The East Carolinian, February 20, 1997







Trail of student money leads downtown
Students tell 7ECwhat
makes saving money a
challenge
amena Hassan
ORIENTATIONGENERAL COLLEtiE ISSUES
STAEF WRITER
Financial planning may not be a general col-
lege requirement, but all students face bud-
geting decisions.
A majority of students, especially those
who live off campus, find their money going
toward gas food and bills. Beyond the basks,
many students spend their extra cash on
entertainment, such as going downtown.
"I like to go downtown says Thomas
Biermann. "It can get expensive, but it
depends on what night you go there, like it's
cheaper during the week. Usually the owners
jack the price up 'when they know the stu-
dents are coming
Biermann is not alone. Gret Sutton said
that while she tries to save money where she
can, she spends a sizable amount on entertain-
ment downtown aba
"Going downtown is what I mostly spend
my cash on Greta Sutton said. "I occasional-
ly go out and see a movie, but I have all the
channels at home, so I usually don't have to.
It's pretty much the same for me and the
friends that I go out with: whatever amount
we take out never comes back with us
Some students who prefer to spend their
extra money downtown say alcohol is not nec-
essarily what they purchase.
"Usually I head downtown and spend my
money, not on beer, though student Eric
White said.
A large part of a student's budget is also
taken up by food and entertainment.
"I enjoy going out on the weekends
Jessica Basillo said. "But I find that after stay-
ing a whole semester on campus, money starts
running out fast
"Mostly, it's on junk food in my dorm,
downstairs Tywanna Miller said. "What is
really ridiculous, though, is laundry�fifty
cents a drum! I know they've got my money
because I wash my clothes every week
"We get a designated driver, go to Denny's
and eat scrambled eggs at 3 o'clock in the
morning Amber Tatum said.
Despite the expenses of food, a few stu-
dents are prudent about how they eat, thus
cutting a lot of extraneous spending.
"During lunchtime, I like to spend only a
dollar and drink water with my meal Cynthia
Jaggernauth said. "So many people spend
money on the combos and find they're spend-
ing $4 every time they eat lunch; that's unnec-
essary"
Extra cash is not even an option for those
who find it hard to cover necessities and find
time for fun.
"I have none, and I would save the money
if it didn't evaporate to somewhere I couldn't
find it student Stevon Johnson said.
"I'm broke, but I like to get late night
food student Eyup Karca said.
"All my cash goes towards my truck pay-
ments Tina Acree stated. "I'm a real tight
wad. It's hard to have extra cash when you're
in college
Spending money on clothes also accounts
for a large part of where students find ways to
use extra money.
"My money goes to anything that's in my
wardrobe that doesn't need to be added stu-
dent Meredith Mansolillo said.
"After I've paid the bills I turn into a shop-
ping freak and really go out to spend some mad
cash, "student Brook Lewis said.
"I'm always at the mall and am a very
impulsive shopper student Tonya D'more
said. "It's constant, all year round. My size is
very easy to find
"Clothes at the mall are my thing student
Sabrina Hart said. "The desire to shop comes
in spurts and I go the way the trends go
Music is also a source of spending.
"I guess a lot of money goes towards
CD's student Meredith Nobles said.
"Probably also gas more than food, because I
commute jchree hours every day
"I spend it on records, CD's and phone
calls student Aaron Chrietzberg said.
Another student, Chris Cardelli said, "My
money probably goes toward CD's. At least
you know you're listening to it and not drink-
ing it
ousekeepers'meeting discuss-
es policy, on-going concerns
OIlyTaSSITER
staff and faculty issues
staff writer
Editor's No Setmxt Thadty's t&ionforcom-
plete coveragr ef Mmmamy's matmg vith tit ECU
The conflict between the ECU Housekeepers
Association and particular university policies
resumed yesterday at 4 p.m. in the Willis
Building Auditorium.
Chancellor Richard EaWnimandated a com-
munity meeting which was requested by the
ECU Housekeepers Association. Much antici-
pation has developed since the announcement
of this essential and overdue confrontation.
Eakin asked two human relations officers,
Greg Miller and Lemar Bell, to meet with
housekeepers and compile a series of distur-
bances to be discussed before the meeting.
The outcome was a. total of 14 meetings and a
number of complaints including lack of promo-
tions to deserving black employees, not fur-
nishing sufficient supplies and charges of racial
discrimination.
Irene Daniels, a temporary housekeeper at
Fleming Residence Hall, discovered that she
was unemployed Jan. 24, 1997, after only one
yearThe reason for this misfortune is due to a
state personnel policy which limits temporary
employees from working in the same position
for more than one year.
Because of this limitation, the university
had no choice. Individuals requested that the
university rehire Ms. Daniels the following
Tuesday by reading a one-page letter to Eakin.
University employers explained that this deci-
sion had ablsoutery nothing to do with Ms.
Daniels' actions or performances. They fol-
lowed state regulations which sadly ended a
job just begun.
"It works like this: The employee is told
when they first start that they arc allowed 12
consecutive months. In the 11th month, they
are reminded of the date of their dismissal
Employee Manager Jim Mullen said
"Tlsey have to stay out for 30 days but can
reappty after this time Mullen said. They
can also work somewhere else during these 30
days
Daniels argues that she was promised a per-
manent position when she was hired and
believes she was fired because of her atten-
dance at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
march. She � now in search of a new job.
This is not the first complaint for the
housekeepers. In the Thursday, Jan. 23, 1997
issue of TEC, we were informed that ECU
housekeepers joined a rally against the privati-
zation of university housekeeping in April
19 because of racial slurs against housekeep-
ers. We are also told that members of the
Housekeepers Association, Coalition Agiinst
Racism (CAR) and other activist groups
marched ECU to protest their issues and
rights.
Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs Richard
Brown told TEC, "We have always supported
our staff; we support and give respect on the
job and we are doing everything in our power
to fix the problems.
Eakin set up this meeting to allow the
housekeepers to express themselves and share
group concerns. Problems and suggestions
were discussed and a middle ground is waiting
to be formed.
Charges against professor dropped
STAFF REPORTS
Charges were dropped last Monday against an
ECU professor arrested in connection with a
December sting operation targeting homosex-
ual activity in Green Springs Park.
The District Attorney's office dismissed a
solicitation to commit crimes against nature
charge against Herbert Hudgins, a professor in
the ECU education department.
The warrant stated Hudgins exposed him-
self and asked an undercover detective to per-
form a sexual favor on him for 17 on Dec. 17.
Kimberty Moore, assistant district attorney,
said the alleged incident is not a crime against
nature according to state law. Moore also said
lifestyle 6
Gray Gallery hosts
photo am)
digital exhibit
opinion5
Support those
Pirates
sportt8
Softball tees off to
that a woman would have to have seen the act
for it to merit an indecent exposure charge.
ECU's Director of Public Affairs said
Hudgins's employment status was not affect-
ed by the charge.
The sting operation developed after the
Greenville Police Department received
numerous complaints from citizens about ille-
gal activities occurring at the park. Citizens
were concerned about children being exposed
to such acts because the park is located near
several schools in the area.
The sting operation lasted through Dec
and resulted in the arrest of 17 people.
The Greenville police plan to continue
monitoring the park to prevent further activi-
ties.
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The Underwater Cafe is just one of the several businesses that benefits from students' money
PHOTO BY PATRICE IREIA
Lines form, tempers flare at Rec Center
Becky alley
HOCSING AND CONSI'M.VTORY 1SS1IRS
STAFF WRITER
After semesters of anticipation, ECU students
and faculty pour into the new student recre-
ation center everyday, but some people are
abusing the facility.
Nance Mize, director of recreational ser-
vices, said the majority of users obey the few
raies that have been set, but there are a few
people who are causing problems for the staff
and users.
"We don't want to 'police' the users to
catch the violators, but we don't want other
users to be continually disadvantaged by them
either Mize said.
Most of the problems have been reported
to the student staff instead of the profession-
al administration, which has delayed any cor-
rective action being taken, lb correct this,
suggestion boxes dubbed chatter boxes�
will be placed in both locker rooms by the end
of February.
Mize said the worst abuse is that some stu-
dents and guests are entering the facility
incorrectly. She said some of them do not
want to wait in the line to have their I.D. or
pass checked so they illegally enter through
the exit gates.
- "A long term solution to this problem is to
replace the gates with one way turnstiles
Mize said Another solution is to place a staff
member at the exit gates to monitor these
actions
Other problems
the Rec Center staff
is concentrating on
deal with basic gym
etiquette. These
problems range from
obeying 30 minute
time limits on popu-
lar equipment to
replacing weights on
the correct racks.
The staff has
already taken some
action to ensure fair
usage of the track
and treadmills. The
track now has signs
designating the
inside lanes for run-
ners and outside
lanes for walkers.
Also, they have creat-
ed sign-up sheers for
the treadmills.
These sheets enable
users to sign up two
hours in advance and
guarantee them they
will be able to use
the treadmill at that specified time for up to
30 minutes.
Mize also noted that some of the users are
carrying food and drink outside the concourse
area.
"Everyone should know that only water in
sealable containers is allowed in the rest of the
facility Mize said.
Dealing with gym etiquette is just one of the tasks at hand for newly appointed
Rec Center staff members.
PHOTO BY PATRICK IRtlAR
Though there have been a few negative
comments. However, Mize said that by far the
majority have been very positive.
"We look forward to getting lots of sugges-
tions out of our chatter boxes and hope to
respond to them quickly Mize said.
ft ft
rii
DTTeTS
All invited to African-American Literature Reading
Night
The ECU community is encouraged to come out and support stu-
dents and faculty in the reading of African-American poetry as the
English Department and ECU Thespians of Diversity sponsor a night
of cultural enlightenment. Any student or faculty member can read
from their favorite African-American author (novel, short story, piay,
poem, speech, letter, etc.) between one to five minutes.
The program is scheduled for Mon Feb. 24, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
in Room 1031 of the General Classroom Building.
Students and faculty members who are interested in participating
as readers should call Dr. Seodial Deena at 328-6683 or Reginald
Watson at 328-6684.
Fundraiser to benefit pediatric oncology programs
A local steakhouse is teaming up with the ECU School of Medicine
class of 200 for a charity luncheon on Mon Feb. 24, to benefit
Pediatric Oncology Ranbow Services of the University Medical
Center.
Outback Steakhouse, which usually doesn't serve lunch, will open
its doors from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m on Monday for members of the
class to host the fundraiser. For a $10 donation, a diner will receive a
salad, potato or vegetable medley, Alice Springs Chicken or 8 oz. rib-
eye, and a beverage served by a class member.
Proceeds will benefit the Pediatric Oncology Rainbow Services
program, which provides recreational and supportive services for chil-
dren with cancer, sickle cell disease and hemophelia. Funds will also
be donated to the Cancer Buddy volunteer program, which was start-
ed two years ago by a member of the Class of 2000.
Take-out and limited delivery options will also be available. For
more information, call the Pediatric Oncology Clinic at 816-4905.
NPHC urges African-American students to give blood
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATrOU BIOG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner Horary
'
Shone
286366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uut8cSecuvm.cis.8Cj.edu
ANGELA KOENIG
HEALTHENVIRONMENTAL ISSl'F.S
STAM WRITER
The National Pan Hellenic Council
(NPHC) is sponsoring a blood drive on
Thursday, Feb. 27 in to encourage African-
Americans to donate blood.
"There is a need for more African-
Americans to give blood because there is a
shortage of African-American blood
Candace Turner, president of the NPHC and
a member of Zeta Phi Beta sorority, said.
"We arc trying to get more people to
donate
"We are sponsoring this in reference to
Black History Month also Turner said.
The blood drive is not only open to
African-American students. All ECU stu-
dents are encouraged to donate because rhe
number of donations has decreased iately.
"Our goal at ECU) is 150 units of blood
and we have not been collecting our goal
lately said a donor recruitment representa-
tive for the American Red Cross Debbie
Page. "Students aren't coming out like they
used to
Because volunreer donations are the only
way to keep an adequate blood supply for
the community, it is important that people
donate.
The American Red Cross reports that 600
to 700 pints of biood must be collected each
day from the Mid-Atlantic Region to ensure
that an adequate supply is available for the
community.
Page said one reason the goal is not being
met at ECU may be because of the growing
number of body piercings and tattoos.
People cannot donate for one year after hav-
ing this done.
The American Red Cross reports that one
donation of blood may help three or four
people. Every 12 seconds someone needs
blood.
Volunteers may donate every 56 days, and
the process to donate takes less than an hour.
Within 24 hours of donating, the body com-
pletely replaces the fluid lost.
The blood drive will be held from 12 until
6 p.m.at Mendenhall Student Center.
TheAmerican Red Cross holds blood dri-
ves at ECU every month from September
through April.
Collectively sponsoring the blood drive
are Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Rho,
Kappa Alpha Psi, Sigma Gamma Rho, Phi
Beta Sigma and Zeta Phi Beta.





2 Thursday, February 20. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Employment honor goes to local business
Supremacist literature found in Burmeister barracks,
sergeant testifies
FAYETTEV1LLE (AP) - An Army sergeant testified today he (bund white
supremacist literature and paraphernalia in the barracks of a former paratroop-
er charged with killing two black residents.
fort Bragg Sgt. Douglas Probasco, who searched James Burmeister's barracks
room after his arrest in connection with the killings, said he also found among
his personal effects Nazi svmbols scrawled on a plastic cup.
Burmeister, of Thompson, Pa is charged with first-degree murder in the
deaths of Michael James. 36, and Jackie Burden, 22, on Dec. 7, 1995.
Cumberland County prosecutors contend Burmeister committed the murders
out of racial hatred prompted by his extremist beliefs.
Prosecutors' testimony earlier in the trial also claims that Burmeister held
those beliefs and was a white supremacist. Burmeister's defense lawyers con-
tend that the testimony about racist beliefs is irrelevant and that no one knows
who committed the killings.
across the n a 1 i n n
Father almitf killing children in religious upbringing
dispute
NEWARK, NJ. (AP) - In a surprise admission on the day his murder trial was
to begin, a man sobbed as he told the judge how he strangled his 12-year-old
daughter and killed his 10-year-old son during a custody battle over their reli-
gious upbringing.
"I held my hands around her neck for about five minutes with my face
pressed to hers Avi Kostner said Tuesday in court. "I cried 'Please forgive
me. Please God forgive me
Kostner said he drugged the children and put them in the back of a car. He
killed the girl after she awoke but said couldn't bring himself to strangle the boy,
so he gave him more of a tranquilizer. He also used a hose to fill the car with its
exhaust fumes.
Kostner, a taxi driver and part-time Hebrew teacher, surprised even his own
lawyer when he suddenly asked to address the court after the judge had sent
the newly selected jurors to lunch. He then pleaded guilty and confessed to the
killings, which came during a battle over custody and whether the children
would be raised as Jews.
EMPI.OVMF.NT HONOR I.OF.S TO LOCAL Bl'SlNESS
JOB SERVICE NEWS RELEASE
Grecnville-ASMO Greenville of North Carolina, Inc. in Greenville was the
recipient of the 19 Job Service Employer Award, the award is in recog-
nition of ASMO's positive contribution to the local economy and for work-
ing closely with a local Job Service Office. The award was presented on
January 29, 1997 by J. Parker Chesson Jr chairman of the Employment
Security Commission of North Carolina (ESC) during a noon luncheon in
Raleigh.
ASMO is one of a record 101 employers who received the award spon-
sored by the Employment Security Commission. Companies are nominat-
ed locally in one of three categories; new business, expanding business and
the partnership award. The new and expanding business categories recog-
nizes firms which have a positive impact and use their local Job Service
office to fill openings created by a new or expanding business. The part-
nership award is a category designed to recognize employers who have
worked consistently with Job Service over the years to make a positive
impact on the local economy.
The winning employers are also recognized for their participation in
local Job Service Employer Committee (JSEC) activities.
This is the first time ASMO has won the award.
Students attend Disney's
15th annual recruiting tour
ASMO Greenville of North Carolina Inc. recieves the 1996 Job Service Employer
Award. Pictured from left: Lebern Rouse, manager. Job Service Center; ECS Chairman
J. parker Chesson; and Michele Ouellette of ASMO.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ASMO
Albright to offer Russia reductions in NATO weapons
ceilings
LONDON (AP) - Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is taking a proposal for
reductions in NATO weapons ceilings to Moscow on Thursday in an effort to
case Russia's concerns with the projected eastward expansion of the military
alliance.
Albright stopped here today to discuss a range of concessions with Bntish
Prime Minister John Major, Defense Minister Michael Portillo and Foreign
Minister Malcolm Rifkind.
The aim is to placate Russia with assurances that NATO is not the same
alliance that confronted the Soviet Union during the Cold Wir. On her trip to
Europe this week she has dismissed such fears as "old think
EMILY LITTLE
SPECIAL BOIMNCI ISSI'ES
STAFF WRITER
More than 100 students waited in
the Mendenhall basement Monday
evening to hear what Disney World
had to offer.
The corporation just blew
through Greenville on its 15th annu-
al recruiting tour to find applicants
for the Disney World college pro-
gram.
Qualifications are at least a 2.0
GPA and no plans for the summer
to work at Epcot Center, Universal
Studios or Disney World itself.
Entry-level postions, starting at
$5.60 an hour, are food and beverage
service, life-guarding, transportation,
park greeting, attractions, recre-
ation, merchandise, custodial work
or housekeeping. Hospitality posi-
tions are available to majors in the
field and reservation sales agent
positions open in the spring.
It may not sound like a job befit-
ting the glamorous Magic Kingdom,
but the program definitely has its
perks. In addition to the amazing
effect the words "Disney World"
have on a resume, participants
receive free entry into a Disney park
at any time and a 20 percent dis-
count in and around anything
Disney. The 15 ECU students who
have participated in the program
before had nothing but positive
feedback and a desire to return to
Orlando.
Tuesday, interested students
went into General Classroom suite
2300, three at a time, to interview
for the job. They faced only the cri-
teria that they be the best available,
competing with students from 180
other universities.
The chosen few will go on to
spend a summer or fall living in
Vista Way, the Disney apartments,
with either five roommates or three
from all over the globe and rent
deducted from their paychecks.
They will take classes on the histo-
ry of Disney and topics related to
their particular fields, in addition to
putting together a portfolio and
updated resume.
Kristi Breen, who began her
career with the company in the food
and beverage division of the college
program, headed the recruitment.
"You're probably not going to be
a merchandise hostess for all your
life Breen said. "But this is a great
foot in the door
Students must attend a presen-
tation to get in on the opportunity,
so if you missed this one, find the
next closest stop on the tour or wait
until the fall when it comes around
again for spring recruiting.
WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE
DC COMICS AND MORE!
NOSTALGIA
NEWSSTAND
The Comic Book
Store
919 Dickinson Ave.
758-6909
TM DC Comics 10 '994
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St ftftft . Hours:
Pittman Building '7UUWJ Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
Rarely has a culture been more obsessed with
than our society
STOP and consider: what are the results?
Assorted Varieties
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Snack Cakes
8-13.5-oz.
Buy One - Get One
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Kroger
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Squares
Find out by viewing
Indecent Exposure
a spectacular, multi-media presentation
examining love, sex, and dating in the 90's.
Wednesday, Feb. 19th o Thursday, Feb. 20th
GCB 1030 GCB 1028
7:00pm 7:00pm
New L i f
Christian F.es
o w s
1 P





3 Thursday, February 20. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Open 7 days a w��k - M-Sat 9am - 2am - Sun 12-2
�Tuesday: Dollar Day
All day and Night
�Wednesday: Ladies Night
Ladies Play All day Free
�Everyday: 32oz. Bud draft $2.25
�Barmaidi Wanted
phone 752-6726
Sunday 9-BaM Tournament 4pm
Notes from the Editor.
Due to an announcement in
Tuesday V edkkR of T��, sotae
waders may be expecting to see cw-
eragc of The Ledoraa WHght
Afrkan-American Student Cotter's
propam: "AfrkanrAmeficw Men
and Women; Crtship Marriage and
fenfly This program took place
after fast rant's production houir, so
our coverage will not jJPP6 ontS
next luesday's edition. wipofegjaK?
ror any inconveniences thb may have
cawed.
Answers to Tuesday's Black
History Thvia areas follows:
February I7,1942:Hack ftnther
founder Huey Newton born;
rebrusry 18: Gambia Independence
Dtty, rebtuary 19, mWEBDubois
organizes fast Pan- African Congress;
ftbruary 20, m& Rckering
organizes first PWAfhlcan Corjress;
February 20, 1927: aewr Sidney
FtOTicr bom; Februsrj 21, 1804
Lemuel Haynes receives honorary
degree from MiddJebury College;
fisbruary, 21,1965: MatecimXassas-
Were Your Apartments Built In
THE STONE AGE?
Players Club Can Help!
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC 27858
Rank Yourself
to 10 In
visibility?
Commitment?
Creativity?
Imagination?
Open Mindedness?
If you scoredtttglt and like being part of a team, pick
up an application for the position of Gtiatrllect for
ECU'S 1997 Homecoming Committee and Chair for
the 1998 Homecoming Committee. Only students who
are currently freshman or sophomore status should apply.
Applications are available at the Mendenhal! Student Center information desk
or MSC - 210. Application deadline is Friday, February 21,1997 at 4pm.
For more information contact J.Marshall, Assistant Director of Student Activities,
MSC-210, or call 328-4711.
February 11
February 14
Damage to property - A resident of White Hall
reported that the passenger window on his vehicle was
broken. His vehicle was parked in the Rcade Street
parking lot.
AssistRescue - A student was transported to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital by Greenville Rescue after
she fainted in the Fletcher Music building.
Damage to property - A resident of Belk Hall report-
ed that the driver side window on his vehicle was bro-
ken.
Larceny - A staff member reported finding the coin
machine from the laundry room in Slay Hall on the ele-
vator. No attempted entry into the coin machine was
evident.
Damage to property - A student reported damage to
the tire on her vehicle. The vehicle was parked north of
White Hall.
Larceny - A staff member reported the larceny of her
purse from her office in the Rawl Building
February 12
February 17
AssistRescue - A student was transported to the hos-
pital by Greenville Rescue after having seizures in the
General Classroom Building.
Disruptive Behavior - A student was banned from
traveling on the SGA buses after he displayed disruptive
behavior toward the SGA transit bus driver.
Larceny - A staff member reported the larceny of a
wooden chair from the lobby of Garrett Hall. The larce-
ny occurred between 103196 and 1120.
Damage to property - A staff member reported that
paint was scraped off his vehicle while it was parked east
of Fletcher Hall. The incident occurred between 2497
and 2597.
February 13
Worthless check - A student was served a criminal
summons at the Police Department for writing a worth-
less check.
Possession of weapon and drugs - A student of Jones
Hall was issued a state citation for possessing an ASP
tactical baton, marijuana and a pipe in his room.
AssistRescue - A student was transported from Tyler
Hall to the hospital by Greenville Rescue after she
became sick.
February 18
Damage to property - A student reported her vehicle
was scratched while parked in the upper Mingcs lot.
Controlled substance violation - A student of Belk
Hall was issued a state citation for possession of mari-
juana and drug paraphernalia in his room.
Larceny - A non-student was arrested near the Child
Adolescent Trailer at the School of Medicine. He was
found pushing a wheelchair which had a VCR in it.
for I month
mmem
$5 Discount
to students
With ID
SPRING BREAK-
DOITT SWEAT IT
Brown & Brown
ATTORN KVS VI LAW
TYuth,Equality,Justice
123 W,3"�ST
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
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Take advantMte of
Student dUcomito
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Door Open: 7:30 p.m. A Toucfi Of Class"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 7ft.B27ft
RSSBSH TUESDAY: Lingerie Night �
H- WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and Silver
P9EHB3e� Ballet Dancers �
Tm THURSDAY: Country & Western Night
I� FRL&SAT: Silver BuOet Exotic Dancers
10 OR MORE GIRL
DANCERS EVERY
"SfykT NIGHT!
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4 Thursday. Fabruary 20. 1997
opinion
Tht East Carolinian
eastffarolinian
BRANDON WADDELL Editor
MATT HEGE WotrtismgOtrecior
MAROl RR1TF. BENJAMIN News Editor
AMY L ROVSTER Assistant News Ediior
Jay Myers lifastyta Erttw
DALE WILLIAMSON Antmit LilnrrMEdiin
AMANDA ROSS Spons Echtor
Patrick Irelan PtnroEditor
Celeste Wilson Ptoductmn Mwtg
Carole Mehle HaadlajajEditor
ANDY FARKAS Staff Illustrator
Heather bcrgess Win Editor
Sarnni a ECU aaaaaj �co �a �a Eaat Cani�a� aabtoHat 12 000 osa �rr hntri on Itwrtr. Tm hJ aanarial in ncti iton a it
oaowii of it Esiwnii Boonl. 11 Em Carohman wttaxaas nan n it editor. aaal at SO wan, ajtncti nwr f erhrvd lor dacaacy or brevity Tt Em
Ca'alaion lasanas it fajtst to aan or nct ajtan for aaaktataat. M ntiats mot at tajnad. Latwi ahoaaj bo adonsaad 13 Damon aafat tot coat
Caratwwan. iMIajaa BuMint. ECU. Gntnviao. 2785M353. Fv mhtowtion. tal 9t9.32S.B366.
oumew
Calling all Pirates!
This is your last chance of the season to support your basketball teams this season at Minges.
The men will be playing their last home game against in-state rival UNC-Wilmington Saturday
night, while the women will host Virginia Commonwealth Sunday afternoon.
Fbr the men, it wilt be the last time Tim Basham, Don Douglas, Morris Grooms and Jonathan
Kerner will play in Minges. But fbr Kerner the season is already over, due to a fracture in his left
hand.The status of Basham, who is said to be out with the flu, is uncertain.
But nonetheless, everyone should make every effort to go and support the Pirates who have
provided an exciting season fbr fans. Attendance has been low from the students, and there is no
excuse. This team puts every effort into winning each and every game and what a great way for
them to end their careers at ECU than to have a packed house with a bunch of crazy fans.
Sunday will be the last time Justine Allpress, Tracey Kelley and Laurie Ashenfelder take the
court for the Lady Pirates and it is vital they have fan support for a victory. The Lady Pirates have
provided some exciting moments this season including scoring over 100 points in a game.
These student-athletes work twice as hard as everyone else since they must juggle academics,
practice and traveling to away games. The least we can do as students is to support our athletes
who have brought recognition to ECU all season.
We at TEC know how much these athletes would love to see a coliseum full of cheering, crazy
fans. We'll be there. Will you be able to say the same thing? We hope so.
Both teams will be bidding for the conference championship titles next week in Richmond at
the CM tournament. It is vital that we send our teams off with a bang, and send them up to the
tournament with home wins.
And if you don't think fans play a role in a team's victory, you're wrong. The adrenaline starts
pumping when you have fans cheering and jarring the visiting team and it is a huge motivation-
al factor for the players. Besides, it's a great way to get all your energy out and support your teams.
So have we convinced you that the best way to spend your weekend is by supporting your
Pirates? We hope so. The seniors deserve the recognition they have worked so hard for and you
can be a part of that excitement by standing up and getting loud for your Pirates.
tFTTERS TO THE EDITOR
Stop turning a deaf ear to racism
GUEST
View Cdli.ni
lb the Editor,
As a student here at East Carolina
University I am very tired of hearing
about injustice on this campus. The
East Carolina housekeepers are once
again demanding that their voices be
heard, and finally it seems that the
Chancellor is beginning to recognize
their complaints, f have read in the
newspaper that this meeting took
place in the Willis building on
Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 4 p.m. As a
Caucasian student, I have felt very dis-
heartened and disillusioned about race
relations in this nation and on this cam-
pus. When will we, as a campus com-
munity and country, stop turning a deaf
ear to increasing racism towards
minorities, particularly African-
Americans?
The housekeepers are not all black,
and their complaints are based mainly
on better treatment and pay, but many
of their complaints concerning dis-
crimination have happened because
some are black. So, please, Chancellor,
do not turn a deaf ear to the allegations
that these housekeepers are making.
They work hard and are not really paid
the respect or the money that they
deserve. In true celebration of Black
History Month, please, Chancellor, set
an example for other universities in
this state and in this nation.
Show everyone on this campus that
we can truly work together. I hope and
pray that this Town Hall meeting is a
productive event that will result in
true progress in racial relations. Until
this is accomplished, I am afraid that
many students and parent, both black
and white, will be ashamed to be affili-
ated with a university that continues to
allow injustice and discrimination to
run rampant.
Ryan Moore
Senior
Art
Kt'ith r.ojipiM
Will the Kennedy-Powell dream become reality?
Now that President Clinton,
Constitutionally, cannot seek a third
term for President, many political
pundits and scholars painstakingly are
contemplating possibilities to replace
Clinton in 2001. Winning presidential
tickets could take many varieties.
However, a very likely ticket for the
year 2000 is as follows: Democratic
Presidential nominee-Joseph Kennedy
II; Kennedy's vice-presidential nomi-
nee-General Colin Powell
(Independent). How does Gore (actor
into Presidential politics in 2000?
rSfell, the American people may wit-
ness a case of taint and shame vs. saint
and familyhousehold names.
Joseph Kennedy has presidential
power in his blood. This thirst for
power encouraged John and Robert
Kennedy to seek the presidency John
won and Robert would have won, had
it not been for the assassin(s) who
murdered Senator Kennedy and pre-
vented him from carrying the torch to
a "new generation of Americans Also,
the Presidential aspirations of the
eldest brother, Joseph, were dashed by
a plane crash during World War II.
Nevertheless, the main reason led
Kennedy did not become President
can be described in one word�
Chappaquiddick (where Mary Jo
Kopechne drowned in 1969). Is
Joseph Kennedy II Presidential mate-
rial? Absolutely Mass. Congressman,
Joe Kennedy, the eldest son of Robert
Francis Kennedy, was elected to
Congress in 1986. His aggressive,
charismatic "press the flesh" approach
led him to defeat his opponents, one
of whom was Franklin Delano
Roosevelt's grandson, James. Joe
Kennedy's campaign style imitates
that of hi ftsrher. RFK. He rolls up his
sleeves and talks to ordinary John Q.
Citizens.
Further, in 1979, Kennedy founded
Citizens Energy Corporation, a non-
profit company that provides cheap oil
for low-income and elderly house-
holds. Kennedy believes that the vul-
nerable elderly and forgotten poor
should not be forced to choose
between heating and eating.
Kennedy's caring and sharing philoso-
phy will attract millions of disadvan-
taged voters.
Kennedy , senior member of the
Veterans Affairs Committee , seeks to
improve the health care system for
veterans. Additionally, Kennedy sup-
ports Gulf War veterans experiencing
"mysterious" illnesses from the
Persian Gulf Crisis. Co-chairman of
the Older Americans Caucus,
Kennedy emphasizes the need for
affordable nursing home care and con-
demns attempts to slash funding for
senior health care programs.
Kennedy's accolades range from a pas-
sion-driven concern for affordable
health care and housing to a commit-
ment to human rights for fellow citi-
zens of the global community.
Kennedy is an updated version of JFK
and RFK
General Colin Powell (from New
York) is not a staunch Republican.
Instead, he is a political centrist.
Ideologically, Powell believes that the
solutions to the many problems plagu-
ing America lie in a mixture of
Liberalism and traditionally conserva-
tive values. This positioning appeals
to labor unions, the elderly, the poor
and social conservatives. African-
Americans are not eager to vote
Republican; they are mostly
Democrats. They primarily voted
Republican from Abe Lincoln's latter
years to 1932. The 1932 political
realignment included African-
Americans largely voting Democratic
for the first time.
The Republican Party epitomized
scandalous activities (i.e. Grant,
Harding, Nixon, Ford, Reagan).
Powell, author and renowned ora-
tor, radiates confidence, personal
responsibility and "can-do" optimum
needed to energize and galvanize
Americans for the 21st Century,
rtolitics as usual must be replaced by a
deep-rooted yearning to build bridges,
heal racial wounds, forge meaningfu.
coalitions and promote humanit?rian-
ism and volunteerism at home and
abroad. Indeed, Powell, the Gulf War
hero who had gone from "rags to rich-
es has an amazing ability to build
winning coalitions. Powell exemplified
this talent when he was Reagan's
National Security Advisor, Bush'?
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
and Clinton's choice to accompany
President Carter and Senator Nunn to
Haiti to restore Democracy there.
Furthermore, wealthy CEOs quietly
have pledged millions of dollars to
Powell for a presidentialvice-presi-
dential bid. If Powell runs as an
Independent, he can bypass the tradi-
tional primaries and avoid the micro-
scopic scrutinies typical of primaries.
A Kennedy-Powell ticket would jolt
the public conscience. The ticket
could carry New England, America's
Heartland, the South, and key west-
em states like California. Kennedy
and Powell could use bus and "whis-
tle-stop" tours as vehicles for connect-
ing with mainstream Americans dis-
gruntled with obstructionists like
Gingrich and Helms.
Whitewater, Paula Jones, the FBI
fiasco and other perceptions of
Presidential improprieties might bury
Gore in an avalanche of shame. This is
reminiscent of 1976, when Ford was
viewed as inextricably linked to
"Tricky-Dick" Nixon. Thus, Carte
(Jimmy Who?) blasted "status quo"
politics and articulated the need for
honesty, respect, and integrity in gov-
ernment. America listened.
Prolonged, time-consuming investiga-
tions of the Clinton White House will
be an albatross around Gore's neck.
Congressman Kennedy and
General Powell, arguably the most
popular man in America, could consti-
tute a winning tickei. The Kennedy
"mystique coupled with an accom-
plished general somewhat like
Eisenhower, is a recipe for victory in
the 2 30 Presidential Election,
txnnedy and Powell embody courage,
optimism, compassion for the under-
privileged and love forcounrry. People
are losing confidence in America,
desiite Clinton's laborious efforts to
restore that confidence. Joe Kennedy
wants to perpetuate America's obses-
sion with the Kennedys. With Powell's
help, he will succeed. Only one thing
conceivably ct ild silence Kennedy, a
man w! m I admire greatly�an assas-
ris bullet. 1 pray this will not be the
case.
Support your SGA leaders
lb the Editor,
Ah, the SGA tuition payment con-
troversy. It isn't very often that a con-
troversy such as this lingers for so long
on campus and is fought with such
passion. But then again, it seems hard-
ly a controversy because when uiking
to many student across campus, I've
found that most strongly do not
believe in the SGA Executive Board
using ECU student fees to pay their
tuition and textbook bills. Therefore,
if the SGA is truly a form of represen-
tative democracy, which it is supposed
to be, then one would think that the
SGA would have reversed this bill.
However, this is obviously not the case
and I must be living in a non-existent
democratic fairy tale land.
I am writing this letter, of course, to
offer my two cents worth of outrage
against the SGA. After reading Mr.
Rocchio's letter of Feb. 18, I simply
thought that perhaps another letter
might spark a real movement on the
part of ECU students to actually force
those in the SGA blessed without a
vote to actually do what we'd like
them to do.
' nave listened to the arguments of
both sides. And actually, I do believe
in paying the SGA Executive Board a
iipend. They do have both a difficult
and important job. In fact, those in
favi of the SGA use of student fees
for ths purpose often point out that
withou any sort of compensation, the
rich would dominate the SGA�point
taken. r fence my stand in favor of a
stipend. But, I also firmly believe that
they should only receive a stipend,
just like the rest of us forced to work a
side job (or jobs) five days a week just
so we can eat.
Furthermore, I'm going to go out on
a limb here and take a wild guess that
much of the student population feels
the same as I. So, to conclude, I have
merely two suggestions for both
student body and SGA Executive
Board.
To the student body: If you're
upset, and I have a feeling that most
are, either start a petition to end the
SGA use of student fees to pay for
their tuition and books or vote in the
spring for candidates who promise to
do so for you. Wc can all complain all
we want, but complaining only goes so
far, which, actually isn't very far at all.
To the SGA officers: I promise you
this, the candidates that win in the
spring will be those that run on plat-
forms in favor of promptly ending this
misuse of student fees. That is, unless
the seemingly endless allegations of
SGA voter fraud are, in fact, true.
Stay tuned.
Mike Walker
Senior
Political Science
ORNION
Nicole
MCMULLEN
Trial of the century
O.J OJ OJ. 1 know, it seems like
that's all we've heard about in the past
two and a half years.
First, it was the never-ending trial
of whether or not O.j. Simpson killed
Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron
Goldman. Then, there was the recent
liability suit against O.J.
A few days after the civil jury found
Simpson liable for the 1994 killings,
Fred Goldman (Ron's father) goes on
national television and gives Simpson
a meaningless offer. He told Simpson
that if he would admit to killing his
son and Nicole, then he would forget
about the money. O.J. declined.
Let's look at this even closer. Let's
say that O.J. decided to take the offer
and said that he did kill Ron and
Nicole. Those of you who believe he is
guilty will say, "I knew it, all he need-
ed was someone to offer him money
Those who believe in his innocence
will say that he took the offer so that
he doesn't have to worry about money
for his children.
No matter what O.J. decides to do,
people will never change their minds
on whether he's guilty or innocent.
Everyone has decided what they want
to believe and they arc sticking to
their decision. Think about your opin-
ion on the case. Now, how much
would it take for you to change your
mind?
Whether we like it or not, this
whole case has somehow affected our
lives.
How many of us were glued to the
television or radio when the verdict
came in as to whether they found him
guilty or innocent? I'll bet that most
every American was following the
case.
Wei it's over. O.J. was found liable
for the killings, but he was also found
not guilty for the crime.
No matter what happens in the
future to O.J almost every American
has an opinion as to if he is guilty or
not. We can't change anyone's opinion
and we can't change the verdict.
What we can change is the way
some of us have centered bur lives
around this case for two and a half
years. It's time to let go. Let O.J. go on
with his life. Let the Goldmans go on
with theirs.
So that finally, we can get on with
ours.
�"





5 Thursday. February 20. 1997
comics
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26 Secret
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lifestyle
Thespians of Diversity speak out
The East Carolinian
6 Thursday, February 20. 1997
CDreviews
DALE WILLIAMSON
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
"The reason I joined the Thespians of
Diversity is for spiritual upliftment,
knowing about my past and knowing
about black history and knowing the
achievements that blacks have accom-
plished) in the past says the tired but
inspired Thespian performer Quentin
Joyner. "It also deals with keeping in
mind that you're able to do something
other than what's been told by the so-
called American history
Joyner is one of the major players in
the ECU dramatic group known as the
Thespians of Diversity, a group that
had a small, independent birth in 1993
but has since matured into a significant
force on campus, particularly for minor-
ity students.
Founded by ECU English lecturer
Reginald Watson, the Thespians seek
out students of all ethnic backgrounds
to express their talents and their cul-
tural views in a positive manner.
Through dramatic productions and
readings, the Thespians entertain and
teach their audience about American
history and culture, with a strong
emphasis on African-American history
and culture.
On Jan. 29, the Thespians enjoyed
great success with their standing-room-
onh performance of I've Seen the
Mountain Top and It Don't Look So Good,
a play about Martin Luther King, Jr.
The Thespians are expecting the same
positive response on Wed Feb. 26
when they celebrate Black History
Month with the history play. Black Voices
from the Past.
Watson, who wrote both plays him-
self, cannot contain his enthusiasm and
joy for the group he helped create.
"It's a learning experience he
insists. "I put it together for just that
You have a number of students involved
in this that are multi-talented, and
they're learning from it. You can sec
that, by them doing this, they're really
gaining something from it
Reginald
Watson
Unfortunately, not a
whole lot of opportu-
nities are offered for
people like Joyner to
express the talent
that they have inside
There's just not a
whole lot of things
offered around this
campus, particularly
for African
Americans to show that talent that they
might have.
"I've had people come in who never
really knew that they could do what
they did on stage. They did not know
until they were given the opportunity
to do it And that's the beauty of what
the Thespians, this play and the other
play are all about Quentin and other
members of the group are really grow-
ing, they're really being spiritually
uplifted by being involved in projects
like this
Even though Joyner had some high
school drama training, the Thespians
have been an awakening experience for
Quentin
Joyner
him because he
now performs in
productions
geared more
towards his her-
itage. "Basically in
high school, I per-
formed in such
pays as Romeo �
Juliet, Macbeth, A
Streetcar Named
Desire - a lot of plays that were either
created or written by a Caucasian
Joyner does treasure participating in
plays that are centered around .African-
American issues, but he still has con-
cerns with the Thespians, concerns
that can be easily rectified with a little
effort.
"One of the things that I realize
about the Thespians is that right now
we don't have participants from black
males, or the turn out of black females.
It's almost as if) they don't realize that
by participating in something that is a
SEE THESPIAMS PAGE 7
Widespread Panic
Bombs & Butterflies
Bruce Cockburn
The Charity of Night
Gray Gallery hosts photo, digital image exhibit
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITE
Once again, the Wellington B. Gray Gallery
and the School of Art are providing local art
enthusiasts with something to satisfy their
interests and passions. They are also provid-
ing them a glimpse of the future of photogra-
phy.
The first biennial International Photography
and Digital Image Exhibition is-currently on dis-
play at the gallery. The exhibition began on
Feb. 10 and is slated to run through March 4.
The exhibition offers 100 works that incor-
porate a variety of photography and digital
image methods. Viewers of the exhibition will
be treated to works that showcase modern
innovations in photography; featured works
use three-dimensional techniques, installa-
tions and digital manipulation.
These innovations are made all the more
impressive by the relative young age of pho-
tography. It is a little more than 160 years old,
rather new in the grand scheme of the uni-
verse.
But changes are occurring everyday, and
those changes will be heavily evident at the
exhibition.
Do not fear, however; the old has not been
discarded and forgotten. Works of traditional
photography are also included in the exhibi-
tion. The exhibition attempts to bring
together the past, present and the future of
the photographic art form by providing an
overview of contemporary photography.
The works that make up the exhibit were
selected out of 900 entries, representing 34
states. Several of the works selected received
additional recognition, including a $1,000
cash prize from the Qualex Corporation, a
Durham based company. Those winners
include: Maggie Taylor (Gainesville, Fla.),
Jon Yamashiro (Liberty, Ind.), Rebecca
Silberman (Gordonsville, Va.), Dallas Walters
(Peoria, III.) and Kaoru Tohara (Indiana, Pa.).
A lecture and a reception were held last
week as part of the exhibition. Olivia Parker, a
professional photographer whose portfolios
have been published in Art News, American
Photographer, Camera, Camera Arts, Popular
Photography and other magazines, was the fea-
tured speaker for the lecture. Parker also
served as the exhibition juror.
The Gray Gallery is open Monday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is open
until 8 p.m. on Thursdays.
All of its exhibits and receptions are free
and open to the public. For additional infor-
mation, call 328-6336.
Obake Ghost hi Jon Yamashiro won the exhibit's Qaalex Award.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THt WEUIHSTON B. 6RAY BAUERt
24 Monday
February
20 Thursday
Lecture and reception: Dr.
Rebecca Martin Nagy, "Sepphoris in
Galilee: Crosscurrents of Culture, Art
& Archaeology in Sepphoris, an
Ancient City in Israel at 7 p.m. in
Speight Auditorium.
That Thing You Do at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre through Feb. 22.
21 Friday
Almighty Senators with Jimmy's
Chicken Shack at the Attic.
Travis Allison Band at Peasants
Caf6.
22 Saturday
Agents of Good Roots at the Attic.
yEP! at Peasants Cafe.
"Chew on This" Lecture with
Tom Younce, Assistant ECU Police
Chief, "Taking a Dive: An
Introduction to Scuba Diving" at
noon in Mendenhall Underground.
African American Reading Day,
sponsored by the English department
at 4 p.m. in GCB 1031. Any student or
faculty member may come and read
from their favorite African-American
author. If you wish to participate,
please submit readings by Feb. 20 to
Prof. Reginald Watson, GCB 2147
(328-6684) or Prof. Seodial Deena,
GCB 2139 (328-6683).
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Great Britain's
Great Canals at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre. There will also be a
theme dinner at 6 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Great Room.
26 Wednesday
Black Voices from the Past production
at 7 p.m. in the Mendenhall Social
Room. There will be a $2 admission to
raise money for the Ledonia Wright
Scholarship fund, which helps minori-
ty students with their studies.
Speaker explores poetic discourse
Dale Williamson
assistant lifestyle editor
Poetry has rapidly developed into an
active form of artistic expression on
campus and within the Greenville
community. Local coffee shops and
book stores host readers, both pro-
fessional and amateur, as they share
their published and unpublished
works.
While poetry is an art form that
prides itself on individuality and
creativity, poetry is also a form of
intellectual rhetoric. Today, the
intellectualism and rhetoric of poet-
ry will be examined in depth when
the English department hosts
Renaissance scholar Deniz Sengel
of Trinity College as she presents
her talk "Truth and Lying: The
Theory of Reading in Philip
Sidney's Theory of Poetry
Sir Philip Sidney's Apolgie for
Poetrie, which was published in
1595, is widely regarded as an exem-
plary piece of Elizabethan literary
and poetic theory. Traditionally,
20th-century criticism views this
Deniz Sengel
work as
illustrating
how poet-
ry works to
morally
improve
the reader.
jtk JL r' Sen8el
t ' 'tM will offer a
Wm m new ap
proach to
Sidney's
writing as
she explores what distinguishes
poetic discourse from other forms of
rhetoric.
Dr. Sengel earned her Ph.D.
from New York University and has
taught at several universities. She is
the editor of three collections on art
and aesthetics and has written a
book entitled The Fallen Icon, which
is set to be published this year.
The lecture will be held in the
General Classroom Building, Room
2014 at 4 p.m. today. This event is
open to the public and a reception
will follow.
For further information, contact
Dr. Lillian Robinson at 328-6681.
PAT REID
ST4FF WRITER
Is this any way to have the best of
both worlds as a band? Is there a way
to be big and successful and yet still
be able to walk down the street or
play smaller venues without minia-
ture riots breaking out?
Apparently there is, and
Widespread Panic knows how. While
the band draws huge numbers of fans
to shows and sells a moderate number
of records with every new release,
they haven't been all over MTV and
VH1, and you don't see them regular-
ly on the cover of Spin or Rolling Stone.
This "popular obscurity" has
enabled the band to play clubs and
colleges as well as amphitheaters all
on the same tour. In fact, a mere two
years ago the band headlined East
Carolina's own Barefoot on the Mall.
Then, a short while later, they head-
lined a show at Walnut Creek
Amphitheater in Raleigh that includ-
ed the classic group War as an open-
ing act.
And now they're back with their
first album since that tour. Their fifth
album overall, Bombs and Butterflies
showcases the band's tight musical
sound as well as their broad range of
influences.
The first track, "Radio Child
starts the album off with a fast, jazzy
groove. The mainstay of this track is
the amazing percussion accompani-
ment. Percussionist Domingo Ortiz
even gets a few seconds of "solo" dur-
ing this track as he pounds out a
groove that brings the song to life.
The majority of the album, howev-
er, is dominated by keyboardist John
Hermann. Songs like "Tall Boy" and
"Happy" have Hermann in the fore-
front instead of just providing the
background fill that most key-
boardists are known for. In fact, "Tall
Boy" seems to take a page out of Greg
Allman's book of tricks with rolling
piano melodies backed with flowing
rhythms.
"Happy an instrumental, is
unusual in and of itself. Most instru-
mentals have the majority of the band
providing background for one main
instrument. Even instrumental clas-
sics like "Jessica" or "Frankenstein
have different instruments taking
turns at the helm. "Happy" on the
other hand, has all the band members
jamming at full pace. No one backs
down, and no one steps forward. The
band collectively weaves up and
down to create a truly unique musical
tapestry.
The first single off the album,
"Hope In A Hopeless World is a
tribute to gospelblues singer Pops
Staples. When the band shared a bill
SEE PANIC. PAGE 8
JOHN JDAVIS
STAFF WRITER
It is rare when the career of a rock
musician lasts more then five years. It
is very rare when one has as long and
illustrious a career as Bruce
Cockbum's.
Though Cockburn has never been
much of a star, his music has a lasting
and profound influence on rock n' roll.
After over 25 years, this Canadian
singersongwriter has journeyed hard
and traveled far, and his music reflects
this.
Until now, Cockburn had always
recorded for Columbia Records. Unlike
most artists, who shop constantly for
better deals, Cockburn has never
moved around in that manner.
Times do change though, and now,
as he settles into his new home with
Ryko, (known most notably for re-
releasing Jimi Hendrix and David
Bowie classics) Cockburn explores
both new and long-abandoned territory
on what is perhaps his best record since
1979's Darning in the Drugpn's Jaws.
The Charity of Night is a record of
changes for Cockburn. Replacing long-
time friend and producer T-Bone
Burnett (best known for his work with
Counting Crows, the Wallflowers and
Elvis Costello) with newcomer Colin
Inden, Cockburn has succeeded in
bringing an ambiance and energy to his
music that has been sorely missed for
at least ten years. The album is filled
with notable musical guests, such as
Jonatha Brooke, Bonnie Raitt and Ani
DiFranco (whom he thanks for
"reminding me what energy is for").
The Charity ofMght is a calm storm,
heavily influenced by the religious ten-
sion of the Psalms. Cockburn has never
been shy about his faith, but on this
album he steps into more of the grey
areas in life and asks hard questions of
himself and of God. Against the back-
drop of well-crafted sonic landscapes
populated by warm acoustic guitars,
ethereal vibes and haunting electric
guitar noise, Cockburn explores the
darker sides of faith, love and nature.
The balance of rock music and faith
is a tricky one, and one that Cockburn
is both uncertain of and thankful for. In
"Get Up Jonah Cockburn calls upon
the prophet in himself: "Lashed to the
wheel Whipping into the storm Get
up Jonah It's your time to be bom In
"Strange Waters" he reflects on the
places God has taken him during the
course of his life: "I've seen a high cairn
kissed by holy wind Seen a mi rror pool
cut by golden fins Seen alleys where
they hide the truth of cities Like the
writers of the Psalms, Cockburn feels
injustice acutely and cries out in
SEE BRUCE. PAGE 8
SPRING
TELEPHONE
REGISTRATION
Monday, February 10-
Sunday, March 2
For Course
Information
Call 321-4245
PITT
CcnTTWyCofc�





I
7 Thuridiy. February 20, 1997
lifestyle
Tht Eist Carolinian
PRO NAILS
Management
3
UU
BAST
CAEOUNA
UNrvmafTY
The Division of
CONTINUING STUDIES
19 9 1
Summer Study Abroad Opportunities
For 1st and 2� Summer Sessions
College rf Arts & StkBictya Costa Rk ,
(Universidad Nacional de Costa Ricft, Hwedia, Costa Rjca7 mites
from San Jose)
Anthropology 2020
Biology 3400
Geology 1700
Spanish 1040
Spanish 2108
Independent Study Courses: By arrangement
Program Director: Professor John Bort, 328-6136
Coikgc of Arta ft Ssieucm to England
(2nd Summer Session only)
English 4510
Program Director: Professor Richard Taylor, 328-668?
International 2400
Program Director: Professor Juhang Shi, 328-1064
College of Arts & Sciences to Belize and Guatemala
(Central American opportunities for 2nd Summer Session)
A focus on African Culture in the Americas Program
Director: Professor Gay Wilentz, 328-6678
School of Art to Finland, Estonia. Rmaia. Poland
Ceramics - Graduate & Undergraduate courses, all levels
Sculpture � Graduate & Undergraduate courses, all levels
Drawing - 3561, 3563, 5560 & 5561
Art History - 4970
Art Appreciation - 1910, open to General College
Hypermedia - 3070
Independent Study - 3500 & 5500 by arrangement
Program Director: Professor Carl Billingsley, 328-6270
ool of Business to Glasfow. Scotland
Jniversity of Strathclyde)
international Management 3352
International Management 6322
Strategic Management 4842
Strategic Management 6722
Program Director: Professor Roy Simerly, 328-6632
School of Nursing to f inland. Estonia, and RliMai
(Oulu Polytechnic University)
International Health
Program Director: Professor
Thespians
continued from page 6
part of them, learning about their past
and showing it to others and teaching
others that they would also receive a
spiritual upliftment that could help
them get through their classes at ECU
and that they could perform better in
their classes.
"But a lot of people don't look at it
like that. They look at it as something
else to do, another task I have to do.
Therefore they don't show up, they
don't come, they don't try to join the
group. I really think that's sad Joyner
said.
Watson does stress that people are
enthusiastic about the Thespians. He
says that students are constantly filling
out applications to join, but when the
time comes to actually work, many sim-
ply don't show.
What Watson and the Thespians
want and need are people who want to
work and make a difference. And that's
where the student body of ECU is
essential.
While the Thespians do focus their
themes around African-American histo-
ry and culture, Watson stresses that the
group is not simply a group for African
Americans. It is a group for any and
everyone willing to work towards posi-
tive and progressive goals for racial
understanding and tolerance.
Joyner believes in what the
Thespians are doing. He sees a need to
reconstruct American history, to tell the
stories that have been historically left
put of many classrooms.
"The African has been left out in
many parts that should have been
included Joyner notes. "It seems that
African history was left out, and being
that it was left out, a lot of whites.
blacks, Chinese, any racial people
wouldn't know of this histoty They
don't know anything else but what has
been told to them or what they've seen,
therefore they feel like African
Americans haven't done anything
because they don't know about it. And
a lot of blacks don't even know about it
themselves So, we arc just trying to
bring light to the achievements of
blacks and trying bring a better race
relationship
"The Thespians of Diversity is not
just a black group Watson adds. "It is
a group for everybody who wants to
come in and express themselves. But
the focus will be on African Americans
and other minorities, because on a lot of
college campuses there's not a chance
to express themselves like this. So
that's why an English teacher put
together a dramatic arts group, because
this English teacher wants to see these
students express themselves in all
ways
This expression can take many
forms, Watson notes. Students can act,
dance, sing, work backstage, and even
write their own plays. "The more plays
the students write, the more inclu-
sive I'm sure we'll be of Caucasians and
other groups Watson says. "That's the
thing we want to do. We want to build
from our foundation by being more
inclusive, not just for whites but also
other minority groups
Having said that, Watson and the
Thespians eagerly await new members
to burst through with their creative
energy. That new member could be
you, so don't be shy. Get active on cam-
pus and within the Greenville commu-
nity. Support the ECU Thespians of
Diversity. As Watson has said time and
time again, "It's for everybody
For more information, contact
Reginald Watson at 328-6684.
o
oifes
ciwSry
SiiMf fifats nttft" motf it tft
the EmeraldCity.
Some are too fUKti MMME
Some art too small.
Whatever the reason, w
just never pf to set some
mighty goodmovies
on the log siren.
When ikry kit video.
htrstruer, they're ours for
theutmg. Tins series rill
hoi at some of tie films
mmdidn't matetie
Greenville cut,
the ours thm got osfuy
Trainspotting is more than
just heroin and humor
John Davis
STAFF WRITER
All art welcome to attend the information session
March 18,7:00 pm
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APARTMENTS
When the movie version of Irvine
Welsh's acclaimed novel about heroin
addiction came to theaters last sum-
mer, right-wing critics charged that it
glorified heroin use. It is painfully
clear then that they never actually
bothered to watch the movie.
Director Danny Boyle's vision of des-
peration glorifies heroin about the
same way that swimming in vomit
would glorify drinking beer down-
town.
Tramspottmg is the story of Renton,
a bored middle class young adult in
Edinburgh, Scotland, and his flirtation
with and addiction to heroin. Renton
and his "mates" � Spud, Sick Boy,
Tommy and Bcgbie � center their
lives around their herein habits and
(because they are too wasted to hold
jobs) crime. "It's the ultimate high
Renton declares at one point, "better
than sex And in the first Miramax
movie to ignore Pulp Ftawtr's influ-
ence, we are transported into the
world of this ultimate high, of addic-
tion and the heavy sacrifices made to
maintain it.
Shocking, jolting, vivid, pic-
turesque and at times revolting,
Trainspotting navigates the utter deso-
Tommy. Bagbit, Renton, Sick Boy and Spud Might viewers
in director Denny Boyle's tour de force, Tnmspatting.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MIRAMAX FILMS
lation and depravity of addicts in
much the same way that Leaving Las
Vfgas displayed the horror of alco-
holism. Colors, lighting, costumes, set
design and music all play into the
mood of the film, leaving a burning
image in one's mind. Black humor
pervades the screenplay as Sick Boy
expounds the glories of Sean Connery
while shooting up (or shooting dogs
for that matter), as Rcnton's girlfriend
Dianne pokes fun at the group's fasci-
nation with "Ziggy Pop and as Spud
is unable to speak most of the time or
control his bowels.
The conversation is not alt heroin
and humor, though. The frustration
and anger of young adults in the space
age is dripping from the screenplay.
When Tommy praises the beauty of
the "great outdoors" and of Scotland,
Renton bites back, "Scotland! We
can't even get colonized by a decent
country. We had to get colonized by a
bunch of wankers
Filmed in Scotland with a Scottish
cast, the stark and unpleasant beauty
of this film is a clear reminder of the
suffocating stranglehold Hollywood
has on the movie industry. There has
not been a Hollywood film of this cal-
iber in years, decades maybe.
The actors are all talented and
refreshing No Mel Gibsons or Kevin
SEE AWAY. PAGE 8
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8 Thursday. Ftbruiry 20. 1997
�ift'style
The East Carolinian
Panic
continued from page 6
with Staples they were moved to
tears by his performance. And from
that comes this dark, yet hopeful
commentary on the world today.
The only real problem with the
album as a whole is the flow of the
songs. The lyrics don't always flow
Bruce
continued from page 6
anguish and protest.
He tastes the violence of man
against man throughout this album,
which he bemoans and questions on
such fblky grooves as "Night Train" and
"Birmingham Shadows He feels the
pain of humanity's exploitation of
nature in "The Mines of
Mozambique a post-folk grinding
tune set to rhesophonic guitars.
Cockbum also celebrates the
human condition, as in "The Whole
Night Sky a world-music love ballad.
He displays his love even more in the
vibe-infected danceable ditty, "The
Coming Rains and the searingry emo-
tional "Live On My Mind He traces
the pent-up feeling of someone grap-
with the groove of the song, and the
songs don't always flow within them-
selves. Often a song will start out with
a great upbeat groove and then stall
during the verses, or, in the case of
"Glory the chorus. This disjointed-
ness is a mystery because it's obvious
with one listen to the album that the
group is extremely talented and that
they work excellently together.
Hopefully they'll focus on this cohe-
siveness in the future.
pling for patience and guidance in
"Pacing the Cage where he observes,
"Sometimes the best map will not
guide you sometimes the darkness is
your friend
The musicianship on this album is
superb. Cockburn's throaty voice is in
top form, as is his sense of spoken word
rhythm. Vibraphone player Gary
Burton is smooth and cool, adding a
jazzy, spooky quality to the songs. The
rhythm section of Gary Craig's drums
and Rob Wasserman's bass is tight and
strong, providing a solid backdrop for
Cockburn's chanting, emoting, wailing
and aching voice.
After 25 years, some rock n' rollers
become dinosaurs, ignoring the musi-
cal language of the day and settling
into blase repetitions of their greatest
hits. Not Cockburn, though. The
Charily of Night is a record for the '90s,
and if I dare say, far beyond.
Away
continued from page 7
Costners here. Ewan McGregor, who
plays Renton, is sublime, smooth and
dazzling as an anti-hero. Robert
Carlyle is superbly obnoxious as the
psychotic Begbie. New actress Kelly
MacDonald plays a wonderfully sexy
and sassy Dianne. One of the best
performances is Ewen Brenner's lov-
able, tragic, junkie burn-out Spud.
One of the most striking evidences
of this film's greatness is its economy,
its grace, the fact that there is always
just enough and no more. Unlike
Hollywood's endeavors. Trainspottings
plot does not move in for the kill.
Rather it takes one just to the point of
collapse and then pulls away brilliant-
ly. The ending is unexpected, but not
unbelievably so.
In fact, this film is astounding in
its believability. One finds it difficult
to return to "must-see TV" laundry,
homework and chores after watching
Trainspotting. It leaves one in a daze, a
stupor of awe and the bleary feeling of
having been in a dream too long.
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107 Eastbcook Drive 758-7570 located post Pizza Inn in front of Eostbrook Apfc.
THIS YEAR A LOT
OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's
Loan Repayment pro-
gram, you could get out
from under with a
three-year enlistment.
Each year you serve
on active duty reduces
your indebtedness by
one-third or $1,500,
whichever amount is
greater, up to a $55,000
limit. The offer applies
to Perkins Loans, Staf-
ford Loans, and certain
other federally insured
loans, which are not in
default. And debt relief
is just one of the many
benefits you'll earn from
the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL TOUCAN BE:
i Honey Nut fa-
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re
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Italian Combo
Sessions
Session I, May 27-Juiie 27
Intercession, June 16-JuJy 17
Session II, July lAngust 1
Remember
We Have All Of ur School
and Dorm SbpfJy Need&-
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at Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403-3297
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E-mail: SummerCuncwil.edu
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Prices and Offers Good Vtednesday, Februarv 19 Through Tuesday,
Ftebruary 2S. 1997 At Yxir Greenville Harris Teeter-
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers.





9 Thursday, February 20, 1997
sports
Tin East Carolinian
Softball swings into action
Tracy Laubach
SENIOR WRITER
ECU softball team has been training hard since August, and now that
spring is finally approaching, the girls are ready to get out on the field and
play some serious ball. This weekend they will head to Raleigh to play in
the Triangle Classic.
Led by five returning seniors, the team is heading into this season
ranked second in the Big South Conference after finishing iast year with a
40-21-1 record. In the preseason coaches and SID's poll, ECU was picked
to finish first in the Big South.
With a new head coach and six freshman faces on the field, this year is
expected to be a learning experience for everyone. The members of the
team have chosen to come to ECU from places as far away as Connecticut,
Oregon, and even the Netherlands.
Under the direction of Head Coach Tracey Kee and Assistant
Coach Jenny Parsons, both of whom played softball for ECU in the past, the
team's biggest goal for the season is to win the Big South Conference
Championship and go on to play at the NCAA Championship, which will
begin on May 9 in Oklahoma City.
Tbnya Oxendine, a senior from Winston-Salem, says one of the team's
biggest strengths is that the girls have really come together and developed
a close unity with one another.
"Everyone listens to everyone else Oxendine said. "In coming togeth-
er as a team, we will be able to stay focused and give our best effort out on
the field
Coming to ECU from Wappingers Rills, N.Y freshman Melissa Langer
says playing for the Pirates is almost like having a fuii-time job. After play-
ing for a high school team where she was looked up to as a star, Langer says
playing on the college level is much more competitive because here, every-
one on the team is a star.
"It's definitely an eye-opener to see so much talent combined on one
team Langer said.
The team treats every prac-
tice like it's a game.
According to Langer, "If
you're not dirty, you didn't
practice hard enough
Langer says the one thing
she considers to be unique
about the softbali program is
that the community is really
involved and interested in
the success of the team. Just
as with mostly all athletic
teams, it always helps to have
a supportive crowd.
Players agree that Kee has a
lot to offer to the softball pro-
gram at ECU.
"Coach Kee works us really
hard and has already taught
us a lot Oxendine said. "She
has done a lot to build up our
confidence level as a team. If
anyone knows the game of
softball, it's her
Isoiwtta Potato fates � swing. Tht sophomore The toughest teams to beat
plays stcond bast and haHs from Curaco, within the conference will
Ntthtrlands. more than likely be UNC
msTssYMvwnacH Greensboro and Coastal
Chuck Kelly, who has spent the past three seasons as an assistant football
coach at the University of South Carolina, has been named assistant coach
at ECU, according to Head Coach Steve Logan.
Kelly will coordinate ECU's efforts on the offensive line, taking over the
positron vacated by Jeff Jagodzinski, who resigned last month to become the
offensive coordinator at Boston College.
The 40-year old Kelly served the 19 season as the Gamecocks' running
backs and special teams coach. He had previously worked with South
Carolina's offensive line for two years.
"I have followed Chuck's career for the past 10 years Logan said. "Wc
are very pleased to have a coach the caliber of Chuck joining our staff. We
are fortunate to be able to have an individual who has tremendous amount
of experience, specifically coaching the offensive line and with out style of
offense
Kelly played one year of football for Louisiana lech after spending his
first two collegiate seasons at Mississippi Delta Junior College.
"This a great opportunity for me to be part of a tremendous offense
under Coach Logan and Coach (Doug) Martin Kelly said. "Coaching the
backs last was a rewarding experience. Duce Staley is outstanding and great
to coach, but I am looking forward to getting back to the offensive line. East
Carolina has made a lot of strides with its program. It's exciting to be a part
of this. Conference USA is a conference on the rise and certainly, we're
going to have the opportunity to play great competition and be tested week
in and week out.
Golfers tee off
spring season
Rhonda Host stretches for � throw during Wednesday' practice before heading to
Raleigh for the Triangle Clastic this weekend.
MOT0 B� DAVID f IHCH
Carolina. The girls will also be meeting with teams outside of the confer
ence, including the University of Texas and Penn State.
The season will kick off this weekend with a game against Minnesota on
Friday and back-to-back games on Saturday against Maryland and Robert
Morris.
With a combination of determination, talent and unity, the Pirates will
be able to face all the challenges that lie before them with confidence and
a positive attitude that will lead them to yet another successful season.
Lacrosse team beats
Seahawks, prepares for
York this weekend
This past Sunday, the ECU lacrosse team faced their arch rival UNCW and
came away with a huge victory. The impressive 22-8 win was a great season
opener for ECU. The scoring was fueled by the attack which accounted for
15 goals and eight assists including a behind the back goal by Brendan "Big
Perm" McLaughlin. There were also two goals apiece by John Provost and
Chris Burgess. The other three ECU goals were scored by "The
Modulators Rich Lagnese and Matt Pozzuto. The hard-hitting action of
defensemen Greg Daiscy, Theron Goodson, Andrew Longaro and Melvin
shut down the Wilmington offense and the body-sacrificing saves of Brian
Trail kept the Hawks out of the net. All in all, a great game was played by
the Pirates and they'll hit the field again this Saturday against York. Come
out and support the team for their one and only home game this season.
(Thanks to Sean Sullivan for the above contribution.)
ANTHONY STANFILL
STAFF WRITER
The ECU golf team begins its
run for the Colonial Athletic
Association championship this
weekend. The Pirates left
Wednesday for Tampa, Fla where
they start off the new season, play-
ing in the Ron Smith USF
Intercollegiate Tournament. It's a
54 hole tournament, being played
on Fri Sat. and Sun at the
University of South Florida.
The Pirates, who will travel to
Tampa, with second year Head
Coach Kevin Williams, are Richie
Creech, Steven Satterfy, Kevin
Miller, Marc Miller and Daniel
Griffis.
Creech, a newcomer, is the only
senior on the team. He transferred
to ECU after three years at Barton
College in Wilson. Creech earned
the number one position by playing
well in the fail and recording the
lowest score on the team with a 69,
at the Charleston Southern Fall
Invitational.
Satterfy and M. Miller are both
freshmen who'll probably see a lot
of time in the Pirates' lineup.
Williams said these two golfers
have made the transition nicley
from high school to college.
"It's hard for some players to
adapt from high school tc collegiate
play, but so far these two have done
well Williams said.
K. Miller and Griffis are two out
of only three returning players. The
two also help lead the Purple and
Gold this year as co-captains. Both
are expecting to do well in Tampa,
playing in the number three and
five spots.
The number five spot on the
team is under hot pursuit, though.
Scott Campbell, who led the team
in putting this fall, and freshmen
Robbie Perry, Matt Riggs, Shane
Robinson and Greg Wall are all bat-
tling for the fifth spot.
Williams expressed his concern
for the lack of stability at the num-
ber five spot. "Throughout the fall
four different people played the five
spot. We need a fifth man
Williams said.
The Pirates are coming off a
rough last season, where they fin-
PIRATE FXTRA!
ished 27th out of 40th in District
Three North, and the team's aver-
age was 306.
"It was my first year coaching,
and, in a nutshell, was a very poor
year Williams said. Williams does-
n't consider this year a building year,
but instead insists that "they have
to get better fast
This fall, in the pre-season tour-
naments, the Pirates accepted
Williams's challenge, by stepping
up their game. The Pirates partici-
pated in four fall tournaments. At
the Pirate Invitational they finished
fifth, 14th in the UTC
Intercollegiate, seventh at ODU
Seascape and finished the pre-sea-
son by winning the CSU Fall
Invitational.
Williams said the ODU Seascape
Tournament was the turning point
for his team. "Even though we did-
n't win the ODU Seascape
Tournament, we grew up there
Williams said.
At one time the Pirates were tied
for second with the Duke Blue
Devils, who are ranked 19th nation-
ally. They ended up losing to the
Blue Devils, but only by five
strokes.
In the last tournament, the CSU
Fall Invitational, Williams sent four
freshmen and Creech. The Pirates
returned victorious, placing first of
15, ending the fall on an excellent
note.
Williams noted that the tourna-
ment this weekend, the
PepsiBradford Creek Classic, the
Furman Spring Intercollegiate and
the CAA championships wilt all be
vital tournaments.
"We have to play good in those
to go to regionals Williams said.
The Pirates will face conference
rival VCU at two of the three tour-
naments and of course again in the
Conference tournament.
"VCU is ranked 17th in the
nation Williams said. "And if we
beat them we may get a NCAA
bid
Going into the Ron Smith USF
Tournament, the Pirates' team aver-
age is 2. This is 10 strokes off of
last year's average that left them
ranked 27th in the district. The
Pirates are hopeful that they can
stay in their present groove and
continue to play better golf
The men's basketball team dropped another conference game Monday
night to Richmond, 78-70. Morris Grooms led the way with 18 points, while
Raphael Edwards had 15. Othello Meadows nailed 14 points, while Tony
Parham and Dink Peters fad 10 apiece. ECU now falls to 7-7 in the CAA and
15-9 overallThe Lady Pirates were on the road Tuesday night against the
number two team in the country and CAA rival Old Dominion. The Lady
Pirates fell to the Lady Monarchs, 88-43 and drop to 9-15 overall and 4-10 in
the CAAThc ECU baseball team, who is on the road to play Georgia
Southern, got shut out 14-0 for their fourth loss of the season Tuesday The
Pirates now go to 4-4, while Georgia Southern heads to 1-6 with the victory
over the Pirates. The lone bright spot for the Pirates was Steve Salargo who
went 2-4 from the plate and still is hitting .500 for the season.
This is it! The men's and women's basketball teams will be playing their last home game of the season in Minges this weekend. Saturday
night the Pirates will host UNCW at 7 p.m. while the Lady Pirates host VCU Sunday at 2 p.m. Come and support the seniors in their last
home games.
TRIVIAtime
Name the PGA golfer who came from
behind to beat Greg Norman last year to
claim the famous green jacket at the
Masters, in Augusta, Ga.
jofopfflpmpqxyuisxufqswtfoi ' v jois ptwpunoa put x(i
ui uvtiv fl�f oijta uvuuotf jBHj oi L9 puma fiwj d )Oip oppy f�A
lelTi
PP
HKI SI VIS
CWL-AID
PANTANA
BOB'S
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At 9:00PM
Featuring
A Simple
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MANUFACTURER S COUPON
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THE RESIDENCE HALL ALL
APPLICATIONS MUST BE
TURNED IN BY MARCH 7, 1997
BY 5OOPM TO SUITE lOO JONES
HALL (328-4663). OFFER VOID
WHERE PROHIBITED.





10 Thursday. February 20. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
COZY COTTAGE NEAR HOS-
PITAL large one bedroom with gas &
elcc. heat. Hardwood and carpeted
floors, fireplace, chandeliers, on wood-
ed lot. Very nice, very quiet. $415.00
mo. Available Feb. 1st. Call 757-9387.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED 1U
SHARE 2 bedroom duplex. Conveni-
ent to campus on Rotary Avc. Rent is
$180 12 utilities. Call 752-2217.
PARK VILLAGE ADAMS BLVD.
one bedroom apts. range, refrigerator,
wd hookup. Free water and sewer.
ECU bus route. Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED KOK
SUMMER large 5 bedroom house
completely furnished with only two oc-
cupants washerdryer three blocks
from campusdowntown 757-9683 ask
for Heath.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO share two bedroom condo in Wil-
lowby Park private roombath tennis
courts, pool $300 rent plus 12 utilities
12 phone. Call 355-5201.
NAGS HEAD, NC- get your group
together early. Two houses in excellent
condition; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps 6
-$1600.00 per month; 3leeps 8 -
$2200.00 per month (757)850-1532.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
LOOKING FOR NEAT RUUM-
MATE ASAP! 2 br 1 bath Elm Villa
Apts. $192.50 plus no more than
$35.00 total utilities. Call Eleftheria
752-8004.
SUBLEASE ON BEDROOM
APARTMENT at Paladin West lo-
cated off 5th street near PCMH. WD
hookup, walk-in closet, deck, very
quiet $355month lease ends July
31st. Call 757-3006.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED IN May to share a 3br 1 12 bath
apartment at Eastbrook. Rent is
$155mo. and 13 utilities. Call 328-
3207 or 328-3211.
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. $775 mo.
One 2 bedroom apt. above BW3 - $500.
One 2 bedroom above Uppercrust
Bakery AVAILABLE now. (New car-
pet) for $475 mo. Luxury Apartments.
Will lease for May first with deposit
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
WANTED: ROOMMATE TO
SHARE townhousc. Access to swim-
ming pool and tennis court. Call 353-
4294. If not at home, please leave a
message.
THE GREENVILLE RECREA-
TION & Parks Department is re-
cruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours ac-
cording to class schedules. This pro-
gram will run from the 17th of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.75 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550.
HEAD LIFEGUARD NEEDED.
EXPERIENCE necessary. Lifeguard
needed. Experience preferred. Seeja-
ninc Jones at the Greenville Country
Club.
GAMMA SIG MONEY TALKED
and the pledges walked. Last Thurs-
day was a blast. Next time give feath-
ers more money and you may go home
as his honey.
SPRING BREAK
air at
We
ROMANCE WAS IN THE
Alpha Phi's Valentine cockr '
hope everyone had a s- eet
their Valentine! Congru itions Traci
on your lavalier to Gill. L "e, Alpha
Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI THANKS for the
great Golf social. We all had so much
fun! Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
CHI OMEGA, NOW THAI we
know you'll do anything for money,
we'll have to do it again sometime real-
ly soon Thanks for a great bid night!
Pi Kappa Alpha.
. Ualiill
3 Days 3Nights
Includes lodging,
A-r Far" from Raleigh
Sfrts at $329
Divinb cc Snorkeling
Package Available
SNOW SKIS FOR SPRING break.
Why rent? 2 good pair K2 5500 with
bindings (Marker M36 & Salomon
647). $95 a pair. Exercise treadmill for
$70. Call after 6 pm or weekends 756-
2066.
BUBBLE GUM OR CANDY vend-
ing machine for sale. Brand new! Still
in the box. $225 obo. Please call 752-
8612 and leave a message. Thanks.
KAYAK FOR SALE. 1996 dagger
tri-colored crossfire kayak. Has been
used only once in calm water. Includes
paddle and skirt. Asking $650. Is an
$1,100 value. Contact Robb at 754-
2637.
TWIN BED FOR SALE. Comes
with box mattress and frame. Not
even a year old! Price is negotiable!
Call 353-1039, Ask for Lisa.
FOR SALE! FULL or queen size
bed. Great condition. Mattress in-
cluded. Call 830-5314.
SEASONAL TEMPORARY PO-
SITIONS AVAILABLE: salesre-
ceivingwarehouse. Ideal for students
sitting out this semester, or individuals
presently between jobs. Schedules in-
volve up to 40 hours per week. Will
consider all availabilities: morningaf-
ternoonsevenings and weekends. Po-
sitions could lead on long term em-
ployment. ReceivingWarehouse areas
require some lifting. Applications ac-
cepted Monday through Friday, 2:00 -
4:00 pm, Brody's, The Plaza.
EARN $6,000 THIS SUMMER.
DYNAMIC COMPANY NOW IN-
TERVIEWINGHIRING AMBI-
TIOUS, ENTREPRENEURIAL
STUDENTS TO FILL SUM-
MER MANAGEMENT POSI-
TIONS IN YOUR HOME-
TOWN. FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION AND TO SCHEDULE AN
INTERVIEW CALL TUITION
PAINTERS 1 (800) 393 - 4521 .
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing info
800-662-2122.
1987 MAZDA RX7 86K 22
$3500obo new motor new brakes good
condition. Call Ray 321-8668. Leave
message.
95 FLEETWOOD EDGEWOOD
14 x 76 3 br2bath garden tub, dish-
washer, shed & fence. Payoff $17,500.
Located in Birchwood Sands Est
Greenville. Call (919)465-8711 or
(919)778-4207 owner.
AFRAID TO STAND IN front of
your class? Make your presentation a
video. Having a party? Remember it
forever, with professional quality
videos. 758-8983.
THE BROTHERS OF PI Kappa
Alpha would like to congratulate the
members of the spring pledge class!
THANKS AGAIN TO SIGMA for
letting us borrow your house for yet
another successful spring rush! Pi Kap-
pa Alphas
THE SISTERS OF GAMMA SIG
would like to welcome the Spring of
'97 Lambda pledge class: Shanita An-
derson, Penny Ashby, Michelle Brum-
field, Sandi Coves, Mary Ruth Davis,
Michelle Edmundson, Jessica Fur-
lough, Michelle Graham, Allison How-
ell, Jenny Kassen, Jennifer Krumbein,
Leslie O'Brien, Emily Perry, Dana Wa-
ters, Kati Watson, Marianna Weigand,
Angie Williams and Carrie Williams.
Good Luck during your pledge period.
Love, the Sisters.
PI LAMBDA PHI WOULD like to
thank all brothers and pledges on a
successful Valentine's Day Party. Great
job social committee.
CONGRATULATIONS ASHLEY
ON YOUR lavalier from Steven.
We're all so excited for you! Love, your
Alpha Delta Pi Sisters.
THANKS ALPHA XI DELTA for
a great time last Tuesday at O'Malley's!
Pi Kappa Alpha!
PI LAMBDA PHI: WEhadagreat
time at the makin' money social last
Thursday night. We never realized all
the different ways that you can make
money! Let's get together again some
time. Show us the money Love, the
sisters of Gamma Sigma Sigma.
Wake 'n Bake for
Spring Break 1997
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discounts Endless Summer Tours 1-
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ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 3 bedroom house with 2 girls.
Rent 13 utilities, phone & cable.
Near campus in nice neighborhood.
Call Kim @ 758-2800 or 830-9036 af-
ter 6 pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMME-
DI AT ELY, 3 blocks from campus,
$250 a month, 13 utilities central ac,
washerdryer, garage, plenty of parking,
fireplace, MarkGene 752-9652.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 2BR
apt. $175 plus utilities cable phone.
No pets. Clean person. Responsible 4
blocks from ECU. Near ECU bus ro-
ute can Kelley 830-3885.
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washer dryer
hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM 1
12 bath townhouse wd hookup, fire-
place, dishwasher, disposal, free cable
ECU bus route lease runs through May
30th. Deposit only $350 rent $415.00.
Call 830-1469.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
STUDIO APARTMENT AT
RINGGOLD Towers available for
sublease, $310month, fully furnished.
Call (919) 552-9293 or call Ringgold
Towers Mgmt. - 752-2865.
ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT. AVAILABLE immediately.
12 block from campus. Heat water &
utilities included. $325 monthly. Con-
tact Jamie at 413-0615. Perfect for
student!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: ASAP to share 2 br 1 12 bath
townhouse $225.00 monthly and 12
utilitiesphone on ECU bus route. Call
Laura at 756-7128.
SENIORS! GRADUATING IN
DECEMBER, 1997? Need an apart-
ment July - Dec. 97? So do we. Look-
ing for ns roommates for Fall semester.
Call Bob 328-72.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen, and
living room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yards. Conveni-
ent to campus and the hospital.
$l,000mo deposit. 524-4111.
THREE AND FOUR BEDROOM
houses for rent within walking distance
of ECU. Rents as low as $400.00 a
Month Fenced backyards, wash-
erdryer hookups, central heat, one
with central air. Must see to believe!
Call 830-9502.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED TO teach sum-
mer camps in NC & SC. Great pay!
Flexible scheduling! Free weekends!
College experience not required. For a
great summer job, CALL ESPRIT!
CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-3223!
ATTENTION STUDENTS:
EARN EXTRA cash stuffing envel-
opes at home. All materials provided.
Send SASE to Midwest Distributors,
RO. Box 624, Olathc, KS 66051. Imme-
diate response.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
CARTOONIST NEEDED TO
HELP design product label. Will ne-
gotiate pay with artist. Call Evan at
752-8837.
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WANTED: OWNER OF lost
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THURS FEB. 20 - FACULTY
Recital, Nathan Williams, clarinet,
Christopher Uiffers, bassoon with Eliz-
abeth Norvcll Uiffers, piano, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. Fri
Feb. 21 - Junior Recital, Leslie Higger-
son, violin, Christina McNeeley, bas-
soon, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
pm. Sat Feb. 22 - Guest Recital, Car-
ol Wincenc, flute, with faculty John B.
O'Brien, piano, and the ECU Chamber
Orchestra, Stephen Blackwelder, Con-
ductor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00
pm. Mon Feb. 24 - Chamber Singers,
Rhonda Fleming, Conductor, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. Tues
Feb. 25 - Guest Recital, Elaine Funaro,
harpsichord, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm. For additional information,
call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline
at ECU-4370.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS,
AND Allies for Diversity will meet on
Feb. 20 at 7:30 pm in room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Hope to
see you there!
THE GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics will be
conducting an Athletics (Track &
Field) Coaches Training School on Sat-
urday, February 1st from 9am - 4pm for
all individuals interested in volunteer-
ing to coach Track & Field. We arc also
looking for volunteer coaches in the
following sports: Swimming, Bowling,
Gymnastics, Rollerskating, Powerlift-
ing. Volleyball, and Equestrian. No ex-
perience is necessary. For more infor-
mation please contact Dwain Cooper
at 830-4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
THE ECU CHAPTER OF theNa-
tional Student Speech Language Hear-
ing Association is sponsoring their 27th
Annual Speech Language and Hearing
Symposium, February 27th and 28th,
at the Ramada Inn, Greenville, NC�
For more information, please call the
ECU Speech Language and Hearing
Clinic at (919)328-4405.
BASKETBALL 1-ON-l entry
deadline: Be sure to register for the 1-
on-1 basketball tourney by 6:00 pm
Rsb. 26 in the main office of the SRC.
PRIORITY REGISTRATION
FOR LIFEGUARD training: If
you're planning to be that "Baywatch"
lifeguard, then be sure to register for
lifeguard training 8:00am. - 6:00pm,
Feb. 26 - Mar. 5 in the SRC main of-
fice.
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHA-
MAS PARTY Cruise! 6 days $279!
Includes all meals, parties & taxes!
Great Beaches & Nightlife! Leaves
from Ft. Lauderdale! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
WAITSTAFF DAYTIME AND
NIGHT shifts available. Must be
able to work at least two weekday
lunch shifts. No Calls. Please apply in
person between 8am and 10am or 2pm
and 4pm. Professor O'Cools Winn Dix-
ie Market Place.
EXCITING SUMMER JOB
WITH housing, first come, cooks po-
sition now available. Kitty Hawk Pizza
at Kitty Hawk, NC
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's Cloth-
ing Store, is now filling part-time posi-
tions. Employees are needed for Sat-
urdays andor weekdays between 10:00
am and 6:00 pm. The positions arc for
between 7 and 20 hours per week, de-
pending on your schedule and on busi-
ness needs. The jobs are within walk-
ing distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commensu-
rate with your experience and job per-
formance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person to
Store Manager, Joan's Fashions, 423 S.
Evans Street, Greenville (on the
Downtown Mall).
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
Things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
PET SITTER: PRE-VET SEN-
IOR offering in-home care for your
pets while you are away. References
available. Call Brian for more'informa-
tion at 752-1891.
BABYSITTER AVAILABLE.
LOTS of experience. Great with
kids. Junior at ECU. References avail-
able. Call Jen 754-2075.
MR. MORTON INVITES YOU
to tune in tomorrow for the Mr. and
Mr. dating game. Listen and help
Amanda find true love. The Mr. and
Mr. Morning Show MWF mornings
from 6am to 10am on 91.3 WZMB.
Spring Break '97
Panama City
Beach
from $129
7nights Beachfront
�Daily Free Drink Parties
�WalkTo Best Bars
�Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
VMCDiscAMEX
J
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(99)
Advertise
PI LAMBDA PHI CONGRATU-
LATIO N S on your new house! Love,
Alpha Delta Pi
PI KAPPA ALPHA WOULD like
to thank Alpha Delta Pi, Delta Zcta,
and Tau Kappa Epsilon for a great time
at our quad social with the Veldt!
PILAMS, CONGRATULA-
TIONS ON THE house and pledg-
es. Respect both and fill both with the
true Pilam spirit. Rex, remember you
are the future. Phantom Writers.
PILAM BROTHERS A WISE man
once said, "You have to walk through
the bottom of the valley before you can
climb to the top of the Mountain"
Happy Climbing. Phantom Writers.
PI DELTA A LITTLE LATE,
but our social was great. Tomorrow
night will be a blast from the past.
Love, Pi Lambda Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS JEN
HOLLAWAY FOR being Senior
Greek of the week! Love, Your Alpha
Delta Pi Sisters.
SPRING BREAK '97. PANAMA
CITY Boardwalk Beach Resort
$129 7nights beachfront, daily free
drink parties, walk to best bars
Group discounts Endless Summer
Tours 1-800-234-7007.
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach "Summit" luxury condos next to
Spinnaker. Owner discount rates
(404)355-9637.
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO
CALL LEISURE TOURS AND GET
FREE INFO FOR SPRING BREAK
PACKAGES TO SOUTH PADRE,
CANCUN, JAMAICA AND FLORI-
DA. 1-800-838-8203.
GAMMA BETA PHI THERE will
be a meeting for all members on Tues-
day, March 4 at 6:00 pm in Speight Au-
ditorium in the Jenkins Arts Center.
ALPHA CHI PLEDGE CLASS
car wash on Saturday, February 22nd
from 9 am - 4 pm at the Fuel Doc (the
Exxon Station) comer of 10th and
Greenville Blvd. Phi Sigma Pi wants to
see you there!
WILDERNESS MEDICINE
WORKSHOP: Do you want to leam
about wilderness medicine? Come
join us on Feb. 25. Be sure to sign up
by Friday, Feb. 21 at 6:00 in the main
office of the SRC.
RELAY RACE RALLY: Join the
Rec Fan club on Friday, Feb. 21 in the
SRC to participate in the relay race ral-
ly from 9:00-11:00 pm.
EARN $200! LOOKING for col-
lege aged males that have not exer-
cised for 1-2" years to take part in re-
search study consisting of I week of
exercise and tests. Interested? Call
328-4688, ask for Chris Shaw.
SIGN UP FOR A BB&TEast Caro-
lina University credit card and get a
FREE t-shirt! When? February 25
(Tuesday) and February 26 (Wednes-
day) from 10 am until 1 pm. Where?
In front of the Student Stores. Don't
Forget Your Student ID!
BEACH HORSEBACKRID1NU:
CEDAR Island, NC : come horse-
backriding with us on March 2. Be
sure to register by 6.00 pm on Feb 21
in the main office of the SRC. i
AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING
BREAK! PANAMA City! room with
kitchen near bars $119! Daytona-Best
Location $139! Florida's new hotspot-
Cocoa Beach Hilton $169! spring-
breaktravei.com 1-800-678-6386
Everything
moves fast in
the classifieds!
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. Ws can
help you obtain funding. Thousands
of awards available to all students. Im-
mediate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities, soror-
ities & groups. Any campus organiza-
tion can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00VISA application.
Call 1-800-932-0528 cxt. 65 Qualified
callers receive Free T-Shirt.
FREE DOG TO GOOD home.
Lab and chow mix 11 months old.
Caught up on ail shoo. Call Kevin or Jeff
758-1348.
��SPRING BREAK 97 - Don't be
left out, space limited Cancun and
Jamaica from $429. Call STS @ 1-800-
648-4849 for more info.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
We Need Timberland boots
and shots! Good Jeans.
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVL GAP, ETC.
Wfe also buy: GOLD & SILVER - Jewelry & Corns - Abo taken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's. CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 200 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & nng buzzer
with us in
The East
OPEN LINE RATE
ADDITIONAL WORDS-OVER 25-
STUDENT LINE RATE
(Must present a valid ECU I.D
3 dollars
5 cents
2 dollars
to qualify)
Bold type1 dollar extra
ALL CAPS type1 dollar extra
,HTO


Title
The East Carolinian, February 20, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 20, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1190
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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