The East Carolinian, February 6, 1997







THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 6. 1997
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Special measures taken to ensure construction site safety
Erika swarts
HOUSINGCONSUMATORY SERVICES ISSUES
STAFF WHITER
With so many campus construction projects around campus, concerns have been raised about the
safety of the sites for students, faculty, staff and workers.
According to Director of Facilities Planning, Design and Construction Mr. Bruce L. Five, Jr
facilities services has taken extensive precautions to ensure the safety of students and faculty.
With help from the individual contractors, facility services has erected protective barriers and
have routed traffic around hazards. They have also tried to manage damages that could be
caused from fires, weather, chemicals, dust, noise, shock and debris.
"To accomplish this, while also operating the University, calls for the added precaution of
involving layers and layers of people for the designers, contractors, and the University on a con-
stantly vigilant basis Flye said.
The national organization that governs over the safety of construction sites is the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). They regulate such things as requir-
ing workers to use hard-hats while inside or around the project. However, according to
Construction Management Director Dr. Douglas Kruger, OSHA only covers the workers involved
in the project. They do, however, ask the employers to keep people out of any project areas.
This leaves the responsibility of individual safety to the individual contractors. So, do students
feel safe?
"I think so. As long as they have fences, I feel protected Lily Worku an occupational ther-
apy major said. "The noise is the only real problem
Students have also complained about the smoke and dust that has been surrounding the sites,
especially near Joyner Library. Freshman Brett Olson said he feels pretty safe. He did agree that
it does get a little noisy. He also was somewhat concerned with the smoke last semester that
clouded the walkway near Joyner.
Aside from being aggravating, the noise vibrations have not caused any damage. According to
Flye, there has only been one incident on campus and that was about 30 years ago during a pile-
driving operation.
Flye notes that he is very concerned with the safety of construction sites, especially the ones
where the most people pass near by. He also gave a list of future construction projects we can
look forward to, such as: adding elevators to Austin and Rawl, and renovating the Fletcher Music
Recital Hall. However, the greatest project is the new Science and Industrial Technology build-
ing which is currently estimated to cost $50 million.
Renovations being made to Dowdy-F-icklen Stadium account for one of the three major constructions projects going on around ECU campus.
PHOTO COURTESY OF PATRICK IREIAN
Construction management team
receives award
The Department of Construction
Management at ECU has received National
Recognition this month by placing fourth in
the National Association of Home Builders
(NAHB) Student Chapters Annual
Construction Management Competition for
four year programs. The event took place on
Jan. 23 and Jan. 24 at the NAHB's National
Convention in Houston. ECU's fourth place
finish was behind Purdue University, Arizona
State and Brigham Young.
ECU's students have competed only twice
in the NAHB competition. Last year's teams
won Rookie of the Year and fifth overall out of
a field of 17 schools.
Team members were: Heather Banks,
Matthew Cave, Eddie Hamlett, Joseph
Mobley, Craig Smith and the alternate,
Jimmie Goodman.
Police Corps Scholarships Awarded
On Jan. 27, the deputy secretary of the North Carolina Department of
Crime Control and Public Safety awarded four ECU students Police
Corps scholarships valued at up to $30,000 each for four years of study.
The students are Vidal Barfield, Christopher Edge, Ted Sauls and
Sandra Vaughn. These students received four of the 20 Police Corps
scholarships to be awarded throughout the state this year.
North Carolina was one of six states chosen by the U.S. Department of
Justice as a pilot site for this national program. To date. Seven North
Carolina students have been awarded scholarships.
ECU graduate joins Sergent-At-Arms staff of the NC Senate
The start of the new session of the General Assembly in Raleigh has garnered much attention, and Bill Gheen, a recent ECU graduate and
advocate of young voters, will be serving the state senate on the Sergent-At-Arms staff. Gheen, who moved to Greenve in 1990 'o attend ECU,
became Senior Class President and graduated with a B.S. in Political Science in May, 1995.
lifestyle 8
Dead Man video
that got away
opinion5
Violence on
campus
sports11
1997 Football
Signees for Pirates
THURSDAY:
partly sunny
high 62
low 46
WEEKEND:
? partly cloudy
high 65
low 43
No pain, No gin:ROTC physical
demands lead to success
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BIDG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutecr3ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
EMILY LITTLE
SPECIAL GUIDANCE ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
The alarm goes off at 5 a.m. By 6 a.m they
are up and running for two minutes, and fol-
low it up with two minutes of sit-ups and
two minutes of push-ups. Physical Training
(PT) may sound exhausting to mere mortals
who wake up in a groggy state for an 11a.m.
class, but the members of the ROTC pro-
gram consider it a daily activity.
Despite the early morning workout,
ROTC is no different from any other pro-
gram in the classroom. Freshmen take an
hour course once a week to learn map read-
ing, basic first aid and general introductory
information. Sophomores take the course
twice a week, learning basic tactics, leader-
ship and communication. Juniors use their
course to learn more advanced tactics and
leadership and seniors teach what they have
learned.
"ROTC is more physically demanding
than academic said Master Sergeant Lee
Custis. "It's as hard as anv elective that
ECU offers
Some of the future officers take advan-
tage of the scholarship funds while others
receive $1500 "love money" for joining the
program. In the end they are all guaranteed
officer standing and employment in the mil-
SEE ROTC. PAGE 4
Ladies Elite Service
organization comes
to ECU
Marguerite Benjamin
NEWS EDITOR
MINORITY STUDENT AFFAIRS
Though February is Black History month and
the efforts and achievements of African-
Americans are in the spotlight for the next
three weeks, many minority students feel the
need for more positive exposure throughout
the year.
One such student is Taiisha Nicole Coins, a
sophomore and member of the ECU track
team, told TEC that she felt like opportunities
for minority students to get involved in posi-
tive activities were very limited.
"I looked around and saw, basically, that
outside of Thespians for Diversity and Allied
Blacks for Leadership and Equality (A.B.L.E.),
there was really nothing for us Coins said.
Coins transferred from Appalachian State
University, where she became a part of a ser-
vice organization for minority women called
Ladies Elite, which she thinks can be an asset
to ECU and Pitt County. Founded in 1982 on
the campus of ASU, the organization cites as
its purpose promoting unity and sisterhood
among all minority women and serving the
African American community through volun-
teer work.
"Our volunteer services are not limited to
just African-Americans, but they are our prima-
ry concern Coins said, adding that the addi-
tion of Ladies Elite to ECU's recognized orga-
nizations could benefit minority women in
many ways.
"Not only does it (the organization) pro-
mote much needed solidarity, but the experi-
ence gained through volunteering will make a
difference in the future. People are under the
impression that they can go their whole college
careers just going to class and that alone will be
enough.
"The truth is that employers look at more
than just grade point averages, and being a part
of a productive service organization is a great
thing to have on your resume Coins said.
While Coins stressed that Ladies Elite is
not a social sorority, the original idea of bring-
ing Ladies Elite to ECU was met with some
tension from other organizations on campus
geared toward minority women.
"My reason for introducing Ladies Elite is
not to offer competition to any other organiza-
tion Goins said. "I'm not here for a populari-
ty contest. I'm here to offer a service. I'm stay-
ing; they're staying
Goins said she saw no reason why students
who were already a part of another organiza-
tion, Greek or Non-Greek, could not be a pan
or at least show support to the new organiza-
tion.
Pamela Gilchrist, president of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, Inc agreed and added that she
also feels the introduction of Ladies Elite is a
good way to promote unity.
"We all strive for excellence and sister-
hood Gilchrist said. "Even though we aren't a
pan of the same group socially, we basically
stand for the same things and our goals are sim-
ilar. For that reason, I think we should support
each other
Gilchrist added that Goins should be com-
mended for her efforts because it takes a lot of
hard work to bring an organization together
especially when everyone is not supportive.
"Personally, I don't feel any Greek organiza-
tion should feel threatened by the addition of
a new organization for minorities Gilchrist
added. "We should all be working toward the
same goal anyway
Today is the last day for interested students
to complete an application, as the intake
process will be starting soon.
"Basically what we're looking for are minor-
ity women of all shapes, sizes and shades who
have time, positive assets and energy to dedi-
cate to an organization dedicated to serving
the community Goins said.
Workshop held for
perspective teaching fellows
Jacqueline D. Kellum
ARTS AND STUDIES ISSUES
STAFF WAITER
This past Saturday ECU's current North
Carolina Teaching Fellows (NCTF) held a
workshop at Mendenhall for those high school
senior who are currently finalists competing
for next year's Teaching Fellows scholarships.
This past Saturday's workshop was a volun-
tary undertaking, which is encouraged by the
Teaching Fellows organization, and which
must be held on one of two Saturdays desig-
nated by the organization. It was arranged by
the Teaching Fellows at ECU and included
campus tours sessions which concentrated on
particular areas of interest, an information ses-
sion which detailed specifics about the schol-
arship and a session on interview techniques.
According to Dr. Ronny VanSant, director of
the Teaching Fellows Program at ECU, this
workshop was part of an ongoing effort to pub-
licize the Teaching Fellows Program and raise
awareness about the need for high quality
teachers in North Carolina classrooms.
"The NCTF program is a $20,000 scholar-
ship, $5,000 each year for four years, with an
intensive enrichment program VanSant said.
"So it is very important to note that it is not
just a scholarship about money It is a program
that is designed to enrich their undergraduate
years and create an educator of excellence
This program began in 1987 in an effort to
prevent a predicted shortage of teachers by the
turn of the century. Students who receive this
scholarship are expected to spend four years
teaching in North Carolina after graduation to
repay their scholarship.
"At East Carolina, the program is an active
one VanSant said. "One of the academic
things we do is to provide seminars once a
month for each class
These seminars include transition issues
for the freshman students, professional com-
SEE TEACH. PAGE 4





Thursday. February 6,
N.C. Zoo keepers try experimental birth control on
giraffes
ASHEBORO, N.C. (AP) - No birth control method, except abstinence,
works all the time.
A new drug being tested on giraffes at the North Carolina Zoo, how-
ever, apparently works none of the time. At least not yet.
Two mother giraffes stood protectively over their calves, 5-foot minia-
tures of their long-limbed, thick-lashed moms.
The carves - a male bom Nov. 11 and a female born Dec. 1 - are among
the zoo's newest arrivals. They had their first day outside with the zebras
and ostriches that share the 3 12-acre Rrest Edge exhibit on Jan. 4.
The calves' rather as well as a second, younger male, remained in pens
behind the grassy enclosure. If allowed back in, Baes explained, they
might try to mate with the females and the carves could get hurt if they
got in the way. And, besides, the last thing the zoo needs is more giraffes.
High school basketball coach faces drug trafficking
charges
HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) - A high school basketball coach who resigned
last week for personal reasons was arrested Tuesday and charged with
cocaine trafficking, police said.
Robert Lee demons Jr 40, the former coach of the T. Wmgate
Andrews High School boys' varsity basketball team, is linked to last
week's seizure of two kilograms of cocaine at a residence, police said.
Clemons faces charges of trafficking in cocaine, conspiracy to traffic in
cocaine, maintaining a dwelling for the purposes of selling controlled sub-
stances and possession with intent to sell and deliver cocaine, said Capt.
Dan Hodgson, commander of the department's special investigation divi-
sion.
The charges against Clemons and two High Point men came after a
four-month undercover investigation by the High Point Police
Department, the Guilford County Sheriffs Department and the State
Bureau of Investigation.
Online world reacts
INTERNET (AP)-The big Wbb sites were primed for an onslaught. The
president was giving the State of the Union address just as a verdict in
the O.J. Simpson trial was expected. Would millions turn to the Internet
for their news?
Not exactly. One of the biggest draws of the evening was talk show
host Rosie OTJonnell, who attracted 16,000 participants to a chat room
on America Online. Simpson's chat room had about 6,000, and just 500
people logged on to talk about the State of the Union.
Many did log on to check out things online. CNN recorded 30,000 hits
a minute just as the verdict was announced. But it was short-lived.
Of the two breaking stories, it was clear what mattered most online:
CNN's home page feature story was the Simpson verdict; the State of the
Union address only warranted a headline slightly bigger than news of
Elizabeth Taylor's benign brain tumor.
Over at rival MSNBC, the Simpson headline got top billing and was
larger than the president's.
Judge allows local TV to show movie about
love-triangle slaying
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) - A judge cleared the way for a movie about
two former military cadets accused in a love-triangle slaying to be shown
on local television despite arguments that it will jeopardize a fair trial.
Attorneys for former Naval Academy midshipman Diane Zamora, 19,
had argued that Dallas-Fort Worth's NBC affiliate, KXAS, should not be
allowed to show "Love's Deadly Triangle: The Texas Cadet Murders
District Judge Joe Drago on Tuesday denied Miss Zamora's request for
an injunction blocking che broadcast, but he asked KXAS to voluntarily
pull the program. He also urged residents not to watch it.
KXAS said the movie will air as scheduled on Monday with a dis-
claimer saying it is not based on a court case because two trials are pend-
ing.
news
The East Carolinian
Academic dept. praises student tutorial program
Iran quakes kill at least 72 people, injure more than
200
BOJNURD, Iran (AP) - A magnitude-5.7 earthquake and dozes of after-
shocks rocked northeastern Iran today, a day after two powerful quakes in
the same area flattened several villages, killing at least 72 people.
The death toll, given by state-run Tehran radio, has been climbing
since two earthquakes about 40 minutes apart shook the city of Bojnurd
and villages around it Tuesday At least 200 people were injured.
No injuries or damage was reported yet from today's quake.
Relief workers and mountain climbers were sent to the stricken vil-
lages, but heavy snows and freezing temperatures prevented them from
reaching all of them, Tehran radio said. Some roads were buried under
knee-high snow or blocked by landslides.
Eight villages were demolished by Tuesday's quakes, and 35 others
suffered damage, the Islamic Republic News Agency quoted the Red
Crescent Society as saying. More than 2,800 houses were severely dam-
aged, said the Red Crescent, the Muslim version of the Red Cross.
BECKY ALLEY
ORIENTATIONGENERAL COLLEGE ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
The Student Tutorial Program of the department
of athletics has proven to be a rewarding educa-
tional experience for both tutors and athletes.
"Wc have had a lot of success with the
Academic Development Program here at ECU.
The tutors have played a big role in our success
and our athletes have really committed to getting
a good education. Our football team alone is
graduating 85 percent within five years and there
are only 15 other Division 1 schools that can say
that said Amy Barnes, athletic development
coordinator.
The tutoring program provides free tutoring
for student-athletes upon their request. The
tutors are students with a minimum 2.5 GPA and
are selected on the basis of faculty recommenda-
tions.
Jeff Mobley, a junior who has been tutoring for
two semesters, feels that it is beneficial to the
learning experience to have a student be the
tutor.
"Having a student tutor helps the athlete
because it is someone who is on their own level.
It shows them that me as a fellow student could
do it so they can too. A lot of them just need
more confidence in their academic abilities
Mobley said.
"It is just more casual for the tutor and
the athlete. It's like having a friend help you out
instead of being lectured at Jennifer Farris, a
former tutor, said.
Besides tutoring, the tutoring staff is respon-
sible for instilling needed study habits, efficient
note-taking skills, and test taking strategies in
the athletes.
"Many people have misconceptions about
what the athletes do all day Barnes said. "They
are generally busy with practice and classes from
6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. They don't have the free
time to prepare for class like everyone else.
Really what the tutors do is help them with man-
agement
"I never realized how busy the athletes were
until I started tutoring them said Jennifer
Emswiler, a math and biology tutor. "It's really
great to help them and see them working hard
The tutoring occurs either in an individual or
group study hall format. Many of the tutors feel
that the individual format has more advantages.
Roshani Shah, who has been a tutor for two years,
says that when the athlete are in a study hall
there are too many distractions for them and that
they do not do as much work.
Anthony Nobles, a freshman football
player, agrees with Shah's comment.
"I prepared more for my tutor so I would know
what she was talking about and it did help my
grades. Study hall though is a whole different
thing. I guess if you need it, it helps Nobles
said.
The program's goal is for every student-ath-
lete to approach teaming with the same commit-
ment and energy they give to athletic cor .peti-
tion. To ensure the tutors are doing a good job,
all tutors are evaluated at the end of the ac-nes-
ter. Barnes said the athletes are also a�Ked dur-
ing the semester if everything is working out
with their tutors.
A tutor who preferred to remain anoii.mous
said a problem facing the program is the violation
of the "no-dating" policy.
The tutor said, "When you get hired, they tell
you this is not a dating service. You are not sup-
posed to date anyone you tutor. However, I've
heard of some of the girls dating the athletes they
tutor and doing their work for them. It's not
right and it's giving the rest of us a bad name.
There needs to be stricter enforcement of this
rule
Several tutors mentioned that some of the
athletes would wait till the night before a test or
paper before they would call them for help. This
also is another problem facing the program.
"When someone is 20 or 21, you can't make
them !eam Farris said. "You can't force them to
do their work. They have to want it
The tutoring program is always in need of
more tutors. Anyone who is interested in becom-
ing a tutor and has at least a 2.5 GPA may contact
Amy Barnes at 328-4673.
President supports boosting
teaching standards
RALEIGH (AP) - Gov. Jim Hunt's
efforts to establish national stan-
dards for teaching received a boost
from President Clinton Tuesday
night in his State of the Union
address.
As he called education his No. 1
priority, Clinton emphasized the
need for the "best teachers" and
cited efforts by Hunt and the
National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards to establish
nationally accepted credentials for
excellence in teaching.
"I was very pleased that he men-
tioned the hard work that's gone
into setting high rigorous standards
for teachers that many of us have
been involved in for the last 10
years Hunt said in a telephone
interview after watching the speech
at the governor's mansion.
Hunt created and chairs the
teaching standards board, which
promotes better teaching through
voluntary certification. North
Carolina was one of the first states
to reward better teaching excellence
by supporting teachers who seek
National Board certification.
The president said 500 of those
master teachers have been certified
since 1995 and his budget would
enable 100,000 more to seek nation-
al certification as master teachers.
North Carolina leads the nation in
the number of educators, with 93
who have successfully gone through
the rigorous process, according to
the governor's office.
Hunt said teachers must take
videos of their teaching to an assess-
ment center as part of the process.
As a reward, those in North Carolina
get an extra 4 percent in their pay-
checks each year.
Hunt said he would recommend
this year that the bonus be raised to
10 percent.
Hunt said many parts of the
president's speech provided a pre-
view to his State of the State
address next week
"The presidents' proposals
tonight are very similar to those that
we're focusing on in North Carolina.
He also had a great deal to say about
early childhood the governor said.
"Smart Stan is the nation's out-
standing systemwide approach for
providing good opportunities for
every child
The governor said he also agreed
with the president's strong words
about the need to protect young
children and teen-agers from the
influence of tobacco, a statement
that received cheers from legislators
in the gallery.
"I agree with that Hunt said.
"But I also stand up for the right of
our farmers to raise tobacco, our
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All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
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Thursday. February 6, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
ECU STUI
USLTAI
OF ALL STI
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POPI
DIRECTORS
FOffiHHRiiRSONS
UNION COMMI1
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All firterested ApplicanisShould Have At Least
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FOR MORE INFORMATfNOR TOI PICK UP AN -APPLICjATJJ
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January 28
Damage to property - A resident of Clement Hall reported damage to her
vehicle while parked in the Reade Street parking lot. The left side mirror
was damaged.
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of her license plate from her
vehicle parked in the Ficklen and Charles parking lot.
January 29
Damage to property - A student reported that the doors of his vehicle
were scratched while the vehicle was parked south of Mendenhall.
Damage to property - A student reported that the doors on his vehicle
were scratched while the vehicle was parked on College Hill Drive.
January 30
Assist Rescue - A student was transported from Austin to PCMH by
Greenville Rescue after he collapsed.
Suspicious Activity - A non-student was banned from campus after he
followed two students from downtown to Fletcher Hall.
Damage to property - A student reported that her vehicle was damaged
while parked south of Fletcher Hall.
January 31
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of his stereo from his vehicle
parked in the Third and Reade Street parking lot.
Larceny - A resident of Garrctt Hall reported the larceny of a ring from
his room.
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of her hubcap from her vehicle
parked in the Third and Reade Street parking lot.
February 3
Assist Rescue - A student was transported from north of the Fletcher
Music Building to Pitt County Memorial Hospital by Greenville Rescue
after suffering from a seizure.
Damage to property - A staff member reported damage to her vehicle
while parked west of the Eppes property.
Breaking and enteringproperty damage - A resident of Jones Hall report-
ed that someone entered his room during the Christmas break and damaged
his bicycle.
Grieving son
sues UNC-
Chapel Hill
Shooting rampage
leaves father dead
CHAPEL HILL, N.C, (AP) - The
son of a man who died during a
shooting rampage has filed a negli-
gence complaint against the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill for the way employees
handled the suspect's mental ill-
ness.
Ralph Walker Jr. and Kevin
Reichard died after Wendell
Williamson, a UNC-Chapel Hill
law student, allegedly walked up a
downtown street firing a high-pow-
ered rifle at people. Williams was
later found innocent by reason of
insanity.
During the trial, psychiatrists
said Williamson was suffering from
mental illness and that he was delu-
sional at the time of the shootings.
The lawsuit is similar to one
filed last week by the parents of
Reichard. It contends that several
employees failed to warn others of
Williamson's potential violence,
provide proper treatment for
Williamson or notify the police
department about Williamson's
mental illness or potential threat.
Ralph Walker III filed the claim,
which seeks $150,000, Friday with
the N.C Industrial Commission. A
deputy commissioner will decide
whether the claim is valid.
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4 Thursday. February 6. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Teach
continued from page 1
J munication for the sophomores,
; multiculturalism for the juniors
�and professional issues for the
� seniors.
J The Teaching Fellows also par-
J ticipate in governing their own
i organization and volunteer in a
! variety of projects in the area.
J "The summer after their fresh-
; man year, all 400 freshman
Teaching Fellows in North
larolina go on a discovery trip all
lover North Carolina VanSant
I said, "to see the schools, to see
' businesses, to see atomic energy
I plants, to see pickle factories, to
I meet the people and say, 'this is
I the state where you will be spend-
' ing four years teaching; this is
'� where the parents of your stu-
dents will be working; these are
, the work places that you need to
1 prepare your students to enter
i In the summer after their
sophomore year, the Teaching
I Fellows can choose to participate
� in a variety of activities, including
' Habitat for Humanity, arts intern-
ship, Outward Bound, trips to
Cambridge, England or other
countries. The rising seniors are
required to spend a week in a
school system- not in classrooms-
learning how the school systems
work.
The Teaching Fellows Program
is now old enough that the first
recipients have finished college
and their four years of teaching,
but according to VanSant, the stu-
dents still aren't staving in the
field.
"We have a high percentage
that are finishing their four years
of teaching VanSant said. After
that -and the state has done a
study on this - they are leaving at
about the same rate as non-
Teaching Fellow teachers. In
other words, teachers are leaving
the classroom in droves
VanSant cited two reasons why,
in her opinion, teachers are not
staying in the profession. One is
lack of pay increases for experi-
enced, veteran teachers. The
other was the lack of a comfort-
able work environment.
"Teachers are professionals.
What professional do you know
that doesn't have an office and a
phone?" VanSant said.
With such a high percentage of
even the best teachers leaving the
classrooms, VanSant said it is
becoming more and more impor-
tant to publicize the Teaching
Fellows program, which is trying
to change the image of teaching
and make it a more respected pro-
fession. Students in our region of
the state, in particular, need to be
aware of this opportunity, as the
northern coastal region has both
the lowest number of applicants
and the lowest number of recipi-
ents.
"We need to get out the word
to public school students in North
Carolina that this opportunity is
available Van Sant said. "Not
just for the money, which does
allow a lot of students to go to col-
lege that wouldn't be able to, but
the enriching program that goes
along with it, which we believe
prepares a professional in a better
way
rotc
continusd from page 1
itary after graduation.
But the students aren't all
camouflage and career. Twice a
year they have a formal. On occa-
sion they take trips to places like
Fort Bragg to demonstrate their
command of critical thinking,
management, and communication
skills which may later assist them
in other walks of life.
Beyond all else, the ROTC
program is a close community. "I
like the fact that everybody looks
out for everybody else said
freshman ROTC student Tracey
Wray.
So while most of the campus
sleeps, in class or in bed, the
future military officers are busy
getting the most out of their col-
lege education.
The East Carolinia
Too busy for exercise? Exercise is needed especially when
Other demands are weighing us down.
.N1RSA Natural High Newsletter
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Series.
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S Thuf��iy, F��r�irr 0, 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
V
astCarolinian
BRANDON WADDRtL fiWOi
AMANDA ROSSI Swk (Mr
Patrick iikian n�nE�w
celrstr Wilson Pio Map
CAROLE MRHLE Hatd Cosy Ettr
ANDY FARKAS Snitl
MATT HtOR Mwfwi OiiKtw
MaROKRRITR Benjamin Ikwi EHiiw
AMY I. ROYSTKR Aurram Ron (�IOf
JAY MYRRS LitelY Edit
Dale Williamson ammwm ibi� Et
HEATHER BUROESS nlW�
Li.llt.iaiimaiiri ' ' l1" " ' � ' " �
mm4mm�u9mimMwmnmtmmmmmM,m
Mmtmmm � �� �lR�wRn�njRtaBRaWMilBniti am ata Mm
tmttm tARtimiw ��� ten, ftwi- ?�i4iM aj tjanran i nmtm
ouwiew
The Wild West has several connotations, depending on the angle one takes. For some, the Wild West
represents a time of adventure and discovery, a time when human sweat and blood paved unimagin-
able roads for future generations.
For others, the Wild West symbolizes a time of lawlessness and violence where even the most
respectable citizen carried a pistol at his or her side. Life was dangerous then; either you defended
yourself, or you became the next name on a tombstone.
That was a time long gone. Or so we at TEC thought. Last week, one of our local TV news stations
aired a feature detailing the increasing violence that is plaguing Greenville. Considering the
Greenville's relatively small size, the city and its citizens have witnessed an inordinate amount of
murders within a short period of time.
One can speculate about the causes of such violence, and one can point fingers, but that is not our
concern at the moment. What concerns us at TEC is a comment made by someone from the Pitt
County Sheriff's office. When questioned about Greenville's violence, an official was quoted as say-
ing Greenville is now like the Wild West, that it is a town of lawlessness.
Fine. He is entitled to that opinion. But he went a step further, a step that should not be taken by
any official who represents a community. He said Greenville citizens should arm themselves with
guns in an effort to defend themselves.
While we arc sure that many local residents may view such a statement as being filled with wis-
dom and sincere concern, such a statement also endorses vigilante actions. An elected official should
be a person the community can look up to and depend on, someone who will work hard to solve the
community's problems. We at TEC feel that the official's unthinking sutement only increases the
problem of local violence; it does not in any form or fashion offer a solution.
We understand that the local law enforcers have their hands full, if not tied, but laws are instated
for a specific purpose - to maintain a sense of peace. If the Sheriff's office tells the public to go out
and purchase guns, the result can only be an increased state of unrest. What happens when someone
decides to use one of those guns, for whatever purpose? Who is going to be the judge and jury who
distinguishes a criminal act from a justified act of self-defense?
We don't have any simple solutions.
Community violence is not a simple issue. Many factors play a part in the problem, whether they
cultural or economic. What we do firmly .believe is that an increase in gun ownership does not deter
crime. If anything, it increases the possibility of violent deaths.
Greenville is not the wild west yet. Crime is bad, but crime is a fact of life throughout the entire
country. If you want to really experience a taste of the Wild West, stick a gun on the side of every hot
shot out there and see what happens. The next drunken fist fight downtown will end up� bit more
messy, and then you'll feel like a true cowboy.
Guns are not the solution. There have got to be other paths to travel.
LETTERS TO T.HE EDITOR
Ricultystaff would benefit from SRC
Ebonics: language or laziness?
Some say it's a dialect. Others say it
is slang. The rest say it is a language,
but only a select few have any real
point of view.
People are for it. People arc
against it. Conservatives want to
apprehend it, to kill it. Many want to
prevent it from flourishing.
So many people seem to be afraid
of it. They are righting like cats and
dogs.
Just because a person is in a posi-
tion of power, or is an educator, does
not make that person an expert on
the subject of ebonies.
Columnist Stanley Crouch refers
to Ebonics as 'coon' business. He
says, "the problem is teachers don't
know how to teach At least, he
acknowledges that a problem exist.
So, even though he is against estab-
lishing Ebonics as an official language,
he seems to be implying that we need
Tb the Editor,
I am writing in response to Mr.
Bazlukt's letter in the Tuesday,
February 4, 1997 issue of TEC. I not
only agree but wish to take his argu-
ment one step further.
1 am willing to bet that in the
recesses of the Health Sciences
Library that there is a research paper
or two that would support employee
benefits of physical fitness. Current
corporate trends bare this out in that
corporations are building in-house
facilities for their employees. Glaxo-
Wellcomc and PCMH are two exam-
ples in Greenville of having instituted
corporate fitness centers. Even one of
our choices for an HMO,
Healthsource, offers $150 towards a
membership in a fitness center.
I would also be willing to guess
that the health insurance companies
have informatZi�ion and research that
would support physical fitness
amongst employees reduces health
care costs overall. Could the
University offer to use the money that
is saved in reduced health care costs
to go towards the Recreation Center?
Maybe have faulty and staff pay to use
the facility but if it is used by the indi-
vidual more than twenty days each
month, refund the monthly fee? 1 do
not believe that the students should
be made to pay for our use of the facil-
ity but there should be some way to
SGA executives deserve free tuition
lb the Editor,
The truth about SGA spending can
only be dealt with by someone who
has done their homework. As of last
semester, SGA spent $3504 on the
tuition of four executive council
members, another $800 was allocated
for books. The stipends per month
were as follows: President $400, vice
president $225, treasurer $250, and
the secretary received $200. The
grand tout of these expenditures for
the executive council for one semes-
ter is $8604, give or take a few.
There were 17,479 students
enrolled in the previous semester.
There average student is paying a
whopping total of $.49 to be repre-
sented on a state wide level. Many
people will spend this amount in typ-
ing paper to voice their disapproval of
the matter. This is a minuscule
amount of money, per student, to have
good representation. It is my opinion
that the stipend should be withdrawn
and only the tuition should be paid.
No actual money should switch hands
and it would only total approximately
$.20 per student.
It is an honor to receive free tuition
for your representation of the
University and not exactly an honor to
boast about a $400 per month income.
The legislature has had a huge
amount of time to resolve this issue,
unfortunately, you the students are
going to be entrenched in this sort of
propaganda once again seeing that it is
to teach teachers how to teach. How
odd! Teaching students how to speak
proper English, and teaching teachers
how to teach these children is exactly
what the entire issue of Ebonics
stems from, in the first place. The
Oakland School Board wants to do
just that. Teach students and teach-
ers. So does everyone who is for
ebonies.
Derrick Bell, a law professor, says,
"Any damn thing that is out of the
main stream of what white people
feel comfortable with causes a contro-
versy!
Some educated blacks feel that
the issue of ebonies brings them
down. Down to where? Down to
what? Perhaps they feel it is taking
them back away from the white
world that they now are a part of and
back to their pre-conceived colored
world.
This kind of thinking is crazy. It
is nothing short of prejudice. Even
some blacks seem to have allowed
white society to prejudice them ,
against their selves.
For blacks and society in general,
to do nothing about the African-
American elementary and high school
student's problems in reading and
writing English productively, is like
shooting your self in the foot.
It hurts, causes pain, and prevents
'equal rights' for all U.S. citizens.
If something is broke and of value
to us as a society, we fix it. We make
it right.
We need to do something to help
our young ill-educated students,
before they grow old and become just
another statistic � another human
being who never amounts to much
because he or she can't read or write
English.
OPINION
Nicole
MCMULLEN
ECU: A party school?
compromise on this issue.
I feel that decisions are often made
by people who may earn a salary where
there is discretionary money available
for spending on physical fitness but
what the support staff who earn under
$20,000 a year and for who this is a
luxury that they can't afford? A good
number of faculty and staff feel as if
they are being nickled and dimed to
death and that this is one more exam-
ple of how the University devalues
their employees.
J. Marshall
Assistant Director of Student
Activities
Department of University Unions
I'm sure that all of you have heard the
rumor going around about ECU. You
know, the one saying that we're a
party school. Well, guess what? We are.
Yes, that's right. We know how to
have a good time out here. We can
throw the best tailgate panics ever.
Have you ever been to a bowl game
that ECU is playing in? If you have,
then you know how that whole city is
painted purple and gold while we're in
town. And you better believe that
when Halloween comes around, we're
ready.
But, do we really want to be known
only for our parrying skills? What can
we, as students, do to help?
Well, way back in the day, ECU
students didn't know how to party
responsibly. We students need to
show the world that, yes, we like to
party, but we can do it safely, which
means no more fighting in our lovely
night clubs, no more turning over cars.
and most importantly no more drink-
ing and driving.
The one incident people associat-
ed most with ECU is the ESPN foot-
ball game which had ECU praying
against Syracuse. You know, the one
where a fight between students broke
out and the camera man just so hap-
pened to catch it on tape. Of course,
it's all blamed on all the alcohol that
we consume before the game.
Everyone took this incident and blew
it way out of proportion. I mean, yes,
our infamous "ECU Mike Tysons" did
make us look bad while throwing
punches at each other. But this one
incident shouldn't be associated with
the whole university.
Another thing that people don't
understand about us East Carolinians
is our shrine, downtown. Downtown,
for those of you who aren't aware of
this, is the street where all those bars
are that you go to almost every night.
We worship downtown. If we can fii
a reason to go out and celebrate, Dab
gun it, we will. There is nothing
wrong with going out every night.
What the rest of the world doesn't
realize, is that us smart party people
know to do our homework before we
go out and not when we get back. And
you know, other colleges have a street
like our 5th Street. For example, N.C.
State has Hilisborough Street, which
has more bars than our 5th Street. So,
why aren't they considered a party
school?
It all boils down to one point, we
East Carolinians know how to party
And yes, we are also proud of our aca-
demic side. We do take our studying
seriously. But we also know how to
have a good time. So, maybe instead
of the other colleges trying to put us
down, they should come out to the
Emerald City and see just what East
Carolina is all about.
almost time for SGA executive council
elections. It makes a nice platform
doesn't it?
To harp on the negative things sur-
rounding SGA To act like you are lis-
tening to students concerns. There
are many things that will influence
your decision to vote so pay close
attention to what you hear in the
upcoming months. Look out for those
alterior motives involved in the elec-
tions process. Do your research like I
have and don't accept election
promises. More than that, get
involved and make your own deci-
sions.
Jonathan Muggins
Senior
Nutrition
Guest columnist application
for Campus View
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what you think about a certain topic. Please return this
form The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs.
Building. Please print.
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changes that may affect the length or content I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submis- I
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submission will be assigned by the editor. .
,�mmmmI





6 Thursday, February 6, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
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Everyday Life
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NEXTAAr.ri(rH
AN6 I THOUGHT ME W�
IliintiNKneH MUM �V �
. IN TK.E CAFfTrfc.
WINTER
CLEARANCE
Up
onnection
Division of U.B.E.
210 EAST 5TH STREET 758-8612 MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10-6, SUNDAY 1-5
Stanton Square Shopping Center
757-7756
Mon-Thurs 11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Fri & Sal 11:00 am - 11:00 pm
CPW'S Sports Bar Specials
February Specials
Monday - $1.50 Premium Draft
& .25 Wings
Tuesday - $2.50 Frozen Daiquiris
Wednesday - $1.75 Import Bottles
Thursday - $2.00 Hi-Balls
Friday - $2.50 Margaritas (All Flavors!)
Saturday - $1.50 Domestics
& .50 Domestic Draft
� Specialty Pizzas -
Stone Oven Baked
� 30 Toppings
� Create Your Own Pasta Dish
February is for lovers
? Lovers of Pizza
? Lovers of Pasta
Join us in February
for our Specials for two!
Appetizer
Hot Artichoke & Spinach Dip
with Blue corn Chips for two.
Linguine with Scallops in a lemon
cream sauce for two.
Marinated Artichoke hearts and
grilled portabeUa mushrooms on
sundried tomato pesto for two.
Featured Wine - George Deboeuf Beaujokus
Pasta
Pizza -
EastCarolina University � Department of Recreational Service
-l Natural Life Program -
� Are you ready for
le ultimate challenge'
lNATURALl
DOWN
1 Supervisor
2 Leave unmen-
tioned
3 Labyrinth
4 Covering of
crumbs
5 Fortified place
6 Dyed�wool
7 Conservative
8 Tokyo, long ago
9 Natural
accumulations
10 Accident
11 Lazy
12 Tragic king
13 Calendar
divisions
21 Forfeit
23 D'Urbervilles
name
ANSWERS
FROM TDESD
25 In advance
26 Dramas
27 Thesaurus
name
28 Came to be
29 Twist
30 Notched, as a
leaf
31 Hearsay
32 Ship part
34 Be at the side of
37 Estrange
38 Second job
40 Something to
drink
41 Ballot
43 Lover on the lam
44 Relocation
specialists
46 Kind of maid
47 Springe
48 This place
49 Appraise
50 Desert feature
51 Spoken
52 Artist Klee
53 Hardens
56 Intimidate
ACROSS
1 Total failure
5 Mentioned for
bravery
10 Gentle
14 Khayyam
15 Battery terminal
16 Inspiration
17 Magnitude
18 Leather lor
sharpening
19 Do in
20 Furtive
22 Different people
24 Charitable
dispensation
25 Bewildered
26 Acclaim
29 Speaks very
softly
33 Greene of TV
34 Guitar ridges
35 Furrow
36 Excited
37 Otherwise called
38 A little
39 Affirmative word
40 Flavorless
41 Cap part
42 Kind of wheel
44 Up-to-date
45 Culinary herb
46 Speck
47 Pitched
50 Evolves
54 Harvest grain
55 Keenly
discerning
57 Dies �
58 Commedia
dell'�
59 Pigment
60 Of ships: abbr
61 Equal
62 Pitchers
63 Building
annexes
R Ai lMh ARE MlR A N Q
A NN eHa FIREEL 1 A
M 1 �1 A PjC W� O DiE 11 A T Y P U SllO P � H E ElLjiTD A Tp e a npBElv 110GALL 11 H g'3 MB EJN C E
L A A L T E E S M C A R1 R 5T R E E L YR A ! N Si lb m e slB SWC E'iSOC1 � R E E OilC A f TrIR olwllL A N t e aMa d o rwIJBu R N 9RAT fTa s t e i !� " III (FALL � OLIO
T EN nBy O U V El10 MAR
S LO TMS E D E RTARE
RECREATIONAL
Register in teams of three :
TJhe SRC Main Office by February 10:
�(Each team should consist of at least one female.) 1
Qualify against other teams of three
E& conquer the FORUM OF FEAR �
� ultimate challenge course!
The Challenge begins
February 13 at 4:00 p.m.
Fo7 more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387!
miMim mm





For Rent
m
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
'PftEE PESfttUftV Mm 2 bedroofn 2
blocks from campus and Rec. Center $350 a
-month plus security deposit. Call 830-2870.
ICOLLfoE VifiW ArftRTUfeMTSTtto
bedrooms, stove, refrigerator, basic cable,
.washer dryer hook-ups, central heat and air.
'All apartments on ground level. Call 931-
mjb6 AfrAfttMEMT At hiNd-
;OOLD Towers available for sublease, $310
.month, fully furnished. Call919) 552-9293
�or call RtnggoW lowers Mgmt. - 752-2865.
share 2-bedroom, I 12 bath townhouse on
Charles St, across from campus! Rent is
$225.00 plus 12 Pius. Please call 757-3789.
marwaa a �cobb bs sac
�um �private entrance, bath, driveway park-
ing-microwave oven, fridge -wired for phone
'(and cable -prefer senior or grad. student.
;$275mo. -call Man after 6:00 pm -321-7211.
EAftK VILLAGE AbAMS BLVb: one
bedroom apta. range, refrigerator, wd hook-
up. Free water and sewer. ECU bus route.
IWainrigbt Property Management 756-6209.
Vainrigbt Property M
JNAGSHeAD, Nc- get your group togeth-
;er early. Two houses in excellent condition;
'fully furnished; washer ft dryer, dishwash-
�er, central AC; available May 1 through Au-
'guat 31; sleeps6-$1600.00 per month; sleeps
8 -$2200.00 per month (757)850-1532.
�MALE'ft66MNJATk WAMtfeb:
�PLAYFRS Club Apartments. WasherDry-
er, use of ail amenities, split cable, phone
4 ways. Call Today 321-7613.
Affordable i
ROOM house on the corner
�of 5th and Lewis. Call Wainright Property
'?Mana�morn 756-6209.
;r6oWMATe nIEEdEd asap Fob 2
JBR, 1 BA, 7 blocks from campus, on ECU
Ibusline. Call Holly 551-1837.
MATE rvEEbfeb.
14 utilities
�Hy!
5KT
JPBmALE ftooli
�OWN bedroom $177.50 month.
11 phone. WasherDryer. Tar River. Call
.757-0406.
MALE r66MMaTE WaNTEC pLaV-
�ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Af-
fair1 eoTTAflE MEAtt HosPITaL
r�Urge one bedroom with gas & dec. heat
rHardwood and carpeted floors, fireplace,
�fchandeuett, on wooded lot Very nice, very
, $4S$J0 mo. Available Feb. tst Call
M$t7
lATENEEDEftWo bedroom
-apt at Whyndam Court $202.50 plus 12 of
�'the utilities. Please call 413-0514.
For Sale
fxmiles accass $2,200, sony receiver
dolby prologic 180 watts $250, sony cd
"5 disc $130, 5 piece speaker system
3$300. Call David 328-7706.
TOV0� NEED A car? Ineedtu-
"titienl 87 Ford Taurus, great condition,
i t3.OO0 obo. � Call Wil 752-3269.
llvTTW-
AlHPEEU kACINC BIKE used. N
tires.
rtf
i�
Help
wanted
Help
wanted
SOMEONE TO PICKUP AND take
care of two children after school nine
to twelve hours per week. References
required. Call 931-6904 and leave a
message.
. TN BIKE GARY KliWER with
�mariton front suspension. Comes with
lock and pump. $450 Call Jon 758-3477
� 'or 758-2860
�fottSALK KI'iTHEN TABLE with
4 chain, $25 and patio furniture, table,
' U chairs, and end table $20 or best of-
Ifer. Call 758-7531.
"M, GIBSON N1CHTHAWK CUS-
TOM guitar $700.00 Roland Jazz - 77
'amplifier contact John � 919-638-
; 13484"
ew
Light
Not a mountain bike
tt.OO. Call 321-7956.
�E! UUEEN SIZE waterbed
with cherry headboard $250.00 for the
.waterbed or have it set up for $75.00
;more. Prices are negotiable. Call Emily
! at 561-7808.
ATIWl'lUN CYCLING ENTHU-
SIASTS! '97 trek 470 road bike, 150-
.200 mi. 52" shimano RX components,
; ergo-shifters for comfort. Excellent
' "first bike upgrade used, quality. (752-
:2?il
Ration
NEED CASH NOW?
CALL CRAZY DAVE!
HE'LL BUY ANYTHING!
PAYING TOP DOLLAR!
754-0468 ANYTIME!
UKEENV1LLE RECKfc-
!tc PARKS Department is re-
craiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess some
' 'knowledge of the soccer skills and have
i;thc ability and patience to work with
r youth. Applicants must be able to coach
;Iyoung people ages 5-18 in soccer fun-
� damcntals. Hours are from 3 pm to 7
'pm with some night and wee' -nil
�'�coaching. Flexible with hours at .ord-
fing to class schedules. This program
?wili run from the first of March to the
i first of May. Salary rates start at $4.75
per hour. For more information, please
Ucall Ben James or Michael Daly at 830-
4550.
RESEARCH REPORTS
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
rt.ro rortcs - ALL SUBJCCTS
Order Catalog Toeiy wrth Visa MC r COD
EB 800-3510222
Or. rush $2.00 to: Rettsreh Assittsnct
11322 Idaho Ave . IM6-RR. Us Angnss. CA 90025
JASMINE GARDENS 2 bedroom 1 hath
Stove, Refrigerator, wd hookups.
?Cloietocampm mm 3551313
�$395mth. gj
classifieds
The East Carolinian
Services
Offered
&
Travel
i�j
M
Greek
Personals
JESSMARKET!N(S 8TU-
DENTS: National Communications
Company is coming to Greenville, Part-
time job opportunities. Get paid for ex-
cellent experience in your field while
attending East Carolina University.
Call 888-605-0906.
A'H'fcN'l ION miDKNTS: EARN
EXTRA cash stuffing envelopes at
home. Ali materials provided. Send
SASE to Midwest Distributors, P.O.
Box 624, Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate
response.
S1S66 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
THE EAST CAROLINA BANK is
looking for a part-time (20-25 hours
weekly) person who likes to work in a
fast-paced, sales-oriented environment
for our in-store location in the Green-
ville Super Walmart. Great opportunity
for college students. We offer a com-
petitive salary and commission pro-
gram. Please send resume along with
cover letter and salary history to: Doug
Hudson, The East Carolina Bank, 210
Greenville Blvd S.W Greenville, NC
27834
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home! Call now!
1-919-243-4507 24 hours ext. NCI 21.
EARN 6,6o6 THIS SUMMER. Dy-
namic Company now interviewinghir-
ing ambitious, entrepreneurial students
to fill summer management positions
in your hometown. For more informa-
tion and to schedule an interview call
Tuition Painters 1 (800) 393 -4521.
IF YOU ARE SEEKING" part-time em-
ploy men t with an established company,
then look no further. ONLINE Col-
lections has just landed several collec-
tion accounts and has an immediate
need for telephone collectors. Appli-
cant must be aggressive, self motivated,
and poses excellent communication
skills. If interested, please contact
Chris Murphy at 754-1615 after 12 pm
or Craig Jackson at 757-2134 after 5 pm.
Only serious applicants need to apply.
OUfCK CaSHY THE SCHOOL of
Business, Office of Professional Pro-
grams, is looking for a photographer to
take photos of our events. Must have
own camera. If interested, call 328-
6377.
PART-TIME TENNIS INSTRUC-
TORSATTENDANTS. River birch
tennis center. Afternoon, weekend
hours. 10-18 hoursweek $4.75hour.
Experience with children helpful. Call
8304559.
ONLINE INFORMATION SER-
VICES, INC is currently seeking in-
dividuals interested in part-time com-
puter programming employment on a
three-to six-month project. Applicants
should possess a working knowledge of
C and C under UNIX and Win32.
Telecommunications experience is a
plus. Please fax resumes, or deliver in
person, to: Online Information Ser-
vices, Inc 1206 Charles Blvd Green-
ville, NC 27834, Fax 919-757-2115
Voice 919-758-4141.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MUST
be 18 years old. Earn great money while
you learn playmates massage, Snow
Hill.NC 747-7686.
VALENTINE HELP NEEDED IN
store and delivery. Apply in person.
Cynthia's Flowers 1318 East 10th
Street.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER '971
Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards, Pool
Managers, Swim Lessons Instructors,
Swim Coaches. Summer positions
available in Charlotte, Greensboro, Ra-
leigh, NC, Greenville, and Columbia,
SC areas, call Carolina Pool Manage-
ment at (704) 541 -9303. In Atlanta, call
SwimAtlanta Pool Management at
(770)992-7765.
HEAD LIFEGUARD NEEDED.
EXPERIENCE necessary. Lifeguard
needed. Experience preferred. See
Janine Jones at the Greenville Country
Club.
NOT GOING ANYWHERE KOk
spring break? Make your friends jeal-
ous by sending postcards from Hawaii,
Florida, Park City, Utah! You fill out
postcards, we have them postmarked
and sent from actual locations! Send
$3 each, 2 for $5, 5 for $10. Add $1.95
to total for P. H. Include desired
ktcation(s). Bendor Novelty Services,
290G Apple wood Center Place-321,
Seneca, SC 29678.
FREE FOR ECU STUDENTS!
Would you like to put your resume or a
classified ad on the internet for free?
We offer services including resume de-
signing and internet access. If you are
interested in any of these, visit our
Website at HTTP:
WWW.NCGALLERIA.COM or call
754-2171 for more information.
GOING TO D.CN.VA. area on week-
end of Feb. 14th? I am desperately
searching for a ride. Will pay for gas.
Please call Sarah at 328-3641.
NEEDYOURCARPETS
CLEANED? 'Special rates for flat-
level apartments: l-br$25&2-br$35.
For more information, please call
Economy Cleaning Service at 931 -1767
amui'i'i'i'L n kV hit abi p iat;
SCUBA
SPECIAL
MASK, F!NS,& SNORKEL
Retail $179.90
ECU Student Special
$99.99
BLUE REGION
SCUBA
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
MO"),
PI DELTA WILL BE holding an in-
formal rush Feb. 17-19. Call Ami at
328-3751 for rides and further details.
Hope to sec you there. Go Greek!
lope to sec yo
�HETA fjTTT
THETA CHI, THANKS FOR show-
ing us such a great time at bid night
Friday. You guys always know how to
have fun! Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi.
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate Anne Newton on her recent
engagement to Kevin Snead. You are a
lucky guy Kevin! Best wishes to both
of you. Love the sisters of Alpha Phi!
Announcements
CELTIC FIDDLER PAULA
TISDALE will head the music for a
Contra Dance by ECU Folk and Coun-
try Dancers. Sac, Feb. 15th, 7:30-9:30.
Beginner's instruction at 7:00. Baptist
Student Center, 511 E. 10th St Green-
ville. Come alone or bring a friend. For
information, 830-5403.
JUST RECEIVED YOUR W-2" forms?
SGA and Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting)
organizations are providing Free tax ser-
vices to students and members of the
University Community. Coming Soon!
I yo
Jph
iitv. Coming N
iNVILLEI
BABYSriTKR AVAILABLE. LOTS
OF experience. Great with kids. Ref-
erences available. Junior at ECU. Call
Jen 754-2075.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
UNKS FOR THE GREAT time
Tuesday night. Phi Tau! Love, ZETA
SIG EP - THANKS FOR a great bid
nightpref party. It was a blast. The
sisters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delt
SORRY WE ARE SO late but thank
you Sigma for your excellent speaker.
She was very wonderful. Love Pi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW Gamma Alpha pledge class of
Alpha Xi Delta: Cyndi Bowman, Holly
Drill, Heidi Gant, Katie Hamil, Dana
Menture, Lesley Parker, Nicole
'Schmitt, Jennifer Thornton, Karen
'webb, and Natalie. We love you, the
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
THEGREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics will be
conducting an Athletics (Track & Field)
Coaches Training School on Saturday;
February 1st from 9am - 4pm for all in-
dividuals interested in volunteering to
coach Track & Field. We are also look-
ing for volunteer coaches in the follow-
ing sports: Swimming, Bowling, Gym-
nastics, Rollerskating, Powerlifting, Vol-
leyball, and Equestrian. No experience
is necessary. For more information
please contact Dwain Cooper at 830-
4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
in roy s
rMAti
Jph
m
OMsBt:
inc.

Trover- g"5tfi
Spring Break '97
Jamaica $399
Cancun $399
Bahamas $379�-
7Nights with Air,
Daily Free Drink Parties.
No Cover at Bast Bars-
Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
VMCDiscAMEX
TO THE BROTHERS OFTau Kappa
Epsilon: Thanks for such a great Pref
Nift. We always have so much fun
partying with you guys. We must do it
again! Love the sisters and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta.
WANT TO MARE A difference? Off-
campus student position is now avail-
able on the ECU Student Transit Board
of Directors. Applications in Mcnden-
hall until February 6, call 328-0254.
nary
Sol
ELEM ED CLUB IS hosting a scho-
lastic book fair Feb. 3rd through 7th, 9
am to 4pm in Speight room 202. Come
check it out!
ITS NO LONGER NECESSARY to
borrow money for college. We can help
you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
fREE T-SHIRT V $1000 Credit Card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus organization can
raise up to $1000 by earning a whop-
ping $5.00VISA application. Call 1-
800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified callers
receive Free T-Shirt.learn to sky dive
Carolina Sky Sports (919) 496-2224
Spring Break '97
Panama City
Beach
from $129
7nights Beachfront
�Daily Free Drink Parties
�Walk To Best Bars
�Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
VMCDtecAMEX
Wake 'n fkike (or
Spring fireak 199;
0ncm Day�i
�radii 6al
mfoncteti 1-800-426-7710
SPRING BREAK '97. PANAMA
CITY Boardwalk Beach Resort $129
7nights beachfront, daily free drink
parties, walk to best bars Group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-
800-234-7007.
SPRING BREAK '97. CANCUN, Ja-
maica, & Bahamas 7nights wair
from $399. Enjoy daily free drink par-
ties, no cover @ best bars, & group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-
800-234-7007.
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach "Summit" luxury condos next to
Spinnaker. Owner discount rates
(404)355-9637.
AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING BREAK!
panama �ity! room with kitchen near
bars $119! Daytona-Best Location
$139! Florida's new hotspot-Cocoa
Beach Hilton $169!
pringbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
springe
K CANCUN & JAMAICA spring
break specials! 7 nights air & hotel from
$429! Save $150 on food, drinks & free
parties! 111 lowest price guarantee!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
springbi
�5Pftl
"SPRING BREAK 9?
left out, space limited
a 3Ky Si
DRUG RAID SEIZURES! Buy din
cheap! Houses, cars, computers, furni-
ture. Free details: Seizures, Dept.
NC121, Box 3573, Wilson, NC 27893
Enclose $100 for postagehandling
or post
ing.
-RlT
TELECOMMUNICATION REPS
WANTED! NO experience needed!
No investment! $4,000month possible
working at home 2 hrswk! For free lit-
erature write: Netel Telecommunica-
tions, Dept. NC121, PO Box 3573, Wil-
son, NC 27893. Include $1.00 postage
handling.
-a Lost and
Found
GOLD BRACELET LOST ON cam-
pus. Last seen Friday, January 24th. If
found, please call Amy at 758-9790.
There is a large reward
sw Personals
SHOULD I GO BACK to his place. It
has been a long time since He will
respect me more if I meet him again
tomorrow over a cup of coffee at the
Beanbag Cafe on 3rd & Jarvis.
eanbag (.
HOEVI
WHOEVER IS PUTTING THESE
Beanbag Coffee Shops ads in the pa-
per needs to get a life, move out of your
parents basement, stop watching star
crek, and get some help!
M
Greek
Personals
�SPRING BREAK 97 - DONT be
left out, space limited Panama City
and Daytona Beach, Florida from $129.
Call STS @ 1-800-648-4849 for more
info.
BEST HOTELS & LOWEST prices
for spring-break beach destinations.
Florida, Cancun, Jamaica, etc. Call now
for rooms or sign-up as Inter-Campus
Repr. 800-327-6013 http:
www.icpt.com
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
party �ruisc! 6 days $279! Includes all
meals, parties & taxes! Great Beaches
& Nightlife! Leaves from Ft. Lauder-
dale! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
ope to see yc
-CT5N7JRT
lpFi
"ATS
DONT be
Cancun and
Jamaica from $429. Call STS@ 1-800-
648-4849 for more info.
Announcements
PI DELTA ECU'S ONLY local soror-
ity is holding an informal spring RUSH
Feb. 17 -19 in the Mendenhall Student
Center. Come on out and bring a
friend. Join us for three days of fun and
excitement! For more info call Ami at
328-3751. Go Greek!
THE CAREER SERVICES OFFICE
will hold orientation meetings in the
Career Services Building for seniors and
graduate students on the following
dates: Mon. Feb. 10 at 400 and Tue.
Feb. 18 at 3:00 pm. Students will re-
ceive instructions on registering with
Career Services, establishing a creden-
tials file, and the procedures for cam-
us interviews.
THE LADIES OF SIGMA Gamma
Rho presents the "King and Queen of
Hearts Pageant Thurs. Feb. 13 at 7
pm. Male and Female contestants will
be modeling in categories of casual,
evening and after hour wear. For every
other person that shows their support,
Sigma Gamma Rho will donate a dollar
to the American Heart Association. Ad-
mission is free. For more info, please
contact, Jessica Mabry 321 -3261.
Dry.
RESEARCHVOLUNTEER?
NEEDED LOOKING for runners with
runningrelated pain. Subjects will
ceive Free orthotics and Gait Analysis.
Call Wanda� 328-4688.
COME LEARN ABOUT STUDVIN
abroad! Hear fellow students share thi
overseas experience. Sponsored by P
Beta Delta and Phi Sigma Iota. Tu
day, Feb. 11 th @ 4:00 pm in GCB
Free pizza
: pia
!ET
ISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS
AND allies for diversity will meet on
February 6, 1997 at 7:30 pm at Men-
denhall room 244. Valentine Dance
tickets on sale at the meeting $5.00 per
person. Come and leam more about B-
GLAD! Bring a friend! Hope to see
you there!
ECU WOMEN'S LACROSS CLUB has
started their spring season. Practices are
held W TH F If interested in playing call
Julie 754-6689.
IN CELEBRATION OF BLACK his-
tory month, the distinguish sisterhood
of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.
would like to give you the opportunity
to exhiblit your special talents. We wel-
come all singers, dancers, poets, artisi
models, etc. to celebrate their achievi
ments on Feb. 20. For more info about
participating, please contact Cassandra
Brown 758-9531
PHYSICAL THERAPY MASSAGE
CLINIC Thursday, Feb. 13,1997 5pm
- 9pm. Belk Allied Health Bldg cor
tier of Greenville Blvd. Charles Blvd.
Purchase tickets from Physical Therapy
students or call the PT department @
328-4450. Cost: $3.00 for 10 min in ad-
vance. $3.50 for 10 min purchasedlat
the door.
FOOD SERVICE ADVISORY COMMIT.
TEE meeting is on Friday, February 7 at 5-00
pm in Sweethearts. Please RSVP to Chris
Warren at 328-2412 by Feb. 7, Please bring
your comments and suggestions.
P"
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL my YOU
$CASH$
Vft Nctd Ttasfeerumd boots
and shot! Good Jeans.
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS, JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTTCA, POLO, LEVT, GAP, ETC
We aiso buy: GOLD 4 SILVER � Jewelry 4 Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door k ring bmzet
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to thank
Delta Chi for the awesome bid night
party. We had a blast. Let's do it again
sometime! Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi!
EPSILON !JIGMA ALPHA SEU-
VICE sorority is holding spring Rush
February 3-6 in Rawl 105 5:30 pm till
6:30 pm. ESA is affiliated with St. Jude
Childrens Hospital. Questions 321-
0307. Hope to see you there!
The East Carolinian
SIC- PI - CONGRATS ON your sue-
cessful spring rush. You guys are the
best! Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA PHI AND CHI Omega: We
arc really happy to have you both as our
sister sororities. We hope to get to-
gether soon. Love, Pi Delta.
TO THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA
Alpha Epsilon. Congratulations on a
successful spring rush. Wish I could
have been your "Namctag girl" Keep
up the good work! Love Jeanne.
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8 Thursday, February 6. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
CD

review
Acuity and students present Dance '97
Nerf Herder
Nerf Herder
arts
Derek T. Halle
SENIOR WRITER
Nerf Herder (a band whose name came from George Lucas' film The Empire
Strikes Back) have compiled a debut self-titled album that will thrill you,
bore you and leave you standing in no-man's land as soon as it's all said and
done.
The three man band, Steve, Parry, and Charlie, have come up with a
groove that touches upon many bands in the music scene at large. With gui-
tar sounds that mimic Green Day and vocal melodies that match up to any
Weezer hit, you'll find that originality isn't their strong suit.
So an original sound isn't what they're looking for. If you ask me, the
band has a whole comic approach to what they're doing in the first place.
They're playing music together for a living. They're writing songs about Van
Halen, having a few laughs, and are constantly moving on to other clubs,
making music in the newest local scene.
"Van Halen" is a song about that group which actually pays them much
respect. For the early years, when Eddie was playing "Eruption the song
sounds pretty good; however, Nerf Herder takes a turn in its music and
SEE WEflF. PAGE 10
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Class: Junior
Miiftir: I'hmtrt h.dmation
Home: Wilmington, NC
I have always
considered the
arts some of the
finer things in
life. Not only do
the arts provide
us entertain-
ment, but they
also teach us
many important
things - motor
skills, hand-eye
coordination,
recognition of colors and shapes, public
speaking skills.
One of the things about art that
impresses me the most is that,
although everyone can appreciate it,
not everyone can do it. Take, for exam-
ple, poetry. I love to read poems, but
can't write them to save my life.
Another art form I wish I could do well
is dance. I don't mean dance the way
we do downtown with that famous,
drunken synchronous sway. I mean real
dance, like ballet, modern, tap and
jazz. I'm a klutz from way back, but I
do appreciate dance.
The East Carolina Playhouse per-
forms a dance program each year com-
bining the talents of the faculty, guest
artists and students. Dance '97
features pieces choreographed
by faculty members and special
guests. This year's program
includes pieces by faculty
members Alan Arnett, Dawn
Clark, Joseph Carow, Patricia
Pertalion and Patricia Weeks
and guest choreographer
Rodger Belman.
The opening performance will
be "O.ms 9, 24 a pure neo-
classic ballet. This piece is
choreographed by ballet master Joseph
Carow and set to music by Benjamin
Britten.
Next comes "Avatar choreo-
graphed by Dawn Clark. It is described
as "an exploration of a past or future
possibility an organic interpretation
of what may happen after the descent
"Interplay Two" combines elements
of Spanish dance, dance styles from the
'20s, mime and cheerleading, as well as
props, vaudeville and ballet bravura
dancing into an exciting and energetic
duet. The non-stop romp is choreo-
graphed by Patricia Pertalion.
New Yorker Rodger Belman choreo-
graphs a guest piece entitled "Tides"
to close out the first act. Through the
use of patterning and repetition,
Belman has abstracted various aspects
of ocean movement in this minimalist,
yet not simplistic, composition.
The second act will open with
choreographer Patricia Weeks
"Confessions which combines dance
and dialogue. The four stories con-
tained within "Confessions" concern
what it means to be a woman.
Senior dance major Sandy Tillet will
perform "The Weakness in Me a
modern jazz solo with music by Melissa
Etheridge. Alan Arnett choreographs
this story of one person's struggle to
overcome lingering dependency on an
ex-lover.
Finally, the performances will con-
clude with "Rhapsody in Blue a trib-
ute to American movie musicals. Alan
Arnett also serves as choreographer her
and will put in a cameo appearance.
Dance '97 opens tonight and will run
until Feb. 11 in McGinnis Theatre. All
performances are at 8 pm. except for
the Sunday, Feb. 9 performance, which
is a matinee at 2 p.m. Students and fac-
ulty can purchase discounted tickets
with a valid ID. For more information
or to order tickets, call the McGinnis
Box Office at 328-6829.
& S S I
Can't cvtn hum along 1at � from � friend
Buy it ana-
Pay ft Prica
over Mendenhall
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
You don't have to get half-cocked
on Blackened Voodoo beer and show
your butt tattoo to strange men for
beads to experience Mardi Gras.
Mendenhall Student Center is your
ways and means to New Orleans on
Friday night.
The student center, Ronald E.
Dowdy Student Stores and the Major
Events Committee of the Division of
Student Life are sponsoring this
Mardi Gras Celebration scheduled to
kick off at 9 p.m. Activities galore are
planned, which promise to be just as
interesting as chugging Kiwi-fruit
Mad Dog with a drag-queen named
Henry on Bourbon Street (or whatev-
er boils your crawfish).
Various activities are planned to
continue through the night until 2
a.m. Video karaoke will give you the
chance to sing and shout about it and
then have it documented forever on a
free video. The hustlers and the king-
pins can square off downstairs with
free billiards and bowling. They'll tat-
too you in the Cynthia Lounge if you
promise not to moon anyone for
beads. Bourbon Street Bingo will be
held in Room 221, and the Lady Luck
Casino will be open for business in the
Social Room.
There will be a contest displaying
masks created by students in the
main lobby and free slices of King
Cake will be given out at the Student
Organization booth. If you find the
hidden baby in one of the slices, you'll
be recognized as royalty and named
King or Queen of Mardi Gras.
There's more though, Jo-Jo.
The Cabaret in the multi-purpose
room will feature the funny stuff of
the Fettucini Brothers, with shows at
9:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. A spades
tournament is slated to begin at 9:30
p.m.
A Tune to Kill, John Boy Grisham's
legal thriller, will be shown beginning
at 10 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Viewers are encouraged to place one
of them hoodoo-voodoo curses on
Grisham.
The Coronation of the Mardi Gras
King and Queen will take place at
10:15 in the multi-purpose room.
At 11 p.m. in the dining hall, you
can chug hot sauce to your heart's
content - or 'til it explodes - at the
Cajun buffet. Then, shake off the
sausage jambalaya in the Great
Room during the DJ dance, last-
ing until 1:30 a.m.
There are prizes up the gumbo
all night long, including t-shirts,
masks, hurricane glasses and
secret grand prizes. Grand prizes
will be awarded at 1:30 a.m. (You
must be present to win.)
The event is free to all ECU
students with a valid ID. One
guest per student will be admit-
ted with a guest pass. Guest pass-
es are available at the Central Ticket
Office from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and at
resident hall community service desks
from 8 a.m. to midnight. On Friday,
pick up guest passes at the Central
Ticket Office until 6 p.m. and at the
Rec Center or community service
desks until 9 p.m.
For more information, call 328-
4766.
Jarmusch kills with Dead Man
February
6 Thursday
Family Fare Series: Black Journey at
2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
9 Sunday
University Unions Sponsored
Darts Tournament at 1 p.m. and Table
Soccer Tournament at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall Billiards Center.
Sunday at the Gallery Concert:
Louise Toppin, soprano, and Sharon
Munden, mezzo-soprano, at 2 p.m. in
the Greenville Museum of Art.
Some films never make it to
tie EmerM City.
Some are too lonlroversial.
Some are too small.
Whatever Ike reason, we
just never get to see some
mighty good movies
on ike tig screen.
When tkey kit video,
however, they're ours for
the taking. This series will
loot at some of the films
that didn't mate the
Greenville rut.
Johnny Depp plays the quiet, unassuming William Blake in director Jim Jarmusch's black and white western. Dead Man.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MIRAMAX FILMS
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing
�Arts Series: Bolshoi Symphony
Sbrchestra at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
B
it)
�� East Carolina Dance Theatre's
Dance '97 at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
.Theatre through Feb. 11.
E
��
' A Tine to Kill at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
SJlieatre through Feb. 8.
m
Ml
"T 7 Friday
! Mardi Gras celebration from 9 p.m.
�rjntil 2 a.m. in Mendenhall.
m
8 Saturday

Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center sponsored African-
American Student Leadership
JVorkshop at 9:30 a.m. in Mendenhall
Jireat Room.
m
m University Unions Sponsored
Jable Tennis Tournament at 1 p.m. in
fendenhall Multi-Purpose Room.
10 Monday
Faculty Recital: Britton Theurer,
trumpet, and Reiko Ishii, piano, at 8
p.m. in AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
International Photography and
Digital Image Exhibition at Gray
Gallery, through March 4.
Faculty Recital featuring Britton
Theurer, trumpet, and Reiko Ishii,
piano, at 8 p.m. at A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
12 Wednesday
Thespians of Diversity: Black
History play. Tentative. Please call
Reginald Watson at 328-6684 for more
information.
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publications Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Jim Jarmusch has a knack for making interesting
films. If you've ever seen his Night on Earth or
Mystery Train, then you know what I mean. His
films are filled with strange and bizarre charac-
ters, quirky dialogue and intriguing, often starkly
beautiful, visuals. It should come as no surprise
then that his latest film, Dead Man. has all of
these elements within it.
In this black and white western written and
directed by Jarmusch, Johnny Depp plays Bill
Blake, an accountant from Cleveland who wears
glasses, a bow tie and a plaid suit. He starts out as
quite the nerd. Having recently lost both his par-
ents, Blake uses his life savings to travel by train
from his hometown, Cleveland, to a small town
named Machine. He has a letter that promises
him a job when he gets there. Sounds simple
enough, right?
Wrong. Within the first few minutes things go
wacky. First of ali, manic actor Crispin Glover
shows up on the train as a soot-covered fireman
and tells Blake, "I wouldn't trust no words writ-
ten on no piece of paper He warns Blake about
Machine and calls it the end of the line.
Of course, the expected happens and when
Blake arrives in Machine, the job has already been
taken. He tries to work his way past the manager,
played to slimy perfection by John Hurt, so that
he can talk to the big boss about the situation.
But when he succeeds he gets more than he bar-
gains for. The big boss turns out to be the eternal
tough guy, Robert Mitchum, who would just as
soon shoot Blake as look at him.
Penniless and jobless, Blake is lost at the end
of the world. And the plot just gets stranger. A
series of mishaps turns the once hopeful accoun-
tant into a wanted murderer, an outlaw with three
bounty hunters on his trail (one of whom is the
sullen and creepy Lance Henriksen).
Blake meets and befriends an outcast Native
American (Gary Farmer) who calls himself
"Nobody" since his name translates literally as
"He who talks loud and says nothing Nobody
mistakenly believes Blake to be the poet William
� Blake, who is one of the Indian's heroes.
Throughout the film. Nobody helps Blake with
his journey, one that had begun as a physical voy-
age but ends up being spiritual.
This sacred overtone, as well as much what
Jarmusch accomplishes in the film, owes a great
deal to director Ingmar Bergman. The look and
feel of Dead Man is reminiscent of Bergman's The
Seventh Seal, in which a knight encounters Death
and plays chess with him in order to win his life
back. The starkness of the wilderness, the
monotony of the beginning train ride, the solem-
nity of Blake's character, even the black and
white film stock used, all harken back to Bergman
films.
As much as Jarmusch owes to Bergman,
though, he owes more to pop culture. Dead Man is
full of pop culture references and representa-
tions. Iggy Pop, former lead singer of the Stooges
and current solo artist, and Gibby Haines, lead
singer for P (a band which features Depp on gui-
tar) and the Butthole Surfers, both make appear-
ances in the film. There are characters in the film
named after George Drakoulias, a big-time record
producer, and Benmont Tench, a member of Tom
Petty and the Heartbreakers. Two marshals sent
to capture Blake are named Lee and Marvin after
the hard-nosed actor Lee Marvin. The haunting
and dismal score for the film is even provided by
flannel rocker god Neil Young.
All of these layers of information combine into
SEE DEAD. PAGE 10
-o





9 Thursday. February 6. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Open 7 days a week - M-Sat 9am - 2am - Sun 12-2
�Tuesday: Dollar Day
All day and Night
�Wednesday: Ladies Night
Ladies Play All day Free
Everyday: 32oz. Bud draft $2.25
'Barmaids Wanted
phone 752-6728
Sunday 9-Ball Tournament 4pm
health
minute
Tips shared for preventing STDs
JENNIFER PHILLIPS
STl'DENT HEALTH SERVICE
Despite the increased public atten-
tion given to STDs, many questions
and misinformation about STD pre-
vention abound. The intent of this
I
NO &ASKET3ALL COURTS AT
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Paqers Club Can Help!
�) FLYERS CLUB
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Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
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J
"Health Minute" is to address some
of the most commonly asked ques-
tions the Student Health Service
receives about STD prevention.
Question: Can a person get an
STD from oral sex?
Answer: Yes. The fact is that
STDs can be transmitted through
unprotected oral, anal and vaginal
sex. With specific reference to oral
sex, a person can acquire an oral
infection of such diseases as chlamy-
dia, herpes, genital warts and gonor-
rhea.
Although the direct relationship
between oral sex and HIV transmis-
sion is still debated, there is mount-
ing evidence that HIV can be trans-
mitted through oral sex. The best
method of preventing an STD is by
practicing abstinence. Specifically,
abstinence refers to refraining from
oral, anal and vaginal sex.
If people choose to engage in oral
sex, some type of barrier should be
used to prevent the exchange of bod-
ily fluids. In performing fellatio (oral
sex on a male partner), non-lubricat-
ed condoms should be used. In per-
forming cunnilingus (oral sex on a
female partner), a barrier such as a
dental dam should be used. A dental
dam is a piece of square latex that is
placed over the area in which oral sex
is to be performed on the female
partner, if dental dams are difficult
to find, a non-lubricated male con-
dom that is cut at both ends and
down the long way can be a suffi-
cient and convenient alternative for
cunnilingus.
Question: Is there a separate
screening test that can be done for
each of the different STDs?
Answer: Yes. For example, syphilis
requires a blood test. Chlamydia and
gonorrhea require a sample of fluids
from the vagina or male urethra for
lab testing. Herpes and genital warts
generally require a physical examina-
tion which looks for signs of these
diseases. HIV involves a blood test.
Unfortunately, there is no such thing
as a single lab test to tell if a person
is completely disease-free.
Students interested in obtaining
an STD screening may make an
appointment at the Student Health
Service by calling 328-6317. When
making an appointment, indicate to
the appointment secretary that you
would like an appointment for a
"personal reason" and specify your
preference for either a male or a
female health care provider.
There is no charge for seeing a
Student Health Service health care
provider. If the provider recom-
mends screening tests, there is a rea-
sonable fee associated with having
these tests done. The Student
Health Service does not provide HIV
antibody testing. Students interest-
ed in a free and anonymous HIV test
Vote For Your God
Last weeks results at the Wright Place in,
"Who answers your prayers?"Are as follows:
99 - Jesus Christ
3 - Allah
2 - pray to themselves
2 - God (the father)
1 - Buddha
1 - Mother Earth
1 - Agnostic
too !ims3, ioeH f oo, irwrt frisks
should call the Pitt CounS
Department of Health at 413-130flJ
Question: How effective are cdjjj
doms at preventing STDs? "�
Answer: Latex condoms aw
effective in reducing the risk for d�
ease transmission, but they do rifff
provide 100 percent protection
When latex condoms are used con-
sistently, correctly and with a spefr
micide, they may have a failure rar�
as low as two percent. When con-
doms are not used both consistently
and correctly with every act of inter-
course, the failure rate could be j�
high as 15 percent.
Question: Is one brand of conr
dom better than the others? -r
Answer: The answer to this ques-
tion is not precise. Condoms ace
considered a personal product, like
laundry detergent or toothpaste.
Everyone seems to have a prefer
ence for a particular brand.
In the May 1995 edition of
Consumer Reports, the following con-
doms were ranked as the top five in
che category of "burst index Excita
Extra Ultra-Ribbed, Ramses Extra
Ribbed, Sheik Elite, Lifestyle Vtbra-
Ribbed and Ramses Extra. Products
with the higher scores on this index
should offer greater assurance
against breakage in use. (The
Student Health Service does not
endorse any of the products listed
above. The information was surj
plied for educational purposes only?)
All condoms sold in the U.S. have
to meet the standards put forth by
the Food and Drug Administration
(FDA). Therefore, if people find a
brand that does not cause any prob-
lems and they like it, there is no rea
son to switch brands.
If you have questions pertaining
to STD prevention, please call the
Student Health Service Health
Educator at 328-6794. 2
f'
� .�
ext
. m?
&
H.
riflg
&
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Mk
&

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101
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Housing and Dining is a winning combination! Our winners enjoy the freedom to choose their
roommates, rooms, residence halls, and meal plans.They have easy access to classesno hunting for a parking place!
They also enjoy recreational facilities, the library, and have tons of fun with hundreds of residence hall and dining
activitiesincluding King and Queen of the Halls and Celebrity Chef Cookout. Our winners save time and money
because they let us take care of the cooking, cleaning and uti.lities.They don't have to find someone to sublet their
apartment, they can just relax over the summer!
Remember, return housing and dining sign-up will take place during the week of February 17 through 21. So be a
winner and live on campus!
university housir.f ssrvic&s m home. (328-4883)





lifestyle
Tht East Carolinian
Court upholds Internet case as free speech
Mary anne georoe and Jeff
Martin
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE
fbrmer University of Michigan student
Jake Baker wrote on the Internet about
raping, torturing and murdering
women. But he didn't threaten them -
at least not under federal taw, a court
ruled.
Ruling two to one, the VS. Sixth
Circuit Court of Appeals panel in
Cincinnati upheld a June 1995 ruling.
Baker, 22, is the first person to be pros-
ecuted for Internet writings in a case
that drew a storm of controversy about
regulating cyberspace.
Baker smiled slightly, but showed
little emotion when told of the ruling.
He faced up to five years in prison if
convicted on the federal charges.
Tb be honest with you, I was
expecting this to go the other way
Baker said. "It's a pleasant surprise
Baker said he was weary from the
two-year ordeal, which began in Rsb.
1995 when U-M officials learned of
Baker's Internet posting describing the
rape and murder of a U-M woman stu-
dent, whom he named. He was sus-
pended from U-M and arrested by the
FBI.
"1 feel that a society hat a right to
monitor elements it might consider
offensive Baker said. "In this case, the
careful monitoring turned into a mass
hysteria and a witch hunt
Baker was first charged for the rape
and murder story. But federal authori-
ties later decided not to prosecute
Baker for that story, charging him
instead in connection with e-mail mes-
sages sent to Arthur Gonda at an
Ontario address. In those messages.
Baker discussed abducting and tortur-
ing young women.
But the story became part of the
case because Gonda first contacted
Baker after reading that story on the
Internet. Gonda was never located.
Ruling in 1995, Judge Cohn said the
e-mail was not a threat because it did
not specify a person or convey an
immediate, unconditional and
unequivocal act. In their majority opin-
ion, US. Appeals Court Judges Boyce
Martin and Martha Daughtrey agreed
with Cohn.
"Baker and Gonda apparently sent
e-mail messages to each other in an
attempt to foster a friendship based on
shared sexual fantasies not to threat-
en the women, the judges wrote.
However, Judge Robert Krupansky,
a member of the three-judge panel, dis-
agreed.
"By publishing his sadistic story on
the Internet, Baker could reasonably
foresee that his threats to harm her
would ultimately be communicated to
her (as they were) and would cause her
Dead
continued from pagi 6
a seamless whole, however.
Jarmusch's writing is just as tight as
his work behind the camera, and it
shows through in the interactions
between his two main characters.
Depp is captivating and mythic as
the quiet Blake. And Gary Farmer
steals the show as the wise-cracking,
poetry-spouting philosopher
Nobody.
Jarmusch has once again crafted a
unique and laughable, yet somewhat
frightening, film. He is truly one of
the best auteurs working within the
Hollywood system today.
Unfortunately, there is usually a lag
time of several years between each
of his films, so it may be quite a
while before we see another. I'll be
waiting.
SPRING IS AT
THE
CORAL SANDS
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Nerf
continued from page 8
lyrics when the subject of Sammy
Hagar comes up. The song describes
a typical scenario in rock n' roll. In
the beginning, a group of kids get
together and form a band. The band
makes its mark, kicks the singer out,
grabs a new one and suddenly every-
thing is cheesy. "bn Halen" is a song
people can relate to. Anyone who
knows anything about n Halen
knows that David Lee Roth is the
one and only true singer for that
band. Apparently, Nerf Herder does
as well.
There's also another song on the
record that spits out a comic
approach. It's a song called
"Nosering Girl There's just some-
thing about three guys singing about
their mad obsession with girls with
fear and intimidation, which in fact
ultimately occurred Krupansky wrote.
The U.S. solicitor general must
decide whether to ask for a rehearing
before the full 16-judge federal appeals
court or take the case to the US.
Supreme Court.
"You must look at the person the
message was intended for. By no stretch
of the imagination was Gonda threat-
ened by the e-mail Baker's attorney
Douglas Mullkoff, said. "The story was
only shown to the woman after the U-
M Department of Public Safety found
it. The purpose of the e-mail was to fos-
ter a friendship about sexual fantasies
FBI Special Agent Greg Stejskal,
the chief investigator in the case, said
the ruling raised the standard for prov-
ing a threat.
"The standard was what a reason-
able person considers to be a threat
Stejskal said. "Now the standard,
according to these two judges, is that
you must look at the subjective intent.
Was he just kidding? Who decides?"
Howard Simon, director of the
American Civil Liberties Union of
Michigan, said, "The court reinforced
the distinction between fantasies and
threats. Even sick fantasies are free
speech; threats are criminal behavior
noserings. It's hard to make out with
someone when you're always worry-
ing about breaking their face. The
song's sarcasm overwhelms me.
Yet, there's not much beyond
comedy on the album. The main rea-
son this record is weak is its lack of
originality. It sounds the same as any
typical punk rock band who might
have grazed a chart in the mid to late
'80s. A lot of those bands were really
good, but it's been done. The bands
have played the clubs, waited for
their turn in line for a speck of inter-
national fame, only to find them-
selves later stuck in lousy day-to-day
jobs.
Overall, I think the music is
entertaining. It makes me laugh. The
only problem I'm having is under-
standing what I'm laughing at. Is it
the music or the band? If the two are
the same, 1 am left in a state of
euphoria. If not, well Do you
believe in the healing power of
laughter?
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11 Thursday, February 6. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirates drop road game by two
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
Rodman Reinstated To Bulls
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Dennis Rodman, mindful that he could face ban-
ishment from the NBA if he takes another wrong step, returns to the
Chicago Bulls next week. And he'll be playing for free until next month.
Suspended without pay by the NBA since kicking a courtside camera-
man during a game between the Bulls and Minnesota Timberwolves on Jan.
15, Rodman was reinstated by the league Tuesday, effective after the All-
Star break.
"I think it's unfortunate for the fans and everybody else that it
occurred Rodman said Tuesday night at halftime of the game between the
Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers at the Anaheim Arena. "I'm
glad I can come back and play like I do again.
"I could say I'm sorry until I'm blue in the face, and it wouldn't prove
anything. But I'm going to play for free. That shows that it isn't all about
money
Rodman's agent, Dwight Manley, said earlier in the day that his client,
as a gesture of appreciation to his fans, will play his first 11 games after the
suspension "for free, and donate the money on behalf of himself and the
Bulls to 11 assorted charities
No Breakthroughs at Umpires Meeting
PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) - Baseball's big summit meeting of players,
umpires and owners failed to produce any changes in the sport's disciplinary
system.
Instead, as often happens in sticky situations, baseball created a com-
mittee to study the matter.
"You kind of have to lay yours cards on the table, and we did New York
Yankees pitcher David Cone said after Tuesday's six-hour session. "There
will be more meetings of this nature, probably on a smaller scale. Ws're not
going to solve all the problems of the world in one day"
Umpires are still angry over the Roberto Alomar spitting incident.
Players are upset that umpires sometimes spark confrontations instead of
diffusing them. Owners are frustrated that neither players nor umpires are
overly cooperative.
In a meeting that included speeches by players, umpires, general man-
agers, the league presidents and acting commissioner Bud Selig, each side
"vented according to several participants. While the talk got heated at
times, it remained civil, according to people in the meeting who spoke on
the condition they not be identified.
Injuries Knock Barkley, Drexler Out of All-Star Game
NEW YORK (AP) - Charles Barkley on Tuesday ruled himself out of the
All-Star game because of an ankle sprain, and teammate Clyde Drexler later
aggravated a hamstring injury that will force him to miss the game, too.
The NBA selected Detlef Schrempf of the Seattle SuperSonics to take
Barkley's place, and a replacement for Drexler should be named
Wednesday.
Drexler reinsured his right hamstring late in the fourth quarter of a 99-
95 loss to the New York Knicks. He had returned Sunday from the injury,
which sidelined him for the previous two games.
Barkley, picked as a Western Conference starter in fan balloting, has
missed the Houston Rockets' last seven games because of a sprained right
ankle. He said he expects to return to the lineup a week from Friday against
Seattle.
"I made up my mind today when I tried to practice and I couldn t do
some stuff Barkley said before the game against the Knicks. "I'm not ready
to play tonight, and I don't think it's fair to jeopardize the rest of our sea-
son just so I can play in the All-Star game
Bowler Sets Three-game Series Record
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - Jeremy Sonnenfeld is going into the record books as
the first bowler to roll three consecutive perfect games in competition.
"It's total elation the University of Nebraska sophomore said Tuesday
after learning that his feat was being officially recognized by the American
Bowling Congress.
Sonnenfeld, 20, a business major, bowled the 36 strikes in a row on
Sunday in Lincoln.
"It is the equivalent of someone getting three holes in one on a 540-yard
par five he said. "It's something nobody thought could be done
Jack Mordini of the ABC compared Sonnenfeld's feat with the golfing
exploits of Tiger Woods, the only person to win three straight U.S. Amateur
golf tournaments.
"Obviously, he should receive all the adulation that anyone setting a
world record should receive Mordini said of Sonnenfeld.
Bowling's sanctioning body, the ABC has kept records for 101 years.
Sonnenfeld is the first to officially hit 36 strikes in a three-game scries.
Sonnenfeld will be presented with an award Saturday at opening cere-
monies of the 1997 ABC amateur tournament in Huntsville, Ala which
includes 9,285 teams competing over four months.
Cigar Wins Second Straight Horse of the Year Award
NEW YORK (AP) - Jerry Bailey, who rode Cigar around the world and into
the record books, summed up the horse's career pretty well.
"I appreciate what Cigar did for me Bailey said Tuesday night, "but I
think we should all appreciate what he did for racing
Cigar became the first horse since Triple Crown winner Affirmed in 1979
to win consecutive Horse of the Year awards, and it also completed his sec-
ond straight sweep of Eclipse awards. On Jan. 10, he was named best older
horse or gelding in North America after winning five of eight starts, includ-
ing the $4 million Dubai World Cup and Woodward Stakes.
Cigar, who reached celebrity status even outside racing circles, was the
overwhelming choice of the three voting groups - the Thoroughbred Racing
Associations, National Turf Writers Association and Daily Racing Form. Skip
Away, the 3-year-old champion, was the only other horse to receive votes.
Cigar received 28 of 29 votes from the TRA, 109 of 118 from the Dairy
Racing Form and 131 of 145 from the turf writers. Skip Away had a total of
25 votes.
"I want to thank the other members of the Dream Team, Jerry Bailey
and Bill Mott owner Alan Paulson said, also referring to Cigar's trainer. "I
sure hope I get another Cigar
That doesn't seem very likely.
The Pirates had a chance to extend
their first place possession in the
CAA Monday night, in Washington,
D.C but American University
spoiled their plans.
The Eagles dropped ECU 63-61.
With less than 10 seconds left,
Nathan Smith shot a three for AU
but it bounced off the rim. Dave
Small grabbed the rebound and put
the ball back for the Eagles' lead.
Being in these situations before,
ECU called their last time-out and
TRMAtime
The 46th annual NBA All-Star game will be
held this weekend in Cleveland. Name the
only olayer to be named the MVP of the All-
Star game four times in his career?
Z9t puv (sio(Jrmuif
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drafted up a plan to get the ball
down the court and in the net with
three seconds left.
Jonathan Kemer inbounded the
ball to Othello Meadows who put up
the shot to tiewin the game. (The
referees were calling the shot a
three, but Meadows' foot was on the
line.) However, the ball hit the rim
but failed to go in, as time ran out
and the Eagles upset the Pirates.
Raphael Edwards was the lead-
ing scorer for ECU, pouring in 15
points and grabbing a team high
eight rebounds. Tony Parham, a
D.C. native, was next with 12 points
and four assists.
The Pira 'ot e5 oercent from
the fie'H fo li u. � percent
from the three point arc and 50 per-
cent from the charity stripe.
Head Coach Joe Dooley said the
Pirates missed out on opportunities
that could have sealed the victory.
"The bottom line was simple
execution Dooley said. "We didn't
produce � second shot opportuni-
ties just absolutely killed us
Parham said AU got the best of
them in the remaining minutes of
the game.
"We kind of 'ost our poise at the
end Parham said. "They out hus-
tled us for all the loose balls. They
were a step faster in the last six min-
utes of rhe game
But, he said, that Meadows gave
it his all with the last shot.
"On our side. tD' got a good look
Parham said. "You can't ask for any
more than that
Alico Dunk j-ees with Parham
that AU mac: some tough shots
with little time left in the game.
"We were in a pretty good situa-
tion to win the game but we kind of
let down there at the end and they
made tough shots at the end and
that kind of hurt us Dunk said.
The Pirates now fall to 7-4 in the
CAA and 14-6 overall. ECU will hit
the road for Saturday's game against
Jacksonville State in Alabama for a
non-conference match up. The
Pirates will return home for the Feb.
12 hosting of Virginia
Commonwealth at 7 p.m.
1
LADY PIRATE TIME
OUT
Trie women's basket-
ball team takes e time
out to discuss the
game plan, during a
recent home game
against Coastal
Carolina. The Lady
Pirates will return
home this Sunday to
host Richmond
University in more CAA
action.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAY00SH
Managers keep
equipment in tact
STEPPIN' UP TO THE PLATE
TRAVIS NEWKIRK
STAFF WRITER
There are many groups that deal
with ECU athletics in some form
everyday. One of these groups is the
ECU equipment managers.
Many people have never heard of
an equipment manager, or have any
idea what an equipment manager
does. The main job of an equipment
manager is to make sure an athlete
has everything that he or she needs
to play the game at a maximum
level. This means if a basketball
player needs some new basketball
shoes, an equipment manager will
provide the new shoes.
Being an equipment manager is
important because he or she is
behind the scenes until he or she
are needed. Much of an equipment
manager's success depends on the
amount of the pride that he or she
takes in the job.
Jason Roberson, assitant equip-
ment manager, and six year veteran
says he takes pride in his work;
that's why he's successful.
"Anybody can do this job, but the
success rate is how much you put in
to it Roberson said. "My favorite
sport to manage is football because
of the traveling, and the big crowds.
This spring I'll be doing baseball,
and it will be a learning experience
Getting into equipment manag-
ing is easy. There are some people
who have never played a sport who
are equipment managers. One of
the main things that must be
learned is responsibility and safety,
especially the safety of a football
player, because of the high impact
collisions that occur on each and
SEE STU0ENT. PAGE 13
MUM Ww�
DERRICK GAMBLE - DL, 6-5, 260,
Neptune, N.J (Valley Forge Pa.
Military Academy)
Registered 37 tackles in 19 at
fclley Forge Military Academyalso
had 6.5 sacksdeflected five passes
and recovered three fumblesruns a
4.58 40-yard dashattended same
high school as current Pirate players
Scott Harley and Dan
Gonzalezmember of the 1995 state
championship tcamcaught eight
touchdown passes as a seniorsecond
on the team in tacklesnamed firs
team All-Shorealso named third
team all-state.
MITCH GRIZZARD - TE. 6-6, 230,
Grifton, N.C. (Ayden-Grifton HS)
Selected All-Coastal Plains 2-A
conference as a junior and Dairy
Reflector second team All-Areawas
a pre-scason all-state selection as a
seniorhad 12 receptions for 305
yards and three touchdowns as a
junioraveraged 12.3 yards per
reception as a senior and also aver-
aged six tackles a game on
defensealso averaged 37 yards per
punt
Due to
TEC.
and three TD'snamed to the .All-
Northwest 4-A Conference squad
and the North Carolina Prep News
all-state teamnamed by Athlon
College Football Magazine in 19
preview edition as one of the top
wide receiver prospects in the
Atlantic Coast regionclocked at 4.7
in the 40-yard dash and bench press-
es 325 poundscaught 21 passes for
234 yard and one TD in junior cam-
paign-notched five receptions for 56
yards and a TD in sophomore sea-
son-two year starter at TE.
HOSEA JAMES - LB, 64, 218,
Jacksonville, N.C. (Jacksonville
HS)
Named as the Jacksonville Daily
News area defensive player of the
year as a senioralso selected to the
All-Midwestern Conference squad as
a junior and a seniorranked as the
No. 16 prospect in the state by the
SuperPrep magazinetotaled 75
tackles and four sacks in senior cam-
paignalso saw action at tight end
making one catch for nine
yardsruns a 4.65, 40-yard dasha
two year starter at LB position.


i

it
Rhonda Rhoust steps up to bat for the Lady Pirate softball team, during spring
practice.
PHOTO BY DAVID FINCH
REMINDER
ELLIDTTE HARTGRGVE - WR, 6-5.
220, Shelby. N.C. (Crest HS)
Helped lead Crest HS to the
state 4-A chanpionship?s a senior
pulled in 35 receptions for 500 yards
SEE SIGNEES PAGE 12
The women's basketball team
will host the Lady Spiders of
Richmond this Sunday, Feb. 9,
at 2 p.m. in Minges.
Go and support your Lady Pirates.
J





m -
12 Thursday, February 6. 1997
Signees
continued from page 11
irginia Beach. Va. (Tallwood HS)
1996 Virginia Beach defensive
player of the yearsclectcd to the all-
district team as a defensive back and
kick returner 19 Virginia Beach
Outstanding Male Athlcteavcraged
three and one half yards per carry as a
seniorthree year starterteam cap-
tain.
ARNIE POWELL -OB, 6-5, 205.
Deep Creek. Va. (Deep Creek HS)
Regarded among the top
prospects in the state of
Virginia-threw for over 2,600 yards
during his careeralso tossed 31
career touchdown passes and ran for
eight TD'shad a completed per-
centage of 55 percentas a prep
senior running the Wing-T offense at
Deep Creek, Powell completed 41 of
72 pass for 786 yards and nine
TD'srushed for 279 yardswas
team Offensive MVP in
1996named Southeastern District
Offensive Player of the year in
1996also selected to the all-region-
al and All-Tidewater teamsthree
year starterled the team to the 1994
Virginia State AAA championship
gamerecord as a starter was 33-4.
CHRIS NELSON- OT, 66. 280,
Hickory, N.C. (Hickory HS)
A Western Piedmont 3-A All-
Conference selectionconsistently
graded out high by Hickory coaching
staffa former soccer goalie, has only
played one year of varsity
footballled Hickory to the 1996 3-A
State title and an undefeated 16-0
recordset a new record of 300
pound in the power clean in the
Catawba County liftoff-bettered
the previous record of 265 pounds.
CHARLIE ROBINSON - DB. 6-0.
170, Vorhees, N.J. (Eastern HS)
A versatile athlete who played
cornerback, quarterback, punter and
place-kicker last seasonrccorded 31
solo tackles, three interceptions and
five deflectionsnished for 386 yards
last seasonthrec for two touch-
downs in wishbone offcnsehelp
. lead team to 7-3 recordmissed last
! games of season after suffering con-
cussion in seventh gameas junior,
I he started at wide receivernamed
� all-conference at quarterback as
j senior in Olympic Conference-led
his team to state payoffs last season.
AARON WALKER - DT, 6-3, 280,
Columbia, S.C. (Irmo HS)
A 19 All-State 4-A selectiona
two time All-Region III and all-area
selcctionparticipated in
NorthSouth All-Star gamethree
year starter and 19 team cap-
tain-recorded 59 tackles, six sacks,
two fumble recoveries and two
blocked kicks.
KEVIN WARD - QB, S3, 180,
Kinston, N.C. (Fork Union Military
Academy)
Currently attending Fork Union
where he played last seasonset
Kinston school single-season record
for passing years with 1,602 and four
touchdown passes with connect-
ed on 98 of 207 attempts senior sea-
son-as a junior, threw for 1,165 yards
while tossing nine TD passes, also
dubbed Kinson's offensive MVP as a
senior-played back-up quarterback
as a sophomore and registered some
time as a wide receivernamed to
the All-Big East Team as a well as the
All-Area squad in 1995-listcd as No.
37 prospect in state by SuperPrep
magazine-runs a 4.55,40-yard dash.
in 1996-played quarterback and
running back as well-runs a 4.6,40-
yard dash.
MARCUS BRYS0N-TE. 6-5, 240,
Laurens, S.C. (Laurens HS)
One of the top prospects in South
Carolina-had 25 catches for 520
yards and 8 TDs at tight end as a
senior last seasonalso played defen-
sive end as a senior recording 13
sacks and had 102 total tackles-rep-
resented South Carolina in the
Shrine Bowl-selected as the No. 3
prospect in the state of South
Carolina by the Charlotte
Observer-listed as a "Top Blue Chip
in Atlantic Coast" region in pre-
view edition of Athlon College
Football-named all-state in football
and basketball-named all-confer-
ence in Region l-4Athree year start
at tight end and defensive end-won
the offensive receiver MVP award
from Laurcns-finished his career
with 75 receptions for 1,128 yards
and 30 TDs-dcfensively he collect-
ed 162 tackles, with 14 sacks and two
interceptions at defensive end-runs
a 4.7,40-yard dash.
BERNARD WILLIAMS -DE. 6-5. High)
PERNELL GRIFFIN - LB. 6-3.221.
Williamston, N.C. (Williamston
212. Winston-Salem, N.C. (North
Forsyth HS)
Selected to the Winston-Salem
Journal All-Northwest team and was
runner up for defense player of the
year in the All-Metro 4-A confer-
ence-logged 12 sacks as a
scnior-also has made three intercep-
tions over the last two years-clocked
at 4.65 in the 40-yard dash-was also
recruited by Clemson, Wake Forest,
Maryland and Virginia Tech.
JOHN WILLIAMSON - DB. 6-2.
215. Cerro Gordo. N.C. (West
Columbus HS)
Two-time all-conference selec-
tion-team MVP in 19-namcd to
the All-Columbus County team
rwice-averaged 5.3 yards per carry as
a senior-threw for over 700 yards in
19intercepted four passes dur-
ing his final season22 total tackles
One the Pirates most highly tout-
ed signees-ranked as No. 2 prospect
in the state by Southern Recruiting
Magazinenamed to AP all-state
team-runs a 4.65, 40-yard
dash-selected to the Shrine Bowl
game-all-confercnce in junior and
senior yearsfirst- team all-
sateDaily Reflector's Defensive
Player of the Year-named to the
Daily Relfcletor's All-Area
Team-also listed by the Charlotte
Observer as one of the state's top
prospectsalso named to the
Washington Daily News All-Area
Tcam-seiected by Athlon College
Football as a top "Blue Chip"
prospect in Atlantic Coast
region-recorded 166 tackles in
19, including 98 solosalso had 35
quarterback pressures-helped the
Tigers to the 1995 Class I-A state
championship.
b
WESLEY STURDIVANT- 0T, 64.
296. Fayetteville. N.C.
(Fayetteville 71st HS)
Ranked as the No. 12 prospect in
the state by Supeiftep
magazinenamed to the All-Mid-
South Conference team as well as
the Fayetteville Observer All-Cape
Fear Region squad-one of the
strongest incoming Pirates, benches
375 pounds, squats 550 and dead-
lifts 495-clocked at 5.5 in the 40-
yard dash�team just missed the
playoffs with a 6-3 record in was
also recruited by Wake Forest,
Tennessee, and Ohio University.
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13 Theraday, February 6, 1997
� � Ml
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sports
Student
continued from page 11
every play Lives are at stake every
time a player puts on a helmet and
shoulderpads. When an athlete feels
tentative about the way the equip-
ment feels, he or she is more prone
to get injured.
In order to ensure that a player
with any sport is as safe as he or she
can possibly be, a new movement
has been developed from the pro-
fessional ranks of equipment man-
aging down to the high school level.
This movement is called equip-
ment management certification.
This certification test concentrates
on the areas of fitting equipment,
inventory, maintenance, laundry,
accounting and management skills.
Head ECU Equipment Manager
Dan Glinski believes the certifica-
tion test is a good thing.
The certification protects you
in cases of tragedy With the certifi-
cation you are seen by your peers as
being knowledgeable of equipment
managing. You can't be accused of
not properly knowing how to fit an
athlete, "Glinski said.
Glinski has had a number of
equipment managing jobs and
internships, but has now settled
down at ECU as the head equip-
ment manager.
"I've had an internship with
Georgia Tech for a year, and I was
with the Atlanta Falcons for six
months. During that time I teamed
a lot of ways of handling equipment.
We even use the internet to find out
different ways of handling equip-
ment Glinski said.
The equipment management
job doesn't come without criticism.
If a school plays on national TV, the
following days will bring calls from
other equipment managers from
across the country Typical ques-
tions would be: What kind of uni-
forms do you wear or what kind of
polish do you use to make the foot-
ball helmets shine?
The hours of an equipment
manager can be tough. During the
fall an equipment manager's work-
day can start at 5:30 a.m. and not
end until 5 p.m. that evening.
"During the fall season I general-
ly work an 80 hour work week. On
average 12 hours a day Glinski
said.
The next time you go to a sport-
ing event, take notice of the damage
free uniforms and equipment. The
uniforms and equipment are in this
condition because of the team
behind the team, the equipment
managers. Without their hard work
and dedication, ECU athletics
would be at a lower standard.
����������
ffijuMtydfa



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The East Carolinian
Tuesday this photo ran with the outline of Heather Clayton, but we goofed -
this athlete is MicheHe Clayton.
Photo courtesy of ECU SID
Garry's
(919) 756-0600
Autoclave Sterilization
S16-A-Hwy 264-A GfeenvW, NC
Sponsored by ECU Ronald E. Dowdy Student Stores, Division of Student Life Major Events Committee
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Must be present at 1:30 to win the Grand Prize!
Priz
Priz
es
Priz
es!
es!
D
Free with valid ECU ID. One free guest per ID. Guest passes available beginning January 31 at Community Service Desks and the Central Ticket Office at regular operating hours.
Day of event tickets available at the Central Ticket office until 6 pm and at the Student Recreation Center and Community Service Desks until 9 pm. fg �
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14 Thursday, February 6, 1997



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Lovelines
our key to a
dentine's Day
to remember
You can win a "Perfect Valentine's Day" when you buy a LoveLines ad. Just
send your Valentine's Day greeting through The East Carolinian and you're
automatically entered to win the grand prize: P!
� Roses from Jefferson's Florist
� Dinner for two at Christine's in the Greenville Hilton
� Two passes to a movie at varmiKe u
� Coffee and dessert at Barnes & KuU
Or win one of two additional Valentine's Day
packages being given away. And it's all FREE
compliments of The East Carolinian and our
participating sponsors. We'll contact
the winner by phone on Tuesday, Feb. 11.
Cafe
Christine's
Jefferson's Florist
Carmike Cinemas
Barnes & Noble
Complete an otiy font by coaug te U� East CaroMan oflta.
No purdast Is ntmaiy.
DEADLINE $W ORDER TO
BiEUGieiETOWIN!
B IT TO IK HIT CNUUNMN ffftt �
AT TIE
Name
Phone.
ID.
Address.
$2 for 25
QNtY f I R S T NAMES OR INITIALS MAY BE USED
10
for each
over 25
All ads
must be
prepaid
13
19
25
14
20
JS.
15
21
10
16
'iSST
22
17
12
18
24
Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Only first names or initials may be used.
The paper reserve the right to edh or omit any ad which is deemed objectionable, inappropriate,
obscene or misleading. No purchase is necessary to enter the contest.
DEADLINE
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 6, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 06, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1186
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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