The East Carolinian, February 27, 1997







Workshops explore changes in SGA funding
Students encourage to
learn about new system
JACQUELINE D. KELLUM
ARTS AND STI'DIF.S ISSl'ES
STAFF WHITE
The Student Government Association (SGA)
will soon adopt a new system for dispensing
funds to student organizations, lb help students
understand the process, two workshops will be
held, the first of which will be next week.
According to SGA President Angie Nix, it was
Saturday night
fight leads to
four arrests
Public affray, assault on
officer among charges
Jeff gentry
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION 1551'ES
STAFF WHITER
Two students and two non-students were
arrested Saturday, Feb. 15 after a fight broke
out on campus near White Hall.
David Dewayne Dial and Micheal Cagte,
two ECU students, and Ronald Brent Jordan
and Dustin Owen Newman, both of Selma,
N.C were all taken into custody late
Saturday night. Dial, Newman and Jordan
were all charged with public affray while
Cagle was charged with assault on a police
officer.
Dial, however, felt as though he was wrong-
ly accused and treated unfairly. According to
Dial, he was walking to Slay Hall when Jordan,
Newman and an unidentified man allegedly
made derogatory comments toward him. He
continued walking and was struck in the back
of the head by one of the assailants. The three
then told him not to bother to run, and con-
tinued to assault him. Another student tried
to come to Dial's aid and was also assaulted.
The student then started to call for someone
to call the police, and the alleged assailants
fled, (bike arrived on the scene, where a
crowd was starting to form. The four were
then taken into custody
Dial had several complaints stemming
from the incident. ECU police responded to
some of these complaints and gave explana-
tions on why matters were handled aa they
were. Dial's biggest complaint was that
despite the fact that it was three on one and
he did not instigate the confrontation, he was
treated in the same manner as his alleged
assailants were.
The key to this thing, and I think people
need to understand, is that when folks get
involved in an altercation in a public place,
there are three elements that have to be met
to charge them with public affray said
Assistant Director of the ECU Police Tom
Youncc. "These are engaging in a fight, in a
public place, involving public citizens. If these
criteria are met and it draws a crowd, it does-
n't make to much difference who initiated the
fight
"As far as the ganging up on Mr. Dial, a
magistrate looked at the case and found prob-
able cause, so what Mr. Dial needs to do is
bring some witnesses to court that will testify
on his behalf. But in terms of whether or not
he was charged properly, that is a matter for
the courts to decide Younce said.
Dial also expressed a concern about non-
students being able to walk freely on campus
and to possibly attack students.
"There is nothing we can do about people
Walking on campus who are not students until
they break a law because ECU is public prop-
erty Younce said. "The two non-students
have been issued ban tickets, which ban them
from being on ECU's campus from now on
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decided that the SGA would begin appropriating
funds twice a year, rather than once, as has been
done in the past. She said it was sometimes dif-
ficult to get word out about this important
event, and SGA is hoping that doing it more
often will increase awareness about this impor-
tant duty of the SGA.
"One of the big parts of the Student
Government job is funding appropriations for
student organizations Nix said.
The funds SGA appropriates to campus orga-
nizations are for use in meeting day-to-day oper-
ating expenses, like office supplies or advertis-
ing, and more infrequent expenditures, such as
traveling expenses to a conference.
In the past there have sometimes been
groups who requested funds on short notice,
who apparently did not understand the amount
of paperwork that was required in various offices
across campus to get approval for an appropria-
tion. By having appropriations sessions twice a
year, the SGA hopes to encourage organizations
to plan out their long term spending strategy.
"What we want to do is biannual appropria-
tions where the groups come and present their
budget Nix said. "If they come with a plan
twice a year, they'll be able to plan better and
help everyone along the way
Organizations should keep in mind that
before they are eligible to apply for funds, they
need to have a valid constitution registered with
the Student Leadership Development Office.
Not also strongly encouraged faculty advisors
for campus organizations to come to the work-
shop so they would better understand the
process themselves and be able to inform their
students.
These workshops will be co-sponsored by the
Student Leadership Development Office, and
the Student Fund Accounting Office will also be
present to help students understand the paper-
work involved.
Another change to be implemented, along
with the biannual appropriations, is what per-
centage of funds will be given out when.
"We plan to give out 45 percent at spring
appropriations to cover the summer and fall, and
30 percent in the fall to cover the spring Nix
said.
The remaining percentage will be reserved
for emergencies throughout the year.
The deadlines for the biannual appropria-
tions will be Apr. 1 for the spring, and the fall
deadline will be approximately Nov. 1, although
that date has not been finalized. Requests
should be submitted by these dates at the SGA
offices, located in 255 Mendenhall.
Nix said she wished to stress to students the
importance of understanding the appropriations
process, what it is used for and their right to the
funds.
"I want students to understand that the
money is out there, it's theirs, and they need to
understand how to apply for it Nix said.
The workshops will be held in Room 221
Mendenhall, from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30p.m on
Monday, Mar. 3 and 17.
Gospel choir sings out at 19th anniversary
Corey algood
(ioNTRIBUTINC WRITKR
MINORITY STl'OENT ISSUES
A combination of six choirs, two duos, two soloists and a dance troupe came to ECU for
one day only to celebrate the anniversary of the ECU gospel choir.
On Feb. 22 at 4 p.m the gospel choir held its 19th anniversary entitled "Glorify The
Lord" in Wright Auditorium. Some of the guest choirs included Lcnoir High School,
Greene Central High School, UNC-Chapel Hill, New Vision Faith Church Choir,
Scripture Center Dance Company and Elder Zephaniah Dixon Choir.
"I didn't expect such a big turnout from ail of the choirs that we invited said Senior
Choir Director Tara Worrell.
Initially, the choir had invited 14 musk groups, and in response to their invitation 10
groups volunteered to perform.
"I've heard many great reviews of the ECU Gospel Choir. I really enjoyed it and I was
realty blessed aa I listened to them singing praises unto the Lord said Charles Pittman,
manager of Taste of Heaven.
Also, one of the unique performances of the program was the Scripture Center Dance
Company which was from Rocky Mount. This group of young ladies performed several
routine dance ensembles to the sounds of current contemporary gospel musk.
"I realty thought that the dance company was really good, because it was another form
of worship which is used to show praises to the Lord said sophomore and gospel choir
keyboardist Dwayne Lucas.
To eliminate the length of the program each group was limited to singing only two
songs with the exceptions of the ECU gospel choir, The Elder Zephaniah Dixon, and one
duo group.
The crowd attendance was estimated to be 650 to 700 people. Each student and faculty mem
ber with ID was charged $2 for tickets at the door.
The money earned from the show will go to the gospel choir tour and other related expenses.
Saturday's celebration in Wright Auditorium marked the 19th anniversary of the ECU Gospel Choir. Several guest choirs
and soloists attended the festivity entitled "Glorify the lord
PM0T0 COURTESY OF ECU 80SPEI CHOIR
The choir sends their gratitude to Carrol Dashkl, Louis Ibpptn, The Pan Hellenic Council,
ABLE, New Generation Ministries (NGM) and all other supporting organizations for making the
success of this anniversary possible.

Co-op marks 22nd anniversary with open house
BECKY ALLEY
HOI'S I NO AND CONRHMATORY SRRVICKS ISSUES
The ECU Cooperative Education Program will
celebrate in 22nd anniversary Mar. 4 with an
open house and reception.
The Cooperative Education (Co-op) cele-
bration, which coincides with ECU's 90th
anniversary, will be held outside the Co-op
offices on the second floor of the General
Classroom Building from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Co-op is a work experience program that
places students in full or part-time jobs directly
related to their major or intended major.
The theme of the 22nd anniversary open
house is "ECU Cooperative Education: Past,
Present, and Future
Linda Carr, a coordinator in the Co-op pro-
gram, said students, faculty and employers are
welcome to come by and see how the program
has changed over the years and what it plans for
the future.
The "past" portion of open house will have
displays of pictures of the history of co-op as
well as student success stories. The founder
and first director of the Co-op program will also
be on hand to answer questions.
The second part of open house, the "pre-
sent will involve students and employers get-
ting hands-on demonstrations of Co-op's cur-
rent JOBS databases.
"Employers and students can see how to use
the JOBS databases and they can find out how
to access them from anywhere on campus and
through our home page Can- said.
The "future" displays will promote new
technology the Co-op Program is installing.
"The CU-See Me video conferencing
equipment will be up and running Carr said.
"We'll have a camera on top of one of the com-
puters and we are going to try to connect with
NASA and a few other federal agencies to
demonstrate how students will be able to do on-
line interviews with people all over the worid
Other technology on display will include the
on-line resume program and virtual reality soft-
ware. The virtual reality software will enable
people in other areas to see actual pictures of
the co-op office and how it is set up.
"We hope to go worldwide soon so student
and employers can access our information from
any program like America On-line Carr said.
The Co-op program offers all qualified stu-
dents an opportunity to gain valuable academic
work and life experiences. The job placements
for the 1995- school year alone exceeded 750.
7b be eligible for a co-op placement, a stu-
dent must be at least a second semester fresh-
man with a minimum 2.0 GPA. They must also
attend a co-op seminar and should plan to make
at least a two semester commitment to the pro-
gram.
For more information about the opportuni-
ties co-op can provide, students and prospec-
tive coop employers can drop by their offices in
2300 GOB, call at 328-6979 or they can access
their home page at
http:ecuvax.cis.ecu.eduacademicsschdept
unstudcoophome.htm
Infraction, suspension raise concerns at WZMB
Marguerite Benjamin
NEWS EDITOR
The recent suspension of WZMB radio personality Brian Paiz
may call into question the immediate future of the station's
Saturday and Sunday "Club" program.
According to WZMB Program Director John Reeves, Paiz's
three-week suspension came after a number of warnings about
breaking station policies.
"Long before this particular incident Paiz was told repeat-
edly about having unauthorized people at the station during
sessions Reeves said, adding that allowing people who aren't
on the schedule to frequent the station may create problems
with safety.
"I was told before about having visitors Paiz said, "but peo-
ple know where the show is aired and I just can't stop them
from coming down here. That's not what I'm concerned about
right now. The other DJs on the other shows during the week
have people in here too; everyone does. I just feel like a guinea
pig because they (the program director and the general manag-
er! watch our show closer than any other
"Paiz is taking this personally Reeves said. "His show was
not singled out Reeves said no one would have known Paiz
had visitors if he had not said, while he was on the air, "I got
some peeps down here letting listeners and the program
director know he was breaking the rules.
"We follow station procedure here with everything we do, so
we had no other choice but to suspend Paiz said WZMB
General Manager Courtney Shelton.
In itself, Paiz's suspension causes no threat to the weekend
programming since there are three other DJs on the Club Show
schedule; however. Reeves said that Pair mid him after being
notified of his suspension that a couple of the other Club Show
DJs had asked him to fill in for them a few times during the
coming weeks.
"He said he was supposed to be filling in for his DJs because
they were busy Reeves said. "I think they are working or doing
student teaching. At any rate, Paiz can't fill in for anyone while
he's suspended
At the time of the interview, Shelton said no decisions about
the weekend show had been made as to whether it would be
aired while Paiz is suspended.
The other Club show disk
jockeys also commented on how
difficult it is to keep people from
"dropping in" at the station.
They said the problem is harder
to control over the weekend than
during the week because of all
the activities that go on at
Mendenhall.
"We're allowed one guest at a
time, but the doors are open all
the time Thadius Jenkins ("T.J.
the DJ") said. "I'm on the air
Sunday night from 10 to 12, and
the doors aren't locked until near
the end of my shift
Another Club DJ Terrance
"Soul" Dove said the program
director and general manager
should make surprise visits to all
the shows.
"A lot of rules get broken dur-
ing the week, but no one has
been caught yet Dove said.
"We kind of feel like the step-
children of 'ZMB. They treat us
like we're the trouble spot of the
station sometimes. If they
suited watching some of these
other guys as much as they
watch us, a lot of people would
be suspended
R.T. Franklin (DJ
Casanova) said a lot of things
go on at the station to make the Club DJs feel like a secondary
segment of the station.
"We can request a repair and it won't get fixed for months�
especially if it's the turntable since we're the ones who depend
heavily on vinyl Franklin said. "Then if we walk in here and its
not time for our shift, they look at us like 'what are you doing
here?' I don't like to think it's racialbur if not, what else is it?"
Franklin added that there was no conflict between the Club
The campus radio station. WZMB, is a source of great pleasure for listeners throughout the week and the
weekend. Programming runs most smoothly when disk jockeys work to uphold the rules of the station.
PHOTO BY PATRICE IREIAM
DJs and the other DJs but between the staff and the Club DJs.
Student Media Advisor Paul Wright maintains that no one
was singled out in this incident.
"There was a violation of station policy; the person got
caught and was punished Wright said. "It's as simple as that
Wright added that Paiz has the right to appeal his suspension if
he so chooses.
Paiz told TEC he has decided to begin the appeal process.





2 Thursday, February 27. 1397
news
The East Carolinian
Campus judiciary deals with sexual assault
Drug bust is largest in Wilkes County history
NORTH W1LKESBORO, N.C. (AP) - Authorities found more than two
pounds of cocaine, $231,602 in cash and other property at a Wilkes County
man's home in what is believed to be the largest drug bust m the county s
KlStAlvin Dale Lewis, 43, was arrested Monday night when investigators
searched his house, car and garage. j:ctrih�r.
He was charged with possession with intent to sell and distribute
cocaine, said Suellen Pierce, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney s omce
Office'rTfrom the State Bureau of Investigation and the sheriffs depart-
ment found a kilogram, or 2.2 pounds, of cocaine hidden mside a clothes
dryer in Lewis' house, Sheriff Dane Mastin Mid.
The cocaine has an estimated wholesale street value of S25,000 to
$30,000, he said. Police also seised five guns, including an assault ntle, trom
the house and garage.
Producers of 'Home Improvement' sue Disney
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The producers of ABC's hit show "Home
Improvement" have sued the Walt Disney Co claiming the company no
longer represents their interests because it now owns ABC. . n irt
The breach-of-contract lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court
on Monday bv Wind Dancer Production Group, which created the popular
TV series starring Tim Allen. It was the network's third-rated show in the
Feb. 17-24 rankings by Nielsen Media Research.
Wind Dancer claims that Disney has no intention of selling the sencs to
any network but ABC, a move that would prevent the sencs from receiving
its full value. The group is seeking unspecified damages and an order direct-
ing Disney to negotiate "in good faith and at arm s length with ABC.
A Disney spokeswoman declined comment Tuesday.
Emily little
SPECIAL GUIDANCE ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Today the judicial system takes on
sexual assault. In addition to infor-
mation provided in a noon forum
by a representative from the
District Attorney's office, other
options for obtaining information
are available to students on cam-
pus.
There is no official charge for
sexual assault under campus policy.
If the perpetrator is a student he
can be charged with endangering
behavior, harassment or "violation
of a university policy, city ordi-
nance, state or federal law letter
"W" under the university code of
conduct. The victim can choose to
bring the case before campus offi-
cials, state attention, or both,
though a campus investigation
could actually hinder the one
brought on by the police. Should
the student desire a criminal trial,
the campus judiciary is more likely
to act as a support.
Should it remain a campus affair
or not, the assault charge will sure-
ly reach the attention of Dean of
Students Karen Boyd. Cases that
find her office generally begin in
campus housing, by an acquain-
tance, but oddly enough a non-stu-
dent. The last known report of a
non-acquaintance assault was
before this decade. If the victim
calls the resident assistant, the hall
coordinator, who normally has a
master's degree and some counsel-
ing experience, takes over and
assists the student in taking the
next step in the university judicial
system.
If the victim calls the police an
investigation commences as soon
as possible. If necessary the police
escort her to the hospital, then
secure the scene, interview and
collect information before calling
Detective Michael Jordan.
"It's important to report the
This booth was set up
outside the Student
Stores in order to pro-
mote awareness and pre-
vent sexual assaults on
campus.
PHOTO BV PATRICK IRELAN
incident as soon as possible
Jordan said. "I've had people report
days or weeks or even months later
because a friend talked them into
reporting
According to Jordan, the best
thing for a victim of sexual assault
to do is not to shower, change
clothes or disturb anything
involved in the case until authori-
ties show up because sexual assault
is nothing but her word against his
if no one can provide evidence to
support the victim's claim.
There have been no reports
thus far this year. Last December
resulted in two cases, but there
were few others throughout 1996.
For every reported incident there
arc many that go undocumented.
Should the perpetrator be found
guilty in Boyd's office he could be
suspended. Should the District
Attorney choose to prosecute and
the courts find him guilty, the pun-
ishment could be much worse.
The purpose of Sexual Assault
Awareness Week is to educate on
this common but often unreported
occurrence. The judicial system
has developed opportunities for
victims to come forward and help
prevent it from happening to
someone else.
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Wnat if a idnt Advisor?
RAs are responsible for helping maintain a safe, comfortable, friendly, and
academic atmosphere for approximately fifty students on a floor. Resident
Advisors serve as community builders, friends, listeners, peacemakers,
programmers, administrators, and informational sources for the residents.
Why V� a �id�nt $.&vUer?
� To have the opportunity to obtain skills that are transferable to the
work place.
� To hold a leadership position.
� To meet different people and to
build friendships.
� To be involved in the residence hall.
� To learn responsibility.
� To build self confidence.
� To develop human relations skills.
Qualification to ilpply
� Have at least a 2.5 grade point average.
� Be enrolled full time as an ECU student.
� Be in good judicial standing with the university. Students on disciplinary
probation are not eligible to apply.
� Have a time schedule free of other commitments, such as outside
employment, that would conflict with the RA job.
� Be at least a second semester freshman at the time of application.
� Graduate and transfer students are eligible to apply.
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Eating & Drinking
Saloon
,�
Monday Night Nitro
Specials: Draff Beer
Monday
$ 1.00 Glass
$4.95 Pitcher
Tuesday
Corona & Corona Light $1.75
1
Government Association and the
ership Development office are hosting workshops
!ing for student organizations. Please come to
mation and ask questions.
Monday March 3, 1997
Monday March 17,1997
endenhall Student Center Room �(TBA)
propriations due April 1, 1997 for 97-98 academic
rs from Student Fund Accounting will be available.
An Evening With
New Artist Showcase
Alison
Quartet
Along With Speefal Quests
W1DNISDAY, APRIL 2,197
8:00PM � Hendrix Theatre
Tickets Go On Sale Monday, March 3,1997.
Tickets - StudentsFacultyStaff $8,
General Public $12, At the Door $15
Available from the Central Ticket Office Monday-Friday
8:30 AM - 6:00 PM in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
Mastercard� and Visa� accepted. All tickets
are General Admission. Doors open at 7:30 PM.
For more information, Call Central Ticket Office st 919 328-4778 or Toil-Free at 1 800 ECU ARTS.
Individuals with (fisoMHw vAo require Ktomwdofon m d� to partit
the Department for Dtsability Support Servkes at 919-378-4802 (VokeTDD) forry-aight noun prtor to ifw stort of the proarom.
-�i injei -
Sponsored by the Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
Attention Students
Parking during Spring
Break
March 8-16,1997
Thirty-minute loading permits are
available to Freshmen with universi-
ty-registered vehicles beginning at
Noon on Wednesday, March 6. These
loading permits are good in des-
ignated spaces only. They are not
valid in Staff, Handicap, or metered
spaces, or in no-parking areas.
Students who do not have University
parking permits may purchase tempo-
rary permits form Parking and Traffic
Services for $2.00 per day or $5.00
per week.
Freshman and unregistered vehicles
may park on campus in student areas
(R, C, University Registered) begin-
ning at 2:00 P.M. Friday. March 8,
1997. Regulations for Limited decals
will be in effect through Friday.
March 8.1997.
Unregistered vehicles or vehicles dis-
playing student permits may not park
in Staff areas during Spring Break.
Vehicles parked in the Private lots
during Spring Break without the prop-
er PI or P2 decal will be issued a
parking citation and towed.
All other parking regulations (handi-
cap parking, expired meter, no park-
ing, impeding traffic, bus zones, etc)
will be enforced during Spring Break.
All questions pertaining to parking on
campus during Spring Break should
be directed to Parking and traffic
Services at 328-6294.
crimestoi
Between 5:30 p.m.on Sat rcb. 15, and 10 p.m. on Sun Feb. 16, someone entered a residence on the
second floor of Umscead Hall and stole a VCR, numerous clothing items, compact disks and cash.
On Sun Feb. 25, between 2:50 a.m. and 10 a.m a 35 inch television, which was located in the second
floor study room of Slay Hall, was stolen. It is believed that it was removed from the back (south) door
sometime around 4 a.m.
Arrests
continued from page
Dial also said the officers failed
to read him his rights when they
arrested him and did not make sure
he was physically OK while at the
scene.
"The only thing an officer has an
obligation to do when they arrest
someone, unless he is going to inter-
rogate them, is to teil them they are
under arrest and what the charge is
against them Younce said.
"That does not apply to inter-
viewing someone at the scene when
trying to find out what happened.
He can also ask where they live,
what's their name and so on.
Identification is not covered by the
Fifth Amendment.
"As far as the medical condition,
as I understand it a crowd of 20-25
people had gathered and police offi-
cers felt that this incident needed to
be handled as quickly as possible
before some of the crowd joined in
Younce said. "Greenville Police were
also called to trie scene, and trie offi-
cers felt as though unless there was
a serious injury that they needed to
resolve the situation
Listen this week for gift certificates from the Beanbag Cafe, Rex Appeal,
tickets to the Attic and other goodies thrown in for good measure.
WZMB's TOP TEN
ARTIST TiTLEUBEL
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2. Space SpiderGetUtiweisat
3. MundyJelly LegsEpic
4. 60 Ft. DollsThe Big 3QGC
5. Sneaker PimpsBecoming XVirgin
6. SilverjetWl me up, drag me downVirgin
7. BackslidersFrom Raleigh NCMammoth
8. Redd KrossShow worldMercury
9. Archers of LoafVitus TinnitusAlias
10. TrickyPre-Millenium TensionIsland
vi. ON INftlG'H . '�
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SunThurs. After 9 PM Dine In Only
Mank'(,inB�stcTuiant
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4 Thundty, Ftsriiiry 27. 1997
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Finally, when the weather looks like it might stay constant and you no longer have to drag
yourself out of bed for that dreaded first class, you are faced with a larger concern�mid-
term exams. It's that hectic time of year when all of the papers are due and you have to read
all of the stuff you should have been reading on the days marked on your course outline.
The worst part is that now is also the time of year when the best parties are scheduled.
How will you cope? Should you bury yourself in your books and fight like hell to get your
GPA up to that parent-pleasing mark, or should you throw caution to the wind and decide
to settle for whatever scraps fate might throw your way?
Either way, the decision cannot be made lightly. If you take the first option and become
a book worm, you might miss time visiting with your friends, not a small price to pay when
some of your best friends might be graduating soon. On the other hand, if you vie for a more
social atmosphere and try to tell yourself you can remember the important stuff, there
might be some grave consequences awaiting you the day report cards go home. Think you
can beat your mom to the mailbox? Don't even try it; she has connections.
Mid-term time is when you see the largest number of people (who usually look pretty
good) walking around looking like they haven't slept since December. Their hair isn't
combed and their shoes don't match, and they're making that mass exodus to the library.
Some words of advice: DONT STRESS! Easier said that done, yes, but you don't have
to lose your mind simply because you might be bordering between two grade levels. Go to
your professor's office and find out exactly where you stand. A good instructor (we pray you
have one) will tell you what grade you have and how many points you need to get to the
next level. Sometimes, if fate is smiling, you might even get a point or two for taking the
time to visit a professor�especially if this wasn't your first visit. After you find out where
you stand, plan what you have to do reasonably. Don't say "today I'll read my whole
Chemistry book and tomorrow I'll cover the Spanish book We guarantee you won't get
anywhere. Plan to give yourself a break now and then, and study outside when you can. End
your relationship with VTvarin and try to get enough sleep.
And remember: This is a test. This is only a test
OPINION
Mai ifi
DIBUDUO
Abortion is murder
Taking the life of an unborn
child is an abrupt cessation of life.
To put it more bluntly: it is killing.
It is murder. This sounds drastic.
Doesn't ir? Perhaps you are think-
ing, "this is stretching it a little too
far
Hester's Colltpatt Dictmtry
describes kill as "to slaughter; to
deprive of life; to put an end to; to
cause to stop The word murder is
described as "something outrageous
or blameworthy; to slaughter wan-
tonly
I am sure that you would agree
that if a flower was pulled by its
roots, before it had a chance to
bloom, that that flower would die
unless the roots were not harmed,
and it was put back into an environ-
ment where it could grow and flour-
ish and bloom.
When an unborn child is ripped,
torn, taken�call it what you will�
from its mother, it is similar to that.
The child is taken away from an
environment in which it can contin-
ue to grow (the womb), and often
this is done with no regard to injury
to the new life that is forming.
Once this bloody mess has taken
place, it is too late. Too late for a
rescue. Too late for a woman to
change her mind. Too late for life.
Several glass jars are on display
in the science building on the
fourth floor. In these jars are abort-
ed unborn babies kept in liquid for
preservation. The display is there
not to horrify you, but for you to
look at. For your learning experi-
ence.
If you are one of the many who
believe abortion is acceptable, or
that believe abortion is not wrong, I
challenge you to personally go look
�t (his display.
I have never met a girl or a
woman who does not grieve the fact
that she opted for abortion. To the
public and to her friends and fami-
ly, she seems fine, but on the inside
it eats her up. I am deeply sorry for
you, if you are one of those who
have engaged in abortion.
Even the Catholic Church has
debated this issue in the past. The
conclusion of the church was that
unless it endangered the life of the
mother, abortion was not even to be
considered.
Each circumstance is different,
and each individual woman does, of
course, have her right to choose.
Unless you have a damn good rea-
son to choose to have an abortion,
not only will you be killing, but you
will likely have it on your con-
science for your entire life.
Sleeping around, having fun and
then finding yourself pregnant is
not a sound reason to murder the
unborn Perhaps rape? Perhaps if
you yourself might die? My sugges-
tion is not to have sex until you are
ready to be a mother.
I have know lots of women who
had an at-risk-pregnancy for both
themselves and their unborn baby.
These woman went for it and had a
healthy baby.
Abortion is horrible! It is killing.
Whether you murder a ten-year-
old, a thirty-year-old, or a person
still in the womb, it all amounts to
the same thing.
Think! Please, I beg of you!
Think before you make yourself
God and take a human life. Get
counseling. Find out all about it. If
you are religious, pray about it.
M
print Curt
UTTERS TO THE EDITOR
Columnists are too liberal
To the Editor,
I am writing to speak out against
the constant display of liberal, left-
wing bias in your newspaper, most
notably by your columnists. In the
past month, we students have been
treated to articles extolling Ebonics,
condemning those who feel homo-
sexuality is wrong, and most recent-
ly, blasting the City Council and a
very racist column defending the
murderer O.J. Simpson. Since
Ebonics has been discarded by the
California school systems, as well it
should be, I will not linger on that
article. However, I do wish to
address Mr. Gabriel Isaac Johnson,
the champion of gay rights, and
those who lambasted the Council.
Mr. Johnson tells us that we all have
homosexual tendencies and that we
should embrace them as a natural
part of life, therefore not condemn-
ing the sexuality of others. He also
uses references to the Bible to tell us
"non-believers" that Jesus meant for
us to love homosexuals was a sin
against nature and God. He told us
to love the sinner, but hate the sin.
And that is what we Christians do-
hate the sin. not the person commit-
ting it.
And to correct a letter to the edi-
tor in the issue of 225 concerning
City Council Mayor Jenkins did not
taunt anyone as they left. She invit-
ed them to stay" and observe the
processes of government in all its
forms, not just when it addressed
one particular issue. Mary Alsentzer
told us that public forums were held
on the issue, and no students
attended, yet they showed up the
Council meeting with the intent of
attacking the members. And Bob
Ramey only claimed that the govern-
ment required them to divide the
district to make them more, fair, not
to intentionally go against the stu-
dents' wishes. The Council was
rightly upset that students were
attacking them for "hating" the
school over this one issue and not
looking at the ways the Council's
decisions have helped ECU. And
Mayor Jenkins was upset that our
Student Body President had not
attended one meeting before that
evening when given the opportunity,
except to show up and help crucify
the Council members.
As for the "Rsnecution of OJ.
Simpson that article made me
wonder how far race relations had
progressed on both tides of the aisle.
Apparently it is O.K. for a black jury
to deliver a decision, but for a white
jury to deliver a different verdict on
a black man, they are labeled racist
by people who need to apply the
word to themselves. O.Js trials
echoed the real tragedy of Rodney
King-police are not appreciated for
trying to do their job.
I know this letter is longer than
you usually accept, but please And it
in your hearts to put it in the paper,
so the rest of the ECU students can
know that someone else feels the
same way the majority of them do.
Richard White
Freshman
Public Relations
Get over O.J.
I think it is pretty sad that this
country and this campus cannot get
over the OJ. trial. I'm also surprised
at TF.Cs publishing of the article
entitled "Persecution of O.J.
Simpson I know it's Black History
Month, but do you really feel the
need to publish such Afrocentric non-
sense? Mr. Cooper stepped way out
line with his comment that, "(the $25
million in punitive damages were
designed to tell African-American
men that there is a high price to pay
for marrying a white woman Maybe
the honest jury was saying, "You may
have used the race card to get acquit-
ted from your first trial, but it is obvi-
ous to us that you had something to
do with these murders and you will
have to pay for it
And Mr. Cooper, don't be mistak-
en, it was the race card that won Mr.
Simpson his freedom not the "bril-
liant Johnny Cochran who led the
'Dream Team' for Simpson during the
criminal trial as you so ignorant!
put it. Another "no brainer" quote
was your astonishing revelation that,
African-Americans overwhelmingly
believe that Simpson got a raw deal
Did it take a genius at the poll booths
to figure that one out? Obviously it
was the information that was found
out about Mark Fuhrman that hurt
and angered the black jurors causing
them to swing even more towards the
direction of a non-guilty verdict. This
same information also outraged the
African-Americans who were at home
listening to all of those racial siurs.so
I seriously doubt they were going to
have a whole lot of the sympathy fir
the prosecution when one of their sar
witnesses turned out to be a racist.
You think that this trial caused ten-
sion between the races, and though
I'm sure it did, it's articles like yours
that keep the races even farther apajre.
The hand that you use to point the
finger at people with could be usedlto
fight racism, not create it.
Steven Starling
Junior
History
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Guest columnist application for Campus View
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you think about a certain topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian
office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print.
Name
Fr Soph Jr Sr ?
Phone number
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
Please consider me for a postion as guest columnist for TEC. Iagree to allow TEC's staff to edit my aubmission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those changes I will be n�j�fi�j.of fV
changes that may affect the length or content. I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submission. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for
submission will be assigned by the editor.
I '4
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Thuwlty, Fubrutry 27.19S7
comics
The East Carolinian
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
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AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER
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behind Parker's Barbecue on Greenville Blvd.
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Do you
stand out
in the
housing
market?
We can help you get noticed.
The East Carolinian is publishing a Housing Guide on March 25.
Just as the students make their housing decisions for the next school year.
With all of the housing options available in Greenville,
you can't afford not to advertise in this special section.
The ad deadline for the guide is March 18.
Call our ad hotline at 328-2000 to reserve your spot.
the eastcarolinian
THE ONLY WAY TO REACH THE ECU COMMUNITY
3
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SPAING DKAK IS JUST AROUND
W COftNtfi & SO IS UAflD BODIES
So fo oh Oh o Step �f and JUt
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for only $30
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By John Murphy
KAMA, aC� I'flf A 6IU.
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To IE A GOOD STtUAjD�fi?
Snowman's Land
0K ART- I KNOW How WE CMi
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By Rob Chapman
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Out wi-m null
Prlmitiv Man
By Karl Trolenben
ACROSS
1 Ogle
4 Design transfer
9 Applaud
13 Legs
15 Run off to wed
16 Rabbit
17 Landed
18 Revealed
19 "The Diary of �
Frank"
20 Emissary
22 Mate goose
24 � of passage
25"� we forger
26 Regard with
deference
29 Climbing vine
33 Onassis, to pals
34 Deplete
36"� You Glad
You're You?"
37 Low voice
39 Excellent
41 Farm building
42 Fail flower
44 Caruso or Lanza
46 Jewel
47 Professors
49 Holy ones
51 Depend (on)
52 Dispatch
53 Lisle, e.g.
56 Places for sports
events
60 Warmth
61 Allen or Frame
63 Step�!
64 Comic Johnson
65 Fleeced
66 Wee
67 Require
68 Certain home
69 Austin's state:
abbr.
e 1997 Tribun Madtai SwvtaM. inc.
M righto iMarwd.
ANSWERS
FROM TUESDAY
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campus
3 Jannings of old
films
4 Those in formal
discussions
5 Gladden
6 Center
7 Millie
Shelves
9 Certain singers
10 Territory
11 British composer
12 Equal
14 Cubic meter
21 Encircle
23 Thin Man's dog
25 Tablecloths, e.g.
26 Morocco's
capital
27 Rub out
28 Panorama
29 Cleans
30 Rule
31 Ria
32 Minute particles
35 Cowboy Gene
38 Hidden away
40 TV comedy
43 Pertmanof
"Cheers'
45 Author Ayn
48 Those bom first
50 Fool
52 Gaze fixedly
53 Comparison
54 Rod cad
response
55 Grade
56 Boutique
57 Single entity
58 Excavate
59 River in Hades
62 Article





6 Tharslay. fibrmry27, 1997
lifest
The East Carolinian
Critic stresses importance of
attending Suburbia
CD reviews
Jennifer Colemsn
Senior Writer
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Generation X.
That same label which sends chills
down the spine of most who hear it,
whether they are young or old, is the dri-
ving force behind the ECU Playhouse pro-
duction of Eric Bogosian's Suburbia.
Perhaps driving force is the wrong
choice of words. After all, the kids in this
play aren't going anywhere very fast. Their
lives revolve around pizza, beer and sex -
and not necessarily in that order. A semi-
famous singer, wannabe pilot, performance
artist, junkie, professional "woman of the
world laid-back skateboarder, and an
intelligent but directionless college drop-
out make up the cast of this look at today's
youth. Place two hardworking Pakistani
shop-owners in juxtaposition and you get
Suburbia.
Suburbia takes place in the parking lot of
a convenience store somewhere in subur-
ban America. All these kids know is "hang-
ing out It's their job, their contribution to
society, if you will. They don't live in a
slum, they're not poor, and they're not stu-
pid. But they are bored. Life presents no
challenge for today's youth. Technology
has increased their leisure time to the
point that all they have is leisure time.
Society has told them again and again that
they are lazy and worthless, and so they
begin to believe it.
This play covers all the bases - sex,
drugs, rock-n-roll, racism, politics. In fact,
every subject that was taboo during my
grandfather's time is included. They drink,
they smoke, they do drugs, they use foul
language, they listen to loud and obnoxious
music, and they don't respect their eiders.
Furthermore, they don't like being told
what to do, but they have no initiative to
do anything on their own. Is this really
where our society is headed? What is
Bogosian trying to tell us?
This show can be taken several ways.
You could watch it and leave thinking that
you wasted your time experiencing two
hours of cussing, drinking and smoking.
You could leave thinking you wasted your
time watching a bunch of nobody kids talk
about things no one really cares about. You
could leave thinking that we've finally
reached rock bottom.
Or, you could leave with a better under-
standing of kids and the problems they
face in today's society. You could leave with
new insight into the reasons today's youth
feel helpless and alone. You could leave
ready to make a difference. You could leave
ready to change things. You could leave
ready to talk, and listen, to Generation X.
I think that's what Bogosian wants.
"Cynicism is bullshit one of his charac-
ters says in the play. The situation isn't
hopeless, but we have to work at bridging
the generation gap. One of the purposes of
theatre is to educate the populace, and in
that respect this play could be the most
important production you'll ever see. How
often do parents sit down and talk to their
kids? How often do kids sit down and talk
to their parents? I don't mean a simple
exchange of words.
I mean really talking about issues that
concern us all. In my experience, it rarely
happens. No one has time to talk anymore.
Evervone is so busy working or doing other
"important" things that no one has time to
do the most important thing of all - get to
know each other. The truth is those "rot-
ten kids" aren't so rotten after all, and the
"old fogeys" know more than we think they
do. So kids, bring your parents. Parents,
bring your kids. Watch Suburbia and listen
to what the characters are saying. Look
past the language, the music and the drugs
and just listen.
Pavement S,eve Earle
Brighten the Corners Train A Com.n
ANDY TliRNER
SENIOR WHITF.R
Attic rocks for Crisis Center
Dale Williamson
assistant lifestyle editor
The loetl musk scene is takinga pos-
itrvt step forward this Friday, when
the Attic hosts the Eighth Annual
Rock 4 REAL benefit concert, a musi-
cal event dedicated to raising funds
for the REAL Crisis Center.
The REAL Crisis Center is a pri-
vite, non-profit, organization that has
served Pitt County for the past 25
years by providing free counseling and
assistance for those in need. The pro-
gram works for all ages, all sexes and
all sockVeconomic backgrounds with
such problems as interpersonal stress,
alcoholdrug dependency, pregnancy,
suicidal tendencies, discrimination,
family strife and sexual assault. In
addition to assisting people with such
difficulties, the REAL Crisis Center
also provides valuable community
information that can help people refo-
cus their energy and goals.
Although the Center receives
financial assistance in the form of
grants from the United Way and the
state, much of the needed money
comes from private contributions and
fund-raisers. That is where Green-
ville's music scene plays a significant
part. ,
Four Greenville bands will rock the
Attic in a dedicated effort to raise
money for this noble organization.
The Bivans Brothers, Nameless?,
Henry Acrobat and Melanie Sparks
will all join
forces and let
their music
work its magic
at the Attic.
According
to Randy Hog-
gard. an ECU
senior and stu-
dent volunteer at the Crisis Center,
the Attic will donate all the proceeds
from this show to the Crisis Center. At
the moment, tickets will be $5 in
advance and J6 at the door, although
Hoggard strongly believes that tickets
will be $5 at the door. This is the first
time that advanced tickets have been
available for the benefit concert. The
decision was made to offer advanced
tickets to increase awareness of the
show. ,
This is not just another show; it s a
local event that has caught the atten-
tion of many local businesses that sup-
port the Crisis Center and its goals.
The Rock 4 REAL show is a reality
thanks largely to sponsorship by such
businesses as Matt Holder Hair-dress-
ing. Byung Lee's Tae Kwon Do,
Computer Geeks, 106.5 WSFL, Busch
Light and the Greenville Musicians
Guild.
Get active with the community
and have a good 'ol time while you're
at it. Take part in the Eighth Annual
Rock 4 REAL benefit concert. It's
rock 'n roll with a purpose.
Kor further information, contact
Tracy A Scott, Program Director for
the REAL Crisis Center, at 758-3110.
te s Kansas City jazzes up small screen
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Robert Altman has proved himself time
and time again at the box office. He has
almost become the standard for quality
American filmmaking, with 31 films under
his belt including such classics as The
Player, Short Cutt, MASMH, Poptye and
AfcsfMSfr. In the many years that he has
been in the cinema game, he has had
almost no missteps, He also makes films
that go against the grain of what
Hollywood expects blockbuster films to
be. He continues to prove that good films
are what are important, not films that sim-
ply rake in big bucks.
Therefore, it should come as no sur-
prise that Kamas City, Altman's newest
film, continues in the vein of good film-
making that he has established. Quirky,
darkly humorous and somewhat disturb-
ing, Ktmm On is a starkly vivid portrait of
1930s street living
The action revolves around Blondie
CHara (Jennifer J"00 WkW who: �EJ
the course of two days, has her life fall
apart. Leigh was hilariously effective as a
�30s reporter in Joel and Ethan Coen's The
Hudsmher Prvxy, where she handled the
explosively fast patter of a tough dame
with ease. Here, however, she hits a stum-
bling block. Her banter falls fiat and her
performance seems stilted.
Fortunately for the film, Leigh is the
only false step. The rest
of the cast is superb.
Harry Belafonte takes a
decidedly nasty turn as
Seldom Seen, gangster
and owner of the Hey
Hey Club. Miranda
Richardson is also won-
derful as the drug-
addled Carolyn Stilton,
wife of a Presidential
advisor.
The plot of Kansas
City is simple and pre-
cise, a testament to
Altman's writing abili-
ties as well (he co-wrote
the film). Blondie's hus-
band Johnny O'Hara,
played to moronic per-
fection by Dermot Mul-
roney, has been cap-
tured by Seldom Seen
and Blondie wants to
get him back. To that end, she kidnaps
Mrs. Stilton, using her husband's political
clout to try and free Johnny.
The film takes a number of twists and
turns towards its inevitable conclusion
and, along the way, Altman introduces the
audience to a bygone time filled with
political thugs (the wickedly intimidating
Harry Belafonte is imokin' in the new Robert Altman film.
PHOTO COURTIS OF MIRAMAX FILMS
Steve Busccmi) and jazz musicians.
In fact, possibly the best part of the
film is that Altman uses current jazz artists
like Joshua Redman and Cyrus Chesnut to
penny past greats like Lester Young and
Count Basic. The soundtrack is as hot as
the film itself. Take my advice and buy
both. You won't be sorry you did.
When I saw Pavement a few years back
in Norfolk, the band dedicated that
night's show to "everybody here from
Suffolk Being a son of the Peanut
City, I was pleased and proud. Of
course, I knew they were goofing on me
and the other inhabitants, but I didn't
mind. Why? Because the men of
Pavement goof on themselves just as
much. Because they're smartasses who
write songs with undeniably sweetass
melodies that won't leave your head
alone. Because they're damn good.
Pavement is back after 1995's disap-
pointing Wotnee Lowe with possibly its
best record to date, Brighten the Corners.
The boys made the album last summer
right here in the Tarheel State; it was
recorded by Mitch Easter (of R.E.M.
producing fame) in his Kernersville
home studio.
Brighten ihr Corners rocks ("Stereo,
"Embassy Row") and sways ("Shady
Lane "Transport is Arranged) with
12 songs filled with memorable
melodies and the usual Pavement pon-
derances on life: "What about the voice
of Geddy Lee How did it get so high
I wonder if he speaks like a normal guy
1 know him and he does
The first track, "Stereo starts with
a screaming guitar that gives way to
Stephen Malkmus's sing-song delivery
and a hip-hopdance beat, before the
exploding guitars return. It's not the
only song on the album that shows a
hip-hop influence. The beat-heavy
"Blue Hawaiian" or the thumpy
"Embassy Row" may not be Ice Cube's,
but they certainly could be Beck's.
Despite the smartass tendencies of
Pavement, Malkmus docs know how to
write love songs - honest love songs. On
"Transport is Arranged he sings "A
voice coach taught me to sing He
couldn't teach me to love
In fact, most of the songs arc stories
about relationships between men and
women, doomed or otherwise. Not that
you're gonna hold hands and skip to
"Date with IKEA "Hype Slowly" or
"Starlings of the Slipstream but they
are indeed honest love songs.
"Shady Lane" is vintage Pavement:
"You're so beautiful to look at when you
cry Freeze don't move You've been
chosen as an extra in the movie adapta-
tion of the sequel to your life Twisted
and terrific.
Pavement writes the songs the
whole world should sing. Brigtun the
Corners is a great album that will no
doubt win a few more converts.
On the last track, "Fin Malkmus
sings wearily, "I trust you will tell me if
I am making a fool of myself Wicked
as they are, Pavement arc just like the
rest of us - even those of us fro n the
peanut capital of the world.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S, Evans St �- nMn Hours:
Pittman Building SWWJ Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC8:00-4:00
Kteupjpy P��Q (MB
7 days a
M-Sat
lam � Sun 12-2
o;
�Tue-adayt
Day
AN day and Night
�Wadnasaayt Ladtaf Night
Lodias Way All day ra�
�Ivarydayt 32oi. Bud draft $2.25
�Barmaids Wanted
phono 752-6726
Sunday 9-Ball Tournament 4pm
Join Us
For Happy
Hour.
FLORIDA COASTAL
SCHOOL OF LAW
If you're coming to Daytona Beach this Spring, stop in to see us any
day, Monday thru Friday from 3-5p.m. WU give you a tour of
America's premiere law school, refreshments and some important
food for thought. Don't pass through Jacksonville without learning
first about our institution's extraordinary commitments to your future.
Take the Beaches Exit off 1-95 to 7555 Beach Boulevard.
For an application call 904-724-6699 www.tcsl.edu
Pat Reid
STAFF WHITES
S:cvc Earlc is probably one of the
best known unknowns around in
country music today. Earle has been
in music since 1982 and has embod-
ied a no-nonsense singersongwriter
attitude ever since. Those who have
heard of him usually wind up laving
his music and respecting his talent.
Those who haven't heard of him prob-
ably have without knowing it.
Earle has not only managed to
have a string of successful songs him-
self, but has had his songs become
hits by other people. A perfect exam-
ple of this is the current Sawyer
Brown hit, "Six Days On The Road"
Earle originally recorded the song for
the soundtrack to the movie Plants,
Trains and Automobiles, and later
included the song on his greatest hits
package. Essential Steve Eare.
Earle's biggest �oln success cante
recently with his luat album, Hd
Alrigit. Recorded after having been
jailed for drug charges and going
through successful rehab for heroin
addiction, Feel Alright was Earle! s
message of coming through the
flames stronger than before. The
album received massive critical
acclaim and was embraced by fans old
and new. ;
Train A Comm, his follow-up to
reel Alright, actually might have been
bumped by that album. The album
was recorded in 1995 and simply kept
on the back burner until nok
Apparently when Earle got out pf
rehab he had some things to say trtat
couldn't wait. But either way. Tram A
Comm is now out and shows a very dif-
ferent side of Earic.
While Train is all acoustic, Earle
makes it clear carry on that it is not an
"unplugged" album. The inlay for the
CD is mostly made up of notes from
Earle himself and the first page serves
as a preface to the album. As the iast
line says, "This ain't no part of no
unplugged nothin' - God, I hate
MTV" In fact, most of the songs were
written before MTV even existed.
Tram A Comm' contains mostly old
songs which Earle played before he
ever got a record deal.
The CD starts off with the track
"Mystery Train Part II Described by
Earle himself as "hillbillies from hell
the song is simple and powerful with
folk and country influences. As the
CD continues, Earle plays a little
blues jam called "Hometown Blues
Complete with a spoken word intro,
the song tells of Earlc going home
where the only people who remem-
bered him were cops.
It's evident early on that "hillbil-
lies from hell" can be used to describe
SEE STtVi PAGE 8
"�$E3
Ctn't ran hum itono
OP'O
Ttp� it from a fritrtd
Buy it lit
Ply Full Pnct
-w apu5 HBMMjk -�
Travff-Advontur txajb nd
Thank Planar Sarlaa Jf'
Film:
Exploring Ancient Anmrica.
Wednesday, March 5, 1997
4 & 7x30 pa
Handrix Thaatra
nrrt
WlnT
.0 0
Dinn�r 6iOolmiSM8C Or��t Room. All
you "am aatgoanat buffot includo.t
ff�upor with ihitmkm mimhroomm. .ucco-
V-m emramml rnppl pi� �d more.
Doodlino �T�dordinnor tick.t.� Fob.
28, �12 ooch. Film tick�t� are fraa
whan ECU ID ia �howB at
tho Cantral Tlclcat Ottlca.
����





'�.
7 Thursday. Februiry 27. 1997
i ft �style
The Eait Carolinian

SILVER
BULLET
Ma
1 Door Open: 7:30 pjn. 'J? TohM Of Class'
�� Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 756-6278
: HSERR TUESDAY:
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nBHB THURSDAY:
r vl I FR,&SAT:
E jHH 10 OR MORE GIRL
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"SfyulT" NIGHT!
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
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Uc�tW5 fl� W�it ofCmntlB. on 264 Alt (Behind AJiddin Limo Service,
������������"AT



Peebles
Store Management Careers
While many other retailers have been packing up and leaving town, we've been moving
in. Peebles represents Main Street, USA. That's where we live, where we work, where
we've built our success, since 1B91. We're truly unique, blending into everyday rural
life, bringing fashion to Middle America. Apparel, accessories, shoes, cosmetics, gilts,
and home fashions define our value to the Middle America customer in search of fashion.
At Peebles, our Store Managers and Store Manager Trainees have an active role in
everyday operations, from receiving merchandise to cuslomer service, and in the future
success of a multi-million dollar store. Our hands-on training can put you into a Store
Manager's position in 12-15 months and it's a career that's challenging, constantly
changing, and a lot of fun.
As one of our successful Store Manager Trainees, you'll enjoy a lull range of rewards:
� A starting salary no less than $22,000 �A performance-based bonus plan � Paid
Personal Hours (Starts at 3 weeks per year) � Croup rates on Health Insurance � Paid
Holidaysa year) � Retirement Plan � 4011k) Savings Plan � Die Insurance (2 x
salary) � Tuition Assistance (up to $1000 a year) � 20 Purchase Discount � Service
and Performance Awards � Short-Term Disability
Check with your Career Services Center to see when a Peebles representative will be
interviewing on campus or faxmail your resume to:
Peebles Inc.
Gavin Harper, Store Management Recruiter
One Peebles Street � South Hill, VA 23970
FAX �. (804) 447-S4S3
afllilOC
We are an equal opporturwly employer �nd promote a drug-free workplace.
i
fi

.t
East Carolina Playhouse
Eric Bogosian's
subUrbia
RATED R
The play contains very frank language, violence and
adult content.
February 27, 28, March 1,3 and 4, 1997 at 8:00 p.m.
March 2,1997 at 2:00 p.m.
WHY PRODUCE AN R RATED PLAY?
SUBURBIA has already established itself as a contemporary
classic. The New York Times calling it 'Chekhov high on speed and
twinkles Although the play can be ferocious and assaulting, it does
concern itself with a specific American themeidle hands are the
devil's workshop All of the characters are under twenty-five and most
are from upper-middle-class, upper class families. They live in an af-
fluent society, having grown up with too many toys, too much free
time, and little parental guidance. These young adults want to be unique
and they compete for their individuality, but the harder they try, the
more they fall into the generic mold of "rebels A character in the play
admits, "No one's really different, even if they think they're different.
They say 'Oh my God, look at my tattoo
The riveting aspects of this play to which we all can relate is
the electric energy and the destructive frustration. Alcohol and drug
abuse are constant factors in the play. "I grew up in the 60's says
director, Donald Biehn, "and the drug culture was new and experimen-
tal. Now it is the norm. In the 90's, our children have more pressure,
more temptation, and more affluence. This can be a deadly combina-
tion
Biehn continues, "My children are teenagers now and, although
the language is harsh and much of the behavior is self-destructive. I
am not embarrassed to have them attend this play with me. Our chil-
dren need to know that we adults can understand how tough it is to be
young and reactive Biehn also recommends the play to parents:
"Inevitably our dialogue can break down with our teenagers-we end
up preaching to them, and eventually, they stop listening. Maybe if
parents and teens attend SUBURBIA together, a new and vital dia-
logue can develop
To end, Biehn is enthusiastic about this specific ECU version
of SUBURBIA. "This is an exceptional group of young actors. They
have the authority, the insight, and the training to portray these char-
acters with utter conviction and convincing empathy
February
27 Thursday
East Carolina Playhouse: Suburbia
by Eric Bogosian at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre through March 4.
Hunchback of Notre Dame at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre through March 1
with a special Saturday matinee at 2
p.m.
The FblkArts Society of Greenville
present Kristen Olsen in concert at
7:30 p.m. at the Greenville Museum
of Art, Jaycee Park Auditorium. For
more information, call 757-3185.
Schliegho at Bsasants Cafe
28 Friday
to support the Real Crisis
Intervention Center of Pitt County.
For further information, call 758-
HELR
Jazz at Night: Carroll V Dashiell,
jr director, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Great Room.
Blue Dogs at Peasants Cafe.
Stuck Mojo at Alive nightclub in
Raleigh.
2 Sunday
prizes from
Mendenhall.
noon-1:30 p.m. at
March
1 Saturday
East Carolina Symphony
Orchestra, Stephen Blackwelder, con-
ductor, at 3 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
Guest Recital: VIDEMUS, Vivian
Taylor, Robert Honeysucker, Ruth
Hamilton, Stan Strickland, and facul-
ty member Louise Toppin, soprano,
with the ECU Steel Drum Ensemble,
Mark Ford, director, at 8 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
3 Monday
Family Fare Series:
Mountain at 2 p.m.
Auditorium.
in
Dinosaur
Wright
The 8th Annual Rock for REAL
benefit concert featuring the Melanie ,
Sparks Band, Henry Acrobat,
Nameless? and the Bivans Brothers at
9:30 p.m. at the Attic. All proceeds go
!i
I
General Public: $8.009.00
ECU StaffFaculty: S7.008.00
' - ECU Students: S6.005.00 ' "
McGinnis Theatre-Corner of Fifth and Eastern
CALL: 328-6829
6th Annual Juried Visual Arts
Competition, through March 8, at the
Ayden Art and Recreation Center, 511
S. Lee St. Entry Fee for up to three
entries of original work completed
within the last three years is $15. For
more information, call the Pitt County
Arts Council at 757-1785.
"A Celebration of Dance" at 3 p.m.
at the Ayden Arts and Recreation
Center Auditorium, 511 S. Lee St. For
more information, call 757-1785.
Hipbone at Peasants Cafe.
"One point five" with Swamp Gas
Charlie at Alive nightclub in Raleigh.
"Walter S. Hartley: A 70th
Birthday Musical Celebration
Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Scott
Carter, conductor, at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
"A History of ECU's College of
Arts and Sciences" lecture by Mary Jo
Bratton at 7:30 p.m. at the Francis
Speight Auditorium.
ECU Symphonic Wind Ensemble
at 8 p.m. at Wright Auditorium.
4 Tuesday
"Chamber Music of Walter S.
Hartley: A 70th Birthday Musical
Celebration Mark Taggert, director,
at 8 p.m. in AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
ECU Anniversary Celebration
filled with refreshments, games and
Ice Carving Demonstration from
12:30-3 p.m. at the Wright Place
Student Plaza.
Dedication of the Wright Soda
Shop and Plaza, with a birthday cake
reception, at 3 p.m.
Faculty and Staff 90th Anniversary
Celebration at 4 p.m. at the Ledonia
Wight African-American Center.
Anniversary Celebration at
Student Recreation Center from 4-10
p.m.
5 Wednesday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Exploring
Ancient America at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre. There will also
be a theme dinner at 6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room.
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event that
you'd like listed in our It's Showtime
column? If so, please send us informa-
tion (a schedule would be nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor j
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858 'I
health
uinum
in
minute
JENNIFER PHILLIPS
STI'OF.NT HEALTH SF.KVICK.
One in seven people will develop skin
cancer during their lifetime. A sign of
beauty? Not really. Having a tan is cul-
turally accepted as a sign of attractive-
ness, but from a health perspective
having a tan is a sign of skin damage.
Overexposure to the sun (includ-
ing tanning beds) can cause prema-
ture aging, wrinkled and leathery skin,
sunburn and skin cancer. One serious
sunburn can increase the risk of skin
cancer by as much as 50 percent.
Who is at risk?
� Everyone, no matter what skin
color. Fair-skinned people have the
greatest risk.
� Anyone with a family history of
skin cancer.
� People who have an outdoor job.
� Those who freckle easily.
� People who take certain antihist-
ami es, antibiotics and oral contra-
ceptives.
Signs to look for
� A growth or sore that will not
heal.
� A flat, red spot that is rough &
scaly.
� A smooth, waxy-looking lump.
� Changes in the size, shape or
color of a mole.
� A mole that feels itchy, hard,
lumpy, swollen or tender.
Signs of skin cancer can be found
anywhere on the body. Most common-
ly they are found on the neck, head,
shoulders, a-ms and legs. There are
different kinds of skin cancer. This is
part of the reason why signs may vary.
Not all changes to the skin are actual-
ly skin cancer.
Tips for safer sunning:
� Use sunscreen with an SPF of at
least 15 and put it on 30 minutes
before going outside.
� Read the labels. Look for sun-
screens that block both UVA and UVB
rays. i
� Reapply sunscreen every twpj
hours and after swimming or perspir-
ing.
� Avoid tanning beds and sun
lamps. These devices arc not anyj
"safer" than the sun.
� Wear hats that shade the neck�
and face.
� Minimize direct exposure from,
the sun between 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
If you are interested in obtaining a;
free skin cancer screening, call the-
Student Health Center at 328-6317.
Health care providers will screen and
make any needed referrals.
BEWARE! '
THERE A ROTTEN
for Too lone
optn.d for Craven Melon
special guests
Root Doctors
Edna Swap
.25 DRAFT $5 odm.
all night long for members
March 17'
St. Patrick's Day
Party with
Acoustic Bus

go.j&'&x;ndthat
Horns our image
DICK'S FOOD l
PRETTY GOOD
NONSENSE IT ATWM.WBWCAT10N
SPREAD Or-toR CHEF'S MJIUEft
BECAUSE ME USES US? RECIPES
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FINAU.Y FINISHED MS MAIL
OGOSQ CDOKWGOXWSE-SWWf!
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I LAST BfSOST
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THE&nwe
0' &AI2EPCOTI.AWPIN&
$5 Discount
to students
UHtb ID 5
SPSUNC BREAK-
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Tafct adiMrtatt of
IcntdtfCM
terror





8 Thursday. February 27. 1997
i ft.style
The East Carolinian
Steve
continued from page 6
the album as a whole. While the music
has a loose jam feel to it, a close listen
will show that, in fact, the musical
unit is very tight and sound. These
guys knew what they were doing and
haI good songs to do it with. Nine of
the songs were written by Earle and
include the usual stories of smugglers,
soldiers and gunslingers. The acoustic
backdrop of the music allows Earle to
weve pictures that take the listener
out of the 1990s and into the 1850s.
Campfire-esque stories and songs
dominate the album and allow for an
escape from the usual hustle and bus-
tle of life.
Songs like "Mercenary Song"
(written while Earle was at work at a
pizza joint) and "Tom Ames' Prayer"
show the TexasfTennessee influence
on Earle, while "Ben McCulloch"
illustrates his angst.
The unique thing about this
album is the soft side of Earle that is
shown. With his usual songs about
tough characters, Earle has a couple of
sentimental songs on the CD that
show a side of him never seen before.
Probably the best of these emo-
tional songs is "Tecumseh Valley
Written by Earle's late close friend
Towncs Van Zandt, "Tecumseh
Valley" tells the story of a frontier girl
who came to the city to make money
and save her family but who ended up
short on time. A touching song, it
ends the album and left me with a
view of Earle very different from the
one I had when the CD began.
Earle has also tried his hand at
what is best described as "island folk"
with the song "Rivers of Babylon
which is one of two songs featuring
Emmylou Harris doing background
vocals. Earle's simplified explanation
of the song is "hillbillies in Jamaica
and that seems to fit just fine.
Overall, Train A Comin' is very
folkcountryish, but it provides a wel-
come change from the usual music on
radio and TV today. Unfortunately,
chances arc none of these songs will
ever see video or radio airplay. It
seems the powers that be at radio and
video stations are more welcoming to
familiar songs than good ones.
ovie
The Hunchback of
Notre Dame
From a commercial perspec-
tive, Disney's most recent ani-
mated feature, The Hunchback
of Notre Dame, is not one of the
studio's greatest successes.
However, Hunchback stands as
giant when viewed as an
entertaining narrative that
pushes the envelope on stan-
dard Disney fare.
Unlike Porohontas and The Uon
King, Hunchback carries Disney
back to a fairy tale setting, the
best place for any Disney story
to be told.
Inspired by, more than based
on, Victor Hugo's novel of the
same name, this film centers around a malformed recluse named
Quasimodo (voiced by Tom Hulce), who lives in the cathedral of Notre
Dame where he serves the needs of a wicked Magistrate of Justice called
Frollo (Tony Jay), a man who twists religious beliefs to serve his own dread-
ful purposes�
Quasimodo's life takes an adventurous turn when the beautiful
Esmerelda (Demi Moore) enters and becomes his friend. Together, along
with the noble Phoebus (Kevin Kline), Quasimodo and Esmerelda chal-
lenge Frollo ahd his tyrannical ways.
Hunchback (exemplifies the best Disney has to offer (fluid animation,
catchy songs, memorable characters), but it also dares to explore the dark-
er areas of human passion. More than any other Disney villain, Frollo is a
veiry real menace filled with what he considers to be justifiable hate.
The beauty of Hunchback is the fact that it is ultimately a story about tol-
erance and acceptance of others despite differences. Ironically, this film was
released at the same time the Southern Baptist Convention attacked
Disney for providing its homosexual employees and their lovers with health
benefits.
Truth,Equality,Justice
123 W.3riST
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
I
Tips for Safe Spring Break:
If you choose to drink alcohol, be responsible
and have a designated driver.
Brought to you by Campus Ministries and
Health Promotion and Weil-Being
I
Great Buys On Winter. New Shipments For Spring
February 26, 27, 28, March 1 and 2
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New coach brings
experience
Dray Km (L) talks with J�my Parsons during Tussday's aam�.Tha
U fain a to i
Photo it cum twottvt
i:
TlACY LAUIACH
If NIOb tllTtll
It has been said that experience is the
pey to success. Under the direction of
Lnew head coach, the women's soft-
ill team is led for the first time by
someone who knows exactly how it
Jeets to be in their shoes.
! Traccy Kee began I softball
� with the Pirates as a freshman
1966. A four-year starter and letter
Kee graduated from ECU in
with a degree in exercise and
science, and then went on to
the coaching staff for the Lady
softball team. After serving as
ftir live yc&Mt. mcc imb
up this sgasbn arid hnf taken
the program as head coach.
" Kee said her experiences aa both a
student and athlete at ECU will give
the girls on the team a very positive
kdvantagc,
' "In this role, I know exactly what
the gMa are going through Kee said.
Athletically, I was here before, play-
ing on this same field. I know what it
to win
Kee has dreamed of coaching the
for as long as she can remember,
is thrilled that everything has fall-
into place to give her this opportu-
nity Since she took over at the begin-
ning of this season, the program has
already been turned completely
upside down.
I "This year, we are looking for our
batters to rip Kee said. "We are not
looking for one run, but five runs
i The recruiting process is another
hing that will be changing about
Lady Pirate Softball. For future
sons, Kee is interested in bringing in
kids who are big, strong and fast.
Kee's coaching philosophy has
been designed to push the girls to be
aggressive and stay disciplined. She
also stresses the importance of taking
a positive mental attitude on the
field.
"If the girls go out on the field
with the attitude that they can score
five or six runs a ball game, they are
going to win a kit of games Kee said.
Kee's transition from assistant to
head coach was especially hard for the
seniors on the team. Kee is proud of
them the meat for learning to adapt to
a new style.
The first ding 1 did when I
found out I got tkcjobwas meet with
the seniors, because tTus'tttheir pro-
gram Kee said? "The seniors have
ownership in this program. It is my
job to guide them
The first sigf to be hung on the
womens' kxkersjread, "ECU Softball
� Where Rookies are Rookies and
Veterans are top Freshman and
seniors alike slipped onto die field
for the first tirnein August not know-
ing what to expect. Each day since
then has been a learning experience
for all, with the primary focus being
on preparing for the Big South
Conference Tournament, which is
scheduled to be held the first week-
end in May.
With two girts (Dana Hulings and
Amy Hooks) eat with injuries, Kee
hopes to add depth to the program
and to have 17 healthy players for the
championship.
Kee said there is a good mixture of
SEE
I PAGE II
TRMAtime
Name the women's pro tennis player who
has won Wimbledon nine times and name
the years.
�06, FLg. 28, '6L SL ��R�3V MW
dy Pirate runs to success
ZlNA BRUEY
mr� wiitir
This year the Lady Pirate Track and
Field team has several new additions
to the team who have helped to keep
the Lady Pirates in the running as one
of the top teams in the'CAA It's also
with hetp from veterans like senior
sprinterjumper Amanda Johnson,
who continue to lead the way
Johnson hails from Beaufort, where
she attended East Carteret High
School. There she led her school to a
team championship. As a senior at
East Carteret, Johnson won the 100m,
200m and the long jump at the State
Championships. Now Johnson contin-
ues that tradition at ECU.
During her debut year as a Lady
Pirate, she earned All-East honors on
the 4x100m relay team and set her
first long jump record. During her
sophomore year, Johnson qualified for
the 1995 NCAA Indoor
Championships, where she placed
15th in the long jump and ran a 23.6 to
anchor the 4x200m relay to a fourth
place finish in the Penn Relays.
Johnson's career started as just a
form of recreation, competing in
school running events when she was
seven or eight years old. It was then
she found that speed and strength
were a natural ability and the rest, as
they say, was history.
Johnson contributes pan of her
success to her older sister Felicia
Johnson, who used to race her home
from school everyday saying, "you
can't beat me Then came the day
when Johnson did beat her, blowing
right past her in perfect stride never
looking back. The other major influ-
ence during her track career was her
father.
"My father arwiya
ton me to never
stop at nothing and
to reach for my'v
dreams Johnson"11
One of Johnson's -
favorite quotes '
says, "Success
begins within.1
This is something 7
she takes to heart -
�nd it shows
mances.
in her track perfbr-
SEEUuw.PAan
TrWynTS
GAA tournament is calling you
Amanda Ross
G0tT. aV Mp0 W fttf nV?
ttiHinmwspommsirr,
KSHt.
AMANDA ROSS
SPOUTS KOITOK
I am making a plea to all you students at
ECU. This week is the biggest week in
Pirate basketball during the season for the
men and women, and your support is vital.
The Lady Pirates, seeded sixth, will
" take on third seeded Richmond tonight in
the Richmond Coliseum, in Richmond.
The Lady Pirates ended their regular sea-
son Sunday afternoon with a 62-41 victory.
They head into the tournament 6-10 in
CAAptay
Saturday night the ECU men's basket-
ball team, who are seeded third, will plsy
JMU, seeded sixth. This is the highest
seeding ever for the Pirates in the CAA
and they are looking for their first champi-
onship title since 1993.
ECU ended the regular season 9-7 in
conference play and will play the last of
four games Saturday night approximately
9:30 p.m. in the evening session.
Now how the tournament tickets are
done is as follows: here at the ECU ticket
office you can buy a block of tickets thai is
good for the entire tournament, men's and
women's for $60. But wait.
If you get your tickets at the Richmond
Coliseum you can buy them per session.
(Look at the tournament brackets chart to
see what games will be played during the
afternoon and evening sessions for the
men.)
Each session is $15 and that includes
both games for that session. Confused?
Don't be. It's simple. For $15 you get two
games. And you can attend any session you
wane But of course I know you will be at
the ECU game. Right? Of course, because
you're a Pirate foithful!
Now I am pleading my case as to why
you should be there. Richmond is only a
two and a half to three hour drive, depend-
ing on what route you take. This is the
first time in a long time spring break has-
n't fallen on the same weekend, so there is
no excuse why you can't make it up there
for Saturday's game.
The Pirates have provided exciting
games this season and the beat way to
repay them for their hard work during the
season b to support them with your cheers
and purple and gold attire.
Many of the CAA schools ate dose to
the championship site, with two schools
right in the city. What this means is that
most schools have a good tan turnout
because of the closeness to Richmond.
ECU is very much in contention for a CAA
title this season, and it arways helps a team
to hear the cheers of their fans. The
Richmond Coliseum has a large seating
capacity so the more the better.
Gather your friends and load up the ear
because you're going on a road trip for a
great weekend of CAA btafcc rball. See you
there!
M1�
Wtk
Uli
II
MEN'S CAA TOURNA-
MENT BRACKET
SATURDAY,
MARCH 1
4 Va. Commonwealth 19-7) jSadpu �2
run
.lb
11
noon
5 William 8 Mary (8-8)
3:30
FRIBAY,
FEB. 28
8 Richmond (7-9)
7 p.m.
9 George Mason (4-12!
1 Old Dominion (10-6)
2:30 p.m.
Winner G1
MONDAY,
MARCH 3
Championship
game 7 p.m.
2 UNC-Wilmington (10-6
Individual session tickets can be
bought at the Richmond Coliseum
for $15 per session. Each session
on Saturday includes two games,
with ECU playing the last game of
the evening session.
The ECU ticket office is also sell-
ing booklets of tickets for ail the
men's and women's game for $60,
which is good for the entire tour-
nament.
7 p.m.
7 American (7-9)
6 p.m.
3 East Carolina (9-7)
9:30 p.m.
6 James Madison (8-f)



a

a
a
a

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Summer study in Moscow
June 30 - July 25
in Enettfh
Open to all ECU students
.Credits transferable to ECU
'Exchange program with Moscow International University
Pay ECU tuition, fees, room, and board
Select two courses from the following:
1. Russian Art and Culture
2. Understanding Russian History
3. The Russian Economy in Transition
Moscow International University is one of the three private
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capitalism. You will be housed in it's new modern secure
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room, and board. Contact International Programs at 4
3284769 or Robert Schellenberger 3284347 B
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321-1521
Unlimited Movie
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49 cents per day!
Ambers
Computers
Color Copies
Fax, Scanning
Laminating
W
uSSBSaS
�Jcru are cordMy invited to store in the
S0t6 Anniversary Ce&Smtion
'East Carolina University
6yattendingtfie
Office of Cooperative 'Education
(Eym Q$6aise
Mmtfi4,1997
11:00 ajn. to 3:00p.m.
Suite2300
general Classroom (Building
EastCaroGna University
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T
?





10 Thursday. rsbrutry 27. 1997
spoils
The East Carolinian
Women's tennis team nets victories
j:Ll
MIKE DANISKA
SENIOR WKITF.H
The Lady Pirates' tennis team got
their feet wet in Charlotte this past
weekend, both figuratively and liter-
ally. In their first matches of the sea-
son, the women battled hard against
Davidson, UNC-Charlotte, UNC-
Asheville and Mother Nature.
While they started play outside,
the matches quickly had to be
moved indoors because of rain and
high winds.
"There is a big difference
between indoor and outdoor courts
sophomore Gina MacDonald said.
"Indoor courts are a lot softer, plus
we are used to practicing on hard
courts
Besides bad weather, the women
also faced playing without one of
their top players. Junior Rachael
Cohen, who normally plays number
two singles, was out with strep
throat.
"Going in, we were pretty excit-
ed junior Catherine Morgan said.
"But I think it would have been clos-
er if Rachael had played
The team lost to Davidson on
Friday, 7-0. The team's only victory
came in doubles when the number
one doubles combination of Mona
Eek and Anne Svae stopped their
Davidson counterparts, 8-6.
"Davidson had a strong team
MacDonald said.
They lost again on Saturday to
UNC-Charlotte, but this time it was
closer, as ECU came up on the short
end of a 5-2 score.
Weather played a factor as the
matches were delayed at the begin-
ning because of rain. The number
one single's seed, Svae aced her
opponent, 6-0, 6-0. Number three
seed Eek produced the only other
single's win with a 6-3, 6-1 triumph.
"It was really windy the whole
weekend Svae said. "But the
weather should not decide who
wins
The women managed to
rebound, however, later that after-
noon to knock off UNC-Asheville 5-
2.
Svae scorched her opponent for a
6-1, 6-1 win. Eek didn't have too
much trouble either as she moved
up to number two seed and blasted
her way to a 6-0, 6-1 victory. Fifth
seed Gina MacDonald and sixth
seed Corissa Cheek continued the
Pirates' impressive play by notching
wins 6-1, 6-2 and 6-0, 6-3, respec-
tively. All three double's teams were
able to put away UNC-Asheville
SEE TENNIS. PAGE II
SuperHoops rocks rec center
ZlNA BR1LEY
STAFF WHITE
It was a great weekend for our new
Student Recreation Center (SRC).
Appalachian State, Campbell, ECU,
The Citadel, Francis Marion, James
Madison, Virginia Tech and UNC-
Wilmington were names of only a few
of the colleges that competed in the
Schick SuperHoops 3-on-3 Basketball
Tournament this past Saturday.
Apparently the ECU men's bas-
ketball team weren't the only ones
with fency basketball skills on the
court this weekend. Teams from all
over the Atlantic Coastal Region
showed friends, family and the rest of
Greenville why they were the best in
3-on-3 competition. Festivitief start-
ed Friday evening at the SRC with the
basketball shooting challenge. There,
the competitors as well as non-com-
petitors, challenged each other for
prizes in three different events: the
hot shot, free throw and three point
shoot-out challenges.
These activities gave the athletes
a chance to warm up for Saturday's big
event and meet people from the other
colleges. Winners from these events
were Clifton Williams from FMU,
who won the hot shot competition;
Mike Rsrdinando from ECU finished
first in the free throw event;
Broderick Adams from Coastal
Carolina captured the top spot in the
three point competition and the
men's overall winner was Steve Perry
from Liberty.
On the women's side, Stephania
Barben from the University of Virginia
was the top three throw shooter.
Kristy Redman from UVA and Areece
Primus from CCU tied for first place
in the hot shot competition and the
overall winner for the ladies was
Brandi Durkac, also from UVA. Other
activities Friday were the slam dunk
contest and turbo hoops sponsored by
Baby Ruth.
Competition didn't stop there;
things pick up full speed early
Saturday morning. Right from the
start the games were very intense,
with each team trying to advance to
the finals. The ECU men's team of
Brandon Wingate, Matt Gullo, Pete
Harris and Grant McMasters repre-
SEE HOOK. PAGE II
Tips for Safe Spring Break:
Theft is high when we all go away.
Stop mail, turn on lights, secure your space!
Brought to you by Campus Ministries
and
Health Promotion and Well-Being
Student Government Association
The Following Positions are Available for the 1997-1998 School Year
o Student Body President
o Student Body Vice President
o Student Body Treasurer
o Student Body Secretary
You must have a 2.0 and be in good standing with 48 semester
hours completed 4 have 2 consecutive semesters at East Carolina
University.
Last day to file is March 7, 1997.
Apply in 225 Mendenhall Student Center.
NO &ASKBT&AU COURTS AT
HOUR APARTMENTS?
Pacfens Club Can Help!

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CALL: 757-0128
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Wendy'sMcDonald's
JB





Thursday, February 27, 1997
Tha East Carolinian
�.

AH istiibers will meet on
Tuesday, March 4th at 6:00
in Speight Auditorium in
the Jenkins Hne Arts Center.
Hoops
continued from page 10
sented ECU well, sailing through pool
play, but got knocked out in the first
round of the men's bracket.
Allison Kemp, Zina Briley, Lea
Jones and Darlene Boone made up
the women's team. These ladies
remained undefeated until they lost
to South Carolina State, 21-16.
The men's final four teams were
The Citadel, Campbell, Appalachian
State and JMU. The Citadel team of
George Hampton, Reggie Moore,
Damen Hall and Derrick Campbell
beat Campbell by two, 34-32 to meet
.Appalachian in the finals. The Citadel
team put up a good fight but fell to
Lady
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We'll even discount your Security deposit and
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continued from page 9
"Talent without desire is unpol-
ished and never to be refined
Johnson said.
That desire has earned her ECU
MVP honors for the last two seasons.
Johnson also holds both the indoor
and outdoor records for the long
jump. This season she would like to
improve on those records and her
personal goals include self-improve-
ment and to qualify for NCAA's in
the long jump.
"Amanda has taken another big
ASU (Shannon Hollar, Brad Apple,
Derek Rogers and Andy
Westmorland) 39-27
Rr the women's division, the final
four teams were FMU, South
Carolina State, ECU and JMU.
JMU kept it close, but in the end
fell to the aggressive FMU team. And
in the final, FMU looked to be the
sure winner, but the ever-determined
SCSU team of Sonya Wilson, Ingrid
Garvin, Anita Williams and Sharon
Jenkins battled back to win 28-26.
Winners received a Schick
SuperHoops jacket and sweatshirt,
along with a Microsoft NBA Game.
Outstanding officials this week-
end were Micah Johnson, Janell Davis
and Dawn Perry Nickens from
Fayettcville State University and
Greg Puccioni from UNC-Chapel
Hill.
step up as one of the top track ath-
letes in the country Head Coach
"Choo" Justice said. " I've been
proud of her performances these
past four years and we're going to
miss her next year
Johnson, and her jumping part-
ner Lave Wilson, (who has been
Johnson's positive influence), will
travel to New Hampshire for
ECAC's. There Johnson hopes to
qualify for NCAA's in the long jump,
a goal she just missed last year.
Johnson will continue to work
hard to prepare for the outdoor sea-
son, but when she's not working out
striving to meet her goals, she enjoys
eating and spending time with fami-
ly and friends, for whom she hopes to
have more time in the future.
Tennis
continued from page 10
with relative ease.
"Wfe beat UNC-Asheville pretty
easily Svae said.
While most teams might be con-
tent to play three times in two days,
the Lady Pirates journeyed on to
Burlington. There they encoun-
tered an Elon team that was ready
to play, but just could not get much
to go their way.
Senior Holly Gordon and
MacDonald paired up to squeak out
9-8 win in number two double's
play. Svae prevailed in her attempt
to capture a third single's victory, 6-
2, 6-3. The Lady Pirates dominated
Eton en route to an 8-1 victory.
"The doubles' matches were
really close against Elon Morgan
said. "It was a really good win for
us
With the first few matches of a
new season out of the way, the Lady
Pirates (2-2) are looking forward to a
bright season.
"I think Morgan said, "that we
have a really good chance at beating
teams we have not beaten in a
while, especially Old Dominion
Coach
continued from page 9
REMINDER-
There is a lot going on in the world of sports around ECU this weak-
end. The softball team will play a double header today at 2 p.m.
then take the field again tomorrow at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. as they
host the Round Robin Tourney. Saturday, the men's tennis team will
play at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the Minges courts, softball wili begin
at 11 a.m. and the baseball plays a double header at 2 p.m. On
Sunday the baseball team will play at 1 p.m.
Wilson Acres Apartments
752-0277
5 BLOCKS FROM
FAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY.
WITH BUS SERVICE
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ELTORO
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freshman talent on the team. She
has displayed her confidence in the
rookies by positioning several of
them at crucial spots on the field.
Doing an exceptional job at second
base is freshman Melissa Langer,
from Wappinger Falls, NY
"As a freshman walk-on, I was
willing to try any position Langer
said. "I am glad that Coach Kee has
confidence in me and has given me
the chance to play at second base
At this point in the season, the
girls are 4-5 overall after splitting a
doubleheader on Tuesday in a home
matchup against Campbell. ECU
won the first game 3-2 and handed
a 6-1 victory to the Lady Camels in
game two.
The Lady Pirates will be in
action today in a doubleheader
against Radford and then they will
host the Round Robin Tourney this
weekend beginning Friday against
UNCW at 1 p.m. and Eastern
Michigan at 3 p.m.
j
Hie UUTMAiT Spring Break Sale!
Pack your bags with savings!

50 OIF ALL SHOOTS!
30 OFF ALL SWEATSHIRTS!
90 OFF ALL T-SHIRTS!
Don't forset to check out the Apparel Sale Rack
with up to 75 OFF resular prices!
25 Off Books on Tape,
Travel Guides, and Fiction!
(includins Paperbacks!)
Pre-Sprins Break Sale runs 22497 - 3897. Offer not valid in conjunction with
any other discount, or on special orders.
Store Hours:
Monday - Friday:7:30 am - 7 pm
Saturday: 9am - 3 pm
Wright Building9 358-6731
In celebration of ECU 90th Anniversary, weve sot a special
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Check out the window displays February 24 - March 3rd by Merchandising Class students:
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and Kristin McPherson & Heather Lancaster.
'Ronald E. 'Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Student Scholars!
r





�H 1
Thursday. Fabruwy 27. 1997
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washer dryer
hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
fOOMMATE WANTED TO
HARE 2 bedroom duplex. Conveni-
ent to campus on Rotary Ave. Rent is
$180 12 utilities. Call 752-2217.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO share two bedroom condo in Wi
lowby Park private roombath tennis
courts, pool $300 rent plus 12 utilities
12 phone. Call 355-5201.
ROOMS AVAILABLE AT THE
Methodist Student Center for Sum-
mer School and the Hill Semester.
Please call 758-2030 for an applicarion.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
J�D: PLAYFSS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, u&c of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable:
PARK VILLAGE ADAMS BLVD:
one bedroom apts. range, refrigerator,
wd hookup. Free water and sewer.
ECU bus route. Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 3 bedroom house with 2 girls.
Rent 13 utilities, phone & cable.
Near campus in nice neighborhood.
Call Kim @ 758-2800 or 830-9036 after
6 pm.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE nice 2 or duplex in quiet
neighborhood. Close to campus. Rent
1230month plus 12 utilities. Gradu-
ate students preferred. Call 353-3909
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. fery Affordable.
WANTED: ROOMMATE TO
share townhouse. Access to swimming
pool and tennis court. Call 353-4294.
If not at home, please leave a mes-
sage.
95 FLEETWOOD EDGEWOOD
14 x 76 3 br2bath garden tub, dish-
washer, shed & fence. Payoff $17,500.
Located in Birchwood Sands Est
Greenville. Call (919)465-8711 or
(919)778-4207 owner.
APPLE SPLIT DESIGN ERGO-
NOMIC keyboard with palm rests.
Like new $50. Call 355-1497.
KAYAK FOR SALE. 19 dagger
tri-colored crossfire kayak. Has been
used only once in calm water. Includes
paddle and skirt. Asking $650. Is an
$1,100 value. Contact Robb at 754-
2637.
SNOW SKIS FOR SPRING break:
Why rent? 2 good pair K2 5500 with
bindings (Marker M36 & Salomon
647). $95 a pair. Exercise treadmill for
"JO. Call after 6 pm or weekends 756-
206a.
SURFBOARD 6'7" HIC LIKE
new excellent condition. Custom
shaped by Lynn Shell $250 obo. Call
758-8621
386 IBM COMPUTER WITH
color monitor. Includes windows 3.0
and MS works. Good computer for
school. Asking $350.00. Call 353-
7029.
1963 VW BUG VERY GOOD CON-
DITION 12V 1600CC NEW PAINT,
RUBBER INTERIOR BRAKES,
TIRES, MUFFLER, CARBURETOR
BATTERY WINDSHIELD $2500.00.
NORD 752-2644.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE ON Lewis
Street needs subteasers for summer!
Cute, soacious and close to campus!
Call 758-2154 - leave a message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: asap to share 2 br 1 12 bath
townhouse $225.00 monthly and 12
utilitiesphone on ECU bus route.
Call Laura at 756-7128.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
SUMMER large 5 bedroom house
completely furnished with only two
occupants washerdryer three blocks
from campusdowntown 757-9683 ask
for Heath.
THREE AND FOUR BED-
ROOM houses for rent within walk-
ing distance of ECU. Rents as low as
$400.00 a Month Fenced backyards,
washerdryer hookups, central heat,
one with central air. Must see to be-
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RINGGOLD TOWERS EFFI-
CIENCY APARTMENT available
for summer '97. Only $200month.
First month 12 off. Call 830-2968 for
details.
STUDIO APARTMENT AT
RINGGOLD Towers available for
sublease, $310month, fully furnished.
Call (919) 552-9293 or call Ringgold
Towers Mgmt. - 752-2865.
COZY COTTAGE NEAR HOS-
PITAL large one bedroom with gas &
elcc. heat. Hardwood and carpeted
floors, fireplace, chandeliers, on wood-
ed lot. Very nice, very quiet. $415.00
mo. Available Feb. 1st. Call 757-9387.
ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT. AVAILABLE immediately.
12 block from campus. Heat water &
utilities included. $325 monthly. Con-
tact Jamie at 413-0615. Perfect for
Student!
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. $775 mo.
One 2 bedroom apt. above BW3 - $500.
One 2 bedroom above Uppercrust
Bakery AVAILABLE now. (New car-
pet) for $475 mo. Luxury Apartments.
Will lease for May first with deposit
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY, talking distance
from campus and downtown. Large
room (15x15) Private phone linecable
in room. Washerdryer included. $175
per month utilities. Call Mike: 752-
2879.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen, and
living room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yards. Conveni-
ent to campus and the hospital.
$l,000mo deposit. 524-4111.
d assif ieds
-
The East Carolinian
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN), INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, & GOOD
PAY. FIND OUT HOW TO
START THE APPLICATION
PROCESS NOW! CRUISE EM-
PLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL
800-276-4948 EXT. C53629.
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
HEAD LIFEGUARD NEEDED.
EXPERIENCE necessary. Lifeguard
needed. Experience preferred. Seeja-
ninc Jones at the Greenville Country
Club.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH Parks
and Recreation Department is seeking
enthusiastic individuals for summer
employment. Positions include pool
managers, lifeguards, camp counselors,
nature, athletic, arts, therapeutic and
lake personnel. .EOE. Applications
available at 2401 Wade Avenue, Ra-
leigh, NC 27602 or call 890-3285.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
RIVER PARK NORTH, PARKAt-
tendant and Camp Counselor positions
available for summer employment. Ap-
ply at Greenville City Hall, Personnel
Department. For information call 830-
4562.
TEMPORARY JOBS AVAIL-
ABLE: BRODY'S is accepting ap-
plications for saleswarehouse posi-
tions. All hours needed up to 40 hours
per week. Great opportunity for those
without Spring Break plans! Ware-
house areas require some lifting. Apply
Wednesday - Friday, 2-4pm, Brody's
The Plaza.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED TO teach sum-
mer camps in NC & SC. Great pay!
Flexible scheduling! Free weekends!
College experience not required. For a
great summer job, CALL ESPRIT!
CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-3223!
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR TA-
HITI? OUR MATERIALS UN-
COVER NUMEROUS OPPOR-
TUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO:
1-800-807-5950 EXT.R53626
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
EARN $6,000 THIS SUMMER.
DYNAMIC COMPANY NOW IN-
TERVIEWINGHIRING AMBI-
TIOUS, ENTREPRENEURIAL
STUDENTS TO FILL SUM-
MER MANAGEMENT POSI-
TIONS IN YOUR HOME-
TOWN. FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION AND TO SCHEDULE AN -
INTERVIEW CALL TUITION
PAINTERS 1 (800) 393 - 4521 .
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, carl Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Manage-
ment at (770)992-7765.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing info
800-662-2122.
MALE AND FEMALE 10 - 20 hrs
weekly, afternoons and weekend. The
Big Splash Golf Range 758-1341.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
KINSTON INDIANS ARE CUR-
RENTLY looking for gameday staff
for the 1997 season (411-830). Posi-
tions available are: ushers, concessions
workers, ticket takers, waitstaff, and
vendors. Apply at Grainger Stadium
M-F from 9am-5pm.
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK
summer in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession
Workers. Earn good money while
working on the Beach! $$Salary plus
bonuses $$ Discounted Housing
lb apply or for further information, call
North Myrtle Beach Lifeguards at
(803)272-4170.
EXCITING SUMMER JOB
WITH housing, first come, cooks po-
sition now available. Kitty Hawk Pizza
at Kitty Hawk, NC
THE GREENVILLE RECREA-
TION & Parks Department is re-
cruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours ac-
cording to class schedules. This pro-
gram will run from the 17th of March
to the first of Mav. Salar rates start at
$4.75 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550.
I
CARTOONIST NEEDED TO
HELP design product label. Will ne-
gotiate pay with artist. Call Evan at
752-8837.
CAMP STAFF FOR GIRL'S resi-
dent camp - counselors, lifeguards,
backpacking, canoeing, climbing, na-
ture & crafts specialists, assistant
camp director, kitchen help, nurse &
business manager. June 4 - Jury 21
andor-July 27 - August 18, 1997: in-
cludes training. Lenior, NC. Call Deb
(704) 328-2444: (800)328-8388: or e-
mail at cvagsc@w3link.com.
SWIM COACHES. MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or maii resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC27U3.
SAPPARI JAPANESE STEAK-
HOUSE IS hiring part-time help. All
positions. If you want to make good
$$, Call 756-8241 and ask for Billy.
Wake 'n Bake for
Spring Break 199"
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest library of Information in U.S.
19.271 WHCS - Ml SUSJiCTS
On Catalog Tottywim Visa MO COD
800-3510222
Or, rush $2.00 to. Wimrth Assistant
11322 Ore Ave 206-RR Los Angass CA 90025
GET BETTERGRADES
Let The Wordsmiths edit your
term papers: $15 per hour
Phone: 321-7441
Pager (886) 233-7395
(PIN) 191-4267
OCEAN LIFEGUARD
asa
SUMMER JOB
"On the Beach in the Sun"
Meet lots of people. Compete in
running and swimming events here
and out of the area, stay in top
shape, get some great training, and
get paid doing it?
? Internships are available ?
Lifeguard Beech Service, Inc.
In Kill Devil Hill and Dare Co.
Is hiring motivated people
for ocean lifeguard posi-
tions. Bonus and incentive
pay. To request application
Call: 919-441-4200
P-lfall:bsr�ach & intemath.com
Leave your nama, addrass, and phone
Ocean Uaguaids & Oeaan Rescue since 1958
Member United States Uteeaving Association
WE'RE REALLY MOVING IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
We Need Timberland boot
and shoes! Good Jeans.
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVL GAP, ETC
Ws also buy. GOLD k SILVER � Jewelry 4c Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players - Home. Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door k ring buzzer.
�Jamaica
�Cancan �Dayton
�Padre
Call for Free
info Packet I 1-800-426-7710
CONGRATULATIONS CHRIS-
TIE ON YOUR Pi Kappa Phi lavali-
cr to Brian. We are so happy for you
guys! Love, Alpha Phi.
CHI OMEGA, THANKS FOR a
great time last Saturday at our roller
skating social. We had a blast, but we
are still recovering. Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon.
ALPHA DELTA PI, WE had a
blast traveling around the world with
you all last
Friday night, and we look forward to
the next time. Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
PI LAMBDA PHI: Friday night was
fabulous! Thank you for hosting our
pref night. We'll have to get together
again soon! Love, the sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta.
ALPHA PHI THANKS FOR Sat-
urday night! Everything worked out
fine. Congratulations sisters. We'll see
you again soon. Love, Theta Chi.
DELTA SIG. WE had a great time
at the pre-downtown last Thursday
night! Thanks! Love Alpha Delta Pi.
PI DELTA WILL BE holding an
open Rush on March 3rd at 7 pm. For
rides or more info, call Ami at 328-
3751.
THANKS TO THE GAMMA
Gammas for all your hard work plan-
ning sisters party. You guys did an awe-
some job! Love, Your big sisters and fa-
milies.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
THANKS FOR TAKING us all ar-
ound the world Friday night. We had a
blast! Love Alpha Delta Pi.
ALPHA DELTA PI GREAT job
on a winning week against Alpha Phi
and AOPi in last weeks intramurals.
Good luck on the next game! Love,
Your Alpha Delta Pi sisters.
THANKS TO ALL FRATERNI-
TIES who made our Sisters party a
.success. We hope everyone had as
much fun as we did. A special thanks
to Luke in OX. Love, the Gamma
Gammas of Alpha Phi!
PHI PSI: GREAT job on Kool Aid
97. Can't wait til next year! Love, Pi
Delta
ATTENTION ALL FRATERNI-
TIES AND sororities! Please re-
member to fill out your contestant
forms for singled out and return them
to the Alpha Phi house as soon as soon
as possible. Thanks! Alpha Phi
Spring Break'97
Panama City
Beach
from $129
7nigrits Beachfront
�Dairy Free Drink Parties
�Walk To Best Ban
�Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
i-SOO-234-7007
VMODfscAMEX
Spring Break '97
Jamaica $399
Cancun $3��
Bah- �f9
7. �ignts with Air,
Daily Free Drink Parties,
No Cover at Best Bars.
Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
S -800-234-7007
VMODiKAMEX
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach "Summit" luxury condos next to
Spinnaker. Owner discount rates
(404)355-9637.
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO
CALL LEISURE TOURS AND GET
FREE INFO FOR SPRING BREAK
PACKAGES TO SOUTH PADRE,
CANCUN, JAMAICA AND FLORI-
DA 1-80O-838-82O3.
AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING
BREAK! PANAMA City! room with
kitchen near bars $119! Daytona-Best
Location $139! Florida's new hotspot-
Cocoa Beach Hilton $169! springbrcak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK '97. PANAMA
CITY Boardwalk Beach Resort
$129 7nighrs beachfront, daily free
drink parties, walk to best bars
Group discounts Endless Summer
Tours 1-800-234-7007.
SPRING BREAK '97. CANCUN,
Jamaica, & Bahamas 7nights wair
from $399. Enjoy daily free drink par-
ties, no cover @ best bars, & group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-
800-234-7007.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
FREE HUSKYLAB PUPPIES
TO loving homes only. Call 946-6346
and leave message please.
INTERVIEW DURING SPRING
BREAK! American crafts gallery
seeks bright, mature students for sum-
mer sales positions. Photo and resume:
PO Box 1036, Kill Devil Hills, NC
27948 or call 919-441-6235.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities, soror-
ities & groups. Any campus organiza-
tion can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping 85.00ATSA application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified call-
ers receive Free T-Shirt.
"NEW TREATMENTS FOR DI-
ABETES" March 3, 1997. Free pro-
gram sponsored by Pitt Co. Chapter
American Diabetes Association. Ga-
skin-Leslie Center next to Pitt Co.
Memorial Mospital @ 7 pm. For more
info call 816-5136 8-4 pm Mon-Fri or 1-
800-682-9692.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES - this program will in-
clude information on assistance to
graduating students who are seeking
full-time career positions. There will
be instruction on setting up a creden-
tials file, procedures for campus inter-
views, and registering with Career
Services. It will be held on Wed. Feb.
26 at 10:00 am and Mon. March 3 at
2:00.
AM A SOCIAL: THE AMERI
CAN Marketing Association is having
its first social of the semester at the
Sports Pad, Feb. 27 from 9-11. Come
out and mingle. You'll be surprised
what we're doing
OUR NEXT MEETING WILL be
held on Monday, March 3rd at 5:15pm
in Ragsdale room 130. The society has
a variety of activities and guest at each
meeting. Open To All Majors
REGISTER FOR ADULT TEN-
NIS lessons: come register for adult
tennis lessons March 3-20 in the SRC
main office from 9:00am 6:00pm.
THE GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics will be
conducting an Athletics (Track &
Field) Coaches Training School on Sat-
urday, February 1st from 9am - 4pm for .
ali individuals interested in volunteer- ;
ing to coach Track & Field. We are also
looking for volunteer coaches in the
following sports: Swimming, Bowling, .
Gymnastics, Rollerskating, Powerlift-
ing, Volleyball, and Equestrian. No ex-
perience is necessary. For more infor- '
mation please contact Dwain Cooper
at 830-4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
THE CAR CAMPER CHEF:
come to the car camper chef workshop
on March 4 from 7:00-8:30pm in the
SRC. Be sure to register by Friday, Feb.
28 at 6:00pm in the SRC main office.
THE NATIONAL PANHELLE-
NIC COUNCIL will be sponsoring a
blood drive at the Mendenhall Student
Center on Thursday, February 27,1997
from 12:00 noon - 6:00 pm. Please
come out and support. You can save a
life.
AEROBIC REGISTRATION:
SIGN up for aerobics March 3-28 bet-
ween the hours of 9:00am and 6:00pm
in the SRC main office.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS MEET-
ING: come join us at the Softball of-
ficials meeting on March 5 at 5:00pm
in the SRC classroom.
GENERAL COLLEGE STUD-
ENTS SHOULD contact their ad
visers the week of March 24-27 to
make arrangements for academic advis-
ing for Summer Session and Fall Se-
mester 1997. Early registration week is!
set for March 31 - April 4
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SOROR
ITY, Inc. invires all interested ladies
to attend formal Rush 1997. Requii
documents for ladies interested
membership include: Official
script in a sealed enveloped and a
ter of interest. When: March 3, 1997.
Place: MSC. Time: 7:00 pm.
SAM WILL BE CONDUCTING
actual essay question practice tests for
theGMAT. Everyone who participates
will receive $15. If you are interested.
Contact Mr. Childers in GCB 3015.
The test will be Thursday 27 at 4:00
pm.
PRIORITY�REGISTRATION
FOR LIFEGUARD training: If
you're planning to be that "Baywatch"
lifeguard, then be sure to register for
lifeguard training from 8:00am -
6:00pm Feb. 26 - Mar. 5 in the SRC
main office.
TUES FEB. 25 - Guest Recital,
Elaine Funaro, harpsichord, AJ Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 8:00 pm Wed Feb. 26
- Symphonic Band and Concert Band,
Christopher Knighten, Conductor,
Wright Auditorium, 8:00 pm Thurs
Feb. 27 - Graduate Recital, David Di-
Muro, percussion, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 pm. Fri Feb. 28 - Guest Re-
cital, Ciompi String Quartet, AJ
Petcher Recital Hall, 2:30 pm. Fri
Feb. 28 - Junior Recital, Raymond J. Al-
dredge III, percussion, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7:00 pm Fri Feb. 28 - Jazz
At Night, Carroll V Dashiell Jr Direc-
tor, The Great Room, Mendenhall
Student Center, 8:00 pm Fri Feb. 28 -
Graduate Recital, Paul Dease, choral
conducting, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
9:00 pm Sat March 1 - Senior Recital,
Krister. Martin, voice, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7:00 pm Sat March 1 - Ju-
nior Recital, Gary Ryan O'Neal Jr
flute, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm
Sun March 2 - East Carolina Sympho-
ny Orchestra, Stephen Blackwclder,
Conductor, Wright Auditorium, 3:00
pm Sun March 2 - Guest Recital, "Vi-
demus Vivian Taylor, piano, Robert
Honeysucker, baritone, Ruth Hamil-
ton, contralto, Stan Strickland, saxo-
phone with faculty Louise Toppin, so-
prano, ECU Steel Drum Ensemble,
Mark Ford, Director, AJ Fletcher Reci-
tal Hall, 8:00 pm Mon March 3 - Sym-
phonic Wind Ensemble, Scott Carter,
Conductor, Wright Auditorium, 8:00
pm Tues March 4 - Faculty Recital,
"Chamber Music of Walter S. Hartley:
A 70th Birthday Musical Celebration
Mark Taggart, Director, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm Wed March 5 -
Senior Recital, Michael Murphy, voice,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm
Wed March 5 - Junior Recital, Chris-
topher Walter Ellis, violin, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 9:00 pm Thurs March 6
- Graduate Reciral. Mark fticoc. organ,
Douglas Blackwood, organ First Presby-
terian Church. 1400 South Elm Street,
Greenville, 7:00 pm. For additional in-
formation, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370.


Title
The East Carolinian, February 27, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 27, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1192
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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