The East Carolinian, January 16, 1997







THURSDAY
JANUARY 16 1997
lnian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Students return to campus to find progress being made at the site of Wnght Cafelrighti The construction
site is beginning to look more like the drawings of the finished product Still there are the detours and
fencesto deal with for a yet undetermined amount of time The new sidewalk cafe promises to be a more
picturesque and modern point of gathering for students and well worth the wait
courtesy rfCintws eoitor Mi �� -����.
Speaking o! waiting Students are finally able to exhale as the doors of the new Student Recreation
Center on West Campus open to the public The Center will be hosting a number of Grand
OpeningWelcome Back programs including a polar bear party" at the 30-foot by 40-foot outdoor pool
Students are now taking advantage of the six-court multiporpose sports area (below) and everytning else
the Center has to offer Be sure to look for the Rec Center s full section explaining programming, hours o
operation membership specifications and itemized details in this issue





2 Thursday, January 16, 1997
Tilt East Carolinian
HIGH POINT (AP) - A Guilford County grand jury indicted a man diag-
nosed with AIDS and charged with assault with intent to kill after raping a
12-vear-oldgirl.
Police originally charged Andrew Lee Monk, 36, of Jamestown, with
first-degree statutory rape and taking indecent liberties with a minor after
the girl was raped on Dec. 15 in High Point.
A day after he was released on bond, police arrested Monk and charged
him with assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, inflicting serious
injury, after learning he had the AIDS virus.
RALEIGH (AP) - The parents of a 9-year-old girl whose intestines were
pulled out when she was caught in the open drain of a wading pool say a
record settlement will allow their daughter to hae a financially secure
future.
The family of Cleric Lakey will receive $30.9 Trillion after announcing a
settlement Tuesday with the Wisconsin company i hat made the pool drain
covers.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Phones rang, volunteers shouted and marijuana
plants grew at the Cannabis Cultivators Club on Tuesday in preparation for
what supporters call the country's first legal sale of the drug in over 60 years.
Protected from California's anti-drug attorney general by a state proposi-
tion and a judge's order, the club was set to provide pot to its first customer
Wednesday.
The drug is known to counter the nausea and loss of appetite in
chemotherapy.
LOS ANGELES (AP) - America Online cannot handle the increased load
that has resulted from its new price plan for Internet service, a lawsuit con-
tends.
The suit said AOL subscribers have encountered "busy and unavailable
phone lines andor inaccessible computer equipment" since the company
began offering unlimited access for a $19.95 monthly fee at the beginning of
thevear.
MAO'ER MOUNTAIN, China (AP) - South China's tallest mountain, cov-
ered with bamboo and mist, concealed the crash of a U.S. bomber for 52
vears. '
A team from the U.S. POWMIA Office, led by Chinese officials and
accompanied by reporters, climbed wet rock and mud walls, edged along nar-
row ledges. There :hey found, scattered in the crags and trees of a steep
rfnfie beneath Mao'er Mountain, the debris of the B-24 bomber, lost on Aug.
3fjl944.
r.
AeMATTC Kazakstan (AP) - Police have arrested two suspects in the killing
own American director of a journalism training program in Kazakstan, news
room said.
STThe body of Chris Gehring, 28, was discovered in his apartment last week
a$�r he failed to show up for work at Internews Network. His throat had
b�n slit.
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3
New semester - new academic strategy
Jacqueline D. kellcm
SENIOR WRITER
While most students probably regard
each new semester as a fresh start,
that attitude may be more meaningful
to some students than others.
Students starting the semester on an
academic warning or probation have
one semester in which to pull their
GPA up sufficiently, get back in good
academic standing and avoid suspen-
sion.
Dorothy Muller, Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, says it is
important for students to be
informed about what the standards
are that determine good academic
standing, academic warning, proba-
tion and suspension.
"lb be in good academic standing,
a student with 31 or fewer hours must
have a 1.75 or better. A student with
32 or more hours must have a 2.0 to be
in good academic standing.
Students who are not in good acad-
emic standing are placed on warning
Muller said.
Muller explained that these stan-
dards are new ones, which have been
adopted but are not yet being
enforced.
"While we are studying the impact
of the new standards, students are not
suspr ded under the new standards,
they are placed on warning. They are
suspended under the old standards
Muller said.
The old standards require lower
GPA's and are different for each classi-
fication from freshman through senior.
Freshmen are required to have a 1.35,
sophomores a 1.60, juniors a 1.80, and
seniors need a 1.90 GPA.
"A number ot years ago, when the
new standards were proposed, the
committee believed that it was inap-
propriate to tell students that they
were okay when they had a 1.35 or a
1.6, or even a 1.8. (The committee
felt) that the students really needed
to know that grades are important
from the beginning Muller said.
Students who are placed on acade-
mic warning, probation, or suspension
are not left on their own to return to
satisfactory academic standing.
"We have for several years now
been working with students placed on
warning and students placed on pro-
bation to try to provide assistance that
they might need in making progress
toward graduation Muller said.
That assistance includes an
Academic Enhancement Conference,
held a week before classes start and
required for all those on warning or
probation, and optional workshops
held throughout the semester.
ftt that conference, every student
got a letter telling him or her what his
or her situation is, and what grades the
student must earn either to avoid pro-
bation or suspension Muller said,
and continued, "we have workshops
on career selection, we have work-
shops on test taking, note taking, and
also opportunities for students to sit
down and talk to someone individual-
ly
With the exception of the confer-
ence, all of the resources available to
the students are
voluntary, and Muller stressed that
it is up to the student to take respon-
sibility for their
academic success or failure. If they
do not pull their GPA up to an accept-
able standard, they are suspended.
"If students fail to meet the crite-
ria for staying in school while they are
on probation, then they are suspend-
ed. A student who is suspended the
first time is suspended for a semester.
If they come back in and don't get
their grades back where they are sup-
posed to be, then they are suspended
for two semesters. The third suspen-
sion is indefinite�the student can
only come in the summer Muller
said.
Muller said that the purpose of a
suspension is to give the student a
chance to resolve whatever problems
led to their academic difficulties in
the first place, whether they are finan-
cial, personal, or lack of time manage-
ment or studv skills.
"A student who has been suspend-
ed comes back en probation. During
that semester on probation, they must
improve his or her academic standing
to where it should be, or the student
is suspended again Muller said.
In addition to the services available
to students to help them get off pro-
bation, there are policies in place that
help students keep their grades up,
such as the grade replacement policy.
This policy allows students to repeat
any 1000 or 2000 level course in which
they received a D or F and can be used
up to three times. If the class is passed
the second time, the failing grade is
not used in computing the GPA, but
only the second grade.
Muller stressed that the grade
replacement form, which must be
turned in to the registrar's office in
order to make use of this opportunity,
must be turned m by the last day of
the add period If the form is not
turned in on time, the student cannot
replace the grade.
While, primary responsibility for
arty student's grades rests with the
student, there are services available to
help anyone who � having trouble.
These services are there to be utilized
by those who are trying to get out of
probation or suspension, or those try-
ing to avoid it.
Student store managers need suggestions
Student ideas for
products and appearai
welcome
AMY L.ROYSTER
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
This spring, the Student Store plans
to offer new items and programs as
well as traditional merchandise.
Store manager Winda Scarborough
said that while the Student Store will
continue to offer text books, school
supplies, apparel, computers, comput-
er software, caps and gowns, apparel,
beauty aids, class rings and nursing
pins, new wearing apparel items will
be available.
"W; are trying to look for a lot of
new items as far as wearing apparel
Scarborough said. "Jake Jacobs is our
new assistant manager who will be
doing the apparel buying He has a lot
of new ideas
A coffee club, another new idea,
started when dinning services and the
Student Store joined forces.
Scarborough said that after purchasing
a specific amount of coffee from any
campus dinning facility, students may
receive a discount on reading books.
Similarly, students whose reading
book purchases total a set amount may
receive discounted coffee.
Scarborough said the Student
Store also offers special event t-shirts
for organizations and departments on
campus.
"If any student has ideas for t-
shirts, we are open to suggestions
Scarborough said.
Other responsibilities of the stu-
dent store include offering course
packs and maintaining vending
machines on campus.
The store regularly offers a dis-
count rack in the wearing apparel sec-
tion which offers at least 30 percent
off selected items and accepts cash,
checks, Visa and Mastercard.
The Student Store employs 25
full-time and 25 part-time students.
"We like to have student employ-
ees because it gives diem the oppor-
tunity to work on campus dose to
classes and to give the rest of the staff
their input on what students �aht
Scarborough said:
All profits realized by the Student
Store are used for student scholar-
ships. Scarborough said many stu-
dents may not understand they are
helping other students by patronizing
the Student Store.
"Students cast give us ideas for
things they want to see in the store
Scarborough said. "Our main purpose
is service.
ECU student store names assistant manager
AMY L. ROYSTER
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Jake Jacobs, a former retail buyer for
Overton's and minor league pitcher
for the Kansas City Royals, has been
named Assistant Manager of the ECU
Student Stores. Jacobs brings- with
him a strong background in retail and.
high enthusiasm for the university, a
1989 graduate of ECU and Pirate
baseball record-holder, Jacobs is excit-
ed about his return to the university
"East Carolina University means a
lot to me Jacobs said recently "I'm
excited to be able to apply my retail-
ing experience in a way which will
benefit the students
Before joining the staff of the
Student Stores, Jacobs worked for
four years as a retail buyer for
Overton's sporting goods in
Greenville. In his new position, Jacobs
will be responsible for the day-to-day
operations of the ECU Student
Stores, including overseeing buyers
and inventory management for the
main store in the Wright Building and
the medical bookstore at the School of
Medicine, as well as the campus vertd-
sarf oancenioni for
A resident ofGreOivBc Jacobs is a
graduate or sou mem wayne nign
acnoot, J0O9c PVLt no v-tne son ot
Cole and Mary Jacobs of Mt. ONve,
NC In his free time, Jacobs enjoys
hunting, and spending ante with his
wife, Karen, and his son. Tucket
Delta Epsilon Chi
student reported the larceny of her wallet from her room in Clement Hall.
accidental Osath
A resident of White Hall was found dead in his room. Investigation continuing.
Assist Rescue
A student was transported from the Rivers Building to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital by Greenville Rescue after complaining of abdominal pains.
Armed Robbery Arrests
Three non-students were arrested .in conjunction with the armed robbery that
took place at Scott Hall on 12-5-96. A man was charged with robbery with a
dangerous weapon and assault by pointing a gun. Another man was charged
with accessory after the fact to a felony. A third man was charged with accesso-
ry after the fact to a felony. The investigation is continuing.
Larceny
A student reported the larceny of the lug nuts from the left front wheel of her
vehicle. The vehicle was parked in the College Hill commuter lot.
Malicious Mischief
A studentstaff member reported that someone has set off firecrackers on his
dormitory room door in Aycock Hall. There was no damage. However, the fire-
crackers set off the fire alarm.
An Association of Marketing Students
Reotgani3ation meeting
Wednesday January 22. 1997
5:15 pm 2014 GC
State � National Competition Friendships Leadership Opportunities Social Events
� Applicable Experience � Professional Interests
Open to Till majors
�social professional ttatemal
Welcome Back tCtf $tudent 6 faculty
Cheers to the ffew Year
The biggest threat to
depression is your
awareness of it
.illy fr�atabtf
UNTRBATt D
DEPRESSION
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3 Thursday. January 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
Crime prevention team patrols campus
Police escorts,
"blue lights
promote safety
Am en Hassan
SUFK WRITER
The Crime Prevention team within the ECU
Police Department will be offering the same
services this semester that have been utilized
by students in the past. Through the use of
escorts, surveys and regular patrolling the
department is making an effort to ensure the
safety of all students.
"We are in the process of prioritizing the
placement of blue light phones crime pre-
vention officer Sergeant Davis said. The blue
light phones which have emergency buttons
are located throughout campus.
"When a button is pressed by a student in
trouble, the police department is able to dis-
patch an officer to the exact location said
Officer McDaniel, patrol officer. "The blue
light phones enable a student to get help even
if he or she can't talk or is being chased by
someone. When the student presses many
blue light phones wc can often check their
path if they are being chased The depart-
ment is working on mapping future blue light
placement through five years from now.
In addition to the blue light phones, the
department is taking lighting surveys two
nights a week. "We are sending police officers
on patrol so that they can check if there are
any light outs Davis said. "Officers also look
out for dark areas where lighting may be need-
ed, since these areas are obviously more recog-
nizable at night rather than during the day. We
haven't seen any potential problems in badly
lit areas, but we're still making sure, in light of
the recent incidents on campus. Since the
downtown areas are already well lit, we are just
reporting random light outages
Police officers are on regular patrol at night
and especially at peak times. According to
Davis, these peak times vary but are mainly
around the time when there are more students
moving around on campus. "Our main goal is
to be visible, when patrolling on campus
Davis said. "We are aiways looking for new
ideas and challenges to make the campus a
more secure place
Another form of patrol that the ECU police
department uses is bike patrol. Officers are
able to maneuver through campus on bikes
rather that patrol cars in order to react faster in
a situation. McDaniel feels bike patrol is more
of a supplement to car patrol. "It is easier to
ask students questions while being on a bike,
and since a lot of students ride bikes anyway,
we have something in common with them
McDaniel commented.
"I personally think that bike patrol ;s ten
times more quick than trying to get through
campus traffic in a car Davis said. "However,
because of the inclement weather we can't
have them riding in twenty degree weather
The Police Department is open twenty-
four hours a day and is located on 10th street.
Nonemergencv inquiries can be directed to
328-4827 for the Main Campus or 816-3863
for the School of Medicine.
Student health expands services
"Health Bandits"
out to promote
well-being
am en a Hassan
STAFF WRITER
This semester the Student Health
Service department will be offering a
variety of familiar programs along with
a few new ones which will provide
students with needed services, edu-
cating them in the process.
"Everything is pretty much set up
as a doctors clinic with basically the
same services as last year" said
Heather Zophy, Health Education
Coordinator. "We offer information
on alcohol, sexually transmitted dis-
eases, dating, eating disorders, contra-
ceptives, and other topics of concern
The Students Health Service, a
part of the Division of Student Life, is
a department that consists of a direc-
tor, a clinical director, physicians,
mental health personnel, pharmacists,
health educators, registered nurse, lab
technologists, x-ray technologists,
nursing assistants, and other staff. All
enrolled students can take advantage
of this service if the department has
the required, recorded report of their
medical history and immunizations.
The department has an urgent care
facility for students in need of emer-
gency care, an allergy clinic, col-
poscopyandroscopy clinics, a mental
health clinic, and x-ray services.
Physical therapy services arc also
offered, as well as HP and AIDS
referrals.
"An assertive marketing approach
that we are using this semester are
the Health Bandits Zophy stated.
The "Health Bandits which consist
of some Health Services staff dressed
in scrubs, stethoscopes, and Band-
Aids, will be in front of the Students
Stores and on campus.
"Their goal is to make students
more aware of health issues by asking
them questions and giving the win-
ners "goody bags' filled with items
such as ibuprofen and antibiotic oint-
ment. "The students seem to enjoy
being approached said one of a
group of health bandits. "They are
mostly curious and are receptive to us,
especially when they receive their
prizes Students should be on the
look out for the Health Bandits on
campus all semester.
Tours of the Student Health
Service can be given by request to
classes or to students on an individual
basis. Student Health Service is open
from 8 am to 5 p.m. on Monday
through Friday and 9 am to noon on
Saturdays and Sundays. Pharmacists
are available to take prescriptions
from Monday through Fridays at 8 am
to 5 p.m. only. Students can obtain
medicine from the pharmacy at a
reduced cost which can be purchased
by check or cash. For more informa-
tion or to make an appointment, call
328-6317.
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out from the crowd
when job nuntin
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The East Carolinian
Welcome back ECU
students and faculty
BOWEN
LAUNDROMATS
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Downtown Greenville





4 Thursday. January 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
A BIRD'S VIEW
Time is Running Out
326-6841
The ECU Immunization Policy mandates that students will he
W11 H DRAWN from classes if immunization information is
not complete before Fehruary 14, 1997end of the 30 day
grace period). For more information, contact the ECU
Student Health Service (SHS) @ 328-1093 or 328-6841.
SHS is offering Tetanus injections and TB tests from 8-10 am every
week day, except Wednesdays until February 14. No appointment is
needed during these clinic hours. These are available for $5 each.
Immediate openings are
available for the following
magazine staff positions:
Assistant Editor
Advertising Director
Advertising Sales Reps
Staff Illustrator
To apply, come by the Student Media
Board office on the second floor
of the Student Publications Bldg. or
call 328-6009 for information.
CHINA BUFFET
Authentic Chinese Restaurant
Tel: (919) 355-0011
Fax: (919) 355-0125
3040S. Evans Street Suite 123
(At University Common Shopping Center Next to Kroger)
Greenville, NC. 27834
Open Daily
Mon. - Thurs. 11:00 am to 10:00 pm, Fri. & Sat. 11:00 am to 11:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 Noon to 10:00 pm (3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Daily Only Menu Items Available)
COME BUILD BRIDGES
WITH US!
Dine In Or
Carry Out
Alt 264 Greenville Blvd.
China Buffet
Special
Buffet Bar
Over 45 Hems
LUNCH
&
DAILY
Lunchen Special
11:00 am to 4:30 pm
1. (Chicken or Shrimp) Chow Mein
2. (Roast Pork or Chicken) Lo Mein
3. Pepper Steak with Onion
4. Bar-B-Q- Spare Ribs
5. Roast Pork Egg Foo Young
6. Chicken with Cashew Nuts
7. Beef with Chinese Vegetable
8. Boneless Spare Ribs
9. Sesame Chicken
10. General Tso's Chicken
11. Shrimp with Chinese Vegetables
12. Broccoli with Garlic Sauce
13. Mixed Chinese Vegetables
14. Beef or Chicken with Broccoli
15. Shrimp with Broccoli
16. Chicken with Garlic Sauce
17. Shredded Beef with Garlic Sauce
18. Sweet and Sour Chicken or Pork
19. Hunan Chicken or Beef
20. Moo Goo Gai Pan
21. Curry Chicken with Onion
22. Hot and Spicy Baby Shrimp
23. Kung Po Shrimp
24. Beef with Pepper Tomatoes
25. Chicken Wings
26. Shrimp with Garlic Sauce
27. Beef or Chicken with Snow Peas
28 Shrimp with Lobster Sauce
3.95
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TEXAS i-GULF
MEXICO
Htrllogata �
BANQUET
ROOMS &
CATERING
20 OFF
all menu items
CHINA BUFFET
One Cupon Per Purchase
Not Valid With Any Other Offer
Expires Feb. 13th
LUNCH BUFFET
$1.00 OFF
Reg. $4.95
Now. $5.95
One Cupon Per Purchase
Not Valid With Any Other Offer
Expires Feb. 13th
DINNER BUFFET
$1.00 OFF
Reg. $6.95
Now. $5.95
One Cupon Per Purchase
Not Valid With Any Other Offer
Expires Feb. 13th
DINNER BUFFET
Buy One Get
Second One
12 OFF
One Cupon Per Purchase
Not Valid With Any Other Offer
Expires Feb. 13th
misismmsssssmssismsMsmmm
�����
WHAT! A mission trip to the TexasMexico Border working with "Puentes De
Cristo" (Bridges of Christ), one of the seven projects within the
Presbyterian Border Ministry which unites the Iglesia Nacional
Prebiterian de Mexico and the Presbyterian Church (USA) in mission.
WHERE: Beynosa, Mexico
WHO A group of 25 college students who study within the bounds of
New Hope Presbyterian
WHEN: MAY 19-28, 1997
HOW: Application deadline is January 31, 1997.
Anticipated cost per student is S150. Group will do fund-raising
together to offset costs and to assist with individual cost.
Scholarships are available.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT TRIP LEADERS:
Cheryl Bissette
DUKE UNIVERSITY
(919) 684-3043
Ollie Wagner
UNC-CHAPEL HILL
(919)967-2311
.





5 Thursday. January 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
lei
PffiASING I OQ SPRING 97
tt r r r
, PWUIUIY MANAUMiN
919-78-1921
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Ljne
Wesley Commons North
Langston Park
Wesley Commons South
Wyndham Court
AM &9itiBiit3 mi lUlU
On Site Hanacehent and Maintenance
On Site Laundry Facilities
Sand Voueykau Court
Party Pavillion
On ECU Bus Route
Twas the Season
The Office of Business Services
reported that Holiday Drive "96 was a
tremendous success, thanks to the
campus-wide generosity of students,
staff and faculty. Prior to Christmas,
Business Services placed 39 collec-
tion boxes in campus departments
and residence halls for items to be
donated to clients of the Pitt County
Department of Social Services. Over
500 foods items, along with toys,
clothing and books were provided to
foster children and other families.
One down. Two to go
Now that the Student Recreation
Center has been completed and is
open to the public, construction
workers can concentrate on the two
remaining extensive renovation pro-
jects on campus-thc Student
StoresWight Place Sidewalk Cafe
and the expansion of Joyner Library.
Campus will have a new and modern
look once the dust settles and the
detours and fences become a thing of
the past.
With Improvement
comes Cost
Pending approval by the UNC Board
of Governors and President of the
UNC System C D. Spangler, stu-
dents may find that the cost of living
has gone up about 6.15 percent. A
proposition which has been in the
works for months could have stu-
dents paying higher fees as early as
Fall 1997. The proposition will be
submitted for final legislation on
February 14.
���������������
ilTJLET Ma
Doors Opm: 7:30 jb. 'ArowfiOfCtass0
IiafHk Night
Night and Silver




Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
Program Calendar
JANUARY
16 CIRCLE DISCUSSION: To Be Young, Black and
Greek-What Does it Mean?"
19 T THEATRE: "Child Support" A play presented by
the Greenville Theatre Arts Company. Matiee-3p.m.
Evening show-7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15.50 in advance
$17.50 at the door, $3 student discount, Wright
Auditorium
20 MLK REMEMBERED: Cultural Center, Student
Union, National Pan-Hellenic Council. Allied Blacks for
Leadership and Equality. Chancellors Martin Luther King
Observance Commitee Present: "A Celebration of the life
and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr
6 p.m. Candeligt Vigil at the crest of College Hill
7:30 p.m. Evening Program featuring Attorney
Bemadine Ballance and the ECU Gospel Choir at Hedrix
Theatre. MSC
22 OPEN LECTURE: Ms. Juanita Moore. Director, National"
Civil Rights Museum, 6 p.m. Great Room. MSC
30 VIDEO CIRCLE DISCUSSION: "Race Matters-How Far
Have We Come?" Bloxton House, 6 p.m.
Pangea Associates Presents
How To Teach English as a Second Language Workshop
�Assessment � Lanuage Acquisition Innovative Strategies � Interactive Participa-
tion � Cultural Awareness � Certificate of Completion
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. � Saturday February 8,1997 ECU�
Willis Building
Registration Mandatory
Call Pangea Associates� 800-706-6715 or 919-933-0399
lpangea@msn.com
LANDMARK
(Across from WAL-MART)
321-8100
3120 E. 10TH ST
(Next to FOODUON)
757-1212
BELLSFORK
(Turnbury Square)
756-6776
CALL THE LITTLE CAESARS NEAREST YOU
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Valid for a limited time at participating locations. Valid on Original Round
1 or Deep Dish pizzas only. 1997 Little Caesars Enterprises, Inc. I
I "DELUXE" MEAL DEAL j
2 rrwdoim pizzas with cheese and 1 topping
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Vaiid for a limited time at participating locations. VaHd on Original Round
I or Deep Dish pizzas only. 1997 Little Caesars Enterprises. Inc. J
Expires 3-9-97
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Valid for a limited time at par-
ticipating locations. Valid on
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1997 Little Caesars
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1997 UWe Caesars
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2
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Thursday. January 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
ur
Inspired veteranarian turns writer
in North Carolina mountains
HENDERSONV1LLE, N.C. (AP) - He was a successful
Veterinarian, and one day he was standing on his back
deck, gazing at the land before him and thinking about this
and all the other things his career had afforded him.
"I suddenly realized it had been months since I had
been out there Dr. Brad Swift said, "and I thought, 'there
to something wrong with this picture - I don't enjoy it
faecause I spend so much of my time trying to pay for it
Today, Swift is a writer living in Flat Rock. His articles
have been published in Hope, The Utne Reader, Yoga
Journal and other magazines. He also has a pair of books in
different stages of production.
"It was a fairly radical switch Swift confessed. "I
imagined myself at the end of my life and I asked myself if
I didn't go for being a writer, would I regret it? When I was
leally honest with myself, the answer was yes
It wasn't that Swift was tired of cats and dcgs. More
precisely, it was a feeling that told him his life was about
something other than what he was doing.
"There are many different ways of expressing one's life
purpose Swift explained. "Being a vet was one way, but
for me the purpose led in a different direction
Life's purpose - the thing deep within you that you
want to pursue, whether you know what it is or not - is cen-
tral to Swift's work. It has led him, with his wife Ann, to
establish the Life on Purpose Foundation, based in Flat
Rock.
"Our purpose is broken down into two parts Swift
explained. "One is to promote public awareness of service-
oriented individuals and organizations who unselfishly
contribute their time to others by being of service.
"The other purpose he continued, "is to educate peo-
ple in what's available by determining your life purpose
and living consistent with it
The foundation highlights service-oriented folks
because Swift believes that service is an element of most
people's life purpose. And beyond writing, mostly about
Cople of service, Swift believes the purpose of his life is
Iping people as they search for theirs.
"I've seen people who have spent years of their life
searching out in the world for their life purpose he said,
"having to look out there someplace, and I don t think
that's where it is
"I think where you get that is from within yourself, and
k's not so much a matter of finding it as it is creating it. You
make it up, and try it out for a while, and see if it makes a
difference in your life and the life of others
Having a positive effect on others, Swift believes, is a
good indication that you're on the right track.
"One of the fundamental aspects of what it is to be a
human being is to want to make a contribution to other
human beings he said. "For me, that equates to being of
service. When you identify your way of being of service,
you're very close to what your life purpose is
But being of service, and being a coach for people
experimenting with their own version of sitting on the
back porch ami wondering whether it's worth it, does not
make Swift a guru. In fact, he cringes at the label.
"I don't let anyone call me that, even in jest he said.
"I'm just as fallible as anybody. I'm not a teacher. I don't
have all the answers, but I do have a way of working with
somebody that makes a difference when they are willing to
look with me - what I commonly call "being coachable
Swift also wants to help children explore their dreams
and find purpose. It has become another focus for the Life
on Purpose Foundation.
"The Kids on Purpose project came out of a conversa-
tion I had with my daughter, Amber, about what she wants
to be. There are a lot of other kids out there that have
equally great dreams
Amber is 4, and her current dreams include becoming a
singer or a ballerina. Her photo, in a dance costume, graces
the signs on several bubble-gun machines placed in local
businesses for the benefit of the foundation.
The project's goal is to provide support - coaching, seed
money, and guidance - for people between 6 and 18 years
old, to help them determine what their dreams are and to
be able to fulfill them.
"It doesn't take much money at a critical time to say
'Yes, you can do what you want to do, and here's some
help Swift observed.
He also offers workshops to organizations around the
country. The next one is in February, at a meeting of the
Minnesota veterinary Association.
How does he feel about returning to face an audience
of former colleagues?
"I'm scared to death he said.
It looks like he will have to live with those kinds of
fears. Swift's foundation is gaining increasing attention,
primarily through his freelance writing for magazines.
The pieces have drawn inquiries from as far sway as
Israel. Additionally, his new book, "The Human Being
Service Manual: Designing a Life of Purpose and Service
is expected to be released soon.
Due to the nature of our business,
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7 Thursdiy, January 16. 1987
Thi East Carolinian �-

.Summer �kientation Assistants
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 203 Erwin Building � 328-4173
NOW HIRING
Orientation Assistants for Summer 1997
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session on January 21 at 4:00 p.m in Room 212 in
the Mendenhall Student Center.
Applications are NOW available in 203 Erwin Building
(Orientation Office). Deadline for completed applications
is January 24,1997 at 5:00 p.m.
tatfMMMt
TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and information
about campus issues and activities.
STUDENT
RADIO
STATION
WZMB 913 FM
Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of music including
alternative, jazz, metal, rap and more.
MINORITY
M A G A Z
N E
Expressions
Pick us up four times during the Fall and Spring terms for discus-
sion of the problems and issues facing ECU's minorities.
LITERARY
ARTS
Rebel
MAGAZINE
Pick us up annually in the late Spring to view a showcase of cam-
pus literary and artistic creations. -
Speaker of the House position,
changes hands l
RALEIGH (AP) - Charlotte
Democrat Jim Black, the House
minority leader for the last two years,
will challenge Republican incumbent
Harold Brubaker for speaker of the
House when the Legislature con-
venes Jan. 29.
Black, nominated by House
Democrats at a closed caucus
Tuesday, said he believes he can win
the House's top post, even though
Democrats have only 59 votes, two
short of a majority.
"I am a serious candidate for
speaker of the House Black said
after the caucus. "This is more than
do-able
But Brubaker, an Asheboro
Republican seeking his second term,
said he was not worried about his
chances.
"This is simply another case of
wishful thinking on the part of the
Democrats Brubaker said. "House
Republicans are united and will stick
together. I enjoyed the support of
conservative Democrats last time and
I look forward to receiving it again
Several Democrats had started
maneuvering for the speaker's post
even before the Nov. 5 elections. But
instead of gaining a majority in the
120-member House, which they lost
in 1994, Democrats only increased
their number from 52 to 59.
RALEIGH (AP) - A legislative
commission studying changes to the
state's fishing laws has delayed any
action until at least Feb. 10, nearly
two weeks after the Legislature
opens its session.
Among the proposals it will consid-
er at that meeting is a compromise by
Rep. David Redwine, D-Brunswick,
that would let fishing piers and boats
that cater to tourists buy group licens-
es.
That would allow tourists to fish
the coastal waters without buying an
individual license.
No license is needed to fish along
the coast now, but a committee
studying the state's dwindling fish
supplies has recommended requiring
recreational fishermen to buy licens-
es.
The legislative commission heard
from pier operators, boat owners,
recreational fishermen and commer-
cial fishermen Tuesday as it contin-
ued a public hearing on a 155-page list
of reforms.
Lawmakers said they want to take
action, but need to spend more time
on the recommendations, which took
the N.C. Moratorium Steering
Committee two years to develop.
GREENSBORO (AP) - A verdict
eluded jurors on their first day of try-
ing to decide whether to make ABC
Inc. pay Food lion as much as $1.9
billion in damages for a hidden cam-
era story.
The jury deliberated 5 hours
Tuesday before telling U.S. District
Court Judge Carlton Tilley they
wanted to go home.
Earlier, the jury sent out a note
asking for a list of agreements, called
stipulations, between each side.
Tilley responded with a note that the
jury needed to be specific about what
they wanted and there was no further
exchange between the jury and judge.
ABC's 'PrimeTime Live" aired a
report Nov. 5, 1992, that accused
Food Lion of selling old meat, bleach-
ing spoiled meat to kill odor and sell-
ing cheese gnawed by rats. Food Lion
denied the allegations, but didn't file
a libel suit.
The grocery chain's attorneys said
nothing in the 43 hours of ABC video-
tape backed up the allegations made
in the report. But Tilley told jurors
they were to assume the report was
true.
RALEIGH (AP) - The parents of a
9-year-old girl whose intestines were
pulled out when she was caught in
the open drain of a wading pool say a
record settlement will allow their
daughter to have a financially secure
future
The family of Vfelerie Lakey will
receive $30.9 million after announc-
ing a settlement Tuesday with the
Wisconsin company that made the
pool drain covers.
"What we were trying to accom-
plish is to have things set up so that
Valerie's health care would be taken
care of, so that she wouldn't have to
be on public aid the rest of her life,
and so she could get a job she wanted,
without worrying about whether
insurance would cover her or not
said David Lakey, Valerie's father.
Valerie and her family agreed not
to pursue punitive damages against
Sta-Rite Industries.
On Monday, the jury awarded the
Lakeys $25 million in compensatory
damages for the 1993 accident. The
settlement means that Sta-Rite
Industries will not appeal the jury's
decision.
Social worker cross-examined by
prosecutor in Wallace trial
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Answering
questions from the prosecutor, a social
worker who investigated convicted
serial killer Henry Louis Wallace's
upbringing admitted that much of her
information came from the defendant
himself.
Wallace, 31, was convicted last
week of raping and strangling nine
Chadott- women from 1992 to 1994.
He face the death penalty or life in
prison.
Defense attorneys are asking the
jury to spare his life in the sentencing
phase now taking place.
On Monday, social worker
Carmeta Albarus answered friendly
questions posed by public defender
Isabel Day. She portrayed Wallace as a
man warped at an early age by an abu-
sive mother and absentee father who
is now controlled by violent sexual
compulsions.
However, Mecklenburg County
Assistant District Attorney Marsha
Goodenow challenged some of the
conclusions Albarus wrote in her 42-
page report on Wallace. The social
worker acknowledged that much of
the information she had about
Wallace's early childhood - including
allegations of bearings and sexual
molestation - came from Wallace.
. si
at)
"MS
i a
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where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. got the strength to
love. In honor of his birthday and Black History
Month we're offering the article "Give die Dream
New Life For your free copy call 1-800-236-9238.
Real love.
Don't settle for anything less.
1-800-236-9238






8 Thursday. January 16, 1997
The East Carolinian
ImportantMandatory
news writers meeting
today from 4-5 p.m.
DO NOT MSS rr.
violators will be prosecuted
lA uAAattet oj 'STaste aa & Bisito
������m
Show Your Valentine You Care. Make Your
Reservations For The Special Occasion.
Valentines Day
For Reservations
call 355-1111
658 E. Arlington Blvd.
in Arlington Village
Full ABC privileges
with extensive beer and wine list.
The Department of
Athletics, Office of
Student Development
is currently hiring full-time
ECU students and graduate students to tutor
student-athletes in all subject areas.
Minimum 2.5 6PA required.
Call 328-4550
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
mm
at
Come Join Us Each Thursday Night For Frienship, Fun, &
Bible Study at 7p.m. General Classroom Building Room 1028
For More Information Call Eddie and
Kahryn Hilliard at (919)321-6262
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
� 24-Hour Message Service
752-7529
georges
hair designs
Wucome Back ECU
-Full Service Unisex Salon
-Tanning
-Skin and Nail Care
-Walk-Ins Welcome
-European Trained Stylists
-Latest In Facial & Body Wax
-Professional Hair Products
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Open MonSat.
9:30 a.m9 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m6 p.m.
Tel: 756-6200
CHARLES BLVD. SHOPPES
Charles & 10th Street
Open MonFri.
9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m6 p.m.
Tel: 830 � 5536
STANTON SQUARE
Stantonsburg Road
Open Mon -Fri.
10 a.m? .m.
Saturday 9 . .n6p.m.
Tel: 7570076
OO Off
SSBn? �
East Carolina University Department of Recreational Services
Register January 13-31
in Recreational Services Main Office
from 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
Purchase a $20 pass and participate
in any class, anytime!
Drop-In passes available for $7 for 5 classes
Chech the&e cl&bi&L out!
D.A.N.S.E Premieres in the new SRC January 15 at 4:15.
Studio Party: Workout in all three studios!
January 17 3:30p.m5:00p.m.
Free Aqua Fitness: Jan. 21 at 5:30 p.m.
January 22 at 4:00 p.m.
Climbing Wall Intro Workshops
January 16-April 29
Tuesdays from 7:00-9:00 p.m.
at the SRC Indoor Climbing Wall
Cost is $5 for studentsmembers & $7 for nonmembers.
Private instruction is available for $10 an hour.
Registration deadline is one business before
the workshop.
Call or stop by the Adventure Program Area for more details!
Be d44ie to- c&me and enjoy, ail al 0441 pAayia4wi
at the Etudewt KecAeotiot Gentesi!
Student Recreation Center
MonFri. 6:00 a.ml 1:30 p.m.
Sat.Sun. 9:00 a.m10:30 p.m.
Climbing Wall
MonFri. 2:00 p.m4:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m10:30 p.m.
Sat.Sun. 2:00 p.m6:00 p.m.
For more information contact Recreational Services at 328-6387.





9 Thursday, January 16, 1997
snort �
The East Carolinian
False Accusations Could Lead To Jail Time
DAI L AS IfiP) - The former stopper who made up a gang-rape accusation
aain Dallas Onsboss stars ErikWIliarns and Michael lrv�n had unt.l yes-
terday to post bond on a charge of tiling a false police fP��-
na Shahravan. 23. could face six months in jail and a 12,000 fine if con-
Vtcted ot the misdemeanor. Mice filed paperwork for the charge with pros-
"Twars issued foe her arrest, but police said she wou.dn t neces-
sarilv b- arrested at her home. She had until vesterday to post bond before
Dillas countv deputies begin trying to find her.
DdlShahran file' a police report Dec. 30 - after first going tc, a.television
reporter - accusing Irvin of holding a gun to her hf?d wh.le Wll.anns and a
third man. who was never identified, raped her in Williams home. She also
-r-cused Irvin of videotaping the attack.
Fndav after she was confronted with evidence that hvm couldnt have
been at Williams' house the night of the alleged attack, Shahravan s.gned a
statement admitting het stop, was a lie.
Negotiations Under Way For Former Giants Coach
KT NTA (MM - Twenty years after he first applied to be head coach of
the Atlanta Falcons. Dan Reeves appears to be on the verge of being hired
Reeves met Mondav night and Tuesday with Falcons president Taylor
Smith, and various reports said a deal was imminent. .
The fired N� York ( ants coach, who interviewed for the Atlanta job in
1977 when the Falcons hired l.ceman Bennett, returned to his home in Ho-
Ho-Kus N 1 . after Tuesday's meeting. . .
The newspaper said today its sources confirmed that negotiat.ons were
under wav and representatives had forwarded various contract proposals.
ferring am unexpected stumbling blocks. Reeves will be introduced as new
Falcons coach by the end of the week, the paper said
Reeves had more wins than any other active NFL coach when he was
fired bv the Giants, but New York had two losing seasons in his four years
Sere. Reeves has said he had little or nothing to do with the Grants per-
sonnel decisions. More control with the Falcons is considered a key to any
Icontact here.
k
Golf Legend Recovering From Surgery
I
ROCHESTFR Minn. (AP) - Arnold Palmer is expected to remain hos-
pitalized for several davs as he recovers from surgery for prostate cancer.
T The 67 vear-old golf star, who checked into the Mavo CImic on Monday,
Vas scheduled to have surgery todav. After his release from the hospital, he
vill remain in Rochester for treatment as an outpatient, the clinic said.
Doc Giffin. Palmer's spokesman, said Palmer was prepared tor the
T"Uhink he's ready Giffin said. "He sounds like he's doing well. He's
Janxious to get on with it ,
Palmer learned Fndav he has prostate cancer. Doctors said Monday they
vere encouraged bv initial test results, and Palmer met again with them
�Tuesday to determine treatment.



Former Cy Young Winner Heads North
CHICAGO AP) - The Chicago White Sox. looking to shore up their
starting rotation, have signed 1990 Cv Young Award winner Doug Drabek to
a one-ear contract. .
Drabek. who won the Cv Young after going 22-6 with Pittsburgh has
pitched the last four seasons with the Houston Astros, compiling a 38-4
record. ,
The 4-vear-old right-hander was 7-9 with a 4.3 earned run average in
30 starts with the Astros last season. He is 137-112 lifetime, with a 3.41 ERA
The deal signed Tuesday will pay him $U million, and he can earn
another SI.3 million in performance bonuses.
Drabek can earn $100,000 bonuses for pitching 170. 180 and 190 innings,
and $200,000 bonuses for pitching 200 and 210 innings. .After that, he would
earn bonuses of $20,000 per inning.
Drabek who made $5.05 million with the Astros last season, talked with
several other teams, including the cross-town Cubs. He chose the Sox, he
said, because thev were persistent and because they have a chance to go to
the postseason. He was drafted by the White Sox in 1983.
Skating Darling Charged With Drinking And Driving
BLOOMFIF.l.D. Conn. I MM - Oksana Baiul. unshakable as she skated to
an Olvmpie gold in 1994. plans to handle her recent fall from grace like a
champion. , .
Baiul surrendered to police Tuesday on charges she drove drunk and reck-
lessK when her Mercedes went off the road in a crash over the weekend.
"She is not trying to hide anything. She wants to deal with the conse-
quences said Bob Young, a longtime friend who runs the Simsbury skating
I center, where Baiul trains. n
He said the skater realizes the "magnitude of her mistake.
"She's a little scared, and this is prettv overwhelming for her Young said.
-1 don't think she's ever had to deal with anything like this in her life. She s
got to nav a very big price for this mistake. .And she's already paying for it.
' The 19-year-old Ukrainian was released without bond after turning her-
; self in at the Bloomfield police station. She is scheduled to appear Jan. 27 in
West Hartford Superior Court.
If convicted, she faces six months in jail. SI.000 in fines, and suspens.on
of her driver's license for one year.
Invitation
date
This Saturday, January 18
time
12:00 P.M. (NOON)
place
MINGES COLISEUM
occasion
THE MEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM WILL HOST THE
RICHMOND SPIDERS
dress
PURPLE & GOLD
This game will be televised regionally
on Home Team Sports (HTS).
Raphael Edwards is leading the way for the Pirates as the top scorer, averaging 13.7
points per game.
PHOTO B CHRIS GAYD0SH
Men's and Women's game results
during the holiday break
MEN
10-3 overall
3-1 conference play
DateOpponentWLScore
12-HSouthwestern LousianaW65-56
12-17at GeorgiaL60-73
12-19St. Joseph'sw68-64
12-28Armstrong State, w77-54
1-2William & Maryw77-58
14Americanw66-60
1-6George Masonw80-74
1-11at Old DominionL70-79
'results of lastnights game at VCU not available
WOMEN
5-8 overall
1-3 conference play
Date
Opponent
WL Score
Othello Meadows, has been a threat from the three point arc all season as well as
inside the lane, as taan above
PHOTO BY CWItS SAT0JJI
12-15af Wake ForestL3545
12-17a, UNC-CharlotteL53-73
12-20CampbellW72-67
12-30HamptonW102-77
1-3William & MaryW60-59
1-5Old DominionL36-74
1-10at RichmondL82-99
1-12UNC-WilmingtonL48-61





10 Thursday. January 16, 1997
sport:
The East Carolinian
MEN'S BASKETBALtSTATISTICS

GamesField goalFree throwAverage points
StartedpercentagepercentageTotal pointsper game
Raphael Edwards0.593.714 (50-70)17813.7
Jonathan Kernsr13.443.679 (38-56)1249.5
Tim Basham13.420.818 (9-11)1189.1
Tony Parham13.406.804(41-51)1168.9
Othello Meadows13.452.730 (27-37)1158.8
Dink Peters3.528.563 (544)1027.8
Morris Grooms10.486.414(12-29)806.2
Don Douglas0.600.000 (0-1)63.0
Alico Dunk0.250.643 (9-14)382.9
� mm m
Spring into athletics for new semester
Amanda Ross
A Jwuor OoHmKMtoK
majnr frnm Kinsttm sht
somakj topts to tt
kuwttt Utilll
costtte.
Welcome back to another semester of ECU
sports. There are a lot of exciting home
events coming up this month including
men'swomen's basketball, and men's
women's swimming.
The men's basketball team is getting off
on the right foot this season with a 10-3
record and a 3-1 conference CAA record.
(This doesn't include last night's contest
with VCU. At press time results were not
available.) The Pirates are undefeated at
home this season and will look to keep that
streak alive on Saturday when they host
Richmond in another CAA battle. That
game will begin at noon and will be televised
on Home Team Sports (HTS).
The women's basketball team will be tak-
ing their game on the road as they head up
north to take on conference foes George
Mason and American, before returning home
on Friday Jan. 25 to host James Madison.
The Lady Pirates arc looking to improve on
their 5-8 overall record and are looking for
another conference win. Currently they are
1-3 in the CAA.
The ECU swimmers, men and women, will
take to the pool this Saturday as they host
Richmond for a 1 p.m. meet. Then, with lit-
tle time to rest, they will hit the pool again
on Sunday when they host the Seahawks
from UNC-Wilmington at 2 p.m.
The Lady Pirates are looking to defend
their CAA title, which they have won two
consecutive seasons9495 and '9596.
The women are undefeated as they take a 6-
0 overall record and a 3-0 CAA record into
Saturday's meet.
The men are also undefeated with a per-
fect 6-0 record and 3-0 in conference meets.
Thv are off to their best start since the '93-
'94 season and will be in the CAA men's title
hunt as well.
All these events are free to students. For
basketball games ID's must be shown to
receive your free ticket and can be picked up
at the basketball ticket office at Minges
Coliseum. (The side that faces Dowdy-
Ficklen).
Swimming events are also at no charge
and students don't need a ticket to enter
Minges Aquatic Center.
The only cover we require is a Sombrero!
WELCOME
BACK
FIESTA
TONIGHT!
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f
11 Thursday. January 16. 1997
sport:
The East Carolinian
Freshmen and transfers adjust to new style
Come join the rest of the Pool Sharks at
Pastime Billiards on Monday Nights
for the 9 Ball Tournaments
Pastimes
Monday
Men shoot pool 12 price
Tuesday
Domestic $1
Ladies shoot free
Wednesday
Men shoot 12 price
$2 Pitchers
Sunday
Natural on tap $1
Pastimes Billiards and Pub
in Carolina E. Center
Memorial Drive � 756-5575
TRACY LAUBACH
STAFF WHITER
South Greenville's
Neighborhood
Restaurant and
Gathering Place
Game Day or Any
Day
1J. MGMurphy'e
M BAB& GRILLE w
Sunday Brunch 11:30 - 2:00 PM
Featuring Grilled Entrees & Sandwiches
Also Salads, Appetizers and
Freshly Created Soups
� Quaint, Relaxed Atmosphere
� Full Service Bar
1914 Turnbury Dr.
(919) 355 -7956
Please inquire about catering
"Experience the Excitement"
of ECU away games and other sporting events
on our TV's
According to Lady Pirate Misty Home, playing
basketball for ECU is like nothing she has ever
experienced before.
A freshman from Statesviile, NC, Home says
that being part of the team means practicing
harder, being tougher mentally, and valuing a
win a lot more.
A a member of the Amateur Athletic Union
and a participant in seven national
tournaments throughout her
career, Home feels that the
strength of the team lies mostly
within the hands of Coach Anne
Donovan.
"Coach Donovan is by far the
best coach around Home said.
"We all have . not only a good
coachathlete relationship, but also
a coachathlete friendship. She
understands each of us because
everything we are experiencing as
athletes, she has experienced,
too
Teammate Nicole Mamula, who
is playing Pirate ball for the first time this year,
agrees that the team has the best to look up to.
"Coach Donovan is a tough coach but a good
coach. She pushes us hard to be the best we can
be Mamula said.
Mamula is a junior college player who began
her career at Winthrop University, which is part
of the Big South Conference. The day after she
signed her letter of intent, the coach was fired.
She then went on to play for Frederick Junior
College, in Frederick, MD, where she led the
team to an overall record of 29-3. She was named
Kodak Junior College Ail-American (the top ten
"Coach Donovan is a
tough coach but a
good coach.
She pushes us hard
to be the best
we can be
Nicole Mamula
ECU woman's basketball
teammember
junior college players in the country are awarded
the honor) as she ied the country in three-point
field goals.
A communications major from Laurel, MD,
Mamula feels that her father has influenced her
winning spirit and attitude.
"My father is who I looked up to for every-
thing in my life. He is truly a great person to fol-
low behind Mamula said.
Freshman Melanie Gillem, who is focusing
mostly of defense this season, says that if she
could thank one person for their support and
encouragement throughout her experiences as a
player, it would definitely be her mom.
"My mom has always pushed me to
be strong and do my best because
she had always dreamed of playing
college basketball herself Gillem
said. "She is so supportive of me.
When 1 was in high school, she
missed only one of my games
Gillem chose to come to ECU
because she liked the location and
the people of the Pirate communi-
ty. She says that playing ball here is
completely different from her past
experiences as an athlete because
for the first time ever, she has to
compete against her teammates for
a starting position.
"At first, all of the new faces were really
intimidating Gillem said. "But now we are all
very close and we work together well
Coming from Roseboro, NC, freshman
Danielle Melvin chose ECU because she felt
that this is where she will best be able to make
a statement about her love for the sport and her
talent out on the court. With an older sister who
plays basketball for NC State, Melvin says her
parents have inspired a legend of basketball for
their whole family.
"Words cannot explain how much support,
good advice, and confidence they have given
me Melvin said.
As a member of a high school team that
claimed victory at the State Championship her
sophomore year, Melvin says that playing college
basketball is different from playing in high
school because her role on the team is so specif-
ic now.
"In high school, I could basically do what I
wanted out on the court. Here, everyone on the
team has a specific job. I contribute mostly to
the offense and getting in for rebounds Melvin
said.
Melvin hopes to establish a place on the team
for herself this year, and improving more and
more each day comes first on her list of priori-
ties.
After struggling with several injuries includ-
ing a broken leg, junior college player Jen Cox
transferred to ECU after spending two years at
Vanderbuilt. According to her, playing basketball
is like having a job.
"It takes a lot of concentration and discipline
to get all of my studying done, but playing bas-
ketball is the main reason why I am here Cox
said.
Cox agrees with her teammates that Coach
Donovan is one of the best of coaches around.
"You couldn't ask for a better coach Cox
said. "She is very intense and she expects a lot
out of us. That is the kind of guidance we need
to be the best
Other first year Pirate players Include
Ashanta Sellers from Largo, MD, and Chrissy
White from New Bern, NC.
Before each game, the team meets for a
pregame meal. It is at this time that the girls
have the opportunity to relax together and get
focused to take their places on the court.
As their season continues, there are many
challenges that still lie before the girls. The
Lady Pirates will be on the road tomorrow as
they play George Mason in another conference
battle.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALLSTATISTICS1
Games StartedFree throw percentageTotal pointsAverage per game
Justine Allpress13-13.744 (67-90)22016.9
Jen Cox12-12.750 (27-38)1179.8
Tracey Keltey12-11.600 (15-25)1038.6
Nicole Mamula114.816(9-11)555.0
Danielle Melvin13-2.697 (23-33)634.8
Misty Home13-5.600 (6-10)574.4
Melanie Gillem134).800 (9-10)524.0
Beth Jaynes130.773 (17-22)433.3
Laurie Ashenfelder8-8.600 (6-10)263.3
Mary Thorn12-9.500 (4-8)252.1 .
Ashanta Sellers7-0.500 (1-2)5.7
Crissy White5-01.000 (1-1)36

ynderwater Qife
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MorvFri 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
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Discount Art Supply
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758-4251 OR 758-9999
and Drive Thru!
Welcome Back ECU
WE'VE GOT JT ALU No single CD over $13.98!
New Releases only $11.98! Used CD's!
Free Video Club Membership!
Every Movie you'll ever want to see!
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12 Thursday, January 16, 1997
Exciting alternatives
to spring break
The East Carolinian
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
With less than two months until
spring break, students should begin
to make plans for the week off. If you
are looking for'an alternative to the
usual spring break vacation, Kitty
Hawk Kites is the place for you.
As it sounds by its name, they do
offer kite frying but the fun doesn't
stop there. They offer a range of
activities from hang gliding to kayak-
ing to sailing.
Kitty Hawk Kites is known for
hang gliding as they offer the world's
largest hang gliding school. More
than 200,000 people have taken
lessons and they have an annual sign
up rate of 10,000 to 15,000 people
who want to take lessons.
But if you're more inclined to
staying down to the ground, then
they offer a number of watersports
from windsurfing, sailing and kayak-
ing.
Through kayaking, the sights of
the Atlantic Ocean and Albemarle
Sound can be seen or Jockey's Ridge
State Park which hosts the East
Coast's largest dune that rises 85 feet
above sea level. And of course the
Wright Brothers Memorial, which is a
tourists delight, is another favorite
attraction.
The President of Kitty Hawk
Kites, John Harris, founded Kitty
Hawk Kites in 1974, and the busi-
ness has been thriving ever since.
Harris fell in love with .he sport of
hang gliding and wanted to share it
with others.
"I fell in love with the concept of
hang glidingwith their portability,
their being your own personal
wings Harris said.
So if you have ever wanted to be
one with the birds in flight, without
sitting in an enclosed space then
hang gliding is your sport.
"You don't need an airport or a
pilot or fuel; all you need is to get to
the top of a hill or mountain Harris
said. "Hang gliding brought a whole
new dimension to flight
If you're interested there are a
number of ways they can be reached.
By the Internet their site is -
www.kittyhawk.comkittyhawk or by
e-mail at
information@khkinfo.pdial.inter-
path.net
Their phone number is 919-441-
4127 and the address is RO. Box
1839, 3933N S. Croatan Highway at
Jockey's Ridge, Nags Head, NC
27959.
When Harris began this business
he had one thought in mind when it
came to hang gliding.
�OSS. W�SB�W�W$
liii
id Vn) pm at the Vwmjn la-jut
WdiU'M
v"n pm a! thi' Newman C
olun
i b- a k'llowshi
GET MONEY FROM YOUR UNCLE INSTEAD.
fees. They even pay a flat rate
for textbooks and supplies.
You can also receive an allow-
ance of up to1500 each school
year the scholarship is in
effect. Find out-today if
you qualify.
Your Uncle Sam. Every
year Army ROTC awards
scholarships to hundreds of
talented students. If you
qualify, these merit-based
scholarships can help you
pay tuition and educational
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE YOU CAN TAKE
For details, visit 346 Rawl Building or call
328-6967
Harris
Your Neighborhood Food Market
VI:
16 oz. Selected Varieties Meat
Oscar Mayer
Wieners
IS oz. Original Del Monte
Sloppy Joe;
Sauce
6oz.SeaPak
Shrimp
Poppers.
21oz.GuiKFree
Nonfat
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lOozBag
Harris Teeter
Pretzels
�Z3 yj" .
" 1 -
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rl I
1 liter
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water
8 oz. Fresh Express
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or Blends
64 oz. Ocean Spray
Island .
duava
12 Inch In The Deli
Psppexoni
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1.25 oz. McCormick Chili
let. loaf In The Bakery
Round Sourdough
French Bread
Mix
16 oz. President's Choice
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PenneRigate
8 oz.
Harris Teeter
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8 ct In The Bakery
Cinnamon
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Soft Drink Feature
Mt. Dew, Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi-Cola
2 Liter
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32 oz.
Prices Effective Throuah January 21,1997
Prices in This Ad Effective Wednesday. January 15 Through January 21, 1997 in our Greenville Area Stores Only.
We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.





;j3 ThMftdty, January 16, 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
l I RKDOS
N vw York Ivi;i
ALFREDO'S
SPORTS
Monday
BAR
"Tuesdiy $1
Rile Ail Nik'
ONE Site
one topping
Drink
$1.25
tH 9pm daily
On Sunday,
Monday, A
Tuesday, frcm
9pm til midnight
one small top-
ping NY Pizza
Vtednesday- $l
R-edium Imports Nite
rVnii sH;iy -I
Mkiu Brew Ni
Friday -Saturdas
Bartender Spediais
Baseball nearing the cracking of bats
Dill Dillard
SENIOR WRITER
DowntownE. 5th st.
7524)022
It's that time of year again folks.
That's right, it's time for the young
'97 college baseball season to crank
up, and young is the adjective to
describe ECU head baseball coach
Gary Ovcrton's club.
Last season the Pirates started off
strong by handled nationally ranked
programs like Tennessee and
Kentucky at the beginning of the sea-
son but seemed to sputter towards
the end of the season with heat break-
ing conference losses. The Bucs
return a lot of experienced personnel
but only have two to show for senior
leadership. The Pirates will return
sophomore second baseman Travis
Thompson as well as much improved
catcher junior Tim Flaherty. Flaherty
will come into the '97 season with
.252 batting average from '96 as well
as the man with the power, leading
the Bucs with eight homers last sea-
son.
The rest of the infield will be new
faces for the starting line up.
Sophomore Jason Howard and fresh-
man Jimmy Forrest will compete for
first base which was vacated by the
move of Randy Rigsby to the outfield.
Junior transfer Ryan Massino will
fill a gap at the shortstop and give the
Bucs some added power to the line
up. Finally Raleigh native and
Louisburg JC stand out Matt Williams
will play third base for the Pirates.
The outfield will show the most
experience for Ovcrton's club with all
three positions filled by experienced
players. Rigsby will make the move
from first base to center field to fill
the void left by former Pirate captain
Jason Head. Left field will be manned
once again by Steve Salargo. The
Wilson native had an outstanding
freshman season and looks to improve
in 97. Last, but certainly not least at
right field will be the speedster
Antaine Jones. Jones, the sophomore
from Stella, NC, showed that he was a
threat at the plate batting .297 and
was every pitchers nightmare as a
threat to steal on any given pitch.
The Pirate pitching staff is
extremely young and has no definite
rotation as of yet, but look for Brian
Fields and Kevin Fulchcr to start off
strong for ECU. Fultcher comes off of
a solid finish to the '96 season and
Fields a proven performer as a transfer
out of NC State.
The Pirates will start the season on
a road trip to Charleston, SC for a bat-
tle with the Citadel on February 7.
HEROES
ARE HERE
TOO!
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BASKETBALL STANDOUTS
Trtcty KMty
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Jonathan Kamer
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7
-
Tuesday
Employee Appreciation Nite:
All Greenville Restaurant & Niteclub Employees Get in Free All HHm
� $1.00 Admission For Everyone Else
$1.00 Domestics
& Hi Balls,
,�
Wedn ESDAY
CLASSICS NIGHT
The test in Classic Rock & Dance plus all of the cui
Don't miss the ECU favorite for over 10 ye;
Thursday
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Double Rum & Coke, Screwdrivers, Bourbon & Gingerale,
& Midori Sours only $3 All Nite!
Friday
iWft; vV
1$ special
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Alter 10:1.00 Members, $3.00 Guests!
� $2.50 22oz. Buds, Natural Ice, Coors Lite & Red Dogs All Nite
And the best in Dance Music all nite long!
SATU RDAY
THE DANCE FACTORY!
Non-Stop Top 40 & NRG Dance Music All Nite
Admission Only $1.00 for Members All nite!
� $2.50 Teas & Sex on the Beach!
758-4591 or 752-4715





H
Pepsi Cola Bottling Company of Greenville, NC
Presents
. - ,
The PEPSI Perfect Attendance Contest
Attend the remaining 5 Men's Home Basketball Games
Sat. Jan. 18 Richmond - 12 Noon
lues. Jan. 21, James Madison - 7:00
Wed. Jan. 29, Old Dominion - 7:00
���
Wed. Feb. 12, Virginia Commonwealth - 7:00
Sat. Feb. 22, UNCW - 7:00
For a chance to win undergraduate, in-state tuition and fees
Hp plus books, for one semester.
m � .
"We, at Pepsi, want to do something to show our enthusiasm for the Pirate Basketball
program said Thomas E. Minges, President of Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of
Greenville. "We are excited about Pirate Basketball and this gesture is our way of
demonstrating our support for Coach Joe Dooley and the program
There will be a sign-up table located in the lower level, east concourse of Williams
Arena at Minges Coliseum. Students must present their valid I.D. in order for their name
to be placed on the list and become eligible for the tuition prize. Then, at each subse-
quent men's home game, each student must go by the table and present his or her I.D.
in order to have their attendance confirmed. ,
At the final 1996-97 home game(Feb. 22 vs. UNC Wilmington), the names of all
eligible students will be placed in a drawing with the winner receiving the grand prize.
U graduating seniors and graduate students are eligible to participate. Due to NCAA regulations,
:ii student-athletes and student employees of the athletic department, are not eligible for the contest.





2
riess lo
Sunday
sored Chess
Mendenhall
University Unions Spon-
ournament at 1 p.m. in 8A-E
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series:
Vienna Choir Boys at 2 p.m. in Wright Audi-
torium.
School of Music sponsored Musicians Against
AIDS: "Sounds of Support a benefit con-
cert for PICASO (Pitt Counry AIDS Service
Organization) at 7 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Tuesday
4
Ledonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center sponsored focus on
film: Sankofa at 7 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
JANUARY
16
hursday
Friday
Lecture and Reception:
Environmental Batiks of Mary Edna Fraser,
American Tapestry Biennial, at 7 p.m. in Gray
Gallery.
Emma at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre through
Jan. 18.
18
24
Jmmm 1 Guest Recital: Eric
Mandat, clarinet, from Southern Illinois Uni-
versity, at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Jazz at Night: Carroll V. Dashiell, Jf direc-
tor, at 8 p.m. in the Mendenhall Social Room.
Saturday
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: Anonymous 4 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium.
25'
Saturday
Scholarship Benefit Gala of
the Friends of the School of Music. Call 328-
6851 for ticket information.
(left) Photo Courtesy of S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series
English guitarist and lutenist Julian
Bream will play in Wright Auditorium
on April 10.
gm W Faculty Recital: Peter
Mills, saxophone, at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Thespians of Diversity: Tribute to Martin
Luther King, Jr. Tentative. Please call
Reginald Watson at 328-6684 for more infor-
mation.
20
Monday
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Candlelight March at 6 p.m. starting at the
crest of College Hill.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration program
at 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre with a re-
ception immediately afterwards in Menden-
hall Multi-Purpose Room.
30'
Thursday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Canadian West at 4
p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. There
will also be a theme dinner at 6 p.m. in Men-
denhall Great Room.
Tuesday
21
jgm University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: CzechSlovakia: Land
of Beauty and Change at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre. There will also be a
theme dinner at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Room.
Guest Recital: Dennis Askew, tuba, at 8 p.m.
in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
31
Friday
23
Thursday
1
Saturday
6
Thursday
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Artseries: Bolshoi Symphony Or-
chestra at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
East Carolina Dance Theatre's Dance '97 at
8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre through Feb. 11.
7
Friday
Mardi Gras celebration at 9
p.m. in Mendenhall.
Photo Courtesy of S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series
(above) The Taylor 2 Dance
Company bring their boundless
energy to Wright Auditorium on
March 22.
81
Saturday
Ledonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center sponsored African-
American Student Leadership Workshop at
9:30 a.m. in Mendenhall Great Room.
Family Fare Series: Black Journey at 2 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium.
10
Monday
12
Wednesday
mation.
13
Thursday
Photo Courtesy of S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series
(right) Watch The Flying Karamozov
Brothers juggle the night away on
March 6.
Sunday at the Gallery Con-
cert: Louise Toppin, soprano, and Sharon
Munden, mezzo-soprano, at 2 p.m. in the
Greenville Museum of Art.
3
Monday
"Walter S. Hartley: A 70th
Birthday Musical Celebration Symphonic
Wind Ensemble, Scott Carter, conductor, at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
2
Wednesday
Faculty Recital: Britton
Thcurer, trumpet, and Reiko Ishii, piano, at
8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
4
Tuesday
"Chamber Music of Walter
S. Hartley: A 70th Birthday Musical Celebra-
tion Mark Taggert, director, at 8 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
TuesdayThursday Jazz
Ensemble, Peter Mills, director, at 8 p.m. in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Thursday
Thespians of Diversity:
Black History play. Tentative. Please call
Reginald Watson at 328-6684 for more infor-
Wednesday
Lecture and reception:
Olivia Parker, juror. International Photogra-
phy and Digital Image Exhibition at 7 p.m.
in Gray Gallery.
51
f University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Exploring Ancient
America at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. There will also be a theme dinner
at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room.
Battle of
sity Mall.
Fourth Annual Barefoot
ands at 7 p.m. on the Univer-
Friday
Opera Theatre Production,
Stephen Blackwelder, director, at 8 p.m. in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
15
Saturday
6
Monday
Thursday
Black History Month Con-
cert: Motown at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall.
S. Rudolph Alexander Per-
forming Arts Series: The Flying Karamazov
Brothers in Sharps, Flats, and Accidentals at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
0 Percussion Players and
Percussion Ensemble, Mark Ford, Director,
at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
20
Thursday
19
Wednesday
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
(above) The Andes mountians are the focus of the TravelAdventure Film
series on April 1. No Fooling.
Lecture and reception: Dr.
Rebecca Nagy, "Art and Archaeology in
Sepphoris, an Ancient City in Israel at 7 p.m.
in Speight Auditorium.
� Young People's Concerts,
EastCarolina Symphony Orchestra, Stephen
Blackwelder, conductor, at �:30 a.m. and 11:30
a.m. in Wright Auditorium
�����
Faculty Recital: Nathan Williams, clarinet,
Christopher Ulffers, bassoon, and Elizabeth
Norvell Ulffers, piano, at 8 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
20
Works hv ECU
Lecture and reception: Dr.
Mary EllerTSoles, "I, Claudia: Women in
Ancient Rome at 7 p.m. in Speight Audito-
rium.
Facultv Reciul: Elliot Frank, guitar, at 8 p.m.
in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Thursday
24
Monday
Saturday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Great Britain's Great
Canals at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. There will also be a theme dinner
at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room.
Symphonic Wind En-
semble, Scott Carter, conductor; and Jazz En-
semble A, Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr director, at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Feeiing Minnesota at 8 p.m. in Hendrix The-
atre through Feb. 2.
FEBRUARY
27
Thursday
in
East Carolina Playhouse:
SubUrbia by Eric Bogosian at 8 p.m
McGinnis Theatre through March 4
MARCH
Premiere Performances of
��m.i v.w Composers. Mark Taart.
director, at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
22'
m Jmm S.Rudolph Alexander Pe
forming Arts Series: Taylor 2 Dance Compa
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
26'
mm f School of Art Undergradu-
ate Exhibition Awards Ceremony and recep-
tion, at 7 p.m. in Speight Auditorium. The
exhibition will run through April 19 in Gray
Gallery.
Concert choir, Brett Watson, conductor, at 8
p.m. in 244 Mendenhall.
Check our Coming Attrac-
tions Column everv Thurs-
day for Hendrix movies and �
more events around campus
and Greenville.
� !� � � �
K � �
Wednesday
Saturday
1
g Family Fare Series: Dino-
saur Mountain at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
31
Monday
Lecture and reception:
American Tapestry Biennial I, Tapestries by
Jean Pierre Larochette and Lurie Yael at 7
p.m. in Speight Auditorium.
Faculty Recital: Malcolm Tait, piano, at 8
p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
University Unions Spon-
sored Spades Tournament at 1 p.m. in 8A-E
Mendenhall.
2
Sunday
"Chew on This" Lecture
at noon in Mendenhall Underground. TBA
Contemporary Jazz Ensemble, Paul Tardif,
director, at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
APRIL
East Carolina Symphony
Orchestra, Stephen Blackwelder, conductor,
at 3 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Guest Recital: VIDEMUS, Vivian Taylor,
Robert Honeysucker, Ruth Hamilton, Stan
Strickland, and faculty member Louise
Toppin, soprano, with the ECU Steel Drum
Ensemble, Mark Ford, director, at 8 p.m. in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
1
Tuesday
University Unions Travel
Adventure Film Series: Darwin's Patagonia &
Tierra del Fuego at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre. There will also be a theme
dinner at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room.
Photo Courtesy of Student Union
This totems are part of what you'll
find Exploring Ancient America on
March 5.





16 Thursday. January 16, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
The Anonymous 4 will be bringing their vocal chanting talents to
Wright Auditorium Saturday evening.
PHOTO COURTESY Of S. BUOOIPH AUXAWKR raffOTMWB ART SERIES
Medieval vocalists sing at Wright
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
Are you ready for the Anonymous 4 to
get medieval on your ass?
Not a twisted tribute to Tarantino
or Pulp Fiction, the Anonymous 4 are
actually four women who have won
international critical and commercial
success with their recordings and per-
formances of medieval chants. The
group will perform Saturday night at
Wright Auditorium on the ECU cam-
pus. The event, part of the S. Rudolph
.Alexander Performing An Series, is
slated to begin at 8 p.m.
Ruth Cunningham, Marsha
Genensky, Susan Hellauer and
Johanna Maria Rose formed in 1986 to
experiment with the sound of
medieval chant and polyphony as sung
by higher voices.
Anonymous 4 takes its name from
an anonymous 13th century
Englishman who, as a student in Paris,
wrote about the vocal polyphony then
being performed at the Cathedral of
Notre Dame.
The group combines musical, liter-
ary and historical scholarship with 20th
century performing intuition to create
programs that interweave music with
poetry and narrative.
The '90s has brought incredible
success to the four women. Their first
album, An English Ijidymass, was named
Classical Disc of the Year for 1993 by
CD Review. So far, it has sold more
than 150,000 copies worldwide. Their
sophomore effort. On Yoolis Night,
topped the Billboard classical chart
within two months of its release. On
Yoolis Night was awarded the prestigious
French Diapason d'Or award. Lace's
Illusion, the group's third album, has
sold more than 100,000 copies world-
wide.
The success of the Anonymous 4
has taken the group across the United
States and Europe. They have played
at festivals in Germany, France,
England and Spain. Their concerts in
Attic swings tonight with Nut Zippers
Jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
If you're not already familiar with Squirrel Nut
Zippers, chances are you will be soon. Why?
Because this Chapel Hill band is coming to our
very own Attic nightclub tonight. Usually the
music scene in the Emerald City caters to roots
rock and beach music fans, but tonight is differ-
ent. Tonight Greenville goes back in time to an
era where everything was cool, classy, smoky,
and jazzy.
Squirrel Nut Zippers play a wicked combina-
tion of swing, jazz, big band, dixieland and bop
music. And this sound seems to be garnering
some national attention. Not only have they
enticed us younguns to discover the joys of our
grandparents' old 78 rpm records, but they have
also tugged on the ears of the old timers as well.
After the release of their first album, The
Inevitable Squirrel Nut Zippers, the band
appeared on Late Night with Conan O'Brien and
National Public Radio even did a piece about
them in which one bandmember said, "Right
now we're just at the point of not quite making
it Without a doubt, they certainly "made it"
after the release of their sophomore effort. Hot,
last year. Selling out dates all over the United
States, Squirrel Nut Zippers still seem to have
plenty of time for their fellow Carolinians and
tend to play several times a year here, as well.
I've seen them three times and I can guarantee
you that you'll have a good time if you go to the
Attic tonight.
These kids play everything from banjo to sax-
ophone to an upright bass in order to make sure
that their sound is authentic to that once heard
in the hippest clubs and music halls of the '20s,
'30s and '40s. It all works perfectly. Yet none of
the instrumentation compares with the angelic
voice of Miss Katharine Whalen, banjo player
and sometime lead singer.
All the comparisons'that are drawn between
Whalen and jazz great Billie Holiday are
deserved, and Whalen also includes an equal
dose of Betty Boop as an influence in her broad
range of vocal stylings. Whalen's smoky, dreamy,
drop-everything-and-listen vocal presence
seems to speak from a different era.
This is not to sav that the rest of the band is
the United States often sell out and
require re-engagements.
Cunningham, Genensky, Hellauer
and Rose have also been featured on
numerous national radio programs,
including National Public Radio's
Weekend Edition and Performance Today
and Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home
Companion.
Advance tickets for the event are
available for $15 to die public $12 for
ECU faculty and staff and $7 for ECU
students and youths. All tickets will be
$15 at the door. rbr more information, call
the Central Ticket Office at 328-4788 or
1-800-ECU-ARTS . rbr deaf or speech
impaired access call 328-4736. The tick-
et office is open 8:30 am to 6 p.m
lacking. Far from it, actually. Having lost a mem-
ber since Inevitable (bet that guy's kicking him-
self now), the now six member group includes
three other proficient vocalists, Tom Maxwell,
Ken Mosher and James Mathus, all of whom are
competent, high-energy musicians as well.
Joining Squirrel Nut Zippers as an opening
act will be The Blue Rags from Boone, NC who
were recently signed to the alternative label Sub
Pop records. (Rumor has it that Afghan Whigs'
lead singer Greg Dulli caught their act and rec-
ommended that they be signed.) The Blue Rags
play ragtime jazz, so their sound will work in per-
fect coordination with Squirrel Nut Zippers.
All in all, this should be a great evening. So
prepare yourself for the show tonight. Go to
Dapper Dan's downtown and buy an old tux or
evening dress, get some cigars from Onix, and
get ready to dance your ass off, old school style.
Bands like these don't come to Greenville often,
so you should jump on the chance to see them.
Who knows, if enough people show up, we might
get a chance to have more of a diverse musical
choice here. But only if people go tonight. The
tickets are $7.50 and are available at CD Alley
and East Coast Music & Video. See ya there.
The Attic goes back in time tonight vAm tha Squirrel Nut Zippers hit the stage.
PH0T0 COURTESY OF MAMMOTH RECORDING COHnUTf
New season springs to life at playhouse
Jennifer Coleman
A Jmior Theatre
Edmatim maor from
WUmmpon. NC. die
someday hopes to
be a thoroughly
mtkss member
ofsocietj.
Christmas break is over and the students of
ECU are faced with another semester of
attending classes, writing papers, taking tests
and stressing out. Everyone knows this is the
longest stretch of the year. What can we do to
avoid a total nervous breakdown in the face of
all this stress?
I suggest attending a few of the produc-
tions scheduled to complete the 1996-97
ECU Playhouse season. Three big shows are
planned for the second semester: Dance '91,
SubUrbia, and Lysistrata. This combination of
dance, drama, and comedy is sure to give you
that necessary break from the rigors of col-
lege life.
1 he first production this semester, Dance
'91, follows in the tradition of past dance the-
atre productions from the department of the-
atre and dance. Faculty and guest artists
choreograph original pieces which are then
brought to life by the dancers on stage. Add
to the dancers' movements a complex light-
ing arrangement, beautiful costumes, and
music that will keep you humming days after
the show is over and you have a theatrical
experience that is not to be missed. Dance '91
will be performed Thursday, Feb. 6, through
Tuesday, Feb. 11.
Eric Bogosian's SubUrbia is the next show
this semester. SubUrbia is a complex show
dealing with the lives of several young people
trying to survive in the '90s. There is hardly a
controversial topic not dealt with in the
course of this production, but Bogosian does
so in a completely new way. He looks at these
topics - sex, drugs, depression, alcohol and
more - from a "Generation X" point of view.
Too many people forget or refuse to accept
that today's youth are living in dangerous
times, with seriously disturbing problems to
face. Bogosian tackles these issues and forces
us to see what happens to our children when
they start spending more time out of the
home than in it. This show does contain
harsh language and mature content. SubUrbia
will be performed Thursday, Feb. 27, through
Tuesdav, March 4.
The final play in the ECU Playhouse
1996-97 season is Aristophanes' classic battle
of the sexes, Lysistrata. Set during the
Peloponnesian War, Lysistrata is the story of
the Athenian women's struggle to put an end
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17 Thursday, January 16. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
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Jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
People hate Larry Flynt. You may not
know who he is, but you have definite-
ly heard of his magazine, Hustler. Larry
Ffynt began publishing Hustler as a
promotional gimmick for his string of
strip clubs in Ohio. The raw and
raunchy magazine caught national
attention after it published nude pho-
tos of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the
former First Lady. Hustler's sales con-
tinued to boom throughout the early
70s, making Flynt into a multi-mil-
lionaire almost overnight.
And that is why people hate Larry
Flynt. He is an obnoxious, opinionat-
ed, larger-than-life, no apologies porn
publisher with tons of money. He has
been in and out of court in defense of
his right to publish because many peo-
ple believe him to be the lowest form
of human life possible - a scum king.
That's where the new film, Tie People
vs. Larry Ffynt, comes in.
In this new movie, directed by
Milos Forman (One Flev Over the
Cuckoo's Nest, Amadeus) and produced
by Oliver Stone (Platoon, Born on the
Fourth of July, JFK, Natural Born Killers,
Nixon), Woody Harrelson portrays
Larry Frynt and his struggle to be the
emperor of sleaze in America.
Although many people are disgusted
by the trash that Flynt produces and
feel him to be below redemption, it
still must be remembered that Flynt is
an American citizen, and as such he is
guaranteed certain rights within the
law. The right to freedom of speech is
one of those.
Although the film portrays (with
painful clarity) FTynt's drug addiction,
sexual promiscuity, physical handicap,
and mental illness, the main focus of
the narative is on an individual's right
to speak his mind without fear of cen-
sorship from the government. As icon-
oclastic as Flynt is, he truly believes in
the rights of American citizens, so
much so that he took his battle to the
Supreme Court. Flynt is an unusual
American hero (and I'm not sure if
that is even the right word to be used
in conjunction with him), but his life
makes for an extremely entertaining
and thought-provoking piece of film.
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Woody Harrelson and Courtney Love get sleazy and political in new film.
PHOTO COURTESY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES
Joining Woody Harrelson in the
film are Hole lead singer and widow of
Kurt Cobain, Courtney Love, as
Flynt's wife Althca Lcasurc; Woody's
real-life brother Brett as Flynt's broth-
er Jimmy; and Love's current
boyfriend Edward Norton as Flynt's
attorney Alan Isaacman. The always
bizarre writeractor Crispin Glover
shows up as Frynt flunkie Arlo, as well.
Several interesting cameos show up,
too. Look for Frynt himself as Judge
Morrissey, the man behind the bench
on Flynt's first court confrontation,
and James Carville, the senior political
advisor to President Clinton, as anti-
pom crusader Simon Lcis.
Love is amazingly good in the film
as the stripper turned wife turned
publisher turned drug addict, Althca.
The love shared between Leasure and
Flynt is vibrant, dedicated, honest
and, of course, weird, and Harrelson
and Love give it all the spark it needs
to ignite the screer Love shows a true
connection with the character of
Althca and if any more parts come up
that require a drug-addled slut with
more than half a brain, I suggest she
snatch them up - she's perfect. No
really, she does do a good job.
The best performance in the film,
however, comes from Harrelson.
Looking and sounding nothing like
Flynt in real life, Harrelson becomes
Frynt on the big screen. He is as
manic, garrulous, and wacko as Frynt
has ever been, which gives the film its
creepy yet tantalizing feel.
As for the film itself, I would highly
recommend it. If you're going for tital-
lation, you'll get it. If you're going for
intelligent discourse, it's there, too. If
you're looking for slice-of-life stuff,
here it is. This movie has it all. And it's
a damn fine story, as well. As stupid
and disgusting as this film had the
potential to be, it is a compliment to
Forman and his crew that turned out
to be such a masterpiece. And I don't
use that word lightly
Also playing in rotation right now
on the A&E cable channel is a biogra-
phy of Larry Ffynt, which tells you
some details that the film leaves out.
Do yourself a favor and see both.
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18 Thursday January 16, 1997
lifestyle
bOOkreview
The East Caronman
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
Anthology
John Davis
s 1 uv WHITER
"The sound must seem an echo to the
sense Alexander Pope once wrote of
poetry. He was. of course, writing in a
time when poets did this very odd
thing with their poetry, a thing which,
sadly is overlooked these days: they
read their poems aloud. To audiences.
These davs poets don't read
their poetry-
very often, or
when they do,
the readings go
relatively unno-
ticed, except by
other poets of
course. Most
i people consider
poetry a thing to be read quietly in lit-
erature class and also a thing for intel-
lectuals, a highbrow aspect of litera-
ture that involves a good deal of mis-
understanding and is not very much
fun either.
But, if Pope is right (and I might
get into a bit of trouble with a few-
professors if I say he wasn't), then
perhaps poetry might be better
understood when it is heard.
Recentlv. there has been a bit of a
renewed interest in poetry reading.
Bill Movers produced the documen-
tary The Ijngucige of Ije, which fea-
tured modern poets reading their own
work. The Nuyorcian Poets Cafe has
been one of the many small groups of
poets involved in bringing attention
to performance poetry with their
anthology entitled Aloud!
Even in North Carolina poets are
starting to make their voices known.
Vheville. Chapel Hill and other cities
have poetry teams that compete in
cutthroat readings called "slams.
.And just this past New Year's Eve,
Raleigh held a poetry reading as a part
of its First Night celebration, which
featured some very brilliant poetry by
Jonathan Williams. Jay Sullivan, and a
fellow who was introduced as
"Bvron
Since this revival is gaining
strength and speed, it is no wonder
that Rhino records released this
anthology, entitled In Their Own Voices:
A Century of Recorded Poetry. The
anthology consists of four CDs and a
book which begins with Walt
Whitman and moves right on up to
modern poets such as Li-Young Lee.
As the title suggests, the poets them-
selves read their works. The set
includes nearly eighty poets reading
well over a hundred works.
The variety in the set is wonderful
and refreshing. Any student of litera-
ture will have noticed the annoying
tendency of anthologies to exclude
certain types of poetry or certain
poets, due to the bias of the editors.
Whether because the producers of
this set were very open-minded or
because thev just wanted to have a
good-sized boxed set, this anthology-
ranges from the very popular poets
(Ogden Nash, Robert Frost), to the
talented but unconventional (Charles
Bukowski, Leonard Cohen), to the
brilliant but not-yet-famous (Li-
Young Lee, Joseph Brodsky).
The pleasant surprise of the inclu-
sion of some of the 19th-century
poets like Walt Whitman and William
Butler Yeats is downright cool, espe-
cially since it's pretty awe-aspiring to
think about Whitman recording
"America" on Edison's wax-record
phonograph way back in the day. 1o
hear Whitman reading one of his sig-
nature pieces only two years before his
death brings chill bumps to the skin,
an experience similar to hearing John
Lcnnon sing "Free as a Bird
The performances themselves are
fascinating. To hear the spooky way
e.e. cummings reads "anyone lives in a
prettv how town or to discover that
Lawrence Ferlenghetti had a slight
lisp, or to sense the frustration in
Allen Ginsberg's voice when he reads
his "America" all add new dimensions
to the poems and the poets. There is
alwavs the worry that hearing the
poets read might take away from the
poem and from the poet, but this is
not the case. The emotion contained
in Langston Hughes' "the Negro
Speaks of Rivers" is even more pro-
nounced when Hughes reads.
The book included with the CDs
is an added bonus. Anthology com-
mentaries are oftentimes academic to
a point of silliness, and the inane way
boxed sets are presented is sometimes
unbelievable. But this book is well
done. It includes only a few of the
obligatory essays, and they are all
entertaining as well as informative.
The book also includes an hysterical
svnopsis of poetry terms and tools
from the book Could be Verse:
Anybody's Cuide to Poetry by John
Timpane. The Guide is actually quite
helpful (read the four definitions ot
"irony" and see why Alanis
Morrissette's song isn't ironic at all). 1
even picked up a few new vocabulary
words myself (I'll never tell you which
ones).
The only problem 1 find with this
anthology is the notable absence ot
anything by T.S. Eliot, who has record-
ed' his poems, and the obnoxious
inclusion of fad-poet Maya Angelou.
She reads about as insipidly as she
writes, but the good thing is that this
is on CD and 1 can program the track
out of my player.
Aside from these two (minor)
flavs. The collection is teally well
done, very informative and enjoyable.
The people who put this thing togeth-
er had their heads screwed on straight.
which is a genuine relief because it
could have been a disaster. But it isn't
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19 Thursday. January 16. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
CHINESE RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SPECIALS: MON-FRI � SUNDAY BUFFET
PRIVATE BANQUET FACILITIES � ALL ABC PERMITS
BANQUET ROOM ACCOMODATES UP TO 120 PEOPLE
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CD
review
The Smashing Pumpkins
The Aeroplane
Flies High
'Olina Uni
Student Union Board of Mri
ng afurifcattoas
i-
tar the 1987-1888
Any full-time student with
a minimum G.P.A. el 2.S can aprf
Applications are avaftable
at the Student Union Office
Room 238 Mendenhaa Student Center
DMm ft Apply: January 22,1
Remember that meatloaf
your mom used to make?
We have it, plus ham,
turkey, and roasted chicken.
Call or Fax Ahead For Pick-Up Orders
Call ub for your catering
and holiday orders.
(919) 321-1700
Dale Williamson
assistant lifestyle editor
The Smashing Pumpkins have had mixed blessings late-
ly. They started out in high gear with the release of their
1995 double CD album Mellon Collie and the Infinite
Sadness, which climbed the charts and became a best-
selling hit. .
Trouble arose when the band became entangled in a
situation that resulted in their keyboard player becoming
a victim of a drug overdose. Jimmy Chamberlain, the
band's drummer, had a struggling history with drug
addiction and was believed cured. Unfortunately,
Chamberlain eventually gave in to his addiction and was
asked to leave Smashing Pumpkins for good, forcing a
delay on the band's highly publicized tour.
Time heals all wounds, and Smashing Pumpkins let
time work its magic. They found a new drummer and
began their tour. They were back in high gear.
As if to prove that they are stronger than ever,
Smashing Pumpkins recently released a CD box set that
highlights their singles from Mellon Collie, but it also
offers much, much more. Instead of filling their collec-
tion with one top 40 hit after another, this box of joy,
entitled The Aeroplane Flies High, is spiced with many b-
sides as well as several tracks that are to be found no
where else, making this a must for any die-hard
Pumpkins fanatic.
Tb be precise, the boxed see contains all the singles
thus far released from Mellon CoOt, 28 b-sides not found
on Mellon Collie, 12 of which were previously unreleased.
Also included are five cover songs that are available only
in this collection and a 44-page book filled with song
lyrics and rare photos. All in all, this collection contains
over 100 minutes of hard-to-find music. And if that isn't
enough, the box itself is a sturdy, portable, compact
case emblazoned with a hypnotizing black-and-white
spiral design. .
The project is the brain child of Smashing Pumpkins
lead singer and mastermind Billy Corgan, along with
assistance from Frank Olinsky, who also served as the col-
lection's an director and designer. Judging from the qual-
ity of tracks chosen for the collection and the appealing
graphics included within the book, Corgan and company
obviously saw this as a worthwhile effort. Tb use a Gen X
expression, it reeks of effort.
Anyone familiar with the Pumpkins sound knows that
they flip-flop from mellow and mystical to hard-edged
and distorted. Most of the tracks included tend to lean
more toward the mellow sound, so those preferring a
more rough than smooth sound may be disappointed.
Still, several tracks exemplify the anger for which
Smashing Pumpkins is famed.
The Pumpkins' hit singles "Bullet with Butterfly
Wings" and "Zero" are both here in their angered glory.
But Corgan and company don't always express anger
through loud, distorted guitar riffs or pounding drums,
and, to be honest, it's not their anger that makes
Smashing Pumpkins worth listening to. It's their willing-
ness to experiment. ,
Songs like "The Boy" incorporate simple lyncal
refrains ("I can't stop 1 can't breathe 1 can't think I'm
in love again") with such an energetic and fun musical
beat that one doesn't care if this innocent pop tune is
from the same band renowned for such songs as "God"
where Corgan bitterly sings, "God knows I'm helpless to
speak on my own behalf God is as helpless as me caught
in the negatives
In many ways, the Smashing Pumpkins arc an enigma;
you can't simply label them as one kind of band or anoth-
er. It's hard to simplify any band that will do a cover of a
Cars song ("You're all I've got tonight"), a tender,
acoustic version of a song originally powered by heavy
studio technology ("Tonight, Tonight") and a sound mix
totaling over 25 distorted minutes of nothing but guitar
riffs and feedback ("Pastichio Medley").
Despite a difficult year, the Smashing Pumpkins have
managed to pull through and prove that they are still one
of the music industry's greatest talents. If this new
boxed sampling is any indication as to the Pumpkins'
willingness to continue on their experimental track, then
this is one band That is going to continue to fry high into
the future of music.
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20 Thursday, January 16. 1997
il('style
The Eost Carolinian
CD
reviews
�0��@
Snoop Doggy Dogg
Tha Doggfather
DEREK T. HALLE
SENIOR WRITER
Oh yes, he shook you.
And now he shakes you again. The
notorious Snoop Doggy Dogg. a.k.a.
Calvin Broadus. is back again with his
most entertaining recording to date.
Although his respectful days of
being with the doctor brought him
huge amounts of fame, the next step
he took seems to be paying off. With a
rags to riches success story nipping at
his heels, it's hard for Snoop Dogg not
to be overshadowed by his past.
However, with no murder conviction
in hand and a phat new Rolls Royce,
the Dogg Fbund is back in business.
Tha Doggfather opens up with a
group of reporters talking, going from
one extreme to the next. "Rapper
Snoop Doggy Dogg seems to be
spending more time in the courtroom
than on the stage says one voice. It's
almost as if he set the reporters up to
take a fall the same way they set him
up.
As the album continues, it takes
the tone of a more influential, more
upbeat rhythm. D.J. ftwh, who appar-
m MOW PACE 21
Law of Nature
More
Pat Reid
STAFF WRITER
Welcome to the latest edition of cook-
ing with music. Today's recipe calls
for a range of ingredients. First take a
heaping helping of Rusted Root.
Then add a small portion of Blues
Traveler and top with a touch of The
Allman Brothers Band. Simmer on low
for about six years and you get Law Of
Nature.
Of course, these aren't the real
influences that made Law Of Nature
what they are. When the band formed
six years ago, no one knew who Blues
Traveler and Rusted Root were.
However, those are the bands that
most resemble the roots rock ensem-
ble of Law Of Nature on their second
album. Afore.
With a line-up of three guys and
two girls, gie band can call on a large
number of vocal arrangements, but
opt instead to leave the singing to the
two girls. The main singer is Jennifer
Knight, but on a couple of songs
bassist Karen Estill takes over the
microphone. This has an effect much
like the duo vocals of the Indigo Girls,
SEE NATURE. PAGE 21
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Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your Ticket Stub
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Friday, January 17
Saturday, January 18
DE N r
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline ot 328-6004.
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students. Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID
No BackpacksBookbags Allowed in Hendrix Theatre
Emma' Is Hie Class Act Of 1996.
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21 Thursday, January 16. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Not .Available on K-mail, (I) ROM, or
the World Wide Web
Nature
continued from 20
with Knight singing high and clear and
Estill taking the deeper parts.
As far as the music goes, Law Of
Nature doesn't experiment much.
Instead they go for what they know.
More is a collection of ten acoustic-
based, upbeat and light-hearted songs
that get better as the album progress-
es.
The first song, "Easiest Thing
left me wondering if this wasn't anoth-
er run-of-the-mill indie band that
could rock but couldn't sing.
Something about Knight's voice took a
little getting used to. "Carolina the
second song, prompted me to quickly
change my mind. With music that bet-
ter fit Knight's range, "Carolina"
achieved the laid-back whimsical
sound that the band seemed to be try-
ing for.
However, don't be fooled into
thinking that Law Of Nature is just
another acoustic hippie group that has
one sound for ten songs. The band
shows some different colors on the
songs "What is This?" and "Better On
Our Own Bringing in elements of
funk, these songs call on Estill to sing
her way through jammy, jazz-influ-
enced songs that provide welcome
contrast to Knight's peppy acoustical
sound.
Then on songs like "Train Song"
and "More Knight contrasts herself
while following the soaring and diving
sound of the music. Together they
weave a musical quilt that exudes har-
mony.
All in all, Law Of Nature seems to
have their act together. The female
vocals give them a sound that provides
welcome change to the grunge-infest
ed world of music today. The band'
holds their own with extended jams
on songs like "Sun" and "As Dark As
You while remaining a tight unit
throughout the album. The only prob
lem with Law Of Nature is that they,
are still on an independen label.
Which means that if you plan to pickr
this one up you may find yourself hav
ing to special order it for now
Hopefully, some smart label will pick
them up soon.
Snoop
continued from 20
ently laid down the samples, is a sur-
prising shock in his own right.
Remember the film Friday?
507 N. Greene St.
757-0265
Coming
Jan (3f)
Don Cox
And
Xanadu
3 Clubs In 1
2 Dance Floors
Remember Red, the guy who always
got beat down by Debo? That's right,
that's D.J. Pooh.
On the record you'll hear Snoop
make references to children and how
they shouldn't walk down his path. He
almost paints himself like the devil.
This is rather cheesy. Everybody
knows who he is, the message he
sends, and the aura he presents. By
adding something like this to his
record, it diminishes his image in a
few ways. It's almost as if his enemy is
truly his conscience.
There are over 20 songs on this
album. It's impressive, but how long
f
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
WOMEN'S BOWLING CHESS

BAE
TABLE Tl
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at James Madision University in Harrisonburg, Va the weekend of
February 14-16,1997, all expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Wednesday, January 22
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center-Rooms 8 A-E
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, January 23
- 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center Rooms 8 A-E
All-Campus Women's Bowling Tournament
Wednesday, January 29
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Table Tennis Tournament (Men's & Women's Divisions)
Thursday, January 30
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
&
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
� of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information.
are the tracks? Quite long enough. A
few guest appearances, such as Too
Short on track ten, make the album
more alive, and a equal amount of
bizarre effects takes you out of the
constant drag that is the Oogg ftund.
Tha Doggfather does happen to
include a track that is a bit out of
the ordinary called "Freestyle
Conversation And it is nothing but
that. Not only does Snoop allow time
for rhythmic patterns in a conversa-
tional style, the man actually talks
over the rhythm. He doesn't stop. It's
almost like he laid his vocal track
down in the studio first, after which
the music was mixed in.
This album seems to be a progres-
sion from Snoop's last. First he was
drinking "Gin and Juice now he's
"Sippin' on some Cognac It's no
doubt that the rap star has placed
himself at the top of the charts. He
presents himself in a way like no
other.
What Snoop gives to rap is a sense
of stardom and a promise of a tomor-
row. With music rapidly changing, it's
hard to stay in the lead. Lucky for
Snoop, he's a dog; he knows how to
stay alert and keep his eyes open at
all times.
Eye
continues from 16
the other women in a revolt guaran-
teed to cause havoc: until the war is
over, there will be no more sex. What
follows is a boisterously entertaining
comedy wherein the audience is left
to decide who has the most trouble
abstaining - the men or the women
themselves. Lysistrata will be per-
formed Thursday, April 17 through
Tuesday, April 22.
All performances are to be held in
McGinnis Theatre and begin at 8
p.m except for Sunday matinees
which begin at 2 p.m. ECU faculty
and students receive a discount on
ticket prices with a valid ID. For fur-
ther information or to order tickets,
contact the McGinnis Box Office at
328-6829.
I-800-999-SKI-9
EiPii
Working at The East Carolinian provides
you with the experience needed to suc-
ceed out of school - real-life experience.
Experience that will help you get a job
and get ahead in that job. Experience
beyond the class-
room and be-
yond college.
Many are paid
positions, and all
have a big PAY-
BACK - experience. Apply now at The
East Carolinian office on the second floor
of the Student Publications Building
(across from the libraryabove CopyServ).





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23
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The East Carolinian
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25 Thursday. January 16. 1997
The East Carolinian
Rec center opens
to ooohs and ahhhs
�M.K
v k
awaited, i
oi the
people
.town
After months of waiting I I s
Student Recreation I K I
opened its doors iond.t 1 lie final
tost of the 150,000 square foot SRC
was :?! 7.9 million.
"It has been
believe it is the
hard work and ded
from the dean of student
working tor a trcn
Director of
Nam Mic s in!
To celebrate the grand opening,
the sRC has a week of activities
planned which began with the ribbon-
cutting ceremony on I in i 5 Student
Government Association President
ngela Ni declared the (.enter offi-
cialk open, and more than 1000 stu-
dents visited within the first few
hours of the ope ning
At the opening ceremony Vice
Chancellor of Student Life Dr.Alfre
Matthews said. "This is the finest
student recreation center tor pureK
student use in the 1 S. I he E 'I stu-
dents deserve it
Tuesday was Demonstration I a
and included a martial arts and aero-
bics class demonstration as well as a
trade show featuring club sporrs and
fitness activities.
On Wedncsdav Dean ol Students
Ronald Speier started the Polar Hear
Pool Parrs b jumping into the out-
door pool. Jaws was shown inside
where students could float in the
indoor pools on rafts and inner tubes
while viewing the movie. V R was
also givei away
Tonight I to8p.m. there will
be basketbal illeyball, badminton
and racquetball intramural gan -
ski machine will also be gjw � away
rherc w
basketball gan eat 7 The I Cl
team will '�
facUi
ing against the Spinal Cord
Association of Greenville I he game
is part of an adaptive program tor dis-
abled students.
"We tried to think of an adaptive
recreational program. So the EC1
community could sec what are pro-
gram is doing s.ii!Coordinator of
Intermural's Paulette Evans.
Throughout the week tree aero-
bits classes have been given away and
will continue through Friday. T-shirts,
kc c hains, frisbees, and water bottles
will also continue to lie given out.
On Sundav there will be a
Community Open House from 2-4
p.m.
The eenrer has a six-court arena
designed for basketball, volleyball and
badminton, seven racquetball eourrs
and one squash court.
It also lias a 10,001) square foot
weight training and cardiovascular fit-
ness center. This area tenures com-
puterized stationary bicycles, stair
climbers, treadmills, rowing
machines, weight machines and free
weights, free 10 minute classes arc
ottered Monday-Wednesday on how
to use Strength machines.
The natatorium has an outdoor
pool with a sunbathing deck and
three indoor pool areas, here is an
eight-lane pool for lane and lap swim-
ming as well as water sports such as
water polo, a four-lane pool area tor
(jua Fitness classes, swim classes and
bee play. There is also a leisure pool
w ith bench seating.
There arc three aerobics rooms, a
three-lane walk, jog and push track.
indoor climbing wall, fitness assess-
ment center and outdoor adventure
center.
The latest addition to dining ser-
vices is the SRC's juice bar. Center
Court. The bar was modeled atter
one at Elon College, i' funt rmns just
like other campus cal ' I is tar as
. ncnt. Meal plans, declining bal-
and cash are accepted.
However there are several diffcr-
i in what is offered The bar
Rec Center HoursMembership Rates�MMER
MonrJat Friday 6 am 11.30 pm.Student Additional Member!
SaturdaySunday 9 am 10:30 p.m.Student Dependent Pass
Climbing iFacultyStaffS100S60
lay 2 p rr�: �FacultyStaff Additional MemberS1C0$60nth
8 p.m,10;30 pmFacultyStatf Dependent Pass� ' iy
SaturdaySunday 2 pm-6 p.m.Retired Faculty
Adventure Program AreaRecent Ait. i
Monday Thursday 2 pm 6 pmRecent Alumni Add 1 MemberS240S60
Friday 10 am-6 pm.Visiting ProfessotStdHS240S100S6Q
Saturday 10 a.m12 p.m.Trustees GuestsS240S100S60S5 day
I
�teat value. ' said
d. wife Dr. Kenneth
he Medical ("enter.
were members of the
lub tor ten ears. To, i.
nd I to go it cost us 8840
i Y SRC membership
ind this is a better
; roud ol T.I I tor this
� � ji pen l
11 ,6

The concourse area provides a convenient
ed with place to relax after your workout
LEFT
i Mi i s.nd Juices, cappucino and other healthy
I I to other schools the snacks are available at the Center Court
equipment and staff are excellent I snack bar
transferred her
ABOVE
Ther�
lane indoor track with pace
able during all operating hours
:





2e
Thunday, J.nmry 18, 1997
we services
The East Carolinian
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1 SPORTS COURTS AREA
A six-court, multipurpose sports area for basketball,
volleyball, badminton and other events.
2 FITNESS AREA
The latest cardiovascular exercise machines including computer-
ized bicycles, rowing machines, stair climbers and treadmills are
here along with selectorized weight machines and free weights.
3 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
The offices of the Rec Services department are located here.
4 POOL
Four pool areas include an eight-lane, 25-yard area, a four-lane,
19-yard area, a spaleisure pool and a 30-foot by 40-foot outdoor
pool set within a sunbathing deck.
5 ADVENTURE PROGRAM
A resource area and rental center with canoes, backpacks, cooking
stoves, tents, sleeping bags and volleyball sets.
6 CLIMBING WALL
A 28-foot high wal! with five varying routes on a curved panel set
in the wall at the end of the sports court area.





27 Thursday. Januiry 16. 1997
rec services
The East Carolinian
:0'f"
7 EXERSISE STUDIOS
Three rooms with specialized floor surfaces for aerobics, dance,
martial arts, yoga and other fitness activities.
8 FITNESS ASSESSMENT AREA
An area designed to provide computerized cardiovascular
endurance, muscular, strength, flexibility and other information.
9 COURTS
This area features seven racquetball courts and one squash court.
10 TRACK
A suspended, one-fifth mile three-lane track with pace clocks is
available during all facility hours.
Nance miz i
DIRECTOR Of IKIHIIUMI MKVii h
Yes, East Carolina, there is a Student
Ret nation Center. The long-awaited opening
of this facility arrived at 12 noon on Monday.
Jan. 13 with its Crand Opening Celebration.
Students, faculty and staff poured into the
rotunda area of the center as the nbbon-cut-
ting was performed by Angle Nix. president of
the Student Government Association, Dr. l
Matthews, vice chancellor of Student Life,
and Nance Mi.e. director of Recreational
Services.
�n anticipated 500-1000 people were
expected opening day, however, over 2000
came through the d�rs.
In celebration of the opening, many activi-
ties and special events have taken place.
Sample of fresh-squeezed juices and snacks
were provided by the Center Court Juice Bar
and faculty member Carroll Dashiell. Jr. and
his four-piece jazz band provided music for the
participants on opening day.
Martial art1- and aerobics class demonstta-
tions on Tuesday night, wherein bricks and
boards were broken with bare hands and men-
tal toughness, caught the attention of many. A
miniature trade show featuring (3 different
club sports teams allowed students an oppor-
tunity to sign up for practice and team compe-
tition. The evening culminated with a ski
machine giveaway. The ski machine was
donated by The Bicycle Post.
Probably the most publicized event of the
week was scheduled for Wednesday night in
the outdoot pool - yes, the outdoor pool - for
the Polar Bear Party. The featured event was
"A Dip with the Dean" where Dean Ron Speier
bared his legs to lead others in braving the arc-
tic waters in the pool. These chartered Polar
Bear members earned a t-shirt, a chance to win
a VCR, and some hot chocolate.
Completing the week's events will be a
mini-tournament tonight from 6-8 p.m.
Tournament play will include basketball, rac-
quetball. wallyball and a wheelchair basketball
game. If you want to show off your hidden tal-
ents or just get out and play to your heart's
content, come to the Sports Courts area to
sign up. A root beer "keg" party, complete with
munchies, will be held at the Center Court
juice bar during tournament play.
And the event the entire community has
been waiting for, the SRC open house, will be
held from 2-4 p.m. on Sunday. This is designed
to provide members of the Greenville commu-
nity with an opportunity to see what the facil-
ity is like. Refreshments will be provided and
tours of the center will be conducted, so please
come join the celebration at the Center





�"�"
Thsriday. Jinmry 16. 1997
opinion
Th� East Carolinian
oumew
The long holiday break is
over and you know what that
means. The start up of class-
es, the hassles of changing
your schedule around and the
joy of buying textbooks.
Now if you haven't used up
all your Christmas money it's
a good thing because you'll
need it for those books. As we
all know at ECU you have
two choices when it comes to
buying books. You can go to
UBE, or the student book-
store. And with only two
places to purchase these
books, you can bet that
you're not going to get a great
deal on prices. We at TEC
hear complaints that match
our own of how the prices of
books seem to be outrageous
and what, is worse you don't
see very much of that money
come back into your pockets
at the end of the semester
when you sell the books back.
The on campus bookstore
will buy your book back at
half of the original price you
bought it for and then turn
GUEST
around and sell it back for
three-fourths the original
price. What this means is a 25
percent mark up.
That may seem like a large
mark up to the students, but
the manager of the bookstore
says that they barely break
even because of overhead
costs like bills and workers
salaries.
But don't blame it all on
the bookstore. The publish-
ers have some say so in what
the prices are to be set at.
While we understand the
need for them to cover their
costs, it seems to us that the
students still shell out a large
chunk of money for some
books they may only use once
during the semester.
What would be nice is if
the students had an alterna-
tive to the book stores in
which they could sell back
their books and buy them for
a price that was more feasible
to them. UNC-Chapel Hill
has a program similar to that.
They have a place run by a
student organization on cam-
pus that sets up an area
where students can set their
own prices on books and
other students can come in
and buy those books if they
want.
That student would get
most of the profit while rhe
rest might go the organiza-
tion. Now the program is
much more detailed than
this, but the idea does spark
some interest.
Nobody could say if the
idea would fly here, but
instead of complaining, a pro-
gram could be set up to help
combat these prices that
seem to be out of the stu-
dents reach.
Nobody has extra money
laying around these days, and
most of us are penny pinch-
ers. It seems ridiculous to pay
the amount of money we do
for books but isn't that what
college is ail about? It teach-
es us that life is one large dol-
lar sign, and that nothing
comes cheap.
opinion!
Eye of the Beholder
Anthony
SLAOE
What is the meaning of ugly?
wanders to things like cranberry sauce
. . u t n A �I UII.r TkAn4i Kyvrk k�V rV
Some of my colleagues and I were discussing what is "ugly
this weekend. W: thought that ugly is an opinion. So, keep-
ing that, in mind, wc decided to look it up in vfebster s
New World dictionary- Third College Edition. The book
has four definitions for ugh. .
Each of the four uses words like unpleasant, aestheti-
cally offensive and repulsive. Now, each of those "defining"
words is just about as vague as the one in question. So, a lit-
tle back-tracking was necessary. It was found that both of
the previous editions of the same dictionary defined ugly as
"the opposite of beauty
Ahhh, well now everything was much clearer! In a boo
of definitions, we got opinions. Granted, definitions are
based on consensus of opinion . But what is the consensus
on ugly? . .
Certainty, we college students can come up with a bet-
ter idea of what ugly is than the aforementioned. Now, I'm
not going to lie and say that I have never said that so & so
was ugly Judgmental as it is, it is sometimes unavoidable.
But as I get elder, I start to realize that passing that kind of
judgment is myopic and crass. (Boy, do you ever feel like
life is just one big 12-step group?) So, how do wc come up
with a definition for ugh that is not only politically correct,
but has sound and fair reason behind it?
Well, it has to be an objective term, but at the same
time it has to be cut and dry.
We don't want any gray matter here, that just wouldn t
be fair. What about anything perceptual that induces
immediate vomiting? No, no, too messy Okay, how about
something that causes physiological, visceral, or psycholog-
ical discomfort? Nah, too Freudian. Got it! Any animal, veg-
etable, mineral, or sound that drives you to a point of delir-
ium where you want to crawl back into your mothers
womb? Nope, definitely way too Oedipal. This is sad.
If I try to sit back and think of something ugly, my mind
�� - �.� -Juce and Tommy, the
grade school bully. Though both have points that make me
"feel" a certain emotion that I associate with ugly, each still
has facets that I could deem worthwhile. For example, my
mom knows that I don't like cranberry sauce, so she does-
n't bother asking me if I want some. Moreovei; Tommy may
have tripped me a lot getting on the bus, but at least he's
in jail now. So, when it comes to a few random things that
I find "ugly" I have alternate feelings that make them not
so "aesthetically offensive
What is so troubling, is that I know this word exists, and
so does a definition behind it. But, I can't seem to find the
ideal example of it. Why is that? Maybe, and I'm just expos-
tulating (SAT word), the word can appropriately be
thought of as a passing of judgment. Judgment is defined
in one way as "an opinion or estimate Ah, my point us
coming to a head! What is an opinion? Opinion is defined
as "a belief not based on absolute certainty or positive
knowledge but on what seems true, valid, or probable to
one's own mind There you have it! With a little bit of rea-
soning and logic we find that "ugly" is a relative term.
Meaning that it is no way based in fact. You cannot show
someone something that is ugly.
Point being, that I'm tired of everyone labeling some-
thing in a negative way. The word ugh doesn't permeate a
good feeling in the person who uses it, nor in the object of
that harsh judgment. Now, I'm not some whacked-out hir
pie looking for Utopia, I'm just sick of thinking that things
arc ugly Because when I think ugly thoughts, I feel ugly,
and I'm simply running out of the valium that gets my
mind off the subject. . .
Ultimately, I'd like to leave you with one last definition.
Judgmental: "judgments considered to be lacking in tolep-
ance, compassion, and objectivity
So, what kind of human being are you?
' How does television convey
the real meaning of Christmas?
I was Christmas shopping, my self of
course, looking for a Christmas album
to get me into the spirit of the season.
What I found changed mv entire out-
look on Christmas, notr�rg. Ifeah, I
found albums like Jire Cats and
Grandma Got Runover by Reindeer, I
even found one called The
Cryptkeeper's Christmas where
HBOs Cryptkeeper sangUsongs like
"Deck the halls with parts of Charlie
What happened to Christmas?
When I was a child, I waited for
each Christmas season with much
anticipation. Christmas to me was the
most magical thing on the earth.
There were shows on television that
weren't on any other time of the year
like "Rudolph the Red-Nosed
Reindeer "Frosty the snowman" and
Twas the night before Christmas I
would plop my little self down four
feet from the television and gaze at
the animated figures as they showed
me what Christmas is really about. Or
did they?
Is Christmas based on a reindeer
with a red nose and an island of misfit
toys? Or is it based on a magic man
made of snow that melts and becomes
the spirit of Christmas?
I don't think so.
If tv-�- TV shows aren't about
Christmas, then what are they about?
Have you heard of people called "New
Ager? New Agers are the people who
made Star Trek and the people who
put humans on a shelf with God, or
just try to take God off the shelf. The
real sin a New Agers is that they take
their poisoned ideals and candy-coat
them so one has no idea what they are
doing. They have effectively taken
the "Christ" out of Christmas,
replaced it with the symblol of our
Generation "X" and turned our sacred
holiday into X-mas. How could we
have let them take the birth of our
Lord away from us? How did they do
it?
By attacking on all sides.
First, they attack u� with TV
Christmas specials and even create
TV commercials implying Christmas
is a sate of mind, not the birth of our
savior. Then, they got on radio. There
are several songs like "Here comes
Santa Claus
Then we got it where it.hurts: ele-
mentary school education. Children
sing "Jolly Old St. Nicholas It's
funny when people can't say that
there's Santa Claus on TV because
it'll ruin the child's "ego but parents
everywhere let those TV shows tell
our kids that a deer, a snowman and a
fat man in a red suit have taken the
place of baby Jesus and Mary.
The only Christmas special that I
will let my children ever watch is
"Merry Christmas Charlie Brown
The characters in the show struggle to
work together to put on a play about
the birth of Christ. Along the way,
they find out what the story is really
about. Chuck felt sorry for the poor
little Christmas tree because nobody
would pick it, then everyone com-
plains because the tree wasn't lavish
enough.
The main Christmas story kids
should be learning is the one in Luke,
Chapter 2- "And it came to pass in
those day, that there went out a
decree from Caesar Augustus that all
the world should be taxed
Have an
opinion about
current issues?
Of course, we all have opinions about things that go on in our
world. But if you possess good grammer skills and a unique way of
expressing them, then you should apply to write for us.
All you have to do is fill out an application at our
office.
We are located on the second floor of the Student
Publications building (across from Joyner).
east&trolinian
BRANDON WADDELL Editor
MATT HEGE Adwrwmrj Oinctw
MARCIHR1TE BENJERMIN N� Editor
AMY L ROYSTER Abswvi Ittw Editor
JAY MYERS litany Editor
DALE WILLIAMSON MUM UtaHr E1"
AMANDA ROSS Soorn Editor
PATRICK IRELAN Pinto Editor
MATT HEATLEY Electronics Editor
CELESTE WILSON Production Umagn
David southerland aw Ptoductjon Mom?'
Jennifer Andrews Production Awstam
ASHLEY SETTLE Production Awnant
CAROLE MEHLE Copy Editor
ANDY FARKAS Stttf
Sawa � ECU earaana war SB. � EM CarJaar. out BOTcocataanitamr
Dmtat: E�nl he I Em Crrtmo mkms Hum I t tm.fmmlnMwa
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otnam





29 Thursday, January 16.1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
iii ii
For Rent
ForSaW fy Services J
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
female roommate needed asap to share 2
bedroom apt. Very affordable and on ECU
bus route. Please call or leave message
551-3702.
Wanted: Christian Roommate to share a
fully furnished townhouse. Access to
swimming pool, tennis courts, and basket-
ball court. Call 353-4294.
roommate needed to share 2 bedroom
apartment $185 per month 13 utilities.
752-0735 ask for Patrick or Corby.
Never before available! Short walk to
campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next to AOTT
house. 3 bedrooms, 212 baths - mint con-
dition. 5tk Strut Square - uptown, above
BW3,3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken liv-
ing area. Also available a 2 bedroom above
BW3 and above Uppercrust Bakery avail-
able Jan. 1st for $475.00 - $500month.
Luxury Apartments. Available now! Will
ease for December or January (6 mo. or
year leases available) Also available - "The
Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment. If
you sec it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at
758-2616.
First Street. 1 bedroom central heatair.
Call Cindy or Amy, Pro Management of
GrecnviHe,756-1234.
Unique one bedroom. Hickory Street.
Call Cindy or Amy, Pro Management of
Greenville, 756-1234.
Roommate needed 3 bedroom house on
Library St. Half block from campus, $190
month utilities. If responsible call 758-
1716.
Third Street duplex. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Central heatair, all hardwood floors. Call
Cindy or Amy, Pro Management of Green-
ville, 756-1234.
Woodside 1 bedroom, central heatair.
$280, water included. Call Pro Manage-
ment 756-1234 ext. 24.
Washington street 1 bedroom, upstairs of
house. $275. Call Pro Management 756-
1234 ext 24
House on 9th street. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
$625. Call Pro Management 756-1234 ext
24.
Fun-loving, responsible, clean roommate
wanted ASAP to share 4 BR house on
Jarvis Street. WD, $200month & 14
bills. Own room, walk to campus. 752-
9102.
2 bedroom 1 12 bath townhouse. 2 blocks
from campus. $450. Call Pro Management
756-1234 ext. 24.
Take over lease at dockside. 3 bedroom
2 bath duplex with wd, beginning 21.
Call 752-5628 Richie or Rodney-
Private rooms available immediately.
Walking distance from campus and down-
town. Large room (15x15) Private phone
linecable in room. Washerdryer in-
cluded. $175 per month utilities. Call
Mike: 752-2879.
NBAR KcU. Nick rooM, pkIva 1 fc.
entrance, access kitchen, bath, washer,
dryer, suntan, sauna, playground. Pets
okay. Secure. Cable, utilities, rent $75
weekly 7528533 any time
furniture and dj equipment: Wrap-around
sofa $75, black glass table $40, pair of JBL
concert speakers 1200 watts $790, 800
watt peavy amp $400, Call Lee at 758-
4644.
for sale: 57 cm Serotta Campagnolo Cho-
rus Ergo Carbon, never raced, 500 miles.
Complete bike, $2000. American Classic
Rollers, $150 neg Sun Mistral 32H
Clincher rims, $30. 830-2494 (voice) or
752-0318 (H).
python for sale with custom built cage.
Must see. Taking best offer. Call 752-
3390, ask for Korey. Serious inquires only-
seven black and brown PitbullRottweiler
puppies with white feet and chest. $100.
1st shots and are wormed. Ready to go
January 22. Call Brian 758-3931.
akc german Rottweilers 9 weeks. $250 and
up. Champion bloodline. Call 919-353-
7174.
attention cycling enthusiasts! '97 trek 470
road bike, 150-200 mi. 52" shimano RX
components, ergo-shifters for comfort Ex-
cellent "first bike upgrade used, qual-
ity. (752-6993).
Offered
Travel
if?
Help
wanted
free for ecu students! Would you like to
put your resume or a classified ad on the
internet for free? We offer services includ-
ing resume designing and internet access.
If you are interested in any of these, visit
our Website at HTTP.
WWW.NCGALLERIA.COM or call 754-
2171 for more information.
need to get in shape? look better? Keel
Healthier? Guaranteed results - certified
personal trainer. Call for free consultation
752-0550.
Typing, fast and accurate. $1.00 per page,
call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
Me yalien�
BusinessMarketing Majors
Are you a junior or senior
looking for experience in the Marketing &
Advertising field? We are currently seeking
enthusiastic and professional individuals for
our growing internet advertising company.
We offer great commission,
experience, and hours to the right people.
Please contact
Steven English st 7S4-2171
or fax resume to 355-1874
niSroviR iu
SPRING
AAdSMUpTcttSt t�Apply�AC.
C8 1-�-iT.?AW-TO.
M
Greek
Personals
congratulations amy megrath on your po-
sition as Panhellenic Asst rush chair. Also
good" luck Ami Brasure as the new presi-
dent of GAMMA. We know you'll both
do great! Love your Pi Delta Sisters.
the sisters of pi Delta would like to wel-
come everyone back to ECU! Have a
great spring semester.
Bahamas Party
Cruise
'279
mouMTaaM
Cancun '399
7WIMNr�rtaMtMtl��afcrta0ilM
Jamaica '419
Florida 'n9
r �m � Pmmm ait, ipn omm ��
;
Announcements
weekly ,
Non-Sm
Jmoking female Roommate wanted.
Fully furnished. Would have own bath.
Located in Dockside $300 per month
12 of utilities. Call 752-1074. Available
Nowl
Male or female roommate needed as soon
as possible. Spacious 5 bedroom house has
only 3 occupants and a Dalmatian. Close
to campus. We're cool. Really. 757-9683
1 bedroom near campus. Utilities in-
cluded, $350. Call Cindy or Amy, Pro
Management of Greenville, 756-1234
Third Street duplex. 2 bedrooms study.
Refinished hardwood floors. $450. Call
Pro Management 756-1234 ext 24.
female roommate to share two bedroom
duplex, wd with neat serious anthropol-
ogy student $275 12 utilities. Please
call Virginia at 756-5340 or 758-9437.
Move-in special first street 1 bedrooms.
One-half month free rent with student ID.
Central heatair. $270, water included.
Call Pro Management 756-1234 ext. 24 for
Sore information.
anted: Graduate student seeking 1 male
housemate $170mo. Includes utilities.
Close to campus. Call Kevin 752-5557.
For Sale
Need $$$$? Excellent income potential
working from home. For free information
send long SASE to Regional Success, P.O.
Box 3950, Greenville, NC 27836-1950.
wanted: weekend leasing agent fot large
apartment complex. Fot more informa-
tion please call: 752-5100.
administrative assistant in local retail busi-
ness. Strengths: Mathematical, Bright,
Prompt Computer Literate. Energetic.
15 or more hours per week. Call 931-6904
leave message.
szechuan garden - Chinese restaurant wait
staff wanted part-time or full-time. No
phone calls. Apply in person. 909 South
Evans Street.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EAkN
EXTRA cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Midwest Distributors, P.O. Box 624,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate response.
Experienced, dependable, and mature
babysitter needed immediately for two
small boys, ages 2 and 5. M.W.F after-
noons, 12-5:30pm. References required.
Please call 756-8262 after 5:00pm.
Wanted: a few good Pirates - The ECU
Telefund is looking for students to con-
tact Alumni fot the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.00 hour. Make your own sched-
ule. If interested, come by Rawl Annex
Room 5, M-TH between the hours of 2-
6 pm.
Part time help needed at Szechuan Ex-
press at the Food Court, the Plaza Mall.
15 - 20 hrs. a week. Cashier experience
preferred. No phone calls please. Apply
in person Monday thru Saturday between
10:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Childcarc wanted: mature, responsible
student with previous childcarc experi-
ence wanted for occasional weekend
baby-sitting fot our two children (ages 7
& 12). Strong preference given to student
who would also be interested in provid-
ing daytime childcarc during the coming
summer months. Must have own transpor-
tation and strong references. Please call
evening at 752-6372.
Tropical Resorts Hiring - Entry-level flc
career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc.). Waitstaff,
housekeepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fit-
ness counselors, and more. Call Resort
Employment Services 1-206-971-3600
ext. R53625.
Help Needed for local business. For free
details, send a self-addressed stamped en-
velope to: S.P.E.L Dept D3, 106 Dog-
wood Drive, Washington, NC 27889
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All
shifts. Must be 18 years old. Call today
747-7686, Snow Hill, NC.
Now hiring for summer '97! Lifeguards,
Head Lifeguards, Pool Managers, Swim
Lessons Instructors, Swim Coaches. Sum-
mer positions available in Chatlotte,
Greensboro, Raleigh, Greenville, and Co-
lumbia areas, call Carolina Pool Manage-
ment at (704) 541-9303. In Atlanta, call
SwimAtlanta Pool Management at
(770)992-7765. �
EAkN $6,000 THIS sUMMkk. by-
namic Company now interviewinghiring
ambitious, entrepreneurial students to fill
summer management positions in your
hometown. For more information and to
schedule an interview call Tuition Paint-
ers 1 (800) 393 - 4521 �
Sales reps - immediate opening at your
Workshops on writing a Professional rc-
sume for employment will be held in the
Career Services Bldg 701E. Fifth StTue.
January 21 at 2:00. Seniors or graduate
students who will soon enter the job mar-
ket or students seeking internships or co-
op experiences are invited to attend. The
program will include information on the
content format and reproduction of the
resume. It will also include tips on pre-
paring a resume that can be electronically
scanned.
Commuter students: if you commute to
ECU and would like someone to share the
ride andor driving responsibilities check
out the ride board in The Wright Place.
If you have any questions or concerns,
contact Commuter Student Services, 211
Whichard, 328-6881.
ecu Folk and Country
Attention all students! Grants. Scholar-
ships, aid available from sponsors! No re-
payments, ever!$$$ Cash for college $$$.
For info: 1-80000-0209.
Free t-shirt $1000 Credit Card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus organization can raise
up to $1000 by earning a whopping $5.00
VISA application. Call 1-800-932-0528
ext 65 Qualified callers receive Free T-
Shirt.
Greek
Personals
t�
Travel
Spring break '97, The reliable spring
break company: Hottest destinations!
Coolest Vacations! Guaranteed lowest
prices! From $99. Organize small group!
Travel free! Sunsplash Tours! 1-800-426-
7710.
aaaa! Florida spring break! panama �ity!
room with kitchen near bars $119!
Daytona-Best Location $139! Florida's
new hotspot-Cocoa Beach Hilton $169!
springbreaktravcl.com 1-800-678-638
aaaa! Spring Break Bahamas party �ruise!
6 days $279! Includes all meals, parties &
taxes! Great Beaches Nightlife! Leaves
from Ft. Laudcrdale!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
aaaa! cancun & Jamaica spring break spe-
cials! 7 nights air & hotel from $429! Save
$150 on food, drinks & free parties! 111
lowest price guarantee!
springbrcaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
Hundreds of students are Earning Free
Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell 8 Trips
& Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Panama City
Daytona $119!
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
Hey pi lam: sorry we're late but we just
wanted to say our sister social was great!
Being "under the sea" was so much fun
we'll have to get together again soon!
Thanks for having us and also thanks
Kappa pledges for putting it all together.
Love the Pi Delta Sisters.
Rush delta zeta the Delta Zeta Soror-
ity is holding an Informal Rush on Janu-
ary 27, 28 6c. 29 from 8-10 pm. For more
information or if a ride is needed, please
call: 758-6362 or 328-8068. Come and
bring a friend!
Thank you jamie for allowing us to use
your home for this year's senior banquet
Also thanks Fulshruti for letting Chef Ami
invade your home for a few hours! Love
the Pi Delta Sisters.
Pi Delta: I'll make this short and sweet
I think we can make this semester better
than last! Let's work hard to accomplish
all our goals! Love the president. Smile
because we're probably on Laura's video
camera!
Alpha Sig: just wanted to thank you guys
fot our social at the Attic and also for the
social at the house. Let's get together
again soon! Love Pi Delta Sisters
pi delta would like to welcome the
Contra dance
Dancers Sat, Jan. 18 at 7:30. Beginner's
instruction at 7:00 Baptist Student Cen-
ter, 511 E. 10th St Greenville. Music by
Elderberry Jam. Come alone or bring a
friend. For more information, 830-5403.
The Greenville-pitt County Special
Olympics will be conducting an Athletics
(Track & Field) Coaches Training School
on Saturday, February 1 st from 9am - 4pm
for all individuals interested in volunteer-
ing to coach Track & Field. We are also
looking for volunteer coaches in the fol-
lowing sports: Swimming, Bowling, Gym-
nastics, Rollerskating, Powerlifting, Vol-
leyball, and Equestrian. No experience
is necessary. For more information please
contact Dwain Cooper at 830-4844 or
Dean Foy at 830-4541
Adult students (25 and Older): Are you
interested in the establishment of an adult
student honor society at ECU? If so,
please contact Adult Student Services, 211
Whichard, 328-6881.
Announcements
Sixth Annual Primary Care Research Con-
ference. The sixth Annual Primary Care
Research Conference will be held on Sat-
urday, March 1, 1997 from 8000:00 am to
2:00 pm at the William B. Aycock Family
Medicine Building on the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus.
The conference is held both to illustrate
the wide range of primary care research
currently taking place at UNC-CH, its af-
filiated programs, and within the AHEC
system and to give practicing and aca-
demic professionals an opportunity to
share their research related to primary care
issues. Registration for the conference
will be $15 which will include a break and
box lunch. A limited number of scholar-
ships will be available for students and
residents. The registration deadline is
February 20,1997; early registration is en-
couraged due to limited Space. For more
information, please contact Laura Seufert
at the Institute for the Generalist Physi-
cian, CB7595, Aycock Family Medicine
Building. Phone: 919966-3456. Fax: 919
966-0536.
Interview skills workshops, sponsored by
Career Services, will be held on Thur. Jan.
16 at 2:00 and Wed. Jan. 22 at 3:00 p.m. in
the Career Services Building. Open to all
students, especially those preparing for
the job search, the workshops are de-
signed to help you learn professional tech-
niques in presenting yourself to employ-
ers
Ecu counseling center offers students
counseling & workshops for career, aca-
demic & personal issues. 316 Wright Au-
ditorium Bldg 328-6661.
Registration is now open for the 19th An-
nual Bryan Adrian Summer Basketball
Camp. Boys and girls ages 5-18 are eli-
gible. Included on the 1997 Summer
Camp Staff are: Tim Duncan (WF), Jerry
Stackhousc (PRO), Dante Calabria
(PRO), Serge Zwikker (UNO, Larry
Davis (USC). There are several locations
including Greensboro, NC; Concord, NC;
Winston Salem, NC; Wilmington, NC;
Gastonia, NC; Spartanburg, SC. For a free
brochure call anytime (704) 372-3236.
Orientation to career services. The Ca-
reer Services Office will hold orientation
meetings in the Career Services building
for seniors and graduate students on the
following date: Friday, January 17 at 2:00
p.m. Students will receive instructions on
registering with Career Services, estab-
lishing a credentials file, and the proce-
dures for campus interviews.
Kappa
Pledge Class to our sisterhood. Our new-
est sisters are: Carrie Barrett, Meredith
Donty, Ann Elms, Jamie Finch, Leslie
Garns, Kelly Goodman, Elizabeth Gveno,
Laura Hollingsworth, Frankyc Hubbard,
Melissa McAnnally, Stephanie Ortiz,
Rachacl Schultz. Congrats ladies.
hey pi delta: wasn't formal great? But
what was funnier the video or the actual
formal? Little Stephanie: tell us one more
time about the bathroom. Rence: how
are you feeling? And who can forget
Shefreaka?
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS. SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP ETC.
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's edition
4p.m. MONDAY for next
Thursday's edition
Rates
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add 5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
formal oak-finished dinning room table
with leaf and 6 hardwood pressback
chairs! Great condition. Will deliver and
setup! Only $325, call 321-0389.
laptop computer! lOOmhz pentium with
10.4" active matrix, BlOmb hard drive,
16mb ram, 4X cd-rom, 1.44mb drive,
sound card, modem, much more! Amaz-
ing machine! $2350, call 321-0389.
electric guitar amp $150 scuba BC mc-
dium $70 portable pioneer CD player
$100 call 752-0550.
University. Offering exceptional pay and
very flexible hours. Gall Accent Screen
Printing 1-800-243-7941.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(9X9) 49424
We also buy:
� GOLD & SILVER
� Jewelry & Coins
� Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates)
� TV's, VCR's, CD Players
� Home, Portable
We Need
Timberland
boots
and shoes!
Good Jeans.
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown,
drive to back door k ring buzzer
S ii di nt Swap Shot
All Greek organizations
must be spelled out - no
abbreviations. The East
Carolinian reserves the
right to reject any ad
for libel, obscenity
andor bad taste.





SPRING '97 PROGRAM SCHEDUL
6. a.m. to 9 a.m.
Wr. Morton
Mr. Wfjfcly
Morning
Show
BoULder
MorNjN8
East Carolina's Alternative
Mr. Morton
Mr. Wiily
Morning
Show
BoULder
MoriM�N3
9a.m to 12 p.m
If r. If orton
Mr.W.I, V�M
Iformn glUeS
Show
WORLD
MUSIC
CROSSOVER
tjazz c�
glues

NOW SOUNDS
A special mix of independent and
regional music
CD OF THE DAY
An uninterrupted hour featuring a
different type of music each weekday
RETRO SHOW
Music from the late 70s & 80s
INSIGHT
i h
our news show
PIRATE TALK
1 hour sports show
ROOTS ROCK
Post-modern look at the past
During the hours when we're not
featuring a specialty show, you can
tune in our mix of alternative rock.
REQUEST
LINE
328-6913
PICK
U P
9 1 .3
The StudentUnion Cultntural Awareness Committee
The National Pan-Hellenic Council
The Ledonia Wright African-American Cultural Center
&
The Chancellors MLK Observance Committee
Present
MLK
Remembered
A Celebration of the Life, Work, and Achievement of
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Monday, January 20, 1997
Candlelight Vigil and March
The Crest of College Hill
6pm (Processional to Hendrix Theatre)
MLK Celebration Program
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
7:30 pm
featuring Guest Speaker
Attorney Bernadine Ballance and
Selections from ECU Gofepel Choir





- February 23,1
Mendenhall Gail
RECEPTION AND AWARDS
Tuesday, February 18,1997
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM in Mendenhall Gallery
CALL FOR ENTRIES
Friday, January 24,1997
1:00 PM- 8:00 PM in Room 244 Mendenhall
Registration Packets Available at the Mendenhall
Information Desk and Gray Gallery
$3.00 Fee Per Entry - Limit Three Entries Per Person
$1,050 to be Award





Works In Glass by Art Haney
January 6 - 24, 1997 Mendenhall Student Center Gallery East Carolina University Sponsored By: The Visual Arts Committee
. y" sfef-L
Jm �
Px

Carroll Dashiell and Students
from the School of Music
Friday, January 24, 1997 � MSC Social Room
8:00 PM - 11:00 PM .MendennaU Student Center
FREEH!
Sponsored by the Student Union
Special Events Committee & ECU School Of Music
e,)DlN7
For More Information,
Call tne Student Union Hotline at 328-6004





HENDRIX
JANUARY
1997
JANUARY 16-18
Keanu
Reeves
RA 0D
Emma' Is Ihe Class Act Of 1996.
It's Perfect mm-
Gvwneth Paltrow � � �
Is lavishing
K. wi -I Ml
'A Remarkable
Achievement!
-awma
i;w,M,�li,R�� roNiCoLtEm turn Cowwnc B�m� McGrsgw
iRin Vwuhm (,hiiVuuii Jli in Stlvinson I'oi.u Ui.keb
"A Wall-To-Wall
Wacky Movie
-Broc Williamson, PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
"Keanu Reeves
And Cameron
Diaz Sizzle
-Jtan Ferguson. PREVUE CHANNEL
3M�Hi;8��ia�M8lll!IMTSlHVIVIII!�HIMll
in
JANUARY 31-FEBRUARY 2





VJIhe Entertainer
The Entertainer is a Student Union Publication printed for East Carolina University and its supporters. All major entertainment on the ECU campus is
brought to the campus by student volunteers. This newletter is composed by the Marketing Committee and the Graphic Artist of the Student Union.
Printed and distributed by The East Carolinian.
MARKETING COMMITTEE
PaQuito Smith
Jamie Ellis
James Sturdivant
Karen Chen
Roy Lion
Latesha Bizzell
Michael Silvermann
James Kahenschnee
Richard Barton
LIST OF COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS
Marketing Chairperson and Editor
Secretary and Copywriter
Copywriter
Layout Artist
LayoutIllustrator
Copywriter
LayoutIllustrator
Creative Director
Graphic Artist
Student Union President
Assistant to the President
Barefoot
Cultural Awareness
Films
Lecture
Popular Entertainment
Special Events
Visual Arts
Martin Thomas
Kristen Alford
Vanessa Cullers
LisaSessoms
Virginia Anderson
Don Wbitten
Vacant
Lakeisha Brown
Tyler Dockery
�R
The Student Union, staffed by student volunteers, programs a variety of
activities for the entertainment and education of the ECU community.
The Student Union is always looking for new members! Come by room
236 in Mendenhall Student Center to pick up more information and an application.
For more information about our activities, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
or check out our web site athttp:www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html


Title
The East Carolinian, January 16, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 16, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1180
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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