The East Carolinian, February 18, 1997







Car vandalism, break-ins on rise
Jeff gentry
SAFKTT AMD TMNSFOKTATIOH IMUIS
STAFF WRITE
rash of car vandalism and break-ins have
compelled the ECU Mice Department and
Parking and Traffic Services to team up to try
to prevent more of these types of crimes.
Since Jan. 31, there have been 13 reports of
vandalism to cars on campus. The majority of
these have been in the parking lot on Reade
St. Some of these have involved thefts from
die cars, ranging firom radios to a hubcap, while
most have been just vandalism. No suspects
have been identified in any of the incidents.
"We have had she damage to property com-
plaints, most of these involving someone walk-
ing by and breaking a window or knocking a
mirror off, said ECU roHoc Assistant Director
Tom Trounce.
Since Jan. 31, there have been seven cases
in the Reade St. parking lot, two at Minges
Coliseum, and one each at Eppes Middle
School, Belk Hall, the Allied Health building,
and on 14th St. and Berkery St.
According to police, most of these inci-
dents appear to be random due to the nature
of the damage and the time of day the vandal-
�sm oocurreo.
"It appears that there is not ready a pattern
to these incidents, other than the number of
incidents in the Reade St. lot Ybunce said.
Three incidents, however, do seem to be
"Vtfe had three last week � actually all on
one day � that started downtown ounce
said. "Whoever it was appeared to be walking,
and started in the Reade St. lot and continued
up by Belk Hall and then went over to the rail-
road tracks near Berkeley, just breaking out car
windows. He didn't steal anything, he just
picked up a rock and smashed the windows.
One of the victims, Karl Russell, had his
jeep broken into twice in the same week, in
two different parking lots on Reade St.
"The first time my radio was stolen and a
piece got broken off my dash Russell said.
"The second time they got my console that
was sitting between my seats. The first time I
had left my door unlocked and they just
opened it, but the second time they cut my
window to get in.
Russell also said there was about $900 dol-
lars worth of damage done to his jeep.
ECU Police and Parking and Traffic
Services met last week to discuss this growing
problem.
"Right now, we are waiting for the design
engineers to get back with us on lighting
schemes and the addition of emergency
phones in the Reade St. parking lot said
Director of Transportation Services James
Midgette.
"We are also going to be working in con-
junction with the police to extend patrol hours
through the evening, and there are plans for
temporary lighting in the parking lot until the
permanent ones are installed Midgette said.
Irounce also said that using common sense
is a good way to prevent break - in from hap-
pening.
"People should not leave valuables or
SfiCM.PAGU
This ear, parked in the ECU Pafiee DepartmenTs parking hit
I at
oneis
Three campus restaurant presented with "Golden PC Awards
Three campus restaurants at ECU have been
swarded the "Golden A Award by the
Environmental Health Division of the Pitt
Counnty Health Department. The Wright
Place, Croatan and Mendenhall Dining Hall
were recognized for their outstanding sanita-
tion records. The department presents the
annual award to establishment which have
maintained a sanitation grade of 95 or higher
during each quarterly inspection,
Managua from the three campus reataraunts
wilt receive the awards at the febraury 25
Board of Health meeting The meeting will
begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Agricultural Extension
Auditorium located at 403 Government Circle in Greenville.
Sengel challenges traditional view of Sidney's Poetics
Renaissance scholar Deniz Sengel of Trinity College will lecture on "Truth and Lying; The
Theory of Reading in Philip Sidney's Theory of Poetry" on Thura Reb. 20, in Room 2014 of the
General Classroom Building. A r eptkm will follow in the (acuity Lounge of the Department of
English, which is sponsoring Dr. Senegal's talk.
Sengel, currently a visiting assistant professor of English at Trinity College in Hartford,
Connecticut, holds her Ph.D. from New Kbfk University and has taught there, as well as at the
Catholic University of America, and at Bosphorus University and Mimar Sinan University in her
Native turkey She has edited three collections on in and aesthetics published in Istnabul, and
her book The Mien Icon is Scheduled for publication this year.
Lecture and reception are both open to the public, and all are invited to attend.
Doctoral student at ECU wins Student Research Award
Murvin Raymond Hymel Jr a first-yeard Ph.D.
student in the ECU School of Allied Health
Sciences, is one of five students in the U.S. to
receive a 1500 Student Research Award from
the American Academy of Audioiogy.
� Hymel, who is pursuing his doctorate in
Communication Sciences and Disorders, has
been studying the effect of aging on the ability
to listen in noisy surroundings.
Hymel was one of approximately 200 audioi-
ogy student researchers in competition for the
five awards granted thi year. The five were
selected by a review committee that evaluated
their research projects, and they will present
their findings in forum at the academy's April
17-20 national convention in Port Lauderdale.
Before coming to ECU, Hymel received his underfgraduate degree in international relations
form the University of New Orleans. He served 13 years in the U.S. Army, including a tour of
duty in the Persian Gulf, leaving active service with the rank of captain.
ECU divided into three voting districts
District Three seat
explains effects of change
Jacqueline D. Kellum
AUTS ANO STUDIES ISSUF.S
STAFF WFITSt
Due to some district changes which were
recently voted on, ECU has been divided into
three voting districts. The campus was formerly
split between two districts, ami there was some
concern from a small group of students that the
new split would lessen the voting power of the
student body.
Those students, including members of the
College Democrats, College Republicans and
the Student Government Association, were pre-
scm at the meeting on Thursday night to object
to this action, but the council voted 5-0 to
approve the plan.
The main redistricting decision affecting
ECU is that College Hill is now in District Four,
they were previously in District Three. The rest
of the campus is divided between Districts Two
and Three.
Inez Ridley, associate director for facility
managemendat ECU, currently holds the coun-
cil seat for District Three. She says that
although some students were shifted around,
there shouldn't be any major impact on their
voting power, although other ideas.were consid-
ered.
"There was some talk cf having their own
representative, and of having all the students in
one district Fridley said.
Pridley called attention to the fact that not
all ECU students live on campus, and that even
if ECU was fitted into one district, there would
soil be off-campus students voting in other dis-
tricts.
The point was made that night that it actu-
ally increases the students' voting power,
because they can now impact throe districts
Fridley said.
Ridley said that if the majority of students
decided they wanted to influence the elections,
they have die power of numbers to do so
"If 17,000 students decided to go vote, they
could take any or all of the seats on the council
Ridley said.
Redistricting the town is a very complex
process, concrelied by rules and laws rrganlaig
protected classes of voters, and driven by num-
bers and statistics, and which voters fail into
which district is determined by these and other
factors.
"One district will pick up pieces of one
another to balance things out Ridley said.
No ECU students were in attendance at
either of the first two meetings when the redis-
tricting was discussed, and none of the groups
SEE
I.MGE3
Television-portrayed asteroid really happened
Scientists find evidence
of dinosaur killer
WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists who drilled
core samples from the ocean bed said Sunday
they have found "smoking gun" evidence that
a huge asteroid smashed into the Earth 65 mil-
lion years ago and probably killed off the
dinosaurs.
"We've got the smoking gun said Richard
D. Norris, leader of an international ocean
drilling expedition that probed the Atlantic
Ocean floor in search of asteroid evidence. "It
is proof positive of the impact
Norris said the expedition recovered three
drill samples that have the unmistakable sig-
nature of an asteroid impact about 65 million
yean ago. The drill cores include a thin brown-
ish section that the scientists called the "fire-
ball layer" because it is thought to contain bits
of the asteroid itself.
"These neat layers of sediment bracketing
the impact have never been found in the sea
before Norris said in a telephone interview.
The scientists, working on the drill ship
Joides Resolution, spent five weeks off the
east coast of Florida collecting cores from the
ocean floor in about 8,500 feet of water. The
team penetrated up to 300 feet beneath the
sea bed, drilling past sediments laid down at
the time of the dinosaur extinction.
The heat of the impact would have been so
intense, said Norris, that the stony asteroid
would have instantly been reduced to vapor
and thrown high into the sky. It then snowed
down, like a fine powder, all over the globe.
Although the dinosaur-killing iarrpact
occurred in the southern Gulf of Mexico,
Norris went to the Atlantic Ocean, believing
that waves from the impact would have
washed completely across Florida.
Robert W. Corel), assistant director for
Geosciences of the National Science
Cultural Center explores African-American relationships: past and present
STAFF REPORTS
MINORITY STUDENT ISSUES
In the celebration of Black History
Month, The Ledonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center will be presenting
an African-American Men and Women,
Courtship, Marriage and Family workshop on
Wednesday, at 6:30 p.m. in Room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center. The keynote
speaker for this workshop is Brenda Verner,
of Verner Communications. The workshop is
free, and the ECU community and general
public are invited.
The workshop will highlight these areas
of discussion:
Media stereotyping of African-American
culture
Manifestations and destructive affects of
self-hate
Courtship: past and present
African-American sexuality; both real and
perceived
The business of the family
Redefinition of positive relationship mod-
els
Setting cultural standards for excellence
Editor's Note: TEC mitt he covering Ms work-
shop more in-depth as a part ofour black history
month coverage, deck Thursday's edition for full
coverage of Ms event.
Predominately black universities tackle student loan default problem
lifestyle 6
Black History
explored
opinionS
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the east Carolinian
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RALEIGH (AP) � The average number of stu-
dents at historically black colleges and universi-
ties who default on loans is 14 percent higher
than the number of students at majority-white
universities who do the same.
Some of the schools with high default rates
are attacking the problem by creating a new
position in the financial aid department that has
turned into a vital part of the school � the default
manager.
Alfreds Carrington, the default manager at
Shaw University in Raleigh, spends her days
counseling loan applicants, explaining interest
rates and hounding borrowers when payments
show up late or not at all.
"Vre stress the consequences of taking out a
loan and we stress that the very last option
should be to take out a ken said Carrington,
who was appointed to Shaw's newly created
position at the start of this school year. Those
things hadn't been stressed before
Shaw students who take out educational
loans must make a trip to Carrington's office
beforehand and listen to her spiel. She lectures
them. She makes them fill out household bud-
gets and other financial worksheets.
Just before students graduate, Carrington
calls them in again for more of the same.
And if they miss payments, they'll hear plen-
ty more from her.
Historically black colleges and universities
across North Carolina have taken similarly
aggressive tactics, and their default rates have
dropped.
Of North Carolina's 11 historically black col-
leges and universities, only Barber-Scotia,
College in Concord, at 29.9 percent, and
Livingstone in Salisbury, at 26.9 percent,
exceeded the federal threshold in 1994, the
most recent year for which data are available.
Most are steadily whittling down their default
rates, following a nationwide trend since the
(
Department of Education stepped up enforce-
ment and sanctions in the early 1990s.
Under federal law, colleges that carry default
nuts of more than 25 percent for three consecu-
tive years can become ineligible for student-loan
programs. Historically black colleges and univer-
sities are exempt, but c !y until Jury 1, 1998.
Lawmakers are considering whether to extend
the exemption as they renew the Higher
Education Act, which expires in September.
"Not only are we serving students who arc
not very well off and desperately in need of assis-
tance when they are in college, but they have a
problem in obtaining employment once graduat-
ing said Julius Chambers, chancellor at
NCCU, which has worked its default rate down
to 7.1 percent.
"We still have a significant earning gap
between blacks and whites he said. "Until we
can eliminate the barriers that continue to limit
opportunities for people to gain employment, I
think one should expect that the historically
black colleges and universities will need that
exemption
"The federal government has become much
more persistent, and that's made us much more
persistent said Wanda White, financial aid.
director at St. Augustine's College in Raleigh,
which has slashed its default rate in half- to 12.2
percent. � -
"When we started looking more closely
White said, "we started finding a lot of errors ;
Rut of a default manager's work is to make-
sure the government knows what has
to students after graduation, particularly
who need deferments, so they aren't counted as
being in default
"So often it's just a case of the student not
knowing the facts about the lender or the lender
not knowing the facts about the student
Carrington said. "Setting it all straight is making
a big difference





.news
Distillery complaint reveals problems in Durham
Beverage Control system
DURHAM (AP) - A complaint from a distillery revealed that the Durham
County Alcoholic Beverage Control system had run up more than $1 million
in liquor bills and was in total disarray
State Alcoholic Beverage Control officials took over the system in January,
soone after the distillery complained that Durham owed it $138,000. While
looking into the matter, ABC officials discovered that the system had run up
$1.2 million in overdue liquor bills, had incurred a $53,000 penalty for a late
tax payment to the state; had improperly back-dated checks; and was respon-
sible for $1300 in phone calls to telephone sex lines, according to Mike
Herring, state ABC administrator.
The Durham County Alcoholic Beverage Control system operates 1Z
stores as part of the state's monopoly on spirit sales to bars, restaurants and
consumers.
Laws light on vandalism
ASHEVILLE (AP) - Angry victims and frustrated attorneys say the state laws
for vandalism must be stiffened or the problem will continue to worsen.
Vandalism arrests in North Carolina almost tripled between 1975 and
1995. Wfestem North Carolina has been particularly hard hit.
In Henderson County, vandals spray-painted walls and carpets, pulled
down more than 100 ceiling tiles, emptied fire extinguishers, cut telephone
lines, poured soda in art office computer, broke two aquariums and spray-
painted an office copier at Dana Elementary School last Jury. Two boys, ages
11 and 14 were charged with causing $200,000 in damages.
But in North Carolina, the amount of damage a vandal creates matters lit-
tle. If they haven't been convicted of any other offense, state law prevents
judges from sentencing them to time in prison.
across
Ul'ltlU1 "
campuses
Lecturer at Appalachian resigns amid allegations of
harassment
An Appalachian State University lecturer from the philosophy and religion
department resigned early this month after three female students filed com-
plaints against him with University Police.
According to three separate University Police reports, the women said Dr.
Young Mann Park "inappropriately touched" them in his office located in
I.G. Greer Hall.
A university police spokesperson said that a further investigation into the
reports is on-going. . ,
According to university records, Park was hired in 19 to teach in the
philosophy and religion department.
Park was hired as a temporary replacement for Dr. OHyun Park who is
currently in Japan studying Japanese religion and has been with the univer-
sity for 26 years. The two men are not related.
Dr. Young Mann Park is a native of Korea and a graduate of Berkeley
University. After graduating, he was hired at Appalachian.
One of Park's colleges, Dr. Frans van der Bogcrt, said, "Dr. Park was a very
serious, studious and religious man. He was very much into meditation and
was very spiritual ,
Bogcrt also said that Park had a "cultural misunderstanding when it
came to American society. '
Department Chairperson of Philosophy and Religion Dr. Alan Hauser,
said, it is most unfortunate that this has happened and our primary concern
is with the students
Hauser also said that nothing like the reported incidents has happened in
the 15 years that he has been at Appalachian.
N.C. State senator wants formal protection of gay
rights
As part of the ongoing struggle to eliminate discrimination, a resolution was
presented to the Student Senate which urges that a sexual orientation clause
be added to to the university's Non-Discrimination Policy.
the resolution, which goes to committee over the next two weeks, would
allow for a formal statement of sexual non-discrimination to be added to the
N.C. State undergraduate catalog.
According to Scott Startin, who co-introduced the resolution, the univer-
sity's official position regarding the issue agrees with the proposed sexual ori-
entation clause, but has not been formally printed in a medium that every
student and faculty member has access to.
"This would be a clear statement of prop or conduct for every member of
the N.C. State community Startin said. "The non-discrimination policy get
printed in the undergraduate catalog, that every student get
One striking difference betweer the proposed clause and those already
listed within the non-discriminatio. policy, is that every group currently pro-
tected by the policy is also protect. J under federal law, whereas the group
in question is not.
This means "the proposed clause would no really have an effect, in a legal
context Starin said.
New organization formed at U.T. to increase women's
safety
A new student group on the University of Tennessc Knoxvillc, campus is
out to make some changes by taking the safety me? es instigated by UT a
step further.
TOTAL CHANGE is the newest women's group on the campus. ll�e
acronym stands for The Only True Action League - Changing Hateful
Attitudes, Needing Good Examples. TOTAL CHANGE is a recently formed
band of 20 students who are dedicated to women's safety and equality issues.
"A lot of people didn't feel safe on campus said kristy Starks, a senior in
English who took part in the formation of the group. "Wfe decided something
needed to be done .
Tb better this situation, Starks and a circle of crime prevention-minded
students set out to improve upon UTs attempts at keeping students safe.
In order to emphasize their idea, TOTAL CHANGE members made
posters satirizing the green boards and hung their signs over the stands. The
group also posted flyers with personal awareness tips around campus.
Events:
Parents who smoke may give children noxious snack
ATLANTA (AP) - The government is highlighting another side effect of
smoking: Thousands of U.S. children get sick each year eating cigarettes.
Eighty-one percent of the 9,733 people who ate tobacco products in 1995
were children ages 6 and under, the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention said Thursday Of those 9,733,47 percent got sick.
According to a separate study in Rhode Island, 146 children ages 6 months
to 2 years swallowed a nicotine product, and 62 percent of them ate cigarettes
or cigarette butts. One child ate pipe tobacco, the CDC said.
One-third of the children who swallowed the cigarettes and butts vomit-
ed, gagged and had pale or flushed skin, but all of the children recovered.
Youngsters whose parents smoked in front of them were four times more
likely to eat nicotine products.
Sporting goods companies join to fight child labor
NEW YORK (AP) - Dozens of sporting goods companies, including Nike and
Reebok, are joining a campaign to halt soccer ball production by Pakistani
children, The New York Times reported today.
As many as 10,000 children under 14 spend 10 hours a day stitching the
balls for pennies. Last summer, the U.S. government began a campaign to dis-
courage Americans from buying child-made balls.
A new coalition of sporting goods companies and labor groups were to
announce a pun today to try to end soccer ball production by Pakistani chil-
dren within 18 months.
North American and European soccer enthusiasts have expressed concern
since 1995 over reports that soccer balls were made by children. Last fall, the
Federation Internationale dc Fbotbol Association (FIFA) said it would not
endorse soccer balls made by children.
WEB Dubois. activist, organizes the first Pan-African Congress
Gambia Independence Day
Lemuel Haynes. first Black minister to serve for a White congre-
gation, becomes the first Black person to receive an honorary
degree (an MA) form a White College (Middlebury College)
Dates:
February 17.1942
celebrated February 18
rfr
This Week in. B.lack History
Trmr
Sidney Poitier. actor, born on this day
ia
(This list is a compilation of historical facts
and events that took place during different
years during the week of February 17-21
Malcom X, activist and Black nationalist, assassinated
years during the week of February 17-21. Huev Newton, founder of the Black Panther Party, bcrn on this
Match the events with their perspective dates
to test your knowledge of the contributions of day�
African-Americans to society. Answers will be "
posted in Thursay's edition of TEC.)
February 19.1919
February 20.1900
February 20.1927
February 21.1804
J.F. Pickering patents his airship invention
February 21. 1365
,1v, 0u- Of
John M. Savage
Criminal Trial Practice
Civil Trial Practice
830-4950
retailer forced to deal with first
unionized store
TORONTO (AP) - After resisting unionization efforts for 35 years, ViM-Mart
Stores must deal with organized labor for the first time after losing a dispute
in Canada.
A provincial labor board ruled Tuesday that Wal-Mart implicitly threat-
ened to close its Windsor branch in Ontario if workers voted to unionize. The
workers rejected unionization by a 151-43 margin last May, but the board said
the outcome was "meaningless" because of deliberate efforts to threaten job
security
Saying a second vote would be equally meaningless, the Ontario Labor
Relations Board ordered immediate certification of the United Steelworkers
as representing workers at the Windsor store.
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RAs are responsible for helping maintain a safe, comfortable, friendly, and
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programmers, administrators, and informational sources for the residents.
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� Have at least a 2.5 grade point average.
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3 Tuesday. February 13, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
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Mitsubishi creates "model work-
place" to battle harassment
CHICAGO (AP) - Mitsubishi released plans today to create "a model work-
place" at its Illinois subsidiary where it had faced a federal sexual harassment
lawsuit.
The 34-point plan, written by a task force led by former U.S. Labor
Secretary Lynn Martin, creates new safeguards to ensure that harassment
complaints are taken seriously. It also takes steps to improve the working
atmosphere at the plant in central Illinois, and help employees advance in
their jobs.
"It is the right and smart thing to do. It is a business imperative Mrs.
Martin said.
She presented the plan to Tsuneo Ohinouye, chairman and chief execu-
tive officer of Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America Inc at a news
conference. Ohinouye promised the company would implement all the rec-
ommendations at the plant in Normal.
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission last year accused
company officials of tolerating widespread harassment of female workers.
The agency said 700 women may have been groped, propositioned and
insulted over the years. A private lawsuit was filed by 29 women making the
same claims.
Mitsubishi initially fought the accusations, but then pledged full cooper-
ation, fired 14 workers for harassment and created a task force to review poli-
cies.
The company tried to brief workers on the plan Tuesday, but few attend-
ed. "It's a big joke said Carl Thomas. "We all mind our p's and q's more,
but that's it. I'm fed up with it
IMMEDIATE OPENING:
The East Carolinian is looking for a responsible, resourceful and
punctual individual to cover an important series of articles. This
position is likely to become permanent and would make for a valu-
able resume entry. Applicants MUST be available on Mondays from
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and as needed on other days. Contact the news
editor at 328-6366 for details or stop by the office (2nd floor
Student Publications Building) and fill out an application. Fpr this
particular position, please mark the application: Attention News
Editor Re: Beat 9.
Explosives charges dismissed
SEATTLE (AP) - Prosecutors
dismissed an explosives charge
against a man accused of plotting to
kill federal agents after an FBI crime
lab technician acknowledged that a
federal report showed he mishan-
dled evidence.
Technician Robert Heckman tes-
tified Tuesday at the trial of six
Washington State Militia and
Freemen that his work had been
criticized in a secret draft report by
the Justice Department.
U.S. District Judge John C.
Coughenour last week released to
the defense the part of the report
questioning Heckman's credibility.
Heckman acknowledged that the
report said some explosives evi-
dence was mislabeled on lab reports
issued in December in the militia
case. He also said that a detonator
was mistakenly listed with an appar-
ent pipe bomb and other evidence
was attributed to the wrong defen-
Asteroid
continued from page 1
Foundation, said the core samples
are the strongest evidence yet that
an asteroid impact caused the
extinction.
"In my view, this is the most sig-
nificant discovery in geosciences in
20 years Corell said. "This gives us
the facts of what happened to life
back then. I would certainly call it
the smoking gun
The ship bearing the core sam-
ples returned to port on Friday and
the NSF announced the findings
Sunday, coincidentally just hours
before NBC was to air a movie about
a fictional asteroid hitting the Earth
and causing widespread destruction.
Geologist Walter Alvarez of the
University of California, Berkeley,
first proposed in 1980 that the
dinosaurs disappeared from fossil
history suddenly because of a mas-
Car
continued from page 1
money laying around in plain view
You nee said. "We had one guy leave
dant.
He said the lab reports were cor-
rected last week.
His testimony prompted the
U.S. attorney's office to drop an
explosives charge against John Lloyd
Kirk, identified as a Freemen mem-
ber.
Six militia activists and a sympa-
thizer are charged with plotting to
kill, attempt to kill or otherwise
attack federal agents. Some also face
weapons charges.
Defense lawyers claim their
clients are innocent and that FBI
agents were misled by an informant.
The FBI's handling of evidence
in the militia case came under
scrutiny after the draft report into a
whistle-blower's accusations
prompted transfer of three supervi-
sors from the lab at FBI headquar-
ters in Washington, D.C.
sive asteroid hit. At first, the theory
had few supporters.
But in 1989, scientists found evi-
dence of a huge impact crater north
of Chicxulub, on Mexico's Yucatan
Peninsula. Later studies found evi-
dence of debris washed out of the
Gulf by waves that went inland as
far as what is now Arkansas.
It's now widely believed that an
asteroid of six to 12 miles in diame-
ter smashed to Earth at thousands
of miles an hour. It instantly gouged
a crater 150 to 180 miles wide.
That energy release was more
powerful than if all of the nuclear
weapons ever made were set off at
once, said Norris. Billions of tons of
soil, sulphur and rock vapor were
lifted into the atmosphere, blotting
out the sun. Temperatures around
the globe plunged.
Up to 70 percent of all species,
including the dinosaurs, perished.
Among the survivors, scientists
believe, were small mammals that,
over millions of years, evolved into
many new species, including
$2 lying in the front of his car, and
someone broke out his window for
it. It ended up costing him $300 to
get his window replaced
"A lot of these things are what we
call 'crimes of opportunity and the
best way to discourage that is to put
valuables in the trunk or just take
them with you Youncc said.
Rank Yourself
1 to 10 In
�psp?i






Responsibility?
Commitment?
INTRODUCTORY OFFER
10i TRADE
OFF; BOOKS
Imagination?
Open Mindedness?
If you scored high and like being part of a team, pick
up an application for the position of ChairEieet for
ECU'S 1997 Homecoming Committee and Chair for
the 1998 Homecoming Committee. Onty students who
are currently freshman or sophomore status should apply.
Applications are available at the Mendenfcall Student Center information desk
or MSC 210. Application deadline is Friday, February 21,199? at 4pm.
For more information contact J.Marshall, Assistant Director of Student Activities,
MSC - 210, or call 328-4711.
Sale runs Monday, February 17 throusri Saturday, February 22. No otner discounts apply Special orders and periodicals excluded.
We're taking 10 OFF regular price trade books, Monday, February 17 through
Saturday, February M! (Plus, throughout February, non-text computer books arc 85 OFF!)
Why are we doing this? Its an introductory offer we want to introduce you to a
new member of the Student Stores management team! Come in and meet our Trade took
Manager Eden Cox. While you're there, check out the variety of trade books, including
fiction and non-fiction novels, computer reference, general reference, literary notes,
children titles, and more! And if there's a title you're looking for that we dent carry,
PLEASE LET US KNOW! Special orders arc no problem!
We arc here to support the educational mission of the university, and will do
whatever it takes to serve the needs of our customers!
A Brief Introduction
Eden Cox has been with the
Student Stores since 1991, initially
as a student assisting in various
departments. She took on full-time
responsibility of Trade Books ta.k.a.
General Reading Department), in
September 1996.
Eden received her undergradu-
ate degree in Elementary Education
from ECU in 1992, and earned her
master's degree in 1994. She is
currently pursuing a master's degree
in Aduk Education.
Fall & Spring Semester Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wrigh Building . 38-6731
http:www.studentstercs.ccu.edu
11
. ii
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Hey, tome in and cheek out the window display cases done by Merchandising students Sherri
Savage a Dana Tucker; Tomeika Mills a Leanne Griffin; and Tracey Weedslde O Nicole Chris!
The windows are in the Wright Building just outside the Student Store!





4 Tustdsy, Fsttysry 18, WP
opinion
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Let's talk about sex.
Okay, now that we have your attention, let's address the real issue. In this day and age, safe
sex is not only a matter of life and death, it can be a matter of a criminal record too. Last week
was Valentine's Day and National Condom Day. This week is Sexual Assault Vfeek. There's a
lot out there to worry about if you're going to be sexually active.
We at TEC aren't trying to spoon-feed you a position or trying to tell you whether to be sex-
ually active. We're simply saying whatever choice you make, make sure it's a safe, informed
choice.
By becoming aware about condoms and their effective use, a sexually active student can
protect themselves against sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancy. Condom
awareness, whether or not a student chooses this form of protection, can benefit a student just
by knowing it's available if and when they need it.
The transmission of STDs has been steadily increasing since 1988, according to the Center
for Disease Control. Not only will condom use prevent transmission of an STD, it may actu-
ally decrease the chances of the female getting cervical cancer. It could be the difference
between a safe sexual experience.
Participating in Sexual Assault Awareness Week can help students who choose to be sexu-
ally active remain physically and emotionally safe. One out of four women become rape vic-
tims. Almost 85 percent reported assaults by an acquaintance. Sexual assault can leave scars
on the inside and outside of a victim. Survivors have already celebrated that they are carrying
on with life after being sexually assaulted. There are rap sessions and lectures about sexual
awareness this week. There are several ways to show support � attend one of the lectures or
rap sessions; read the literature that's handed out; march in Thursday's "Take Back the Night"
March.
The activities offer students not only a chance to become aware about dealing with sexual
assault, but also how to prevent it and even how to make a relationship work better. Being
aware of sexual assault can also make a possible offender think twice before they commit a
crime.
College students have a lot to worry about without having to deal with stress from the dat-
ing scene. It may be a lot to deal with, but so are physical and emotional scars left by being
sexually assaulted or by contracting an STD.
Dating is scary enough, even for lucky ones in a monogamous relationship. Becoming aware
of ways to stay safe could save a life � if not yours, then maybe the life of someone you love.
OPINION!
OMNIUM
Homosexuals are people, too
It is time that the students at ECU
opened their minds and accepted
the fact that homosexuals ate peo-
ple, normal people with wants,
needs, desires and feelings. The
recent vandalization and threatening
phone calls to the B-GLAD organiza-
tion are signs of ignorance arid self-
ishness.
It is said that over half of the pop-
ulation has homosexual tendencies
or desires. I can't help but wonder if
the people who are most against
homosexuals are trying to condemn
them because of desires that they
have felt and are afraid to admit. It's
the classic case of suppressed homo-
sexuality. People are told that homo-
sexuality is wrong, and so they grow
up believing this, and during the
adolescent period, they are faced
with homosexual desires, dream and
fantasies. So, instead of realizing
that almost everyone has some
homosexuality inside them, they
repress the feelings and aim their
hostility at the group of people who
are homosexual. It is unfortunate,
but most people think that if you
have homosexual desires, that it
means that you are a homosexual. In
reality, homosexual tendencies are a
natural part of development of a per-
son's sexuality and in no way require
that a person be homosexual.
Homosexuality is not a personal
choice, but a natural part of sexuali-
ty. Who, in their right minds, would
choose to be the object of ridicule,
discrimination and outright mean-
ness? Oh, sure they can choose to
ignore those feelings inside and just
conform to what society would have
them, and many people have done
that, but it is not fair to say that they
have to do that. A person's sexuality
is personal and has no effect upon
their ability to love, or feel compas-
sion, or do a job, or get an education.
Homosexuals need comfort and sup-
port, even more than the average
person, and if we turn our backs on
them, and continue to condemn
them, than we are the ones who are
committing the sin.
It seems that people forget that
the most important thing in a rela-
tionship is not sex, but love. You
may not agree with homosexuality,
but how can you disagree with love?
Homosexuals are people, just like
heterosexuals. They have needs and
wants and desires and feelings, and it
makes me sad to see people who
believe that if someone is homosexu-
al, it means they are a freak of
nature, or that they are unnatural. A
person's sexuality should never con-
cern anyone but that person and his
or her chosen partner. In no way
does anyone's sexual preference
affect my life, and it is time we real-
ized that a person's choice is more
important than our personal opin-
ions. Keep your sexuality to yourself,
and donit worry so much about other
people's.
� � � � � ���������������������� "1
I Guest columnist application for Campus View
mil vour chance � U . - -erven, who TBC what you
think about a certain topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian
office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
I
� Name
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mission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content Other than those changes I will be notified of any
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Fitness for faculty should have price
To the Editor,
I would like to write in response
to the February 4 editorial entitled
"Faculty has right to be fit too" writ-
ten by LecturerTrainer Jim Bazluki.
I think that Mr. Bazluki has misstat-
ed some of his "facts" in his editorial
which should quickly be corrected.
"Facts" which are causing a lot of
confusion in the eyes of a certain
group of people on campus, namely
the acuity and staff.
For some six years now, both the
ECU and Greenville communities
have watched as the Student
Recreation Center has been erected.
1 point out the emphasis on the word
STUDENT for a reason. Many peo-
ple on this campus haven't taken
note of that part of the title, and I
think that it is time that somebody
does. Mr. Bazluki says in his article
that he would buy the excuse that
student fees paid for the center and
therefore should be only for their use
if the university did not use any state
monies, paid for by his taxes. Not to
disappoint you sir, but that is a fact,
not an excuse. Every single penny
that went towards this building was
paid by that line on each student's
bill every semester entitled "Student
Fees To be exact, ever since 1991
when the decision was made to build
the SRC. And just to correct another
"fact $18.1 million (the total cost of
the building) in students fees went
toward the building not just $11 mil-
lion.
I think it is also important to
point out that in all of his disagree-
ments, Mr. Bazluki did not once
thank the university or the depart-
ment of recreational services for
allowing him to use the building
FREE of charge during January. Not
until February 1 did a single faculty
or staff member have to show a mem-
bership card to enter the building.
And for that much, the membership
for staff and faculty for this semester
was reduced to $60, not the normal
price of $100.
Mr. Bazluki also sheds some light
on the issue that the building is paid
for, but fees are still being charged.
This, my fellow Pirates, is true. The
building has been built, and what a
beautiful piece of architecture it is.
But the price of keeping it that way is
certainly not free. Student fees,
along with membership fees paid by
faculty and staff, go to the upkeep of
the building. Activities such as aero-
bics and the climbing wall are extra-
for everyone, including students.
So, to be fair, Mr. Bazluki, you are
right. Faculty do have the right to be
fit too. But, just like everything else
in this world, it has a price. You might
think that it has no price to each and
every student on this campus, but in
all actuality it does. Look no further
than the bill that every student
receives each August and January.
And truthfully and very honestly, the
student pays for the "membership"
whether they use it or not. Those of
you who are members of the faculty
and staff have an option. So would
you like for the university to just pay-
roll deduct the fee from your pay-
check, whether you feel the need to
be fit or not?
Douglas Smith
Sophomore
Accounting
.
SGA isn't listening to students
To the Editor,
The Student Government
Association (SGA) is group of stu-
dents who should be doing their best
to represent us. So these students
are probably doing their best to hear
our opinions, right ?
Wrong!
These so-called "leaders" are not
listening to us, nor are they trying to
save students any money.
Why is it that the SGA executive
council claims they deserve free
tuition? Oh that's right, they work
really hard for us! Actually the only
thing they work hard at is making
sure no bills pass that will negatively
affect them. Maybe these "leaders"
should think back to why they chose
to join SGA Was it free tuition? Free
books? Money? The real reason any-
one should represent a body of peo-
ple is to help voice the body's opin-
ions, not just their own.
When the SGA voted down the
motion last week for them to begin
paying for their tuition and books,
they pretty much told the student
body that they do not care about us.
Maybe it is about time we have an
all-campus vote on this unbelievable
topic. But this would never be
allowed by the SGA They know that
a student with any intelligence
would vote "no" to free tuition to any
students. The SGA in my eyes is a
joke, and they will continue to play it
on us!
Greg W Rocchio
Senior
Biology
GUEST
Virw Column
Pant Wright
STUDENT MEDIA ADVISER
Calling
drivers
it is always refreshing somehow
when a researcher finally confirms
something that all of us perceptive
people in the world have known all
along. It allows us to don an "I knew
that" attitude and pat ourselves on
the back for being so astute.
Such an occasion happened
recently when two Canadian
researchers reported that talking on a
cellular telephone while driving is
dangerous.
Imagine that.
Carrying on a conversation on a
telephone smaller than the calculator
most people use while swerving a
two-ton automobile around slower
cars and crossing pedestrians is dan-
gerous?
Who'd have thought?
The researchers compared the
risk of talking on a cellular phone
while driving to driving while slight-
ly intoxicated (0.10 percent blood
alcohol level).
Well, duh
Teli me something we non-com-
municative drivers don't already
know.
You certainly don't have to be a
Canadian researcher to see that peo-
ple talking on their phones are slow-
ing, blocking, restricting, delaying
and impeding traffic. They are origi-
nating, precipitating, provoking,
prompting and causing dangerous
situations.
Just hit the road between home
and school (even here in the metrop-
olis of Purpleville) and you'll
encounter several of your fellow road
warriors who are making appoint-
ments for the afternoon, discussing
the Hornets' prospects for the com-
ing weekend or ordering Chinese
take-out anything but paying
attention to the road.
The researchers analyzed 26,798
cellular telephone calls made by 699
drivers who had been involved in
traffic accidents over a 14-month
period in 1994 and 1995.
They concluded that people using
a cellular telephone arc 4.3 times as
likely to have an accident as drivers
who are not. And those drivers using
hands-free phones are 5.9 times as
likely to have an accident.
(Hey, don't ask me. I'm just
reporting these numbers.)
And if that isn't enough good
news for one day. The National

Transportation Safety
Administration reports that more
than 35 million cellular phones are in
use in the U.S and more than 80 mil-
lion are expected to be in use by the
year 2000.
But the researchers arc quick to
add that no one is in favor of banning
the use of cellular phones by drivers,
just avoid unnecessary calls and keep
your conversation brief is the stan-
dard advice they offer.
That's like giving someone a mil-
lion dollars, but telling them to
spend it only when absolutely neces-
sary and never buy anything that
costs more than $50.
Or it's like saying that driving 125
mph down Greenville Blvd. in mid-
aftemoon is hazardous and irrespon-
sible, but if you're only going to the
store 10 blocks down the street
what the heck - go for it.
Don't get me wrong. I'm not advo-
cating that we take cellular phones
away from the drivers using them.
Nay, not so.
A cellular phone comes in very
handy when calling the police to
report the accident you've just
caused.
' pjM � t





review
When We Were
Kings
Original Motion Picture
Soundtrack
Jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The year is 1974. The setting is Zaire. Two of boxing's greatest champions -
Muhammad Alt and George Foreman - get ready to go toe-to-toe in a collos-
al fight billed as "The Rumble in the Jungle This is the subject of the new
documentary, When M Wnr Sup.
The film, directed by Leon Gast and 20 years in the making, chronicles
the fight's six-week history and the trials and tribulations of its underdog,
Ali. TUrning a unfortuitous delay (caused by a gash above Foreman's eye) into
an all-out media circus, Ali used the unforeseen six weeks leading up to the
match as psychological warfare against Foreman. Through this process he
became a champion for the African people, who took up the chant "Ali,
Bomaye ("Ali, kill him) in support.
The film opened nationwide on Valentine's Day and, although we didn't
gti it in Greenville, the soundtrack is available. Why would anyone want the
soundtrack to a boxing documentary? Good question.
The Rumble in the Jungle" was not just a fight taking place in the
Belgian Congo. It was also the impetus for a concert like no other, billed as
the "African Woodstock The concert was to take place over the three days
leading up to the Ali-Fbreman match. The fight promoters didn't want sim-
ply a warmup to the fight, either. They wanted to put on a musk festival that
would showcase the greatest black musicians of two continents. And they got
what they wanted. Sorta.
Although the concert went on as planned, with big names like James
Brown. B.B. King, Miriam Makeba, The Spinners, The Jazz Crusaders, Bill
Withers and The Pointer Sisters, the six-week delay almost killed it. The sta-
dium where it took place seated 80,000 people, but only about 5,000 seats
were filled when the concert began.
Nonetheless, the filmmakers caught all of it on tape. And although the
turnout was less than the promoters expected, the concert itself was incred-
ible. Not only did the music come from the infamous American performers
listed above, but also from 18 of the best musical acts on the African conti-
nent.
Unfortunately, for one reason or another, the soundtrack for the film does-
n't give as much breadth or depth as it seems would be warranted by this con-
cert.
Of the American acts included in the event, only five of them make it
onto the album - James Brown (The Payback" and "Gonna Have a Funky
Good Time), B.B. King ("Sweet Sixteen" and "I Got Some Help I Don't
Need"), Bill Withers ("Ain'r No Sunshine" and "You"), The Spinners ("I'll
Be Around" and "I'm Coming Home") and The Jazz Crusaders ("Put It
Where You Want"). Of the African acts, only three are on the record (none of
them are named) and the total time devoted to their chanting is a little over
a minute.
Which makes it even more puzzling that the soundtrack producers decid-
ed to include three tracks by new artists. The Rigees, A Tribe Called Quest,
SEE
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netbvtes
Websites detail black
history and culture
colleen DeBaise
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE
February marks Black History
th, and whether you're in the
mood for learning or reflecting, a
number of websites offer information
about African-American culture, her-
itage and history.
For starters, if you're not sure why
February was set aside to celebrate
African-American achievements, read
about historian Carter Woodson on
the United States Information
Agency's website (usiahq.usis.
usemb.se:80topicsblackhiswood-
son.txt). Woodson, one of the first
blacks to receive a doctorate from
Harvard University, proposed "Negro
History Week" in 1929, believing
that black Americans must look back
before moving forward.
Biographies of important 19th
century African-Americans, such' as
Harriet Tubman and Sojurner Truth,
are located at Webcom's site
(www.webcom.combrightsource
blackfac.html), while a collage of
photographs greet visitors to the
Martin Ijithtr King Jr. Directory (www-
leland.stanford.edugroupKing)
The directory, a joint project from
the Martin Luther King Jr. Center in
Atlanta and Stanford University, fea-
tures King's speeches and a letter he
wrote from a Birmingham, Ala jail.
Don't miss the African-American
Mosaic (www.loc.govexhibitsafrican
intro.html) an extensive website cre-
ated by the Library of Congress for
the study of black history and cul-
ture Visitors can read about the
influence of prominent abolitionists
such as Frederick Douglass and
Harriet Beecher Stowe. The site also
features narratives by ex-slaves.
If all the historical texts are mak-
ing you bleary-eyed, unwind at Cafe
LosNegroes (www.losnegroes.com), a
New York-based virtual hangout for
blacks and latinos. "Da Bounca"
requests that you pick a nickname
and ID for its chat forums, so better
register "if you're not down with the
Cafe Crew
Your next destination after Cafe
LosNegroes might be NetNoir
(www.netnoir.com.), a San Francisco-
based netzine that presents info "in
such a way that anyone, from any
walk of life, that has any interest in
Afrocentric culture, can participate
NetNoir features a lifestyle section, in
which users can "explore the realm of
hip-hop and a business section with
tips for money management. The
"soul spa" page offers healthy eating
and fitness advice. Also, NetNoir's
current "Spotlight" page highlights
the people and events that have
inspired Black History Month.
Other netzines include mainstays
Essence (www.essence.com) and Vibe
(www.vibe.com), which offer dairy
news updates in "VtbeWm" and clips
of the latest music videos in
"HfeVideo
For an lovers, check out "an eclec-
tic cultural collection" on The
African American Home Page
(www.lainet.comjoejonesindex.
htm). Visitors can mull over a "digital
gallery" and order prints, such as the
"Million Man March Commemora-
tive Poster
Music aficionados can appreciate
the Archives of African American
Music and Culture at Indiana
University (www.indiana.edu
aaamcindex.html), which has a
searchable database of recordings,
radio programs and photographs.
A few mouse clicks away is the
National Civil Rights Museum
(www.mecca.orgcrightsncrm.htm
I), "where history is always happen-
ing The museum is located in
Memphis, Tenn on the site of the
Lorraine Motel where King was
assassinated in 1968. The virtual tour
SEE WH. PAGE 6
BlacfVoices ready to be heard
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Editor's Note: This is the first part of
a two-part article. Thursday's edition will
have a special follow-up interview with
Reginald Watson and Quentin Joyner.
Hot off their recent production of
the Martin Luthur King, Jr. play I've
Seen the Mountain Top and It Don't Look
So Good, the Thespians of Diversity
are diving immediately into another
show. This time the Thespians will
honor Black History Month by hon-
oring black history in general with
the play Black Voices From the Past,
which is set to be performed on
Wed Feb. 26.
Written by Reginald Watson, an
ECU English instructor and the
founder of the Thespians, Black Voices
is a history play that depicts various
historical figures and icons who
paved a progressive future for
African Americans. These figures
take on the form of actual people
from history, such as author Zora
Neale Hurston, to representatives
from certain historical moments,
such as a black soldier fighting the
Vietnam War.
Much of the play is presented
through expositions narrated by each
character, starting with a tribal chief
of a past Africa and traveling all the
way to Thurgood Marshall in pre-
sent-day America. Through the
monologues of these characters, the
audience leams about the cultures,
communities, struggles, triumphs,
sorrows and joys of African
Americans as a collective people. As
a result, the play is as educational as
it is entertaining.
According to Watson, I've Seen the
Mountain Top and It Don't Look So
Good pulled in a full house, and that
success ignited his new group of
Thespians into full gear. "That
(play) was the starting point for my
new group said Watson, "because I
have mostly new members this year
These new members include a
talented bunch. Jeff Mobley, who
also serves as the group's president,
will play Mansa Musa and Frederick
Douglass in the play; Laetitia
Lisane, vice-president of the
Thespians, will portray a slave
woman and sing a few songs;
Rocquina (Tudie) Vaughan will play
Nzingha, an African queen and war-
rior; Joe (Big Joe) Williams will be
Benjamin Banneker, the great scien-
tist and surveyor; Quentin Joyner
will take on two roles, one as a black
soldier and the other as Thurgood
Marshall; and Sebrina Cooke will
bring the Harlem Renaissance writer
Zora Neale Hurston to full life.
In addition to this fine cast,
music and song will be supplied by
Debra Dixon-Trahan, director of the
ECU Gospel Choir, and Cheronda
Cherry, as well as an African dance
sequence by Tiffany Swinson and
Letitia Nicole.
The talent doesn't stop there.
Capping everything else off will be a
poetry reading session featuring dra-
matic readings from Tytishia Frazier,
Kendra Robinson, Joyner and others.
The Thespians are always striving
to be positive role models for the
community and a source of inspira-
tion for minorities. This play is no
exception for them. Admission to
the Feb. 26 production of Black Voices
will be $2, and ali the proceeds will-
support the Ledonia Wright
Scholarship fund, which serves to
assist minority students on campus.
The Thespians will be busy this
month. On top of their performance
on campus, they will also perform
Black Voices on the morning of Feb. 19
in the Greene County School sys-
tem, Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. at Chowan
College in Murfreesboro, Feb. 20 at
Reginald Watson
Dobbs School
in Kinston,
Feb. 24 at the
Pitt County
Center on
Aging, and
Feb. 28 at
Ro bcrson
Elementary
School in
Edgecombe
County. And,
just as an
extra treat, the Thespians will also
help conduct a poetry reading in
Jenkins Art Building at 7 p.m. on
Feb. 24.
"This is a learning experience
Watson stresses. "I've put it togeth-
er just for that You have a number
of students involved in this that are
multi-talented, and they're learning
from it
Open yourself up to this worth-
while learning experience on Feb.
26. Blade Voices From the Past will be
performed in the Social Room of
Mendenhall Student Center at 7
p.m. Admission will be $2, and a
reception sponsored by Tytishia
Frazier and the A.B.L.E. organization
will follow.
For more information, contact
Reginald Watson at 328-8616.
RECOMMENDED
reading
Ten selections of diversity offered
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Change may take time, but change nat-
urally results with the passing of years.
And many times change can mean
progress. Black History Month cele-
brates change and progress, the change
and progress brought on by the blood
and sweat of African Americans dedi-
cated to a common cause - the better-
ment of a people and a nation.
The fruits of this cause have taken
on various forms, everything from
improved social and political rights to
an ocean of artistic efforts. Within the
last decade, many American universi-
ties and colleges have opened them-
selves up to change by incorporating
multiculturalism into the curriculum.
As a result, African-American literature
has grown into a dominant literary
force.
This literary genre (for it may be
called a genre in itself) is not easily
defined. Its authors express themselves
in poetry, prose, song, memoirs, jour-
nab, biographies, autobiographies, fic-
tion, non-fiction, scripts, photography
and an. African-American literature is
vibrant and large; there is no way to
simplify or summarize it. So, I won't
even attempt such a feat.
I will, however, make some recom-
mendations for an invigorating reading
list. There are going to be glaring omis-
sions (I can't list everything). For exam-
ple, 1 don't include WEE DuBois or
James Baldwin.
But anyone interested in exploring
the world of African-American litera-
ture should find these selections to be
more than pleasing.
Invisible Man - Ralph Ellison's mas-
terpiece has almost become a standard
text for many schools. The story deals
with a black man's struggle against
racial and social injustices from a world
that refuses to acknowledge him.
Ellison's simple yet lyrical opening
paragraph is as powerful as anything by
Shakespeare or Dickens: "I am an invis-
ible man I am invisible, understand,
simply because people refuse to see
mat
Colored People - Henry Louis Gates,
Jr one of the most respected literary
scholars currently active, pulls the read-
er into his family's history through this
astounding memoir. Examining such
themes as racial community and sexual-
ity, Gates illustrates how every family
has a history and a story worth telling.
Their Eyes Hire Watching God -
Writing in a time when women authors
weren't fashionable, particularly
African-American women authors, Zora
Neale Hurston set a standard with this
novel which generations of African-
American authors have attempted to
follow. Alice Walker, author of The
Color Purple, proudly boasts that
Hurston'j novel is the most important
book in her life.
Beloved - Taking place shortly after
the Civil War and concerning a young
slave woman's struggle to come to
terms with her life, Toni Morrison's
highly acclaimed novel is essential read-
ing. Morrison won the 1988 Pulitzer
Prize for fiction as well as the Nobel
Prize in literature.
Maya Angina's: Poems - Although her
most popular work is Know Why the
Caged Bad Sings, 1 wanted to include
poetry. And what better person to rep-
resent African-American poetry than
Angelou? Filled with heritage and pas-
sion, Angelou's poetic talents should
entertain even those who resist poetry
SEE MAD. PAGE 6
Coksnd People just one of the highlights of our Black History i
PHOTO COURTESY OF yiNTAK BOOKS
Scholar explains meaning of Black History Month
Dr. Felix boateno
KNIGHT-RIDDERTRIBUNE NEWS
Editor's Note: Dr. Boateng directs the
Bishop Johnson Black Cultural Center and is
a professor of education at Vanderbdt
University. He am be reached at Box 1666,
Station B, Vanaerbilt University, Nashville,
Temt.37235.
A full appreciation of the celebration of
Black History Month requires a review
and a reassessment of the social and
academic climate that prevailed in the
Western world, and especially in North
America before 1926 when Black
History Month was established.
It is important to recall that
between 1619 and 1926, African
Americans and other peoples of African
descent were classified as a race that
had not made any contribution to
human civilization.
Within the public and private sector,
African Americans and other peoples of
African descent were continually dehu-
manized and relegated to the position
of non-citizens and often defined as
fractions of humans. It is estimated that
between 1890 and 1925, an African
American was lynched every two and a
half days.
The academic and intellectual com-
ir �y was no different than the bulk
i n America. Peoples of
African dfc. -re visibly absent in
ny scholarshi, � in HectAr' r�rourae
that dealt with human civilization.
African American were so human-
ized and tlieir history so i lit rd in
academia that "slavery, peonage -gre-
gation and lynching" were considered
justifiable conditions.
In fact, Professor John Burgess, the
founder of Columbia University gradu-
ate school of political science and an
important figure in American scholar-
ship, defined the African race as a race
of men which has never created any civ-
ilization of any kind
It was this kind of climate and the
sensational, racist scholarship that
inspired the talented and brilliant
African-American scholar, Dr. Carter
Godwin Woodson to lead the struggle
and seirch for the trurh and institution-
alize what was then referred to as
"Negro History Week A Harvard-
trained Ph.D Dr. Vfoodson dropped
out of mainstream academia to devote
' his life to the scientific study of the
African experience in America, Africa
and throughout the world.
Under Wfoodson's direction and con-
tributions from other African-American
and white scholars, the "Negro History
Week" was launched on a serious plat-
form in 1926 to neutralize the apparent
ignorance and deliberate distortion of
Black History. Meetings, exhibitions,
lectures and symposia were organized
to climax the scientific study of the
African experience throughout the year
in order to give a more objective and
scholarly balance in American and
World history.
Today, this national and internation-
al observance has been expanded to
encompass the entire month of
February. The expansion, of course, has
increased the number of days for cele-
bration, but its strength and importance
lie in the new meaning that has
emerged. As Ralph L Crowder points
out in an article in the December 1977
issue of the Western Journal of Black
Studies, "it is no longer sufficient to
devote the entire month to the celebra-
tion of great Negro contributions to the
American mainstream
I believe, like Dr. Crowder, that it is
necessary to use the occasion to exam-
ine the collective ingenuity, creativity,
cultural and political experiences of the
masses of African .Americans and other
peoples of African descent. In North
America, a variety of programs - includ-
ing lectures, exhibitions, banquets,
dance performances, screenings of
Black oriented films and a host of other
cultural activities - are presented
throughout the month of February to
commemorate the occasion.
The intention of the founders of
Black History Month was not, and is
still not, to initiate a week's or a
month's study of the universal Black
experience. Instead, the observance
portrays the climax of a scientific study
of the Black experience throughout the
year. The month of February is signifi-
cant and recognized in African-
American history for the birthdays of
great AfricanAmerican pioneers and
the establishment of ground-breaking
African-American institutions.
These include the birthdays of
Frederick Douglass, WE.B. DuBois,
Langs ton Hughes and Eubie Blake, as
well as the creation of the NAACP and
the first Pan African Congress.
Historians may also recall that the first
African-American senator, Hiram
Revels, took the oath of office bi
February 1870.
Black History Month takes on a
paramount significance as we approach
the 21st century. Civil rights laws and
celebrations such as Black History
Month have exposed the legal conse-
quences of overt discriminatory prac-
SEE HISTORY PAGE 6





6 Tuesday. February 18, 1997
I f
KM
style
The East Carolinian
History
continued from page 5
tices and racial harassment. The strug-
gles for civil rights in America and
achievement of independence by
African countries in the 20th century
have shown the strength, the humani-
ty, the ingenuity and the contributions
of Black people to the human civiliza-
tion. However, these revelations have
not neutralized the prevalence of prej-
udicial attitudes which generate dis-
criminatory acts in both the national
and the international arenas.
Behavior may be controlled by laws,
but attitudes can only change through
education and the elimination of igno-
rance. I believe strongly that Black
History Month should be the reaffir-
mation of struggle and determination
to change attitudes and heighten the
understanding of the Black experience.
In the words of Ralph Crowder,
"The observance must be a testimony
to those Black pioneers who struggled
to affirm the humanity of African peo-
ples and a challenge to the present
generation to protect and preserve
the humanity of all peoples of African
descent
As we celebrate the 1997 Black
History Month, let us remember that
our study of the human experience is
compromised when the experiences of
Black people are neglected or treated
only as "interesting" diversions.
Happy Black History Month.
Web
continued from page 5
includes an overview of historical
events, from Brown vs. Board of
Education of Topeka to the Chicago
Freedom Movement.
Users also can learn about land-
mark achievements in the civil rights
movement by viewing the hompage
of the National .Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
(www.naacp.org).
For links to countless other sites,
check out:
� Aframian WHmrt (www.he.net
�aweindex.html), a site launched in
1995 to be an infocenter of links to
other websites for African -Americans
("Aframians"). The site features a
monthly Top Ten list of Afrocentric
web sites.
� AfriNET (www.afrinet.net), an
electronic community with links to
black organizations and businesses.
AfriNET provides a link to WehThva
(http:www.afrinet.nethallh), a
netzine which bills itself as "Your tie
to African descendants throughout
the Diaspora
� Melanet (www.melanet.com),
"the uncut black experience which
hosts chats with newsmakers and a
"universal afrocentric calendar"
where users can find out the date of
the next Black Expo USA or the
Young Black Writers Conference.
Read
continued liom page 5
in all its forms.
The Color of Water - James McBride
earned great critical praise for this
intriguing account of his white mother.
Anvone interested in racial and cultur-
al identity will savor McBride's
recount and his mother's, and his, life.
Autobiography of Malcolm X - Alex
Haiey. the author of Roots, put great
effort into chronicling the life of
Malcolm X as Malcolm X told it. The
result is an exemplary example of biog-
raphy. Filmmaker Spike Let hased his
epic film Malcolm .Von this book.
Do the Right Thing - Speaking of
Spike Ixe, his script for his master-
piece movie. Ih the Right Thing, is avail-
able as a trade paperback. Rarely has a
screenwriter captured such unique
characters and inventive dialogue as
exemplified here. Complete with the
film's entire screenplay, production
notes and photographs, this is an excel-
lent purchase for any movie buff.
Incidents m the life of a Slave Girl -
Harriet Jacobs' disturbing journal digs
deep into a time America will never
live down. Set in North Carolina dur-
ing the American slave trade, Jacobs
recounts in horrifying detail the ago-
nies of being a slave. This book has
become so widely read that it is now
regarded as one of the standards of
slave narratives, alongside Frederick
Douglass.
Breaking Ice - This is my best
attempt to include as many worth-
while writers as possible in one text.
Edited by Terry McMillan, the author
of Waiting to Exhale, this is an ideal
anthology of contemporary African-
American fiction. Within this book,
one can find the works of such authors
as Amiri Baraka, Ciayl Jones, Alice
Walker, Randall Kenan and much,
much more.
That concludes my personal picks
for the best African-American litera-
ture out there. Let me remind you
that this list is embarrassingly concise
and that it would probably change
from moment to moment. There is
just too much out there to make a top
10 list. Pick and choose from this list as
you please, and just leap into the ocean
from there.
Kings
continued from page 5
Bosta Rhymes ami Forte team up on
"Rumble in the Jungle Brian
Mc Knight and Diana King provide
the title track and Zelma Davis does
a revamp on James Brown with "I'm
Calling (Say it Loud)
Although The Fngees (et al.)
track is great, the other two new
tracks are examples of the same-old
"soul-less" music that began crop-
ping up in the "HOs and is still with us
today. Why these two bland and
nuisicallv devoid tracks were includ-
ed instead of something bv folksinger
Miriam Makeba or The Pointer
Sisters (who were at their peak in the
'70s), I'll never know. Needless to
say, there needs to be another vol-
ume of music released from this
unbelievable concert.
That said, what we do have on the
album is pretty amazing. All of the
tracks that are actually from the eon-
cert itself are classic performances.
But that is only one reason you must
buy the record (although it's a good
reason).
The other is to hear the sound
bites by the King of Banter, the
Original Rapper. Muhammad Ali. His
"Float like a butterfly, sting like a
bee" is legendary. But on When We
Were Kings he outdoes, himself. With
quotes like "If you think the world
was surprised when Nixon resigned,
wait till I kick Foreman's behind" and
"When I get to Africa, we gonna get
it on, because we don't get along! I'm
gonna eat him up Ali proves that he
is not only an unending fountain of
wit, but also the consummate per-
former.
However, the true genius and
heroism of Ali shows in the phrase
that opens the album: "I'm gonna
fight for the prestige. Not for me. but
to uplift my little brothers who are
sleeping on concrete floors today in
America, black people who are living
on welfare, black people who can't
eat. black people who don't know no
knowledge of themselves, black peo-
ple who don't have no future
Those are the words of a champi-
on.
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Rarely has a culture been more obsessed with
Stj?Jan our soc'etY
STOP and consider: what are the results?
Find out by viewing
Indecent Exposure
a spectacular, multi-media presentation
examining love, sex, and dating in the 90's.
Wednesday, Feb. 19th o Thursday, Feb. 20th
GCB 1030 GCB 1028
7:00pm 7:00pm
New Life Christian Fellowship
Commonly :
Unbearable,
Dangerously
Believable,
Subsequently
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Brown & Brown
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Greenville
Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
25th
Anniversary -
209 E. 5 s�.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Wednesday
WARREN
, Comedy Zone
Favorite
Thursday
Brilliance
"progressive dance"
$1.50 Bottled Beer
$1.50 Hi Bolls
Friday
ALMIGHTY
SENATORS
wJimmy's Chicken Shack
opened tor Too Sktmiee J's m September
25 DRAFT $5 adm.
Jail night long for member:
Saturday
AGENTS OF
GOOD ROOTS
25 DRAFT
i all night long
$5 adm.
for members
fe Csuj-G lirjyk N&g�
mmmm
ILLUMINA'97 EXHIBITION
Through February 23,1997
Mendenhall Gallery
CLOSING RECEPTION AND AWARDS PRESENTATION
Tuesday, February 18,1997
7PM - 9PM in Mendenhall Gallery
vr
I
0?JLv
RATTLE
OF THE
RAJSTDS97
THURSDAY, AI'TUX 3, 1997, 7TM
ON THE MALL
FIRST PRIZE $500,
AND OPENING BAND AT BAREFOOT
SECOND PRIZE $100
DEADLINE' FRIDAY FEBRUARY 21 1997 AT 4PM
TO AUDITION PLEASE SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE
CONTAINING THREE SONGS A PRESS KIT PLUS
OFFICIAL ENTRV FORM TO THE STUDENT UNION
OFFICE ROOM 236. MENDENHALL STUOENT
CENTER. OR MAIL I
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
GREENVILLE. NC 27858-4353
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 328-4715
The Student Union Is Now Accepting Applications For Committee
Members. Stop By Room 236 To Pick Up an Application!
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.eGu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html





7 TMttfty. February 18, 1997
vvxIaAvo
The East Carolinian
RI66AN
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3193A East 10th St.
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Phone 758-0204
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Our Specialty ii Sole & Heel Repilr
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By Farkas
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Men's Rubber Heels � $6.00
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee Presents
BATTLE
RAOT)S97
THURSDAY, APRIL 3,1997, 7PM
ON THE MALL
By Andre Germain
FIRST PRIZE $500,
AND OPENING BAND AT BAREFOOT
SECOND PRIZE $100
DEADLINE! FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21,1997 AT 4PM
TO AUDITION, PLEASE SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE
CONTAINING THREE SONGS, A PRESS-KIT, PLUS
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM TO THE STUDENT UNION
OFFICE, ROOM 236, MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER OR MAIL TO:
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE.
236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 328-4715
OFFICIAL BATTLE OF THE BANDS ENTRY FORM
NAME OF BAND
CONTACT PERSON:
PHONE NUMBER(S):
ACROSS
1 Commence
6 HMtth resort
9 Outspoken
14 Consumer
15SCUS
16 Residence
17 Waste away
18 Vane dir.
19 Pays heed to
20 Work by Keats
22 Most shrewd
24 Food passage
tube
27 High peaks
30 Golfer's Hem
31 Baby's toy
35 Model airplane
wood
37 Spud
39 Raced
40 Before
41 Prepared for the
match
43 Do sums
44 A Gardner
45 Chip dip
46 Edge furtively
48 Team's good
luck animal
50 Atmosphere
52 Requisite
53 Welding gas
56 Sidy
59 Entertainment
room
63 Masseyof
movies
64 One way to
stand
67 Actor's place
68 ND city
69 Mrs. Cantor
70 Pitched In
71 Condition
72 Hound
73 Filled the cargo
hold
ii-�r�I1T-rni��wun
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ANSWERS
FROM THURSDAY
OZT1
DOWN
1 Understands
2 Poi source
3 Like �of bricks
4 Blushing
condition
5 Kilmer poem
6 Family member
7Gtveabad
review
8 Tropical palm
9 Foremost
positions
10 Certain musician
11 Sheep shelter
12 Fruit drinks
13 Forbear that
21 A tttUe person
23 Come to terms
25 Flower part
26 Inadmissible
evidence,
perhaps
27 Nautical term
28 Insect stage
29 Guilty and not
32 Engage In barter
33 Serving spoon
34 Closed
36 Someone to do
business with
38 Lag behind
42 Eucharist piate
47 Sluggishness
49 Is unable to
51 AgL
54 Lukewarm
55Twangy
56 Goals '
57 Gash .
58 New Rbchelle
college
60 Alan or Cheryl
61 Double curve
62 AFoxx
65 Fuss � �
66 Label
1





8 Tutsday, Ftbruiry 18. 1887
sports
The East Carolinian
George seems Oakland-bound; other free agents look-
ing for places to play
NEW YORK (AP - Jeff George is apparently going to Oakland. But where
are Elvis Grbac, Rick Mirer and Heath Shuler going?
All four quarterbacks are looking for a place to play next season, along with
a group of players who officially became NFL free agents after midnight
Thursday.
George, the talented but troublesome quarterback who was cut by
Atlanta last season after a spat with coach June Jones, now wants to play for
the Raiders. He is expected to sign a five-year, $25 million contract with
Oakland within a few days.
"George made the decision today to exclusively negotiate with Oakland,
so we're in the last phases of attempting to put a deal together with the
Raiders his agent, Leigh Steinberg, said Thursday.
Grbac, who has been Steve Young's understudy in San Francisco the last
two seasons, could be headed to Kansas City. But unlike many free agents,
he's in no rush to make a decision.
"This is going to be done judiciously with anyone we talk to his agent
Jim Steiner, said.
The Chiefs also are talking to Houston quarterback Chris Chandler, who
is expected to lose his starting job to Steve McNair next season.
Harding says she escaped from bushy-haired abductor
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Just 10 days before Tonya Harding plans to make
a figure skating comeback, she finds herself in the news as a victim.
Clackamas County sheriff's deputies say they're taking seriously her
report that a bushy-haired man abducted her at knifepoint early Wednesday
from outside her suburban home.
Sounding hysterical, Harding talked to a 911 dispatcher after she escaped
by running her truck into a tree, then eluding the man in a foot chase.
"I don't know. The guy hit me several times. I don't know, i can't see,
she said when the dispatcher asked her if she needed medical attention. "
left him the in the woods, wherever I was. I don't remember where I was
Harding looking pale and shaken, spent 2 12 hours at the sheriff's office
in Oregon City on Wednesday night providing information for a composite
sketch of the suspect.
The sketch showed a white male with a round face and a thin mustache
Shaq out 8-10 weeks with knee injury
INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) - Shaquillc ONeal's return to the Los Angeles
Lakers lineup lasted less than a quartet Now, it appears they'll be fortunate
to have their 1120 million man for the playoffs.
O'Neal, the NBAs third-leading scorer and fourth-leading rebound sus-
tained a serious injury to his left knee on Wednesday in the opening minutes
of a 100-84 victory at Minnesota. On Thursday, the news was bad - Shaq's
out 8-10 weeks.
"With or without Shaq, I think that when we play, we're similar to a
Broadway play with Elden being the understudy Lakers coach Del Harris
said after a 132-117 win over Denver on Thursday night. "We continue with
the system we've established here this year
Elden Campbell filled in well as an understudy against the Nuggets, and
on Feb. 5, he had a career-high 34 points and 14 rebounds in a 106-90 win
over the Chicago Bulls.
But how hell fare on a dairy basis is a big question for the Lakers, who
have the best record in the Western Conference.
Williams sues city, police, TV station over false rape
tion
DALLAS (AP) - Hoping to set a legal precedent calling for better police
work and more accurate reporting Dallas Cowboys star Erik Williams has
filed two lawsuits stemming from a false rape claim.
Williams filed a federal lawsuit accusing police of violating his civil rights
The other case in state district court accuses the TV station that first report-
ed the story and one of its reporters of defaming him.
Former topless dancer Nina Shahravan told police Dec. 30 that the night
before she was raped by Williams at his home while teammate Michael Irvin
pointed a gun at her and videotaped the attack. ,
A day later, KXAS reporter Marty Griffin reported her allegation, and
police later held a news conference that was widely broadcast. Shahravan
confessed it was a hoax Jan. 10, and the players were immediately cleared.
El Guerrouj sets world indoor mile record after 1,500
mark last week
GHENT, Belgium (AP) - The month of Ramadan fasting might have cost
Hicham el Guerrouj some of his strength. It didn't cost him a chance to act
world records.
After running his first-ever mile Wednesday, the Moroccan now has two
world records in 10 days, and he took awav the oldest indoor mark in the
books, held by Eamonn Coghlan.
In Germany on Feb. 2, el Guerrouj still lived within the limits of the
Musiim Ramadan, but thrived in heated competition with Ethiopia's Haile
Gebreselassie as he smashed the 1,500 indoor world record.
At the Flanders Indoor meet, the Ramadan fast was a thing of the past,
but he had to struggle the final two laps as a lonesome figure against the
clock.
He finished in a time of 3 minutes, 48.45 seconds, beating the previous
record by 1.33 seconds. After his victory lap, he was wrapped in the Moroccan
flag exhaustion finally taking effect.
Baseball team scores victories over weekend
STEVE LOSEY
STAFF WRITER
TRMAtinno
What men's college basketball team has
the most NCAA tournament appearances
and how many times have they gone to
the Final Four? How many championship
titles does this team hold?
:�
(96, XL S, '� 'o, frj
'
fc-
The baseball team played its first
home series of the season this week-
end, coming out on top in three of four
games.
Due to bad weather on Friday, the
Pirates' game with Radford University
was moved to Sunday. But on Saturday
ECU would match up again with
Radford, handing them a 4-3 loss, and
with Monmouth in the next game
winning, 9-4. Head Coach Gary
Overton celebrated his four hun-
dredth win on Saturday against
Radford.
Again on Sunday these teams
would meet up with ECU and the
Pirates recorded a 6-1 victory against
Monmouth and then lost to Radford
in 13 innings in the make up game
from Friday, 7-5.
The first game on Sunday, against
Monmouth, was scoreless until the
third inning Center fielder Kevin
Monroe scored on a hard ground ball
to right field hit by left fielder Steve
Salargo.
In the fourth inning, an over-
thrown pitch allowed third baseman
Jason Howard to get on base. A single
by catcher Jason Colquitt advanced
Howard to scoring position and a sac-
rifice bunt by second baseman Macort
Jones left Howard at third and
Colquitt at second. Right fielder
Antaine Jones blasted a line drive to
left field and drove home Howard and
Colquitt.
In the fifth inning, Monmouth got
on first base from a line drive to center
field. Next time up for Monmouth an
error allowed a second runner on the
bases. However, a sharp double play
hurt the Hawks and their drive was
ended when first baseman Randy
Rigsby ran to the fence to catch a pop
up foul ball.
Rigsby then followed up his defen-
sive play with some offense, as he got
on first by hitting a single. Next up to
bat for ECU was designated hitter
Tim Flaherty who hit a line drive to
left field. An error by the Hawks left
fielder helped Rigsby make it to third
and Flaherty to second. Howard drove
Rigsby home and the bases were
loaded when Colquitt was hit by the
pitcher. M. Jones then drove Flaherty
home to make the score 5-0.
The Hawks got their only run in
the sixth inning. Three consecutive
singles loaded the bases, and a fly ball
to center field scored a runner. The
Pirates quickly matched the run in the
bottom of the sixth. Monmouth's
pitcher walked Monroe and Salargo
singled. A line drive by Rigsby to cen-
ter field drove Monroe in.
The seventh inning ended quick-
ly, partly due to a leaping catch by
third baseman Chris Shaffer, and the
final score was ECU 6, Monmouth 1.
The second game remained score-
less until the fourth inning, despite
some good hits by the Pirates. In the
SEE MKIAU. PAGE 9
(top) Ksvyn Fulchaj debvars a pitch during Sunday's gams against Monmouth. (above) Antaine Jones dives safetJy back into first basa.
photo by patmsk mum
Lady Pirates split weekend games
Tracy Laubach
SF.NIOR WRITER
The Lady Pirates hosted George
Mason on Friday evening and
American University on Sunday. The
Patriots (13-9, 6-6 in the CAA) head-
ed into the matchup looking for their
eighth consecutive win over the Lady
Pirates. But they left disappointed as
ECU handed them a loss, 67-52.
ECU had four double figure scor-
ers: Justine Allpress led the Pirates
with 16; Tracey Kelley turned in 14;
and Misty Home and Mary Thorn put
11 and 10 on the board, respectively.
On Sunday, the Lady Pirates
recorded their ninth conference loss,
82-61. ECU headed into the matchup
against American 9-13, 4-8 in the
CAA, while the Eagles brought a 14-8,
7-5 conference record with them to
Greenville.
Allpress led the Pirates with 20
points and was followed by Kelley,
who put 10 on the board for ECU.
The Eagles were led by Mary Klima
with 21. Kim Campbell and Stacey
Meeker turned in 10 each for
American.
The first points to be put on the
board were from Klima with a field
goal from underneath. Klima dominat-
ed the court throughout the first half
of play and held 15 of American's 48
points at the half.
Fbr the Pirates, Melanie Gillem
put in two three-pointers while Beth
jaynes and Kelley sunk three field
goals each. The first half was closed
out with a 31-48 American lead.
To start out the second half,
ECU's Laurie Ashenfelder put the
ball to the hoop with a 10 foot jump
shot. American's Nichole Grant and
Kari Gaskins answered right back with
shots that put the Eagles ahead by 20
with 12:58 left in the game.
Lady Pirate Head Coach Anne
Donovan said that as American's lead
grew, they were able to build up the
confidence that was needed to take
shots that they wouldn't usually take.
"American is a very physical team
Donovan said. "We were not aggres-
sive enough to respond the way we
should've
With 7:01 left, American's Kim
Gombola sent in a shot from under-
neath to give her team a 30 point lead,
78-48. Allpress answered with an 18
foot jumper and two layups, and Misty
Home put in a three pointer with 1:53
left on the clock. The game ended
with a 21 point Eagle lead after
Allpress sent in a jumper and Jaynes
shot one from the line.
As the season comes to its end,
ever game counts, so it is important
that the Lady Pirates put the
American loss behind them and move
on. The next conference battle is
scheduled for tonight at Old
Dominion who is ranked second in the
nation.
Donovan said that the girls will put
their best effort out and play as big as
they can. Even in a matchup against a
team as accomplished as ODU, any-
thing is possible.
Justine Allpress shoots a three pointer in Sunday's home loss to American.
PHOTO 8Y PATRICK IREIAN
CAA STANDINGS
Misty Home drives by an American defender.
PHOTO BT PATRICK IREIAN
TEAM CAA
UNCW 9-5
James Madison 8-5
Va. Commonwealth 8-6
East Carolina 7-6
Old Dominion 7-6
William & Mary 7-6
American 6-7
Richmond 5-8
George Mason 3-11
'Does not include last night's
against Richmond.





9 Tuesday, February 18, 1997
spor
s
The East Carolinian
bating � Drinking
mifSATcwcLSAGHmrma m
REIAC HfflEFWWDENWGWDSPORTS
SPORTS BAR AMD RESTAURANT
Absahitdy the beet
Buffalo Whigs
in town
Just 25 cents each 4-7 PM Dairy
Oielnonty
Winn Dixie Marketplace Shopping Center
356-2946
CASUAL DINING-rORMAL DRINKIMG
Baseball
continued from page 8
first inning, a fly to left field by
Rigsby left him on second and
Salargo, who had been walked, on
third. Designated hitter Brad
Simons singled off of a fly to left
field in the second inning, but was
caught in a rundown while stealing.
Salargo energized the Pirates in
the fourth with a crushing home run
that sailed over the fence at left cen-
ter. In the sixth, catcher Flaherty hit
a ground rule double to left field and
was driven in by shortstop Ryan
Massimo's double to shallow right
field.
Unfortunately, what looked like a
sure win for the Pirates turned ugly
in the top of the seventh. A double
scored two runs and tied the game
at 2-2. Radford took the lead in the
ninth inning, but Shaffer tied it up
again.
"It was pretty much a bad hit at
a bad time said John Payne, who
pitched the first nine innings of the
Radford game. "From then on, it was
a battle to stay in the game
The Pirates kept fighting, and in
the eleventh inning, A. Jones avert-
ed a potential home run when he
ran all the way to the fence to grab a
fly ball. In the 12th inning, the
Pirates walked in a run and a base
hit by Radford scored another.
However, the Pirates refused to let
the game slip away in the bottom of
the inning. A. Jones singled, stole
second and then scored on Monroe's
hit to right field. Salargo then dou-
bled on a fly to deep right and drove
in Monroe.
A hard fought game ended in the
13th inning when a tiring Pirate
defense allowed two runs to be
scored. The Pirates were unable to
match those two runs, and after a
well played game, the score stood
Radford 7, ECU 5.
The Pirates will hit the road for a
five games until they return home to
Harrington Field on March 1, to
host Virginia in a double header.
"The team went about it the
right way Overton said. "They
showed a lot of character today.
They played the game the way it
was meant to be played
SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Jonathan femer will be out indefinitely for the men's baafeetbaS oeam
after suffering a ftacoKe to his left band in "WWiwarJay's home game to
Virginia Ckmmonwea3i University
i&rner, 3 64 f�245 pound senior from Atlanta, suffered a fracture- at the
second roetacarpaJ bone in his left hand after playing on? six minutes.
T feel terrible for Jonathan Head Coaen Joe Dootey said "He has
worked hard ro become a good basketball player and solid contrfoutor to
our team. I don't dank he ha missed a day of practice in threeyears. It's
just a shame for Jonathan to havethis octm"
Thkoagb 22 games this season, ferner is averaging 9.1 points and 4.6
rebounds per game.
ECUjuntor tennis player Roope Katajo defeated jon Pastel seeded3foR
in the nation, late Friday night to defeat Davidson 7-0.
Kaiajo, playing the No J poafaon in singles beat Pastel, 6-2,6-4. It was
the first win over a top ranked player in Coach KB Moote's tenure and the
first win over Davidson in so? years.
In the Saturday match against; tMS-AsJarnifc, the Pmucs came out
again and won 7-6.
On Sunday Vis-teiltmtmediiSaQ. Junior Roope
Kalajo and sophofbore fertfty KSdid tm play their singles termis match-
es at No. J arid-plot'S�� � ��� ��� � �- � �'�
1
�7
CHINESE RESTAURANT
909 Evans St. Greenville, NC 27834
"Cfian is now offering fits
customers a new (Expanded
(Buffet or individually prepared
disfiesjust fife fie s afways
done - tfie cfioice is yours
THE NEW EXPANDED BUFFET
0v�A 30 ftetK
$4.95
' Now Served Monday - Friday 11:30-2:30
To Accommodate Large Parties Sunday 12 noon - 3pm $5.95
we offer Private Banquet Facilities NoW 7 NightS A Week
SunThurs. 5:30-9:00 Fri. &-Sat.5:30-10:00
With A Special Price Of Only $5.95 Through February 23rd (Regular j6.95)
ECU Students With Valid Student ID - It's Always 5.95
Take-Out Orders
757-1818 � Fax 757-8708
OPEN!NQ HOURS
MonThurs. 11:30-9:30
Sat. 5:00-10:30
Fri. 11:30-10:30
Sun. 12:00-9:30
-TCffS S&ffciffS
- to JVlendenhall Student Center
if
m
���
i5
i
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
Lighting the fak:
Hetivating anb fZetalning Zatn PUmfets
Leadership Seminar featuring Dr. Martha Wisby, Dean of Student Life
Development on Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 5-6 p.m. in Great Room 3
Happjj B�rtHdaj ECU!
Celebrate ECU'S 90th birthday March 4 at 12 p.m.
including free birthday cake and 90 minutes of free billiards.
TaibC' a Pivfe
Lunchtime Lecture on underwater excursions with
Assistant Police Chief Tom Younce. Free beverages and desserts.
Tuesday Feb. 25 at 12 p.m. in the Underground
US
s
� � t
Mi
I
Nils Alomar, Stephen;Sfce�lu�s� and Brett Rowley ECU swpt the
doubles with the teams of KatajoBrb fOnaaetfAiornar and RtwfcyDerek
Slate all defeating tfw opponents.
The Pirate are now 6-3 on the season will have the week off from com-
petition faefote returning to action in Greenville on March t. ECUwift tate
onBartonat9amandTKmhitat3p.m.attlK:ECUrennacouixs.

ECU's Mike Milter won his first eoftegfeae event on Sandayaahepkeed
first in the 406 meters at the GMU CofJegute Invitational. Mffier placed
fox in 48.3�. In the W8t competition, EClPsRashdca Barrow and the
ECU 4x400 meter refc, iffed for the March ECAC Indoor
Charnpkmhrp andscSao!records were aetmthctmdtiitmpemd
weight throw.
ECU'S Demcfc Ingram also had a rop-three place, finishing second in
the 200 tnetm in 21.95, fo the mer& 60 meter dash, Marcos Gladden was
ECU's lorie qualified in die final and placed sixrn in 6.91.
-kwas a gr��gR�ptf targets in the 60 meter fiBaSs ECU Head
Coach fell Carson said "lliedinner iDxrid Bobb-UMBC) finished third
�n thenatkm in dm event fast year and the second and third fimsfcers were
IC4A ehawwonsWf bat season. They ran imattached and edgpd out
ECU'S Vauw Monroe and Bevm roster for a spot in the anafe.
ECU's 4400 meter reisjr team turned in a winning time (&15.90 but
was dwajal ���- -� .
returned to
an ankle injury.
In distance competition, ECU Jaime Mance placed fifth in the &806
meters in S:4L93 ami Briar, Betfiniahed ninth in &5S.62 in therafc ton
David Balon Snbhed 16th in mM
In the women's compedtioa, Barrow ted a ridtd place fimshed (5U66 in
rhc 60-meter daah and Nta Goms finished fnith in 7.95. Barrow joins a
ECU-high ht o2�e m the ECAC Indoor Caammonships. Barrow
also lielped the 4x400meter relay to txw -ECU reoord &S2&7 and
ECorBcatkHi. Barrow ran the third fcg while Carmen VAtdon, Keisfea
jfohoson md'Samlbait.c. relay
.Amanda Johnson coBected two second place Smshes on Sadc to the
200 meters, Johnson finished in 25.54 and in the longiomp, missed a first
place finish by- rwo omapr�rsv
ECU'S second sefecK �orddf the meet came in rhe 2� pound weight
throw b?.Mkh�ke&iifa&Mte
own record. Clayton m� placed third in the shot 44'21f and tM
Bmonon finished fifttWid�40?3 lM" tferow,
miW�pQM �&�rsTlaid verk:ArraBd4
Johnson's had mtr�r�Mime�rrtWk4
aweaome season
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AIR FORCE OPPORTUNITIES
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1-800-423-USAF
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p5�
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umlna y
Student Art Exhibit in the Mendenhall Gallery through Feb. 28.
Closing Reception and Awards Presentation: TONIGHT, 7-9 p.m.
Coming Soon
That Thing You Do (PG) Feb. 20-22 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with ECU ID. One guest permitted per I.D.
MUJIttW
���
m
���
C1'
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL
Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month
from 8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the
games you can bowl, plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental
included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of
discounted bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m.
until 6 p.m. Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
'
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s-
Nightly Special
Dow ntown
5pm-9pm, Man. -Sat. only
Ciibbics & New Location-600 I Arlintit
ocation-600 I Arlington Blvd.
(Across from Plaa Mall)
52-649"
521-8091

FREE
l:nc With Purchase Of Any Cubbies Sized Sandwich
(iv i. L'ii i'i' i
(With Student I.D.)

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"Qiotecf st9tfof. Qog and
Sambuitgeft in Qitt County"






Tuesd.y. Ftbruary 18. 1997
classifieds
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SUBLEASE ON BEDROOM
APARTMENT at Paladin West lo-
cated off 5th street near PCMH. WD
hookup, walk-in closet, deck, very
quietl! $355month lease ends Jury
31st. Call 757-3006.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 3 bedroom house with 2 girls.
Rent 13 utilities, phone & cable.
Near campus in nice neighborhood.
Call Kim @ 758-2800 or 830-9036 after
6 pm.
THREE AND FOUR BEDROOM
houses for rent within walking distance
of ECU. Rents as low as 1400.00 a
Monthll Fenced backyards, wash-
erdryer hookups, central heat, one
with central air. Must see to believe!
Call 830-9502.
BEDROOM APARTMENT. LO-
CATED within walking distance to
ECU. Watersewerbasic cable, wash-
erdryer hook-up. Call Woodcliff
Rentals at 758-5005.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMME-
DIATELY, 3 blocks from campus,
$250 a month, 13 utilities central ac,
washerdryer, garage, plenty of parking,
fireplace, MarkGene 752-9652.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED TO share three bedroom house.
$225month plus 13 utilities, wash-
erdryer, gas heat, ax. One block from
campus. Call 931-0348.
2 BEDROOM 2 BATH apartment
2 blocks from ECU, watersewerbasic
cable, washerdryer hook-up included.
Available nowl Also taking deposits for
May 1. For more information or to see
a unit stop in at Dogwood Hollow
Apartments. Located at 1110 East
10th Street or call 752-8900.
ONE" BEDROOM APART-
MENT. AVAILABLE immediately.
12 block from campus. Heat water &
utilities included. $325 monthly. Con-
tact Jamie at 413-0615. Perfect for
studentl
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: ASAP to share 2 br 1 12 bath
townhouse $225.00 monthly and 12
utilitiesphone on ECU bus route. Call
Laura at 756-7128.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED IN May to share a 3br 1 12 bath
apartment at Eastbrook. Rent is
fl55mo. and 13 utilities. Call 328-
3207 or 328-3211.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 2BR
apt. $175 plus utilities cable phone.
No pets. Clean person. Responsible 4
blocks from ECU. Near ECU bus ro-
ute can Kelley 830-3885.
SENIORS! GRADUATING IN
DECEMBER, 1997? Need an apart-
ment July - Dec. 97? So do we. Look-
ing for ns roommates for Fall semester.
Call Bob 328-72.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED!
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
TO share two bedroom condo in Wil-
lowby Park private roombath tennis
courts, pool $300 rent plus 12 utilities
12 phone. Call 355-5201.
3 BEDROOM 2 12 bath town-
house. Located at Wildwood villas on
Beech Street. Available March 1.
Stove, Fridge, Dishwasher WasherDry-
er hook-up. For information call Wood-
cliff Rentals at 758-5005.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
COLLEGE VIEW APART-
MENTS TWO bedrooms, stove, re-
frigerator, basic cable, washer dryer
hook-ups, central heat and air. All
apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
PARK VILLAGE ADAMS BLVD.
one bedroom apts. range, refrigerator,
wd hookup. Free water and sewer.
ECU bus route. Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. $775 mo.
One 2 bedroom apt. above BW3 - $500.
One 2 bedroom above Uppercrust
Bakery AVAILABLE now. (New car-
pet) for $475 mo. Luxury Apartments.
Will lease for May first with deposit
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
COZY COTTAGE NEAR HOS-
PITAL large one bedroom with gas &
elec. heat. Hardwood and carpeted
floors, fireplace, chandeliers, on wood-
ed lot. Very nice, very quiet. $415.00
mo. Available Feb. 1st. Call 757-9387.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
PRIVATE 2 bedroom 1 bath living
area 2 blocks from campus. Access to
washer dryer central HAC cable utili-
ties included $350.00 a month call 551-
0580.
STUDIO APARTMENT AT
RINGGOLD Towers available for
sublease, $310month, fully furnished.
Call (919) 552-9293 or call Ringgold
lowers Mgmt. - 752-2865.
SUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM 1
12 bath townhouse wd hookup, fire-
place, dishwasher, disposal, free cable
ECU bus route lease runs through May
30th. Deposit only $350 rent $415.00.
Call 830-1469.
NAGS HEAD, NC- get your group
together early. Two houses in excellent
condition; fully furnished; washer &
dryer, dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps 6
-$1600.00 per month; sleeps 8 -
$2200.00 per month (757)850-1532.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen, and
living room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yards. Conveni-
ent' to campus and the hospital.
$l,000mo deposit. 524-4111.
FOR SALE! FULL or queen size
bed. Great condition. Mattress in-
cluded. Call 830-5314.
95 FLEETWOOD EDGEWOOD
14 x 76 3 br2bath garden tub, dish-
washer, shed & fence. Payoff $17,500.
Located in Birchwood Sands Esc,
Greenville. Call (919)465-8711 or
(919)778-4207 owner.
TWIN BED FOR SALE. Comes
with box mattress and frame. Not
even a year old! Price is negotiable!
Call 353-1039, Ask for Lisa.
HONDA DEL SOL- 1993 black,
stick shift, low 46,000 miles.
Great condition, must see.
$10,000 Firm. Call 830-6943.
r-
i
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12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
� snd Maroon RmHk nofnagoraio.
VWw Drjar Hookup. M wd Mai
In mojt unla. Laundry Fidlitv,
SandVbtaytaH Court
Loond 5 bfodu from oenput.
HuHWATBLSEWHl
2KMOOMS
SwiH'tii !� aim rfPMnwhor
Wiihof. Dryor Hookup
Pmmm on Hrst Hoot
Looted 5 Stocks from Campm
�kW-MJAuv We5
twaroom, nptmti. mm, bwric cable. 5 btodo
twnpu. Now owftaraMpw
New Liodt)Caupvw.
TH�S� AND OTH� FIT PiG�KTtES
MANAGED 3Y
from
IMA IKMVNLEA DMVE
7SS-IWI CXbjr ExDirM Mi-W
KAYAK FOR SALE. 1996 dagger
tri-colored crossfire kayak. Has been
used only once in calm water. Includes
paddle and skirt. Asking $650. Is an
$1,100 value. Contact Robb at 754-
2637.
1987 MAZDA RX7 86K 22
$3500obo new motor new brakes good
condition. Call Ray 321-8668. Leave
message.
LARGE ANIMAL CAGE, OAK
wood frame, previously used for fer-
rets, excellent condition. Call 931-
0348.
SNOW SKIS FOR SPRING break:
Why rent? 2 good pair K2 5500 with
bindings (Marker M36 & Salomon
647). $95 a pair. Exercise treadmill for
$70. Call after 6 pm or weekends 756-
2066.
EXCITING SUMMER JOB
WITH housing, first come, cooks po-
sition now available. Kitty Hawk Pizza
at Kitty Hawk, NC
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom duplex. Conveni-
ent to campus on Rotary Ave. Rent is
�180 12 utilities Call 752-2217.
Things Really Move �
In the Classifieds!
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing info
8C0-662-2122.
HEAD LIFEGUARD NEEDED.
EXPERIENCE necessary. Lifeguard
needed. Experience preferred. See Ja-
nine Jones at the Greenville Country
Club.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's Cloth-
ing Store, is now filling part-time posi-
tions. Employees are needed for Satur-
days andor weekdays between 10:00
am and 6:00 pm. The positions are for
between 7 and 20 hours per week, de-
pending on your schedule and on busi-
ness needs. The jobs are within walk-
ing distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commensu-
rate with your experience and job per-
formance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person to
Store Manager, Joan's Fashions, 423 S.
Evans Street, Greenville (on the
Downtown Mall).
ATTENTION STUDENTS:
EARN EXTRA cash stuffing envel-
opes at home. All materials provided.
Send SASE to Midwest Distributors,
P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS 66051. Imme-
diate response.
I
RIVER PARK NORTH, PARK At-
tendant and Camp Counselor positions
available for summer employment. Ap-
ply at Greenville City Hall, Personnel
Department. For information call 830-
4562.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED TO teach sum-
mer camps in NC & SC. Great pay!
Flexible scheduling! Free weekends!
College experience not required. For a
great summer job, CALL ESPRIT!
CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-3223!
CARTOONIST NEEDED TO
HELP design product label. Will ne-
gotiate pay with artist. Call Evan at
752-8837.
WAITSTAFF DAYTIME AND
NIGHT shifts available. Must be
able to work at least two weekday
lunch shifts. No Calls. Please apply in
person between 8am and 10am or 2pm
and 4pm. Professor CCools Winn Dix-
ie Market Place.
SEASONAL TEMPORARY PO-
SITIONS AVAILABLE: saleare-
ceivingwarehousc. Ideal for students
sitting out this semester, or individuals
presently between jobs. Schedules in-
volve up to 40 hours per week. Will
consider all availabilities: morningaf-
ternoonsevenings and weekends. Po-
sitions could lead on long term employ-
ment. ReceivingWarehouse areas re-
quire some lifting. Applications ac-
cepted Monday through Friday, 2:00 -
4:00 pm, Brody's.The Plaza.
GET BETTER GRADES
Let The Wordsmiihs edit your
term papers. SI 5 per hour
Phone: 3217441
Pager: (S83) 233395
ADULT TOY PARTY - for women
only! Earn free products just for host-
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Contractors
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TO TAU KAPPA EPSILON, Phi
Kappa Alpha, and Alpha Delta Pi for
the Quad social last Saturday. We real-
ly enjoyed it and hope to do it again.
Love the sisters and new members of
Delta Zeta.
ALPHA PHI IS EXCITED to have
Pi Delta and Chi Omega as our sister
sororities. We hope to share some great
times together this semester. Love,
Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA
OMICRON PI on your basketball
victories over Delta Zeta and Sigma.
We're off to a great start! Love your
sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI -we'reglad
that you are our sister sorority. We've
looking forward to doing something
with you sometime soon. Love, the
sisters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delta.
GREEKS OF THE WEEK AL-
PHA Delta Pi: Jenny Wienke, Laura
Holcomb Alpha Xi Delta: Megan Hop-
kins, Alayne McNeal Alpha Omicron
Pi: Heather King, Michelle Gotschalle
Alpha Phi: Traci Sorrell, Anne Newton
Zeta Tau Alpha: Angie Greene, Amel-
ia Burney Pi Delta: Jen Keller, Ann
Elms Delta Zeta: Torri Forbes, Chasid-
ty Evangelista Sigma Sigma Sigma:
Kelye Jacobs, Tracy Maurer Chi Ome-
ga: Mary Marshell Harris
THETA CHI, WE HAD a great
time with you and your ODU brothers
last Saturday. Thanks again! Love,
Chi Omega
THANK YOU CHI OMEGA for
attending our speaker last Monday.
We're glad you could attend on such
short notice. Love, your sister sorority.
Pi Delta.
TO THE BROTHERS OF Phi
Kappa Psi: You guys sure know how to
celebrate Mardi Gras! The beads were
well earned and the dancing was defi-
nitely an experience! We hope to do it
again real soon. Love, the sisters and
new members of Delta Zeta.
ALPHA XI DELTA HOPES eve-
ryone had an awesome time at the
"Crush Party Thanks for coming out
you guys and making it a success. We
enjoyed it and hope to do it again!
Thanks Megan and Alayne - The
Sisters of Alpha Xi Delta and new
members.
DELTA SIGMA PHI WOULD
like to thank Alpha Zie Delta for the
jail break social, and Congrats, to the 7
new pledges.
PI KAPPA ALPHA - your bid night
was great. All of us had fun playing
with the money. Love, Chi Omega.
THANKS PANHELLENIC FOR
A successful banquet! Congrats to
everyone on your awards. Love, The
Sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha.
GOOD JOB JUDE NAGLE on the
sorority appreciation window in the
Student Store. It looked great! Love,
your Alpha Omicron Pi Sisters.
MARTI CONGRATS ON YOUR
engagement. I'm happy for you both.
Love your big Sis Leigh Ann.
ALPHA PHI THANKS THE Rug-
by team for the great social Thursday.
We all had a blast. The roses were a
sweet touch. Thanks guys! Love, Al-
pha Phi.
PI KAPPA ALPHA WE had a great
time Tuesday night. Hope to see more
of you guys. Love the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta.
GOOD LUCK SIGMA BASKET-
BALL in your game tomorrow night.
Love the Sigma Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA
XI DELTA on winning Panhelienic
Greek Image Award, Greek Hall of
Fame: Heather Atkinson and Michelle
Matthews, Artemis Award: Andrea
Luther, Outstanding Alumni: Anna
Hansen, and Outstanding New mem-
ben Stephanie Branson. We're proud
of you - the sisters and new members
of Alpha Xi Delta.
VALENTINE'S DAY WAS EX-
TREMELY special for all of the Del-
ta Zeta's and their dates. Thanks to
Torri for planning such a great evening.
We love ya. Love the sisters and new
members of Delta Zeta.
HAPPY
TINE'S
ter.
BELATED VALEN-
DAY. Love the Sigma sis-
TO THE BROTHERS OF Delta
Sigma Phi: Thank you for inviting us
last Wednesday night. We hope that
you guys had as much fun as we did.
We can't wait to party with you again.
Love, the sisters and new members of
Delta Zeta.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WE
wanted to thank you for the crazy time
on Tuesday night. We'd especially like
to thank Rob, John, Brad, Chris, Andy,
and Kevin. Thanks. Kristy, Meredith,
Alison, Valerie, Beth, and Katie.
CONGRATS MARTI MILLS ON
your engagement to Jimmy Bryant. We
wish yall the best. Ziam, your Zeta Tau
Alpha Sisters
PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS:
WE enjoyed meeting each of you last
night and hope to see each of you back
this evening. Love the Pi Delta
Sisters.
WANTED: OWNER OF lost
checkbook, wallet with driver's li-
cense. Owner's name: Tabitha Johane
Clark from Raleigh. Call 328-3590
Monday thru Thursday. Leave mes-
sage on machine.
SPRING BREAK '97. PANAMA
CITY Boardwalk Beach Resort
$129 7nights beachfront, daily free
drink parties, walk to best bars
Group discounts Endless Summer
Tours 1-800-234-7007.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sport
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO
CALL LEISURE TOURS AND GET
FREE INFO FOR SPRING BREAK
PACKAGES TO SOUTH PADRE,
CANCUN, JAMAICA AND FLORI-
DA. 1-800-838-8203.
��SPRING BREAK 97 - Don't be
left out, space limited Panama City
and Daytona Beach, Florida from $129.
Call STS @ 1-800-648-4849 for more
info.
Wake 'n Bake for
Spring Break 1997
�Jamaica
?Cancan �Dayton
�Padre Bahkm
Call for Free ��. ���.
into Packet I 1-800-426-7710
Spring Break'97
Jamaica $399
Cancun $399
Bahamas $379�,
7Nights with Air,
Daily Free Drink Parties,
No Cover at Best Bars.
Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
VMCDltcAMEX
The Esst Carolinian
Spring Break '97
Panama City
Beach
from $129
7nights Beachfront
�Daily Free Drink Parties
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Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
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SPRING BREAK '97. CANCUN,
Jamaica, & Bahamas 7nights wair
from $399. Enjoy daily free drink par-
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counts Endless Summer Tours 1-
800-234-7007.
SCUBA
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MASK, FINS,4 SNORKEL
Retail $179.90
ECU Student Special
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BLUE REGION
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Greenville 321-2670
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AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHA-
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Includes all meals, parties & taxes!
Great Beaches & Nightlife! Leaves
from Ft. Lauderdale! springbreaktrav-
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AAAA! CANCUN & JAMAICA
spring break specials! 7 nights air & ho-
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drinks & free parties! 111 lowest
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AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING
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kitchen near bars $119! Daytona-Best
Location $139! Florida's new hotspot-
Cocoa Beach Hilton $169! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
��SPRING BREAK 97 - Don't be
left out, space limited Cancun and
Jamaica from $429. Call STS @ 1-800-
648-4849 for more info.
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach "Summit" luxury condos next to
Spinnaker. Owner discount rates
(404)355-9637.
RELAY RACE RALLY: Join the
Rec Pan club on Friday, Feb. 21 in the
SRC to participate in the relay race ral-
ly from 9:00-11:00 pm.
CLIMBING CONTEST: BE at
the SRC on February 19 at 6:00 pm to
watch the climbing contest.
WILDERNESS MEDICINE
WORKSHOP: Do you want to learn
about wilderness medicine? Come join
us on Feb. 25. Be sure to sign up by
Friday, Feb. 21 at 6:00 in the main of-
fice of the SRC.
THURS FEB. 20 - FACULTY
Recital, Nathan Williams, clarinet,
Christopher Ulffcrs, bassoon with Eliz-
abeth Norvell Ulffers, piano, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. Fri
Feb. 21 - Junior Recital, Leslie Higger-
son, violin, Christina McNeeley, bas-
soon, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
pm. Sat Feb. 22 - Guest Recital, Car-
ol Wincenc, flute, with faculty John B.
O'Brien, piano, and the ECU Chamber
Orchestra, Stephen Blackwelder, Con-
ductor, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00
pm. Mon� Feb. 24 - Chamber Singers,
Rhonda Fleming, Conductor, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. Tues
Feb. 25 - Guest Recital, Elaine Hinaro,
harpsichord, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm. For additional information,
call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline
at ECU-4370.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS,
AN D Allies for Diversity will meet on
Feb. 20 at 7:30 pm in room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Hope to
see you there!
GAMMA BETA PHI THERE will
be a meeting for all members on Tues-
day, March 4 at 6:00 pm in Speight Au-
ditorium in the Jenkins Arts Center.
BEACH HORSEBACKRIDING:
CEDAR Island, NC : come horse-
backriding with us on March 2. Be sure
to register by 6:00 pm on Feb 21 in the
main office of the SRC.
EARN $200! LOOKING for col-
lege aged males that have not exer-
cised for 1-2 years to take part in re-
search study consisting of 1 week of ex-
ercise and tests. Interested? Call 328-
4688, ask for Chris Shaw.
THE GREENVILLE-PIT
COUNTY Special Olympics will be
conducting an Athletics (Track &
Field) Coaches Training School on Sat-
urday, February 1st from 9am - 4pm for
all individuals interested in volunteer-
ing to coach Track & Field. We are also
looking for volunteer coaches in thc
following sports: Swimming, Bowling,
Gymnastics. Rollerskating, Poweriift-
ing, Volleyball, and Equestrian. No etf
periencc is necessary. For more infor-
mation please contact Dwain Cooper
at 830-4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB
WILL hold its next meeting on Tues-
day, February 18th, at 3:30, in GCB
1010. Our guest speaker will be Mr.
Dean Browder of Wachovia. Topics will
cover investment accounting, as well as
employment and internship opportuni-
ties. All majors welcome.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
WILL be having their Valentine's Day
Party on Tuesday, February 18 at
Sportsworld. Cost for skating will be
$2 per person. All ECU Friends and
Little Friends are encouraged to at-
tend. So join us February 18 from 7-9
pm at Sportsworld!
IT'S NEVER TOO LATE to come
out to RUSH! If you still think you
want to go Greek Pi Delta's informal
spring Rush is being held tonight in
the Underground at MSC. Come on
out and bring a friend. For more info
call 328-3751
CLIMBING CONTEST: BE at
the SRC on February 19 at 6:00 pm to
watch the climbing contest.
THE ECU POETRY FORUM will
meet on Wednesday, February 19th in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room
248 at 8 pm. Open to the general pub-
lic, the Forum is a free workshop.
Those planning to attend and wanting
critical feedback on their work should
bring 8 or 10 copies of each poem. Lis-
teners welcome.
THE ECU CHAPTER OF theNa-
tional Student Speech Language Hear-
ing Association is sponsoring their 27th
Annual Speech Language and Hearing
Symposium, February 27th and 28th,
at the Ramada Inn, Greenville, NC.
For more information, please call the
ECU Speech Language and Hearing
Clinic at (919)328-4405.
FREE DOG TO GOOD home. Lab
and chow mix 11 months old. Caugnrr
up on all shots. Call Kevin or Jeff 758-
1348.
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. We can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
FREE GERMAN SHEPHERD
DOG to good home 3 years old. Male
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1188
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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