday, March
24-27 between 8:30 AM and 4:30 PM.They will have the paperwork I need
to fill in I don't even need any moneyUniversity Housing Services will
bill me! Wow I am so lucky. I can live on campus and not be stuck with
the hassles of living in an apartment If you forgot to reserve a room for
next year, you can do the same thing! If you don't believe that they will give
you a second chance, just call them at ECU-HOME (328-4663).
uaivsrsity botisiaf aa dtr.ini ssrvicss
fjsstioas? call scu-tortis (321-4683)
and rental agreements contain
clauses that entitle you to "quiet
enjoyment" of your home.
A neighbor who is blasting the
stereo in an unreasonable man-
ner is probably violating the
lease or rental agreement and
can be evicted for doing so.
If you warn your neighbor
about the noise in writing and
are sure that your lease entitles
you to a reasonable amount of
quiet, send a copy of the lease
along with your letter. In your
letter, tell the neighbor that the
next complaint will be to the
landlord or neighborhood asso-
ciation if the noise continues.
If warning your neighbor
doesn't work, go to your land-
lord. Most tenants don't like to
complain to the landlord or A
manager about unreasonable .
noise or other nuisances because
they are afraid of being branded
as troublemakers. But other
neighbors are probably bothered
by the noise too.
Get together with them and
complain to the landlord as a
group. It's easier and you might
get faster results. Most land-
lords don't want arguments be
tween tenants and won't put up
with tenants who cause trouble
by ignoring signed lease or rental
agreements. Your landlord wiE
probably tell the noisy tenant to
pipe down or face eviction.
�1994 Nolo Press
fc
ru
h
K3
How to get along
with your roommate?
A successful relationship
with your roommate begins with '
you! It's true. Having a good
roommate is often as easy as
simply being a good roommate.
Perhaps the best advice ever
given to roommates can be
summed up in just one word:
communicate. Share your feel-
ings, your habits, your attitudes,
your ideas, your moods, and your
backgrounds. Listen and learn!
Be open-minded about
people who are from different
backgrounds or who may look,
think, or do th'ngs differently
than you. You just might learn
something new!
Remember that living in
close quarters with a person you
do not yet know is somewhat
frightening and in some cases
very challenging. You are pre-
sented with the opportunity to
build a relationship based on
mutual respect, appreciation for
individual differences, and the
commitment to discuss the day-
to-day issues and problems that
arise in any relationship.
There is no such thing as a
"perfect roommate" or a room-
mate who is a carbon copy of
you. Roommates are always dif-
ferent in some ways. Celebrate
those differences, and don't for-
get that you don't have to be
best friends in order to have a
successful roommate relation-
ship.
In order to reduce potential
friction and unexpected (and
disappointing) surprises, sit
down with your roommate(s)
during your first several days to-
gether and discuss some of he
following issues:
� Your family
� How you'd like to arrange
the room
� Your hometown
� What property you're will-
ing to share
� Your high school activi-
ties
� Your normal study habits
� How much sleep you
need
� How neatclean you'd like
the room to be
� Considerations when
guests visit the room
� Times when guests are -
not preferred
� Your weekend activity v
preferences
� Your interests and activi-
ties
These are just starters. If -j
you need more help, please sec
your Resident Advisor. While i
most roommates succeed in re?
solving their differences, there,
are times when some may i
need outside help.
If ever you feel yourself in an
unacceptable position of not be-
ing able to study, sleep or get j
along with your roommate or t
others, let a residence hall staff
member know immediately. Ifj
you live off campus, contact die
Counseling Center for sugges-
tions on how to deal with the
problem.
A successful relationship
sometimes just hinges on using
your head and not placing temp-
tation in the way
Here are some other tips:
� Always lock your resi-
dence hall room door when
you are out of your room or
sleeping.
� Keep all small items of
value out of sight.
� Engrave your social secu-
rity number on all personal
belongings.
� Do not lend your room
key to anyone!
� Do not prop open exterior
residence hall doors.
� Ask questions!
� Avoid walking alone at
night. Use the "buddy sys-
tem
� Use well-lighted and well-
traveled routes. Don't walk
through dark areas of campus
alone.
� Be aware of what is going
on around you.
� Familiarize yourself with
emergency telephone num-
bers.
PRO MANAGEMENT
Monthly Leases Starting at $270 and Up
Office hours 8:30 - 5:30 � Monday - Friday
Treetops � 150 Firetower Road � Suite A
756-1234
We offer many Townhom.es. apartments, condominiums and single
family houses throughout the University and Greenville area.





Breakdown of Campus Residence Halls
floors
Capacity
COLLEGE HILL NEIGHBORHOOD
Aytock B�flt Jon� Scott Tyter
4 4 4 4 9
CENTRAL CAMPUS NEIGHBORHOOD
Cotten Fleming Slay Umstead
All male
All female
Coed
480
495
332
487
472
WEST CAMPUS NEIGHBORHOOD
Clement Fletcher Garrett Greene White
10
10
10
245
169
193
287
387
416
296
387
197
�StudyLounge
' Sink in room
Air conditioning
Local telephone service
Community Service Office
Elevators
Laundry
Computer lab
, Handicapped accessible
Fitness center
Cablecomputer hookups
;�. Carpeted rooms
Nonsmoking floor
: Quiet study floor
m, � MMi All of the aoartmenthousing listings in this guide were carefully checked for accuracy but errors do occur or some
?M OTE I cLs since we checked. Call the hous.ngapartment office to verify the -nformat.on here.
.
�:�
Tar fbur JZgt&g
Wilson Acres Apartments
752-0277
1806 E. 1st St.
Greenville. N.C. 27858-0772
i2$ fke Cute
I
$ fer rr srf �veT � rihe a ?$' if2 artJ
j.lb-r visas t �"fls sM HanJ &" &
�r r? I &- ane?$4er�?$ aparftyenfs are
a Srt$�re remedyfr p�rfl" f
Vl& �S fAfJ j�rfars1 frh�n1
Greece. jVe ��
6r
Keep Your
Cash
in your hand!
Wilson Acres Charges
No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300.00 Security Deposit For 2 Bedrooms &
$400.00 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses
1 � Baths
Pool
Basketball
Tennis
Water Sewer and Cable included
Small Pets o.k. with Fee
� ��





Greenville iliea Apartments
as listed by the Greenville Chamber of Commerce
Arlington Square
Avery St.
Azalea Gardens
Bradford Park
Branches Apts
Brasswood Apts.
Brookfieid
Brookgreen
Brookhill
Campus Sites II
Campus Pointe
Cannon Court
Captains Quarters
Carriage House
Cedar Court
Cherry Court
Cheyenne Court
College Towne Row
College View
Colonial Village
Cotanche St.
Courtney Square
Cypress Gardens
Dockside
Doctor's Park
Dogwood Hollow
Eastbrook
Elm Villa
Fairlane Farms
Forest Acres
Forest Glen
264Byp�s
Bvtfii St. Extention
npit
Afi�u from Lowe
1309 El lth St.
RwJOrde
301 & 12th St.
New Bern Hwy.
756-5067
758-1821
756-7815
321-8350
758-3781
355-5006
355-5497
752-8900
355-1313
355-2213
355-1313
756-6209
355-8731
756-3450
355-1313
752-1557
355-1313
355-8731
355-8731
756-6209
756-5067
756-6209
758-1821
758-2577
752-8900
752-5100
752-3376
355-2198
756-5577
McGregor Downs Rd 355-1313
Crwry Court Dr
OfftedBankaRd.
E. 10th St
Hwy. 11
I
S� Bfeb St�
BrttUeCitcle
Forest Manor
Georgetown
Green Mill Run
Greenville Manor
Greentree Village
Greenway
Heritage Care
Holloman
Holloman
Hyde Park
Johnston St. Apts.
Kennelworth
King's Arm?:
King's Row
Langston Park
Medical Center Apts.
Medical Oaks
Oakmont Square
Park Village
Pine Brook Apts.
Pinewood Village
Pirate's Landing
Plantations Apts.
Player's Club
Property Management
Quail RidgeWind Ridge
Reedy Branch
Regency House
Ringgold Towers
River Oak
Rollinwood
2603 E. 10th St.
Circle
IJfcSt
Rfvefbluff
3915 IkmmeTr.
Coontry Club Dr.
506ManoxRd.
E. 10th St
ilQOCbJBtesSt.
Hwy. 43 South
Johnston St.
132 Oakmont Dr.
1209 Charles
E 10th St.
StancilDr.
Paladin West Dr.
1202 Allen Rd.
1212 Redbanks Rd.
Adams Blvd.
E 10th St
WinterviUe
206 W. 8th St
3278 Colony Ct.
1500 Charles
Dr. '
10th St.
405E. 5th St.
635 Contache St
N. Summit St.
264 Bypass
756-5577
752-0277
758-2628
355-1313
757-1799
756-6869
752-9210
758-0491
756-7809
756-5067
355-1313
355-8731
752-8915
752-3519
752-2533
756-1234
355-3900
756-4151
756-6209
756-4151
756-4615
355-1313
355-5995
321-7613
355-8731
' 355-1313
830-2072
355-1313
752-2865
355-8731
355-1313
Rosemont Apts
Sandy Villa
Sedgefield Towers
Shenandoah Village
Sheraton Village
Shore Drive
South Square
Stratford Arms
Summer-field
Sycamore Hill
Tanglewood
Tar River Estates
Treybrook
Twin Oaks
University Apts.
University Medical Park
Village Green
Wandsworth Commons
Wedgewood Arms
West HillsGreenridge
Wesley Commons
Whitton Court
Williamsburg Manor
Willoughby Park
Wilmardel
Wilson Acres
Woodlawn
Woodland Apts.
Wood's Edge
Woodside
Wyndham Circle
Wyndhara Court
Rosemont
Have Dr.
St Andrews
Alice Dr.
Landmark St
705 E 1st St
Patton Circle
S. diaries Blml
Peed Dr.
HE. 5th St
125 Avery St
214 Elm St
itt
roperty
Apartments & Rental Houses
PO Box 873 � 108 Bfownlea Drive. Suite A
Greenville. North CoroUno 27835-0873
(9)9) 758-1921 � FAX (919) 757-7722
Wesley Commons South Apartments
Wesley Commons North Apartments
HI wyndham Court Apartments
Langston Park Apartments
wyndam Court Duplexes
Dockside Duplexes
All Apartments Just S Block
from ECU Campus
On Site Management and Maintenance
On Site Laundry Facilities
Sand Volleyball Court
Party Pavillion
On ECU Bus Route
LOOKING FOR A ROOMMATE?
DONT OVERLOOK THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS!
First Full Month's Rent
12 Price with Presentation
of this coupon
not valid with any other specials
EXPIRES April 28,1997

m
(ft
ii
� i
ii
ii
ii
� i
ii
A professional management team that cares
i I :i
Largest Property Management Co. in the
Greenville Area.
A wide variety of properties in different locations:
?Cannon Court
Cedar Court
?College Town Row
?Forest Acres
?Gladiolus
?Jasmine Garden
?Peony Garden
?Park Village
?Cotanche Street
?Cypress Gardens
?Wilmardell
Call and Reserve your space today!
756-6209
102-B East Victoria Court Greenville, NC 27858
, I





IPARTMBOT
IREAKDOWN
PHHB8
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mh
jn
�jt
;U
IT
� "�" s
'tsrr
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tsrr
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-5C5WT
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Players Club
Serving Up Fun!
Walking Distance to Campus &
Downtown
Swimming Pool, Sand Volleyball,
Lighted Basketball & Tennis Courts
Clubhouse with Fitness Room
herDryer in Every Apartment
Planned Social Events
� Roommate Matching Service Available
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC 27858

t
! I
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for
the position of:
Editor
The East Carolinian
Genera! Manager
WZMB
General Manager
Expressions
Editor
Rebel
for the 1997-98 academic year.
Applications are available from the
Media Board office on the second floor
of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a
completed application is
Friday, March 28 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board
office at 328-6009.
' " I �J �� � "��. . -� , �
r
� � ���





Be careful in selecting off-campus rental housin;
'
MAUREEN GERRiTY WHEELER
STUDENT LEGAL LEARNING CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
If you'd Hire to live off-cam-
pus, it's a good idea to start your
preliminary work at least one se-
mester in advance. The folks
who get the best deals are the
ones who shop early.
Many places ask present ten-
ants to renew or commit to a
Jury move by the end of March.
Around Spring Break is tradi-
tionally the time when most
places are rented on a written
lease of one year to start the
next August.
Your method of searching for
future rental housing is as im-
portant as getting an early start.
The best way is clearly word-of-
mouth. In fact, the landlord you
want to deal with probably
doesn't have to advertize in the
paper. If you have transporta-
tion, it's a good idea to start
cruising neighborhoods you like
for "For Rent" signs. I once
called an owner a half hour after
seeing him put a sign in the
yard, only to find that two fami-
lies were ahead of me. The first
callers got it.
Listings are a valuable source
of information, but never as reli-
able a channel as friends or ac-
quaintances with similar needs.
Check all of the local and cam-
pus publications. Keep in mind
however, that such sources in no
way guarantee the place or the
reputation of the owner.
The person who composes
the list is only responsible for
printing the words provided by
the person placing the adver-
tisement.
It is essential that you investi-
gate your potential landlord's
reputation. Once more, check
with fnends and fellow students
with some rental housing expe-
rience. Local papers routinely
run articles on the good, the
bad, and the ugly in the world of
rental housing.
You can also check with the
local Better Business Bureau for
any complaints filed with them.
A complaint or two shouldn't
necessarily deter you. Maybe
you'd agree with the landlord if
you knew the whole story. It's
the notorious repeaters we're
Dogwood Hollow Apartments
Now Preleasing for summer and fall semester.
Hurry
before the last units are taken!
Spa
c 1 o u s
Dogwood
Hollow
Apartments
752-8900
2 Bedroom2 Bath(full) $485 per month � watersewer, stove, refrigerator, dishwasher & garbage disposal, washer and dryer hookups � We rent washers & dryers � No pets2 Bedroom2 Bath(full) 1036 sq. ft. $460 per month � watersewer, basic cable � Very close to campus On site laundry facilities
concerned with. When the tenth
client came to me with a serious
"repair delay" problem in one
near-campus complex, I be-
lieved his theory that his land-
lord is just collecting rent on the
dive until it falls down and be-
comes a student parking lot. Pay
special attention if complaints
reoccurre.
On the other hand, some
folks don't have a realistic per-
spective on the frequency of re-
pairs needed on older housing.
Like old cars, such property is
acquired because it's affordable,
but each season brings new diffi-
culties. Pay attention to the
problems that people who own
their own "starter homes" gripe
about. You can expect similar
headaches in rental housing.
What your lease promises is
prompt and careful maintenance
and repair. Just remember that
lower rent is no bargain at all if
the place is not kept up.
I'd also be wary of some Cor-
porations and elaborate manage-
ment systems. Both are per-
fectly legal ways of doing busi-
ness and could in fact be a sign
of extra efficiency. Just be alert
if it seems to be a one-man
show, yet the paperwork in-
cludes a wife, son or corporation.
It may be a method of "passing
the buck" as to landlord respon-
sibilities.
All rental housing must meet
the city's housing code, which
sets minimum sanitation and
safety standards.
Keep two things in mind in
this regard. First, the sanitation
standards are the minimum. For
instance the place might be safe
but in no way energy efficient.
Second, we are working very
hard as a community to enforce
these rules, but the city remains
seriously understaffed.
Hundreds of students each
year lose substantial amounts of
sleep and money due to room-
mate conflicts. Therefore, no
advice about choosing rental
housing is complete without
emphasizing care in selecting
the person with whom you plan
to share it.
Did you know that when two
of you sign a lease you are each;
guaranteeing that the full rerir'
will be paid? All lease signers are
liable together and as individu-
als. The owner can charge aay of
the persons who signed for all -
rents due, regardless of who -
moved out early or caused the
damage. Unfortunately, it's usu-
ally the more responsible one
who gets stuck with the bill
If you get caught in this'tyjx:
of mess use Small Claims Court.
The problem is that it's often
too late. Even if you win a judge-
ment you may never collect V
what's owed to you.
In signing a lease to rent off
campus housing you are entering
into a binding, legally enforce-
able contract. Both sides have
rights and responsibilities. Your
landlord or landlady should be
someone with whom you can '
communicate and can trust �
The vast majority of housing
owners are business people who
are looking for the same qualU
ties in prospective tenants. Sljop
around, shop early, and shop "
carefully. You'll find them �
Things to watch for in rentim
ERIC A. FARRSS
STUDENT LEGAL LEARNING CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
Looking for an apartment?
You might want to start now and
there are things you should
know. Many students start hunt-
ing for apartments for the fall as
early as spring break.
In addition to luxuries like
swimming pools, dishwashers
noctf times, poo fooi nrsat frisr
"I overslept and wasn't in class
last year when the Prize Patrol
came looking for me. I lost out
�Sam the Snoozer
Era
CAKOtlWA
UNrvntsmr
Be sure to go to class April 2 to see if The Prize Patrol
has your winning ticket You could win one of the seven
fabulous prizes that will be given away. Don't gamble with
off-campus living.
Mark your calendar now. Go with a sure thing
campus living.
university housint aitf dini.i services
Iusstions? call ecu-torm (328-4863)
and microwaves there are other
matters you should consider be-
fore signing a lease.
Check the apartment's con-
struction, appliances, electrical
outlets, lighting, window and
door locks, and the general
cleanliness and parking.
Are there laundry facilities
available or close by is there gro-
cery shopping or a bus stop?
All these things should be
considered in addition to the
general reputation of the land-
lord for making repairs in a
timely manner and for returning
security deposits at the end of
the lease.
Once you decide on an
apartment, you should carefully
review the lease. Read it word
for word If you do not under-
stand a provision or do not agree
with it, have someone explain it
or advise you how to rewrite it in
terms agreeable to you and the
landlord.
If the landlord makes prom-
ises regarding repairs that will
be made before you move in or
shortly thereafter, get those
promises in writing, along with a
date they will be completed.
If you have roommates, ev-
erybody should sign the lease.
Remember that the lease is a
binding contract. If the term of
the lease is for one year, you are
bound to its terms for one year.
Choose your roommates care
fully. You could be paying their
rent if they decide to move out.
Every roommate signing the
lease is legally obligated for the
full amount of the rent if an
other roommate fails to pay.
Roommates should have a writ-
ten agreement with each other,
stating who pays what. If a util-
ity is billed in your name, you
are responsible for the entire-bill
and must ask reimbursement
from your roommates.
Can you afford it? It is highly
advisable to check your budget
before signing the lease, not'
when you receive an eviction no-
tice or a call from a debt collec-
tor.
If you have problems with
your apartment, there are spe-
cific laws andor ordinances that
may provide help for you; how-
ever, there are specific require-
ments which you must follow in
order to preserve your rights.
If a problem does arise,
check out the local or state laws
which may apply in the univer-
sity or city library.
GREEN MILL RUN
APARTMENTS
"Spacious affordable
Secluded Apartments"
"One Block From E.C.U. Campus"
� I Block From ECU Campus
� Professional Management & Maintenance
� On Property Resident
� 2 Bedroom & I Bedroom Garden Apartments
� Modern Kitchens
� Fully Carpeted Drapes Included
� Private Laundry Facilities
� Large Pool
� Cable TV Furnished
� Private Balconies
� Convenient to Shopping Centers & Restaurants
Located
I llh Slrccl
Crccnrillc, N.C.
Phone: 758-2628
- '





TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and information
about campus issues and activities.
STUDENT RADIO STATION
WZMB 91.3 m
Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of music including
alternative, jazz, metal, rap and more.
MINORITY MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up four times during the Fall and Spring terms for discus-
sion of the problems and issues facing ECU's minorities.
LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
Rebel
Pick us up annually in the late Spring to view a showcase of cam-
pus literary and artistic creations.
Student Media
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
f
f r-


Title
The East Carolinian, March 25, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 25, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1196
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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