The East Carolinian, November 26, 1996






November 26,1996
Vol 72, No. 27
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pases
Across The State
ASHEVILLE (AP) - Conflict-
ing goals, congressional battles
and dissension over the future of
public lands has left the U.S. For-
est Service with a confused mis-
sion, said the agency's chief.
Jack Ward Thomas, in
Asheville this week hosting the
annual meeting of the North
American Forest Commission of
the United Nations, said compet-
ing goals have put pressure on the
agency as it struggles with how
to manage 191 million acres of
national forests.
RALIEGH (AP)- State High-
way Patrol troopers will be setting
up checkpoints this holiday week-
end to catch motorists who have
been drinking.
Troopers already have set up
checkpoints in Buncombe County,
and the road checks will continue
through Thanksgiving and into
the weekend.
The checkpoints are part
of the so-called "Booze It and
Loose It" campaign that targets
drunken drivers.
Across The Country
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - The
public will get to speak its piece
on a plan for stabilizing the price
of milk in New England.
The Northeast Dairy Com-
pact Commission has scheduled
two public hearings in December
to take comments on its efforts to
halt plunging milk prices. The
panel, made up of farmers, milk
processors, retailers and consum-
ers, hopes to set a price that is
fair, consistent and not too high.
NEW YORK (AP) - On a
chilly, overcast morning, Chicqua
Roveal marched her three young
children up to the roof of their 14-
floor building. She looked over the
edge into a trash-strewn court-
yard. Then, she methodically
pushed them off, one by one.
Roveal followed them down,
jumping to her death along with
her 7-year-old son, Andre, police
said. The boy's twin sister, Andrea
and 2-year-old brother, Shando,
were critically injured.
Around The World
MANILA, Philippines (AP) -
When he first met Chinese Presi-
dent Jiang Zemin in 1993, Presi-
dent Clinton took care not to be
seen smiling. On Sunday, the two
joked about Clinton's hoarseness
and promised to visit each other.
It was a sure sign that rela-
tions between China and the
United States - relations of criti-
cal importance to the world - are
finally improving.
TOKYO (AP) - An American
detained in North Korea since
August on spy charges will be re-
leased and flown to Tokyo, the
U.S. Embassy said today.
The announcement came as
Rep. Bill Richardson, D-N.M vis-
ited North Korea to win the free-
dom of Evan C. Hunziker, 26, of
Tacoma, Wash. Hunziker entered
North Korea from China in August
and was arrested.
Charity drives start holiday season at ECU
Groups organize
campus-wide
collections for
poor
Jeff Gentry
News Writer
Charity begins at home, but it
has also started at East Carolina Uni-
versity as two major charity drives
started in the past two weeks.
The Health Sciences Library and
the ECU Business Services unit have
begun taking donations for their re-
spective holiday collection programs
to help feed the hungry. Both drives
are a campus wide effort and all do-
nations go to the Pitt County Social
Services Department and the Salva-
tion Army.
The Health Sciences Library will
be accepting non-perishable foods in
replacement of money for overdue
book fines from November 15 until
December 31. Pet food will also be
accepted, and will be given to the
Humane Society in Pitt Co. Each
canned good brought in will be worth
one dollar toward any overdue book
or other fee.
Collection Access Librarian and
co-organizer of the drive Elizabeth
Winstead said, "We got the idea from
other libraries that have done this.
It started off kind of slow, but I un-
derstand it has started to pick up as
word has spread around. This is the
first time that the Library has done
anything like this Winstead also ex-
plained that a person could not pay
for a lost book by doing this, only
fines and fees for late books or li-
brary services.
Winstead also said, "We're tell-
ing people that they don't have to
have fines to make a contribution
Anyone wishing to take advantage of
this offer or just make a donation can
bring food to the Circulation Desk
in the Health Sciences Library.
The ECU Business Services is
also coordinating a campus-wide ef-
fort to help feed the hungry and pro-
vide for underprivileged families dur-
ing the holiday season. This program
is collecting not only food, but also
clothing, toys and even school sup-
plies for families that are in need. The
effort began on November 1 and will
continue through December 13. This
is the second year that Business Ser-
vices has operated this program,
which was a success last year. Direc-
See ECU page 3
Travel advice series
begins this month
Students learn "How To Get There
From Here"
Marina Henry
Steff Writer
Editor's Note: This article is part one of a series of future TEC travel
articles.
When deciding to take a trip, there are so many choices and so many
decisions to make, a convenient way to approach the whole travel experience
would make things so much easier. So, we here at TEC worked together with
The Bicycle Post's Wilderness Shop, The Outpost, to formulate an easy way to
get you out into the world with as few hitches as possible.
The first step to successful traveling is to discover what type of traveler you
are.
" The first thing that you need to do is to research the places you have
always wanted to go. Use the library, pamphlets, call a travel agency, order a
� traveling manual, anything that will
give you a feel of the place you want to
go said Cathy Brown of The Outpost
After deciding where you would
like to go, try to list what attracts you
to the place. Do you like the sandy
beaches for sunbathing, the clear wa-
ters for scuba diving or snorkeling, the
trails for hiking, or the many rivers and
streams for boating? Or do you prefer
shopping and visiting old historical
points of interest? The degree of ad-
venture, the amount of time flexibility
and the desire to stick to a schedule
influence the type of traveler you are.
Community shelter gets fresh
face from fraternity
Pht Kappa Psi
volunteer pdmt
job over weekend
Scott Hopkins
MA ,tf�" �
The local support of ECU and
U Paitheflenic society shines
through again as Phi Kappa Psi
fraternity spent the weekend paint-
This past Saturday members of
Ae fraternity Phi Kappa Psi spent
their day helping the homeless at
the CreenvHIe Community shelter.
"liey reaBy M a good job
Valerie Taveras, the operations
manager said, "We needed the work
done and they were there to help
Every year Phi Kappa Psi par-
ticipates in a fund-raiser and com-
munity service volunteer work for
the Greenville Community shelter.
Last spring, along with other
years Phi Kappa Psi put on a
fund-raiser at the Attic in down-
town Greenville to raise money for
the shelter.
"They are really excited to
help the shelter said Kate
Murray, volunteer coordinator for
the Greenville community shelter.
Along with spring fund rais-
ers Phi Kappa Psi also does vol-
unteer work in the spring.
"The first thing
that you need to
do is to research
the places you
have always
wanted to go
� Cathy Brown, The
Outpost
More Pohypnol seizures on
college campuses
See TRAVEL page 3
Holiday classic begins
finals week
Scott Hopkins
Staff Writer
The holiday season is upon us and ECU is going to ring it in with a
holiday classic that everyone knows and loves. The ECU Symphony Orches-
tra along with various student soloists, will be performing George Fredrick
Handel's Messiah.
" We will be doing the Christmas portion of Handel's Messiah in an
audience 'sing-along" performance Dr. Rhonda Fleming, professor of choral
music and music education, said. "We want alot of people to come and join in
the performance
The performance is being sponsored by the ECU student chapter of the
American Choral Directors Association.
The Orchestra will do the instrumental ensemble, which will be led by
graduate students and advanced conducting students. The performance will
also include 20-30 ECU students, who will do solos.
"This is a tradition in many large cities, such as Charlotte and Chicago,
we are hoping to make it an ECU tradition for the holidays Fleming said.
This will be the second year that the ECU School of Music has put on this
performance, the first was last year but was only for the School of Music.
Some famous songs from the work that will be sung as the audience sing
along chorus will be, the "Hallelujah" chorus, "And the glory of the lord
"Singers are encouraged to bring their own music scores. However, scores
will be available for purchase at the door Fleming said.
The performance will be Tuesday, Dec. 3, in the Fletcher music recital
hall. The show will start at 7 p.m.
According to Fleming, there is no admission charge for attending, you
should bring your singing voice to join in on the performance.
"This is probably one of the most well known and longest played perfor-
mances of this kind and we want to give the community the opportunity to
participate Fleming said. " We want to help to get everyone into the holiday
mood
Police find 300
tablets at Clemson
Universtiy
(CPS) - Clemson- Four
Clemson University students were
arrested Oct. 23 for possession of
Rohypnol, a powerful sedative
known as the "date-rape" drug.
The arrests are thought to be
among the first in connection with
the illegal drug, which has no taste,
odor or color when dissolved in a
drink and is 10 to 20 times more
powerful than valium.
The four students were arrested
at an off-campus apartment after po-
lice reportedly found more than 300
Rohypnol tablets and several grams
of marijuana.
Ari Sandor Mutchnik, 19, was
also charged with selling the drug.
He was suspended from Clemson
pending an administrative hearing,
the university said.
"University policies allow us to
immediately impose temporary sanc-
tions when a student is considered
to be a danger to the campus com-
munity said Almeda Jacks, vice
president for student affairs. "Be-
cause of the dangers associated with
this particular drugwe believe that
such sanctions are warranted
The three other students
charged with possession are: Garrett
T. Hoffman, 20; Gregory John
Jawski, 19; and
Mathew Daniel
Mahon, 19.
Also known as
"roofies the small,
white tablets cause
loss of inhibition,
extreme sleepiness,
relaxation and am-
nesia, and have
been connected to a
growing number of
date-rape cases.
The drug can
be dropped into an
unknowing victim's
drink, causing them
to pass out and have
little memory of the
crime or the
attacker's identity.
At the Univer-
sity of Florida, one woman reported
being told in the morning that five
men had slept with her. Some col-
lege students also use the polls to
get a quick high from alcohol and
marijuana.
The drug is smuggled in from
Mexico, South America, Europe and
Asia, where it is sold over-the-
counter and used to treat insomnia.
In an effort to reduce date rape
on campus, Congress approved a bill
in October that imposes much
harsher criminal penalties for using
any drugs to commit sexual assault
and other violent acts.
Though the bill targeted all
� Never accept a beverase unless
it is in a sealed container
� Never leave a beverase
unattended
� Never go out with or go home
with anyone you do not know
well
� Never leave a friend who is
behaving in an extraordinary way
or displaying any effects of this
drug. Be sure to see him or her
home safely.
drugs used as weapons, it also con-
tains harsher penalties for posses-
sion and distribution of Rohypnol.
Simple possession of the drug car-
ries a prison term of up to three
years, while distribution of 30 milli-
grams can get someone up to five
years in jail. Those found guilty of
distributing a gram of the drug can
receive up to 20 years in prison.
"We wanted to provide stricter
penalties for Rohypnol in addition
to fighting date rape said Rep.
Gerald Solomon (R-N.Y.). The new
levels are similar to criminal penal-
ties for possession of cocaine, heroin
and LSD.
More reasons cited not to legalize marijuana
Researchers question healing powers of herb
(AP)- Washington, D.C. - The small silver canister that looks like a cookie tin arrives promptly once a month for Florida
stockbroker Irvin Rosenfeld.
Its contents: 300 tightly rolled marijuana joints. His supplier the U.S. government
"The quality is satisfactory, and I don't have to buy it on the street Rosenfeld said.
The 44-year-old suffers from a rare bone disease and is one of eight people legally supplied with marijuana under the
government's longstanding "compassionate use" program.
It's run by the same health and drug agencies that condemn marijuana as part of the national war on drugs. And this
fall, top government officials from those agencies campaigned against ballot measures in California and Arizona to legalize
marijuana for medical purposes. The issues passed in both states, although the courts likely will determine their fate.
"Research shows that marijuana is harmful to one's brain, heart lungs and immune system wrote Health and Human
Services Secretary Donna Shalala in a recent statement "Any law premised on the notion that marijuana or these other
See LEGAL page 2
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'Melrose Place' foretells Menudo reunionpage
OPINItm
Sore throat keeps Quest from bustin rhymespage
sports
jtjg
Clash between Pirates and Wolfpack set for Saturdaypage
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Tuesday
Raining

High 65
Low 42
Wednesday
Raining

High 67
Low 40
�d eac& a
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
3286558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner

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Tuesday, November 26,1996
The East Carolinian
CRIMF S'ENE
November 19
Damage to property - A resident of Umstead Hall reported dam-
age to her vehicle. The victim had parked in three different locations on
campus before noticing the damage.
Unauthorized use of a computer - A faculty member reported
that someone was using his computer without his permission.
November 20
Larceny - A student reported the larceny of her art work from the
lithograph studio in the Jenkins Art building.
Soliciting - A faculty member reported a non-student was selling
art work on campus without a permit The non-student was banned
from campus.
Indecent exposure - A non-student from Jacksonville, North Caro-
lina was arrested for indecent exposure. The incident occurred on Col-
lege Hill Drive.
Weapon on campuscarrying a concealed weapon � A student of
Umstead Hall was cited for carrying a weapon on campus and carrying
a concealed weapon (two knives, a black jack and a night stick). The
weapons were found in the student's vehicle which was parked in the
lot on Ninth Street
November 21
Simple assault - A staff member reported that a person struck his hand
as he was issuing a parking ticket The incident occurred near Brewster.
Harassing phone calls - A resident of Belk Hall reported receiving ha-
rassing phone calls. She also reported damage to her vehicle.
November 22
Found contraband - A student reported finding a pouch lying in the
street on Dowell Way. The pouch was turned over to the Police Department
and upon further investigation, it was discovered the pouch contained drug
paraphernalia and marijuana.
November 23
LarcenyEscape from custody - A student was arrested west of Scott
Hall for misdemeanor larceny and resisting arrest He was served a warrant
tor his involvement and a warrant is pending service on another person.
Warrant served - A student of Scott Hall was served an arrest warrant
for possession of stolen goods and larceny. This arrest was from an earlier
incident listed above.
Felony breaking and entering, larceny and damage to property - A
resident of Scott Hall reported that his room was broken into and vandal-
ized.
I ublic intoxication - A non-student of Camp Lejune, North Carolina
was confined in the Pitt County Detention Center under 24 hour lock-up for
public intoxication after being found at Aycock Hall.
Compiled by Amy L Royster. Taken from official ECU police reports.
ELTORO
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TRAVEL from page 1
"On my last trip to Mexico, I had
my hotel room booked for the first and
last night of my trip only, but some
people don't enjoy leaving that much
up to fate. I am independent traveler
because I don't like to be confined by
a tight or restrictive schedule said
Brown.
Independent travelers take the
rough way, hiking, boating or climb-
ing where they want to go. Time is
not a problem, and light packing is a
must, since you will be carrying all of
you belongings on your back. A keen
sense of direction is needed, as travel
guides are usually not used.
" If someone craves adventure but
isn't willing to go all out and prefers a
slight schedule, then wilderness adven-
ture traveling may be preferred said
Brown.
The wilderness adventure traveler
goes on expeditions or adventure tours
that are guided. The elements of ex-
citement and danger are still there but
in a more organized manner. Sleep-
ing in the elements is the norm, so
packing light is once again essential.
Not as much research is required since
the company you are traveling with
should provide you with a list of nec-
essary equipment and clothing, as well
as a knowledgeable tour guide who will
make the trip a safe and fulfilling jour-
ney.
� For those people who enjoy re-
laxing, without that margin of danger,
or who have a limited amount of time
to be spending, say two hours or a few
days, then more traditional recreational
traveling may be more their style said
Brown.
Packing as much gear as you may
need, no matter how bulky is not a
problem for the recreational traveler.
Snow or surfboards, fishing tackle, or
photo equipment are the usual fare.
Plans are made by charters, hotels,
travel agencies, etc. to cover every de-
tail of the experience, so that you have
as little to do as possible.
"After deciding what kind of trav-
eler you are, you can go deeper into the
type of activities you will do, what equip-
ment you will need, how much it will
cost and what problems you need to an-
ticipate. It is much easier to plan a trip
MAKE
TOR
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Lincoln
Hamilton
Jackson
Big Books Equal Big Bucks At
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516 S. Cotanche Street, 758-2616
Open 9:00-6:00 Monday-Friday, 10:00-5:00 Saturday
when you know what type of traveler
you are said Brown.
If you are still having a few doubts
about the whole travel thing, then ECU
has "How to Get There From Here"
nights, showing films and serving cui-
sine from exotic places. December 4,
Students will have the opportunity to
experience Hawaii. On January 21,
Czechoslovakia will be the adventure.
The Canadian West will be the special
January 30. February 24, the British
Canals will be featured. Ancient America
will be explored again March 5. The se-
ries will conclude April 1 with Darwin's
Patagonia and Tierra Del Fuego. Tick-
ets are $12 and must be ordered in ad-
vance from ECU's Central Ticket Office.
I-800-999-SKI-9
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-4,
77ie East Carolinian
Tuesday, November 26,1996
(Juebdau
COLLEGE NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
LADIES NIGHT
$ Dollar Drink Specials $
�:
Lfi�4 fat l6t& 4Zjftt,
L�Cl AJL from page 1
illicit drugs are medically useful is susr
pect"
So why does the government con-
tinue supplying it'
"When we have a compassionate-
use situation, out of feeling for the pa-
tient, we don't take that away says Don
McLearn, a spokesman for the Food and
Drug Administration. "We just don't add
to it"
The federal marijuana program
started in the 1970s and was discontin-
ued in 1992 - partly because of a huge
increase in applications from AIDS pa-
tients. The 13 people already receiving
monthly pot shipments were allowed to
continue. Five have since died. The oth-
ers will be supplied - at taxpayer ex-
pense - for as long as they want
They suffer from cancer, glaucoma,
multiple sclerosis and rare genetic dis-
eases.
Marijuana, they say, helps control
nausea and muscle spasms, ease eye
pressure and pain and stimulate appe-
tites. Pot patients insist it works better
than other drugs, including the highly
expensive Marinol, a pill form of mari-
juana that has the same active ingredi-
ent, THC.
"We are sick people. We are des-
perate people says Ervy Musikka of
f.
Florida, who has glaucoma and carries
her daily ration of marijuana "brown-
ies" in her pocketbook She bakes them
from the 300 joints the National Insti-
tute on Drug Abuse sends her every
month.
"This medicine gives us quality of
life
The government crop is harvested
on a 7.5-acre pot farm at the Research
Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at
the University of Mississippi From there,
the marijuana is shipped by airplane to
Raleigh, N.C where the cigarettes are
rolled by machine, packed in canisters
and delivered to medical centers for the
eight patients to pick up.
The entire operation costs about
$200,000 a year.
It's a tiny - but uiorny - sum for
the various agencies involved: the FDA,
which administers the program, and its
parent, the Department of Health and
Human Services; the National Institute
on Drug Abuse, which acts as supplier,
and the Drug Enforcement Agency,
which must approve the use of any con-
trolled substance.
The official position of these agen-
cies today is that marijuana is more
likely to cause health problems than
ease them.
"Holiday Delivery Guaranteed
JbrCjU from page 1
tor of Marketing for Business Ser-
vices Leslie Craigle said, "We are tak-
ing up donations for families regis-
tered with the Social Services De-
partment as well as specific families
that have ties to the university,
whether they are employees or stu-
dents who are not receiving enough
assistance and need help during the
holidays
Last year the drive collected
three van loads of donations, includ-
ing 24 large boxes of clothing, 15
cases of food, and four large boxes
of toys. This year they are setting a
goal of twice that Craigle explained,
"We got a late start last year because
we didn't start until late Novembet
But this year we started in early No-
vember, and have 38 boxes out on
campus.
Associate Vice Chancellor for
Business Services Layton Getsinger
also added, "We were pleased witi)
the support last year, but by starting
earlier, placing additional collection
boxes across campus, and getting the
word out to students and faculty, we
should be able to increase our gi
ing and make an even greater impact
on the community
Collection boxes are available all
over campus, as well as at selected
dorms. For more information on the
project, notify the Business Services
office or visit their homepage at the
ECU website.
Last Chance To Order
At 96 Prices
Dec. 2 - 6
Mon Fri.
9am - 4pm
Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
?Special Foment Plans Available
RIG6AN
SHOE REPAIR
ISemittif Stem t
Jam fait - Vkfl 2tU
Out Sfec(�ttf U Sale &
Rivergate East
Shopping Center
3193 A East 10th St
Phone 758-0204
Mon-Fri 7:30 am - 6 p.m
Sat 9KM am - 2 pm
A. R. RIGGAN,
OWNER
fc:W5 Mm-fS M! KHZ UHKff 5 S3HKHS 5�
1 wsfccoftte 1
g to Mendenhall Student Center
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YOUR C E NTER OF ACTIVITY �.
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MADRIGAL DINNERS
Enjoy an evening of music, dance, food and fellowship
reminiscent of the Elizabethan period
Dec. 5, 6, 7 at 7 p.m. and Dec. 8 at 5 p.m. In the Great Room
Students may use their meal carddeclining balance. Student tickets are
$15 (regular $20 or $27.50) available at the Central Ticket Office from
MonFri. from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.
ML-V-CAN-9WI
Bowl the night away at the Mendenhll Bowling Alley
Saturday, Nov. 30 from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. for only $5
which includes shoe rental and all the games you can bowl,
plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
c
s,
Courage Under Fire (PG-13) Nov. 21-23 in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with ECU ID
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in
I The Honors Program of East Carolina University I
takes pleasure in congratulating the following December 1996 ECU graduates
who have earned General Education Honors:
"Kristina Shine Verne Xathryn Smith Jtadenmuller
Brandie Lee ffarfer Matthew ClevelandOieatley
Angetia 9(enee 9lope Audra Jennet Latham
'David Scott Lemon 'Irung ttieu Nguyen
Cheryl Sugg Seaman
Congtrats to the following ECU graduates
who have also earned University Honors:
athryn Smith FladenmuUer
Irung tHieu Otyuyen
Cheryl Sugg Seaman
All Honor Students are invited to attend the Honors Recognition Ceremany on
Thursday, December 5,1996 at 5pm in General Classroom Building 1028.
J
TAKE A MIDDAY BREW SKCHL S
Take a break from your hectic class schedule to enjoy 10 frames of the
best bowling for students. Monday, Wednesday and Friday from
1 p.m. until 6 p.m bowling is only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
4
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Travel - Adventure Film
See Royal Hawaii: By One Who Lives There on Wednesday, Dec. 4 at
4:30 and 7 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. An all-you-can-eat theme dinner is
served at 6 p.m. for $12. Film tickets are free with ECU I.D. at the
Central Ticket Office. Dinner tickets must be reserved
with meal cards, cash, check or credit card.
Mi
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iS
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Discover how far a career in the Air
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AIR FORCE OPPORTUNITIES
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1-800-423-USAF
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games yA
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4





Tuesday, November 26,1996 The East Carolinian
Owitiew
The Popular
Entertainment
committee needs
to be applauded
for their efforts to
bring A Tribe
Called Quest and
Busta Rhymes, a
show that
seemed doomed
from the start.
A Tribe Called Quest and Busta Rhymes were set to play in
Williams Arena on Saturday, but the show never came to be. A
number of rumors have spread like a virus across campus con-
cerning the reasons why the show was canceled. These need
to stop.
If for nothing else, they need to stop because most of the
rumors blame the Student Union Popular Entertainment Com-
mittee for the cancellation - the very committee (made up of
students mind you) that pushed so hard in the face of their
advisors to have Tribe and Busta come here in the first place.
If anything, the Popular Entertainment Committee needs to
be applauded for their efforts.
The truth of the matter is that Q-Tip, a member of Tribe,
had a sore throat and canceled the concert That's it, plain and
simple. No if's, and's or but's.
Of course, that's not to say that this particular concert
didn't seem jinxed from the start Considering what had tran-
spired against the concert, the sore throat that finally killed
the show felt like it was destined to happen. Let us inform you
of what we know.
Right from the get-go, ticket sales were in a slump. Usually
with a general admission show, ticket sales will be strong at
first then take a slump, and then pick up right before the
date, with a peak in sales on the day of the show itself. Unfor-
tunately for this concert the tickets never sold in the begin-
ning.
Many factors could have contributed to this. The first week
that tickets went on sale, no radio, print, or other media adver-
tising was done for the show. Only word of mouth carried
news of the show's confirmation, and even then most people
didn't know that tickets were actually on sale.
Tribe had also recently played several dates in North Caro-
lina that the Student Union was not aware of. Many of the
possible non-student ticket buyers that would have normally
jumped at the chance to see Tribe had, in all probability, al-
ready seen them.
In addition to this, the choice of shows to see on Saturday
was plentiful. Chapel Hill's Dean Dome was playing host to
Stone Temple Pilots that night and in Fayetteville, Run DMC
was bringing down the house with their old-school style. Al-
though Tribe is a cross-cultural draw, these other shows could
have pulled (and more than likely did pull) a number of inter-
ested students away from campus.
Possibly one pf the biggest factors behind the low ticket
sales, though, is something that has been an ongoing problem
for ECU'S concert events - we only sell tickets through the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall. Not only is this location
hard to find for non-students who aren't familiar with the cam-
pus, they also aren't open after 6 p.m. or on weekends.
A number of the ticket buyers for this particular show would
probably have been local high school students who have nei-
ther credit cards nor their own transportation. Many adults
are sure to have also been in the same situation. Making the
tickets more available and accessible would probably help any
performance scheduled for campus, including the Tribe con-
cert But that's a problem for another day.
When it came down to it the Student Union decided to go
through with the show. Despite the apparent lack of support
from students who, when surveyed, had earlier been behind
the decision. Despite the low ticket sales. Despite qualms over
losing the tens of thousands of dollars that were at risk. The
Popular Entertainment Committee decided in favor of what
the students wanted and hoped for the best on the day of the
concert That day never came.
Now, the committee has decided not to reschedule A Tribe
Called Quest and Busta Rhymes for a later date. They will be
looking for another way to serve the student body. We hope
that this fiasco won't stop them from considering all of their
options.
Of course, as always, that will ultimately be determined by
the students. We have only ourselves to thank or to blame.
TEO1925 3?
sg
The East Carolinian
�$
$
Marguerite Benjamin, News Editor
Amy L. Royster, Assistant News Editor
Jay Myers, Lifestyle Editor
Dale Williamson Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Dill Dillard Assistant Sports Editor
Matt Heatiey, Electronics Editor
Heather Burgess, Wire Editor
Andy Farkas, Staff Illustrator
Brandon Waddell, Editor-in-Chief
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Matt Hege, Advertising Director
David Southerland, Asst Prod. Manager
Jennifer Andrews, Prod. Assistant
Ashley Settle, Prod. Assistant
Caria Cole, Copy Editor
David Blgelow, Copy Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Carole Mehle, Copy Editor
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Serving theECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies everyTuesday and �' ltoln .J
Son is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Caroiinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, whid. may be edrted
for decency or brevity The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be s.gnedAetters should
TSfihTT?- "nor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building. ECU. Greenville, NC 278584353. For Information, call (919)
3284366.
Hers's a pick-up: Be yourself
While watching Letterman re
cently, I picked up the inspiration and
topic for this weeks column. The
theme for the Top 10 List was "Top
10 Pick Up Lines Used by Lifeguards
Me, as usual, being more than willing
to ignore political correctness when
it comes to good humor, found the
skit hysterical. My favorite was "You
can hear the ocean if you put your
ear close enough to my red shorts
Please keep in mind that I didn't make
it up, haven't used it and don't plan
to at any time in the near or distant
future. I just found it to be distaste-
fully funny.
But enough on the Letterman
review and me defending my funny
bone.
The topic of the day is pick-up
lines. We've all heard them and most
of us have at least one friend who
brags about being able to wield and
manipulate them as if they were a
saber.
As with anything, in order to fully
understand something, you must first
define the issue. The definition of pick
is to strike with something pointed,
or to select Up is defined as aloft,
high, or as a prefix to imply raising or
improving. A line is the shortest dis-
tance between two points. This being
the case we have two choices as long
as we are talking about people. We
can define a pick up line as striking
someone high along a path between
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
Who's going to
respect someone
that doesn't even
respect or believe
in themselves?
two places. Definition number two is
a select way of raising someone so that
they come into line with you, assum-
ing that you and they are the points.
In layman's terms, a pick-up line
is a lyrical gimmick used to gain the
attention of another person in hopes
of gaining a conversation or more out
of another person depending on how
ambitious you are.
In case you haven't been out in a
while a modern day example would
be" Hey baby, where's the fire? Some-
thing is smoking in here, it must be
you?"
This gimmick can involve a fol-
low up. The follow up is a line used
later as way of continuing the gim-
mick. This could be a little tougher to
catch and might go something along
the lines of but not limited to "You're
special I feel surprisingly close to
you for having only known you for a
short while "You're not like all the
others, I can talk to you
These approaches are not limited
to males. There are more than enough
women that take this approach as well,
although it is usually a little more
subtle. Something to the tune of
"Don't I know you from somewhere?"
or "Aren't you in one of my classes?"
I am always amazed at the way
that people rely on these lines. Its as
if meeting someone new is like get-
ting into a house. Most people would
just knock on the door and invite
themselves in by introducing them-
selves. But no, these cheese balls have
to get in by using the conversational
equivalent of jumping through the
window. Only one in 10 people will
give you a chance to explain yourself,
fewer than that will let you stay, and
the majority will give you the boot
The best way to meet someone is
by simply introducing yourself. If you
don't have the self confidence to sell
and be yourself then the chances are
that you're going to fall on your face
anyway. Who's going to respect some-
one that doesn't even respect or be-
lieve in themselves?
By the way, did I mention that
the Red Cross certified me to write
on pick up lines?
SdC�o
Parking a problem for staffers too
� Guest columnist application for "Campus View
I This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you think about a certain topic.
� Please return this form to The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print.
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Submission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those changes I will be notified
Zof any changes that may affect the length or content. I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my
submission. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a
'deadline for submission will be assigned by the editor.
To the Editor,
This letter is on behalf of em-
ployees of East Carolina University
who, like myself, have at one time or
another felt harassed by the Univer-
sity Parking and Traffic Department
Students need to know that parking
troubles are not limited to the stu-
dent population. Staff of East Caro-
lina University also pay exorbitant
prices to "hunt for spaces" on cam-
pus. As employees of the university,
no compensations are made to us for
having to pay these parking fees,
while school teachers and all other
state employees are provided free
places to park.
However, paying parking fees
and hunting for spaces are not what
triggered this letter. My letter is on
behalf of employees of this univer-
sity who go beyond the duties re-
quired in their "job description" time
and time again-only to be persecuted
by Parking and Traffic Department.
Mv personal experience involved
unloadeding two large boxes of flow-
ers from an event my department
held off campus the night before. I
loaded the flowers in my car after
the event, drove home with them in
my car and brought them back to the
office the next morning to be distrib-
uted. The next morning I stopped
beside the sidewalk at the back door
just long enough to unload the flow
ers and sit them on the sidewalk. It
took approximately 60 seconds and
during that time I was partially black-
ing a handicapped space. There are
13 handicapped spaces behind our
building, all of which were empty at
the time. Of course, I received a $50
parking ticket.
I also remember a time that a
close friend of mine worked during
registration and went out at 8:30 p.m.
to get her car. She had been forced
to park on a side street because park-
ing spaces were unavailable around
Spilman at 7:30 that morning. It was
in Andiict anH a trn hranrh haH row.
ered the 2 hour parking warning on
the side street and after looking for
over 45 minutes for her car, she real-
ized she had been towed. What a nice
reward for putting in over 12 hours
at work that day! Of course, she had
to bear all of the expenses. I could
go on with incident and after inci-
dent of staff who have unselfishly
given to the University only to be
compensated with parking tickets,
towing charges and the like.
Parking problems have probably
single-handedly done more to hurt
the morale of the staff than any other
issue we have had to deal with. It is
time for the Administrators to ad-
dress the issue we have had to deal
with. We are tired of the hassle. We
would like to come to East Carolina
to do our job and would also like a
space to park our car in while work-
ing here. It really does not seem like
too much to ask.
Susan M. Keene





I '
5 Tuesday, November 26,1996 The East Carolinian
Marshall Tucker and
Backsliders rock Attic
IReottot?
Andy Turner
Senor Writer
"Let's go back to 1975 - before you
were born Marsh?' cker Band
frontman Doug Cray tm - �creai mng,
fist-pumping, enthusiastic-as-theywanted-
to-be Attic crowd Saturday night
Gray, pushing 50 and the only origi-
nal band member left, was perfectly con-
tent, however, to play for the merry
Tucker toddlers, who sang and shook
along to each new song.
There were those in attendance who
occupied Gray's age group, too. Before
the Tuckers took the stage, a man next
to me recounted seeing the band back
in 77. "Damn good he said, looking
reverently to the ce
Indeed, nostalgia and smoke hung
in the air, fighting for space.
The Marshall Tucker Band were
South Carolina's contribution to the
national music scene long before the
Blowfish blew. The Spartanburg natives
released their first album on Capricorn
Records in 1973, scoring numerous na-
tional hits before becoming the object of
a bidding war. eventually signing with
Warner Brothers in 1979.
Those '70s southern rock anthems
still made up the majority of the group's
show - much to the delight of the crowd.
The group happily and faithfully
went through the hits: "Fire on the Moun-
tain "Searchin' For a Rainbow "Heard
it in a Love Song " and "Runnin Like
the Wind all of which propelled the fist-
pumping further.
Marshall Tucker certainly knows
1. jw to entertain a crowd; however, some
of their extended jams were a bit long-
winded and often appeared to leave the
band themselves winded. "Heard it in a
Long Song complete with flute accom-
paniment, was "nice" enough to make
appropriate fodder for elevator music
But this evening was not for such
suggestions. It was about feeling good,
and the crowd certainly seemed to feel
good. Whether alcohol or the Tuckers
were the feel-good source is a question
best left uninvestigated.
The two opening bands left me with
two other feelings: hope and despair.
In an effort to end on a good note,
let me cover despair first
Opening act and Rocky Mount na-
tives, At Wit's End, were adept enough
musically but appeared to have every
single ounce of originality sucked from
their bodies (the suck remained). They
played the generic G.E. Smith constipa-
tionmasturbation blues: long, long,
long, boring, boring, boring guitar jams.
The lead singer even did the old behind
the back guitar solo and also played gui-
tar with his teeth. "Look ma, no hands
Enough already.
Most of their repertoire consisted
of cover songs of other people's cover
songs, copying the style of the copier.
"There's a Man Down There "Willy and
the Hand Jive "Mary Had a Little
Lamb To make matters worse, they in-
troduced songs as being by whoever cov-
ered the song instead of who originally
sang it "Here's an old Stevie Ray num-
ber the frontman said before going in
to "Texas Flood which was originally
done by Larry Davis and His Band in
1958. Granted, Stevie Ray Vaughan did
do the song and quite well, but could we
have just a little respect for the original
bluesmen, please? Don't crap on the win
dowsill of the blues without checking to
see who or what is inside, I say, indig-
nantly and with very little cause.
OK, now for hope.
The second act The Backsliders,
who are Raleigh natives, were received
well by the crowd. Many accepted lead
singer Chip Robinson's request to dance.
Robinson, noticing the gap between band
and audience, told the crowd. "This ain't
the cootie zone; if s the boogie zone
That said, the crowd took to the floor.
The band played a number of songs
off their forthcoming Mammoth album
Throwing Rocks at the Moon, due out
at the end of January: "If You Talk to My
Baby "Lonesome Teardrops "Paper
See BAND page 6
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle
Editor
The 1996-97 Writers
Reading Series of Eastern
North Carolina will once
again be in full throttle
on Monday, Dec. 1 when
Margaret Randall shares
her work with the Green-
ville community.
Randall, who has
had her poetry and prose
published extensively in
an eclectic collection of
books and journals, is a
multiculturalist in every
sense of the word. She
was born in New York
City, but left the country
in her mid-20s and did
not return to the States
until 1984. While abroad,
she lived in such coun-
tries as Mexico, Cuba and
Nicaragua; worked as a
midwife; translated Latin
Margaret Randall
Poet and author Margaret Randall
will be reading her work at the Willis
Building on Sunday, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m.
with a book sale and signingto follow.
American prose and poetry; and became involved in the women's move-
ment
Her travels have impacted on not only writing style but also the.
subjects of her writing. Randall's work typically focuses on women's lives
and other cultures. In 1962, Randall founded and co-edited El Corno
Emplumado (The Plumed Horn), a bilingual literary quarterly which flour-
ished as an important contribution to the literary world of the '60s.
Randall's writing has appeared in such books as Giant of Tears (1959),
the recently published The Price You Pay: The Hidden Cost of Women's
Relationship to Money (1996) and the soon-to-be-published Hunger's
Table, The Recipe Poems (1997).
Randall is also an accomplished photographer, having several photos
published in such works as Women Writers Calendar (1986)and Women
and Work (1986).
Anyone interested in creative writing or cultural issues should mark
Dec. 1 on all their calendars. A "meet the writer" event will be at 3 p.m. at
the Greenville Museum of Art, and a reading by Randall will be at 7 p.m
followed by a book-signing and sale, at the Willis Building, located at 300
E. 1st St.
Be an active member in the growing literary tradition of Eastern
North Carolina and support the Writers Reading Series.
For further information, contact Professor Julie Fay at 328-6578.
"Movie TZevtecm
0D1&evteev4.
Capable crew carries First Contact
Dale Williamson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Kirk is dead. The voyage of the clas-
sic crew is over. Now is the time for a
new generation to take over.
After seven successful seasons as
a popular television series. Star Trek:
The Next Generation eased its way onto
the big screen two years ago with the
film Star Trek: Generations, which
served as a transition piece from the
old crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise to the
new one. As fun (and flawed) as that
film was, its sole purpose for existence
was basically to pass the throne from
one captain to another, i.e. Kirk (Will-
iam Shatner) to Picard (Patrick
Stewart).
Now that Kirk and the rest of his
crew have been laid to rest Picard and
his crew are the central focus for the
films, and the newest entry in the Trek
filmography is so energetic and driven
that it stands to be one of the best jour-
neys ever.
Star Trek: mmmmmmmm
First Contact is
a fast-paced ad-
venture piece
that hits warp
drive immedi-
ately after the
opening credits.
Those unfamil-
iar with Next
Generation
may be some-
what lost at first
because the
story (co-writ-
ten by Brannon
Braga and Ronald D. Moore) doesn't
waste time with background exposition.
Within the first 15 minutes of screen
time, we know that the Borg (one of
Trek's most popular and most deadly
enemies) are back, that Picard is haunted
by his memories of them, and that the
Borg want to change Earth's history so
that they can assimilate the entire planet
As far as plot summary goes, the
above suffices. The thrusting force of this
film is not so much plot as action and
Blind Melon
Nico
Photo Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) and Commander
Data (Brent Spiner) kick Borg butt all over the big screen.
Watching Worf
face down a
cybernetic Borg in
zero gravity is the
kind of thing that
gets a Trek crowd
cheering.
some interesting character development
Although knowledge of the televi-
sion series is necessary to fully appreci-
ate First Contacts overall significance,
the film should succeed with non-Trek-
kers. The special effects are impressive,
light humor bounces in and out of the
brooding darkness of the film, and sev-
eral key action sequences prove to be
engaging enough for any adventure fan.
Adventure is the key to the success
for First Contact. While Generations lost
itself in babble about spatial anomalies
and fulfilling one's destiny. First Con-
tact doesn't hesitate to place a laser rifle
in Picard's hands and
a Klingon blade in
Worfs clutches. The
new crew, as a result
take on much more of
an active role than
they were able to in the
previous film. Watch-
ing Worf face down a
cybernetic Borg in
zero gravity is the kind
of thing that gets a
Trek crowd cheering.
Still, Fir�i Con-
tact does not allow its
characters to get lost
in the action. While the new crew has
too many members to fully develop in a
two-hour film (the women, admittedly,
serve almost no purpose in this story),
several powerful scenes shed some light
on at least two key players - Picard and
Data
Stewart in a powerful performance,
reveals Picard's weakness through his
obsession for vengeance against the
Borg, who had captured and assimilated
him as their own several years earlier.
As Data, Brent Spiner also further
humanizes his character by exploring
Data's conflicting desire to be more hu-
man and his temptation to become part
of the collective Borg.
Credit must be given to the filmmak-
ers for being wise enough to do a Borg
story, especially since there is a huge fan
base out there who want to see the Borg
on the big screen. While the film's writ-
ers may have slipped by dealing with yet
another time travel plot (it has become
way too easy to zip through time in these
movies), they still expand on the Borg
concept in some intriguing ways by in-
troducing the Borg Queen (played seduc-
tively by Alice Krige).
Also deserving notable recognition
and critical praise is the commanding
direction of Jonathan Frakes (who not
only directs the film but also plays the
Enterprise's ever-lovable first officer, Will
Riker). Being part of the Next Gen crew
for nearly a decade. Frakes knows the
Trek material as well as anyone, and has
proven his talent behind the camera by
directing some solid episodes of both
Next Generation and Deep Space Nine.
As far as I'm concerned, Frakes should
be given the director's chair for the rest
of the film series.
Paramount, the studio releasing
First Contact has reportedly been a little
worried about its Star Trek franchise
lately. Supposedly, the ratings for the
Star Trek shows have been slipping, and
reception to the last Star Trek film was
lukewarm. If First Contact is any indica-
tion as to the direction the films will be
going. Paramount needs to stop worry-
ing and just find a place to store its
money Star Trek is in very capable
hands.
John Davis
Staff Writer
I'm not quite sure who exactly it
was that decided that it would be a good
idea for Blind Melon to release another
album after their lead singer. Shannon
Hoon, passed into the great rehab clinic
in the sky. I'm not really sure why any-
one thought it would be a good idea for
Blind Melon to release a second album
anyway, much less a third.
I can describe this band in three
words: one hit wonder. "No Rain" was a
good song. Heck, it was a great song.
The passion and frustration of Shannon
Hoon's life came through the music and
the lyrics of that single clearly and pow-
erfully. As an added plus, the video for
the song was equally cool.
(Remember the BefrGirl?)
When great musicians release the
collections of their unreleased material,
the listening public is allowed to experi-
ence these bands at their most honest
and personal. With a great band, these
experiences are often rewarding.
It is even more rewarding when the
artist in question is no longer recording,
or even deceased. Then fans are offered
a treat a chance to hear new and differ-
ent aspects of their favorite artists. Of-
ten these revealing collections include
powerful alternate versions of songs or
material that is artistically excellent but
doesn t fit into the artist's normal reper-
toire.
Some fine examples from through-
out the years include R.E.Ms Dead Let-
ter Office. The Beatles' Anthologies, Jimi
Hendrix's Blues. Nirvana's Incesticide
and U2's Passengers. In the case of each
of these, a look at the unreleased songs
is like a look into the diaries of the art-
ists that have affected ourlives.
But who wants to look at the dia-
ries of Blind Melon? If Blind Melon some-
how thought that the death of their
heroin-saturated singer would escalate
the sales of their material as in the case
of Kurt Cobain or Jimi Hendrix, they for-
got one simple thing: both Cobain and
Hendrix wrote good songs on a consis-
tent basis.
I don't know much about Shannon
Hoon, except that he must have been a
pretty stupid guy. O.K. O.K this is a judg-
ment call on my part But he was ad-
dicted to heroin! Now heroin is not a
cheap narcotic. Rich people, such as
those who are riding the coattails of the
success of a number one single, buy
heroin.
My point Hoon no doubt increased
his heroin intake after his success. Why
the heck would anyone do this? "Hey,
I'm rich, I'm famous, what say I slowly
kill myself with a highly addictive and
lethal drug? Sounds good to me
This album (if it can be called that)
is not quite horrible. If Blind Melon re-
ally did sound this bid in their candid
moments, if s no wonder the magic of
the recording studio couldn't help them
any more than it did. Most of the songs
are merely lame and insipid. Some actu-
ally border on torturous.
The last track, recorded on an an-
swering machine (probably while Hoon
was strung out), is lethal. I almost forgot
why I like music listening to this track.
My roommates protested loudly and with
great vigor when I played "Letters from
a Porcupine" for them. One of them still
avoids me in the hallway, and the others
hold a deep resentment The band even
manages to slaughter "No Rain" in a
horrid outtake version.
Some of the other frightening mo-
ments include the band's attempt at
"John Sinclair a John Lennon song they
recorded for his tribute. Most people just
do Lennon's songs badly, which is un-
derstandable, Lennon being one of the
few who could do his own songs justice.
But if I didn't know any better, I would
be inclined to think that Blind Melon
purposefully destroyed and mocked this
song, perhaps in an attempt to get back
at Lennon for having so much of the tal-
ent that they never seemed to have.
The band also stumbles through a
Steppenwolf song, "The Pusher I wasn't
aware that somebody could make
Steppenwolf sound worse than
Steppenwolf themselves do, but Blind
Melon pull it off.
I'm sure that the remaining four
guys in the band meant well. They named
the album after Hoon's daughter. Nico
There is nothing more useless
than screaming at a wall. It's just
spittle and bricks, bricks and
spittle. However, if you put
enough voices together, that wall
might just be blown over. So join
in another futile attempt to
change the status quo and listen
to a "Scream at the Wall
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
I feel the need to correct a fla-
grant misconception.
My friends think that being a
theatre education major is easy.
They think that I get to play games
all day and have fun. that I get to
travel to exotic places to perform.
They're partially right I do get
to play games, although certainly
not all day, and I do have fun. But
being a theatre education major is
certainly not easy. I have rehears-
als. I build sets. I rig lighting. Oh,
and I write papers, too.
And on top of all this, I get to
live in fear of whether or not I'll find
a job when I graduate.
There aren't that many people
in my major. Don't quote me on this,
but I think at most there are twenty
20 of us at ECU. The problem in
arts education is not that there are
too many applicants for the position,
it's that there are too few positions
for the applicants. I have to worry
because, by the time I graduate, my
job might no longer exist
However, that's not the impor-
tant issue here. The issue at hand is
what children are going to do with-
out exposure to the arts through
art teachers.
Recently, the state of North
Carolina has put a lot of energy into
implementing their ABC program.
ABC stands for "Accountability,
Back to Basics, and local Control
The A means that schools will be-
come accountable for the success
or failure of their students. The C
means that more decisions can be
made at the local level. What every-
one seems to be having trouble with
is the B.
Getting back to the basics
means that children need to master
basic skills before moving on to ad-
vanced levels. These basic skills in-
clude reading, writing and math-
ematics. Unfortunately, there are
some people who think that these
are the only skills included in ba-
sics.
The arts are not just dessert
that you only get if you finish the
rest of your dinner; they are a vital
part of each and every major intel-
lectual food group. The arts are ev-
ery bit as important as reading, writ-
ing and math. In fact the arts can
be used as a tool to help teach these
subjects. But who is going to listen
to me? Money talks and bullshit
walks, and I'm over here spewing a
major load, according to the taxpay-
ers.
On the bright side, the A
Schools Program, another program
implemented by North Carolina, in-
tegrates the arts into the curricu-
lum at every level and in every sub-
ject for grades kindergarten
through eighth. I had the opportu-
nity to attend their training insti-
tute this past summer, and it was
an eye-opening experience.
I spoke with a math teacher
who got together with a science
teacher to teach the concept of
measurement in conjunction with
the solar system. These kids made
a scale model of the solar system
on the playground so they could
"see" the immense distance each
planet was from the others.
I also spoke with an English
teacher and a Social Studies teacher
who. together, planned a medieval
fair for the students. One entire day
was devoted to activities such as
reading Shakespeare, designing cos-
tumes, tasting food, dancing, learn-
ing and loving every minute of it.
The biggest problem these
teachers had with their students was
not lack of motivation. It wasn't dis-
cipline either. It was attendance.
They couldn't get the kids to stay
home when they were sick!
See BLIND page 6
See WALL page 6





wmmmmmmimm
Tuesday, November 26, 1996
The East Carolinian
VAXL from page 5 BAND from page 5 BLIND from page 5
' Studies have been done that prove
thajt arts education in the schools in-
creases attendance and raises test
secjres. But I don't place much stock
in statistics. What I place my faith in is
the! look on a child's face when she
finally understands her multiplication
tables, or when he reads a new piece
of literature and is swept away into an
imaginary place that is so wonderful
and. exciting he can't wait to go again.
Wrat I place my faith in is a teacher
whb cares enough to try anything and
everything to make a subject clear for
her! class.
Unfortunately, every year more
and more money is taken away from
educational programs, and every year
arts education is in danger of being
completely taken away. When the bud-
gets cut, the arts are always the first
to j�o. God forbid someone should take
money away from the football program.
After I graduate. I'll still lose sleep
because of long rehearsal hours. My
fingers will bleed from pricking them
while sewing costumes. I'll risk my life
agkin hanging lights.
' And I'll do it in spite of my insig-
nificant salary and stressful job envi-
ronment I'll do it despite high in-
stances of teacher burnout I'll do it
even though I may be looked down
upon by my peers and thought of as
just a drama teacher
I'll teach drama until they bleed
it dry and leave it for dead. I'll still be
there, donating my own clothes to a
non-existent costume closet and build-
ing sets out of the wood I was sup-
posed to be using to repair the hole in
my garage.
Oh yeah, the government has
found their sucker � me.
Doll World etc. They played them slow,
they play them fast and they played them
well.
Live, the Backsliders' song "Hey
Sheriff' seems to be a mediation on the
evils of a premature ejaculation. Clock-
ing in at over eight minutes long, the
song builds slowly to an explosive end-
ing. That is a good thing if you wee
wondering. Patience, darling; there's a
fiesta in the making as we speak.
I wish the Backsliders could have
played longer, but so goes the story of
an opening band.
As I said before, the two opening
bands left me feelings of hope and de-
spair. It was easy to tell that there was a
lot of feeling in the Attic Saturday night
(which will probably cause some emo-
tional damage), who was probably named
after the sometime Velvet Underground
member. Thank God they didn't attempt
any Velvet Underground songs.
Yes, these boys meant well. But re-
member that George Wallace meant well,
Lenin meant well, Milli Vanilli even meant
well. The road to hell is paved with good
intentions, and the soundtrack along the
way is probably this album. Or maybe
this album and William Shatner's The
Transformed Man, which isn't as bad as
this one but has William Shatner sing-
ing on it And whatever I may have
against Blind Melon. Shannon Hoon
never sang as badly as Shatner. Though
here, he does come close.
WZMB is now hiring for all DJ, sportscaster, newscaster positions
for the Spring '97 semester. Any student interested please call Jim
Matheson at 328-4751 or stop by the WZMB studios on the ground
floor of Mendenhall Student Center and pick up an application.
Ql .3 FM
r East Carolina University
YOV'LL SAVE
NUCHOS PESOS,
AMICOS!
Sunday 12 Price Chili Cheese Fries'
$1.50 Sangrias
Monday 12 Price Pitchers of Draft
12 Price Fiesta Platter
Twosday Buy One Appetizer
Get one Free
$2.50 Lime Margaritas
Wednesday 12 Price Pizza &
Nachos Grande
$1.50 Imports
Thirstday 12 Price Wings
$1.99 Hi-Balls
Tired oS Relatives?
Wing in the holiday
withBW-3!
Open, Thanksgiving
6 p.m.
Saturday November 28th
vs. N.C. STATE
3:30 pm
BUFFALO WILD WINGS & WECK
1 14 East Fifth Street � 758-9191
TAILGATE SPECIAL
S3� wings for
$1900
EXP X1Z99
fr�.
mk
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT
COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON
Applications are available
at the Student Union Office
Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline To Apply: December 6,1996
CONCERT
CANCELLED
The concert scheduled for
Saturday, November 23 at
8:00 p.m. in Williams Arena-
Minges Coliseum, ECU,
featuring
A Tribe Called Quest and
Busta Rhymes
has been cancelled by the band
due to sickness of one of the
performers.
TICKET REFUND POLICY
Ticket must be presented for refund.
Refunds will be given during the following times:
- Saturday, November 23 from the ticket office at
Williams Arena-Minges Coliseum, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m
-and through Thursday, December 19 during
normal operating hours at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University,
Call 919-328-4788 for operating hours schedule.
SJHj
�.
Ivfr
7
The ECU Student Union apologizes for any
inconvenience caused by the cancellation.
fflTtpHlpiirn��





7 Tuesday, November 26,1996 The East Carolinian
Records broken in
victory over Memphis
Not going anywhere?
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
It was a record setting day for
the Pirates, in their 20-10 win over
Memphis.
Fullback Scott Harley, rode right
into the record books with his 145
rushing yards against the Tigers on
Saturday. That gave him the single
season rushing record with 1,394
yards. The old record was set by Jun-
ior Smith in 1993 with 1,352 yards.
Harley gave the credit to several
people who have helped him with his
success this season.
"I'm just happy the man upstairs
gave me the power to play football
and to my parents Harley said. "I
just have to thank Coach Logan for
giving me the chance to play
Split end Larry Shannon added
to his career touchdown receptions
snagging two catches and running
them in for the score. Shannon leads
the ECU history book with 19 touch-
down receptions. The old mark, of
17, was set by Clayton Driver from
1989-1992.
Mitch Galloway continued to add
to his career receptions record with
four receptions. Galloway now has
124 receptions. The past record was
set by Luke Fisher who grabbed 102
receptions from 1988-1991. Galloway
is also just 21 yards shy of becoming
the Pirates all-time leader with ca-
reer receptions yardage. Currently he
has 1,639 yards.
Quarterback Dan Gonzalez got
his third straight start on Saturday
and finished with 351 passing yards,
two touchdowns and three intercep-
tions. Marcus Crandell again had to
watch the game from the sideline.
Gonzalez said his confidence
level keeps rising with each start he
gets.
"I felt a lot more confident to-
day Gonzalez said. "Those three big
mistakes left a mark on me and that's
something I don't want to do
The first quarter was scoreless
for both teams as ECU had a chance
to put three points on the board, but
Chad Holcomb missed a 49-yard at-
tempt
The Pirate defense held the Ti-
gers to just 50 yards while ECU com-
piled 74 in the first quarter.
Head Coach Steve Logan told
his team before the game that the
defense had to be prepared to put
on one of their best performances.
"I told our team if we were go-
ing to win this game, we had to come
Sec BALL page 8
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Carlos Brown, (53) drags down his opponent. Brown and the rest of the defensive
unit will look to keep the Wolfpack as close to scoreless as possible this Saturday.
� Wolfpack
ends volleyball season Get to rumble
Tournament defeat
Mike Daniska
Staff Writer
The women's volleyball team con-
cluded a disannointing season with a
loss to second seeded James Madison
in the quarterfinal game Friday at the
CAA tournament in Wilmington. The
Lady Pirates lost in straight sets 17-
15,15-5 and 15-10. The loss capped a
season that saw the Lady Pirates cap-
ture only seven victories in 33 games.
"We hit some bumps in the road
sophomore Kristen Warner said.
While they lost in straight sets,
the Lady Pirates did not go down with-
out a fight
"We could have just as easily won
the first game freshman setter Julia
D'Alo said. "We knew that we had the
ability to beat any team we came up
against We knew that anything was
possible if we just played well
Even though they entered the
tournament seeded seventh, the Lady
Pirates were pumped up for the game.
"I think that they were pretty ex-
cited Assistant Coach Marcus Young
said. "We played JMU tough. We
played tight at first, but they were
tight too
Team captain Kristen Woodruff,
a senior, led the team with eight kills.
while D'Alo paced the team with 21
assists.
The CAA tournament also ended
a season that saw the Lady Pirates
already a shorthanded team of 10 play-
ers reduced to seven. The three play-
ers were lost in the middle of the sea-
son, all in the same week.
"It was difficult" D'Alo said. "Be-
cause we spent the beginning of the
season molding together as a team.
After that we had to remold. If we
could have done a better job at com-
ing together, we could have had more
success, but that is not an excuse
The struggles seemed to bring
the team a little closer though.
"It hurt our depth a bit Young
said. "But they came closer as a team.
But it is hard to play and win with only
seven players
Having only seven players on the
team proved even more difficult when
it came to practice.
"Lack of six-on-six game experi-
ence in practice may have played a part
(in the season) Young said.
The season was not totally lost
however, there were a few bright spots.
One such bright spot this year hap-
pened right before the CAA tourna-
ment when the Lady Pirates won a
tournament held at Cornell University
where they beat Morgan State, Wagner
College and host team Cornell.
"The Cornell tournament was the
high point in the season because it
symbolized the time that we molded
D'Alo said. "It took us so long, but we
came together and competed hard.
There were three good teams there and
we beat them by playing hard and to-
gether
Another high point in the season
came two days before the CAA tourna-
ment when the Lady Pirates beat
Campbell, a team that had beaten them
soundly earlier in the year.
The success of talented D'Alo was
a plus this season.
"Julia did a really fine job for us
on and off the court this season
Young said.
While the season was a struggle
for these young Pirates, all eyes seem
to be on the future.
"We are really going to improve
Young said. "We can only get better
Some of the players feel the same
way.
"We are on the right track
Warner said.
It was a losing season that saw
the women's volleyball team face many
obstacles that other teams may have
crumbled under - the Lady Pirates
didn't and this truly makes them win-
ners.
"We could have just given up
D'Alo said. "But we didn't"
Dill Dillard
Assistant Sports Editor
Club sports still thriving
Cathy Biondo
Rec Services
Recreational Services Club
Sports Program is in full swing. All
the teams have shown enthusiasm and
dedication from the start of the sea-
son. The Club Sports Program offers
a unique opportunity for students to
participate in the sport or activity of
their choice.
Some of the active Club Sports
include, Men's and Women's Lacrosse,
Field Hockey, Men's and Momen's
Frisbee, Men's and Women's Volley-
ball, Goju Shorin, Tai Chi, Tae Kwon
Do, Isshihyu, Disc Golf, Rugby, Wa-
ter Skiing, Underwater Hockey and
Kayaking.
The variety of teams are a combi-
nation of instruction and competition.
Clubs are developed and organized by
students and administration with fi-
nancial support provided by Rec Ser-
vices. Most importantly, everyone has
the opportunity to relax and have fun.
Saturday, Nov. 2, the ECU Tae
Kwon Do Club sparring team traveled
to Herndon, Va. for the Eagle Tae
Kwon Do Federation National Com-
petition. Twelve dedicated members,
who have worked hard and trained all
semester anxiously awaited to test
their skills.
The competition consisted of
poomse (forms), breaking and 90 sec-
onds long sparring matches. ECU'S
hark work and dedication paid off for
everyone who put forth their best ef-
fort and performed extremely well.
Seven members performed well
enough to place within the top three
in the nation: Robert Shin, Greg Har-
ris and Megan Brown took first place
in their division, Mack Osborne and
Chris Sarbo finished second and
Cathy Totten and Correai Moore
placed third.
With the first tournament of the
season out of the way, nerves have
calmed and confidence has grown.
The sparring team continued to train
each day to gear up for the biggest
tournament of the semester.
On Thursday, Nov. 14, the team
traveled to Berkeley, California for the
National Collegiate Tae Kwon Do
Tournament. The team has partici-
pated in this tournament for the past
three years and has brought back six
Collegiate National Titles. Hopes and
anticipation for this year's team is no
exception and promising results are
expected.
The Men's Volleyball Club trav-
eled to Knoxville, Tenn. to participate
in a 10 team tournament They split
with Georgia 15-9,6-15 split with Sega
15-10, 9-15 and lost to Tennessee 7-
15,10-15.
This tournament has given them
tournament experience, and they look
to better their record. The Men's Vol-
leyball team hosted Methodist on Nov.
15. A fun and competitive was had by
all. The "A" team won 16-14,15-13,5-
15, and 154. The "B" team won 15-6,
15-8,15-10. Thanks to Mark Slawinski
and Tim Mobley for their time in or-
ganizing the match.
The Issinryu Karate Club partici-
pated in the "Battle of the Carolinas"
the weekend of November 9-10.
Latoya Mills competed in the white
belt Kata, Mike Poulk competed in the
men's white belt Kata and fighting,
David Fair competed in the men's
advanced brown belt Kumite, and
Anthony Gribble competed in the
black belt weapons.
Anthony Gribble placed first in
the men's black belt weapons and first
in the men's black belt Kata. Con-
gratulations to the Club Sports par-
ticipants.
It doesn't take a genius to real-
ize that there is a big game coming
to Charlotte this Saturday. Well, if
you've been under a rock the last
year and a half, the big game I speak
of is the renewal of the ECUN.C.
State rivalry.
The series has been dominated
by the Wolfpack 12-7, but the Bucs
have had the last laugh three out of
the last four meetings. Of course the
last meeting of the two teams came
in the '92 Peach Bowl where the 11-
1 Pirates made the comeback of the
century to win the last Peach Bowl
played in Fulton County Stadium.
Now, you can talk stats and strat-
egies all you want to, but a game with
this much attention, you ran throw
the records out the windo .v.
"This is the last game for us se-
niors, and we will be re
membered for one of
two things senior
BJ Crane said.
"The class that
started the tradi-
tion, or the class
that renewed the
State rivalry with a
loss
As stated by
coach Steve Logan,
none of the players from either
side played in the '92 Peach Bowl,
or know first hand, what the rivalry
is all about.
"Being from New Jersey, I really
didn't know much about the series
between the two teams, but talking
to fans and people who know, you
see things more clearly quarterback
Dan Gonzalez said.
With the program growing to a
national status, along with the series
with State just getting cranked up
again, the only people who really
know what it's like would be the
coaches.
"This is a ballgame
where emotions run
high, and you can throw
the records out because
it's anybody's ballgame
Logan said. "These kids
will know when they hit
that tunnel and see all of
the excitement It's go-
ing to be a hard hitting
ballgame
The 7-3 Pirates have
flaunted such victories
over South Carolina and
Miami, while State has
stayed in the cellar of the
ACC with only three vic-
tories to their name. De-
spite the differences in
records, this has little or
no effect on the ballgame whatsoever.
Since the early '70's, these two pro-
grams have slugged it out punch by
punch, and you can expect more of
the same in Charlotte.
Now the biggest question on
the minds of every Pirate fan is will
Marcus Crandell make his return in
the biggest game of the year? As ev-
ery Pirate fan from Manteo to
Murphey knows, Gonzalez has been
performing solidly for the injured
Crandell, but will the senior from
Robersonville sit out his last game
in Purple and Gold?
"It's very disappointing being in
the situation that I'm in right now,
not knowing if I'm going to play or
not" Crandell said. "I most definitely
want to be in there and I want to
play, but i. I don't this team will still
ECU
219FIRST DOWNS179
1581RUSHING YARDS1446
2599PASSING YARDS2130
4180TOTAL OFFENSE3576
26.6AVG. POINTS PER GAME23.9
136FUMBLESLOST2417
i 15INTERCEPTIONS10
- - -
Photo Courtesy ofN.C. State Media Guidej
Tremayne Stephens, 20, leads the
Wolfpack with 712 rushing yards.
give it everything it's got"
The Pirates will have to give it
all they've got to beat a team that is
slowly gaining confidence.
Logan is impressed with State's
freshman quarterback Jamie
Barnette and said if you're jj
not careful he can get you. -JgJ
"I'd love to coach JJJ
Jamie Barnette Logan �
said. "He's a small QB IS
with a rocket arm, and � �
he can do a lot to hurt 'm
you �
The Pirates will j
also have to stop a
backf ield with a bruising
fullback in 233 pound Carlos J
King as well as a quick scat back bed
hind him in Tremayne Stevens.
"Defensively, we're going to have
to pay attention, because these boyC
can score Logan said. � i
Linebacker Carlos Brown is not"�
expecting anything new from the
Wolfpack. �
"We've seen the big backs afcj;
Tech, and we've seen the quick guys;
at other places , so we kind of knovt J
what to expect" Brown said. w
This game will be making history
a of its own Saturday. This will be
the largest crowd to see a college
football game in the state of North, �
Carolina. So far about 64,000 tiefcj
ets have been sold. Around
32,000 of those have been'
sold to ECU fans.
The previous largesC
college football game seen
in North Carolina was i�jjj
1986 when, you guessed it, -
the Wolfpack hosted ECU-
in Carter-Finley Stadium
Attendance for that game
was 58,650.
These two teams wifiC
hit the field and battle iCj
out on Saturday at 3:3��
p.m. at Ericcson Stadium �
in Charlotte and will be na-
tionally televised or�7
ESPN2.
NCSU





(W �
8
Tuesday, November 26,1996
The East Carolinian
D ALL. from page 7
down to Memphis and play East Caro-
lina 'D Logan said.
Offensively, ECU stepped it up
in the second quarter. Harley got the
(irst snap of the second quarter and
rushed five yards down to the ECU
40-yard line. The next play was a pass
play from Gonzalez to Shannon who
grabbed the ball, broke away from
his defender and turned the play into
i 60-yard touchdown reception. ECU
lead 7-0.
Holcomb got another chance to
score as he nailed a 22-yard field goal
hvo drives later. The Pirates had a
fcomfortable 10-0 lead. Memphis
scored a field goal late in the first
naif, but ECU still had the 10-3 edge.
At the half Memphis had com-
piled just 95 total offensive yards.
Linebacker Carlos Brown said defen-
sively the Pirates haven't been
pleased with the last two game per-
formances.
"We knew on defense it was time
for us to reestablish ourselves that
we were back because the last two
weeks we've had off games Brown
said.
That defense came out with a
vengeance to start the third quarter.
The Pirate offense struggled to get
the ball into the end zone, but where
the offense left off, the defense
picked up.
During Memphis' first posses-
sion to open up the second half,
noseguard Travis Darden and line-
backer Rod Coleman got back-to-back
quarterback sacks on Qadry Ander-
son. A visibly shaken up Anderson
returned to the sideline to try to col-
lect his thoughts and get back in the
game.
Coleman was trying to get to the
quarterbacks as much as possible.
"I was just trying to get to them
every chance I got and get them out
of the game Coleman said. "That's
all I was trying to do
The third quarter was again
scoreless for both teams. ECU had a
one touchdown lead going into the
fourth. Logan had told his players in
practice that a good goal for the of-
fense was to end with 21 points.
"I didn't know how many points
we could get on them Logan said.
"I told our offense if we could get
21, we could win and that's about
how it ended up
The offense did come out and
score 10 more points, from a
Gonzalez to Shannon touchdown and
another field goal from Holcomb.
The Pirates were on their own
48-yard line when Gonzalez found Sh-
annon who found the end zone. Then
with 6:39 left in the game, Holcomb
scored the final points with a 36-yard
attempt.
Two of Gonzalezs' three inter-
ceptions came within the red zone
(20-yard line). He felt good about the
way the Pirates drove down the field,
but knows he tried to force some
passes.
"I felt good about driving down
the field the way we did Gonzalez
said, i think we did well going down
the field and we got into the red zone
and I tried to force some things that
I'm really disappointed with
Logan believes in his back up
and knows these are just young mis-
takes.
"He's gotten us into the red zone
a couple of times and taken the ball
out of our offense's hands Logan
said. "That's not bad quarterback
play, that's young quarterback play
For the game ECU netted 487
total offensive yards compared to just
190 by Memphis. Shannon led with
reception yardage with 112. Tight
end Scott Richards compiled 68
yards, while Galloway finished with
48 yards.
The Pirates now prepare for the
most talked about game all season -
N.C. State. Shannon says after the
Memphis win, spirits are soaring.
"We're flying high right now
Shannon said.
Monday, December 2
7:30 am - 7:00 pm
ECU Student Stores' Annual
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St nftft Hours:
Pittman Building ' 3 ' "UWU Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC8:00-4:00
11011. Gkaitot���.
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Need some music for your drive
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Have a safe and Happy Thanksgiving!
Good luck this Saturday Pirates!
Student Stores
Where your dollars support student scholars!
3SS-6731
Wright Building
www4tudcntstorcs.ccu.edu
Sale excludes previously reduced books and bargain books.
Nol valid in conjunction with other offers. Special order merchandise not included.
Sttdmts arc also welcome to the Annual laenKySUrf
HoMtrr Sal, Tacsday, December 3, Wl pm to �� pm.
DON 1 FORGET THE ECU STUDENT STORES' POINTS SALE TODAY:
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Tuesday, November 26,1996 The East Carolinian
cms
ETQbl
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
m
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 2 bedroom, 2 bath townhouse. All
furnishings except BDR. WasherDryer in-
cluded. Pets negotiable available mid Decem-
ber. Must be clean and sociable. Rent
$217.50month. Must see! 756-6556
UNIQUE ONE BEDROOM, HICKORY
Street Call Cindy or Amy, Pro Management
of Creenville, 756-1234.
ROOMMATE NEEDED AS OF spring se-
mester to share 4 bedroom house on 14th
Street Close to campus. Rent $187.50. Call
752-7325
FUN-LOVING, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN
roommate wanted ASAP to share 4 BR house
on Jarvis Street WD, $200month & 14
bills. Own room, walk to campus. 752-9102.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
NICE house, close to campus. 752-8682.
ONETWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
ACROSS from campus. Own parking. $325
$425. Call Rizz (91921-3225.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO share
three bedroom house close to campus. $190
per month plus 13 utilities. Call 321-6176.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED START-
ING spring semester. Two bedroom, 2 12
bath, fully furnished, pool, on ECU bus ro-
ute. Please call 752-0813.
NO DEPOSIT! 1 BR apt available Jan. 1st
WD hook-up. Pets allowed (wdeposit)
$275mo. 756-3657 leave a message. Water
and sewage included.
WANTED: CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE TO
share a fully furnished townhouse. Access to
swimming pool, tennis courts, and basket-
ball court Call 3534294.
ROOMMATE WANTED IMMEDIATELY.
MALE or female. $260 per month and 12
utilities, fully furnished. Call 3534451.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3 BR
2 12 BA townhouse. Prefer older student
or professional. Must be neat and responsi-
ble. NS. $270 'month & 12 utilities. Call
355-6457. Start Dec. 1.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IMME-
DIATELY to share three bedroom apt Non-
smoker preferred. Wilson Acres Apts. $225
month plus utilities and phone. If interested
call 7524297 or (910) 395-5324 (spring se-
mester);
3 BRM DUPLEX FOR rent starting Jan. 1st
Rent $525, cheap utilities, big backyard, great
neighbors, close to campus and downtown.
Pets allowed. Call 758-3788 now!
WANTED: GRADUATE STUDENT SEEK-
ING 1 male housemate $170mo. Includes
utilities. Close to campus. Call Kevin 752-
5557.�
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAY-
ERS Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use
of all amenities, split cable, phone and utili-
ties 4 ways. Call Today 321-7613. Very Af-
fordable!
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! Short walk
to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - Next to AOTT
house. 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths - mint con-
dition. 5th Street Square - Uptown - Above
BW3 - 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken liv-
ing area. Luxury Apartment 'Available Now!
Will lease for December or January (6 month
or year leases available) Also Available - "The
Beauty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment - if
you see it, you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-
2616.
MF NEEDED TO MOVE into 2bdr apt sur-
rounded by fun and friendly neighbors. Lo-
cated on Fifth Street across campus, down-
town. $200 a month. Available Jan. 1st Call
757-3434.
1 BEDROOM NEAR CAMPUS. Utilities in-
cluded. $350. Call Cindy or Amy, Pro Man-
agement of Greenville, 756-1234
114 WOODLAWN. 2 BR. 1.5 bath, ceiling
fans, deck, balcony, washerdryer hook-ups,
3 blocks from campus. $500month. Avail-
able end of December. 758-6886
1 BEDROOM FOR RENT. Sublease from
January 1 to August 1. Wesley Commons. Call
830-9585.
FIRST STREET. 1 BEDROOM central
heatair. Call Cindy or Amy, Pro Management
ofGreenville.756-1234.
FREE DECEMBER RENT! MF roommate
wanted. Close to campus. Private bedroom
and bath. Free cable, water and sewer. $190
month. Call Keith after 6pm 551-3799.
3 BEDROOM - Wilson Acres. Take over
lease. Jan � July. Call anytime. 830-9449.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED BY Jan. 1
to share 2 bedroom apartment 5 blocks from
campus. $187.50 plus 12 utilities. Call Mike
at 752-8291.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:
THIRD Roommate for a four bedroom house
on 406 Rotary Avenue. 2 houses from cen-
ter of campus. Call Jason or Jamie at 752-
3552.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! Short walk
to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next to AOTT
house. 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths - mint con-
dition. 5th Street Square - uptown, above
BW3, 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken liv-
ing area. Also available a 2 bedroom above
BW3 available Jan. 1st for $500.00month.
Luxury Apartments. Available now! Will ease
for December or January (6 mo. or year
leases available) Also available - "The Beau-
ty Salon" - 3 bedroom apartment If you see
it you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: PLAYERS
Club Apartments. WasherDryer, use of all
amenities, split cable, phone and utilities 4
ways. Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
TWIN OAKS 3 BEDROOM, 2 12 baths,
fireplace, all appliances, very large quiet pool
close to park. $595 month. 756-3009 after
6:00 pm.
THREEFOUR BEDROOM HOUSE AT
201 East 13th . All hardwood floors five
blocks from campus. Rent $450month. Call
757-3191.
CLOSE TO ECU - Woodcliff Apts 10th
Street - 2 bedrooms, very energy efficient
washerdryer hook-ups, watersewer includ-
ed. 756-0944.
THIRD STREET DUPLEX. 2 bedrooms, 1
bath. Central heatair, all hardwood floors.
Call Cindy or Amy, Pro Management of
Greenville, 756-1234
ROOMMATE WANTED DEC. 1:3 bedroom
house one block from campus, 13 utilities,
you get own bath. Washer and dryer indud-
ed. Male or female call Tammy 757-9310.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted. 3 blocks from campus. Central AC
Heat WD. Dishwasher. Only $185 a month
and 13 utilities. Call 752-6999. Available
now!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP!
For Spring semester Twin Oaks. On ECU
bus route. 3 bedroom, 2 12 baths. Rent &
13 utilities. Call Kristi 758-9486. Available
now.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO take
over lease. Great house 1 block from cam-
pus. Mid Dec or Jan. 1. Call 830-5419.
FORD ESCORT 1985, NEW battery, ster-
eo, standard shift 4 gears, runs great $1400
or best offer. Call now 353-7152.
THULE ROOF-MOUNTED BICYCLE rack,
set up for 2 bikes, $150. American Classic
rollers. $100. Sun Mistral 32H clincher rims,
$25.57 cm Serotta TG, Campy Chorus Ergo
Carbon. 400 training miles. Complete bike
$2000. Call 830-2494 (voice-mail) or 752-
0318 (H).
FOR SALE: SOFA, CHAIR, kitchen table
w4 chairs, coffee table, end table.Si00.00
Call 758-1319
P100 COMPUTER WITHOUT ANY ram,
hard drive, or CD-rom. Has SVGA 15" moni-
tor. Call 754-8261.
PEAVY ELECTRIC GUITAR and crate amp.
with awesome reverb. Comes with case,
stand, and tuner. All for $350.00. Call 830-
0921.
LOOK BETTER & FEEL GREAT 100
Natural & Dr. recommended. A healthier you
through cellular nutrition. 30 Day money-
back guarantee. Call now 756-1188.
MOVING SALE: RECLINER, WALL unit
coffee table, TV stand, chair, sleeper sofa:
All must go! Best offer taken. Call 7524457.
For Sale
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT j
! WITH PRESENTATION OF THIS �
COUPON
I I and 2 Bedroom Range. Refridgerator. Washer.
I Dryer Hookups. Decks and Patios in most units
1 Laundry Facility, Sand Volleyball Court. Located 5 j
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
t
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
blocks from campus.
FREE WATER, SEWER, CABLE
I BEDROOMS
StoveRefridgeratorDishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Pattos on First Floor
Located 5 Blocks from Campus
2 bedroom, appliances, water, basic cable, 5
blocks from campus. New ownership. New
Landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
! 08 A BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
tf
Help
Wanted
ADMIRE VOLUPTUOUS, RUBENESQUE,
MAJESTIC, INCOMPARABLE African
American women? Then order photograph-
ic images of Gorgeous full-figured african-
american women modeling exotic lingerie!
All material is non-pornographic and free
of nudity. Write: African-American Multi-
Media Productions, P.O. Box 28051, Raleigh,
NC 27611-8051; Fax: 1-919-321-8771 or E-
mail:amp3@ix.netcom.com A free catalog is
available upon request! Check out our web
site at http:www.best.comamp3 You
mutt be 18 year of age to order.
IBM PSI WITH 386 processor, color moni-
tor, mouse and modem $499. 29 gallon
aquarium setup: tank, hood, light undergrav-
el filter, filter powerhead, rock & plants, with
stand. Call Chris 752-3552.
GREAT DEALS MUST SELL. 1982 Toyota
Supra 6-Cyl 5 speed. $1800. Covercraft car
cover, never used, fits 15-16' car, $70; weight
bench squat rack 300 lbs 2 bars. $300. Call
752-1321.
VIVITAR V635 35MM SINGLE reflex cam-
era with autofocus 28-70mm macro 300m
lens. Manualsmall case included. Barely
used. $100. Call 321-8572 after 5 pm.
BUS TRIP TO AND from Charlotte to the
ECU - State game. Includes travel to and
from Charlotte (leaving Friday, Nov. 29th and
returning Sunday, Dec. 1st), Friday and Sat-
urday night hotel, and shuttle to and from
game on Saturday. $300couple. Tickets to
game also available. Call 523-1192.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS! SONY STEREO 135
wattschannel. $400. Large entertainment
center $150. Alphasonik amplifier, 300 watts,
$150. Brian 752-1891.
DRUM SET FOR SALE. Pearl Export Five
piece. Black. Sounds excellent' Makes a great
gift Negotiable. Call Matt at 752-5221.
386PC 4MB RAM WIN 3.1 & more! $400.
Wedding dress, size 1820 $200. Tuxedo,
waist size 30 $100. Desk $15. shelf $10. All
negotiable. 756-3657 leave a message.
'87 NISSAN SENTRA - runs great AC,
Alpine CD. 5 speed - $1400 or best offer.
Call 752-1741.
WINTERVILLE FLEA MARKET: AN-
TIQUES, used furniture, gift items, collect-
ibles, household items, etc. Consignments,
booth rentals. 0 Haul dealer. We recycle eve-
rything! 116 W. Main Street Telephone 756-
1726. Take any Winterville exit off Route
11
GRADUATION SALE. EVERYTHING
MUST go! Best offers taken. Call 353-1769
and ask for Maria or Susan.
i LEATHER SOFA AND CHAIR $700 (paid
i $1800); contemporary canopy bed $175;
i black ceiling fan $25; Poik audio speaker
box $175,321-7183.
Help
Wanted
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MULTI-MEDIA
PRODUCTIONS is now recruiting full-fig-
ured african-american women to model ex-
otic lingerie during photographic sessions.
All work is non-pornographic and free of
nudity. Earn up to S100 per hour! You must
be at least 21 years of age to apply. Call 1-
919-321-8218, 1-800-921-3855 or e-mail
amp3@ix.netcom.com.
Now Hiring Playmates. Top Pay. All shifts.
Must be 18 years old. Call today 747-7686,
Snow Hill, NC.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EUROPE
- Conversational English teachers needed in
Prague, Budapest or Krakow. No teaching
certificate or European languages required.
Inexpensive room & boardother benefits.
For info, call: (206) 971-3680 ext K53624.
HELP WANTED: EXPERIENCED WAIT
STAFF and cashier. No phone calls. Apply
at Szechuan Gardens, 909 S. Evans St,
Greenville.NC.
NEED $$$$? EXCELLENT INCOME po-
tential working from home. For free infor-
mation send long SASE to Regional Success,
P.O. Box 3950, Greenville, NC 27836-1950.
OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING You
could be earning $500 - $5000 a MONTH.
Call 756-1188 for Info.
BUS DRIVERS NEEDED. PAID training
provided - no experience necessary. Must be
a student in good standing with a GPA of at
least 2.00. Contact Carl at 3284724 for more
information
THE CENTER COURT IS now hiring: The
juicebar in the new recreation center is in
search of staff that are willing to work in a
fun and exciting atmosphere. Successful can-
didates will be enthusiastic, responsible and
very dependable. We offer flexible hours ar-
ound school schedules. Come by the ARA-
MARK Dining Office in Mendenhall Stud-
ent Center and get your application today!
EOE
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EXTRA
cash stuff in g envelopes at home. All materi-
als provided. Send SASE to Midwest Distribu-
tors, P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS 66051. Im-
mediate response.
COURTYARD TAVERN IS NOW accepting
applications for waitstaff and cooks. Please
apply in person between 24 weekdays.
WARRENS 'HOT DOGS NOW accepting
applications for third shift, 10:00 pm - 8:00
am. Very flexible. Call Jan at 752-3647.
GOING 2 COLLEGE YOUNG, dynamic com-
pany looking for energetic, motivated indi-
viduals to fill full time and part time posi-
tions. People skills a must For an interview,
3214864.
GET ON THE JOB Experience and a pay
check! Child care center needs early child-
hood majors for part-time work. Monday-Fri-
day, 3:00pm-6:00pm and 2:00pm4:00pm.
$5.00hour. Apply in person at Cornerstone
Christian Child Development Center, corn-
er of Stantonburg and Allen Road, Green-
ville, NC.
TROPICAL RESORTS HIRING - Entry-lev-
el & career positions available worldwide (Ha-
waii, Mexico, Caribbean, etc.). Waitstaff,
housekeepers, SCUBA dive leaders, fitness
counselors, and more. Call Resort Employ-
ment Services 1-206-971-3600 ext R53625.
HELP WANTED: WAITSTAFF DAYTIME
and night shifts available. Musi be able to
work at least two weekday lunch shifts. NO
CALLS. Please apply in person between 8
am and 10 am or 2 pm and 4 pm. Professor
O'Cools, Winn Dixie Market Place.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES. The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Department
is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time youth
basketball coaches for the winter youth bas-
ketball program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the basketball skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 7 -18, in basketball fun-
damentals. Hours range from 3:00pm until
7:00pm with some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from the end of
November to mid-February. Salary rates start
at $4.75 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at 830-
4550 after 2pm.
HELP NEEDED FOR LOCAL business. For
free details, send a self-addressed stamped
envelope to: S.P.E.L, Dept D3,106 Dogwood
Drive, Washington, NC 27889
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000 month working on Cruise Ships
or Land-Tour companies. World travel. Sea-
sonal & full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For more information
call 1-206-971-3550 ext C53628.
DON'T READ THIS UNLESS you re moth
vated, ready for a change. Looking to make
$2-$5Kmonth bonus. Training and travel
available. Call 353-7106.
$1750 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING our
circulars. For info call 202-298-1335
HELP WANTED: WAREHOUSE HELP
needed. Apply in person. Carpet Bargain Cen-
ter, 1009 Dickinson Avenue
ft
Services
Offered
KIM'S TYPING SERVICE: TERM papers
and resumes, reasonable prices. Call 756-
5813 after 2:30pm.
TYPING, FAST AND ACCURATE. $1.00
per page, call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
Other
Other
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER 1997 MAN-
AGEMENT POSITIONS, DYNAMIC COM-
PANY NOW HIRING ENTREPRENEUR-
IAL STUDENTS FOR SUMMER MANAGE-
MENT POSITIONS ACROSS SOUTH-
EAST U.S. FOR INFORMATION OR AN
INTERVIEW CALL TUITION PAINTERS
1-800-3934521-29

Travel
"30 SHOPPING DAYS LEFT! NOW is
the time to guarantee the lowest rates and"
best hotels for spring break. Leisure Tours'
has packages to South Padre, Cancun, Ja-
maica and Florida. 800-838-8203

Travel
"WHO'S WHO IN HEALTH CARE FOR
PITT COUNTY" December 2, 19. Free
program sponsored by Pitt Co. Chapter
American Diabetes Association. Gaskm-L.es-
lie Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial Hospi-
tal @ 7:00 pm. Refreshments will be served
followirig the program. For more info call
816-5136 from 84 pm Mon-Fri or 1-800682-
9692.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Over $6 Bit
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible. Let us help. For more info, call;
1-800-263-6495 ext F53629.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Grants and
scholarships available from sponsors! No
repayments, ever! SSS Cash for college
$$$. For info: 1-800400-0209.
FREE CAT - Male, short haired, fixed with
all shots. 1 12 year old. I have moved and
can't keep him. Very sweet natured. Call 931-
1127.
AKA BOOK SCHOLARSHIP: THETA Mr
pha Chapter will award a $200 book schol-
arship for the best essay entitled "What is
the most challenging problem facing our gen-
eration and what can you do to help change
it?" Essays should be 2 typed pages and dou-
ble-spaced and should be post marked by No-
vember 30th. Essays should be mailed to:
Alpha Kappa Alpha, P.O. Box 2886, Green-
ville, NC 27858.
LEARN TO
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Tent & Portable Toilet Rentals
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We also rent tables and chairs
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owner
�5 S
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Personals
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY SHELL! I love you
-Phil
CONGRATULATIONS MIKE EDGERTON
FOR receiving the Minority Student Recog-
nition Award! ECU Ambassadors.
4�
Greek
Personals
AMERICA'S 1 STUDENT TOUR OPERATOR
l$h'9
PI KAPPA PHI � We had a great time Thurs-
day night Thanks for the shagging lessons,
the cards, and let's not ferret the super shoot-
er! What was that green stuff anyway? Al
pha Xi Delta
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA: CONGRATULA-
TIONS to our new members! Kim Bergstad,
Jessica Bond, Kelly Christenbury, Brooke
Curtis, Sam Dassler, Christie DeVivo, Melis
sa Dixon, Lindsay Flythe, Jennifer Foley,
Scarlett Foster, Kelly Graham, Liz Hodgson,
Amber James, Christine Kiesling, Julie Lind-I
er, Jenny Love, Terese Messick, Charity MilkJ
er, Jessica Offner, Hope Pfeil, Sam Snyder;J
Christie Swindell, Susan Tart Mary VanLuvJ
en, Lisa Vexler, Katie Waldman and Bettu
Wilder. We're very proud of y'all! Love, youn
Gamma Sig sisters
TKE- FOR BETTER FOR worse, for richer
for poorer, in sickness and in health the'
marriage was great and getting a divorce has
never been so much fun. Let's get hitched �
again soon! Alpha Xi Delta
A BIG THANKS TO the Panhellenic Exec)
of 19 for all your hard work. VP Nikkr
Norsn, Rush Heide Roland, Treasurer Melis-
sa Gentry, Secretary Lori Sherman, Assis-
tant VP Ami Brasure, Assistant Rush Jennif-
er Klimek, Public Relations Laura Barden.
Love, Stefanie Hippie. 9
ALPHA XI DELTA WOULD like to wish eve
ryone a Happy Thanksgiving! Best of luckv-
to ECU in Charlotte. Beat State!�
ALPHA XI DELTA, WE had a great time,
with you'ol at the caveman social. Thanks ,
for coming. And we are looking forward to
next semester with you. Sigma Pi.I
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW sif-
ters of Alpha Xi Delta: Stephanie Bronson, �
Jordan Simmons, Peyton Moore, Alicia Mar-
blo, Kasey Stone, Emily Ische, Kim Shaffer, �;
Karen Kushner, Catherine Ultz, Kerri Augus- J
tino, Holly Buchanan, Amy Steinberg, Holly
McDonald, Molly Parrish, Sara Hudgins,
Lindsay Wilder, Kristy Holmes, Carolina,
Cuarachi, Holly Honaker, Langhorne Syn
dor, Shelley Bissette, Catherine Sanders, and
Michelle Kimsey. We are proud of you. Love,
the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA DELTA PI. WE had a great time
racing with you at the social. We look for-
ward to doing it again. Love, Delta Sigma
Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW Exec
of Order of Omega: President - Chris Arline,
Vice President - Melissa Godwin, VP of Pro-
gramming - Marian Cheek, Secretary - Lau-
ra Barden, Treasurer - Nikki Noren
THANKS TO JR. PANHELLENIC who par
ticipated in the Bake sale.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THIS YEAR'S
KA rose - Alison Rouse. We love you! The
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
PIKA - THE "all day and night" tailgate was
a blast From the field, to Eastern Street to
downtown, what a great way to end the foot-
ball season?! Alpha Xi Delta, P.S. Can I see
some l.D. please?
Announcements
I-800-999-SKI-9
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AAAA! CANCUN & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & Hotel $399! Prices
Increase Soon - Save $50! Save $150 on
Food. Drinks & Free Parties! 111 Lowest
Price Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-
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HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ARE Earn-
ing Free Spring Break Trips & Money! Sell
8 Trips & Go Free! Bahamas Cruise $279,
Cancun � Jamaica $399, Panama CityDay-
tona $119! www.springbreaktravel.com 1-
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AAAA! SPRING BREAK PANAMA City!
Boardwalk Beach Resort! Best Hotel & Lo-
cation! 7 Nights $129! Daytona-Best Loca-
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Parties, Taxes! Great Beaches & Nightlife!
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ADVENTURES IN HEALTH CHILDREN'S
Museum is sponsoring its 5th Annual Christ-
mas Magic Home Tour on Sunday, Decem-
ber 8, from 2:0045:00 pm. Advance tickets
are available for $12.00 or $15.00 on the
day of the tour. For more info, contact Erin
Spence at 752-7231.
ECU LAW SOCIETY: ELECTIONS for the
'97 year will be held Tuesday, December 3rd
at 5:15 pm in Ragsdale. room 218A. AH po-
sitions are open to anv member or interest-
ed student The society is open to all ma-
jors. Guest speaker will be present
ORIENTATION TO CAREER SERVICES:
Seniors and graduate students graduating
in December 1996 or MaySummer '97 are
encouraged to register with the Career Serv-
ices Office by attending one of the follow-
ing Orientation meetings: Mon, Dec 2,10:00
am, Wed, Dec. 4,4:00 pm, Thur, Dec. 5,1:30
pm, Tue, Dec. 17, 2:00 pm. This overview
includes procedures for employment inter-
views on campus, resume referral service and
establishing a credentials file with Career
Services.
DROP-IN AEROBICS - get in shape! Drop-
in any aerobics class December 2-12 between
3:00 pm - 7:00 pm. Purchase your Drop-In
ticket today in 204 Christenbury. Rec Serv-
ices 328-6387
THE ECU STUDENT CHAPTER of the
American Choral Directors Association is
sponsoring a Messiah Sing. The "sing-along"
will be held in the AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall
on the ECU Campus, at 7:00 pm on Tues-
day, December 3. Only the Christmas por-
tion of the work, plus the "Hallelujah Cho-
rus" will be sung. The ECU Symphony
Orchestra will participate as the instrumen-
tal ensemble for the event which will fea-
ture advance conducting students and solo
singers from the School of Music. Event is
open to all interested musicians who would
like to participate as singers in the chorus-
es. Singers should bring their own score to
the event It will also be possible to purchase
a score at the door. There is no admission
charge for the "sing For more information,
please contact Dr. Rhonda Fleming, Profes-
sor of Choral Music and Music Education at
the School of Music, 328243.





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Title
The East Carolinian, November 26, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 26, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1178
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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