The East Carolinian, January 30, 1997







THURSDAY
JANUARY 30. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNrVEBSTTY
GREENVULE. NORTH CATOUMA
Early birds
et more aid
Financial aid advisor
warns against
procrastination
amena Hassan
ORIENTATION AND GENERAL COLLEGE ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
It is the season for students to submit their
financial aid forms for the summer of the 1997
and 1997-98 academic year. Students should
mail their completed forms as early as possible
to receive the maximum grant award for their
university expenses.
The deadline for submitting the
Application for federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
is Apr. 15,1997. The forms can be obtained at
the ECU Office of Student Financial Aid or
other sites in Greenville, such as Sheppard
Memorial Library. Students who have
received financial aid in the past should have
received their FAFSA renewal form in the
mail, although the financial aid office recom-
mends to file a regular FAFSA if the renewal is
late.
Director of Student Financial Aid, Rose
Mary Stelma, said she feels it is to the extreme
disadvantage of a student to procrastinate in
sending the FAFSA.
"You would not believe the amount of
students that apply in July or August Stelma
said. "We have to do a whole summer's work
in a period of half an hour to an hour, and ua
then forced to tell them that they don't quali-
fy for any financial aid.
If a student applies early for financial aid,
it gives our office an opportunity to review
their case over the spring and summer, before
the bill is due, and ensures a more attractive
grant package
Stelma advises that those students who
plan to procrastinate should talk to another
student who went through the process in the
past.
Ask a student who has been through this
and find out how awful it is to sit in the office
and wait to be told you don't qualify Stelma
said.
Other essential tips the financial aid office
offers are that students should always write
their social security numbers at the top of each
page of alt materials submitted to ECU. This
ensures faster processing and makes the work
easier for the financial aid workers. Students
should use black or blue ink and print out
information in capital letters, round off dollar
amounts and respond speedily to requests for
additional information. Also, all students
should keep copies of documents such as IRS
forms, since the office asks approximately 30
percent of students to submit these articles.
Common errors students make when filling
out forms are reporting income tax withheld
rather than actual tax liability, using the wrong
Social Security numbers and failing to report
untaxed income and benefits, such as living
allowances for military personnel. Another
common error is failure to report parent or
stepparent information, since their income has
a direct effect upon the student.
For further information, call the Office ot
Student Financial Aid at 328-6610.
Appointments are available on a walk-in basis.
Office hours are from IftOQ am to 5:00 p.m.
Doors open for
graduating seniors
Reynolds Rxmdation
offers fellowships,
internships
Jacqueline D. kellum
ARTS AND STUDIES ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Graduating seniors may be interested in an
annual fellowship opportunity as well as sever-
al summer intern positions provided by a large
foundation.
The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation offers
fellowships and internships to currently
enrolled students.
Foundation fellows work for a year as a
junior program officer, alongside three full
time Foundation employees. They assist in
evaluating grant proposals, go on on-site visits,
and are given the chance to work on projects
of particular interest to them.
Mamie Broadhurst is the current
Foundation fellow, and says that there are no
specific requirements for the fellows, other
than the citizenship requirement.
"The only requirement is that the person
be a North Carolinian, andor be a recent grad-
uate of a North Carolina college or university
Broadhurst said.
The purpose of the citizenship require-
ment is that the Foundation wants its fellows
to have a personal interest in the welfare of
North Carolina and its people.
"The people who are fellows usually have
been involved in their communities and trying
to improve North Carolina. There is a focus
outside themselves, and trying to better the
area we live in, because that's what we're
about Broadhurst said.
The Foundation was established in 1936 in
memory of RJ. Reynold's youngest child, and
since then has given more than $230 million in
grants all over North Carolina. The
Foundation focuses on various areas of major
interest from time to time, with their current
concerns being pre-collegiate education,
minority issues, women's issues, community
economic development and the environment.
The Foundation has two grant cycles, from
February to May and August to November, and
during those rimes the primary responsibility
of the fellow is helping with the grant propos-
als. But at other times, the fellow has more
freedom to choose their projects. Preferably,
the fellow's interests should coincide with one
of the Foundation's current focus areas.
"During the off-months, the fellowship is
really intriguing, because it can be whatever
the fellow wants it to be Broadhurst said.
The summer internship, of which there are
two to three positions available, is similar to
the fellowship with the difference being that
the interns are usually currently enrolled stu-
dents, and there is some flexibility in when
the internship is carried out.
"They can do some of the same things like
the fellow as far as getting involved in projects
that interest them Broadhurst said.
Broadhurst said that her own experience as
a Foundation fellow has widened her perspec-
tive on current affairs in North Carolina, and
thinks it will help her in her prospective career
as a teacher after she finishes her fellowship.
"Doing this fellowship gives me an amazing
sense of an overall view of what's happening in
North Carolina, and how to improve the state.
I have a greater sense of the recourses avail-
able to North Carolinians Broadhurst said.
lite fellowship begins in August and is a
paid position with benefits. The deadline is
March 1 every year, but as that falls on a
Saturday this year, Broadhurst says the appli-
cations must be postmarked by March 3.
Anyone who wants more information on the
fellowship or internship should contact
Mamie Broadhurst at 1-800-443-8319, or at
101 Reynoida Village, Winston-Salem, NC,
27106-5199.
Breast cancer:
College-age women also at risk
i
ANGELA KOENIG
HEALTHENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Eborsnotr. This is thefirst m a two part series. Next Tuesday's edition of
TE�mMmchideafeatunonmECUptvfessorBomgKUkhnastcam3a:
Although breast cancer is associated mainly with older people, it is
important for students to learn about it and its diagnosis now. Although
increasing age is a primary risk factor; incidents can occur to college
students.
"Although some women do not think it is important at this age to
do breast examinations, we do know that it exists at this age said
Donna Walsh, director of the office of Health Promotion and Well-
Being.
Being female is the greatest risk factor, but breast cancer b not
restricted to females. Males account for one percent of the diagnoses.
Its cause is unknown, but it is the most common form of cancer in
American women. As many as 2 million women will be diagnosed
with breast cancer during this decade and more than 500,000 people
will die from it in North America alone.
It is the leading cause of death for women ages 40-55 and the lead-
ing cause of death from cancer among African American women.
Breast cancer is increasing. It is estimated that one out of eight
women will develop this cancer in her lifetime. In 1960, the risk was
one in 14 of being diagnosed.
If a woman has never had children, or if she had her first child after
the age of 30, risk also increases.
If a woman's mother or sister had breast cancer prior to
menopause, the risk of the woman developing the cancer is six rimes
greater. The risk is 10 times greater if the mother or sister had can-
cer in both breasts.
A family history of cancer of the uterus, cervix or colon also
increases the risk of breast cancer slightly Obesity triples the risk of
developing it.
These are not the only factors causing breast cancer. Most women
who develop breast cancer have no identifiable risk factors. More
than 70 percent of all women diagnosed with breast cancer do not
even have a family history of the disease.
Early detection is important. Breast self-examination accounts for
75 percent of discoveries of all breast growths. Breast cancer can
often be treated effectively with surgery that does not call for removal
of the breast.
"The best thing to do is to become aware of how to do a self-exam
now and get into the habit of checking your breasts Walsh said.
"The most powerful thing is to learn about this early If you know
now what your breasts arc like, then you will be more likely to know if
any change occurs later in life
Although most breast irregularities are discovered by self-examina-
tion, most women do not know how to correctly perform them and few
do them often enough.
Do not panic if a lump is detected. It is best to contact a doctor and
The Accepted Patterns for Breast Exam
Use the same pattern to feel every part of the breast tissue.
Choose the method easiest for you. The diagrams above show
the three patterns preferred by women and their doctors: the
circular clock or oval pattern, the vertical strip and the wedge.
1. In the shower or in front of a mirror, examine your breasts.
2. With your arms raised over your head, observe them individ-
ually from different angles. Look for any changes in the contour,
skin, nipple or dimpling of the skin.
3. Lie down and place a pillow or folded towel under your
shoulder.
4. With fingers flat gently rub in circular motions around each
breast. Begin at me outermost part of e breast and continue
to the nipple. Notice how the structure of your breast feels.
5. Squeeze the nippple gently using the index finger and thumb.
Notice if any fluid is discharged.
6. Report any abnormalities to your doctor immediately.
schedule an appointment.
"It is not suggested to have a mammogram at this age. Women in j
their thirties should be more concerned with them Walsh said.
Students vyth any questions about how to perform a sdf breast
exam or a suspicious lump may call the Student Health Center at 328-
6841.
-4
ECU Welcomes Vienna Boys Choir
The Vienna Boys Choir will perform at ECU Sunday Feb. 2, at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium as an added attraction to the 1996-97 S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series.
Since their first visit to the U.S. in 1932, the Choir has become the most pop-
ular ever to tour North America. They previously performed in Greenville during
ECU's 1969-70 and 1984-85 Performing Arts Series.
Each season a new choir of boys carries on the rich traditions of Vienna's musi-
cal life, tracing its roots to such figures as Mozart, Haydn and Schubert. Their
repertoire also features short operettas (in costume), sacred works and a broad
range of secular and folk music.
Tickets: $15 general public, $12 faculty and staff, $7 students and youth
Bolshoi Symphony to appear at ECU
The Bolshoi Symphony Orchestra will perform in ECU's Wight Auditorium Thursday Feb. 6 at 8 pjn. The pro-
gram will consist of the Overture from Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet, the Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 and
Rachmmaninoffs Concerto No. 2 in C Minor, featuring pianist Mikhail Petukhov. The orchestra will be direct-
ed by Peter Feranec (pictured).
The Feb. 6 concert is a return appearance in Greenville for the Bolshoi Symphony which also performed at ECU
for the 1993-94 season, during its first US. tout
Admission to the concert is by Performing Arts Series season ticket or by single ticket. Advance reserved-seat
gle tickets arc now on sale at the ECU Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
Tickets (single): $30 general public, $25 faculty and staff, $15 students and youth and $30 at the door
Family Fare Series presents "Black Journey"
Black Journey, a musical drama recalling the voyage of African-American people from
the villages of Africa to modem-day America, will be presented at ECU Saturday Feb.
8, as a pan of the campus Family Fare Series.
To tell the story of African-Americans, the show uses black oral tradition and music,
beginning with African chants, through gospel, jazz, blues, ragtime and swing, to the
rock and rap music of today, the audience is introduced to the rhythms of Africa that
became the folk songs of black people in America.
This production, like all Family Fare presentations, is suitable for both children and
adults, and runs about one hour. '
Tickets: $8 general public, $7 faculty and staff, $5 students and youth
Kfestylt 7
Vienna Chior boys
sing at Wright
opinion5
Seniors deserve to
be special
sports11
Victories continue
for Lady Pirates
THURSDAY:
pwtty sunny
high 50
low 25
WEEKEND:
pertly cloudy
high 45
low 21
Hunt proposes $251 million in budget adjustnients
mRT tntc� A�Hi lvi years, nwke budget adjustments one year at a supervisor in state government oversees only million in unspecified reductio
11 laV lalaC CJLlv time. one or two emolovees. rhree vears rn nav for his nlans.
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG,
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
across from Joyner library
Shone
28-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
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uutecPecuvm.cis.ecu.sdu
ftoposal may raise educa-
tors' salaries
RALEIGH (AP) - Gov. Jim Hunt is propos-
ing $251 million in adjustments to this year's
budget to begin funding his four-year program
of expanding Smart Start and raising teacher
salaries to the national average.
"I'm going to ask for a four-year commit-
ment on these things Hunt said Tuesday at a
meeting of the Advisory Budget Committee,
where he presented an outline but few details
of his budget plans.
"I'm not asking for something that will last
forever, just four years Hunt said.
Legislators, who are elected every two
years, make budget adjustments one year at a
time.
Hunt also indicated to Republicans on the
Advisory Budget Commission that he is willing
to consider merit pay for teachers in his plan to
raise the average salary.
"We haven't finished things, of course, in
terms of the budget Hunt told the panel of
legislative budget leaders. He said the propos-
als unveiled Tuesday were a "broad outline" of
his full two-year budget plan, which will not be
released for at least a week.
Hunt's proposals include using increased
child support enforcement payments and sav-
ings from his welfare reform program to pay for
Smart Start and child care; reducing the
growth of Medicaid from its current rate of 11
percent a year to 8 percent a year over the next
four years; and eliminating situations where a
supervisor in state government oversees only
one or two employees.
Marvin Dorman, Hunt's budget officer, said
reshuffling state agencies would lead to the
elimination of positions, but not necessarily
employees.
"We do not believe that there will be any
employees laid off in the first yearDorman
said. "This is not intended to be a workforce
reduction
Rep. George Holmes, R-Yadkin, the co-
chairman of the House budget committee,
said cutting the growth of Medicaid is often
discussed as a way to save money.
"That's going to be tough Holmes said. "I
hope we're not playing games with the num-
bers here
In addition to $251 million in budget
adjustments this year, Hunt proposes $150
million in unspecified reductions over the i
three years to pay for his plans. Legislators last
year cut $175 million from the budget.
Dorman said his four-year projections
showing how to pay for the governor's pro-
grams do not include a downturn in the econ-
omy. The economy is already in one of the
longest growth cycles since World War II.
If we have a recession, it will require
adjustments throughout Dorman said. But
he said there was no agreement among econo-
mists that a downturn is imminent.
Republicans have said they want the
biggest raises paid to the best teachers, rather
than giving across-the-board raises to get them
all to the national average.
Hunt said the average teacher salary could
SEE HUNT. PAGE 4





2 Thursday, January 30. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
.news
u in era
DAN RATHER SAYS MUGGER FROM
NORTH CAROLINA
NEW YORK (AP) - Dan Rather says the mugger who more than 10 years ago
yelled, "What's the frequency?" before knocking the CBS anchorman to the
ground and kicking him was a North Carolina man.
The mugger was William Tager of Charlotte, N.C Rather said Tuesday
after examining pictures of the man. Tager was sentenced last year to 25
years in prison for shooting an NBC technician to death outside the "Today"
show studios in 1994.
Rather was confronted at about 11 p.m. on Oct. 4,1986, on Park Avenue.
The attack had been a mystery to Rather until psychiatrist Park Dietz, who
examined Tager after the shooting, told Rather he was certain Tager was the
attacker.
GRANDFATHER BUSTED
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) - Onslow County Sheriff's deputies arrested a
61-year-old grandfather Tuesday after his daughter said she caught him per-
forming oral sex on his 9-year-old granddaughter.
The man was arrested in his home, where officials believe the crimes
occurred over a two-month period.
His granddaughter stayed with him after school. Her 6-year-old brother
was playing outside the home when the crimes allegedly occurred. Detective
Sgt. Pam Sanders said.
BABIES THROWN OUT THE WINDOW
TACOMA, Wash. (AP) - Two toddlers were hurled out a third-floor apart-
ment window as police responded to a domestic dispute. The infants land-
ed on the hood of a car, but were expected to survive, police said Tuesday.
The children's father, the subject of several domestic violence com-
plaints, has been arrested for investigation of two counts of assault, spokes-
woman Corina Hopkins said.
The 2-year-old girl was in critical condition with head and internal
injuries; her 1-year-old brother was in serious condition with bruises and
minor internal injuries, said hospital spokesman Todd Kelly said.
Apartment manager Pat Hutson said another tenant saw it happen.
GM WORKERS REACHED A TENTATIVE PACT
MORAINE, Ohio (AP) - Workers at General Motors Corps truck assembly
plant here reached a tentative pact to end a three-day strike over disputes
that included overtime and sick days.
The International Union of Electronic Workers said Tuesday that GM
agreed to settle all grievances.
The plant makes the Oldsmobile Bravada, Chevrolet Blazer and GMC
Jimmy. The 4,300 workers were expected to return starting with the first
shift today, said Gerry Holmes, a spokesman at GM's North American head-
quarters in Warren, Mich.
TOWER FIRE
BOMBAY, India (AP) - Fire spread through the top stories of a 25-story office
tower today, killing three people and trapping others for about an hour high
above the beaches of the Arabian Sea.
Firefighters' ladders reached to only the 14th floor, so rescuers had to
bring people down the stairs to that level. About 21 people were evacuated
through 14th-floor windows to safety.
The fire may have started in plywood and plastic being used for con-
struction by an American consultant company on the 21st floor, said Deputy
Chief Fire Officer M.G. Sarkod.
POOREST INVESTORS RECEIVE IMMEDIATE CASH
TIRANA, Albania (AP) - Albania's president said today only the poorest
investors will receive immediate cash payments from the frozen assets of two
failed get-rich-quick funds.
Prime Minister Aleksander Meksi said Tuesday investors would begin
receiving payments Feb. 5 from the pyramid schemes, which were declared
illegal and frozen after weeks of unrest sparked by their failure to pay out.
President Sali Berisha told a news conference today that most investors
would get account statements, rather than cash payments.
2SL
Try the easy way by advertising
in our classifieds.
Student sues USF for first amend-
ment violation
Senior Amy Andre is suing the University of
South Florida after University Police at New
College in Sarasota seized a videotape depicting
nudity and sexual situations at a campus party.
Andre, 22, filed a federal lawsuit in conjunc-
tion with the American Civil Liberties Union
Wednesday against the UP and several USF offi-
cials including President Betty Castor for confis-
cating her video "Annie Sprinkle's Sluts and
Goddesses Video Workshop
The videotape, featuring naked women
demonstrating self-examinations and sexual
techniques, was projected onto an outside wall of
a dorm Oct. 4 in Palm Court, an area used for
campus events. The video was shown at a party
celebrating the second edition of the student
publication "The PHlowbook where Andre is
the managing editor. According to Andre's lawyer,
George K Rahdert, UP officer Paul Shideler
decided the tape was pornographic and stopped
it. Andre was unavailable for comment. Noreen
Segrest, general counsel for USE said the UP
stopped the tape and took it because Andre was
illegally exhibiting the video in a public place.
"The event was attended not only by univer-
sity students, but community members and high
school students Segrest said. "It was inappro-
priate for (Amy) to show the video
Andrew Kayton, legal director for the ACLU,
said Andre's constitutional rights were violated.
"This is a basic case of Amy's First
across
campuses
Amendment rights being violated Kayton said.
"It's kind of ironic that an environment of higher
learning would do something this silly
Andre's attorney, George K Rahdert said the
tape is not obscene and noted the same movie
was shown in its entirety in Lesbianism, a course
offered at New College.
New SGA home page at UT gives
students vocal outlet
Students have a new outlet to voice their con-
cerns on campus matters.
The SGA at the University of Tennessee,
Knoxviile has opened a new link on the UT home
page which will provide a discussion forum for
students across campus.
The link features issues the SGA is currently
dealing with and includes space for student
responses to such matters.
The interactive website allows students to
respond to any of the included information, as
well as any other concerns they may have.
"You can post something to the site an people
can reply to your post explained SGA President
Jason Little. "For example, if you read the safety
report and have other things to add to the list (of
safety roblems), we'll look at it and reply
The site is the result of a bill passed last
November in the SGA Senate after representa-
tive expressed concern over not being able to
gather constituent input on a controversial tech-
nology fee.
NC State student to bike across
America
This summer, Andy Lorenc, a junior in the N.C.
State chemical engineering program, will be
pushing his physical limitations on a cross coun-
try bicycle tour to benefit disabled people.
Lorenc, a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity,
will join 59 of his fraternity brothers in June to
travel on a 3500 mile "Journey of Hope" for
PUSH America.
The organization aims to improve the lives of
people with disabilities through service, volun-
teerism, education and awareness.
"PUSH America is our fraternity's national
philanthropy organization Lorenc explained.
"This is the big fund-raiser and publicity deal for
the year
The 1996 "Journey of Hope" raised nearly
$300,000 for the charity.
Two teams of 30 men each will cycle from San
Francisco to Washington, D. C, taking either a
southern or a northern route. The teams will pass
through a total of 22 srates, traveling an average
of 75 miles per day for 63 days.
At each stop, team members will participate is
special events to increase awareness and raise
funds for PUSH America.
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"BIGGEST SALE OF THE YEAR"
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3 Thursday. January 30. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
p 1GQny'6-jkinj"P.

5(919) 756-0600 Autoclave Sterilization 516-A-Hwy 264-A Greenville. NC
Jtt Bad news: TEC has
� 1 lost a few news
,r writers.
Good news: JjJ�
Several positions 7
are now open! Apply
today!
News Writers' Meeting:
Today @ 4:30 p.m.
All writers should bring in
their "Beat Assignment
Packages
New concerns rise about
1950's monkey virus
BETHESDA, Md. (AP) - Scientists are dusting off a 40-year-oid medical
mystery: Does a monkey virus that contaminated a polio vaccine millions
of Americans took during the 1950s increase the risk of certain rare can-
cers?
Government data suggest such fears are unwarranted, because the
types of cancer involved do not appear to be increasing among people old
enough to have gotten the tainted vaccine. And the polio vaccine sold
today is tested to ensure it is free of this monkey virus, called SV40.
But scientists recently found genetic pieces of the SV40 lurking inside
tumors removed from cancer victims, and injecting the virus into labora-
tory animals gives them cancer.
That's far from proof that SV40 actually harmed a person. But interna-
tional scientists who spent two days furiously debating the issue here con-
tend this virus might predispose some people - perhaps those with dam-
aged immune systems - to certain cancers of the brain, bone and lung.
And some question whether continuing to use monkey tissue to make
vaccines might allow viruses that people don't yet know exit to sneak in.
"Make it in anything but animals said Barbara Loe Fisher of the
National Vaccine Information Center, which criticizes vaccine safetv.
"We have the technology to make vaccines in human cell lines that are
clean said Dr. Michele Carbone of Loyola University Medical Center,
one of the first to discover SV40 inside human tumors.
Carbone doesn't want Americans to fear vaccines; he recently had his
own child immunized against polio.
But government officials worry that even debating the issue will fright-
en some parents. "We do a grave disservice to the public if we were now
to question the safety of the current polio vaccines on the basis of SV40
warned Dr. Arthur Levine of the National Institutes of Health.
Making polio vaccines using human cells - the kind sold in Canada but
SUMMER
ON
Mil
ihi:
FOR PEOPLE
WAY TO THE TOP.
If you didn't sign up for
ROTC as a freshman or
sophomore, you can still
catch up this summer by
attending Army ROTC
Camp Challenge, a paid
six-week course in
leadership. Apply
now. You may qualify
for a $4,000 scholarship
and advanced officer
training when you return
to campus in the fall.
You'll also have the
self-confidence and
discipline you need
to succeed in college
and beyond.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE YOU CAN TAKE
For details, visit 346 Rcrwl Building or call
328-6967
items & Prices Good Thru Feb 1.1997
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An opening is avail-
able for the following
staff position:
Assistant
Editor
To apply, come by the
Student Media Board
office on the second
floor of the Student
Publications Bldg. or
call 328-6009 for
more information.
not here - isn't risk free either,
Levine added, because they must
be tested for human infections.
Mass vaccination with the
then-new polio vaccine began in
1955. But in 1960. doctors discov-
ered SY40 in monkeys and in the
vaccine. When they injected this
virus into hamsters, it caused can-
cer, so the Food and Drug
Administration ordered companies
to manufacture virus-free versions.
But by the time they reached
the market in 1963, as many as 98
million people may have been
exposed to SV40.
Whether that early contamina-
tion posed any harm was debated
during the 1960s and 1970s, but
then faded away until 1992 - when
Carbone found SV40's genetic fin-
gerprint inside human cancer.
Carbone tested preserved sam-
ples of rare child brain tumors
called ependymomas, bone tumors
and a particularly deadly lung can-
cer called mesothelioma that
mostly strikes people exposed to
asbestos.
He found pieces of SV40's
genetic material inside 60 percent
of the brain and lung cancers he
tested, and a third of the bone
cancers he tested.
Other scientists got mixed
results. British researchers, for
example, spotted SV40 signs in 44
percent of the mesotheliomas they
tested, and a Baylor University
researcher even culled the actual
virus from a tumor. Some of the
tumors were from people exposed
to the tainted vaccine, but not all -
and some researchers found SV40
in noncancerous tissue, suggesting
the virus either had spread or was
in humans before tainted vaccine.
But other scientists couldn't
find the virus in human tissue at
all. and questioned whether labo-
ratory contamination was fooling
their colleagues.
Carbone and other researchers
now have preliminary evidence
that SV40 may do damage by tying
up proteins vital to keeping cells
from turning cancerous.
Also, SV40 appears related to
two human viruses that harmlessly
infect nearly all Americans, but
which cause rare cancers in people
with severely damaged immune
systems, such as AIDS patients.
That suggests SV40 could similar-
ly be a risk only to immune-sup-
pressed patients.
But NTH's Dr. Howard
Strickler studied cancer rates and
found no evidence of a jump
among people old enough to have
gotten the tainted vaccine.
Neither did researchers in
Sweden, who compared 700,000
people who got tainted U.S. vac-
cine against the general popula-
tion that received virus-free vac-
cine.
Those studies wouldn't detect
small rises in these very rare
tumors, Strickler acknowledged.
But while he called the data
intriguing Strickler joined Food
and Drug Administration officials
Tuesday to emphasize that it does
not "point us in a clear direction of
whether this virus is a cause of
cancer
The government called for
more research, although it would-
n't commit to federal funding, and
Strickler is preparing archives of
tumor tissue for scientists to test.
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4 Thursday. January 30, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
America Online settles with customers
Customers say they
paid but could not
logon
WASHINGTON (AP)-The nation's
largest online service, America
Online Inc has agreed to reimburse
customers for their inability to logon
in a settlement with 37 states, a
source familiar with the agreement
said today.
Terms and details of the settle-
ment were not immediately dis-
closed. The source, speaking on con-
dition of anonymity, said the size of
any credit would be determined by
how much time a customer recently
has been online.
America Online has been
swamped with complaints, accused
of signing up hundreds of thousands
of new users without the means to
accommodate the heavy usage.
The new customers over-
whelmed America Online's comput-
er network, taking advantage of a
new plan that gave them unlimited
online time for $-19.95 a month. At
the same time, AOL undertook a
massive advertising campaign to
push its service.
America Online stock shot up
$1.62 12 to $36.87 12 on the New
York Stock Exchange in response to
the settlement announcement.
Analysts said the settlement should
help stop an embarrassing barrage of
negative publicity at a time when
AOLs online service is threatened
by easier and easier access to the
Internet.
AOL also said it would add a dis-
claimer to its ads, starting in
February, that says customers are
having trouble logging on. No ads
will be run without the disclaimer.
The company also agreed to
make it easier for people to cancel its
service, including more lines for cus-
tomers to fax in their cancellations.
Because of the large number of
states involved in the settlement, an
agreement would affect AOLs 8 mil-
lion customers nationwide.
Several states had threatened to
sue America Online unless it
promised refunds and stopped pro-
moting a plan it can't reliably deliver.
The attorneys general in the
states involved scheduled a press
conference for this afternoon to
announce the settlement. An
America Online spokeswoman had
no immediate comment.
The heavy use often results in
annoying busy signals for AOL sub-
scribers attempting to log on during
peak periods. The company has also
been plagued with a recent rash of
technical glitches, such as e-mail
"brownouts as it attempts to
upgrade its network to accommo-
date new users.
America Online, based in Dulles,
Va has said it is selectively giving
refunds to people who complain
about their difficulty getting online.
But until now, it had declined to give
blanket refunds.
America Online is spending $350
million between now and June to
upgrade its network, including buy-
ing new modems, building a new
data center to house computer
equipment and adding more cus-
tomer support representatives.
The problems in getting online
are expected to decrease as the new
Not Available on I -mail, (I) ROM, or the World Wide Web
Vienna Choir Boys It's awesomethe sound of angels coming out of 23'devilish' young boys. 1? , � : .f, r �- - �. r � - � 1 ' �� �� V: r"
' 5' VS
fltilftfe
Execs consider buyout of furniture division slated to close
GREENSBORO (AP) - Singer Co.
wants to get out of the furniture busi-
ness, a move that will mean the clos-
ing of the company's 340-emproyec
manufacturing plant in Chocowinity.
But Singer Furniture executives
are looking at whether to buy the
division and spin it off into an inde-
pendent company - likely preserving
jobs at the Chocowinity plant and
other plants in Lenoir already slated
for closure.
Singer Furniture officials are
expected to meet this week and dis-
cuss a passible management buyout,
the News & Record of Greensboro
reported Tuesday.
The Chocowinity and Lenoir fur-
niture operations produce bedroom
and dining room furniture and
employ more than 1,000 workers.
Another 20 employees work at divi-
sion headquarters in High Point and
40 workers at administrative offices
in Roanoke, Va.
"If (a management buyout) is
HUNT
continued from page 1
be "raised roTfie riinoriaTliverage
"by a variety of ways including
putting more money into the ABC
education plan that rewards high-
performing schools, paying teachers
for mentoring and other duties.
Raising teacher salaries to
the national average "doesn't mean
everybody ought to be at the
national average Hunt said. "If
they do exceptionally well, they
should be above the average. Some
will be below
Hunt said his full budget
will be available after the State of
the State address to the
Legislature. That speech usually is
given in the Legislature's first few
days, but has not yet been sched-
uled.
successful, then the plants would stay
open, and the employment would be
protected said Craig Shoemaker,
Singer Furniture's president and a
member of the buyout team. "It's a
little early to say what numbers it
would protect from a job standpoint
New York-based Singer
announced late last week it would
stop making furniture after reporting
a fourth-quarter loss of $20 million.
Singer - known for its sewing
machines - blamed S16.5 million of
that loss on the furniture division.
Singer announced in December
that it would close the Lenoir opera-
tion by late March, affecting about
720 workers. Already 100 positions
have been cut, said William Foster, a
Singer vice president.
Lenoir manufacturing operations
were to be consolidated with the
Chocowinity facility. Foster said no
closing date for the Chocowinity clos-
ing has been announced.
Shoemaker said Singer Cos
reception toward the buyout has been
neutral so far.
"We hope to have some discus-
sions with them in the next few days
and sec if we can get real serious
about it Shoemaker said.
As recently as 1994, the Singer
Furniture division was the nation's
20th largest furniture maker with
2,400 employees and more than $100
million in annual sales.
Singer Furniture has suffered
from a declining market share, as well
as considerable excess manufactur-
ing capacity that has resulted in high
operating costs, officials say.
Sunday, February 2,1997
2 pan. Wright Auditorium
.SRudolph Alexander
'trloriniilii Arts Series
v ill ;nl .illi i uMh .1 .Mill I I
All I l SI5 .It lilt limit. .
il.il .il tl'u nli.il I u k, IIlli,
iiii.il! Mini, hi. in r. :s r-NS
Pangea Associates Presents
How To Teach English as a Second Language Workshop
�Assessment Lanuage Acquisition � Innovative Strategies � Interactive Participa-
tion � Cultural Awareness � Certificate of Completion
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. � Saturday February 8, 1997 ECU�
Willis Building
Registration Mandatory
Call Fangea Associates� 800-706-6715 or 919-933-0399
lpangea@msn.com
�������
i -rfm SILVER
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J Door.Opn: 7:30p.m. �ATouchOjClass"
�� 756-6278
TUESDAY: lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
THURSDAY:
FRI. A SAT:
if Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.


iMSfcllHH� W�at�fCws��t��lMAH. (Brtrind AladdinLinao Switrt

WZMB is accepting applications for the following positions:
GRANTS MANAGER
SPORTSCASTER
DISC JOCKEY (ESP. METAL)
Those interested should come to the station in the basement of
Mendenhall Student Center and complete an
application as soon as possible.
10 OR MORE GIRL
DANCERS EVERY
NIGHT!
It PUCE
FOtTIET
NEffYonsrainzzAi
$5.4
ALFREDO'S
New York l'ia
uiul Bar
DAILY LUNCH
SPECIAL
2 ONE TOPPING SLICES
AND DRINK25
til 4pm
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
LIYI ENTERTAINMENT
TUESDAYS
DAMN SUlTiR
SI'K I VI
Sin.ill cn.it' lii)iir 1'ii-
$6.99
� Specialty Pizzas -
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$1 ROtUNG ROCK NIGHT
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February Specials Appetizer
Monday �
Tuesday -
Wednesday
Thursday �
Friday -
Saturday -
SI.50 Premium Draft
& .25 Wings
82.50 Frozen Daiquiris
. $1.75 Import Bottles
�2.00 Hi-Balls
82.50 Margaritas (All Flavors!)
$1,50 Domestics
& .50 Domestic Draft
Hot Artichoke & Spinach Dip
with Blue corn Chips for two.
Linguine with Scallops in a lemon
cream sauce for two.
Marinated Artichoke hearts and
grilled portabella mushrooms on
sundried tomato pesto for two.
featured Wine - George Deboeuf Beaujolais
Pasta
Pizza -
fmwe
A resounding evening
featuring Rachmaninoff
and Tchaikovsky.
Bolshoi Symphony
Orchestra
Thursday, February 6, 1997
8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
East Carolina University
Tickets now available.
Advance Individual tickets:
$30 public, $25 ECU facultystaff,
$15 ECU studentyouth.
All tickets $30 at the door.
Group rates available.
ECU Central Ticket Office,
8:30 a.m6X) p.m Monday-Friday;
919-328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS;
deafspeech-lmpaired access . �.
919-328-4736 fc fl
HEIMDRIX FILMS
Friday, January 31
Saturday, February 1
Sunday, February 2
2:00 PM Matinee
,VJDEVr
"A Wall-To-Wall
Wacky Movie
-Brae Williamson. �?�tAVNOY MAGAZINE
"Keanu Reeves
And Cameron
Diaz Sizzle
lyOnomo
, PREVUE CHANNEL
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
!Rj.�i
nv





5 Thursday. January 30. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
easijfctrolinian
BRANDON WADDF.LL Editor
MATT HEGE Mwrittino. Director
MARGUERITE BENJAMIN Ntws Editor
AMY L ROYSTER Aswan! New Editor
IAY MYERS UfeiYH Editor
DALE W AMSON Aarjnnt Uhstfit Editor
AMANDA ROSS Sporo Editor
PATRICK IRELAN Photo Editor
CELESTE WILSON Productiori Managnr
CAROLE MEHLE Hod Copy Editor
ANDY FARKAS Salt IHustfiKjr
HEATHER BURGESS Win Editor
am t t� dm Bowl � E� (mtnm �rsrr� km I on �w. Smrt B 2M w. �� r t� irt ta Hre) or Iww 11� E�
rnfcw r�r� rr. nj � � �r litm tor piarato
drakan Mtarml amtdmg ECU. Gum. SK�4363. t� ntarrma. oi Wja.SM.
OUW1CW
We at 7EC are concerned about you, our fellow students at ECU. Life can be tough for
the average college student. Just living day-to-day is often difficult, stressful and
extremely expensive.
Who out there doesn't know the taste of Ramen noodles? Who hasn't had a check
bounce because of insufficient funds? Who hasn't paid some late fees to the library, the
video store, the electric company, the phone company, the credit card company, etc.? If
you haven't yet, you're either really lucky or really responsible. However, more likely than
not, most of you have had to pay fees that were either unexpected or unnecessary.
It's easy to fall into the trap of an inflated and uncontrollable budget when you're in
college. Almost as soon as students walk on campus for the first time, they are bombard-
ed by credit card companies willing to give anyone and everyone $2,000 dollars or more,
no questions asked. Combine that with the thousands offered by Financial Aid, and
before the first day of classes have even begun the average student can be several thou-
sand dollars (possibly tens of thousands) in debt.
Managing this load seems easy at first, but along come living expenses like food, cloth-
ing, power, phone, gas, and so on. Add to that non-essentials like music, videos, movies
and cable and the debt becomes insurmountable. And parents can't always help by tak-
ing this additional debt on, nor should they since we are all supposed to be adults.
Many students do not recognize the dangers of this kind of debt until it is too late. It's
easy to see why. When you're buying a new stereo system, computer, TY VCR or game
system with that newly acquired credit, you're not in the frame of mind to be thinking
about all of the other expenses that come with that initial purchase. You'll need CDs to
play on the stereo, software for the computer, cable for the TY videos for the VCR - you
can see where this is going. And all of these little things add up.
Of course, we're easy prey. That's what most corporations feel, anyway. Why do you
think they give our generation so much consumer attention? Because we buy, buy, buy.
And we're trendy, too. We dig 70s clothes, roots rock and fat-free foods. Consequently,
there are now more 70s clothes manufacturers, more roots rock bands and more fat-free
foods to be had. Of course, we have to pay a little more for these things, but we do want
them, we do need them, don't we? We can't seem to stop and that pleases the powers
that be to no end. They will happily keep us in debt until the end of time.
Where is all of this debt taking us? It seems that if this trend continues, we will turn
into a generation that cannot afford anything - no homes, no businesses, no property. We
will be so in debt that no options for the future will be available to us. This buying fren-
zy may be good for the economy now, but it can't be good for the economy to come.
If we as a generation get burned by outrageous consumerism now, will we continue
that consumerism later? Or will we be so angry and fed up with where we are financially,
that we will not be buyers any longer?
If so, we could be heading for a bleak future. If we stop buying in such huge quantities
and at such inflated prices, then the consumer market may fail. If the consumer market
fails, then the economy will fail as well. And we will be too late to stop it, then.
All of this can change, however.
Solutions are there, but they're not easy. First, we have to regulate our spending. We
have to learn to be more responsible. We have to say no to those who would prey on our
hard-earned dollars.
Perhaps we could censor companies from soliciting on campus. Maybe we could con-
vince those who charge us fees to be a little more lenient towards the beginning spender.
Financial instruction could be required for the student community.
But these suggestions are only possibilities, really it comes down to the individual. You
can only be responsible for yourself. We at TEC encourage you, if you have not already, to
give some serious thought to your financial state before it gets out of your control.
Good luck.
r
l
t
Guest columnist application for Campus View
� This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEG what you
think about a certain topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian
�i office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
I
m m
1
Name.
Fr SophQ Jr Sr Q
i Phone number.
opinion!
Ntcotei
MCMULLEN
Seniors deserve seniority
Will, you're finally a senior at ECU.
You plan on graduating in May, huh?
You've sat through 82,000 lectures
from a professor you can hardly
understand, 150 hours standing in
line to register for those classes that
you must have, waited in a line that
stretched all the way down 10th
Street so you can get a parking stick-
er for $96Then you waited in anoth-
er line for hours on end to find a place
to park in that glorious parking lot.
What about all that time you've
enjoyed spending in the book store
searching for the books you need,
only to find out they're sold out? How
about the two million freshmen who
have given your favorite outfits those
wonderful beer stains? After four, five,
maybe even six long years of drudgery,
you've finally achieved this wonderful
senior status. But, what do you have
to show for it? Well, you do have your
Official Purple Pirate Pass that gets
you all your free goodies like a deck of
cards, a beach towel and even a class
mug.
Don't you?
You've also had the pleasure of
watching that beautiful recreational
center being built from the first day
they started to dig. And yes, you can
use the rec center that you helped
pay for, only for a small fee.
And you do get to pay a $25 appli-
cation fee to apply for graduation.
Remember, it's the same amount that
you paid when you applied to attend
college here. You finally received the
recognition you deserve for being a
senior. Right?
Wrong. For the past four years,
LETTERS TO THE. EDITOR
you've been busting your tail to
become a senior. You have stood in all
of those lines. You've attended all
those boring classes that you thought
for sure you didn't need. You have put
in endless hours of studying. You've
given up numerous amounts of vaca-
tion proposals. Now, you want more.
You deserve more.
How about a parking lot designat-
ed to graduating seniors only? That
way, you're not fighting with the
underclassmen for a parking place.
You know that before you leave your
home, you are guaranteed a space.
Now, I'm not saying that you
should have your own personalized
parking space. However, a special
parking lot for graduating seniors only
would give you one less thing to worry
about.
What about a registration day for
graduating seniors only? You graduat-
ing seniors would be able to get those
last few classes that you need without
having to worry about getting special
permission. It's only fair that you get
first dibs on classes before anyone
else. This would also give you a head
start at the bookstore since you know
what classes you'd be taking. After all,
everyone else will be here next
semester.
The one privilege that graduating
seniors deserve is the rec center. For
the past three years, tuition has
increased. The reason; our wonderful
new rec center. However, if you're
graduating in May, then you only have
about three more months to enjoy it
for free. After you graduate, you must
pay a membership fee to use that
building that you practically built.
Graduating students should be able
to enjoy the rec center for at least one
semester following graduation.
We can compare this whole sce-
nario to the business world. Let's say
that ECU is a large company in New
York City. The business people who
have been working here the longest
get special privileges. Instead of
parking on the fourth level of the
parking deck, they get to park right in
front of the door on the first level.
The "senior" partners also get to
choose what jobs they would like to
work on first. The senior employees
are the ones who arc committed to
the organization. They've stuck it out
through thick and thin. The company,
in turn, makes them feel special and
recognizes their accomplishments.
It's time for ECU seniors to be
recognized and to receive those spe-
cial privileges. Every student at ECU
who has what it takes, will be a senior
one day. And yes, on that fine day, all
of you underclassmen will be entitled
to whatever privileges that come with
that senior status. Wouldn't you like
to have something to look forward to
for all of your hard work?
I'm not saying to give the seniors a
huge parade. Nor am I saying to give
them free food, books, or anything
they want. What I am saying is that
when a student reaches senior status,
they have many things to stress over.
Why not make a student's last semes-
ter at ECU more enjoyable and mem-
orable? Give the seniors their seniority.
Housekeeping staff issues unresolved
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
Please consider me for a postion as guest columnist for TEC. Iagree to allow TEC's staff to edit my sub-
mission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those changes I will be notified of any
changes that may affect the length or content I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submis-
sion. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for
submission will be assigned by the editor.
To the Editor,
I must say I was quite unim-
pressed with the bit of unprofession-
al journalism in Thursday's edition of
The East Carolinian. The article
entitled, "ECU officials shed light on
discrimination claim was shoddy
and unrcscarched to say the least. To
start with, the picture accompanying
the article was one of a black house-
keeper and a white housekeeper,
insinuating that there are as many
white housekeepers as black. The
truth is, there are very few white
housekeepers on staff at ECU. Next,
the article portrays Vice Chancellor
of Business Affairs, Richard Brown, to
be concerned with the welfare of the
workers, when in fact, the only issue
he addressed was the documented
racial slurs used.
Mr. Brown never responded to any
of the workers grievances about work
environment, salary or respect
(which was left out of the article
entirely). The only discontent even
dealt with was Brown's half-hearted
statement, problem of the racial
slur (insinuating only one occur-
rence) has been locked into and
appropriate action has been taken I
fail to see what discontent this obvi-
ous "slap on the wrist" will help to
settle. The article continues into
another obvious dodge of the real
issue. Brown says that the rate hike is
not a school issue, but if not, how is it
that UNC's housekeepers settled for
one million dollars in pay and work
environment improvement?
Promotions are almost unheard of in
the realm of housekeeping. Perhaps
after 20 or 30 years of working in min-
imal conditions, a pay raise will be
given out. But even after that, a
housekeeper can make not more than
20 to 21 thousand dollars a year, not
nearly enough to support an entire
family. Chancellor Eakin, who has
finally allowed for meeting with the
housekeepers, seems to think that a
meeting is all that is required to "oil
the wheel" so to speak, but I, for one,
won't allow him neglectsic) human
rights of the housekeepers.
There is much more to this issue
than has been discussed by Hopkins
and Algood in this article. The house-
keeping staff have not been the sub-
jects of just one racial slur, but con-
stant racial discrimination. I find
myself disheartened and fully dis-
gusted with this paper's lack of
research on the issue. The issue of
housekeepers' rights aresic not to
be taken lightly. It's very easy for us
as privileged children of society to
blame the problem on someone else,
but if we continue to let discrimina-
tion of this sort continue, we will be
and are the guilty party. In one tiny
paragraph, you managed to reduce a
well planned and very emotional
march for human rights to no more
than an activist group protest. The
actions and complaints must be
heard, and as if it weren't enough
that Chancellor Eakin and the
administration ignore them, but the
local newspaper as weil is belittling
their cause. This is much more than a
march for pay raise, this is a proud
display of courage and honor in the
tradition of Martin Luther King, Jrs
dream. After all, King was shot while
marching for sanitation workers just
like ECU's housekeepers. I think it's
time this paper started thinking
about real issues instead of "the
Parking Predicament
Gabriel Isaac Johnson
Freshman
Undeclared major
-





6 Thursday. January 30, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
Lake Imp USA
UOiJ. Vi bOitJb H0tf� (ft
lh,X I'M ExMUSTab
John Murphy
�FR�F Cable TV
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Come find out what service and friendship is all about!
For more information call Melanie Knox at 551-0578
Nine Stitches
By Andre' Germain
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; East Carolina Style
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17 Pasternak heroine242526
18 Film spools 19 Painful272129 3031323334
20 Warns of imminent danger 22 Quantity of food3$� 3S37M
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27 Like some paintings49so� 5152
31 Equine animals� S35455
36 Wooden shoe 38 Drink noisily 39 Hastensss57sa59� no616263
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41 At no time 43 Ohio's lakeSt0
44 Happening 46 Russian revolu71"1"
tionist
48 "Peer Gynf
name
49 Hold
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styled
53 Kind of school
55 Wander
56 Cook a certain
way
60 Percussion
instrument
64 Kazan
65 Refuse
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All itgMt r�Mfvd
27 Worker with a
flashlight
28 Artless
29 Swift
30 Peace symbols
32 Rustic
33 Get up
34 Kind of trap
37 Opera singer
40 Make a speedy
recovery
42 Rebound
45 Retread
47 Kind of bean
50 Delicious drink
52 Fruits
54 Cleanse
56 Wagers
57 Jai �
58 Small stream
59 Cup handles
61 Melancholy
62 � mater
63 Workrooms, for
short
66 Understand
ANSWERS
FROM TUESDAY
�D
Rloiol
67 � podnda
68 Soft mineral
69 Correspond
70 Lacking feeling
71 Evening gown
fabric
72 Adiust agam
73 Red and Yellow
DOWN
1 Expressive
dance
2 Mr Roberts
3 Fiendish one
4 Costlier
5 Rider
6 Had a bite
7 Stage
8 Spills the beans
9 Not the real
thing
10 Come together
11 Housetop
12 Hindu teacher
13 City on the Oka
21 "� the night "
23 letters
25 Mutineer
The Free Party includes: t
Video Karaoke Bourbon Street Bingo
Lady Luck Casino Spades Tournament a .
Mask Display Tattoos
Movie Time to Kill 10:00 pm
Cabaret: Fettucini Brothers 9:30 and 11:30 pm
King and Queen Coronation 10:15 pm
DJ Dance 11:00 pm-1:30 am
Cajun Buffet 11:00 pm-1:00 am
�a Prizes!Prizes!Prizes!
fc Must be present at 1:30 to win the Grand Prize!
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7T,HI997 9?M- 2AM
o MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
� k UA FCU ID One free euest per ID. Guest passes available beginning January 31

Day of event tickets available at the Centra Ticket Office until 6 JT� M
r fr Service Desks until 9 pm and at theStudent Recreatton Center 6 pm to 9pm.
Sponsored by Student Life Major Events Committee, Division of ECL Ronald E. Dowdy Student Stores � �
�T






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�isJJi
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Wright hosts Vienna Choir Boys
Jennifer Calemin
Senior Writer
CkaJmrnr
Mtfon Tkrfrr ftAtabw
I remember very little about when I was a kid.
Granted, a tot less time has gone by for me than for
some of my friends, but still, my memories are very
selective. I remember playing -1 did a tot of that. I
remember going to school and hating it (well, some
things never change). I remember that homework
was a drag and milk and cookies were a nutritious
meal. I remember building tents in the living room
and camping in the Smokies without ever leaving
home.
1 remember pretending to be a rock singer and
holding concerts for all of my stuffed animals. I was-
n't very good, and come to think of it, a tot of my
favorite cuddly friends got tost right after I began
my 1981 World Tbur, but I always dreamed of what
it would be like to live "on the road
I watched all the shows with the child actors,
dreaming I could one day be like them. Child actors
are a dime a dozen, and while their innocence lasts,
America will continue to watch their cute antics.
Even after their innocence is gone, we'll get our
kicks watching their trials on TV As the child stars
grew older, so did I, and I tost some of my fascina-
tion with them. But recently I've discovered a
group of kids who have been performing for more
years than America has been independent of
England.
They are the Vienna Choir Boys. Rw almost 500
years the Vienna Choir Boys have been traveling
the world, sharing their gift of music and perfor-
mance with people everywhere. Five hundred
years. There is nothing in my life that stable. Talk
about job security.
SEE VKMM. PAGE 9
On Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m the Vienna Choir Boys will perform in Wright.
rHOTO COURTESY Of THE S. RUDOLPH ALEXANDER KRHMMHW ARTS SERIES
Concert benefits AIDS patients
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
Creativity often arises from tragedy,
offered Dr. Jay Pierson, an ECU voice
professor.
Pierson's creativity - and his
tragedy will be exhibited Feb. 2 at the
A Fletcher Recital Hall during
"Sounds of Support a benefit con-
cert for people living with HIV and
AIDS. The concert, scheduled to
begin at 7 p.m will feature music
connected to the AIDS pandemic
performed by ECU students and fac-
ulty.
Money generated from the event
will benefit Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization Incorporated tPlCA-
SO). Tickets for the show are avail-
able for $10 in advance through East
Coast Music and Video and from
PICASO itself.
Pierson knows first hand the
tragedy of AIDS. His partner in life,
James "Mark" Hamilton, died of an
AIDS-related brain cancer on Nov.
24,1995.
He will perform "Songs for Mark
a cycle of six songs, in tribute to
Hamilton at the concert. Pierson
composed the music and the words
for the cycle.
"It is a memorial to him and our
life together Pierson explained.
Pierson said he hopes the tragedy
that the music reflects will bring
about a greater "education" concern-
ing AIDS and HIV
This is a unique medium for rais-
ing the level of awareness he added.
"TTj'is concert is important because it
helps raise the level of awareness
close to home in eastern North
Carolina
In addition to Pierson, Nathan
Williams, an associate professor of
clarinet and chamber music, knows
well the tragedy of AIDS. His broth-
er, composer and poet Neal Williams,
died of AIDS in 1993. "A Particular
fall a song based on a poem written
by Neal Williams, will make its debut
at the concert.
A song written by the late compos-
er Kevin Oldham will also be per-
formed. Oldham, who passed away
recently due to AIDS, was a friend of
Marilyn Lucht, the assistant to the
dean of communications at ECU.
Approximately ten performers are
slated to perform at the concert.
John Beleutz, executive director
for PICASO, said he hopes the show
review
will become an annual event.
According to Beleutz, 230 people
in Pitt County have been document-
ed as having AIDS. It is the third
highest rate in the state. He esti-
mates there arc 100 or more addition-
al people with HIV-some who know
and some who do not know.
PICASO is hoping to raise
between $12,000 and $13,000 from
the event.
Beleutz said the show is a good
and unique opportunity to play music
that is purely connected to the HIV
pandemic.
"I hope to see some folks there
he added. "I think the music will be
pretty interesting for folks who like
this sort of music
For additional information or ques-
tions about tickets, call PICASO at
830-1660.
DALE WILLIAMSON
ASSISTANT LIRESTYLES EDITOR
I've been educating myself on musi-
cals lately. Within the past year, I've
watched such classics as Somtk Pacific,
The SmmdofMwx. West Side Story and,
my personal favorite. Tie Musk Men.
Why don't they make movies like this
anymore? Such a question is a cliche,
but it is a legitimate question.
Watching such films (as a film critic
and a film buff) and knowing that
they are no longer being made leaves a
emptiness in my heart. Why is
Hollywood afraid of the musical these
days?
The answer revolves around
money. Producers in Hollywood firmly
believe that the golden age of the
musical film is over, that no money
can be made from such films.
Strangely enough, two high-profile
musicals by two accomplished direc-
tors have been released within the last
few months. Woody Allen has taken a
stab at the musical with his film,
Everyone Says I Love You.
Unfortunately, Greenville theaters
don't show Woody Allen films, so don't
expect that gem to be playing at a the-
ater near you anytime soon.
Surprisingly, though, Alan Parker's
new musical, Evita, is in Greenville,
and it is a stunning epic that does jus-
tice to the entire genre of film musi-
cals.
Evita is powered by the music of
Andrew Lloyd Webber, the lyrics of
Tim Rice and the vocal performances
of Madonna and Antonio Banderas.
While all of this may form an unlikely
company, the resulting product proves
that the musical does not have to die.
It is a genre that can be just as invigo-
rating, exciting and hypnotic as any
other type of film.
Based on the actual historical fig-
ure of Eva Duarte de Peron, a stage
actress who grew into a national sym-
bol for the peasant people of
Argentina, Evita covers a great deal of
narrative ground. The film follows
Eva's life from a young girl with no
home or family, through her efforts to
climb the social ladder by means of
SEE EVITA. PAGE 9
Antonio Banderas and Madonna heat up the screen in the new film musical, Evita.
RH0T0 COURTESY OF CINERBI PICTURES
� H �
CD
review
Manday Huge
Manday Huge
Pat Reid
staff writer
In a time when the music world is being deluged with different versions of
the same old thing, it's refreshing to see that someone somewhere is still doing
something different. In a time when alternative is running the scene, the "art"
of thrash has been tost by the wayside.
And, in fact, thrash is a form of art. When you stick with mainly one or two
chords or progressions and your singer sounds like Satan's father on a bad day,
you have to know what you're doing to pull off good songs. Take for example,
the band Pantera. Simple, grinding songs with vocals that make you fear for
your life, but they still have rhythm and originality.
Unfortunately, the same can't be said for Manday Huge. The only thing
keeping these guys from being rated "Run Away" is the fact that if you turn
their music up loud enough, it can still make your house shake. Seriously, this
trio from the Outer Banks of North Carolina has a couple of good things going
here and there, but they never combine them into a good song or two. In the
words of their own song, "How It Is "Roll it up all you get is one big ball of
shit And that's how it is I couldn't have said it better myself.
Their independent self-titled CD starts off with "Underground Rom the
opening scream, I knew this would be a long CD. But I actually thought they
had potential. "Underground" is a straight-ahead thrash song from beginning
to end. Though overall not a bad song, the last line helps prepare you for the
rest of the CD when it says "Don't be a wimp and hold your ears which is
exactly the reaction that the next song encourages.
"Spinach" marks the beginning of the end for Manday Huge. The lack of
musical skill begins to show, with rapid breaks and stow scales being the main
riff of the song. Basically, the band learned a scale, broke it down, and then sang
over it. Placing the vocals over the scale breaks sealed the coffin shut on this
one.
"Never Happen" starts out with a cool little guitar effect and has a deep
bass sound that makes this fast, funky song a decent attempt at good music.
But in mixing the song, somebody must not have realized the importance of
the bass sound, because during the guitar solo the bass is subdued to a point
where it has no real pan to play. At feast the rest of song shows some effort.
"Piece" is another example of good and bad points in the same song. The
intro and chorus need work. The music is mediocre to begin with, and sporadic
drumming disrupts any flow that it might have had. During the verses, how-
ever, they get their act together and actually rock some. Then the chorus
comes and, surprise, surprise, it's the same thing as the intro.
Among the other weaknesses of the band is the songwriting, I hope the
guys don't have the attitude of the songs m real life. The songs arc junior high-
level attempts at "fighting the establishment They gripe about anything and
everything dealing with authority or rates, and a little of that goes a long way
By the end of the album, it's just the same old stuff over and over again and
this is the number one way to turn listeners off.
However, the guys in Manday Huge obviously don't know this. How can I
tell? There's a hidden song on the CD. And you have to wait two full minutes
after the last song before it starts. First of all, they'll be lucky if anyone even
makes it to the last track, and second, it'll be a miracle if someone finishes the
CD and actually lets it play for two more minutes before turning the player oft
You want to know the true irony of this situation? The hidden song is one
of best songs on the album, fast and funky, Manday keeps the song's time
down to a couple of minutes, which allows them to play only the good stuff
Instead of throwing in bad parts in the interest of a longer song, they keep this
one short and simple.
Rom the lyrics on the album, the band appears to be trying to play the rotes
of big, bad guys who take no junk from anybody. Instead, they come across as
unskilled guys who play junk for anybody. Is this dose enough? You can decide
for vourself.
tmtrnm CHI fts.RlwR.W-ii BrtRIW PMN�
health
minute
It's not hip to gpt hep
Sm i! hsf Fti.
Rtftt R on VMM
Sm.
Ply Full Pric
STEVE JOHNSON
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
With more than 300,000 new cases
each year, hepatitis i is considered to
be more than 100 times as contagious
as AIDS. Approximately 14 Americans
die each day from hepatitis B related
illnesses.
Hepatitis B is a virus that can live
in all body fluids. Also, it may live in
dried blood for up to seven days,
therefore making it more contagious
than AIDS. A major method of trans-
mission for hepatitis B is sexual inter-
course. Another method of transmis-
sion is using contaminated needles for
reasons such as intravenous drug use,
tattooing and ear and body piercing.
One other mode of transmission is
sharing personal items such as razors,
toothbrushes, and nail clippers.
Since anyone can contract hepati-
tis B, it is important to be able to rec-
ognize the symptoms. Before looking
at the symptoms, it is important to
note that about half of the people
infected with hepatitis B show no
symptoms. Approximately 49 percent
will have flu-like symptoms such as
tiredness, mild fever, loss of appetite,
aching muscles or joints, and nau-
seadiarrhea. Another symptom is
jaundice, a yellow appearance that
may develop on the eye or skin.
One percent of the people who
contract hepatitis B may develop liver
cancer or cirrhosis, which could prove
to be fatal. The Hepatitis B
Foundation in Pennsylvania claims
that 90 percent of those infected will
recover successfully through a natural
healing process. However, up to ten
percent will not recover successfully,
and it is next to impossible to predict
who will recover and who will not.
Since there is no cure for hepatitis
B, prevention is the key. Abstinence is
the best method for not contracting
hepatitis B through sexual contact.
However, if a. person insists on being
sexually active, correct use of a latex
condom is imperative. It is also impor-
tant to never use contaminated nee-
dles intended for medical or non-
medical purposes. Another technique
of prevention is to be certain not to
share personal items such as tooth-
brushes, razors or nail clippers.
Just as important, a low-fat, low
cholesterol, high fiber diet including
yellow vegetables, broccoli and cab-
bage is a great way to help your liver.
Also helpful is a professionally pre-
scribed exercise program.
One very important method used
for prevention is the hepatitis B infec-
tion vaccination. The hepatitis B vac-
cine is available at the ECU Student
Health Center at a reduced cost for all
three injections.
Since hepatitis B and many other
infectious diseases are contracted
largely through social relations, it is
important to communicate assertively
to other people that you do not want
to take part in certain social actions
such as having sex or allowing some-
one to use your shaving razor. Being
able to communicate "No" to other
people without offending them is a
large concern for many people. It is
very difficult to communicate "No"
white at the same time being discreet.
A sense of humor is one method
used to lessen the tension in a diffi-
cult situation while at the same time
effectively communicating the "No"
message. Within this mind set, a diffi-
cult situation has been composed in
question and answer format with a
possibly humorous answer
SEE HEALTH PAGE 9





8 Thursday, January 30. 1997
iiestyle
The East Carolinian
Parks offers advice
Gordon Parks, the director behind Shaft, serves es a true inspiration.
PHOTO COOTTRY OF TH� lirKMKT
NEW YORK (AP) - Gordon Parks,
the first black photographer for Life
magazine and the first black to
direct a mainstream Hollywood film,
thinks things will always be tough for
blacks. Just don't use it as an excuse.
"The doors are more readily open
for blacks getting into the arts
today Parks says in Sunday's Daily
News. "But I'm afraid racism will
never go away
The 84-year-old artist, novelist,
director, photographer, composer,
poet and screenwriter built his leg-
endary career on some solid parental
advice.
"My mom always said, 'If you're
going to be somebody, you have to
want to be somebody Parks said.
"If anything propelled me in my life,
it was that I wouldn't let bigotry
stand in my way. My daddy told me,
'Sometimes you have to waltz
around your enemy to fox-trot on his
back
Parks, who lives in New York, con-
tinues to write, paint and compose
music. He's also an inspirational
resource for young black artists.
"John Singleton, the young direc-
tor, was here the other night, asking
for some advice Parks said. "1 also
get notes from Spike (Lee) just to
say. 'I love you
Parks, who started working for
Life in the late 1940s, directed the
film version of his novel The Learning
Tree in 1969 and was the director of
1971 's penultimate blaxploitation
film, Shaft.
January
30 Thursday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Canadian West
at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. There will also be a theme
dinner at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Room.
Amsterdam at the Attic.
Conehead Buddha at Peasants
Cafe.
31 Friday
Faculty Recital: "Abendmusik
John B. O'Brien, harpsichord and
Perry Smith, tenor, at 5 p.m. in the
First Presbyterian Church, Greenville.
Faculty Recital: "Hymnus
Paradisii Janette Fishell, organist, at
8 p.m. in the First Presbyterian
Church, Kinston.
Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Scott
Carter, conductor, and Jazz Ensemble
A Carroll V Dashiell, Jr director, at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Feeling Minnesota at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre through Feb. 2.
Breakfast Club at the Attic.
Doxy's Kitchen at Peasants Cafe.
February
1 Saturday
University Unions Sponsored
Spades Tournament at 1 p.m. in 8A-E
Mendenhall.
Purple Schoolbus at the Attic.
The Pondering at Peasants Cafe.
2 Sunday
University Unions Sponsored
Chess Tournament at 1 p.m. in 8A-E
Mendenhall.
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series Added Attraction: Vienna
Choir Boys at 2 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
School of Music sponsored
Musicians Against AIDS: "Sounds of
Support a benefit concert for PICA-
SO (Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization) at 7 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
3 Monday
Faculty Recital: Piano Music of
William Gillock, Henry Doskey, piano,
at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
4 Tuesday
Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center sponsored focus on
film: Sankofa at 7 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre.
5 Wednesday
Faculty Recital: Peter Mills, saxo-
phone, at 8 p.m. in AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St ftftft Hours:
Pittman Building '3'uuu-5 Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC 8:00-4:00
The Nail Salon, Etc.
Tired of thick, yellow,
unnatural looking nails?
Ifso come see our staff,
for the NEW LOOK
for nails in 1997!
Silk Wraps
For a limited time, we will
remove your old product and
replace it with Silk for the cost
of a Full Set Save $25
Hurry because this offer
expires February 29,1997
LICENSED AMERICAN MANICURIST
FOLLOWING STATE SANITATION
PROCEDURES AND INSPECTIONS!
NO DRILLS
919-355-1661
3401 S. Evans St Ext.
Wesley Commons North Apartments
Langston Park Apartments
Tesley Commons South Apartments
Wyndham Court Apartments
ill ill) ilftliTMlU jiilil I ri33(D&3
Jl(ii ICS (312)103
On Site Management and Maintenance
On Site Laundry Facilities
Sand Volleyball Court
Party Pavillion
On ECU Bus Route
LoveLines
our key to a
alentine's Day
V to remember
You can win a "Perfect Valentine's Day" when you buy a
LoveLines ad. Just send your Valentine's Day greeting through
The East Carolinian and you're automatically entered to win the grand prize:
� Roses from Jefferson's Florist
� Dinner for two at Christine's in the Greenville Hilton
� Two passes to a movie at Carmike Cinemas
� Coffee and dessert at Barnes & Noble Cafe
Or win one of two additional Valentine's Day packages being given away. And it's all
FREE compliments of The East Carolinian
and our participating sponsors. We'll contact
the winner by phone on Tuesday, Feb. 11.
Christine's � Jefferson's Florist
Carmike Cinemas � Barnes & Noble
and more to come!
Complete w enfcy torn by canto) to Tht East CaroMan office. No porduse
3 C0MimTIISroRMJUU
"2 PAYrVrEWWOURWWUJBOXATTW
l
A professional management team that cares
Name
Address.
Phone.
ID
O N l Y F 1R S T N AM E S ORINITIALS MAYi E USED
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over 25 All ads192021222324
must be prepaid252627282930
Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Only first names or initials may be used. U � A D LI N E
The paper reserves the right to edit or omit any ad which is deemed objectionable, inappropriate, R9SBIBWI9W
obscene or misleading. No purchase is necessary to enter the contest. WmmMsMmMimBkm
II





9 Thursday, January 3Q. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
Vfednesday,Jsraiary29,1997
Sprite. Diet Coke or
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Chunk Light
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HEALTH
continued from page 7
Question: What do I tell someone if
they ask to borrow my toothbrush?
Answer Say something like, "No, I
saw in the newspaper where your
mouth was condemned by the health
department after you knocked out that
classroom of people with your stinking
breath
This is merely a suggestion intend-
ed for lessening a very difficult but pos-
sibly very dangerous situation while
communicating "No" at the same time.
This method of refusing people will not
work for everyone; however, it is impor-
tant to find your own personalized
method of refusing people. Remember,
there is no cure for hepatitis B, and it
may be life threatening
for more information on the vacci-
nation or hepatitis B in general, please
call the Student Health Service at 328-
6749.
EVITA
continued from page 7
one man at a time, to her political
awakening in fighting for the riits of
the lower classes of Argentina.
The narrative structure of this film
may throw many off, including fans of
the traditional musical, because the
entire story is told in song, including
most of the dialogue. Webber and
Rice make Evita more like Les
Miserable than The Musk Man. Going
into the film with such knowledge
allows one to better open up to the
film's style and mentality.
Also, a little historical knowledge
of Eva and Argentina wouldn't hurt.
The screenplay (written by ftrker
and Oliver Stone) effectively tells
Eva's story, but the more significant
elements of the film involve
Argentina's political and cultural his-
tory, and the facts are somewhat
blurred when told in song and dance.
But those criticisms are easily over-
looked once the film embraces you.
Rice and Webber work musical won-
ders together, creating many (for lack
of a better word) catchy songs that
should impress the Oscars this year.
While some songs seemed forced -
particularly when dialogue is spoken
in song - the music, which makes or
breaks any musical, ultimately lifts
Evita to the status of a modem epic.
Fitting neatly into their musical
roles are Madonna, Banderas and
Jonathan Pryce. Pryce is particularly
impressive in an understated perfor-
mance as the newly-elected
Argentinian leader Juan Peron, who
becomes Eva's lover and eventually
her husband.
While the film does paint Eva as a
force of good and justice, it doesn't
simply show one side of the story.
Playing the political leader and Cuban
revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Gucvar,
Antonio Banderas serves as the Greek
chorus that narrates and comments on
much of the narrative. With Banderas
(who stands out with his rebellious,
raspy vocal presence) firmly
entrenched in the film, there is always
a question as to what exactly moti-
vates Evita - the people or money and
fame.
Serving as the centerpiece of the
film. Madonna excels way beyond any
limitations she displayed in such films
as Who's That Gnior Desperately Seeking
Susan. Madonna makes love to the
camera with her classic movie star
beauty, her voice translates Rice's
lyrics with a natural case, and she, the
actress, just seems to be having the
time of her life. When watching
Madonna in this role, one clearly sees
a performer giving it her all.
Alan Parker (Mississippi Burning,
Angel Heart) turns in a tour-de-force of
direction by weaving the entire film
together into a coherent whole. Along
with cinematographer Darius Khondji,
he fills the wide screen with beauti-
fully composed images not seen
enough in most of mainstream cine-
ma. Thanks to Parker and Khondji,
Evita actually demands to be seen on
the widescrccn. When this film hits
video, a letterboxed version must be
released to keep the integrity of the
visuals intact.
Response to Evita has been over-
whelmingly positive. The film is doing
well at a very competitive box office,
and it won several major awards at this
year's Golden Globe Awards ceremo-
ny (including best musical or come-
dy)-
Hopefully, with the success of
Evita. future awards ceremonies will
have more musicals competing for
such an award.
VIENNA
continued from page 7
The Vienna Choir Boys, actually
four separate choirs, tour with 24 boys
ages ten to 14. Each of the choirs has its
own concertmastcr. nurse and prefect.
When not on tour, the boys live togeth-
er in a "school" environment in
Augartcn Palace in Vienna. They
receive schooling in subjects such as
music theory and instrument lessons,
as well as hours of practice and
rehearsal. Those who wish to pursue a
career with the Vienna Choir Boys
attend a special preparatory school and.
at age nine, take an examination. If
they pass, they might be allowed to
audition for any spots in the choir that
open up.
I wonder how these spots do open
up. It would be terribly mean to kick a
kid to the curb on his 15th birthday.
(Sorry son, you're just too old.) It turns
out that once the boys' voices start to
crack, they are retired to studio apart-
ments on the grounds of Augartcn
Palace and are allowed to continue their
education. The whole deal sounds
pretty cushy to me.
The concert consists of three parts,
secular music, non-secular, and a mini-
operetta. In the past, the Vienna Choir
Boys have been known to do a delight-
ful rendition of a Richard Rossmaycr
comedic opera concerning a prince who
visits a local man expecting to meet his
beautiful daughters, and instead meets
his cross-dressing sons. If you ask me,
they couldn't have picked a more
appropriate selection. Whatever the
opera, the boys make use of their beau-
tiful voices, superb costumes and nat-
ural playfulness to have fun and enter-
tain the audience.
The Vienna Choir Boys will be arriv-
ing at ECU for a Sunday afternoon per-
formance at 2 p.m. as an added attrac-
tion for the S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series. Tickets arc $7
for ECU students with a valid ID and
$12 for ECU faculty and staff. All tick-
ets at the door will be $15. The show
starts at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Don't miss this opportunity to see a
world tradition in person.
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Thursday, January 30.1997
spo
The East Carolinian
Streak of victories continues
TRACY LAL'BACH
SENIOR WRITER
JACKSON COUNSELS DENNIS RODMAN
CHICAGO (AP) - The Rev. Jesse Jackson, after counseling Dennis Rodman,
wants the NBA to immediately reinstate the misbehaving Chicago Bulls for-
Jackson planned to meet with commissioner David Stem today in New York
to plead the case for Rodman, who was suspended at least 11 games for kicking
a courtside cameraman on Jan. 15. �
NBA spokesman Brian Mclntyre said, "No such meeting is scheduled.
"Like everybody else, I don't condone Dennis' action Jackson told the
Chicago Sun-Times on Tuesday. "I want to convey to the commissioner my sen-
timent and the sentiments of a growing number of people that Dennis has
already been punished enough for the very act in question
The Bulls' 111-96 victory Tuesday night at Vancouver was the sixth game ot
the suspension, which will cost Rodman more than $1.1 million " salary He also
was fined $25,000 by the league, and he has agreed to pay a $200,000 out-ot-
court settlement to Minneapolis cameraman Eugene Amos.
COWBOYS OWNER OWES IRS
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) - The Internal Revenue Service claims Dallas
Cowbovs owner Jerry Jones and his wife owe $8.3 million in back taxes and
penalties from 1992, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported today.
The newspaper said Jones and his wife. Gene, are contesting the matter in
U.S. Tax Court, with the couple's tax lawyers saying that such disputes with the
IRS are not uncommon and won't affect the team.
An IRS spokesman would not comment on the case, but an IRS lawyer told
the newspaper about 95 percent of tax disputes are settled before they reach a
tax court judge for a ruling.
The IRS told the Joneses in October that they were liable for $1Z.8 million
in total taxes in 1992, but said they paid less than $5.9 million. The government
agency said the Joneses understated their 1992 income by $23.4 million, listing
it as $19 million when it should have been $42.4 million.
The disputed income involved the sale of 49 percent of the stock in lexas
Stadium Corp. to Pro Seat Limited Partnership and dividends from Texas
Stadium Corp. and its subsidiaries.
AUTHORITIES WON'T PRESS CHARGES AGAINST
: WELLS
:
SAN DIEGO (AP) - New York Yankees pitcher David Wells will not face charges
JJn connection with a fight that left two other men injured, the distnct attorney
said Tuesday.
' Wells and a male companion fought with two men Jan. 12 after they thought
hat two other men had taken the keys to Wells' car. Wells broke his left hand in
Jthe altercation.
"We will not file any criminal charges against David Wells in connection with
San incident outside an Ocean Beach bar said District Attorney spokeswoman
tGayle Falkenthal. . �. �
j Wells signed a $13.5 million, three-year contract with the Yankees last
fmonth.
Robinson didn't say whether Wells and his companion each threw punches.
, Wells, 6-foot-4 and 225 pounds, went to Point Loma High in San Diego and
lives in Florida. He apparently was in California for his mother's funeral,
?Robinson said.
� Wells, 33, was 11-14 with a 5.14 ERA for the Baltimore Onoles last year.

� RALIEGH BEING SUED FOR SECRET MEETING ABOUT
: NEW ARENA
The Lady Pirates8-10, 3-5 in the GA) are
on a roll as they claimed their third consecu-
tive win on Tuesday evening in a non-confer-
ence battle against Coastal Carolina (5-12
overall).
The Pirates controlled the lead throughout
the entire duration of the game, and were lead
by Justine Allpress and Jen Cox, who turned in
20 and 18 points each respectively.
Two and a half minutes into the game,
Allpress sunk a three-point field goal to put
ECU ahead by 12. The others were both put
in during the first half of play by Misty Home,
who played with all of her heart for a total of
35 minutes in the ballgame.
The Chanticleers, lead by Jackie Kershaw
and Lori Gray, were never quite able to gain
control at any time during the first half of the
game. Allpress put in a 10-foot jump shot at
the buzzer to end the first half 15 points
ahead with a score of 41-26.
Coastal Carolina came back strong in the
second half to turn the game around. The
Chanticleers managed to put all 17 of their
attempted free throws through the hoop in
the second half.
Aside from one completed free throw from
Tracey Kelley, the Pirates did not put any
numbers on the scoreboard in the second half
until, with 11:33 remaining, Kelley sunk a 16-
foo u
Meanwhiu ral Carolina was racking
in -)int after pc it. i lly Shutters put up a
12-foot jup shot with 11:11 left on rhe clock
to put her team behird by oru.� one point with
a score of 44-43.
Allpress. Kelley and Cox ans. red with
confidence and consistency that enabled the
Pirates to increase their lead once again to a
score of 56-47 with 3:01 of game time remain-
ing.
With 1:18 left on the clock and a six point
Pirate lead. Coastal Carolina's Meredith
Luebbers sent a three pointer into the basket.
Seconds later, teammate Kershaw fouled, and
Cox was sent to the line to shoot one-and-one.
Immediately after Cox missed her shot,
Allpress fouled and Coastal Carolina's
Lindsey Blossom was sent to the foul line to
shoot. She nailed both of her shots, and with
less than a minute of play time left, ECU led
bv onlv two points.
With 45.9 seconds until the buzzer, the
Chanticleers gained two with a 12-foot jumper
by Gray, and the game was sent into overtime.
With five more minutes put on the clock
and a tied score of 58-58, the victory was in
the hands of either team.
Kelley, 50 seconds into overtime, put two
points on the board for ECU. Seconds later,
the opponents were given the opportunity to
respond with four free throws, all of which
were completed. Cox came back in the end
and sunk two free throws of her own along
with a shot from underneath. Danielle Melvin
ended the game with two shots from the line
SEE BASKETBALL. PAGE 12
Beth Jaynes goes up for two of her six points in Tuesday's 70-64 win
over Coastal Carolina.
PHOTO 61 CHRIS GAV00SH
Rugby tradition continues for a new season
JRALEIGH (AP) - News organizations sued Raleigh Mayor Tom Fetzer and four
"City council members Tuesday over an alleged secret meeting to talk about a
'proposed hockev arena.
� The News & Observer in Raleigh, Capitol Broadcasting Corp which owns
IWRAL-TV; ABC. which owns WTVD-TV; NBC, which owns WNCN-TV;
�WLFL-TV, the Fox affiliate; the North Carolina Press Association and the North
�Carolina Association of Broadcasters are the plaintiffs in the suit.
I The lawsuit contends Fetzer and city officials violated the state's Open
jMeetings Law by discussing the arena while watching a college basketball game
Jon Jan. 19 at a private home.
"We have every reason to believe that the mayor and four other council mem-
bers broke the law, and we want to make sure that under oath, they can prove
they didn't break the law said Fred Crisp, publisher of The News & Observer.
A day earlier, Geoff Elting, who served three terms on the city council, filed
suit against Fetzer and City Council members Paul Coble, John Odom, Marc
Scruggs Jr. and Kieran Shanahan.
STADIUM EXPANSION COULD BE HALTED
SAN DIEGO (AP) - At least two cities have contacted the NFL about hosting
the San Diego Chargers next season should a controversial expansion of Jack
Murphy Stadium be halted by a referendum, team president Dean Span.os said
Tuesday night.
Spanos wouldn't elaborate, saying he hadn't talked directly to representatives
from other cities. However, a source told The Associated Press that a city in the
Los Angeles area and Houston would be interested in hosting the Chargers
should the expansion project be stopped.
Los Angeles lost the Raiders and Rams two seasons ago, and the Oilers plan
to move from Houston to Nashville in 1998.
San Diego also is in danger of losing the 1998 Super Bowl, and competition
for the game is heating up among Pasadena, Calif Detroit; Minneapolis, and
Tempe, Ariz the source said.
NFL officials did not return telephone calls Tuesday seeking comment.
The 10,000-seat expansion, which includes additional skyboxes and club
seating, plus a new practice site for the Chargers, has been wrapped in contro-
versy since the City Council approved the deal in May 1995.
TRAVIS NEWKIRK
STAFF WRITER
What do you get when you cross the
game of soccer with the game of foot-
ball? This may sound like the begin-
ning of a cheesy joke, but this is actu-
ally true. The answer is rugby.
Rugby is fairly new in the U.S. as
compared to the rest of the world.
Rugby started in Europe around the
same time as soccer. The dimensions
of the field are similar to that of a soc-
cer and football field, i he rugby
field's length is 100-meters long and
60-meters wide. This does not
include two 10 meter end zones. The
field also includes goalposts, just like
in football.
When it comes to rules, that is
where things get interesting. The
only equipment in the game of rugby
is cleats, long socks, jerseys and a ball.
No pads are allowed.
Each team has 15 players on the
field at a time. There are no time-outs
or substitutions, unless a player is
hurt. Rugby has two 40-minute halves
with a five minute half time. The
biggest rule that a person may notice
is that a player can't pass the ball for-
ward. When passing to a teammate, it
must be a lateral. Contrary to belief,
fighting is not allowed.
The object of the game is simple.
The offensive team tries to advance
the ball toward the defensive goal
line. When the offensive man crosses
the goal line, this is called a tri. In
order for the score to count, the ball
must be touched down on the ground.
This is equivalent to a touchdown in
football. A tri is worth five points, and
the point after tri is worth two points.
ECU has had its own rugby team
SEE RUGBY PAGE 12
The ECU rugby team sports a rich tradition in winning. On Saturday they will host camp Leieune at 1 p.m. at the Allied Health Fields
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ECU RUGBY
Students enjoy new facility
TRIVIAtime
��-�� �VVWv�
Question: When was the last time the ECU
men's basketball team won the CAA champi-
onship title and who did they defeat on their
way to the top? Who was the team they faced
in the first round of the NCAA tournament?
L9SR Wllmv inwQ � (rfwmj.i
jmoiitmimwtu w) 'fMp4t mipjrr) quotf iti tim go �Mf ('jq
jitj jij mw o (fp-ft i WttPVm'4Pm 0SSS tfuiiufl U JNil Pm
tfixis 19Unaopm-fmumgofmpaqOtj fggi wmjmCiu Msasuy
STEVE LOSEY
STAFF WRITER
After a long wait, ECU's new Student
Recreation Center opened to a flood
of students eager for a place to work
out. Students agree that the Rec
Center has surpassed their expecta-
tions. The wide variety of activities
available allows students the freedom
to exercise however they wish.
"It's like Club Med freshman
Josh Briggs said. "It makes exercising
a lot more fun
The rec center is drawing a varietv
of people. Some work out religiously,
while others have let their exercise
slack off and are seeking to make
amends. The others just play a pick-
up game of basketball or racquetball
now and then.
A large part of the student body
has found themselves going whenever
they have some spare time. The ele-
vated track is always full of joggers
and the pool has more than its fair
share of swimmers doing lap after lap.
The weights and nautilus equipment
are heavily frequented.
The Center Court is also an addi-
tion that is drawing crowds. It offers
low fat drinks to thirsty patrons after
their workout and can get as busy as
the other features rhe rec center has
to offer.
"It gets real busy around 6 p.m.
and 10:30 p.m said Center Court
Employee Travis Peterson.
The only objections people have
are minor. Some students have found
the size of the rec center overwhelm-
inS-
"It would be nice if the weight
room was divided into sections
freshman Sala Ray said.
Another student Jason Burkett
was disappointed by the policies
regarding racquetball court reserva-
tions.
"You can only reserve them one
dav in advance Burkett said.
Burkett suggested a more open pro-
cedure which allowed students to
make plans two or three days ahead of
time. There also have been problems
on the track with walkers getting in
the way of runners.
Nobody knows whether the mad
rush to the rec center is just a fad or a
genuine move by ECU'S students
toward a more physically fit lifestyle.
But tor now, it seems, a stop at the rce
center has become a regular habit tor
most of ECU'S population.
Meet prepares team for season
ZlNA BRILEY
STAFF WRITE
This past weekend the Pirate track
team competed in Tennessee for the
USAir Invitational.
ECU. East Tennessee, Francis
Marion. Illinois. Southern
Methodist, Virginia Tech. Life
College. UNO-Chapel Hill. South
Carolina. Duke. Marshall, demon,
Appalachian St. and JMt) met virh
40 other schools at East Tennessee
University for the meet.
The Pirate Sprint Squad and the
Lady Pirares Track and Field Team
met with over 50 schools from all
over the southeast for the Jan. 24-25
invitational. On the men's side, there
was big competition, but the Pirates
prevailed and had a respectable
meet.
The Men's 4x400 meter relav fin-
ished fourth overall. Titus Hay-good
and Vaughn Monroe finished well in
the men's 60-meter dash, and as for
the rest of the Pirates, they aie defi-
nitely looking forward to rhis week-
end's meet in Kentucky.
"This was the second worse
I men's meet in Iast Carolina history
We definitely have work to do
Head Coach Bill Carson said.
On the ladies side, once again the
veterans led the way for the Lad
Pirates. Amanda Johnson won her
heat in the women's 60-meter dash
and placed 11th in the women's
Longjump to finish up the weekend
The other bright spot for the
weekend was Michelle Clayton.
Clavton finished ninth out of a field
of 20 in the women's 20
poundsvveght throw and a set school
record in the women's shot wi
throw of 44-9, beating the old
by a half an inch. The throv
a personal record for (das
qualifies her for F.CC
Vs for the other l.ad I
everyone had a decent meet k r ti
the heavy competition.
"We didn't run well for difl
reasons, but we'll bounce back. This
meet served as a motivator to get us
readv tor Virginia Tech Head Coach
"(Ihoo" Justice said.
The sprint squad will trr
Kentucky this weekend an I
compete in the University ol
Kentucky Im i tional I
will v





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1 p.m.
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REMINDER
The man's and woman't swim teams wl
host their final home meet of the season
this Saturday. Feb. 1. The swimmers wil hit
the pool at 1 p.m. ind will face the Virginia
Tech Hokies. Tha meat is free to students
and will be held in the Minges Aquatic
RUSH
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
National Co-Ed Fraternity
Informational Meetings:
Tuesday, February 4
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 221 2nd Floor
8:00 pm
Wednesday, February 5
Methodist Center on 5th Street
Dinner Social beginning at 6:30 pm
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12 Thursday. January 30. 1997
RUGBY
continued, from page 10
since 1975. Rugby at ECU is a club
'sport and doesn't receive any
�money from the F.Cl' athletic
department. The rugby team does
Receive assistance and funding
through Intramural Sport Services,
which raises money from fund-
monev through
John Masborougn. i lu-yearvet-
has toured urope w hilc
playing rugby.
, "lntramur;iK has worked hard to
gee us where we are today
1 lasborougri said. "We appreciate
the help of those guys. Other rugby-
teams don't have this kind of sup-
port
Support and recognition is what
the team is seeking. Most people
4re unaware of the tradition of the
ECU rugby team. The team has
won the last six out of seven state
championships, including five in a
row (92-). In 1994 the team
finished eighth in the nation while
advancing to the sweet 16 in the
national tournament.
The majority of the guys who
pj rugby left a sport that they
: BASKETBALL
continued from page 10
that put the Pirates ahead bv six
with a final score of 70-64.
Just seconds before Vlelvin was
sent to the line to shoot, Allpress
was dribbling the ball toward Pirate
territory when Kelley suddenly
called a time-out. Allpress lost con-
trol of herself and the ball as she
began to slow down, and fell to the
floor with what is believed to be a
sprained ankle With a little rest,
she believes that she will be set and
ready to go for Sunday's matchup
against I NC Wilmington.
ch Donovan was proud of the
girls for stepping up and fighting
hard when Mlpress went down.
"The team relies so much on
Jftstine both offensively and defen-
sively it was good for the other girls
oh the team to have to step up and
get the job done without her
Donovan said.
Allpress was named CAA player-
of-the-week this week for her out-
standing contribution to the ECU
victories claimed over JMU and
v"C.i last week.
Donovan complimented Coastal
Carolina's determination and ability
uo pull themselves out of the hole
iftei half-time.
�Coastal Carolina's gir1- �� r
their composure out on the court
ind kept fighting until the end
Donovan said. "Putting the game
into overtime and not giving up is a
tribute to their team
Donovan was disappointed with
nc overall offensive playing dis-
jlaved by che girls, but to her, the
tin I what matters the most.
; "The second half was just a poor
JO minutes of shooting Donovan
Jid. "Bur I think it's a good thing
that poorly offensively and
� walk away with a win. It's not a
Jo minutes any of us evrir wants to
i iiyin. but we survived it, and
that's what's impon
The second half �: 1AA play will
Begin for the Lady Pirates on
Sunday as they take on the
j hawks (1-5 in the CAA)in
! Imington. ECU heads into the
hup with hopes of continuing
i winning streak. They also
rart off the second half of
:h strength that will
ip in the end.
sport
The East Carolinian
loved to try something new. Two of
these players are Mickey Crawford
and John Oathout.
"Rugby is a good way to stay in
shape and release aggression
Crawford said.
Oathout learns something new
each time he plays.
"I pick up a new trick of the
trade every time I play the game
Oathout said.
Life is not over for an ECU
rugby player after graduation.
There are several different rugby-
leagues that a player can get into.
The problem with these leagues is
that a player doesn't get paid. The
hope is for the United States to
start a 12 team league that plays a
series of games between them-
selves, and eventually play the
championship game on the ABC or
ESPN networks.
Even though rugby is a rough
sport and is seen as barbaric, it's
actually a gentleman's sport with a
lot of comradery. There are no hard
feelings towards players on the
opposing team after the game.
Come check out the ECU
rugby team this Saturday when
rhey play Camp Lejeune at the
Allied Health field at 1 p.m.
If you have any questions or
want to join the ECU rugby team
call John at 355-6817.
MARK A. WARD
Attorney at Law
DWI, Traffic And Felony Defense
NC Bar Certified Specialist in State
Criminal Law
24 Hour Message Service
752-7529
�, i
; ii
i. i
r-
; i ;

. I
10
sodium nitrite
30�
animal fat
8
you don't want
to know

: �
�. i
Next Friday
The
Backdoors
I
209 E. 5st.
Greenville, NC
752-7303
Thursday
Amsterdam
Papa Oliver's Pizxo Special
$1.50 Bud Light
Friday
Breakfast Club
25 Draft
1-800-COLLECT
Wo
SAVINGS
Saturday
PUE.PLE-
CTiJ�7�?L&U
2S Draft
Sunday
IAJR
8 PM - UNTIL
Next Week
thursday
Brilliance
Dial 1-800-COLLECT and save up to 44:
'For long stinco c
ills. Sitings disk in i 3-iinti �TJ ogium iiiHi iilinuu eil1





13 Thursday, January 30.1997
classifieds
For Sale
p
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
t bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
2 AND S BEDROOM house on the cor-
ner of 5th and Lewis. Call Wainright
HmMbrnvu in
now or sub-lease for summer. Four bed-
room house on 406 Rotary Avenue. 2
houses from center of campus. Call Jason
orjamie it 752-3552.
OWE BEDMXMUI APT. FOR sub-lease.
Tbwer Village Acts, wd hookup, dish-
washer, large dock patio. Lease ends Jury
31, 1W. $320month. Call 321-0628.
M?l�CRcMMaTE WANTKb:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today!
321 -7613. Very Affordable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NKHdHD
IMMEDIATELY to share two bedroom
duplex. $207month. Located behind
Papa Johns on Brownlea Drive. Free
cablet Call Misty 754-2169 leave mes-
fto&MMATE NEEDED For Two
bedroom townhouse near campus. Bus
goes to gym and campus. $225month.
Call 1-910-674-6489.
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARK
two bedroom duplex, wd with neat, seri-
ous anthropology student. $275 12 utili-
ties. Please call Virginia at 756-5340 or
758-9437
yVAMTED: GRADUATE STUDENT
SEEKING 1 male housemate $170mo.
Includes utilities. Close co campus. Call
Kevin 75Z-S557.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today
32! -7613. Very Affordable!
NA6� HEAP, HC- 0ET your group to-
gether early. Two houses in excellent con-
dition; fully furnished; washer & dryer,
dishwasher, central AC; available May 1
through August 3t; sleeps6 -$1600.00 per
month; sleeps 8 -$2200.00 per month
flOTXEofviEW APARTMENTS
TWO bedrooms, stove, refrigerator, basic
cable, washer dryer hook-ups, central heat
and air. All apartments on ground level.
Call 931-0790.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE ON Lewis Street
needs subleasers for summer! Cute, spa-
cious and close to campus! Call 758-2154
FEmmtcffiMMATE NEEDED
TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE, 21
2 BATH, POOL, ON ECU BUS LINE.
PLEASE CALL 7S2-0813.
MALE 6ft "EMALE ROOMMATE
needed as soon as possible. Spacious 5
bedroom house has only 3 occupants and
a Dalmatian. Close to campus. We're cool.
Realty, 757-9683
TAKE 6VER LEASE 2 bedroom ,t
Wesley Commons, $405 per month plus
deposit, wd hook-up, on ECU bus line.
Open Immediately call 830-9162. Leave
m
QUEEN WATERBED SUITE HAS
cabinets and lighted bridge with 6 drawer
pedestal $350 or best offer 756-9639.
AT&T IBM COMPATIBLE PC 8MB
rain 540mb HD 14.4 modem, monitor,
pri'iter, keyboard, mouse, msoffice soft-
ware, games, etc. $500BO. Call (919)527-
5237, anytime.
W i X 61CW CHROME SPLIT 5 star
rimswtires. 4 lug- came off of CRX. 6
months old. Call Tracy 551-1363. SiOOO.
TABLE AND 2 CHAIRS, gft exercise
bike, $15. Call and leave message 353-
1698
ARC GERMAN ROTTWEILERS 9
WEEKS. $250 and up. Champion blood-
line. CaH 919-353-7174.
Travel
t?
Help
Wanted
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
party Cruise! 6 days $279! Includes all
meals, parties & taxes! Great Beaches &
Nightlife! Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
sprinclbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
KlNo BREAK 97 - D6NT be left
out, space limited Panama City and
Daytona Beach, Florida from $129. Call
STS�l-800-648-4jM9formoieinfo
out, space limited Cancun and Jamaica
from $429. Call STS 9 1-800-648-4849
for more info.
AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING BREaK!
panama City! room with kitchen near bars
$119! Daytona-Best Location $139!
Florida's new hotspot-Cocoa Beach Hilton
$169! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
AaaA! CANCUN ic JAMAICA SPRING
break specials! 7 nights air & hotel from
$429! Save $150 on food, drinks 8c free
parties! 111 lowest price guarantee!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
WOTTNT5FEMALE
ROOMMATE wanted. Fully furnished.
Would have own bath. Located in
Dockstde $300 per month 12 of utilt-
ties. Call 752-1074. Available Now!
sTurrro�apartment�at
RINGGOLD Towers available for sub-
lease, $310month, fully furnished. Cad
(919) 552-9293 or call Ringgold Towers
Mtmt. - 752-2865.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE!
SHORT walk to campus. Woodltwn Apts.
- next to AOTT house. 3 bedrooms, 2 12
baths - mint condition. 5th Street Square
- uptown, above BW3,3 bedrooms, 2 12
baths, sunken living area. Also available a
2 bedroom above BW3 and above
Uppercrust Bakery available Jan. 1st for
$475.00 - $500month. Luxury Apart-
ments. Available now! Will ease for De-
cember or January (6 mo. or year leases
available) Also available - "The Beauty
Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment If you see
it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: TWoBEB-
ROOM APT. at Whyndam Court $202.50
plus 12 of the utilities. Please call 413-
0514. .
ffi For Sale
THE EAST CAROLINIAN IS NOW HIR-
ING A PRODUCTION ASST. PLEASE
APPLY AT OUR OFFICE ON THE SEC-
OND FLOOR OF THE STUDENT
PUBS. BLDG. ACROSS FROM JOYNER
OCCASIONAL SITTING NEEDED
FOR children - ages 3 and 6 months. Pre-
fer graduate student with Tuesday or
Thursdays free. Call 355-7875.
BU5INESSMARKETINC STU-
DENTS: NATIONAL Communications
Company is coming to Greenville, Part-
time job opportunities. Get paid for ex-
cellent experience in your field while at-
tending East Carolina University. Call
888-605-0906
WARREN'S HOT' DOCS NOW ac-
cepting applications. Part-time third shift
12:00 am-8:00 am. Very flexible. Please
contact Jan at 752-3647.
$iM5 WEEKLY POTENTIAL MAIL-
ING our circulars. For info call 301-429-
N0W HIRING FOR SUMMER W
Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards, Pool Man-
agers, Swim Lessons Instructors, Swim
Coaches. Summer positions available in
Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh, NC,
Greenville, and Columbia, SC areas, call
Carolina Pool Management at (704) 541-
9303. In Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool
Management at (770)992-7765.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
VERY FUN work - flexible part-time
hours (mostly eves, and weekends). Must
have outgoing personality and reliable
transportation. Own 35mm SLR camera
a plus, but not essential. No experience
necessary, we train. $7.00 per hour. Call
Sara or Tbsha 1-800-722-7033 12-5 pm.
TELESERV1CE REPRESENTATIVE
NEEDED FOR office furniture com-
pany. Structured program. Skills; people
person, comfortable talking on the tele-
phone, enjoys selling. Call 931-6904 and
t?e'gTeeRville recreation
Ac PARKS Department is recruiting 12 to
16 part-time youth soccer coaches for the
spring indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and week-
end coaching. Flexible with hours accord-
ing to class schedules. This program will
run from the first of March to the first of
May. Salary rates start at $4.75 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
Wf)p n Bdke for
Sprinq Break 1997
C�Kn DqHw
ATTENTION cYCLINO ENTHUSI-
ASTS! '97 trek 470 road bike, 150-200 mi.
52" shimano RX components, ergo-
shifters for comfort Excellent "first bike
upgrade used, quality. (752-6993).
T0V6TA ThECEL IM6 45P i33,666
miles accass $2,200, sony receiver dolby
prologic 180 watts $250, sony cd 5 disc
$130, 5 piece speaker system $300. Cat
David 328-7706.
(A) IS X 1 ALUMINUM CRAND prix
racing 5 star rims wtires. 4 lug came off
of cnt Call Tracy 551-1363. $400.
HOME CROWN SM0K1N1 Jams Cb
now available at CD Alley! Featuring:
Percy Hill, yep Ekoostik Hookah,
Grinch, Schleigho, Pondering & many
more. Music for the head.
lames or Michael Daly at 830-4550.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MUST
be 18 years old. Eam great money while
you team playmates massage. Snow Hill,
NC 747-7686.
EARN $6,666 THIS SUMMER, by-
namic Company now interviewinghiring
ambitious, entrepreneurial students to fill
summer management positions in your
hometown. For more information and to
schedule an interview call Tuition Paint-
ers 1(800) 393 -4521.
IF YOU ARE SEEKING part-time em-
ployment with an established company,
then look no further. ONLINE Collec-
tions has just landed several collection
accounts and has an immediate need for
telephone collectors. Applicant must be
aggressive, serf motivated, and poses ex-
cellent communication skills. If inter-
ested, please contact Chris Murphy at
754-1615 after 12 pm or Craig Jackson at
757-2134 after 5 pm. Only serious appli-
cants need to apply.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN
EXTRA cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Midwest Distributors, P.O. Box 624,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate response.
WHJaiffiP
It.mTOKS-MlSUUKTS
On CaWog Today w�i Visa MCof COD
810-3510222
Or, rusH $2.0010 - , WwC
mMnto.fX6-m.UBkylm.CAXXte
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina �Uojr Sports
CaH tor Fret
info Paean I
l-MO-426-77101
�SCUBA
SPECIAL
MASK, FINS, SNORKEL
RotcoN $179.90
ECU Student Special
$99.99
BLUE REGION
SCUBA
26 Carolina East Contra
GroonvRo 321-2670

MOlt
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Cat I -100-iT-rAtS-TO.
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Cancun '399
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1

Lost and
Found
Services
Offered
PftEE P6ft ECU STUDENT! Would
you like to put your resume or a classified
ad on the internet for free? We offer ser-
vices including resume designing and
internet access. If you are interested in
any of these, visit our Website at HTTP:
WWW.NCGALLERIA.COM or call
754-2171 for more information.
Announcements Announcements!
� I
FREE T-SHIRT Ii6d6 Credit TSSk
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus organization can raise
up to $1000 by earning a whopping $5.00
VISA application. CaH 1-800-932-0528
ext. 65 Qualified callers receive Free T-
Shirt.
ELEM WCSm IS HofiTlNo a 3C
lastic book fair Feb. 3rd through 7di, 9 am
to 4pm in Speight room 202. Come check
Intimate issues for mun &
Women with Diabetes" February 3,1997.
Free program sponsored by Pitt Co. Chap-
ter American Diabetes Association.
Gaskin-Lealie Center next to Pitt Co.
Memorial Hospital � 7 pm. For more info
call 816-5136 from 8-4pm Mon-Fri or 1-
800-682-9692.
ITS N6 LONGER NECESSARY 'I'D
borrow money for college. We can help
you obtain funding. Thousands of awards
available to all students, immediate quali-
fication 1-900-651-3393.
Or- Personals
OVER A LATTE AT THE Beanbag
Cafe on 3rd Jams. She touched my spirit
with her sensuous brown eyes and exotic
good looks. It was her spirit, her words
& her stories that changed me. I wanted
her -

Greek
Personals
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGA-
NIZATION will meet on Thursday, Janu-
ary 30th, 1997 at 5:00 pm in GCB Room
1003. All honor students and students
with a 3.3 GPA are invited to attend. For
more info call Yaqooh Mohyuddin at 758-
Votl ARE INVITED To the 1st
monthly ECU International Coffee Hour
for International Faculty, Students and
Staff. Join us on Friday, January 31,1997
from 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm. Ledonia Wright
African American Cultural Center
(Bfoxton House)
CIRCLE R CLUB; FOCUSING on the
Future for Children. Come team about
our community service organization here
on Campus, Thursday, January 30; 7:00
pm Mendenhall Social Room.
THE DEPARTMENT 6F COMMU-
NICATION Sciences and Disorders will
be providing the speech, language and
hearing screening for students who are
fulfilling requirements for admission to
Upper Division on February 3, 4, 8c 5,
1997 from 5:00-6:00 pm each day. These
are the only screening dates during the
Spring Semester. The screening will be
conducted in the Belk Annex (ECU
Speech and Hearing Clinic) located next
to the Belk Building (School of Allied
Health Sciences), near the intersection of
Charles Street and the 264 by-pass. No
appointment is needed - Please do not call
their office for an appointment Waiting
is outside the clinic waiting room. Sign
in begins at 4:50 p.m. Screenings are con-
ducted on a first come, first serve basis.
THE OFFICE OP HEALTH Promotion
and Weil-Being has moved! We are now
located in Whtehard 210. Our resource
room has many types of up-to-date refer-
ences on issues such as health, sexuality,
nutrition, alcohol, and other drags. Ref-
erences include pamphlets, brochures,
books, videos, audiotapes, and newslet-
ters. Visit our other Resource Room at
our Web Site: www.ecu.eduhpwb
home.htm Call for more information S28-
ABliLT STUDENTS 'I'D r'IND out
the latest information of concern to you,
sign up for the adult student listserv
ADULTSTU. Just bring your e-mail ad-
dress to 211 Whkhard. If you have any
questions, call 328-6881.
THE flREENVILLE-H'H1 COUN'H
Special Olympics will be conducting an
Athletics (Track 8t Field) Coaches Train-
ing School on Saturday, February 1st from
9am - 4pm for ail individuals interested
in volunteering to coach Track tt Field.
Wc are also looking for volunteer coaches
in the following sports: Swimming, Bowt-
ing. Gymnastics, Rollerskating,
Powerlifting, Volleyball, and Equestrian.
No experience ia necessary. For more in-
formation please contact Dwain Cooper
at 830-4844 or Dean For at 830-4541.
CHI 6MECA, LAMBDA CHI, W Kapp.
Alpha, We had a great time getting to-
gether at the Quad last Wed. We always
love hanging out with you! Love Alpha
Delta Pi.
C6NCRATULATI6NS BECKY ON
YOUR lavalier from Reid. We're all so
excited for you! Love, your Alpha Delta
Pi Sisters.
IF YCU'RE TIRED 6F BE with Suys
in ties, and just want to relax, rush Sigma
Pi. Thanks for everything Alpha XI Delta,
you girls are the best!
LAURA, WE'RE ALL 56 happy for you!
Congratulations on your lavalier from
Wade. We love you! Love your. Alpha
Delta Pi sisters.
CHI 6MECA, KApPA ALPHA, Phi TiS
Thanks for a great time Friday night at
the Quad. Can't wait to do it again! Love,
K-N-E-A-D A FRIEND RELAXATION
Massage Workshop - Instructor Debra
Casebere, LMT of the Massage & Body-
work Center of Eastern Carolina. Fee is
$70couple (This includes instruction,
handbook and oil). All work will be taught
in pairs. You "Need" a friend to
"KNEAD" a friendeveryone is wel-
come! Saturday, February 15,1997,9:00
am until 1:00 pm. Location St Peter's
Catholic Church Parish Hall, 2700 E. 4th
Street, Greenville, NC For more infor-
mation or to register call Debra at 919-353-
1121 ext 1. You must preregister, walk-
ins not accepted. Your registration will be
confirmed by phone or mail. Class size is
limited. If this program is full, you will
be offered an alternate date.
THE MoNTHLYMEETINCOF THE
adult Student Association will be held
Wednesday, Feb. 5 1997 at 4:00 in !
208 Whichard. All adult students age ;
and older are invited to attend. Call 328-
6881 for more information.
NEWCRflANIZATrONTol
dies Elite" Minority Women who want
to serve our community while promoting
Sisterhood and Academic Excellence.
Interest meeting Thursday, January 30,
1997, GCB 1010 7:00 pm Business Dress.
ECTJ LAW sreiETVw-ANT'i'o JOIN
a school organization that's fun and inter-
esting? Try the Law Society. Our meet-
ing is on Monday, Feb. 3rd at 5:15 pm in
Ragsdale Room 130. We will have elec-
tions for all offices and the society is open
to all majors.
WEP JAN ft- FACULTY Recital, Pe-
ter Mills, saxophone, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, &00 pm Thurs Jan. 30 - Guest Re-
cital, Roger McVey, piano, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm Fri-Sat, Jan. 31-Feb.
1 - ECU Religious Arts Festival a two-day
event celebrating excellence and creativ-
ity in religious arts, Janettc Fishell, Di-
rector, for information call 328-6851 (In-
cludes three public concerts:) Fri Jan. 31
- Faculty Recital, "Abendmusik John B.
O'Brien, harpsichord. Perry Smith, tenor.
First Presbyterian Church, 1400 S. Elm
St 5:00 pm. Fri Jan. 31 - Faculty Re-
cital: "Hymnus Paradiaii" Janette Fishell,
organ, First Presbyterian Church, North
Heritage Street, Kinston, 8:00 pm. Sat,
Feb. 1 - "Hymn Festival" The Memorial
Baptist Church, 1510 Greenville Blvd.
Southeast, Greenville, 4:00 pm Fri Jan.
31 - Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Scott
Carter, Conductor and Jazz Ensemble A,
Carroll V. DaahieH, Jr Director, Wright
Auditorium, 8:00 pm Sac, Feb. 1 - East-
ern District High School and Junior High
Honors Bend Concert, Wright Audito-
rium, 7:00 pm Sun Feb. 2 - Musicians
Against Aids: A Benefit for PICASO (Pitt
County AIDS Service Organization). AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm. (Tickets
$10 - at door, or m advance from PICASO,
830-1660, or East Coast Musk and Video)
Mon Feb. 3 - Faculty Recital: Henry
Doskey, piano, "Piano Music of William
Gillock AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 800
pm.
CLA& BInG LOST AT MSC. Last seen
on Friday, January 17th. If found call MSC
at 328-4700 or Edward Urdaneta at 328-8183.
There is i reward.
Announcements
AMERICAN DIABETES ASsoCIa-
TION WILL hold their next program
on February 3,1997 "Intimate Issues for
Men and Women with Diabetes All pro-
grams will be held in the Gaskin-Leslie
Center next to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital at 7:00 pm. There is no cost for
attendance. Everyone is invited. Please
mark your calendars for the first Monday
of each month. For more information call
816-5136 from 8:00 am - 4:00 pm Mon-
Fri. or call 1-800-682-9692.
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
�;
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Wi WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP ETC.
N
We also buy:
� GOLD & SILVER
� Jewelry & Coins
� Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates)
� TV's, VCR's, CD Players
� Home, Portable
We Need
Timberland
boots
and shoes!
Good Jeans.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM Ifc00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown,
drive to back door It ring buzzer
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
All Greek organizations must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad for libel, obscenity andor
bad taste.





w �
ft, .� U- �
jpg "f'r �$"
fe
14 Thursday. Jinuiry 30. 1997
The East Carolinian
Millions have
already come
forward
"Last year I had an opportunity to live
on campus and be a winner. But instead
I chose to live off campuswhat a
mistake. I got stuck with utility, phone
and cable bills. The security deposit I
had to pay for the apartment really cut
me short on money. I had to eat my
own cooking and then wash all the
messy dishes. I even had to clean my
own bathroomYuck! I don't have time
to meet new friends because I have to
spend so much time cleaning my
apartment, not to mention shopping for
groceries. I have an 8:00 class, and
searching for a commuter parking space
is a big headache. If I lived on campus, I
could just walk to class. My roommate
has left Greenville and I'm stuck with
the rent. Now, it also looks like I will
have to find someone to sublet my
apartment because I won't be in
Greenville during the summer. Man, did
I goof by not choosing to live on campus.
I am so embarrassed.
I will definitely sign up to live on campus
next year! I hope to see you at
Sweetheart's in Todd Dining Hall the
week of February 17-21. Don't make
the mistake of living off campus like I
did!
You don't want to end up being embarrassed like poor
Rob here? Do you? He decided not to live on campus and look
what he had to put up with.
PRICE COMPARISON
BETWEEN ON AND OFF CAMPUS LIVING
COST COMPARISON
RENT
UTILITIES
UTILITY HOOK UP
PHON-tls
(long distance excluded)
PHONE HOOK UP
DEPOSIT
CABLE HOOK UP
(Including HBO 1.2. & 3)
TOTAL PER PERSON!
ON CAMPUS-ddiible
room wo air
pe'r-er:�on
$ 1780 fottftonths
J$tabK!�d
Included
Included
Included
�Jiiclu:ded
included
included
yt'x�:�: ��:�: �;�;�: -x'x:xx'X: t'
:$l98nnonth
OFF CAMPUS-One
bedroom apt. living alone bedroom w I njfhmat
per person
$ 3480 for 12 months
$700 for I 2 months
$100
$ 420 for 12 months
OFF CAMPUS-Tw
bedroom w
per person
$ 2460 for 12 months
$610 for 12 months
$50
$210 for 12 months
OFF CAMPUS-Three
bedroom w 2 roommates
per person'
S2$$PoV 12 months
�� �
$600 for 12 months
$33
$ 140 for 12 months
lllltllllft
$463month
$3l7month
$140 for 12 months
$288month
(Based on listing of off-campus housing prices and survey of off-campus students)


Title
The East Carolinian, January 30, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 30, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1184
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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